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Sample records for ligase gp78 increases

  1. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 increases solubility and facilitates degradation of the Z variant of {alpha}-1-antitrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuxian; Ballar, Petek; Fang, Shengyun . E-mail: fangs@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-11-03

    Deficiency of circulating {alpha}-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is the most widely recognized abnormality of a proteinase inhibitor that causes lung disease. AAT-deficiency is caused by mutations of the AAT gene that lead to AAT protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the mutant AAT accumulated in the ER predisposes the homozygote to severe liver injuries, such as neonatal hepatitis, juvenile cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the fact that mutant AAT protein is subject to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), yeast genetic studies have determined that the ubiquitination machinery, Hrd1/Der3p-cue1p-Ubc7/6p, which plays a prominent role in ERAD, is not involved in degradation of mutant AAT. Here we report that gp78, a ubiquitin ligase (E3) pairing with mammalian Ubc7 for ERAD, ubiquitinates and facilitates degradation of ATZ, the classic deficiency variant of AAT having a Z mutation (Glu 342 Lys). Unexpectedly, gp78 over-expression also significantly increases ATZ solubility. p97/VCP, an AAA ATPase essential for retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER during ERAD, is involved in gp78-mediated degradation of ATZ. Surprisingly, unlike other ERAD substrates that cause ER stress leading to apoptosis when accumulated in the ER, ATZ, in fact, increases cell proliferation when over-expressed in cells. This effect can be partially inhibited by gp78 over-expression. These data indicate that gp78 assumes multiple unique quality control roles over ATZ, including the facilitation of degradation and inhibition of aggregation of ATZ.

  2. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Nazli; Wang, Rejean liqun; Marek, George; Krotova, Karina; Kirst, Mariana; Liu, Chen; Rouhani, Farshid; Brantly, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys) at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290–342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT]), protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein) interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte–like cell line (AT01). Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD. PMID:28301499

  3. p38 MAP kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the Gp78 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls ER-mitochondria association and mitochondria motility.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Gao, Guang; Shankar, Jay; Joshi, Bharat; Foster, Leonard J; Nabi, Ivan R

    2015-11-01

    Gp78 is an ERAD-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase that induces degradation of the mitofusin mitochondrial fusion proteins and mitochondrial fission. Gp78 is localized throughout the ER; however, the anti-Gp78 3F3A monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizes Gp78 selectively in mitochondria-associated ER domains. Epitope mapping localized the epitope of 3F3A and a commercial anti-Gp78 mAb to an 8-amino acid motif (533-541) in mouse Gp78 isoform 2 that forms part of a highly conserved 41-amino acid region containing 14-3-3- and WW-binding domains and a p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK) consensus site on Ser-538 (S538). 3F3A binds selectively to nonphosphorylated S538 Gp78. Using 3F3A as a reporter, we induced Gp78 S538 phosphorylation by serum starvation and showed it to be mediated by p38 MAPK. Mass spectroscopy analysis of Gp78 phosphopeptides confirmed S538 as a major p38 MAPK phosphorylation site on Gp78. Gp78 S538 phosphorylation limited its ability to induce mitochondrial fission and degrade MFN1 and MFN2 but did not affect in vitro Gp78 ubiquitin E3 ligase activity. Phosphomimetic Gp78 S538D mutation prevented Gp78 promotion of ER-mitochondria interaction, and SB203580 inhibition of p38 MAPK increased ER-mitochondria association. p38 MAPK phosphorylation of Gp78 S538 therefore regulates Gp78-dependent ER-mitochondria association and mitochondria motility.

  4. gp78 functions downstream of Hrd1 to promote degradation of misfolded proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Yue; Liu, Yanfen; Ye, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells eliminate misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via a conserved process termed ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Central regulators of the ERAD system are membrane-bound ubiquitin ligases, which are thought to channel misfolded proteins through the ER membrane during retrotranslocation. Hrd1 and gp78 are mammalian ubiquitin ligases homologous to Hrd1p, an ubiquitin ligase essential for ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the functional relevance of these proteins to Hrd1p is unclear. In this paper, we characterize the gp78-containing ubiquitin ligase complex and define its functional interplay with Hrd1 using biochemical and recently developed CRISPR-based genetic tools. Our data show that transient inactivation of the gp78 complex by short hairpin RNA–mediated gene silencing causes significant stabilization of both luminal and membrane ERAD substrates, but unlike Hrd1, which plays an essential role in retrotranslocation and ubiquitination of these ERAD substrates, knockdown of gp78 does not affect either of these processes. Instead, gp78 appears to act downstream of Hrd1 to promote ERAD via cooperation with the BAG6 chaperone complex. We conclude that the Hrd1 complex forms an essential retrotranslocation module that is evolutionarily conserved, but the mammalian ERAD system uses additional ubiquitin ligases to assist Hrd1 during retrotranslocation. PMID:26424800

  5. Ube2g2-gp78-mediated HERP polyubiquitylation is involved in ER stress recovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Long; Liu, Weixiao; Zhang, Huihui; Liu, Chao; Shang, Yongliang; Ye, Yihong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Wei

    2014-04-01

    A large number of studies have focused on how individual organisms respond to a stress condition, but little attention has been paid to the stress recovery process, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress recovery. Homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP) was originally identified as a chaperone-like protein that is strongly induced upon ER stress. Here we show that, after ER stress induction, HERP is rapidly degraded by Ube2g2-gp78-mediated ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. The polyubiquitylation of HERP in vitro depends on a physical interaction between the CUE domain of gp78 and the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of HERP, which is essential for HERP degradation in vivo during ER stress recovery. We further show that although HERP promotes cell survival under ER stress, high levels of HERP expression reduce cell viability under oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that HERP plays a dual role in cellular stress adaptation. Together, these results establish the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of HERP as a novel mechanism that fine-tunes the stress tolerance capacity of the cell.

  6. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  7. Cbl-c Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Is Increased via the Interaction of Its RING Finger Domain with a LIM Domain of the Paxillin Homolog, Hic 5

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Philip E.; Kales, Stephen C.; Yadavalli, Rajgopal; Nau, Marion M.; Zhang, Han; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Cbl proteins (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) are ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study we identify a new Cbl-c interacting protein, Hydrogen peroxide Induced Construct 5 (Hic-5). The two proteins interact through a novel interaction mediated by the RING finger of Cbl-c and the LIM2 domain of Hic-5. Further, this interaction is mediated and dependent on specific zinc coordinating complexes within the RING finger and LIM domain. Binding of Hic-5 to Cbl-c leads to an increase in the ubiquitin ligase activity of Cbl-c once Cbl-c has been activated by Src phosphorylation or through an activating phosphomimetic mutation. In addition, co-transfection of Hic-5 with Cbl-c leads to an increase in Cbl-c mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR. These data suggest that Hic-5 enhances Cbl-c ubiquitin ligase activity once Cbl-c has been phosphorylated and activated. Interactions between heterologous RING fingers have been shown to activate E3s. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of ubiquitin ligase activity of a RING finger ubiquitin ligase by the direct interaction of a LIM zinc coordinating domain. PMID:23145173

  8. Cardiac-specific overexpression of E3 ligase Nrdp1 increases ischemia and reperfusion-induced cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Min; Tian, Cui; Ma, Xu; Chen, Houzao; Fang, Quan; Jia, Lixin; Du, Jie; Li, Huihua

    2011-05-01

    Cardiomyocyte death is a major event of myocardial infarction. Previously, we and others have shown that E3 ligase-mediated protein turnover plays a critical role in cardiac injury. In this study, we sought to determine the role of a newly identified E3 ligase, neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1), on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. I/R injury markedly upregulated Nrdp1 expression in heart tissue. To elucidate the role of Nrdp1 in I/R-induced cardiac injury, neonatal cardiomyocytes were infected with adenoviral constructs expressing wild-type, dominant-negative Nrdp1 genes. Increased Nrdp1 expression enhanced I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and inflammation as compared with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) control; these effects were attenuated by overexpression of a dominant-negative Nrdp1 (C34S/H36Q). Furthermore, cardiac-specific Nrdp1 overexpression in vivo in mouse significantly increased infarct size, the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei and inflammatory cells, as well as mortality, as compared with wild-type mice after I/R injury. The mechanisms underlying these effects were associated with the downregulation of an Nrdp1 substrate, ErbB3, accompanied by suppression of its downstream targets AKT, ERK1/2, and activation of p38 and JNK1/2. Together, these results provide evidence for an important role for Nrdp1 in regulating I/R-induced cardiac injury. Nrdp1 may constitute a new therapeutic target for ameliorating the I/R-induced cardiac injury.

  9. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  10. Resveratrol and 4-hydroxynonenal act in concert to increase glutamate cysteine ligase expression and glutathione in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongqiao; Shih, Albert; Rinna, Alessandra; Forman, Henry Jay

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to protect against oxidative stress through modulating antioxidant capacity. In this study, we investigated resveratrol-mediated induction of glutathione (GSH) and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), and the combined effect of resveratrol and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) on GSH synthesis in cultured HBE1 human bronchial epithelial cells. Resveratrol increased GSH and the mRNA contents of both the catalytic (GCLC) and modulatory subunit (GCLM) of GCL. Combined HNE and resveratrol treatment increased GSH content and GCL mRNAs to a greater extent than either compound did alone. Compared to individual agent, combining exposure to HNE and resveratrol also showed more protection against cell death caused by oxidative stress. These effects of combined exposure were additive rather than synergistic. In addition, Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the combined effect of HNE and resveratrol on GCL induction. Our data suggest that resveratrol increases GSH and GCL gene expression and that there is an additive effect on GSH synthesis between resveratrol and HNE. The results also reveal that Nrf2-EpRE signaling was involved in the combined effects. PMID:18983812

  11. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm−/− mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm−/− and Gclm+/+ mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm−/− mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm−/− ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm−/− mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  12. The Expression of the Ubiquitin Ligase SIAH2 (Seven In Absentia Homolog 2) Is Increased in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Paula; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Soler-Torronteras, Rafael; Caro, Teresa; Medina, Manuel; Álvarez, Antonio; Salvatierra, Ángel; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Overall 5-year survival has shown little improvement over the last decades. Seven in absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate proteasomal protein degradation by poly-ubiquitination. Even though SIAH proteins play a key role in several biological processes, their role in human cancer remains controversial. The aim of the study was to document SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (mRNA, protein level and immunohistochemistry) in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples compared to surrounding healthy tissue from the same patient, and to analyse the association with clinicopathological features. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty-two samples from a patient cohort treated surgically for primary lung cancer were obtained for the study. Genic and protein expression levels of SIAH2 were analysed and compared with clinic-pathologic variables. Results The present study is the first to analyze the SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (RNA, protein expression and immunohistochemistry) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We found that SIAH2 protein expression is significantly enhanced in human lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell lung cancer (SCC). Paradoxically, non-significant changes at RNA level were found, suggesting a post-traductional regulatory mechanism. More importantly, an increased correlation between SIAH2 expression and tumor grade was detected, suggesting that this protein could be used as a prognostic biomarker to predict lung cancer progression. Likewise, SIAH2 protein expression showed a strong positive correlation with fluorodeoxyglucose (2-deoxy-2(18F)fluoro-D-glucose) uptake in primary NSCLC, which may assist clinicians in stratifying patients at increased overall risk of poor survival. Additionally, we described an inverse correlation between the expression of SIAH2 and the levels of one of its substrates

  13. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  14. Suppression of Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL78 increases tolerance to cold stress and decreases tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-08-19

    AtATL78 is an Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays revealed that AtATL78 was up-regulated by cold stress and down-regulated by drought. AtATL78 was localized at the plasma-membrane. Suppression of AtATL78 increased tolerance to cold stress but decreased tolerance to drought. Our data suggests that AtATL78 is a negative regulator of cold stress response and a positive regulator of drought stress response in Arabidopsis. These results further suggest that AtATL78 plays opposing roles in cold and drought stress responses.

  15. Reduced association of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 with E3 ligase Mule increases the stability of Mcl-1 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pervin, S; Tran, A; Tran, L; Urman, R; Braga, M; Chaudhuri, G; Singh, R

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms that increase resistance to apoptosis help promote cellular transformation. Cancer cells have deregulated apoptotic pathways, where increased expression and stability of anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 increases resistance to apoptosis. Pathways that increase the stability of proteins in cancer cells remain poorly understood. Methods: Using human mammary epithelial and established breast cancer cell lines, we assessed the mechanisms that increase the stability of anti-apoptotic proteins in breast cancer cells by caspase assay, western blot, small-inhibitory RNA treatment and immunoprecipitation. Results: While breast cancer cells were resistant to de novo inhibition of protein synthesis, a rapid proteosome-mediated degradation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 induced apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells. Although Mule, an E3 ligase that targets Mcl-1 for degradation was expressed in mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell lines, rapid increase of polyubiquitinated Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 was detected only in mammary epithelial cells. Only transient formation of the Mule–Mcl-1 complex was detected in breast cancer cells. Downregulation of pERK1/2 in breast cancer cells reduced Mcl-1 levels and increased Mcl-1/Mule complex. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that reduced Mule/Mcl-1 complex has a significant role in increasing the stability of Mcl-1 in breast cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. PMID:21730980

  16. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  17. Distinct mechanisms controlling rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum contacts with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peter T C; Garcin, Pierre O; Fu, Min; Masoudi, Matthew; St-Pierre, Pascal; Panté, Nelly; Nabi, Ivan R

    2015-08-01

    Gp78 (also known as AMFR), an endoplasmic-reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) E3 ubiquitin ligase, localizes to mitochondria-associated ER and targets the mitofusin (Mfn1 and Mfn2) mitochondrial fusion proteins for degradation. Gp78 is also the cell surface receptor for autocrine motility factor (AMF), which prevents Gp78-dependent mitofusin degradation. Gp78 ubiquitin ligase activity promotes ER-mitochondria association and ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) coupling, processes that are reversed by AMF. Electron microscopy of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cancer cells identified both smooth ER (SER; ∼8 nm) and wider (∼50-60 nm) rough ER (RER)-mitochondria contacts. Both short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of Gp78 (shGp78) and AMF treatment selectively reduced the extent of RER-mitochondria contacts without impacting on SER--mitochondria contacts. Concomitant small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Mfn1 increased SER-mitochondria contacts in both control and shGp78 cells, whereas knockdown of Mfn2 increased RER-mitochondria contacts selectively in shGp78 HT-1080 cells. The mitofusins therefore inhibit ER-mitochondria interaction. Regulation of close SER-mitochondria contacts by Mfn1 and of RER-mitochondria contacts by AMF-sensitive Gp78-mediated degradation of Mfn2 define new mechanisms that regulate ER-mitochondria interactions.

  18. Hyperthermic stress-induced increase in the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase and glutathione levels in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Choi, Jinah; Forman, Henry Jay; Medina, Mónica

    2008-09-01

    Hyperthermic stress is known to trigger the loss of unicellular algae from a number of symbiotic cnidarians, a phenomenon commonly referred to as bleaching. Oxidative and nitrosative stress have been suggested to play a major role during the process of bleaching, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. In animals, the intracellular tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is involved in antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis and intracellular redox signaling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that hyperthermal stress-induced bleaching in Aiptasia pallida, a model for symbiotic cnidarians, results in increased levels of GSH synthesis. We report the cDNA sequence and functional analysis of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in GSH biosynthesis. In a time-series experiment, both GCLC gene expression and total GSH levels increased 4- and 1.5-fold, respectively, in response to hyperthermal stress. These results suggest that hyperthermal stress triggers adaptive increases in intracellular GSH biosynthesis in cnidarians as a protective response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Our results show the conserved function of GCLC and GSH across animals while placing a new perspective on the role of GSH in redox signaling during cnidarian bleaching.

  19. c-CBL E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Expression Increases Across the Spectrum of Benign and Malignant T-Cell Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Salva, Katrin A; Reeder, Margo J; Lloyd, Rita; Wood, Gary S

    2016-10-31

    Prolonged survival of lesional T cells plays a central role in the pathogenesis of T-cell-mediated dermatoses. We have recently shown that the ubiquitin ligase c-CBL is highly expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and that its knockdown increases activation-induced cell death, a key pathway for T-cell apoptosis. Here, we extend our work on c-CBL expression in malignant T cells to their nonneoplastic counterparts in benign inflammatory dermatoses. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-c-CBL antibody was performed on lesional biopsies from a total of 65 patients with atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis vulgaris, lichen planus, mycosis fungoides (MF)/Sézary syndrome (SS) as well as on tonsil tissue from 5 individuals and on 5 human CTCL cell lines. Protein levels were measured in situ using multispectral image analysis, a quantitative method that is ×5 more sensitive than standard immunohistology for antigen detection. There was a significant (P < 0.05) and progressive increase of mean c-CBL expression across the spectrum of inflammatory dermatoses (2-fold), MF/SS (3-fold), and lymphoma cell lines (4-fold) as compared with tonsillar T lymphocytes. A subset of MF/SS cases expressed mean c-CBL levels above the ranges observed in inflammatory dermatoses. Given our prior finding that c-CBL inhibits activation-induced cell death, c-CBL might play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory dermatoses and CTCL.

  20. Increased Sensitivity to Testicular Toxicity of Transplacental Benzo[a]pyrene Exposure in Male Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit Knockout (Gclm−/−) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Brooke N.; Mohar, Isaac; Lawson, Gregory W.; Cortés, Mabel M.; Hoang, Yvonne D.; Ortiz, Laura; Patel, Reshma; Rau, Bogdan A.; McConnachie, Lisa A.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), like benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), are ubiquitous environmental pollutants formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials. The tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is a major antioxidant and is important in detoxification of PAH metabolites. Mice null for the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH concentrations. We investigated the effects of Gclm deletion alone on male fertility and spermatogenesis and its effect on the sensitivity of male embryos to the transplacental testicular toxicity of BaP. Gclm−/− males had dramatically decreased testicular and epididymal GCL enzymatic activity and total GSH concentrations compared with Gclm+/+ littermates. Ratios of reduced to oxidized GSH were significantly increased in Gclm−/− testes. GSH reductase enzymatic activity was increased in Gclm−/− epididymides. We observed no changes in fertility, testicular weights, testicular sperm head counts, or testicular histology and subtle changes in cauda epididymal sperm counts, motility, and morphology in Gclm−/− compared with Gclm+/+ males. Prenatal exposure to BaP from gestational day 7 to 16 was dose dependently associated with significantly decreased testicular and epididymal weights, testicular and epididymal sperm counts, and with vacuolated seminiferous tubules at 10 weeks of age. Gclm−/− males exposed prenatally to BaP had greater decreases in testicular weights, testicular sperm head counts, epididymal sperm counts, and epididymal sperm motility than Gclm+/+ littermates. These results show no effects of Gclm deletion alone on male fertility and testicular spermatogenesis and subtle epididymal effects but support increased sensitivity of Gclm−/− males to the transplacental testicular toxicity of BaP. PMID:22253057

  1. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  2. Types of Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Francesca Ester; Walden, Helen

    2016-03-24

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Ubiquitination requires the sequential action of three enzymes: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes), and E3 (ubiquitin ligases). This SnapShot highlights the main types of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which can be classified in three families depending on the presence of characteristic domains and on the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer to the substrate protein.

  3. The atrzf1 mutation of the novel RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase increases proline contents and enhances drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Woo; Min, Ji-Hee; Chung, Moon-Soo; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2013-04-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular function through biological events involving abiotic or biotic stress responses, immune responses, and apoptosis. Here, we characterize the biological function of the Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) in dehydration response. AtRZF1 was significantly reduced by drought stress. The atrzf1 mutant was less sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type during early seedling development, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing AtRZF1 were hypersensitive, indicating that AtRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the AtRZF1 gene was very significantly influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, membrane ion leakage and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. AtRZF1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase, and its conserved C3H2C3-type RING domain is likely important for the biological function of AtRZF1 in drought response. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase AtRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development.

  4. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays.

  5. Core-binding factor β increases the affinity between human Cullin 5 and HIV-1 Vif within an E3 ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Lippa, Geoffrey M; Belashov, Ivan A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-11-06

    HIV-1 Vif masquerades as a receptor for a cellular E3 ligase harboring Elongin B, Elongin C, and Cullin 5 (EloB/C/Cul5) proteins that facilitate degradation of the antiretroviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G). This Vif-mediated activity requires human core-binding factor β (CBFβ) in contrast to cellular substrate receptors. We observed calorimetrically that Cul5 binds tighter to full-length Vif((1-192))/EloB/C/CBFβ (K(d) = 5 ± 2 nM) than to Vif((95-192))/EloB/C (K(d) = 327 ± 40 nM), which cannot bind CBFβ. A comparison of heat capacity changes supports a model in which CBFβ prestabilizes Vif((1-192)) relative to Vif((95-192)), consistent with a stronger interaction of Cul5 with Vif's C-terminal Zn(2+)-binding motif. An additional interface between Cul5 and an N-terminal region of Vif appears to be plausible, which has therapeutic design implications.

  6. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Alan E; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-12-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target.

  7. DNA ligases ensure fidelity by interrogating minor groove contacts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingfang; Burdzy, Artur; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2004-01-01

    DNA ligases, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, covalently link the 3'-hydroxyl and 5'-phosphate ends of duplex DNA segments. This reaction represents a completion step for DNA replication, repair and recombination. It is well established that ligases are sensitive to mispairs present on the 3' side of the ligase junction, but tolerant of mispairs on the 5' side. While such discrimination would increase the overall accuracy of DNA replication and repair, the mechanisms by which this fidelity is accomplished are as yet unknown. In this paper, we present the results of experiments with Tth ligase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 and a series of nucleoside analogs in which the mechanism of discrimination has been probed. Using a series of purine analogs substituted in the 2 and 6 positions, we establish that the apparent base pair geometry is much more important than relative base pair stability and that major groove contacts are of little importance. This result is further confirmed using 5-fluorouracil (FU) mispaired with guanine. At neutral pH, the FU:G mispair on the 3' side of a ligase junction is predominantly in a neutral wobble configuration and is poorly ligated. Increasing the solution pH increases the proportion of an ionized base pair approximating Watson-Crick geometry, substantially increasing the relative ligation efficiency. These results suggest that the ligase could distinguish Watson-Crick from mispaired geometry by probing the hydrogen bond acceptors present in the minor groove as has been proposed for DNA polymerases. The significance of minor groove hydrogen bonding interactions is confirmed with both Tth and T4 DNA ligases upon examination of base pairs containing the pyrimidine shape analog, difluorotoluene (DFT). Although DFT paired with adenine approximates Watson-Crick geometry, a minor groove hydrogen bond acceptor is lost. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe that DFT-containing base pairs inhibit ligation when on the 3' side of

  8. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) < 1 nM at 25 °C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  9. T4 DNA ligase is more than an effective trap of cyclized dsDNA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiong Wen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden A

    2007-01-01

    T4 DNA ligase is used in standard cyclization assays to trap double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in low-probability, cyclic or highly bent conformations. The cyclization probability, deduced from the relative yield of cyclized product, can be used in conjunction with statistical mechanical models to extract the bending stiffness of dsDNA. By inserting the base analog 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at designated positions in 89 bp and 94 bp dsDNA fragments, we find that T4 DNA ligase can have a previously unknown effect. Specifically, we observe that addition of T4 ligase to dsDNA in proportions comparable to what is used in the cyclization assay leads to a significant increase in fluorescence from 2-AP. This effect is believed to originate from stabilization of local base-pair opening by formation of transient DNA-ligase complexes. Non-specific binding of T4 ligase to dsDNA is also confirmed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments, which reveal a systematic reduction of dsDNA diffusivity in the presence of ligase. ATP competes with regular DNA for non-covalent binding to the T4 ligase and is found to significantly reduce DNA-ligase complexation. For short dsDNA fragments, however, the population of DNA-ligase complexes at typical ATP concentrations used in DNA cyclization studies is determined to be large enough to dominate the cyclization reaction.

  10. SCR7 is neither a selective nor a potent inhibitor of human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Greco, George E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Brooks, Rhys C; Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    DNA ligases are attractive therapeutics because of their involvement in completing the repair of almost all types of DNA damage. A series of DNA ligase inhibitors with differing selectivity for the three human DNA ligases were identified using a structure-based approach with one of these inhibitors being used to inhibit abnormal DNA ligase IIIα-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB)s in breast cancer, neuroblastoma and leukemia cell lines. Raghavan and colleagues reported the characterization of a derivative of one of the previously identified DNA ligase inhibitors, which they called SCR7 (designated SCR7-R in our experiments using SCR7). SCR7 appeared to show increased selectivity for DNA ligase IV, inhibit the repair of DSBs by the DNA ligase IV-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, reduce tumor growth, and increase the efficacy of DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities in mouse xenografts. In attempting to synthesize SCR7, we encountered problems with the synthesis procedures and discovered discrepancies in its reported structure. We determined the structure of a sample of SCR7 and a related compound, SCR7-G, that is the major product generated by the published synthesis procedure for SCR7. We also found that SCR7-G has the same structure as the compound (SCR7-X) available from a commercial vendor (XcessBio). The various SCR7 preparations had similar activity in DNA ligation assay assays, exhibiting greater activity against DNA ligases I and III than DNA ligase IV. Furthermore, SCR7-R failed to inhibit DNA ligase IV-dependent V(D)J recombination in a cell-based assay. Based on our results, we conclude that SCR7 and the SCR7 derivatives are neither selective nor potent inhibitors of DNA ligase IV.

  11. DNA-ligase activities appear normal in the CHO mutant EM9.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Thompson, L H; Becker, F F

    1984-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant strain EM9 was previously shown to be hypersensitive to killing by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), to have a 12-fold increased baseline incidence of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), and to be defective in rejoining DNA strand breaks after treatment with EMS, MMS, or X-rays. A study was performed to determine if the primary biochemical defect might be a DNA ligase. DNA-ligase activities were assayed and compared after separation of the multiple forms of ligase by AcA 34 gel-filtration chromatography of total cellular extracts. In EM9 cells the levels of the presumptive replicative forms, DNA ligase Ia (480 kd) and ligase Ib (240 kd) were about 50% and 60%, respectively, of those in the parental AA8 cells, whereas DNA ligase II (80 kd) was unaltered in EM9 . In a phenotypic revertant line ( 9R1 ) ligases Ia, Ib and II levels were 35%, 37% and 100%, respectively, of those in AA8 . The reduced levels of ligases Ia and Ib in EM9 and 9R1 cells are apparently not related directly to the mutant phenotype and may be attributable to the somewhat slower growth rates of these strains compared with those of AA8 . To determine if the repair defect in EM9 might reside in the ability to induce DNA-ligase activity after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, AA8 and EM9 cells were treated with MMS at 30 micrograms/ml for 60 min before preparing fractions for ligase assays. Under these conditions the activities of ligases Ia and Ib decreases 70-80% in both cell lines, but ligase II increased 2.0- and 2.6-fold, respectively, in AA8 and EM9 . As a further test of defective ligase activities in EM9 , assays were performed in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl or after heating the fractions for 10 min at 50 degrees C. Although all 3 forms of ligase showed altered activity under both of these conditions, there were no significant differences between EM9 and AA8 cells. These data combined with the above results provide strong

  12. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  13. A design principle underlying the paradoxical roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daewon; Kim, Minjin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important cellular components that determine the specificity of proteolysis in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, an increasing number of studies have indicated that E3 ubiquitin ligases also participate in transcription. Intrigued by the apparently paradoxical functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in both proteolysis and transcriptional activation, we investigated the underlying design principles using mathematical modeling. We found that the antagonistic functions integrated in E3 ubiquitin ligases can prevent any undesirable sustained activation of downstream genes when E3 ubiquitin ligases are destabilized by unexpected perturbations. Interestingly, this design principle of the system is similar to the operational principle of a safety interlock device in engineering systems, which prevents a system from abnormal operation unless stability is guaranteed. PMID:24994517

  14. A design principle underlying the paradoxical roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daewon; Kim, Minjin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important cellular components that determine the specificity of proteolysis in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, an increasing number of studies have indicated that E3 ubiquitin ligases also participate in transcription. Intrigued by the apparently paradoxical functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in both proteolysis and transcriptional activation, we investigated the underlying design principles using mathematical modeling. We found that the antagonistic functions integrated in E3 ubiquitin ligases can prevent any undesirable sustained activation of downstream genes when E3 ubiquitin ligases are destabilized by unexpected perturbations. Interestingly, this design principle of the system is similar to the operational principle of a safety interlock device in engineering systems, which prevents a system from abnormal operation unless stability is guaranteed.

  15. A conserved physical and functional interaction between the cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader and DNA ligase I of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Levin, David S; Varkey, Johnson; Post, Sean; Bermudez, Vladimir P; Hurwitz, Jerard; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2007-08-03

    DNA ligase I joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and completes certain excision repair pathways. The participation of DNA ligase I in these transactions is directed by physical and functional interactions with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, and, replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader. Here we show that DNA ligase I also interacts with the hRad17 subunit of the hRad17-RFC cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader, and with each of the subunits of its DNA sliding clamp, the heterotrimeric hRad9-hRad1-hHus1 complex. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of RFC, hRad17-RFC stimulates joining by DNA ligase I. Similar results were obtained with the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins indicating that the interaction between the replicative DNA ligase and checkpoint clamp is conserved in eukaryotes. Notably, we show that hRad17 preferentially interacts with and specifically stimulates dephosphorylated DNA ligase I. Moreover, there is an increased association between DNA ligase I and hRad17 in S phase following DNA damage and replication blockage that occurs concomitantly with DNA damage-induced dephosphorylation of chromatin-associated DNA ligase I. Thus, our results suggest that the in vivo interaction between DNA ligase I and the checkpoint clamp loader is regulated by post-translational modification of DNA ligase I.

  16. Tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives can specifically target bacterial DNA ligases and can distinguish them from human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nisha; Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Hajela, Kanchan; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-21

    DNA ligases are critical components for DNA metabolism in all organisms. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) found exclusively in bacteria and certain entomopoxviruses are drawing increasing attention as therapeutic targets as they differ in their cofactor requirement from ATP-dependent eukaryotic homologs. Due to the similarities in the cofactor binding sites of the two classes of DNA ligases, it is necessary to find determinants that can distinguish between them for the exploitation of LigA as an anti-bacterial target. In the present endeavour, we have synthesized and evaluated a series of tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives for their ability to distinguish between bacterial and human DNA ligases. The in vivo inhibition assays that employed LigA deficient E. coli GR501 and S. typhimurium LT2 bacterial strains, rescued by ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase or Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase (Mtb LigA), respectively, showed that the compounds can specifically inhibit bacterial LigA. The in vitro enzyme inhibition assays using purified MtbLigA, human DNA ligase I & T4 DNA ligase showed specific inhibition of MtbLigA at low micromolar range. Our results demonstrate that tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives can distinguish between bacterial and human DNA ligases by ∼5-folds. In silico docking and enzyme inhibition assays identified that the compounds bind to the cofactor binding site and compete with the cofactor. Ethidium bromide displacement and gel-shift assays showed that the inhibitors do not exhibit any unwanted general interactions with the substrate DNA. These results set the stage for the detailed exploration of this compound class for development as antibacterials.

  17. Ubiquitination regulates the assembly of VLDL in HepG2 cells and is the committing step of the apoB-100 ERAD pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Eric A.; Khanna, Neeraj A.; McLeod, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) is degraded by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) when lipid availability limits assembly of VLDLs. The ubiquitin ligase gp78 and the AAA-ATPase p97 have been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of apoB-100. To study the relationship between ERAD and VLDL assembly, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce gp78 expression in HepG2 cells. Reduction of gp78 decreased apoB-100 ubiquitination and cytosolic apoB-ubiquitin conjugates. Radiolabeling studies revealed that gp78 knockdown increased secretion of newly synthesized apoB-100 and, unexpectedly, enhanced VLDL assembly, as the shift in apoB-100 density in gp78-reduced cells was accompanied by increased triacylglycerol (TG) secretion. To explore the mechanisms by which gp78 reduction might enhance VLDL assembly, we compared the effects of gp78 knockdown with those of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase1/2 inhibitor that enhances apoB-100 secretion in HepG2 cells. U0126 treatment increased secretion of both apoB100 and TG and decreased the ubiquitination and cellular accumu­lation of apoB-100. Furthermore, p97 knockdown caused apoB-100 to accumulate in the cell, but if gp78 was concomitantly reduced or assembly was enhanced by U0126 treatment, cellular apoB-100 returned toward baseline. This indicates that ubiquitination commits apoB-100 to p97-mediated retrotranslocation during ERAD. Thus, decreasing ubiquitination of apoB-100 enhances VLDL assembly, whereas improving apoB-100 lipidation decreases its ubiquitination, suggesting that ubiquitination has a regulatory role in VLDL assembly. PMID:21421992

  18. Cullin RING Ligases: Glommed by Glomulin

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cullin ring ligases (CRLs) constitute the largest group of RING finger ubiquitin ligases. Two recent studies in Molecular Cell describe glomulin as a CRL1 inhibitor that blocks interactions with its ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) (Duda et al., 2012; Tron et al., 2012). These findings and their significance are discussed. PMID:22883621

  19. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  20. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  1. DNA looping by a ligase under nanoconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarpour-Roushan, Maedeh; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA looping is essential for the function and maintenance of genetic information. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of DNA loops (48500 bp) induced by T4 ligase inside a nanofabricated channel system with a channel cross-section of 100x100 nm2, and a few hundred microns channel length. We found that addition of the ligase profoundly alters the behavior of DNA. In particular, ligase acts to stabilize hairpin geometries in which the extended forward and backward arms of the hairpin scan past each other. From the linear density of DNA inside the channel, we deduce that the effective excluded volume vanishes upon addition of T4 ligase and ATP. We conclude that the two strands are effectively stapled together through a large number of weak bonds involving T4 ligase.

  2. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia–reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair. PMID:27853172

  3. DNA and RNA ligases: structural variations and shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M

    2008-02-01

    DNA and RNA ligases join 3' OH and 5' PO4 ends in polynucleotide substrates using a three-step reaction mechanism that involves covalent modification of both the ligase enzyme and the polynucleotide substrate with AMP. In the past three years, several polynucleotide ligases have been crystallized in complex with nucleic acid, providing the introductory views of ligase enzymes engaging their substrates. Crystal structures for two ATP-dependent DNA ligases, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, and an ATP-dependent RNA ligase demonstrate how ligases utilize the AMP group and their multi-domain architectures to manipulate nucleic acid structure and catalyze the end-joining reaction. Together with unliganded crystal structures of DNA and RNA ligases, a more comprehensive and dynamic understanding of the multi-step ligation reaction mechanism has emerged.

  4. Circulating E3 ligases are novel and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Cai-Xia; Hua, Qi; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Nan; Yang, Yan-Zong; Du, Jie; Xia, Yun-Long; Li, Hui-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitin ligase (E3) is a decisive element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is the main pathway for intracellular protein turnover. Recently, circulating E3 ligases have been increasingly considered as cancer biomarkers. In the present study, we aimed to determine if cardiac-specific E3 ligases in circulation can serve as novel predictors for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By screening and verifying their tissue expression patterns with microarray and real-time PCR analysis, six of 261 E3 ligases, including cardiac-specific Rnf207 and cardiac- and muscle-enriched Fbxo32/atrogin-1, Trim54/MuRF3, Trim63/MuRF1, Kbtbd10/KLHL41, Asb11 and Asb2 in mouse heart, were selected for the present study. In the AMI rats, the levels of five E3 ligases including Rnf207, Fbxo32, Trim54, Trim63 and Kbtbd10 in the plasma were significantly increased compared with control animals. Especially, the plasma levels of Rnf207 was markedly increased at 1 h, peaked at 3 h and decreased at 6-24 h after ligation. Further evaluation of E3 ligases in AMI patients confirmed that plasma Rnf207 level increased significantly compared with that in healthy people and patients without AMI, and showed a similar time course to that in AMI rats. Simultaneously, plasma level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was measured by ELISA assays. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that Rnf207 showed a similar sensitivity and specificity to the classic biomarker troponin I for diagnosis of AMI. Increased cardiac-specific E3 ligase Rnf207 in plasma may be a novel and sensitive biomarkers for AMI in humans.

  5. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  6. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  7. Deubiquitinase FAM/USP9X Interacts with the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SMURF1 Protein and Protects It from Ligase Activity-dependent Self-degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yang; Avello, Monika; Schirle, Markus; McWhinnie, Elizabeth; Feng, Yan; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Wilson, Christopher; Nathans, Robin; Zhang, Jing; Kirschner, Marc W.; Huang, Shih-Min A.; Cong, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification that mediates diverse cellular functions. SMAD-specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (SMURF1) belongs to the Nedd4 family of HECT ubiquitin ligases that directly catalyzes ubiquitin conjugation onto diverse substrates. As a result, SMURF1 regulates a great variety of cellular physiologies including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, cell migration, and planar cell polarity. Structurally, SMURF1 consists of a C2 domain, two WW domain repeats, and a catalytic HECT domain essential for its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. This modular architecture allows for interactions with other proteins, which are either substrates or adaptors of SMURF1. Despite the increasing number of SMURF1 substrates identified, current knowledge regarding regulatory proteins and their modes of action on controlling SMURF1 activity is still limited. In this study, we employed quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze SMURF1-associated cellular complexes, and identified the deubiquitinase FAM/USP9X as a novel interacting protein for SMURF1. Through domain mapping study, we found the second WW domain of SMURF1 and the carboxyl terminus of USP9X critical for this interaction. SMURF1 is autoubiquitinated through its intrinsic HECT E3 ligase activity, and is degraded by the proteasome. USP9X association antagonizes this activity, resulting in deubiquitination and stabilization of SMURF1. In MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, SMURF1 expression is elevated and is required for cellular motility. USP9X stabilizes endogenous SMURF1 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Depletion of USP9X led to down-regulation of SMURF1 and significantly impaired cellular migration. Taken together, our data reveal USP9X as an important regulatory protein of SMURF1 and suggest that the association between deubiquitinase and E3 ligase may serve as a common strategy to control the cellular protein dynamics through modulating E3 ligase stability. PMID:23184937

  8. A palmitoylated RING finger ubiquitin ligase and its homologue in the brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazuaki; Kawamura, Meiko; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Kanbe, Daiji; Ishii, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Tomio; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) ligation is implicated in active protein metabolism and subcellular trafficking and its impairment is involved in various neurologic diseases. In rat brain, we identified two novel Ub ligases, Momo and Sakura, carrying double zinc finger motif and RING finger domain. Momo expression is enriched in the brain gray matter and testis, and Sakura expression is more widely detected in the brain white matter as well as in many peripheral organs. Both proteins associate with the cell membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells. We examined their Ub ligase activity in vivo and in vitro using viral expression vectors carrying myc-tagged Momo and Sakura. Overexpression of either Momo or Sakura in mixed cortical cultures increased total polyubiquitination levels. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that the combination of Momo and UbcH4 and H5c, or of Sakura and UbcH4, H5c and H6 is required for the reaction. Deletion mutagenesis suggested that the E3 Ub ligase activity of Momo and Sakura depended on their C-terminal domains containing RING finger structure, while their N-terminal domains influenced their membrane association. In agreement, Sakura associating with the membrane was specifically palmitoylated. Although the molecular targets of their Ub ligation remain to be identified, these findings imply a novel function of the palmitoylated E3 Ub ligase(s).

  9. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-08-21

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246-401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95-G96 and containing 5'-phosphomonoester and 3'-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively.

  10. Partial suppression of bacteriophage T4 ligase mutations by T4 endonuclease II deficiency: role of host ligase.

    PubMed

    Warner, H R

    1971-04-01

    Endonuclease II-deficient, ligase-deficient double mutants of phage T4 induce considerably more deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis after infection of Escherichia coli B than does the ligase-deficient single mutant. Furthermore, the double mutant can replicate 10 to 15% as well as wild-type T4, whereas the single mutant fails to replicate. When the E. coli host is also deficient in ligase, the double mutant resembles the single mutant. The results indicate that host ligase can substitute for phage ligase when the host DNA is not attacked by the phage-induced endonuclease II.

  11. Protein Neddylation: Beyond Cullin-RING Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Enchev, Radoslav I.; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    NEDD8 is a ubiquitin-like protein that activates the largest ubiquitin E3 ligase family, the cullin RING ligases. Many non-cullin neddylation targets have been proposed in recent years. However, overexpression of exogenous NEDD8 can trigger NEDD8 conjugation through the ubiquitylation machinery, which makes validating potential NEDD8 targets challenging. Here we re-evaluate these studies in light of the current understanding of the neddylation pathway, and suggest criteria for the identification of genuine neddylation substrates under homeostatic conditions. We describe the biological processes that might be regulated by non-cullin neddylation, and the utility of neddylation inhibitors for research and as potential therapies. Understanding the biological significance of non-cullin neddylation is an exciting research prospect primed to reveal fundamental insights. PMID:25531226

  12. DNA ligase IV syndrome; a review.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Thomas; Gennery, Andrew R

    2016-10-07

    DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation.Within developing lymphocytes, DNA ligase IV is required to repair programmed DNA double stranded breaks induced during lymphocyte receptor development.Patients with hypomorphic mutations in LIG4 present with a range of phenotypes, from normal to severe combined immunodeficiency. All, however, manifest sensitivity to ionising radiation. Commonly associated features include primordial growth failure with severe microcephaly and a spectrum of learning difficulties, marrow hypoplasia and a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. Diagnostic investigations include immunophenotyping, and testing for radiosensitivity. Some patients present with microcephaly as a predominant feature, but seemingly normal immunity. Treatment is mainly supportive, although haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used in a few cases.

  13. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  14. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4.

  15. Reinvestigation of DNA ligase I in axolotl and Pleurodeles development.

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, S; Hardy, S; Prigent, C; Philippe, M; Thiebaud, P

    1991-01-01

    We have recently shown that the exclusion process causing the replacement of DNA ligases II by DNA ligase I in amphibian eggs after fertilization does not occur in the case of Xenopus laevis [Hardy, S., Aoufouchi, S., Thiebaud, P., and Prigent, C., (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 701-705]. Since this result is in contradiction with the situation reported in axolotl and Pleurodeles we decided to reinvestigate such results in both species. Three different approaches have been used: (1) the substrate specificity of DNA ligase I; (2) the DNA ligase-AMP adduct reaction and (3) the immunological detection using antibodies raised against the X.laevis DNA ligase I. Our results clearly demonstrate that DNA ligase I activity is associated with a single polypeptide which is present in oocyte, unfertilized egg and embryo of both amphibians. Therefore, the hypothesis of a change in DNA ligase forms, resulting from an expression of the DNA ligase I gene in axolotl and Pleurodeles early development must be rejected. We also show that, in contradiction with published data, the unfertilized sea urchin egg contains a DNA ligase activity able to join blunt ended DNA molecules. Images PMID:1886765

  16. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  17. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  18. Cellular DNA ligase I is recruited to cytoplasmic vaccinia virus factories and masks the role of the vaccinia ligase in viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; De Silva, Frank S; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Moss, Bernard

    2009-12-17

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes DNA polymerase and additional proteins that enable cytoplasmic replication. We confirmed the ability of VACV DNA ligase mutants to replicate and tested the hypothesis that cellular ligases compensate for loss of viral gene expression. RNA silencing of human DNA ligase I expression and a small molecule inhibitor of human DNA ligase I [corrected] severely reduced replication of viral DNA in cells infected with VACV ligase-deficient mutants, indicating that the cellular enzyme plays a complementary role. Replication of ligase-deficient VACV was greatly reduced and delayed in resting primary cells, correlating with initial low levels of ligase I and subsequent viral induction and localization of ligase I in virus factories. These studies indicate that DNA ligation is essential for poxvirus replication and explain the ability of ligase deletion mutants to replicate in dividing cells but exhibit decreased pathogenicity in mice. Encoding its own ligase might allow VACV to "jump-start" DNA synthesis.

  19. Effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide on ligation capability of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Guojie; Mu, Runqing; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2014-09-01

    To further understand the ligation mechanism, effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) on the T4 DNA ligation efficiency were investigated. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay was used to monitor the nick-joining process by T4 DNA ligase. Results showed that substitutions at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick decreased the ligation efficiency by 48.7% ± 6.7% and 70.6% ± 4.0%, respectively. Substitutions at both 5'- and 3'-ends decreased the ligation efficiency by 76.6% ± 1.3%. Corresponding kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km, and kcat, have been determined in each case by using the Michaelis-Menten equation. The kinetic data showed that the 2'-OMeN substitutions reduced the maximal initial velocity and increased the Michaelis constant of T4 DNA ligase. Mismatches at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick have also shown different influences on the ligation. Results here showed that the sugar pucker conformation at 3'-end impairs the ligation efficiency more profoundly than that at 5'-end. Different concentrations of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), Na(+), and ATP were also demonstrated to affect the T4 DNA ligase activity. These results enriched our knowledge about the effects of 2'-OMeN substitutions on the T4 DNA ligase.

  20. Single-stranded DNA library preparation from highly degraded DNA using T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Gerber, Tobias; Glocke, Isabelle; Korlević, Petra; Lippik, Laurin; Nagel, Sarah; Riehl, Lara Maria; Schmidt, Anna; Meyer, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    DNA library preparation for high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA usually involves ligation of adapters to double-stranded DNA fragments. However, for highly degraded DNA, especially ancient DNA, library preparation has been found to be more efficient if each of the two DNA strands are converted into library molecules separately. We present a new method for single-stranded library preparation, ssDNA2.0, which is based on single-stranded DNA ligation with T4 DNA ligase utilizing a splinter oligonucleotide with a stretch of random bases hybridized to a 3' biotinylated donor oligonucleotide. A thorough evaluation of this ligation scheme shows that single-stranded DNA can be ligated to adapter oligonucleotides in higher concentration than with CircLigase (an RNA ligase that was previously chosen for end-to-end ligation in single-stranded library preparation) and that biases in ligation can be minimized when choosing splinters with 7 or 8 random nucleotides. We show that ssDNA2.0 tolerates higher quantities of input DNA than CircLigase-based library preparation, is less costly and better compatible with automation. We also provide an in-depth comparison of library preparation methods on degraded DNA from various sources. Most strikingly, we find that single-stranded library preparation increases library yields from tissues stored in formalin for many years by several orders of magnitude.

  1. Origin and diversification of TRIM ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Most proteins of the TRIM family (also known as RBCC family) are ubiquitin ligases that share a peculiar protein structure, characterized by including an N-terminal RING finger domain closely followed by one or two B-boxes. Additional protein domains found at their C termini have been used to classify TRIM proteins into classes. TRIMs are involved in multiple cellular processes and many of them are essential components of the innate immunity system of animal species. In humans, it has been shown that mutations in several TRIM-encoding genes lead to diverse genetic diseases and contribute to several types of cancer. They had been hitherto detected only in animals. In this work, by comprehensively analyzing the available diversity of TRIM and TRIM-like protein sequences and evaluating their evolutionary patterns, an improved classification of the TRIM family is obtained. Members of one of the TRIM subfamilies defined, called Subfamily A, turn to be present not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, such as fungi, apusozoans, alveolates, excavates and plants. The rest of subfamilies are animal-specific and several of them originated only recently. Subfamily A proteins are characterized by containing a MATH domain, suggesting a potential evolutionary connection between TRIM proteins and a different type of ubiquitin ligases, known as TRAFs, which contain quite similar MATH domains. These results indicate that the TRIM family emerged much earlier than so far thought and contribute to our understanding of its origin and diversification. The structural and evolutionary links with the TRAF family of ubiquitin ligases can be experimentally explored to determine whether functional connections also exist.

  2. A network of ubiquitin ligases is important for the dynamics of misfolded protein aggregates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Saini, Jagdeep; Caplan, Avrom J

    2012-07-06

    Quality control ubiquitin ligases promote degradation of misfolded proteins by the proteasome. If the capacity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system is exceeded, then misfolded proteins accumulate in aggregates that are cleared by the autophagic system. To identify components of the ubiquitin/proteasome system that protect against aggregation, we analyzed a GFP-tagged protein kinase, Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP, in yeast strains deleted for 14 different ubiquitin ligases. We show that deletion of almost all of these ligases affected the proteostatic balance in untreated cells such that Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP aggregation was changed significantly compared with the levels found in wild type cells. By contrast, aggregation was increased significantly in only six E3 deletion strains when Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP folding was impaired due to inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with geldanamycin. The increase in aggregation of Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP due to deletion of UBR1 and UFD4 was partially suppressed by deletion of UBR2 due to up-regulation of Rpn4, which controls proteasome activity. Deletion of UBR1 in combination with LTN1, UFD4, or DOA10 led to a marked hypersensitivity to azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, suggesting some redundancy in the networks of quality control ubiquitin ligases. Finally, we show that Ubr1 promotes clearance of protein aggregates when the autophagic system is inactivated. These results provide insight into the mechanics by which ubiquitin ligases cooperate and provide feedback regulation in the clearance of misfolded proteins.

  3. Expression and biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Casta, Louis J; Butz, Charles E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Taraschi, Theodore F

    2007-10-01

    We report that Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) encodes a 912 amino acid ATP-dependent DNA ligase. Protein sequence analysis of Pf DNA ligase I indicates a strong sequence similarity, particularly in the C-terminal region, to DNA ligase I homologues. The activity of recombinant Pf DNA ligase I (PfLigI) was investigated using protein expressed in HEK293 cells. The PfLigI gene product is approximately 94kDa and catalyzes phosphodiester bond formation on a singly nicked DNA substrate. The enzyme is most active at alkaline pH (8.5) and with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) and ATP as cofactors. Kinetic studies of PfLigI revealed that the enzyme has similar substrate affinity (K(m) 2.6nM) as compared to human DNA ligase I and k(cat) (2.3x10(-3)s(-1)) and k(cat)/K(m) (8.8x10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) which are similar to other ATP-dependent DNA ligases. PfLigI was able to join RNA-DNA substrates only when the RNA sequence was upstream of the nick, confirming that it is DNA ligase I and has no associated DNA ligase III like activity.

  4. Electronic structure and optical properties of noncentrosymmetric LiGaSe2: Experimental measurements and DFT band structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Ananchenko, L. N.; Isaenko, L. I.; Yelisseyev, A. P.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectra for pristine and Ar+ ion-irradiated surfaces of LiGaSe2 single crystal grown by Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Electronic structure of the LiGaSe2 compound is studied from a theoretical and experimental viewpoint. In particular, total and partial densities of states of LiGaSe2 are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method and they are verified by data of X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The DFT calculations indicate that the main contributors to the valence band of LiGaSe2 are the Se 4p states, which contribute mainly at the top and in the upper portion of the valence band, with also essential contributions of these states in the lower portion of the band. Other substantial contributions to the valence band of LiGaSe2 emerge from the Ga 4s and Ga 4p states contributing mainly at the lower ant upper portions of the valence band, respectively. With respect to the conduction band, the calculations indicate that its bottom is composed mainly from contributions of the unoccupied Ga s and Se p states. The present calculations are confirmed experimentally when comparing the XP valence-band spectrum of the LiGaS2 single crystal on a common energy scale with the X-ray emission bands representing the energy distribution of the Ga 4p and Se 4p states. Measurements of the fundamental absorption edges at room temperature reveal that bandgap value, Eg, of LiGaSe2 is equal to 3.47 eV and the Eg value increases up to 3.66 eV when decreasing temperature to 80 K. The main optical characteristics of the LiGaSe2 compound are clarified by the DFT calculations.

  5. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Xie, Juan-Juan; Han, Zhong; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xi-Peng

    2013-02-01

    We describe the biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii) DNA ligase and its potential application in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The recombinant M. jannaschii DNA ligase is an ATP-dependent ligase. The ligase activity was dependent on metal ions of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). The optimal concentrations of ATP cofactor and Mg(2+) ion were 0.01-2 and 10 mM, respectively. The optimal pH value for DNA ligation was 8.5. High concentrations of NaCl inhibited DNA ligation. The effects of mismatches on joining short oligonucleotides by M. jannaschii DNA ligase were fully characterized. The mismatches at the first position 5' to the nick inhibited ligation more than those at the first position 3' to the nick. The mismatches at other positions 5' to the nick (3rd to 7th sites) exhibited less inhibition on ligation. However, the introduction of a C/C mismatch at the third position 5' to the nick could completely inhibit the ligation of the terminal-mismatched nick of an oligonucleotide duplex by M. jannaschii DNA ligase. Therefore, introducing an additional mismatch at the third position 5' to the SNP site is a more effective approach in genotyping by M. jannaschii DNA ligase.

  6. DNA ligase I is not essential for mammalian cell viability.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Masani, Shahnaz; Hsieh, Chih-lin; Yu, Kefei

    2014-04-24

    Of the three DNA ligases present in all vertebrates, DNA ligase I (Lig1) has been considered essential for ligating Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and thereby essential for cell viability. Here, we report the striking finding that a Lig1-null murine B cell line is viable. Surprisingly, the Lig1-null cells exhibit normal proliferation and normal immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination and are not hypersensitive to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. These findings demonstrate that Lig1 is not absolutely required for cellular DNA replication and repair and that either Lig3 or Lig4 can substitute for the role of Lig1 in joining Okazaki fragments. The establishment of a Lig1-null cell line will greatly facilitate the characterization of DNA ligase function in mammalian cells, but the finding alone profoundly reprioritizes the role of ligase I in DNA replication, repair, and recombination.

  7. Alternative Okazaki Fragment Ligation Pathway by DNA Ligase III.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Iliakis, George

    2015-06-23

    Higher eukaryotes have three types of DNA ligases: DNA ligase 1 (Lig1), DNA ligase 3 (Lig3) and DNA ligase 4 (Lig4). While Lig1 and Lig4 are present in all eukaryotes from yeast to human, Lig3 appears sporadically in evolution and is uniformly present only in vertebrates. In the classical, textbook view, Lig1 catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the DNA replication fork and the ligation steps of long-patch base-excision repair (BER), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Lig4 is responsible for DNA ligation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by the classical, DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway of non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ). Lig3 is implicated in a short-patch base excision repair (BER) pathway, in single strand break repair in the nucleus, and in all ligation requirements of the DNA metabolism in mitochondria. In this scenario, Lig1 and Lig4 feature as the major DNA ligases serving the most essential ligation needs of the cell, while Lig3 serves in the cell nucleus only minor repair roles. Notably, recent systematic studies in the chicken B cell line, DT40, involving constitutive and conditional knockouts of all three DNA ligases individually, as well as of combinations thereof, demonstrate that the current view must be revised. Results demonstrate that Lig1 deficient cells proliferate efficiently. Even Lig1/Lig4 double knockout cells show long-term viability and proliferate actively, demonstrating that, at least in DT40, Lig3 can perform all ligation reactions of the cellular DNA metabolism as sole DNA ligase. Indeed, in the absence of Lig1, Lig3 can efficiently support semi-conservative DNA replication via an alternative Okazaki-fragment ligation pathway. In addition, Lig3 can back up NHEJ in the absence of Lig4, and can support NER and HRR in the absence of Lig1. Supporting observations are available in less elaborate genetic models in mouse cells. Collectively, these observations raise Lig3 from a niche-ligase to a

  8. DNA ligase and the pyridine nucleotide cycle in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Olivera, B M; Hughes, K T; Roth, J R; Hillyard, D R

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial DNA ligases use NAD as an energy source. In this study we addressed two questions about these enzymes. First, what is the physiological consequence of completely removing the NAD-dependent enzyme and replacing it with an ATP-dependent DNA ligase? We constructed Salmonella typhimurium strains in which the endogenous NAD-dependent DNA ligase activity was inactivated by an insertion mutation and the ATP-dependent enzyme from bacteriophage T4 was provided by a cloned phage gene. Such strains were physiologically indistinguishable from the wild type, even under conditions of UV irradiation or treatment with alkylating agents. These results suggest that specific functional interactions between DNA ligase and other replication and repair enzymes may be unimportant under the conditions tested. Second, the importance of DNA ligation as the initiating event of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle was critically assessed in these mutant strains. Surprisingly, our results indicate that DNA ligation makes a minimal contribution to the pyridine nucleotide cycle; the Salmonella strains with only an ATP-dependent ligase had the same NAD turnover rates as the wild-type strain with an NAD-dependent ligase. However, we found that NAD turnover was significantly decreased under anaerobic conditions. We suggest that most intracellular pyridine nucleotide breakdown occurs in a process that protects the cell against oxygen damage but involves a biochemical mechanism other than DNA ligation. Images PMID:2649488

  9. Understanding and Engineering Thermostability in DNA Ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519.

    PubMed

    Modarres, Hassan Pezeshgi; Dorokhov, Boris D; Popov, Vladimir O; Ravin, Nikolai V; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-05-19

    The physical chemical principles underlying enzymatic thermostability are keys to understand the way evolution has shaped proteins to adapt to a broad range of temperatures. Understanding the molecular determinants at the basis of protein thermostability is also an important factor for engineering more thermoresistant enzymes to be used in the industrial setting, such as, for instance, DNA ligases, which are important for DNA replication and repair and have been long used in molecular biology and biotechnology. Here, we first address the origin of thermostability in the thermophilic DNA ligase from archaeon Thermococcus sp. 1519 and identify thermosensitive regions using molecular modeling and simulations. In addition, we predict mutations that can enhance thermostability of the enzyme through bioinformatics analyses. We show that thermosensitive regions of this enzyme are stabilized at higher temperatures by optimization of charged groups on the surface, and we predict that thermostability can be further increased by further optimization of the network among these charged groups. Engineering this DNA ligase by introducing selected mutations (i.e., A287K, G304D, S364I, and A387K) eventually produced a significant and additive increase in the half-life of the enzyme when compared to that of the wild type.

  10. Biotin protein ligase from Corynebacterium glutamicum: role for growth and L: -lysine production.

    PubMed

    Peters-Wendisch, P; Stansen, K C; Götker, S; Wendisch, V F

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a biotin auxotrophic Gram-positive bacterium that is used for large-scale production of amino acids, especially of L-glutamate and L-lysine. It is known that biotin limitation triggers L-glutamate production and that L-lysine production can be increased by enhancing the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, one of two biotin-dependent proteins of C. glutamicum. The gene cg0814 (accession number YP_225000) has been annotated to code for putative biotin protein ligase BirA, but the protein has not yet been characterized. A discontinuous enzyme assay of biotin protein ligase activity was established using a 105aa peptide corresponding to the carboxyterminus of the biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit AccBC of the acetyl CoA carboxylase from C. glutamicum as acceptor substrate. Biotinylation of this biotin acceptor peptide was revealed with crude extracts of a strain overexpressing the birA gene and was shown to be ATP dependent. Thus, birA from C. glutamicum codes for a functional biotin protein ligase (EC 6.3.4.15). The gene birA from C. glutamicum was overexpressed and the transcriptome was compared with the control strain revealing no significant gene expression changes of the bio-genes. However, biotin protein ligase overproduction increased the level of the biotin-containing protein pyruvate carboxylase and entailed a significant growth advantage in glucose minimal medium. Moreover, birA overexpression resulted in a twofold higher L-lysine yield on glucose as compared with the control strain.

  11. Heterologous expression of rice SUMO E3 ligase (OsSIZ1) enhances drought and heat tolerance in transgenic cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis gene AtSIZ1 encodes a SUMO E3 ligase that plays important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salt, and nutrient starvation. Loss of function in AtSIZ1 leads to increased sensitivity to drought, heat, and salt stresses, whereas overexpression of t...

  12. Amplification and disruption of the phenylacetyl-CoA ligase gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding an aryl-capping enzyme that supplies phenylacetic acid to the isopenicillin N-acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Vaca, Inmaculada; Rodríguez, Esther; Casqueiro, Javier; Martín, Juan F

    2006-04-01

    A gene, phl, encoding a phenylacetyl-CoA ligase was cloned from a phage library of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78. The presence of five introns in the phl gene was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The phl gene encoded an aryl-CoA ligase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase. The Phl protein contained most of the amino acids defining the aryl-CoA (4-coumaroyl-CoA) ligase substrate-specificity code and differed from acetyl-CoA ligase and other acyl-CoA ligases. The phl gene was not linked to the penicillin gene cluster. Amplification of phl in an autonomous replicating plasmid led to an 8-fold increase in phenylacetyl-CoA ligase activity and a 35% increase in penicillin production. Transformants containing the amplified phl gene were resistant to high concentrations of phenylacetic acid (more than 2.5 g/l). Disruption of the phl gene resulted in a 40% decrease in penicillin production and a similar reduction of phenylacetyl-CoA ligase activity. The disrupted mutants were highly susceptible to phenylacetic acid. Complementation of the disrupted mutants with the phl gene restored normal levels of penicillin production and resistance to phenylacetic acid. The phenylacetyl-CoA ligase encoded by the phl gene is therefore involved in penicillin production, although a second aryl-CoA ligase appears to contribute partially to phenylacetic acid activation. The Phl protein lacks a peptide-carrier-protein domain and behaves as an aryl-capping enzyme that activates phenylacetic acid and transfers it to the isopenicillin N acyltransferase. The Phl protein contains the peroxisome-targeting sequence that is also present in the isopenicillin N acyltransferase. The peroxisomal co-localization of these two proteins indicates that the last two enzymes of the penicillin pathway form a peroxisomal functional complex.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, Nn-bis-(5-deoxy-α-d-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the µM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents. PMID:16361267

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, N(n)-bis-(5-deoxy-alpha-D-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the microM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents.

  15. A Self-Replicating Ligase Ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Natasha; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    A self-replicating molecule directs the covalent assembly of component molecules to form a product that is of identical composition to the parent. When the newly formed product also is able to direct the assembly of product molecules, the self-replicating system can be termed autocatalytic. A self-replicating system was developed based on a ribozyme that catalyzes the assembly of additional copies of Itself through an RNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reaction. The R3C ligase ribozyme was redesigned so that it would ligate two substrates to generate an exact copy of itself, which then would behave in a similar manner. This self-replicating system depends on the catalytic nature of the RNA for the generation of copies. A linear dependence was observed between the initial rate of formation of new copies and the starting concentration of ribozyme, consistent with exponential growth. The autocatalytic rate constant was 0.011 per min, whereas the initial rate of reaction in the absence of pre-existing ribozyme was only 3.3 x 10(exp -11) M per min. Exponential growth was limited, however, because newly formed ribozyme molecules had greater difficulty forming a productive complex with the two substrates. Further optimization of the system may lead to the sustained exponential growth of ribozymes that undergo self-replication.

  16. Dysregulation of ubiquitin ligases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases are critical components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which governs fundamental processes regulating normal cellular homeostasis, metabolism, and cell cycle in response to external stress signals and DNA damage. Among multiple steps of the UPS system required to regulate protein ubiquitination and stability, UBLs define specificity, as they recognize and interact with substrates in a temporally- and spatially-regulated manner. Such interactions are required for substrate modification by ubiquitin chains, which marks proteins for recognition and degradation by the proteasome, or alters their subcellular localization or assembly into functional complexes. UBLs are often deregulated in cancer, altering substrate availability or activity in a manner that can promote cellular transformation. Such deregulation can occur at the epigenetic, genomic, or post-translational levels. Alterations in UBL can be used to predict their contributions, affecting tumor suppressors or oncogenes in select tumors. Better understanding of mechanisms underlying UBL expression and activities is expected to drive the development of next generation modulators that can serve as novel therapeutic modalities. This review summarizes our current understanding of UBL deregulation in cancer and highlights novel opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26690337

  17. A plant DNA ligase is an important determinant of seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Masnavi, Ghzaleh; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Jiang, Qing; Bray, Clifford M; West, Christopher E

    2010-09-01

    DNA repair is important for maintaining genome integrity. In plants, DNA damage accumulated in the embryo of seeds is repaired early in imbibition, and is important for germination performance and seed longevity. An essential step in most repair pathways is the DNA ligase-mediated rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Here, we report the characterization of DNA LIGASE VI, which is only found in plant species. The primary structure of this ligase shows a unique N-terminal region that contains a β-CASP motif, which is found in a number of repair proteins, including the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor Artemis. Phenotypic analysis revealed a delay in the germination of atlig6 mutants compared with wild-type lines, and this delay becomes markedly exacerbated in the presence of the genotoxin menadione. Arabidopsis atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display significant hypersensitivity to controlled seed ageing, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seed viability relative to wild-type lines. In addition, atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display increased sensitivity to low-temperature stress, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seedling vigour upon transfer to standard growth conditions. Seeds display a rapid transcriptional DNA DSB response, which is activated in the earliest stages of water imbibition, providing evidence for the accumulation of cytotoxic DSBs in the quiescent seed. These results implicate AtLIG6 and AtLIG4 as major determinants of Arabidopsis seed quality and longevity.

  18. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  19. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  20. DNA Ligase III Promotes Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining during Chromosomal Translocation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J.; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jasin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1. PMID:21655080

  1. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Justin J; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T; Fults, Eric S; Buchanan, Bryce W; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2015-07-24

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3'-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane.

  2. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Justin J.; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T.; Fults, Eric S.; Buchanan, Bryce W.; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G.; Rubenstein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3′-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane. PMID:26055716

  3. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains and that thalidomide blocks the formation of CRBN-ubiquitin conjugates. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitinated CRBN is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines such as MM1.S, OPM2, and U266 with thalidomide (100 μM) and its structural analog lenalidomide (10 μM) results in stabilization of CRBN and elevation of CRBN protein levels. This in turn leads to the reduced level of CRBN target proteins and enhances the sensitivity of human multiple myeloma cells to IMiDs. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which thalidomide and its analogs modulate the CRBN function in cells. Through inhibition of CRBN ubiquitination, thalidomide and its analogs allow CRBN to accumulate, leading to the increased cullin-4 RING E3 ligase-mediated degradation of target proteins.—Liu, Y., Huang, X., He, X., Zhou, Y., Jiang, X., Chen-Kiang, S., Jaffrey, S. R., Xu, G. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function. PMID:26231201

  4. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  5. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  6. Antagonistic roles of ubiquitin ligase HEI10 and SUMO ligase RNF212 regulate meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Huanyu; Prasada Rao, H B D; Yang, Ye; Fong, Jared H; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Deacon, Dekker C; Nagel, Kathryn E; Swartz, Rebecca K; Strong, Edward; Holloway, J Kim; Cohen, Paula E; Schimenti, John; Ward, Jeremy; Hunter, Neil

    2014-02-01

    Crossover recombination facilitates the accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. In mammals, poorly characterized regulatory processes ensure that every pair of chromosomes obtains at least one crossover, even though most recombination sites yield non-crossovers. Designation of crossovers involves selective localization of the SUMO ligase RNF212 to a minority of recombination sites, where it stabilizes pertinent factors such as MutSγ (ref. 4). Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase HEI10 (also called CCNB1IP1) is essential for this crossover/non-crossover differentiation process. In HEI10-deficient mice, RNF212 localizes to most recombination sites, and dissociation of both RNF212 and MutSγ from chromosomes is blocked. Consequently, recombination is impeded, and crossing over fails. In wild-type mice, HEI10 accumulates at designated crossover sites, suggesting that it also has a late role in implementing crossing over. As with RNF212, dosage sensitivity for HEI10 indicates that it is a limiting factor for crossing over. We suggest that SUMO and ubiquitin have antagonistic roles during meiotic recombination that are balanced to effect differential stabilization of recombination factors at crossover and non-crossover sites.

  7. Substrates of IAP ubiquitin ligases identified with a designed orthogonal E3 ligase, the NEDDylator

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Min; Guan, Shenheng; Wang, Haopeng; Burlingame, Alma L.; Wells, James A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are guardian ubiquitin ligases that keep classic pro-apoptotic proteins in check. Systematic identification of additional IAP substrates is challenged by the heterogeneity and sheer number of ubiquitinated proteins (>5000). Here we report a powerful catalytic tagging tool, the NEDDylator, which fuses a NEDD8 E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc12, to the ubiquitin ligase, XIAP or cIAP1. This permits transfer of the rare ubiquitin homolog NEDD8 to the ubiquitin E3 substrates allowing them to be efficiently purified for LC/MS/MS identification. We have identified >50 potential IAP substrates of both cytosolic and mitochondrial origin that bear hallmark N-terminal IAP binding motifs. These substrates include the recently discovered protein phosphatase, PGAM5, which we show is proteolytically processed, accumulates in cytosol during apoptosis, and sensitizes cells to death. These studies reveal mechanisms and antagonistic partners for specific IAPs, and provide a powerful technology for labeling binding partners in transient protein-protein complexes. PMID:23201124

  8. Up-regulation of WRN and DNA ligase IIIalpha in chronic myeloid leukemia: consequences for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Tomkinson, Alan E; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2008-08-15

    Expression of oncogenic BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) that in turn cause increased DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have previously shown increased error-prone repair of DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) in CML cells. Recent reports have identified alternative NHEJ pathways that are highly error prone, prompting us to examine the role of the alternative NHEJ pathways in BCR-ABL-positive CML. Importantly, we show that key proteins in the major NHEJ pathway, Artemis and DNA ligase IV, are down-regulated, whereas DNA ligase IIIalpha, and the protein deleted in Werner syndrome, WRN, are up-regulated. DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN form a complex that is recruited to DSBs in CML cells. Furthermore, "knockdown" of either DNA ligase IIIalpha or WRN leads to increased accumulation of unrepaired DSBs, demonstrating that they contribute to the repair of DSBs. These results indicate that altered DSB repair in CML cells is caused by the increased activity of an alternative NHEJ repair pathway, involving DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN. We suggest that, although the repair of ROS-induced DSBs by this pathway contributes to the survival of CML cells, the resultant genomic instability drives disease progression.

  9. Biochemical characterization of the DNA ligase I from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; Cardenas, Helios; Azuara-Liceaga, Elisa; Brieba, Luis G

    2010-11-01

    DNA ligases play an essential role in DNA replication and repair. Herein, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of DNA ligase I from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (EhDNAligI). EhDNAligI is an ATP-dependent DNA ligase of 685 amino acids with 35% identity to human DNA ligase I. This report shows that heterologous expressed EhDNAligI is able to perform the three conserved steps of a DNA ligation reaction: adenylation, binding to a 5'-phosphorylated nicked DNA substrate and sealing of the nick. EhDNAligI is strongly inhibited by NaCl and displays optimal activity at pH 7.5. EhDNAligI uses Mn2+ or Mg2+ as metal cofactors and ATP as nucleotide cofactor. EhDNAligI has a nicked DNA binding constant of 6.6microM and follows Michaelis-Menten steady-state kinetics with a K(m) ATP of 64nM and a k(cat) of 2.4min(-1). Accordingly to its properties as a family I DNA ligase, EhDNAligI is able to ligate a RNA strand upstream of a nucleic acid nick, but not in the downstream or the template position. We propose that EhDNAligI is involved in sealing DNA nicks during lagging strand synthesis and may have a role in base excision repair in E. histolytica.

  10. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  11. SUMO E3 ligase activity of TRIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Yang, X

    2011-03-03

    SUMOylation governs numerous cellular processes and is essential to most eukaryotic life. Despite increasing recognition of the importance of this process, an extremely limited number of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein ligases (E3s) have been identified. Here we show that at least some members of the functionally diverse tripartite motif (TRIM) superfamily are SUMO E3s. These TRIM proteins bind both the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and substrates and strongly enhance transfer of SUMOs from Ubc9 to these substrates. Among the substrates of TRIM SUMO E3s are the tumor suppressor p53 and its principal antagonist Mdm2. The E3 activity depends on the TRIM motif, suggesting it to be the first widespread SUMO E3 motif. Given the large number of TRIM proteins, our results may greatly expand the identified SUMO E3s. Furthermore, TRIM E3 activity may be an important contributor to SUMOylation specificity and the versatile functions of TRIM proteins.

  12. Adenylation-Dependent Conformation and Unfolding Pathways of the NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase from the Thermophile Thermus scotoductus

    PubMed Central

    Georlette, Daphné; Blaise, Vinciane; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Damien, Benjamin; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigridur H.; Depiereux, Eric; Gerday, Charles; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Feller, Georges

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years, an increased attention has been focused on NAD+-dependent DNA ligases. This is mostly due to their potential use as antibiotic targets, because effective inhibition of these essential enzymes would result in the death of the bacterium. However, development of an efficient drug requires that the conformational modifications involved in the catalysis of NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are understood. From this perspective, we have investigated the conformational changes occurring in the thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD+-DNA ligase upon adenylation, as well as the effect of cofactor binding on protein resistance to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results indicate that cofactor binding induces conformational rearrangement within the active site and promotes a compaction of the enzyme. These data support an induced “open-closure” process upon adenylation, leading to the formation of the catalytically active enzyme that is able to bind DNA. These conformational changes are likely to be associated with the protein function, preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes between deadenylated ligases and DNA. In addition, enzyme adenylation significantly increases resistance of the protein to thermal denaturation and GdmCl-induced unfolding, establishing a thermodynamic link between ligand binding and increased conformational stability. Finally, chemical unfolding of deadenylated and adenylated enzyme is accompanied by accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and premolten globule states. Maximal populations of these intermediates are shifted toward higher GdmCl concentrations in the case of the adenylated ligase. These data provide further insights into the properties of partially folded intermediates. PMID:14747344

  13. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  14. Bacteria-host relationship: ubiquitin ligases as weapons of invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maculins, Timurs; Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize the ubiquitin (Ub) system for maintaining a balanced functioning of cellular pathways. Although the Ub system is exclusive to eukaryotes, prokaryotic bacteria have developed an armory of Ub ligase enzymes that are capable of employing the Ub systems of various hosts, ranging from plant to animal cells. These enzymes have been acquired through the evolution and can be classified into three main classes, RING (really interesting new gene), HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus) and NEL (novel E3 ligases). In this review we describe the roles played by different classes of bacterial Ub ligases in infection and pathogenicity. We also provide an overview of the different mechanisms by which bacteria mimic specific components of the host Ub system and outline the gaps in our current understanding of their functions. Additionally, we discuss approaches and experimental tools for validating this class of enzymes as potential novel antibacterial therapy targets. PMID:26964724

  15. The G1 phase E3 ubiquitin ligase TRUSS that gets deregulated in human cancers is a novel substrate of the S-phase E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp2.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Azfar; Swarnalatha, Manickavinayaham; Sultana, Sarwat; Joshi, Prashant; Panda, Subrat K; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases have been implicated in the ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of several key regulators of cell cycle. Owing to their pleotropic behavior, E3 ubiquitin ligases are tightly regulated both at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRUSS (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated ubiquitous scaffolding and signaling protein) which negatively regulates c-Myc, are found down-regulated in most human cancer cell lines. However, the mechanism of regulation of intracellular levels of TRUSS remains elusive. Here we show that TRUSS is expressed majorly during the G1 phase of cell cycle and its level starts to decline with the expression of S-phase specific E3 ligase Skp2. Enforced expression of Skp2 led to a marked increase in the ubiquitination of TRUSS after its phosphorylation by GSK3β and followed by rapid proteolytic degradation. Our co-immunoprecipitation studies suggested a direct interaction between Skp2 and TRUSS through the LRR motif of Skp2. Interestingly, the human tumor samples that exhibited elevated expression of Skp2, showed relatively poor expression of TRUSS. Further, enforced expression of HBx, the oncoprotein of Hepatitis B virus which is known to stabilize c-Myc and enhance its oncogenic potential, led to the intracellular accumulation of TRUSS as well as c-Myc. Apparently, HBx also interacted with TRUSS which negatively impacted the TRUSS-c-Myc and TRUSS-Skp2 interactions leading to stabilization of TRUSS. Thus, the present study suggests that TRUSS is a novel substrate of E3 ligase Skp2 and that disruption of TRUSS-Skp2 interaction by viral oncoproteins could lead to pathophysiological sequelae.

  16. Regulation of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen; Martinez-Torres, R Julio

    2012-09-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease. In addition, it is a putative tumour suppressor, and has roles outside its enzymatic activity. It is critical for mitochondrial clearance through mitophagy, and is an essential protein in most eukaryotes. As such, it is a tightly controlled protein, regulated through an array of external interactions with multiple proteins, posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation, and self-regulation through internal associations. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies into Parkin regulation and discuss future challenges for gaining a full molecular understanding of the regulation of Parkin E3 ligase activity.

  17. The Atypical Occurrence of Two Biotin Protein Ligases in Francisella novicida Is Due to Distinct Roles in Virulence and Biotin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Chin, Chui-Yoke; Chakravartty, Vandana; Gao, Rongsui; Crispell, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological function of biotin requires biotin protein ligase activity in order to attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are enzymes involved in central metabolism. The model intracellular pathogen Francisella novicida is unusual in that it encodes two putative biotin protein ligases rather than the usual single enzyme. F. novicida BirA has a ligase domain as well as an N-terminal DNA-binding regulatory domain, similar to the prototypical BirA protein in E. coli. However, the second ligase, which we name BplA, lacks the N-terminal DNA binding motif. It has been unclear why a bacterium would encode these two disparate biotin protein ligases, since F. novicida contains only a single biotinylated protein. In vivo complementation and enzyme assays demonstrated that BirA and BplA are both functional biotin protein ligases, but BplA is a much more efficient enzyme. BirA, but not BplA, regulated transcription of the biotin synthetic operon. Expression of bplA (but not birA) increased significantly during F. novicida infection of macrophages. BplA (but not BirA) was required for bacterial replication within macrophages as well as in mice. These data demonstrate that F. novicida has evolved two distinct enzymes with specific roles; BplA possesses the major ligase activity, whereas BirA acts to regulate and thereby likely prevent wasteful synthesis of biotin. During infection BplA seems primarily employed to maximize the efficiency of biotin utilization without limiting the expression of biotin biosynthetic genes, representing a novel adaptation strategy that may also be used by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:26060274

  18. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  19. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  20. Ubiquitylation-dependent oligomerization regulates activity of Nedd4 ligases.

    PubMed

    Attali, Ilan; Tobelaim, William Sam; Persaud, Avinash; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Mashahreh, Bayan; Levin-Kravets, Olga; Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Pilzer, Inbar; Kupiec, Martin; Wiener, Reuven; Wolf, Dieter A; Rotin, Daniela; Prag, Gali

    2017-02-15

    Ubiquitylation controls protein function and degradation. Therefore, ubiquitin ligases need to be tightly controlled. We discovered an evolutionarily conserved allosteric restraint mechanism for Nedd4 ligases and demonstrated its function with diverse substrates: the yeast soluble proteins Rpn10 and Rvs167, and the human receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR1 and cardiac IKS potassium channel. We found that a potential trimerization interface is structurally blocked by the HECT domain α1-helix, which further undergoes ubiquitylation on a conserved lysine residue. Genetic, bioinformatics, biochemical and biophysical data show that attraction between this α1-conjugated ubiquitin and the HECT ubiquitin-binding patch pulls the α1-helix out of the interface, thereby promoting trimerization. Strikingly, trimerization renders the ligase inactive. Arginine substitution of the ubiquitylated lysine impairs this inactivation mechanism and results in unrestrained FGFR1 ubiquitylation in cells. Similarly, electrophysiological data and TIRF microscopy show that NEDD4 unrestrained mutant constitutively downregulates the IKS channel, thus confirming the functional importance of E3-ligase autoinhibition.

  1. Cullin E3 Ligase Activity Is Required for Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Shapiro, Paige; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Lange, Stephan

    2017-04-07

    The role of cullin E3-ubiquitin ligases for muscle homeostasis is best known during muscle atrophy, as the cullin-1 substrate adaptor atrogin-1 is among the most well-characterized muscle atrogins. We investigated whether cullin activity was also crucial during terminal myoblast differentiation and aggregation of acetylcholine receptors for the establishment of neuromuscular junctions in vitro. The activity of cullin E3-ligases is modulated through post-translational modification with the small ubiquitin-like modifier nedd8. Using either the Nae1 inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) or siRNA against nedd8 in early or late stages of differentiation on C2C12 myoblasts, and primary satellite cells from mouse and human, we show that cullin E3-ligase activity is necessary for each step of the muscle cell differentiation program in vitro. We further investigate known transcriptional repressors for terminal muscle differentiation, namely ZBTB38, Bhlhe41, and Id1. Due to their identified roles for terminal muscle differentiation, we hypothesize that the accumulation of these potential cullin E3-ligase substrates may be partially responsible for the observed phenotype. MLN4924 is currently undergoing clinical trials in cancer patients, and our experiments highlight concerns on the homeostasis and regenerative capacity of muscles in these patients who often experience cachexia.

  2. The Glomuvenous Malformation Protein Glomulin Binds Rbx1 and Regulates Cullin RING Ligase-Mediated Turnover of Fbw7

    PubMed Central

    Tron, Adriana E.; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M.; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N.; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder Glomuvenous Malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues and GVM lesions results in decreased levels of Fbw7 and increased levels of Cyclin E and c-Myc. The increased turnover of Fbw7 is dependent on CRL and proteasome activity indicating that Glmn modulates the E3 activity of CRL1Fbw7. These data reveal an unexpected functional connection between Glmn and Rbx1 and demonstrate that defective regulation of Fbw7 levels contributes to GVM. PMID:22405651

  3. The glomuvenous malformation protein Glomulin binds Rbx1 and regulates cullin RING ligase-mediated turnover of Fbw7.

    PubMed

    Tron, Adriana E; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-04-13

    Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins, including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here, we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder glomuvenous malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues, and GVM lesions results in decreased levels of Fbw7 and increased levels of Cyclin E and c-Myc. The increased turnover of Fbw7 is dependent on CRL and proteasome activity, indicating that Glmn modulates the E3 activity of CRL1(Fbw7). These data reveal an unexpected functional connection between Glmn and Rbx1 and demonstrate that defective regulation of Fbw7 levels contributes to GVM.

  4. Control of Amino Acid Homeostasis by a Ubiquitin Ligase-Coactivator Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Damian; Chapiro, Sonia M; Pratelli, Réjane; Yu, Shi; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie; Pilot, Guillaume; Callis, Judy

    2017-03-03

    Intercellular amino acid transport is essential for the growth of all multicellular organisms, and its dysregulation is implicated in developmental disorders. By an unknown mechanism, amino acid efflux is stimulated in plants by overexpression of a membrane-localized protein (GLUTAMINE DUMPER 1 (GDU1)) that requires a ubiquitin ligase (LOSS OF GDU 2 (LOG2). Here we further explore the physiological consequences of the interaction between these two proteins. LOG2 ubiquitin ligase activity is necessary for GDU1-dependent tolerance to exogenous amino acids, and LOG2 self-ubiquitination was markedly stimulated by the GDU1 cytosolic domain, suggesting that GDU1 functions as an adaptor or coactivator of amino acid exporter(s). However, other consequences more typical of a ligase-substrate relationship are observed: disruption of the LOG2 gene increased the in vivo half-life of GDU1, mass spectrometry confirmed that LOG2 ubiquitinates GDU1 at cytosolic lysines, and GDU1 protein levels decreased upon co-expression with active, but not enzymatically inactive LOG2. Altogether these data indicate LOG2 negatively regulates GDU1 protein accumulation by a mechanism dependent upon cytosolic GDU1 lysines. Although GDU1-lysine substituted protein exhibited diminished in vivo ubiquitination, overexpression of GDU1 lysine mutants still conferred amino acid tolerance in a LOG2-dependent manner, consistent with GDU1 being both a substrate and facilitator of LOG2 function. From these data, we offer a model in which GDU1 activates LOG2 to stimulate amino acid export, a process that could be negatively regulated by GDU1 ubiquitination and LOG2 self-ubiquitination.

  5. The HERC2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for embryonic development and regulates motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Hadjebi, Ouadah; Pedrazza, Leonardo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Langa, Francina; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Duran, Joan; de Anta, Josep Maria; Alcántara, Soledad; Ruiz, Rocio; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Aguilar-Montilla, Francisco J; Carrión, Ángel M; Armengol, Jose Angel; Baple, Emma; Crosby, Andrew H; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-08-30

    A mutation in the HERC2 gene has been linked to a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to the Angelman syndrome. This gene codifies a protein with ubiquitin ligase activity that regulates the activity of tumor protein p53 and is involved in important cellular processes such as DNA repair, cell cycle, cancer, and iron metabolism. Despite the critical role of HERC2 in these physiological and pathological processes, little is known about its relevance in vivo. Here, we described a mouse with targeted inactivation of the Herc2 gene. Homozygous mice were not viable. Distinct from other ubiquitin ligases that interact with p53, such as MDM2 or MDM4, p53 depletion did not rescue the lethality of homozygous mice. The HERC2 protein levels were reduced by approximately one-half in heterozygous mice. Consequently, HERC2 activities, including ubiquitin ligase and stimulation of p53 activity, were lower in heterozygous mice. A decrease in HERC2 activities was also observed in human skin fibroblasts from individuals with an Angelman-like syndrome that express an unstable mutant protein of HERC2. Behavioural analysis of heterozygous mice identified an impaired motor synchronization with normal neuromuscular function. This effect was not observed in p53 knockout mice, indicating that a mechanism independent of p53 activity is involved. Morphological analysis showed the presence of HERC2 in Purkinje cells and a specific loss of these neurons in the cerebella of heterozygous mice. In these animals, an increase of autophagosomes and lysosomes was observed. Our findings establish a crucial role of HERC2 in embryonic development and motor coordination.

  6. The HERC2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for embryonic development and regulates motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Hadjebi, Ouadah; Pedrazza, Leonardo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Langa, Francina; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Duran, Joan; de Anta, Josep Maria; Alcántara, Soledad; Ruiz, Rocio; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Aguilar, Francisco J.; Carrión, Ángel M.; Armengol, Jose Angel; Baple, Emma; Crosby, Andrew H.; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    A mutation in the HERC2 gene has been linked to a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to the Angelman syndrome. This gene codifies a protein with ubiquitin ligase activity that regulates the activity of tumor protein p53 and is involved in important cellular processes such as DNA repair, cell cycle, cancer, and iron metabolism. Despite the critical role of HERC2 in these physiological and pathological processes, little is known about its relevance in vivo. Here, we described a mouse with targeted inactivation of the Herc2 gene. Homozygous mice were not viable. Distinct from other ubiquitin ligases that interact with p53, such as MDM2 or MDM4, p53 depletion did not rescue the lethality of homozygous mice. The HERC2 protein levels were reduced by approximately one-half in heterozygous mice. Consequently, HERC2 activities, including ubiquitin ligase and stimulation of p53 activity, were lower in heterozygous mice. A decrease in HERC2 activities was also observed in human skin fibroblasts from individuals with an Angelman-like syndrome that express an unstable mutant protein of HERC2. Behavioural analysis of heterozygous mice identified an impaired motor synchronization with normal neuromuscular function. This effect was not observed in p53 knockout mice, indicating that a mechanism independent of p53 activity is involved. Morphological analysis showed the presence of HERC2 in Purkinje cells and a specific loss of these neurons in the cerebella of heterozygous mice. In these animals, an increase of autophagosomes and lysosomes was observed. Our findings establish a crucial role of HERC2 in embryonic development and motor coordination. PMID:27528230

  7. Testosterone represses ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and Murf-1 expression in an androgen-sensitive rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Maragno, Ana Leticia G C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Gomes, Marcelo D; Godinho, Rosely O

    2010-02-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by denervation and metabolic diseases has been associated with increased ubiquitin ligase expression. In the present study, we evaluate the influence of androgens on muscle ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1/MAFbx/FBXO32 and Murf-1/Trim63 expression and its correlation with maintenance of muscle mass by using the testosterone-dependent fast-twitch levator ani muscle (LA) from normal or castrated adult male Wistar rats. Gene expression was determined by qRT-PCR and/or immunoblotting. Castration induced progressive loss of LA mass (30% of control, 90 days) and an exponential decrease of LA cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio (nuclear domain; 22% of control after 60 days). Testosterone deprivation induced a 31-fold increase in LA atrogin-1 mRNA and an 18-fold increase in Murf-1 mRNA detected after 2 and 7 days of castration, respectively. Acute (24 h) testosterone administration fully repressed atrogin-1 and Murf-1 mRNA expression to control levels. Atrogin-1 protein was also increased by castration up to 170% after 30 days. Testosterone administration for 7 days restored atrogin-1 protein to control levels. In addition to the well known stimulus of protein synthesis, our results show that testosterone maintains muscle mass by repressing ubiquitin ligases, indicating that inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic system is critical for trophic action of androgens in skeletal muscle. Besides, since neither castration nor androgen treatment had any effect on weight or ubiquitin ligases mRNA levels of extensor digitorum longus muscle, a fast-twitch muscle with low androgen sensitivity, our study shows that perineal muscle LA is a suitable in vivo model to evaluate regulation of muscle proteolysis, closely resembling human muscle responsiveness to androgens.

  8. Ubiquitin Ligase NEDD4 Regulates PPARγ Stability and Adipocyte Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing Jing; Wang, Ruishan; Lama, Rati; Wang, Xinjiang; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth; Park, Edwards A.; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor which controls lipid and glucose metabolism. It is also the master regulator of adipogenesis. In adipocytes, ligand-dependent PPARγ activation is associated with proteasomal degradation; therefore, regulation of PPARγ degradation may modulate its transcriptional activity. Here, we show that neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (NEDD4), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, interacts with the hinge and ligand binding domains of PPARγ and is a bona fide E3 ligase for PPARγ. NEDD4 increases PPARγ stability through the inhibition of its proteasomal degradation. Knockdown of NEDD4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes reduces PPARγ protein levels and suppresses adipocyte conversion. PPARγ correlates positively with NEDD4 in obese adipose tissue. Together, these findings support NEDD4 as a novel regulator of adipogenesis by modulating the stability of PPARγ. PMID:27917940

  9. Splint ligation of RNA with T4 DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Christopher J.; O’Keefe, Raymond T.

    2014-01-01

    Splint ligation of RNA, whereby specific RNA molecules are ligated together, can be carried out using T4 DNA ligase and a bridging DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the RNAs. This method takes advantage of the property of T4 DNA ligase to join RNA molecules when they are in an RNA:DNA hybrid. Splint ligation is a useful tool for the introduction of modified nucleotides into RNA molecules, insertion of a radiolabel into a specific position within an RNA and for the assembly of smaller synthetic RNAs into longer RNA molecules. Such modifications enable a wide range of experiments to be carried out with the modified RNA including structural studies, co-immunoprecipitations, and the ability to map sites of RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions. PMID:23065567

  10. Systematic approaches to identify E3 ligase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Iconomou, Mary; Saunders, Darren N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is a widespread post-translational modification, regulating cellular signalling with many outcomes, such as protein degradation, endocytosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair and transcription. E3 ligases are a critical component of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), determining the substrate specificity of the cascade by the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins. Currently, there are over 600 putative E3 ligases, but many are poorly characterized, particularly with respect to individual protein substrates. Here, we highlight systematic approaches to identify and validate UPS targets and discuss how they are underpinning rapid advances in our understanding of the biochemistry and biology of the UPS. The integration of novel tools, model systems and methods for target identification is driving significant interest in drug development, targeting various aspects of UPS function and advancing the understanding of a diverse range of disease processes. PMID:27834739

  11. TRIM proteins as RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite motif(TRIM) proteins harboring the RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil (RBCC) domain motifs form a large protein family. The members of this family are involved in various biological processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis and transcription and also in diseases and oncogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that TRIM proteins play key roles in innate antiviral immunity. An accumulating body of evidence has demonstrated that some TRIM proteins function as E3 ubiquitin ligases in specific ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathways; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully elucidated. In this chapter, we focus on the TRIM family of proteins specially with regard to E3 ligase.

  12. Regulation of neddylation and deneddylation of cullin1 in SCFSkp2 ubiquitin ligase by F-box protein and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Gil; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2006-01-01

    The activity of cullin-containing ubiquitin protein ligase complexes is stimulated by linkage to cullin of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 (“neddylation”). Neddylation is inhibited by the tight binding of cullins to CAND1 (cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1) protein, and Nedd8 is removed from cullins by specific isopeptidase activity of the COP9/signalosome (CSN) complex. The mechanisms that regulate neddylation and deneddylation of cullins were unknown. We examined this problem for the case of SCFSkp2, a cullin1 (Cul1)-containing ubiquitin ligase complex that contains the S phase-associated protein Skp2 as the substrate-binding F-box protein subunit. SCFSkp2 targets for degradation the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p27 in the G1-to-S phase transition, a process that requires its phosphorylation and binding to cdk2-cyclin E. Because levels of Skp2, cyclin E, and the accessory protein Cks1 (cyclin kinase subunit 1) all rise at the end of G1 phase, it seemed possible that the neddylation of Cul1 in SCFSkp2 is regulated by the availability of the F-box protein and/or the substrate. We found that the supplementation of Skp2–Skp1 and substrate (along with further components necessary for substrate presentation to the ubiquitin ligase) to extracts of HeLa cells synergistically increased levels of neddylated Cul1. Skp2–Skp1 abrogates the inhibitory influence of CAND1 on the neddylation of Cul1 by promoting the dissociation of the cullin–CAND1 complex, whereas substrate, together with substrate-presenting components, prevents the action of CSN to deneddylate cullin. We propose a sequence of events in which the increased availability of Skp2 and substrate in the transition of cells to S phase promotes the neddylation and assembly of the SCFSkp2 ubiquitin ligase complex. PMID:16861300

  13. Signaling-mediated control of ubiquitin ligases in endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Polo, Simona

    2012-03-15

    Ubiquitin-dependent regulation of endocytosis plays an important part in the control of signal transduction, and a critical issue in the understanding of signal transduction therefore relates to regulation of ubiquitination in the endocytic pathway. We discuss here what is known of the mechanisms by which signaling controls the activity of the ubiquitin ligases that specifically recognize the targets of ubiquitination on the endocytic pathway, and suggest alternative mechanisms that deserve experimental investigation.

  14. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  15. Inhibiting Mitochondrial DNA Ligase IIIα Activates Caspase 1-Dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Roginskaya, Vera; Van Houten, Bennett; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-09-15

    Elevated levels of DNA ligase IIIα (LigIIIα) have been identified as a biomarker of an alteration in DNA repair in cancer cells that confers hypersensitivity to a LigIIIα inhibitor, L67, in combination with a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Because LigIIIα functions in the nucleus and mitochondria, we examined the effect of L67 on these organelles. Here, we show that, although the DNA ligase inhibitor selectively targets mitochondria, cancer and nonmalignant cells respond differently to disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα in cancer cells resulted in abnormal mitochondrial morphology, reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA, and increased levels of mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species that caused nuclear DNA damage. In contrast, these effects did not occur in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα activated a caspase 1-dependent apoptotic pathway, which is known to be part of inflammatory responses induced by pathogenic microorganisms in cancer, but not nonmalignant cells. These results demonstrate that the disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism elicits different responses in nonmalignant and cancer cells and suggests that the abnormal response in cancer cells may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5431-41. ©2016 AACR.

  16. High sensitivity EndoV mutation scanning through real-time ligase proofreading.

    PubMed

    Pincas, Hanna; Pingle, Maneesh R; Huang, Jianmin; Lao, Kaiqin; Paty, Philip B; Friedman, Alan M; Barany, Francis

    2004-10-28

    The ability to associate mutations in cancer genes with the disease and its subtypes is critical for understanding oncogenesis and identifying biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. A two-step mutation scanning method that sequentially used endonuclease V (EndoV) to nick at mismatches and DNA ligase to reseal incorrectly or nonspecifically nicked sites was previously developed in our laboratory. Herein we report an optimized single-step assay that enables ligase to proofread EndoV cleavage in real-time under a compromise between buffer conditions. Real-time proofreading results in a dramatic reduction of background cleavage. A universal PCR strategy that employs both unlabeled gene-specific primers and labeled universal primers, allows for multiplexed gene amplification and precludes amplification of primer dimers. Internally labeled PCR primers eliminate EndoV cleavage at the 5' terminus, enabling high-throughput capillary electrophoresis readout. Furthermore, signal intensity is increased and artifacts are reduced by generating heteroduplexes containing only one of the two possible mismatches (e.g. either A/C or G/T). The single-step assay improves sensitivity to 1:50 and 1:100 (mutant:wild type) for unknown mutations in the p53 and K-ras genes, respectively, opening prospects as an early detection tool.

  17. Deficiency in ubiquitin ligase TRIM2 causes accumulation of neurofilament light chain and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balastik, Martin; Ferraguti, Francesco; Pires-da Silva, André; Lee, Tae Ho; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Lu, Kun Ping; Gruss, Peter

    2008-01-01

    TRIM RING finger proteins have been shown to play an important role in cancerogenesis, in the pathogenesis of some human hereditary disorders, and in the defense against viral infection, but the function of the majority of TRIM proteins remains unknown. Here, we show that TRIM RING finger protein TRIM2, highly expressed in the nervous system, is an UbcH5a-dependent ubiquitin ligase. We further demonstrate that TRIM2 binds to neurofilament light subunit (NF-L) and regulates NF-L ubiquitination. Additionally, we show that mice deficient in TRIM2 have increased NF-L level in axons and NF-L-filled axonal swellings in cerebellum, retina, spinal cord, and cerebral cortex. The axonopathy is followed by progressive neurodegeneration accompanied by juvenile-onset tremor and ataxia. Our results demonstrate that TRIM2 is an ubiquitin ligase and point to a mechanism regulating NF-L metabolism through an ubiquitination pathway that, if deregulated, triggers neurodegeneration. PMID:18687884

  18. Protein-protein interactions involved in the recognition of p27 by E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kui; Belunis, Charles; Chu, Wei; Weber, David; Podlaski, Frank; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Reed, Steven I; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2003-01-01

    The p27(Kip1) protein is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, the level of which is decreased in many common human cancers as a result of enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation. The multiprotein complex SCF(Skp2) has been identified as the ubiquitin ligase that targets p27, but the functional interactions within this complex are not well understood. One component, the F-box protein Skp2, binds p27 when the latter is phosphorylated on Thr(187), thus providing substrate specificity for the ligase. Recently, we and others have shown that the small cell cycle regulatory protein Cks1 plays a critical role in p27 ubiquitination by increasing the binding affinity of Skp2 for p27. Here we report the development of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay that allows the quantification of the molecular interactions between human recombinant Skp2, Cks1 and a p27-derived peptide phosphorylated on Thr(187). Using this assay, we have determined the dissociation constant of the Skp2-Cks1 complex (K(d) 140 +/- 14 nM) and have shown that Skp2 binds phosphorylated p27 peptide with high affinity only in the presence of Cks1 (K(d) 37 +/- 2 nM). Cks1 does not bind directly to the p27 phosphopeptide or to Skp1, which confirms its suggested role as an allosteric effector of Skp2. PMID:12529174

  19. The Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 Regulates Obesity-induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Gail; Carter, Lauren E.; Newman, Susan; Burk, David H.; Manuel, Justin; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic, low-grade adipose tissue inflammation associated with adipocyte hypertrophy is an important link in the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance. Although ubiquitin ligases regulate inflammatory processes, the role of these enzymes in metabolically driven adipose tissue inflammation is relatively unexplored. Herein, we examined the effect of the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 on obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation. Methods Wild-type and Siah2KO mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 16 weeks. Indirect calorimetry, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance were assayed along with glucose and insulin levels. Gene and protein expression, immunohistochemistry, adipocyte size distribution and lipolysis were also analyzed. Results Enlarged adipocytes in obese Siah2KO mice are not associated with obesity-induced insulin resistance. Proinflammatory gene expression, stress kinase signaling, fibrosis and crown-like structures are reduced in the Siah2KO adipose tissue and Siah2KO adipocytes are more responsive to insulin-dependent inhibition of lipolysis. Loss of Siah2 increases expression of PPARγ target genes involved in lipid metabolism and decreases expression of proinflammatory adipokines regulated by PPARγ. Conclusions Siah2 links adipocyte hypertrophy with adipocyte dysfunction and recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells to adipose tissue. Selective regulation of PPARγ activity is a Siah2-mediated mechanism contributing to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:26380945

  20. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    PubMed

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments.

  1. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains and that thalidomide blocks the formation of CRBN-ubiquitin conjugates. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitinated CRBN is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines such as MM1.S, OPM2, and U266 with thalidomide (100 μM) and its structural analog lenalidomide (10 μM) results in stabilization of CRBN and elevation of CRBN protein levels. This in turn leads to the reduced level of CRBN target proteins and enhances the sensitivity of human multiple myeloma cells to IMiDs. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which thalidomide and its analogs modulate the CRBN function in cells. Through inhibition of CRBN ubiquitination, thalidomide and its analogs allow CRBN to accumulate, leading to the increased cullin-4 RING E3 ligase-mediated degradation of target proteins.

  2. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4−/− cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ. PMID:26787905

  3. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  4. The multidrug resistance pump ABCB1 is a substrate for the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-1

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Begum G.; Zolnerciks, Joseph K.; Ritchie, Tasha K.; Bauer, Bjoern; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Sullivan, James A.; Linton, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP Binding Cassette transporter ABCB1 can export the neurotoxic peptide β-amyloid from endothelial cells that line the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This has the potential to lower cerebral levels of β-amyloid, but ABCB1 expression in the BBB appears to be progressively reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The surface density of many membrane proteins is regulated by ubiquitination catalysed by ubiquitin E3 ligases. In brain capillaries of mice challenged with β-amyloid ex vivo, we show that the level of the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 increases concomitant with reduction in Abcb1. In vitro we show that human ABCB1 is a substrate for human NEDD4-1 ligase. Recombinant ABCB1 was purified from Sf21 insect cells and incubated with recombinant NEDD4-1 purified from E. coli. The treated ABCB1 had reduced mobility on SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry identified eight lysine residues, K271, K272, K575, K685, K877, K885, K887 and K1062 that were ubiquitinated by NEDD4-1. Molecular modelling showed that all of the residues are exposed on the surface of the intracellular domains of ABCB1. K877, K885 and K887 in particular, are located in the intracellular loop of transmembrane helix 10 (TMH10) in close proximity, in the tertiary fold, to a putative NEDD4-1 binding site in the intracellular helix extending from TMH12 (PxY motif, residues 996-998). Transient expression of NEDD4-1 in HEK293 Flp-In cells stably expressing ABCB1 was shown to reduce the surface density of the transporter. Together, the data identify this ubiquitin ligase as a potential target for intervention in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26006083

  5. Itch WW Domains Inhibit Its E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity by Blocking E2-E3 Ligase Trans-thiolation.

    PubMed

    Riling, Christopher; Kamadurai, Hari; Kumar, Suresh; O'Leary, Claire E; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Manion, Erica E; Ying, Mingjie; Schulman, Brenda A; Oliver, Paula M

    2015-09-25

    Nedd4-family E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate an array of biologic processes. Autoinhibition maintains these catalytic ligases in an inactive state through several mechanisms. However, although some Nedd4 family members are activated by binding to Nedd4 family-interacting proteins (Ndfips), how binding activates E3 function remains unclear. Our data reveal how these two regulatory processes are linked functionally. In the absence of Ndfip1, the Nedd4 family member Itch can bind an E2 but cannot accept ubiquitin onto its catalytic cysteine. This is because Itch is autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxy terminus domain) and two central WW domains. Ndfip1 binds these WW domains to release the HECT, allowing trans-thiolation and Itch catalytic activity. This molecular switch also regulates the closely related family member WWP2. Importantly, multiple PY motifs are required for Ndfip1 to activate Itch, functionally distinguishing Ndfips from single PY-containing substrates. These data establish a novel mechanism for control of the function of a subfamily of Nedd4 E3 ligases at the level of E2-E3 trans-thiolation.

  6. Successful Conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II Biotin Protein Ligase into a Group I Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Sarah K.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that allows transcriptional regulation of biotin biosynthetic and transport genes whereas Group I BPLs lack this N-terminal domain. The Bacillus subtilis BPL, BirA, is classified as a Group II BPL based on sequence predictions of an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif and mutational alteration of its regulatory properties. We report evidence that B. subtilis BirA is a Group II BPL that regulates transcription at three genomic sites: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function. This is the first example of successful conversion of a Group II BPL to a Group I BPL with retention of full ligase activity. PMID:24816803

  7. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and isoperoxidase expression in Zinnia mesophyll cells induced to differentiate into tracheary elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, D. L.; Galston, A. W.

    1988-01-01

    When cultured in inductive medium containing adequate auxin and cytokinin, isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate into tracheary elements with lignified secondary wall thickenings. Differentiation does not occur when cells are cultured in control medium, which has reduced levels of auxin and/or cytokinin. The activities of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and peroxidase, were examined. An induction-specific cationic isoperoxidase, visualized by low pH polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, is detectable in soluble and wall fractions of cultured Zinnia cells long before tracheary elements visibly differentiate and is thus an early marker of differentiation. Compounds (such as antiauxins, anticytokinins, and tunicamycin) that inhibit or delay differentiation alter the expression of this isoperoxidase. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase activity increases dramatically only as cells differentiate. Together, these results suggest that the onset of lignification in differentiating Zinnia cells might be controlled by the availability of precursors synthesized by way of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. These precursors would then be polymerized into lignin in the cell wall by the induction-specific isoperoxidase.

  8. RCAD/Ufl1, a Ufm1 E3 ligase, is essential for hematopoietic stem cell function and murine hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M; Zhu, X; Zhang, Y; Cai, Y; Chen, J; Sivaprakasam, S; Gurav, A; Pi, W; Makala, L; Wu, J; Pace, B; Tuan-Lo, D; Ganapathy, V; Singh, N; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    The Ufm1 conjugation system is a novel ubiquitin-like modification system, consisting of Ufm1, Uba5 (E1), Ufc1 (E2) and poorly characterized E3 ligase(s). RCAD/Ufl1 (also known as KIAA0776, NLBP and Maxer) was reported to function as a Ufm1 E3 ligase in ufmylation (Ufm1-mediated conjugation) of DDRGK1 and ASC1 proteins. It has also been implicated in estrogen receptor signaling, unfolded protein response (UPR) and neurodegeneration, yet its physiological function remains completely unknown. In this study, we report that RCAD/Ufl1 is essential for embryonic development, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) survival and erythroid differentiation. Both germ-line and somatic deletion of RCAD/Ufl1 impaired hematopoietic development, resulting in severe anemia, cytopenia and ultimately animal death. Depletion of RCAD/Ufl1 caused elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress and evoked UPR in bone marrow cells. In addition, loss of RCAD/Ufl1 blocked autophagic degradation, increased mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species, and led to DNA damage response, p53 activation and enhanced cell death of HSCs. Collectively, our study provides the first genetic evidence for the indispensable role of RCAD/Ufl1 in murine hematopoiesis and development. The finding of RCAD/Ufl1 as a key regulator of cellular stress response sheds a light into the role of a novel protein network including RCAD/Ufl1 and its associated proteins in regulating cellular homeostasis. PMID:25952549

  9. Mitochondrial DNA ligase is dispensable for the viability of cultured cells but essential for mtDNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Fayzulin, Rafik Z; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2013-09-13

    Multiple lines of evidence support the notion that DNA ligase III (LIG3), the only DNA ligase found in mitochondria, is essential for viability in both whole organisms and in cultured cells. Previous attempts to generate cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA ligase failed. Here, we report, for the first time, the derivation of viable LIG3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These cells lack mtDNA and are auxotrophic for uridine and pyruvate, which may explain the apparent lethality of the Lig3 knock-out observed in cultured cells in previous studies. Cells with severely reduced expression of LIG3 maintain normal mtDNA copy number and respiration but show reduced viability in the face of alkylating and oxidative damage, increased mtDNA degradation in response to oxidative damage, and slow recovery from mtDNA depletion. Our findings clarify the cellular role of LIG3 and establish that the loss of viability in LIG3-deficient cells is conditional and secondary to the ρ(0) phenotype.

  10. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 'preferentially' promotes TLR-mediated production of type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Chen, Taoyong; Zhang, Jia; Yang, Mingjin; Li, Nan; Xu, Xiongfei; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. Here we report that Nrdp1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines but increased interferon-beta production in Toll-like receptor-triggered macrophages by suppressing adaptor MyD88-dependent activation of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 while promoting activation of the kinase TBK1 and transcription factor IRF3. Nrdp1 directly bound and polyubiquitinated MyD88 and TBK1, which led to degradation of MyD88 and activation of TBK1. Knockdown of Nrdp1 inhibited the degradation of MyD88 and the activation of TBK1 and IRF3. Nrdp1-transgenic mice showed resistance to lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock and to infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our data suggest that Nrdp1 functions as both an adaptor protein and an E3 unbiquitin ligase to regulate TLR responses in different ways.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Ligase Is Dispensable for the Viability of Cultured Cells but Essential for mtDNA Maintenance*

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the notion that DNA ligase III (LIG3), the only DNA ligase found in mitochondria, is essential for viability in both whole organisms and in cultured cells. Previous attempts to generate cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA ligase failed. Here, we report, for the first time, the derivation of viable LIG3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These cells lack mtDNA and are auxotrophic for uridine and pyruvate, which may explain the apparent lethality of the Lig3 knock-out observed in cultured cells in previous studies. Cells with severely reduced expression of LIG3 maintain normal mtDNA copy number and respiration but show reduced viability in the face of alkylating and oxidative damage, increased mtDNA degradation in response to oxidative damage, and slow recovery from mtDNA depletion. Our findings clarify the cellular role of LIG3 and establish that the loss of viability in LIG3-deficient cells is conditional and secondary to the ρ0 phenotype. PMID:23884459

  12. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  13. Heterogeneity of mammalian DNA ligase detected on activity and DNA sequencing gels.

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A; Politi, N; Bertazzoni, U

    1984-01-01

    A new method to detect DNA ligase activity in situ after NaDodSO4 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has been developed. After renaturation of active polypeptides the ligase reaction occurs in situ by incubating the intact gel in the presence of Mg++ and ATP. Further treatment with alkaline phosphatase removes the unligated 5'-32P-end of oligo (dT) used as a substrate and active polypeptides having ligase activity are identified by autoradiography. Analysis on DNA sequencing gels of the oligo (dT) reaction products present in the activity bands ensures that the radioactive material detected in activity gels or in standard in vitro ligase assays corresponds unambiguously to a ligase activity. Using these methods, we have analysed the purified phage T4 DNA ligase, and the activities present in crude extracts and in purified fractions from monkey kidney (CV1-P) cells. The purified T4 enzyme yields one or two active peptides with Mr values of 60,000 and 70,000. Crude extracts from CV1-P cells contain several polypeptides having DNA ligase activity. Partial purification of these extracts shows that DNA ligase I isolated from hydroxylapatite column is enriched in polypeptides with Mr 200,000, 150,000 and 120,000, while DNA ligase II is enriched in those with Mr 60,000 and 70,000. Images PMID:6377238

  14. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    PubMed

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  15. Human DNA Ligase I Interacts with and Is Targeted for Degradation by the DCAF7 Specificity Factor of the Cul4-DDB1 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhimin; Liao, Zhongping; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Yang, Austin; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-10-14

    The synthesis, processing, and joining of Okazaki fragments during DNA replication is complex, requiring the sequential action of a large number of proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, interacts with and coordinates the activity of several DNA replication proteins, including the enzymes flap endonuclease 1 (FEN-1) and DNA ligase I that complete the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments, respectively. Although it is evident that maintaining the appropriate relative stoichiometry of FEN-1 and DNA ligase I, which compete for binding to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, is critical to prevent genomic instability, little is known about how the steady state levels of DNA replication proteins are regulated, in particular the proteolytic mechanisms involved in their turnover. Because DNA ligase I has been reported to be ubiquitylated, we used a proteomic approach to map ubiquitylation sites and screen for DNA ligase I-associated E3 ubiquitin ligases. We identified three ubiquitylated lysine residues and showed that DNA ligase I interacts with and is targeted for ubiquitylation by DCAF7, a specificity factor for the Cul4-DDB1 complex. Notably, knockdown of DCAF7 reduced the degradation of DNA ligase I in response to inhibition of proliferation and replacement of ubiquitylated lysine residues reduced the in vitro ubiquitylation of DNA ligase I by Cul4-DDB1 and DCAF7. In contrast, a different E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates FEN-1 turnover. Thus, although the expression of many of the genes encoding DNA replication proteins is coordinately regulated, our studies reveal that different mechanisms are involved in the turnover of these proteins.

  16. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligases, HUWE1 and NEDD4-1, Are Involved in the Post-translational Regulation of the ABCG1 and ABCG4 Lipid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Aleidi, Shereen M.; Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J.; Yang, Alryel; Rao, Geetha; Brown, Andrew J.; Gelissen, Ingrid C.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 has an essential role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, and dysregulation has been associated with a number of high burden diseases. Previous studies reported that ABCG1 is ubiquitinated and degraded via the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, so far the molecular mechanism, including the identity of any of the rate-limiting ubiquitination enzymes, or E3 ligases, is unknown. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we identified two HECT domain E3 ligases associated with ABCG1, named HUWE1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase) and NEDD4-1 (Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally down regulated gene 4), of which the latter is the founding member of the NEDD4 family of ubiquitin ligases. Silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing human ABCG1 significantly increased levels of the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric protein forms, however ABCA1 protein expression was unaffected. In addition, ligase silencing increased ABCG1-mediated cholesterol export to HDL in cells overexpressing the transporter as well as in THP-1 macrophages. Reciprocally, overexpression of both ligases resulted in a significant reduction in protein levels of both the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric forms. Like ABCG1, ABCG4 protein levels and cholesterol export activity were significantly increased after silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing this closely related ABC half-transporter. In summary, we have identified for the first time two E3 ligases that are fundamental enzymes in the post-translational regulation of ABCG1 and ABCG4 protein levels and cellular cholesterol export activity. PMID:26296893

  17. Unique ligation properties of eukaryotic NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Tong, Jie; Feng, Hong; Huang, Jianmin; Afonso, Claudio L; Rock, Dan L; Barany, Francis; Cao, Weiguo

    2004-09-01

    The eukaryotic Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus (MsEPV) genome reveals a homologous sequence to eubacterial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent DNA ligases [J. Virol. 73 (1999) 533]. This 522-amino acid open reading frame (ORF) contains all conserved nucleotidyl transferase motifs but lacks the zinc finger motif and BRCT domain found in conventional eubacterial NAD(+) ligases. Nevertheless, cloned MsEPV ligase seals DNA nicks in a NAD(+)-dependent fashion, while adenosine 5'-monophosphate (ATP) cannot serve as an adenylation cofactor. The ligation activity of MsEPV ligase requires Mg(2+) or Mn(2+). MsEPV ligase seals sticky ends efficiently, but has little activity on 1-nucleotide gap or blunt-ended DNA substrates even in the presence of polyethylene glycol. In comparison, bacterial NAD(+)-dependent ligases seal blunt-ended DNA substrates in the presence of polyethylene glycol. MsEPV DNA ligase readily joins DNA nicks with mismatches at either side of the nick junction, except for mismatches at the nick junction containing an A base in the template strand (A/A, G/A, and C/A). MsEPV NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase can join DNA probes on RNA templates, a unique property that distinguishes this enzyme from other conventional bacterial NAD(+) DNA ligases. T4 ATP-dependent DNA ligase shows no detectable mismatch ligation at the 3' side of the nick but substantial 5' T/G mismatch ligation on an RNA template. In contrast, MsEPV ligase joins mismatches at the 3' side of the nick more frequently than at the 5' side of the nick on an RNA template. The complementary specificities of these two enzymes suggest alternative primer design for genomic profiling approaches that use allele-specific detection directly from RNA transcripts.

  18. Cofactor binding modulates the conformational stabilities and unfolding patterns of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Thermus scotoductus.

    PubMed

    Georlette, Daphné; Blaise, Vinciane; Dohmen, Christophe; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Damien, Benjamin; Depiereux, Eric; Gerday, Charles; Uversky, Vladimir N; Feller, Georges

    2003-12-12

    DNA ligases are important enzymes required for cellular processes such as DNA replication, recombination, and repair. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases are essentially restricted to eubacteria, thus constituting an attractive target in the development of novel antibiotics. Although such a project might involve the systematic testing of a vast number of chemical compounds, it can essentially gain from the preliminary deciphering of the conformational stability and structural perturbations associated with the formation of the catalytically active adenylated enzyme. We have, therefore, investigated the adenylation-induced conformational changes in the mesophilic Escherichia coli and thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD(+)-DNA ligases, and the resistance of these enzymes to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results clearly demonstrate that anchoring of the cofactor induces a conformational rearrangement within the active site of both mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes accompanied by their partial compaction. Furthermore, the adenylation of enzymes increases their resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, establishing a thermodynamic link between cofactor binding and conformational stability enhancement. Finally, guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases is shown to be a complex process that involves accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and its precursor.

  19. Cullin-RING Ligases as Attractive Anti-cancer Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) promotes the timely degradation of short-lived proteins with key regulatory roles in a vast array of biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, oncogenesis and genome integrity. Thus, abnormal regulation of UPS disrupts the protein homeostasis and causes many human diseases, particularly cancer. Indeed, the FDA approval of bortezomib, the first class of general proteasome inhibitor, for the treatment of multiple myeloma, demonstrated that the UPS can be an attractive anti-cancer target. However, normal cell toxicity associated with bortezomib, resulting from global inhibition of protein degradation, promotes the focus of drug discovery efforts on targeting enzymes upstream of the proteasome for better specificity. E3 ubiquitin ligases, particularly those known to be activated in human cancer, become an attractive choice. Cullin-RING Ligases (CRLs) with multiple components are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and are responsible for ubiquitination of ~20% of cellular proteins degraded through UPS. Activity of CRLs is dynamically regulated and requires the RING component and cullin neddylation. In this review, we will introduce the UPS and CRL E3s and discuss the biological processes regulated by each of eight CRLs through substrate degradation. We will further discuss how cullin neddylation controls CRL activity, and how CRLs are being validated as the attractive cancer targets by abrogating the RING component through genetic means and by inhibiting cullin neddylation via MLN4924, a small molecule indirect inhibitor of CRLs, currently in several Phase I clinical trials. Finally, we will discuss current efforts and future perspectives on the development of additional inhibitors of CRLs by targeting E2 and/or E3 of cullin neddylation and CRL-mediated ubiquitination as potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:23151137

  20. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase affects chemosensory behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julia; Jennings, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of fundamental aspects of neurobiological function has been linked to the ubiquitin signaling system (USS), which regulates the degradation and activity of proteins and is catalyzed by E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls diverse developmental and signaling processes in post-mitotic neurons; however, potential roles for the APC in sensory function have yet to be explored. In this study, we examined the effect of the APC ubiquitin ligase on chemosensation in Caenorhabditis elegans by testing chemotaxis to the volatile odorants, diacetyl, pyrazine, and isoamyl alcohol, to which wild-type worms are attracted. Animals with loss of function mutations in either of two alleles (g48 and ye143) of the gene encoding the APC subunit EMB-27 APC6 showed increased chemotaxis towards diacetyl and pyrazine, odorants sensed by AWA neurons, but exhibited normal chemotaxis to isoamyl alcohol, which is sensed by AWC neurons. The statistically significant increase in chemotaxis in the emb-27 APC6 mutants suggests that the APC inhibits AWA-mediated chemosensation in C. elegans. Increased chemotaxis to pyrazine was also seen with mutants lacking another essential APC subunit, MAT-2 APC1; however, mat-2 APC1 mutants exhibited wild type responses to diacetyl. The difference in responsiveness of these two APC subunit mutants may be due to differential strength of these hypomorphic alleles or may indicate the presence of functional sub-complexes of the APC at work in this process. These findings are the first evidence for APC-mediated regulation of chemosensation and lay the groundwork for further studies aimed at identifying the expression levels, function, and targets of the APC in specific sensory neurons. Because of the similarity between human and C. elegans nervous systems, the role of the APC in sensory neurons may also advance our understanding of human sensory function and disease. PMID

  1. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  2. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. Influence of polyethylene glycol on the ligation reaction with calf thymus DNA ligases I and II.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, H; Tsukada, K

    1987-01-01

    High concentrations of the nonspecific macromolecule polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) enabled DNA ligases I and II from calf thymus to catalyze intermolecular blunt-end ligation of duplex DNA. Intermolecular cohesive-end ligation with these enzymes was markedly stimulated in the presence of 10-16% (w/v) PEG 6000. The effect of PEG 6000 (4-16%) on the sealing of single-stranded breaks in duplex DNA with DNA ligases I and II was not appreciably stimulatory but rather inhibitory. PEG 6000 (15%) enhanced more twofold the rate of DNA ligase II-AMP complex formation, but moderately suppressed the rate of formation of DNA ligase 1-AMP complex. Polyamines and KCl inhibited blunt-end and cohesive-end ligations with DNA ligases I and II in the presence of PEG 6000.

  4. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  5. Signal-induced disassembly of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex by Cdc48/p97

    PubMed Central

    Yen, James L.; Flick, Karin; Papagiannis, Christie V.; Mathur, Radhika; Tyrrell, An; Ouni, Ikram; Kaake, Robyn M.; Huang, Lan; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary A large group of E3 ubiquitin ligases is formed by the multisubunit SCF complex, whose core complex (Rbx1/Cul1-Cdc53/Skp1) binds one of many substrate recruiting F-box proteins to form an array of SCF ligases with diverse substrate specificities. It has long been thought that ubiquitylation by SCF ligases is regulated at the level of substrate binding. Here we describe an alternative mechanism of SCF regulation by active dissociation of the F-box subunit. We show that cadmium stress induces selective recruitment of the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97 to catalyze dissociation of the F-box subunit from the yeast SCFMet30 ligase to block substrate ubiquitylation and trigger downstream events. Our results not only provide an additional layer of ubiquitin ligase regulation but also suggest that targeted, signal-dependent dissociation of multisubunit enzyme complexes is an important mechanism in control of enzyme function. PMID:23000173

  6. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures. PMID:26508902

  7. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2016-12-14

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination.

  8. Selective multifaceted E3 ubiquitin ligases barricade extreme defense: Potential therapeutic targets for neurodegeneration and ageing.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Chhangani, Deepak; Mishra, Ribhav; Mishra, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and regular performance of Ubiquitin Proteasome System and Autophagy continuously eliminate deleterious accumulation of nonnative protiens. In cellular quality control system, E3 ubiquitin ligases are significant employees for defense mechanism against abnormal toxic proteins. Few findings indicate that lack of functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases can be a causative factor of neurodevelopmental disorders, neurodegeneration, cancer and ageing. However, the detailed molecular pathomechanism implying E3 ubiquitin ligases in cellular functions in multifactorial disease conditions are not well understood. This article systematically represents the unique characteristics, molecular nature, and recent developments in the knowledge of neurobiological functions of few crucial E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we review recent literature on the roles of E6-AP, HRD1 and ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligases in the neuro-pathobiological mechanisms, with precise focus on the processes of neurodegeneration, and thereby propose new lines of potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Cloning, overexpression and nucleotide sequence of a thermostable DNA ligase-encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Barany, F; Gelfand, D H

    1991-12-20

    Thermostable DNA ligase has been harnessed for the detection of single-base genetic diseases using the ligase chain reaction [Barany, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 189-193]. The Thermus thermophilus (Tth) DNA ligase-encoding gene (ligT) was cloned in Escherichia coli by genetic complementation of a ligts 7 defect in an E. coli host. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene revealed a single chain of 676 amino acid residues with 47% identity to the E. coli ligase. Under phoA promoter control, Tth ligase was overproduced to greater than 10% of E. coli cellular proteins. Adenylated and deadenylated forms of the purified enzyme were distinguished by apparent molecular weights of 81 kDa and 78 kDa, respectively, after separation via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  10. Rejoining of DNA strand breaks by T4 DNA ligase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Edreira, A; Piñero, J

    2002-06-01

    We have tested the ability of T4 DNA ligase to rejoin radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in living hamster cells (CHO-K1, EM9, xrs-5). T4 DNA ligase was introduced into cells by electroporation prior to x-irradiation. Single- and double-strand breaks were measured by the alkaline comet assay technique, and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method. In the comet assay, the three cell lines showed reduced tail moments following pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase, both directly after irradiation and after repair incubation for 4 h. Similarly, the results obtained from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed reduced DSB frequencies after pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase. We conclude that exogeneous T4 ligase contributes to rejoining of radiation-induced strand breaks.

  11. Hakai, an E3-ligase for E-cadherin, stabilizes δ-catenin through Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Hridaya; Ryu, Taeyong; Seo, Young-Woo; Park, So-Yeon; He, Yongfeng; Dai, Weiye; Park, Eunsook; Simkhada, Shishli; Kim, Hangun; Lee, Keesook; Kim, Kwonseop

    2017-02-01

    Hakai ubiquitinates and induces endocytosis of the E-cadherin complex; thus, modulating cell adhesion and regulating development of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of metastasis. Our previous published data show that δ-catenin promotes E-cadherin processing and thereby activates β-catenin-mediated oncogenic signals. Although several published data show the interactions between δ-catenin and E-cadherin and between Hakai and E-cadherin separately, we found no published report on the relationship between δ-catenin and Hakai. In this report, we show Hakai stabilizes δ-catenin regardless of its E3 ligase activity. We show that Hakai and Src increase the stability of δ-catenin synergistically. Hakai stabilizes Src and Src, which in turn, inhibits binding between glycogen synthase kinase-3β and δ-catenin, resulting in less proteosomal degradation of δ-catenin. These results suggest that stabilization of δ-catenin by Hakai is dependent on Src.

  12. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and lymphoid commitment

    PubMed Central

    King, Bryan; Boccalatte, Francesco; Moran-Crusio, Kelly; Wolf, Elmar; Wang, Jingjing; Kayembe, Clarisse; Lazaris, Charalampos; Yu, Xiaofeng; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lasorella, Anna; Aifantis, Iannis

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dormant in the bone marrow and can be activated in response to diverse stresses to replenish all blood cell types. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 as a crucial regulator of HSC functions via its post-translational control of N-myc. We found Huwe1 to be essential for HSC self-renewal, quiescence and lymphoid fate specification. Using a novel fluorescent fusion allele (MycnM), we observed that N-myc expression was restricted to the most immature, multipotent stem and progenitor populations. N-myc was upregulated in response to stress or upon loss of Huwe1, leading to increased proliferation and stem cell exhaustion. Mycn depletion reversed most of these phenotypes in vivo, suggesting that the attenuation of N-myc by Huwe1 is essential to reestablish homeostasis following stress. PMID:27668798

  13. Bovine Papillomavirus Replicative Helicase E1 Is a Target of the Ubiquitin Ligase APC

    PubMed Central

    Mechali, Francisca; Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Castro, Anna; Lorca, Thierry; Bonne-Andrea, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 replicative helicase is essential for replication and maintenance of extrachromosomal viral genomes in infected cells. We previously found that the bovine papillomavirus E1 protein is a substrate of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. Here we show that E1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). Inhibition of APC activity by the specific inhibitor Emi1 or point mutations in the D-box and KEN-box motifs of E1 stabilize the protein and increase viral DNA replication in both a cell-free system and in living cells. These findings involve APC as the ubiquitin ligase that controls E1 levels to maintain a constant low copy number of the viral genome during latent infection. PMID:14963168

  14. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  15. E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b suppresses human ORMDL3 expression through STAT6 mediation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Xia; Jin, Rui; Jiang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Shu, Jin; Li, Ling; Zhu, Liang-Hua; Zhuang, Li-Li; Gao, Chao; Zhou, Guo-Ping

    2015-07-08

    Orosomucoid 1-Like Protein 3 (ORMDL3) is an asthma candidate gene and Casitas B lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is a critical factor in maintaining airway immune tolerance. However, the association of Cbl-b with ORMDL3 for asthma is unclear. Here, we show that expression of ORMDL3 is significantly increased and shows a strong linear correlation with decreased Cbl-b in the peripheral blood of recurrent wheeze patients. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation, we identified that Cbl-b suppressed the transcriptional activity and mRNA expression of ORMDL3 in vivo. Further investigation showed that phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) was induced by interleukin 4 bound to the ORMDL3 promoter, while Cbl-b reduced the phosphorylation of STAT6. Our results show that Cbl-b suppresses human ORMDL3 expression through STAT6.

  16. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in eukaryotic histone H3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BirA ligase, a prokaryotic ortholog of human holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), is known to biotinylate proteins. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase may also catalyze biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would render recombinant BirA ligase a useful surrogate for HCS in stud...

  17. Enzyme-regulated activation of DNAzyme: a novel strategy for a label-free colorimetric DNA ligase assay and ligase-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Li, Wang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhuoliang; Nie, Lihua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-03-26

    The DNA nick repair catalyzed by DNA ligase is significant for fundamental life processes, such as the replication, repair, and recombination of nucleic acids. Here, we have employed ligase to regulate DNAzyme activity and developed a homogeneous, colorimetric, label-free and DNAzyme-based strategy to detect DNA ligase activity. This novel strategy relies on the ligation-trigged activation or production of horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme that catalyzes the generation of a color change signal; this results in a colorimetric assay of DNA ligase activity. Using T4 DNA ligase as a model, we have proposed two approaches to demonstrate the validity of the DNAzyme strategy. The first approach utilizes an allosteric hairpin-DNAzyme probe specifically responsive to DNA ligation; this approach has a wide detection range from 0.2 to 40 U mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.2 U mL(-1). Furthermore, the approach was adapted to probe nucleic acid phosphorylation and single nucleotide mismatch. The second approach employs a "split DNA machine" to produce numerous DNAzymes after being reassembled by DNA ligase; this greatly enhances the detection sensitivity by a signal amplification cascade to achieve a detection limit of 0.01 U mL(-1).

  18. Directed evolution of the substrate specificity of biotin ligase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-Cheng; Levy, Matthew; Kincaid, Rodney; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    We have developed selection scheme for directing the evolution of Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase (BPL) via in vitro compartmentalization, and have used this scheme to alter the substrate specificity of the ligase towards the utilization of the biotin analogue desthiobiotin. In this scheme, a peptide substrate (BAP) was conjugated to a DNA library encoding BirA, emulsified such that there was a single template per compartment, and protein variants were transcribed and translated in vitro. Those variants that could efficiently desthiobiotinylate their corresponding peptide:DNA conjugate were subsequently captured and amplified. Following just six rounds of selection and amplification several variants that demonstrated higher activity with desthiobiotin were identified. The best variants from Round 6, BirA6-40 and BirA6-47 , showed 17-fold and 10-fold higher activity, respectively, their abilities to use desthiobiotin as a substrate. While selected enzymes contained a number of substitutions, a single mutation, M157T, proved sufficient to provide much greater activity with desthiobiotin. Further characterization of BirA6-40 and the single substitution variant BirAM157T revealed that they had twoto threefold higher kcat values for desthiobiotin. These variants had also lost much of their ability to utilize biotin, resulting in orthogonal enzymes that in conjunction with streptavidin variants that can utilize desthiobiotin may prove to be of great use in developing additional, robust conjugation handles for a variety of biological and biotechnological applications.

  19. Multisite clickable modification of proteins using lipoic acid ligase.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Joseph G; Falatach, Rebecca; Kastantin, Mark; Berberich, Jason A; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-06-17

    Approaches that allow bioorthogonal and, in turn, site-specific chemical modification of proteins present considerable opportunities for modulating protein activity and stability. However, the development of such approaches that enable site-selective modification of proteins at multiple positions, including internal sites within a protein, has remained elusive. To overcome this void, we have developed an enzymatic approach for multisite clickable modification based on the incorporation of azide moieties in proteins using lipoic acid ligase (LplA). The ligation of azide moieties to the model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), at the N-terminus and two internal sites using lipoic acid ligase was shown to proceed efficiently with near-complete conversion. Modification of the ligated azide groups with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), α-d-mannopyranoside, and palmitic acid resulted in highly homogeneous populations of protein-polymer, protein-sugar, and protein-fatty acid conjugates. The homogeneity of the conjugates was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. In the case of PEG attachment, which involved the use of strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry, the conjugation reaction resulted in highly homogeneous PEG-GFP conjugates in less than 30 min. As further demonstration of the utility of this approach, ligated GFP was also covalently immobilized on alkyne-terminated self-assembled monolayers. These results underscore the potential of this approach for, among other applications, site-specific multipoint protein PEGylation, glycosylation, fatty acid modification, and protein immobilization.

  20. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; de Winter, Johan P; Medhurst, Annette L; Wallisch, Michael; Waisfisz, Quinten; van de Vrugt, Henri J; Oostra, Anneke B; Yan, Zhijiang; Ling, Chen; Bishop, Colin E; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Joenje, Hans; Wang, Weidong

    2003-10-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 1,2). A key step in this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in the redistribution of FANCD2 to nuclear foci containing BRCA1 (ref. 3). The underlying mechanism is unclear because the five Fanconi anemia proteins known to be required for this ubiquitination have no recognizable ubiquitin ligase motifs. Here we report a new component of a Fanconi anemia protein complex, called PHF9, which possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vivo. Because PHF9 is defective in a cell line derived from an individual with Fanconi anemia, we conclude that PHF9 (also called FANCL) represents a novel Fanconi anemia complementation group (FA-L). Our data suggest that PHF9 has a crucial role in the Fanconi anemia pathway as the likely catalytic subunit required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2.

  1. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-01-01

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis. PMID:10582239

  2. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-09-29

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis.

  3. Recognition mechanism of p63 by the E3 ligase Itch

    PubMed Central

    Bellomaria, Alessia; Barbato, Gaetano; Melino, Gerry; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The HECT-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch mediates the degradation of several proteins, including p63 and p73, involved in cell specification and fate. Itch contains four WW domains, which are essential for recognition on the target substrate, which contains a short proline-rich sequence. Several signaling complexes containing these domains have been associated with human diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer’s or Huntington’s diseases. To gain further insight into the structural determinants of the Itch-WW2 domain, we investigated its interaction with p63. We assigned, by 3D heteronuclear NMR experiments, the backbone and side chains of the uniformly ¹³C-¹⁵N-labeled Itch-WW2. In vitro interaction of Itch-WW2 domain with p63 was studied using its interactive p63 peptide, pep63. Pep63 is an 18-mer peptide corresponding to the region from 534–551 residue of p63, encompassing the PPxY motif that interacts with the Itch-WW domains, and we identified the residues involved in this molecular recognition. Moreover, here, a strategy of stabilization of the conformation of the PPxY peptide has been adopted, increasing the WW-ligand binding. We demonstrated that cyclization of pep63 leads to an increase of both the biological stability of the peptide and of the WW-ligand complex. Stable metal-binding complexes of the pep63 have been also obtained, and localized oxidative damage on Itch-WW2 domain has been induced, demonstrating the possibility of use of metal-pep63 complexes as models for the design of metal drugs to inhibit the Itch-WW-p63 recognition in vivo. Thus, our data suggest a novel strategy to study and inhibit the recognition mechanism of Itch E3-ligase. PMID:22935697

  4. Rad7 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Attenuates Polyubiquitylation of Rpn10 and Dsk2 Following DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Benoun, Joseph M.; Lalimar-Cortez, Danielle; Valencia, Analila; Granda, Adriana; Moore, Destaye M.; Kelson, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    During Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) in the yeast S. cerevisiae, ubiquitylation of Rad4 is carried out by the E3 ubiquitin ligase that includes Rad7-Elc1-Cul3 and is critical to optimal NER. Rad7 E3 activity targets Rad4 for degradation by the proteaseome but, in principle, could also trigger other DNA damage responses. We observed increased nuclear ubiquitin foci (Ub-RFP) formation in S. cerevisiae containing a Rad7 E3 ligase mutant (rad7SOCS) in response to DNA damage by benzo[a]pyrenediolepoxide (BPDE) in dividing cells. Immunoblots reveal that ubiquitin conjugates of Rpn10 and Dsk2 accumulate in greater abundance in rad7SOCS compared to RAD7 in dividing cells in response to BPDE which makes Rpn10 and Dsk2 candidates for being the ubiquitylated species observed in our microscopy experiments. Microscopy analysis with strains containing Dsk2-GFP shows that Dsk2-GFP and Dsk2-GFP/Ub-RFP colocalized in nuclear foci form to an increased extent in a rad7SOCS mutant background in dividing cells than in a RAD7 wild-type strain. Further, Dsk2-GFP in the rad7SOCS strain formed more foci at the plasma membrane following BPDE treatment in dividing cells relative to strains containing RAD7 or a rad7Δ deletion mutant. In response to a different agent, UV irradiation, levels of ubiquitylated proteins were increased in rad7SOCS relative to RAD7, and the proteasomal deubiquitylase subunit, Rpn11 was even monoubiquitylated in the absence of damaging agents. Together these data show that Rad7 E3 activity attenuates ubiquitylation of proteins regulating the shuttling of polyubiquitylated proteins to the proteasome (Dsk2 and Rpn10) and removal of ubiquitin chains just prior to degradation (Rpn11). Since Rad7 E3 ligase activity has been shown to increase ubiquitylation of its target proteins, yet our results show increased ubiquitylation in the absence of Rad7 E3, we suggest that Rad7 E3 action regulates ubiquitin ligase and deubiquitylase (DUB) activities that act on Rpn10, Dsk2

  5. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene's essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells.

  6. The Notch ligand E3 ligase, Mind Bomb1, regulates glutamate receptor localization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Morgan; Davis, Dustin; Albers, Amanda; Beatty, Derek; Austin, Rik; Ferguson, Matt; Tounsel, Brittany; Liebl, Faith L. W.

    2015-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a protein-rich network important for the localization of postsynaptic glutamate receptors (GluRs) and for signaling downstream of these receptors. Although hundreds of PSD proteins have been identified, many are functionally uncharacterized. We conducted a reverse genetic screen for mutations that affected GluR localization using Drosophila genes that encode homologs of mammalian PSD proteins. 42.8% of the mutants analyzed exhibited a significant change in GluR localization at the third instar larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a model synapse that expresses homologs of AMPA receptors. We identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mib1, which promotes Notch signaling, as a regulator of synaptic GluR localization. Mib1 positively regulates the localization of the GluR subunits GluRIIA, GluRIIB, and GluRIIC. Mutations in mib1 and ubiquitous expression of Mib1 that lacks its ubiquitin ligase activity result in the loss of synaptic GluRIIA-containing receptors. In contrast, overexpression of Mib1 in all tissues increases postsynaptic levels of GluRIIA. Cellular levels of Mib1 are also important for the structure of the presynaptic motor neuron. While deficient Mib1 signaling leads to overgrowth of the NMJ, ubiquitous overexpression of Mib1 results in a reduction in the number of presynaptic motor neuron boutons and branches. These synaptic changes may be secondary to attenuated glutamate release from the presynaptic motor neuron in mib1 mutants as mib1 mutants exhibit significant reductions in the vesicle-associated protein cysteine string protein and in the frequency of spontaneous neurotransmission. PMID:26596173

  7. Enzymatic Analysis of PTEN Ubiquitylation by WWP2 and NEDD4-1 E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zan; Thomas, Stefani N.; Bolduc, David M.; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wolberger, Cynthia; Cole, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid phosphatase that converts phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-phosphate (PIP3) to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-phosphate (PIP2) and plays a critical role in the regulation of tumor growth. PTEN is subject to regulation by a variety of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation on a C-terminal cluster of four Ser/Thr residues (380, 382, 383, and 385) and ubiquitylation by various E3 ligases, including NEDD4-1 and WWP2. It has previously been shown that C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN can increase its cellular half-life. Using in vitro ubiquitin transfer assays, we show that WWP2 is more active than NEDD4-1 in ubiquitylating unphosphorylated PTEN. The mapping of ubiquitylation sites in PTEN by mass spectrometry showed that both NEDD4-1 and WWP2 can target a broad range of Lys residues in PTEN, although NEDD4-1 versus WWP2 showed a stronger preference for ubiquitylating PTEN's C2 domain. Whereas tetraphosphorylation of PTEN did not significantly affect its ubiquitylation by NEDD4-1, it inhibited PTEN ubiquitylation by WWP2. Single-turnover and pull-down experiments suggested that tetraphosphorylation of PTEN appears to weaken its interaction with WWP2. These studies reveal how the PTEN E3 ligases WWP2 and NEDD4-1 exhibit distinctive properties in Lys selectivity and sensitivity to PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings also provide a molecular mechanism for the connection between PTEN Ser/Thr phosphorylation and PTEN's cellular stability. PMID:27295432

  8. The Notch ligand E3 ligase, Mind Bomb1, regulates glutamate receptor localization in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Morgan; Davis, Dustin; Albers, Amanda; Beatty, Derek; Austin, Rik; Ferguson, Matt; Tounsel, Brittany; Liebl, Faith L W

    2016-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a protein-rich network important for the localization of postsynaptic glutamate receptors (GluRs) and for signaling downstream of these receptors. Although hundreds of PSD proteins have been identified, many are functionally uncharacterized. We conducted a reverse genetic screen for mutations that affected GluR localization using Drosophila genes that encode homologs of mammalian PSD proteins. 42.8% of the mutants analyzed exhibited a significant change in GluR localization at the third instar larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a model synapse that expresses homologs of AMPA receptors. We identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mib1, which promotes Notch signaling, as a regulator of synaptic GluR localization. Mib1 positively regulates the localization of the GluR subunits GluRIIA, GluRIIB, and GluRIIC. Mutations in mib1 and ubiquitous expression of Mib1 that lacks its ubiquitin ligase activity result in the loss of synaptic GluRIIA-containing receptors. In contrast, overexpression of Mib1 in all tissues increases postsynaptic levels of GluRIIA. Cellular levels of Mib1 are also important for the structure of the presynaptic motor neuron. While deficient Mib1 signaling leads to overgrowth of the NMJ, ubiquitous overexpression of Mib1 results in a reduction in the number of presynaptic motor neuron boutons and branches. These synaptic changes may be secondary to attenuated glutamate release from the presynaptic motor neuron in mib1 mutants as mib1 mutants exhibit significant reductions in the vesicle-associated protein cysteine string protein and in the frequency of spontaneous neurotransmission.

  9. ATM mediates oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwan; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2006-01-01

    Among the three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases, only the LIG3 gene does not have a homolog in lower eukaryotes. In somatic mammalian cells, the nuclear form of DNA ligase IIIalpha forms a stable complex with the DNA repair protein XRCC1 that is also found only in higher eukaryotes. Recent studies have shown that XRCC1 participates in S phase-specific DNA repair pathways independently of DNA ligase IIIalpha and is constitutively phosphorylated by casein kinase II. In this study we demonstrate that DNA ligase IIIalpha, unlike XRCC1, is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Specifically, DNA ligase IIIalpha is phosphorylated on Ser123 by the cell division cycle kinase Cdk2 beginning early in S phase and continuing into M phase. Interestingly, treatment of S phase cells with agents that cause oxygen free radicals induces the dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha. This oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha is dependent upon the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase and appears to involve inhibition of Cdk2 and probably activation of a phosphatase.

  10. ATM mediates oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhiwan; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Among the three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases, only the LIG3 gene does not have a homolog in lower eukaryotes. In somatic mammalian cells, the nuclear form of DNA ligase IIIα forms a stable complex with the DNA repair protein XRCC1 that is also found only in higher eukaryotes. Recent studies have shown that XRCC1 participates in S phase-specific DNA repair pathways independently of DNA ligase IIIα and is constitutively phosphorylated by casein kinase II. In this study we demonstrate that DNA ligase IIIα, unlike XRCC1, is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Specifically, DNA ligase IIIα is phosphorylated on Ser123 by the cell division cycle kinase Cdk2 beginning early in S phase and continuing into M phase. Interestingly, treatment of S phase cells with agents that cause oxygen free radicals induces the dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα. This oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα is dependent upon the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase and appears to involve inhibition of Cdk2 and probably activation of a phosphatase. PMID:17040896

  11. Purification and characterization of benzoate-coenzyme A ligase and 2-aminobenzoate-coenzyme A ligases from a denitrifying Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Altenschmidt, U; Oswald, B; Fuchs, G

    1991-01-01

    The enzymes catalyzing the formation of coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters of benzoate and 2-aminobenzoate were studied in a denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. anaerobically grown with these aromatic acids and nitrate as sole carbon and energy sources. Three different rather specific aromatic acyl-CoA ligases, E1, E2, and E3, were found which catalyze the formation of CoA thioesters of benzoate, fluorobenzoates, and 2-aminobenzoate. ATP is cleaved into AMP and pyrophosphate. The enzymes were purified, their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined, and their catalytic and molecular properties were studied. Cells anaerobically grown on benzoate and nitrate contain one CoA ligase (AMP forming) for benzoic acid (E1). It is a homodimer of Mr 120,000 which prefers benzoate as a substrate but shows some activity also with 2-aminobenzoate and fluorobenzoates, although with lower Km. Cells anaerobically grown on 2-aminobenzoate and nitrate contain three different CoA ligases for aromatic acids. The first one is identical with benzoate-CoA ligase (E1). The second enzyme is a 2-aminobenzoate-CoA ligase (E2). It is a monomer of Mr 60,000 which prefers 2-aminobenzoate but also activates benzoate, fluorobenzoates and, less effectively, 2-methylbenzoate, with lower affinities to the latter substrates. The enzymes E1 and E2 have similar activity levels; a third minor CoA ligase activity is due to a different 2-aminobenzoate-CoA ligase. The enzyme (E3) is a monomer of Mr, 65,000 which 2-aminobenzoate pathway (U. Altenschmidt, C. Eckerskorn, and G. Fuchs, Eur. J. Biochem. 194:647-653, 1990); apparently, it is not completely repressed under anaerobic conditions and therefore also is induced to a small extent by 2-aminobenzoate under anaerobic growth conditions. Images PMID:1885526

  12. Building and remodelling Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lydeard, John R; Schulman, Brenda A; Harper, J Wade

    2013-01-01

    Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) control a plethora of biological pathways through targeted ubiquitylation of signalling proteins. These modular assemblies use substrate receptor modules to recruit specific targets. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the mechanisms that control the activity state of CRLs through dynamic alterations in CRL architecture. Central to these processes are cycles of cullin neddylation and deneddylation, as well as exchange of substrate receptor modules to re-sculpt the CRL landscape, thereby responding to the cellular requirements to turn over distinct proteins in different contexts. This review is focused on how CRLs are dynamically controlled with an emphasis on how cullin neddylation cycles are integrated with receptor exchange. PMID:24232186

  13. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  14. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Lindy M.; Pace, Chandler R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. IMPORTANCE The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin

  15. E6-AP/UBE3A protein acts as a ubiquitin ligase toward SOX9 protein.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takako; Kishino, Tetsuya; Stephen, Shelley; Eberspaecher, Heidi; Maki, Sayumi; Takigawa, Masaharu; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2013-12-06

    SOX9 is a transcription factor that acts as a key regulator at various stages of cartilage differentiation. There is ample evidence that intracellular SOX9 protein levels are tightly regulated both by sumoylation and by degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Using a proteomics approach, here we report the identification of a SOX9-binding protein, E6-AP/UBE3A, that may act as a ubiquitin ligase toward Sox9. E6-AP bound SOX9 through the region consisting mostly of its high mobility group domain in vitro. In nuclear lysates, FLAG-tagged E6-AP coprecipitated with Sox9 and its high mobility group domain. This finding was estimated using nuclear lysates from a chondrocytic cell line that endogenously expresses E6-AP and SOX9. Accordingly, ectopically expressed E6-AP and SOX9 colocalized in the nucleus. We show that E6-AP ubiquitinates SOX9 in vitro and in vivo and that SOX9 levels are enhanced after addition of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Similar, siRNA knockdown of E6-AP and the E2 ligase Ubc9 increased cellular SOX9 amounts, supporting the notion that SOX9 may be ubiquitinated in hypertrophic chondrocytes by E6-AP and degraded by proteasomes. This is in accordance with the distribution of SOX9 levels, which are high in proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes but low in hypertrophic chondrocytes, whereas E6-AP levels are high in hypertrophic chondrocytes and low in prehypertrophic chondrocytes. Furthermore, E6-AP-deficient mice showed SOX9 accumulation in chondrocytes and the brain. These findings support the concept that E6-AP regulates SOX9 levels in developing cartilage by acting as a ubiquitin ligase.

  16. Effects of ageing on expression of the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and Akt-dependent regulation of Foxo transcription factors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Akira; Shiozuka, Masataka; Takayama, Yuzo; Hoshino, Takayuki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFbx and MuRF1 are transcriptionally upregulated in the process of sarcopenia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ageing on mRNA/protein expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and Akt/Foxo signalling in gastrocnemius muscles of female mice. Old mice exhibited a typical sarcopenic phenotype, characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, decreased amount of myofibrillar proteins, incidence of aberrant muscle fibres, and genetic signature to sarcopenia. Activation levels of Akt were lower in adult and old mice than in young mice. Consequently, Akt-mediated phosphorylation levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3 proteins were decreased. Nuclear levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3 proteins showed an overall increasing trend in old mice. MAFbx mRNA expression was decreased in old mice relative to adult mice, whereas MuRF1 mRNA expression was less affected by ageing. At the protein level, MAFbx was less affected by ageing, whereas MuRF1 was increased in old mice relative to adult mice, with ubiquitin-protein conjugates being increased with ageing. In conclusion, we provided evidence for no mRNA upregulation of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and disconnection between their expression and Akt/Foxo signalling in sarcopenic mice. Their different responsiveness to ageing may reflect different roles in sarcopenia.

  17. The ubiquitin-protein ligase Nedd4 targets Notch1 in skeletal muscle and distinguishes the subset of atrophies caused by reduced muscle tension.

    PubMed

    Koncarevic, Alan; Jackman, Robert W; Kandarian, Susan C

    2007-02-01

    Ubiquitination-dependent proteolysis is a fundamental process underlying skeletal muscle atrophy. Thus, the role of ubiquitin ligases is of great interest. There are no focused studies in muscle on the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4. We first confirmed increased mRNA expression in rat soleus muscles due to 1-14 days of hind limb unloading. Nedd4 protein localized to the sarcolemmal region of muscle fibers. Hind limb unloading, sciatic nerve denervation, starvation, and diabetes led to atrophy of soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius muscles, but only unloaded and denervated muscles showed a marked increase in Nedd4 protein expression. This increase was strongly correlated with decreased Notch1 expression, a known target of Nedd4 in other cell types. Overexpression of dominant negative Nedd4 in soleus muscles completely reversed the unloading-induced decrease of Notch1 expression, indicating that Nedd4 is required for Notch1 inactivation. Overexpression of wild-type Nedd4 in soleus muscles of weight bearing rats caused a decrease in Notch1 protein, indicating that Nedd4 is sufficient for Notch1 down-regulation. To further show that Notch1 is a Nedd4 substrate in muscle, conditional overexpression of Nedd4 in C2C12 myotubes induced ubiquitination of Notch1. This is the first finding of a Nedd4 substrate in muscle and of an ubiquitin ligase, the activity of which distinguishes disuse from cachexia atrophy.

  18. Essential Roles of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Sanam; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitination pathway and proteasomal degradation machinery dominantly regulate p53 tumor suppressor protein stability, localization, and functions in both normal and cancerous cells. Selective E3 ubiquitin ligases dominantly regulate protein levels and activities of p53 in a large range of physiological conditions and in response to cellular changes induced by exogenous and endogenous stresses. The regulation of p53’s functions by E3 ubiquitin ligases is a complex process that can lead to positive or negative regulation of p53 protein in a context- and cell type-dependent manner. Accessory proteins bind and modulate E3 ubiquitin ligases, adding yet another layer of regulatory control for p53 and its downstream functions. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of p53 regulation by selective E3 ubiquitin ligases and their potential to be considered as a new class of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in diverse types of cancers. PMID:28218667

  19. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  20. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Nair,P.; Nandakumar, J.; Smith, P.; Odell, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.

  1. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  2. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; ...

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  3. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in histone H3.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Keyna; Sarath, Gautam; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-04-30

    BirA ligase is a prokaryotic ortholog of holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) that can biotinylate proteins. This study tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase catalyzes the biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would mean that recombinant BirA ligase is a useful surrogate for HCS in studies of histone biotinylation. The biological activity of recombinant BirA ligase was confirmed by enzymatic biotinylation of p67. In particular, it was found that BirA ligase biotinylated both calf thymus histone H1 and human bulk histone extracts. Incubation of recombinant BirA ligase with H3-based synthetic peptides showed that lysines 4, 9, 18, and 23 in histone H3 are the targets for the biotinylation by BirA ligase. Modification of the peptides (e.g., serine phosphorylation) affected the subsequent biotinylation by BirA ligase, suggesting crosstalk between modifications. In conclusion, this study suggests that prokaryotic BirA ligase is a promiscuous enzyme and biotinylates eukaryotic histones. Moreover the biotinylation of histones by BirA ligase is consistent with the proposed role of human HCS in chromatin.

  4. The Ubiquitin Ligase Smurf1 Functions in Selective Autophagy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Anti-tuberculous Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis H; Nair, Vidhya R; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Torrealba, Jose R; Shiloh, Michael U; Levine, Beth

    2017-01-11

    During antibacterial autophagy, ubiquitination of intracellular bacteria recruits proteins that mediate bacterial delivery to the lysosome for degradation. Smurf1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase whose role in selective bacterial autophagy is unknown. We show that Smurf1 facilitates selective autophagy of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Smurf1(-/-) macrophages are defective in recruiting polyubiquitin, the proteasome, the ubiquitin-binding autophagy adaptor NBR1, the autophagy protein LC3, and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to Mtb-associated structures and are more permissive for Mtb growth. This function of Smurf1 requires both its ubiquitin-ligase and C2 phospholipid-binding domains, and involves K48- rather than K63-linked ubiquitination. Chronically infected Smurf1(-/-) mice have increased bacterial load, increased lung inflammation, and accelerated mortality. SMURF1 controls Mtb replication in human macrophages and associates with bacteria in lungs of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Thus, Smurf1 is required for selective autophagy of Mtb and host defense against tuberculosis infection.

  5. Incorporation of gemcitabine and cytarabine into DNA by DNA polymerase beta and ligase III/XRCC1.

    PubMed

    Prakasha Gowda, A S; Polizzi, Joanna M; Eckert, Kristin A; Spratt, Thomas E

    2010-06-15

    1-Beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (cytarabine, araC) and 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine, dFdC), are effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents due to their ability to become incorporated into DNA and then subsequently inhibit DNA synthesis by replicative DNA polymerases. However, the impact of these 3'-modified nucleotides on the activity of specialized DNA polymerases has not been investigated. The role of polymerase beta and base excision repair may be of particular importance due to the increased oxidative stress in tumors, increased oxidative stress caused by chemotherapy treatment, and the variable amounts of polymerase beta in tumors. Here we directly investigate the incorporation of the 5'-triphosphorylated form of araC, dFdC, 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (FdC), and cytidine into two nicked DNA substrates and the subsequent ligation. Opposite template dG, the relative k(pol)/K(d) for incorporation was dCTP > araCTP, dFdCTP > rCTP. The relative k(pol)/K(d) for FdCTP depended on sequence. The effect on k(pol)/K(d) was due largely to changes in k(pol) with no differences in the affinity of the nucleoside triphosphates to the polymerase. Ligation efficiency by T4 ligase and ligase III/XRCC1 was largely unaffected by the nucleotide analogues. Our results show that BER is capable of incorporating araC and dFdC into the genome.

  6. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase.

  7. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 Contributes to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer by Regulation of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jianfei; Tripathi, Manisha; Mishra, Rajeev; Sahgal, Natasha; Fazil, Ladan; Ettinger, Susan; Placzek, William J.; Claps, Giuseppina; Chung, Leland W.K.; Bowtell, David; Gleave, Martin; Bhowmick, Neil; Ronai, Ze'ev A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanism underlying the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR), a central player in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), holds promise for overcoming the challenge of treating CRPC. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 targets a select pool of NCOR1-bound, transcriptionally-inactive AR for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, thereby promoting expression of select AR target genes implicated in lipid metabolism, cell motility, and proliferation. Siah2 is required for prostate cancer cell growth under androgen-deprivation conditions in vitro and in vivo, and Siah2 inhibition promotes prostate cancer regression upon castration. Notably, Siah2 expression is markedly increased in human CRPCs. Collectively, we find that selective regulation of AR transcriptional activity by the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 is important for CRPC development. PMID:23518348

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2 contributes to castration-resistant prostate cancer by regulation of androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianfei; Tripathi, Manisha; Mishra, Rajeev; Sahgal, Natasha; Fazli, Ladan; Fazil, Ladan; Ettinger, Susan; Placzek, William J; Claps, Giuseppina; Chung, Leland W K; Bowtell, David; Gleave, Martin; Bhowmick, Neil; Ronai, Ze'ev A

    2013-03-18

    Understanding the mechanism underlying the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR), a central player in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), holds promise for overcoming the challenge of treating CRPC. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 targets a select pool of NCOR1-bound, transcriptionally-inactive AR for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, thereby promoting expression of select AR target genes implicated in lipid metabolism, cell motility, and proliferation. Siah2 is required for prostate cancer cell growth under androgen-deprivation conditions in vitro and in vivo, and Siah2 inhibition promotes prostate cancer regression upon castration. Notably, Siah2 expression is markedly increased in human CRPCs. Collectively, we find that selective regulation of AR transcriptional activity by the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 is important for CRPC development.

  9. Ubiquitin ligase gene neurl3 plays a role in spermatogenesis of half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) by regulating testis protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenteng; Li, Hailong; Dong, Zhongdian; Cui, Zhongkai; Zhang, Ning; Meng, Liang; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Yang; Li, Yangzhen; Guo, Hua; Ma, Jialu; Wei, Zhanfei; Zhang, Nianwei; Yang, Yingming; Chen, Songlin

    2016-10-30

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large gene family that plays a diversity of roles in spermatogenesis. In this study, the functional characterization of a neuralized E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 3 (neurl3) revealed its potential participation in spermatogenesis. Firstly, we found that neurl3 exhibited male-biased transcription and that its translation was predominant in testis germ cells. The knockdown of neurl3 by RNA interference caused increased transcription of spermatogenesis-related genes. These results corroborate previous studies indicating a role for neurl3 in spermatogenesis. Moreover, the levels of neurl3 transcription and testis protein ubiquitination were closely correlated. Based on these findings, we speculate that neurl3 modulates testis protein ubiquitination in a dosage-dependent manner and that this influences spermatogenesis.

  10. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  11. Structure and two-metal mechanism of a eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent RNA ligases are agents of RNA repair that join 3′-OH and 5′-PO4 RNA ends. Naegleria gruberi RNA ligase (NgrRnl) exemplifies a family of RNA nick-sealing enzymes found in bacteria, viruses, and eukarya. Crystal structures of NgrRnl at three discrete steps along the reaction pathway—covalent ligase-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP•Mn2+ intermediate; ligase•ATP•(Mn2+)2 Michaelis complex; and ligase•Mn2+ complex—highlight a two-metal mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer, whereby (i) an enzyme-bound “catalytic” metal coordination complex lowers the pKa of the lysine nucleophile and stabilizes the transition state of the ATP α phosphate; and (ii) a second metal coordination complex bridges the β- and γ-phosphates. The NgrRnl N domain is a distinctively embellished oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold that engages the γ-phosphate and associated metal complex and orients the pyrophosphate leaving group for in-line catalysis with stereochemical inversion at the AMP phosphate. The unique domain architecture of NgrRnl fortifies the theme that RNA ligases have evolved many times, and independently, by fusions of a shared nucleotidyltransferase domain to structurally diverse flanking modules. The mechanistic insights to lysine adenylylation gained from the NgrRnl structures are likely to apply broadly to the covalent nucleotidyltransferase superfamily of RNA ligases, DNA ligases, and RNA capping enzymes. PMID:26512110

  12. Cloning, molecular characterization and expression of a DNA-ligase from a new bacteriophage: Phax1.

    PubMed

    Setayesh, Neda; Sabouri-Shahrbabak, Saleheh; Bakherad, Hamid; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham

    2013-12-01

    DNA ligases join 3' hydroxyl and 5' phosphate ends in double stranded DNA and are necessary for maintaining the integrity of genome. The gene encoding a new Escherichia phage (Phax1) DNA ligase was cloned and sequenced. The gene contains an open reading frame with 1,428 base pairs, encoding 475 amino acid residues. Alignment of the entire amino acid sequence showed that Phax1 DNA ligase has a high degree of sequence homology with ligases from Escherichia (vB_EcoM_CBA120), Salmonella (PhiSH19 and SFP10), Shigella (phiSboM-AG3), and Deftia (phiW-14) phages. The Phax1 DNA ligase gene was expressed under the control of the T7lac promoter on the pET-16b (+) in Escherichia coli Rossetta gami. The enzyme was then homogeneously purified by a metal affinity column. Enzymatic activity of the recombinant DNA ligase was assayed by an in-house PCR-based method.

  13. Defects in DNA ligase I trigger PCNA ubiquitylation at Lys 107.

    PubMed

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalysed by DNA ligase I (ref. 1). An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibits growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression, probably due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. As DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to address this issue. We uncovered a new pathway, which facilitates ubiquitylation at Lys 107 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Unlike ubiquitylation at Lys 164 of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, which triggers translesion synthesis, modification of Lys 107 is not dependent on the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) Rad6 (ref. 4) nor the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rad18 (ref. 5), but requires the E2 variant Mms2 (ref. 6) in conjunction with Ubc4 (ref. 7) and the E3 Rad5 (Refs 8, 9). Surprisingly, DNA ligase I-deficient S. cerevisiae cdc9-1 cells that carry a PCNAK107R mutation are inviable, because they cannot activate a robust DDR. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitylation of PCNA in response to DNA ligase I deficiency is conserved in humans, yet the lysine residue that is modified remains to be determined. We propose that PCNA ubiquitylation provides a 'DNA damage code' that allows cells to categorize different types of defects that arise during DNA replication.

  14. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  15. Characterization of a novel eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase from Naegleria gruberi

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of the amoebo-flagellate protozoan Naegleria gruberi is rich in candidate RNA repair enzymes, including 15 putative RNA ligases, one of which, NgrRnl, is a eukaryal homolog of Deinococcus radiodurans RNA ligase, DraRnl. Here we report that purified recombinant NgrRnl seals nicked 3′-OH/5′-PO4 duplexes in which the 3′-OH strand is RNA. It does so via the “classic” ligase pathway, entailing reaction with ATP to form a covalent NgrRnl–AMP intermediate, transfer of AMP to the nick 5′-PO4, and attack of the RNA 3′-OH on the adenylylated nick to form a 3′–5′ phosphodiester. Unlike members of the four known families of ATP-dependent RNA ligases, NgrRnl lacks a carboxy-terminal appendage to its nucleotidyltransferase domain. Instead, it contains a defining amino-terminal domain that we show is important for 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nick-sealing and ligase adenylylation, but dispensable for phosphodiester synthesis at a preadenylylated nick. We propose that NgrRnl, DraRnl, and their homologs from diverse bacteria, viruses, and unicellular eukarya comprise a new “Rnl5 family” of nick-sealing ligases with a signature domain organization. PMID:25740837

  16. Discovery and design of DNA and RNA ligase inhibitors in infectious microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily known as DNA and RNA ligases carry out the enzymatic process of polynucleotide ligation. These guardians of genomic integrity share a three-step ligation mechanism, as well as common core structural elements. Both DNA and RNA ligases have experienced a surge of recent interest as chemotherapeutic targets for the treatment of a range of diseases, including bacterial infection, cancer, and the diseases caused by the protozoan parasites known as trypanosomes. Objective In this review, we will focus on efforts targeting pathogenic microorganisms; specifically, bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, which are promising broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, and ATP-dependent RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei, the species responsible for the devastating neurodegenerative disease, African sleeping sickness. Conclusion High quality crystal structures of both NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and the Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase have facilitated the development of a number of promising leads. For both targets, further progress will require surmounting permeability issues and improving selectivity and affinity. PMID:20354588

  17. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  18. Base-modified NAD and AMP derivatives and their activity against bacterial DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Cominetti, Marco M D; Butt, Julea N; Field, Robert A; Bowater, Richard P; Wagner, Gerd K

    2015-06-14

    We report the chemical synthesis and conformational analysis of a collection of 2-, 6- and 8-substituted derivatives of β-NAD(+) and AMP, and their biochemical evaluation against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial DNA ligases are validated anti-microbial targets, and new strategies for their inhibition are therefore of considerable scientific and practical interest. Our study includes several pairs of β-NAD(+) and AMP derivatives with the same substitution pattern at the adenine base. This has enabled the first direct comparison of co-substrate and inhibitor behaviour against bacterial DNA ligases. Our results suggest that an additional substituent in position 6 or 8 of the adenine base in β-NAD(+) is detrimental for activity as either co-substrate or inhibitor. In contrast, substituents in position 2 are not only tolerated, but appear to give rise to a new mode of inhibition, which targets the conformational changes these DNA ligases undergo during catalysis. Using a molecular modelling approach, we highlight that these findings have important implications for our understanding of ligase mechanism and inhibition, and may provide a promising starting point for the rational design of a new class of inhibitors against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases.

  19. IRT1 degradation factor1, a ring E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulates the degradation of iron-regulated transporter1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-08-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, iron-regulated transporter1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 degradation factor1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity.

  20. IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1, a RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Regulates the Degradation of IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity. PMID:23995086

  1. E3 ubiquitin ligase gene CMPG1-V from Haynaldia villosa L. contributes to powdery mildew resistance in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanfei; Li, Yingbo; Fei, Fei; Wang, Zongkuan; Wang, Wei; Cao, Aizhong; Liu, Yuan; Han, Shuang; Xing, Liping; Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Wei; Tang, Sanyuan; Huang, Xiahe; Shen, Qianhua; Xie, Qi; Wang, Xiue

    2015-10-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most devastating wheat fungal diseases. A diploid wheat relative, Haynaldia villosa L., is highly resistant to powdery mildew, and its genetic resource of resistances, such as the Pm21 locus, is now widely used in wheat breeding. Here we report the cloning of a resistance gene from H. villosa, designated CMPG1-V, that encodes a U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase. Expression of the CMPG1-V gene was induced in the leaf and stem of H. villosa upon inoculation with Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) fungus, and the presence of Pm21 is essential for its rapid induction of expression. CMPG1-V has conserved key residues for E3 ligase, and possesses E3 ligase activity in vitro and in vivo. CMPG1-V is localized in the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and partially in trans-Golgi network/early endosome vesicles. Transgenic wheat over-expressing CMPG1-V showed improved broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance at seedling and adult stages, associated with an increase in expression of salicylic acid-responsive genes, H2 O2 accumulation, and cell-wall protein cross-linking at the Bgt infection sites, and the expression of CMPG1-V in H. villosa was increased when treated with salicylic acid, abscisic acid and H2 O2 . These results indicate the involvement of E3 ligase in defense responses to Bgt fungus in wheat, particularly in broad-spectrum disease resistance, and suggest association of reactive oxidative species and the phytohormone pathway with CMPG1-V-mediated powdery mildew resistance.

  2. Activation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Thomas R; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-04-01

    The PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homologue-induced putative kinase 1)/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control pathway mediates the clearance of damaged organelles, but appears to be disrupted in Parkinson's disease (PD) [Springer and Kahle (2011) Autophagy 7, 266-278]. Upon mitochondrial stress, PINK1 activates the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Parkin through phosphorylation of the Ub-like (UBL) domain of Parkin and of the small modifier Ub itself at a conserved residue [Sauvé and Gehring (2014) Cell Res. 24, 1025-1026]. Recently resolved partial crystal structures of Parkin showed a 'closed', auto-inhibited conformation, consistent with its notoriously weak enzymatic activity at steady state [Wauer and Komander (2013) EMBO J. 32, 2099-2112; Riley et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1982; Trempe et al. (2013) Science 340, 1451-1455; Spratt et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1983]. It has thus become clear that Parkin must undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic functions. Recent published findings derived from X-ray structures and molecular modelling present a complete structural model of human Parkin at an all-atom resolution [Caulfield et al. (2014) PLoS Comput. Biol. 10, e1003935]. The results of the combined in silico simulations-based and experimental assay-based study indicates that PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation of Parkin is required for its activation and triggering of 'opening' conformations. Indeed, the obtained structures showed a sequential release of Parkin's intertwined domains and allowed docking of an Ub-charged E2 coenzyme, which could enable its enzymatic activity. In addition, using cell-based screening, select E2 enzymes that redundantly, cooperatively or antagonistically regulate Parkin's activation and/or enzymatic functions at different stages of the mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) process were identified [Fiesel et al. (2014) J. Cell Sci. 127, 3488-3504]. Other work that aims to pin-point the particular

  3. Ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 controls hippocampal plasticity and learning by regulating synaptic γ-actin levels

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Joerg; Végh, Marlene J.; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Loos, Maarten; Labonté, Dorthe; Li, Ka Wan; Van Nierop, Pim; Van Diepen, Michiel T.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Kneussel, Matthias; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Smit, August B.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Although two actin isoforms, β- and γ-actin, are expressed in dendritic spines, the specific contribution of γ-actin in the expression of synaptic plasticity is unknown. We show that synaptic γ-actin levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3. TRIM3 protein and Actg1 transcript are colocalized in messenger ribonucleoprotein granules responsible for the dendritic targeting of messenger RNAs. TRIM3 polyubiquitylates γ-actin, most likely cotranslationally at synaptic sites. Trim3−/− mice consequently have increased levels of γ-actin at hippocampal synapses, resulting in higher spine densities, increased long-term potentiation, and enhanced short-term contextual fear memory consolidation. Interestingly, hippocampal deletion of Actg1 caused an increase in long-term fear memory. Collectively, our findings suggest that temporal control of γ-actin levels by TRIM3 is required to regulate the timing of hippocampal plasticity. We propose a model in which TRIM3 regulates synaptic γ-actin turnover and actin filament stability and thus forms a transient inhibitory constraint on the expression of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:26527743

  4. The ubiquitin ligase MuRF1 regulates PPARα activity in the heart by enhancing nuclear export via monoubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Liao, Jie-Ying; He, Jun; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Drujan, Doreen; Glass, David L.; Frederick, C.Brandon; Yoder, Bryan C.; Lalush, David S.; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte S.

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α by post-translational modification, such as ubiquitin, has not been described. We report here for the first time an ubiquitin ligase (muscle ring finger-1/MuRF1) that inhibits fatty acid oxidation by inhibiting PPARα, but not PPARβ/δ or PPARγ in cardiomyocytes in vitro. Similarly, MuRF1 Tg+ hearts showed significant decreases in nuclear PPARα activity and acyl-carnitine intermediates, while MuRF1−/− hearts exhibited increased PPARα activity and acyl-carnitine intermediates. MuRF1 directly interacts with PPARα, mono-ubiquitinates it, and targets it for nuclear export to inhibit fatty acid oxidation in a proteasome independent manner. We then identified a previously undescribed nuclear export sequence in PPARα, along with three specific lysines (292, 310, 388) required for MuRF1s targeting of nuclear export. These studies identify the role of ubiquitination in regulating cardiac PPARα, including the ubiquitin ligase that may be responsible for this critical regulation of cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:26116825

  5. A novel high-throughput activity assay for the Trypanosoma brucei editosome enzyme REL1 and other RNA ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Hall, Laurence; Riley, Sean; Sørensen, Jesper; Amaro, Rommie E.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), which threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. Without treatment the infection is almost always lethal. Current drugs for HAT are difficult to administer and have severe side effects. Together with increasing drug resistance this results in urgent need for new treatments. T. brucei and other trypanosomatid pathogens require a distinct form of post-transcriptional mRNA modification for mitochondrial gene expression. A multi-protein complex called the editosome cleaves mitochondrial mRNA, inserts or deletes uridine nucleotides at specific positions and re-ligates the mRNA. RNA editing ligase 1 (REL1) is essential for the re-ligation step and has no close homolog in the mammalian host, making it a promising target for drug discovery. However, traditional assays for RELs use radioactive substrates coupled with gel analysis and are not suitable for high-throughput screening of compound libraries. Here we describe a fluorescence-based REL activity assay. This assay is compatible with a 384-well microplate format and sensitive, satisfies statistical criteria for high-throughput methods and is readily adaptable for other polynucleotide ligases. We validated the assay by determining kinetic properties of REL1 and by identifying REL1 inhibitors in a library of small, pharmacologically active compounds. PMID:26400159

  6. Atomic Structure and Nonhomologous End-Joining Function of the Polymerase Component of Bacterial DNA Ligase D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Nandakumar, J.; Aniukwu, J.; Wang, L.; Glickman, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligase D (LigD) is a large polyfunctional protein that participates in a recently discovered pathway of nonhomologous end-joining in bacteria. LigD consists of an ATP-dependent ligase domain fused to a polymerase domain (Pol) and a phosphoesterase module. The Pol activity is remarkable for its dependence on manganese, its ability to perform templated and nontemplated primer extension reactions, and its preference for adding ribonucleotides to blunt DNA ends. Here we report the 1.5- Angstroms crystal structure of the Pol domain of Pseudomonas LigD and its complexes with manganese and ATP-dATP substrates, which reveal a minimized polymerase with a two-metal mechanism and a fold similar to that of archaeal DNA primase. Mutational analysis highlights the functionally relevant atomic contacts in the active site. Although distinct nucleoside conformations and contacts for ATP versus dATP are observed in the cocrystals, the functional analysis suggests that the ATP-binding mode is the productive conformation for dNMP and rNMP incorporation. We find that a mutation of Mycobacterium LigD that uniquely ablates the polymerase activity results in increased fidelity of blunt-end double-strand break repair in vivo by virtue of eliminating nucleotide insertions at the recombination junctions. Thus, LigD Pol is a direct catalyst of mutagenic nonhomologous end-joining in vivo. Our studies underscore a previously uncharacterized role for the primase-like polymerase family in DNA repair.

  7. Targeting Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases for drug discovery: structure, assembly and small-molecule modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bulatov, Emil; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the ubiquitin–proteasome system has emerged as a valid target for the development of novel therapeutics. E3 ubiquitin ligases are particularly attractive targets because they confer substrate specificity on the ubiquitin system. CRLs [Cullin–RING (really interesting new gene) E3 ubiquitin ligases] draw particular attention, being the largest family of E3s. The CRLs assemble into functional multisubunit complexes using a repertoire of substrate receptors, adaptors, Cullin scaffolds and RING-box proteins. Drug discovery targeting CRLs is growing in importance due to mounting evidence pointing to significant roles of these enzymes in diverse biological processes and human diseases, including cancer, where CRLs and their substrates often function as tumour suppressors or oncogenes. In the present review, we provide an account of the assembly and structure of CRL complexes, and outline the current state of the field in terms of available knowledge of small-molecule inhibitors and modulators of CRL activity. A comprehensive overview of the reported crystal structures of CRL subunits, components and full-size complexes, alone or with bound small molecules and substrate peptides, is included. This information is providing increasing opportunities to aid the rational structure-based design of chemical probes and potential small-molecule therapeutics targeting CRLs. PMID:25886174

  8. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  9. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available.

  10. Mechanism of auxin perception by the TIR1 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xu; Calderon-Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Sharon, Michal; Zheng, Changxue; Robinson, Carol V; Estelle, Mark; Zheng, Ning

    2007-04-05

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth and development. Perceived by a small family of F-box proteins including transport inhibitor response 1 (TIR1), auxin regulates gene expression by promoting SCF ubiquitin-ligase-catalysed degradation of the Aux/IAA transcription repressors, but how the TIR1 F-box protein senses and becomes activated by auxin remains unclear. Here we present the crystal structures of the Arabidopsis TIR1-ASK1 complex, free and in complexes with three different auxin compounds and an Aux/IAA substrate peptide. These structures show that the leucine-rich repeat domain of TIR1 contains an unexpected inositol hexakisphosphate co-factor and recognizes auxin and the Aux/IAA polypeptide substrate through a single surface pocket. Anchored to the base of the TIR1 pocket, auxin binds to a partially promiscuous site, which can also accommodate various auxin analogues. Docked on top of auxin, the Aux/IAA substrate peptide occupies the rest of the TIR1 pocket and completely encloses the hormone-binding site. By filling in a hydrophobic cavity at the protein interface, auxin enhances the TIR1-substrate interactions by acting as a 'molecular glue'. Our results establish the first structural model of a plant hormone receptor.

  11. A conformational switch regulates the ubiquitin ligase HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Bodo; Xu, Wenshan; Eilers, Martin; Popov, Nikita; Lorenz, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The human ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 has key roles in tumorigenesis, yet it is unkown how its activity is regulated. We present the crystal structure of a C-terminal part of HUWE1, including the catalytic domain, and reveal an asymmetric auto-inhibited dimer. We show that HUWE1 dimerizes in solution and self-associates in cells, and that both occurs through the crystallographic dimer interface. We demonstrate that HUWE1 is inhibited in cells and that it can be activated by disruption of the dimer interface. We identify a conserved segment in HUWE1 that counteracts dimer formation by associating with the dimerization region intramolecularly. Our studies reveal, intriguingly, that the tumor suppressor p14ARF binds to this segment and may thus shift the conformational equilibrium of HUWE1 toward the inactive state. We propose a model, in which the activity of HUWE1 underlies conformational control in response to physiological cues—a mechanism that may be exploited for cancer therapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21036.001 PMID:28193319

  12. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A.; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E.; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S.; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3′s cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1’s conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2–E3 interface through small-molecule modulators. PMID:27001857

  13. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  14. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  15. Prebiotic Factors Influencing the Activity of a Ligase Ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2017-04-06

    An RNA-lipid origin of life scenario provides a plausible route for compartmentalized replication of an informational polymer and subsequent division of the container. However, a full narrative to form such RNA protocells implies that catalytic RNA molecules, called ribozymes, can operate in the presence of self-assembled vesicles composed of prebiotically relevant constituents, such as fatty acids. Hereby, we subjected a newly engineered truncated variant of the L1 ligase ribozyme, named tL1, to various environmental conditions that may have prevailed on the early Earth with the objective to find a set of control parameters enabling both tL1-catalyzed ligation and formation of stable myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles. The separate and concurrent effects of temperature, concentrations of Mg(2+), MA, polyethylene glycol and various solutes were investigated. The most favorable condition tested consists of 100 mM NaCl, 1 mM Mg(2+), 5 mM MA, and 4 °C temperature, whereas the addition of Mg(2+)-chelating solutes, such as citrate, tRNAs, aspartic acid, and nucleoside triphosphates severely inhibits the reaction. These results further solidify the RNA-lipid world hypothesis and stress the importance of using a systems chemistry approach whereby a wide range of prebiotic factors interfacing with ribozymes are considered.

  16. Screening for E3-Ubiquitin ligase inhibitors: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Landré, Vivien; Rotblat, Barak; Melino, Sonia; Bernassola, Francesca; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in the regulation of most cellular pathways, and its deregulation has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies that include cancer, neurodegenerative and immunological disorders and viral infections. Targeting the UPS by small molecular regulators thus provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases. The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib was approved for treatment of hematologic malignancies by the FDA in 2003, becoming the first drug targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in the clinic. Development of drugs targeting specific components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, however, has lagged behind, mainly due to the complexity of the ubiquitination reaction and its outcomes. However, significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular nature of the ubiquitination system and the vast variety of cellular signals that it produces. Additionally, improvement of screening methods, both in vitro and in silico, have led to the discovery of a number of compounds targeting components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, and some of these have now entered clinical trials. Here, we discuss the current state of drug discovery targeting E3 ligases and the opportunities and challenges that it provides. PMID:25237759

  17. Structural basis of tubulin tyrosination by tubulin tyrosine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Prota, Andrea E.; Magiera, Maria M.; Kuijpers, Marijn; Bargsten, Katja; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara; Jaussi, Rolf; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Janke, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) catalyzes the post-translational retyrosination of detyrosinated α-tubulin. Despite the indispensable role of TTL in cell and organism development, its molecular mechanism of action is poorly understood. By solving crystal structures of TTL in complex with tubulin, we here demonstrate that TTL binds to the α and β subunits of tubulin and recognizes the curved conformation of the dimer. Biochemical and cellular assays revealed that specific tubulin dimer recognition controls the activity of the enzyme, and as a consequence, neuronal development. The TTL–tubulin structure further illustrates how the enzyme binds the functionally crucial C-terminal tail sequence of α-tubulin and how this interaction catalyzes the tyrosination reaction. It also reveals how TTL discriminates between α- and β-tubulin, and between different post-translationally modified forms of α-tubulin. Together, our data suggest that TTL has specifically evolved to recognize and modify tubulin, thus highlighting a fundamental role of the evolutionary conserved tubulin tyrosination cycle in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:23358242

  18. Interaction of N-methyl-2-alkenyl-4-quinolones with ATP-dependent MurE ligase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: antibacterial activity, molecular docking and inhibition kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Juan David; Wube, Abraham; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Gupta, Antima; Hüfner, Antje; Basavannacharya, Chandrakala; Rahman, Md. Mukhleshur; Thomaschitz, Christina; Bauer, Rudolf; McHugh, Timothy Daniel; Nobeli, Irene; Prieto, Jose M.; Gibbons, Simon; Bucar, Franz; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the antibacterial activity and MurE inhibition of a set of N-methyl-2-alkenyl-4-quinolones found to inhibit the growth of fast-growing mycobacteria. Methods Using the spot culture growth inhibition assay, MICs were determined for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. MICs were determined for Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium phlei, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microplate dilution assays. Inhibition of M. tuberculosis MurE ligase activity was determined both by colorimetric and HPLC methods. Computational modelling and binding prediction of the quinolones in the MurE structure was performed using Glide. Kinetic experiments were conducted for understanding possible competitive relations of the quinolones with the endogenous substrates of MurE ligase. Results The novel synthetic N-methyl-2-alkenyl-4-quinolones were found to be growth inhibitors of M. tuberculosis and rapid-growing mycobacteria as well as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, while showing no inhibition for E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The quinolones were found to be inhibitory to MurE ligase of M. tuberculosis in the micromolar range (IC50 ∼40–200 μM) when assayed either spectroscopically or by HPLC. Computational docking of the quinolones on the published M. tuberculosis MurE crystal structure suggested that the uracil recognition site is a probable binding site for the quinolones. Conclusions N-methyl-2-alkenyl-4-quinolones are inhibitors of mycobacterial and staphylococcal growth, and show MurE ligase inhibition. Therefore, they are considered as a starting point for the development of increased affinity MurE activity disruptors. PMID:21622974

  19. Cinnamate:CoA Ligase Initiates the Biosynthesis of a Benzoate-Derived Xanthone Phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum Cell Cultures1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gaid, Mariam M.; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg2+ and K+ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mm, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages. PMID:22992510

  20. Sister chromatid telomere fusions, but not NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal telomere fusions, occur independently of DNA ligases 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Liddiard, Kate; Ruis, Brian; Takasugi, Taylor; Harvey, Adam; Ashelford, Kevin E.; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Baird, Duncan M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres shorten with each cell division and can ultimately become substrates for nonhomologous end-joining repair, leading to large-scale genomic rearrangements of the kind frequently observed in human cancers. We have characterized more than 1400 telomere fusion events at the single-molecule level, using a combination of high-throughput sequence analysis together with experimentally induced telomeric double-stranded DNA breaks. We show that a single chromosomal dysfunctional telomere can fuse with diverse nontelomeric genomic loci, even in the presence of an otherwise stable genome, and that fusion predominates in coding regions. Fusion frequency was markedly increased in the absence of TP53 checkpoint control and significantly modulated by the cellular capacity for classical, versus alternative, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We observed a striking reduction in inter-chromosomal fusion events in cells lacking DNA ligase 4, in contrast to a remarkably consistent profile of intra-chromosomal fusion in the context of multiple genetic knockouts, including DNA ligase 3 and 4 double-knockouts. We reveal distinct mutational signatures associated with classical NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal, as opposed to alternative NHEJ-mediated intra-chromosomal, telomere fusions and evidence for an unanticipated sufficiency of DNA ligase 1 for these intra-chromosomal events. Our findings have implications for mechanisms driving cancer genome evolution. PMID:26941250

  1. [THE EFFECT OF waaL LIGASE GENES DELETION ON MOTILITY AND STRESS ADAPTATION REACTIONS OF YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA 6471/76].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, J I; Shilina, J V; Pozur, V K; Skurnik, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to estimate the influence of waaL(OS) and waaL(PS) genes deletion on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, bacterial motility and stress resistance of bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica 6471/76. Single and double waaL mutants were created by replacing the wild-type alleles in bacterial chromosome for mutant ones. The phenotypes of mutants were visualized by DOC-PAGE gels stained with silver and immunoblot with specific to O-polysaccharide and outer core monoclonal antibodies. Bacterial motility was evaluated by the diameter of the migration zone. Wild type bacteria and mutants were analyzed by bacterial growth curves in a hypertonic medium. Participation of WaaL ligases in resistance to osmotic pressure was found only in case of both ligese genes deletion. Also the YeO3_os_ps mutants showed motility decreasing, which recovered after adding a functionally active gene. Thus, deletion of both waaL ligase genes lead to a drastic reduction in bacterial motility and increase their sensitivity to hypertonic medium that can indirectly characterize biological role of WaaL ligases.

  2. SHP-1 inhibition by 4-hydroxynonenal activates Jun N-terminal kinase and glutamate cysteine ligase.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-07-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major lipid peroxidation product, is toxic at high concentrations, but at near-physiological concentrations it induces detoxifying enzymes. Previous data established that in human bronchial epithelial (HBE1) cells, both genes for glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) are induced by HNE through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is thought to play a role as a negative regulator of cell signaling, and has been implicated as such in the JNK pathway. In the present study, SHP-1 was demonstrated to contribute to HNE-induced-gclc expression via regulation of the JNK pathway in HBE1 cells. Treatment of HBE1 cells with HNE induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4), JNK, and c-Jun. HNE was able to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase activity of SHP-1 through increased degradation of the protein. Furthermore, transfection with small interference RNA SHP-1 showed an enhancement of JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation, but not of MKK4, leading to increased gclc expression. These results demonstrate that SHP-1 plays a role as a negative regulator of the JNK pathway and that HNE activated the JNK pathway by inhibiting SHP-1. Thus, SHP-1 acts as a sensor for HNE and is responsible for an important adaptive response to oxidative stress.

  3. The HECTD3 E3 ubiquitin ligase suppresses cisplatin-induced apoptosis via stabilizing MALT1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zehua; Zhao, Dong; Chen, Hui; Chen, Wenlin; Zhou, Zhongmei; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hongmin; Chen, Ceshi

    2013-01-01

    Homologous to the E6-associated protein carboxyl terminus domain containing 3 (HECTD3) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with unknown functions. Here, we show that HECTD3 confers cancer cell resistance to cisplatin. To understand the molecular mechanisms, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) as an HECTD3-interacting protein. HECTD3 promotes MALT1 ubiquitination with nondegradative polyubiquitin chains by direct interacting with the MALT1 through its N-terminal destruction of cyclin domain. HECTD3 does not target MALT1 for degradation but stabilize it. HECTD3 depletion dramatically decreases the levels of MALT1 in MCF7 and HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, which is correlated to an increase in apoptosis. Knockdown of MALT1 likewise increases cisplatin-induced apoptosis in these cancer cells. However, HECTD3 over-expression leads to a decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of MALT1 partially rescues HECTD3 depletion-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that HECTD3 promotes cell survival through stabilizing MALT1. Our data have important implications in cancer therapy by providing novel molecular targets.

  4. The ubiquitin ligase TRIM25 targets ERG for degradation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Humphries, Caroline G.; Ma, Shi-Hong; Hutchinson, Ryan; Li, Rui; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Kittler, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Ets related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that is overexpressed in 40% of prostate tumors due to a gene fusion between ERG and TMPRSS2. Because ERG functions as a driver of prostate carcinogenesis, understanding the mechanisms that influence its turnover may provide new molecular handles to target the protein. Previously, we found that ERG undergoes ubiquitination and then is deubiquitinated by USP9X in prostate cancer cells to prevent its proteasomal degradation. Here, we identify Tripartite motif-containing protein 25 (TRIM25) as the E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates the protein prior to its degradation. TRIM25 binds full-length ERG, and it also binds the N-terminally truncated variants of ERG that are expressed in tumors with TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. We demonstrate that TRIM25 polyubiquitinates ERG in vitro and that inactivation of TRIM25 resulted in reduced polyubiquitination and stabilization of ERG. TRIM25 mRNA and protein expression was increased in ERG rearrangement-positive prostate cancer specimens, and we provide evidence that ERG upregulates TRIM25 expression. Thus, overexpression of ERG in prostate cancer may cause an increase in TRIM25 activity, which is mitigated by the expression of the deubiquitinase USP9X, which is required to stabilize ERG. PMID:27626314

  5. The α2 helix in the DNA ligase IV BRCT-1 domain is required for targeted degradation of ligase IV during adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Timra; Greer, Amy E; Vindigni, Alessandro; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2012-07-05

    In adenovirus E4 mutant infections, viral DNAs form concatemers through a process that requires host Non-homologous End Joining (NHEJ) proteins including DNA Ligase IV (LigIV). Adenovirus proteins E4 34k and E1b 55k form the substrate-selection component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase and prevent concatenation by targeting LigIV for proteasomal degradation. The mechanisms and sites involved in targeting this and other E3 ligase substrates generally are poorly-understood. Through genetic analysis, we identified the α2 helix of one LigIV BRCT domain (BRCT-1) as essential for adenovirus-mediated degradation. Replacement of the BRCT domain of DNA ligase III (LigIII), which is resistant to degradation, with LigIV BRCT-1 does not promote degradation. A humanized mouse LigIV that possesses a BRCT-1 α2 helix identical to the human protein, like its parent, is also resistant to adenovirus-mediated degradation. Thus, both the BRCT-1 α2 helix and an element outside BRCT-1 are required for adenovirus-mediated degradation of LigIV.

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  7. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR® Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4–6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  8. RBR E3 ubiquitin ligases: new structures, new insights, new questions

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Walden, Helen; Shaw, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The RBR (RING-BetweenRING-RING) or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] E3 ubiquitin ligases comprise a group of 12 complex multidomain enzymes. This unique family of E3 ligases includes parkin, whose dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of early-onset Parkinson's disease, and HOIP (HOIL-1-interacting protein) and HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1), members of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). The RBR E3 ligases share common features with both the larger RING and HECT (homologous with E6-associated protein C-terminus) E3 ligase families, directly catalysing ubiquitin transfer from an intrinsic catalytic cysteine housed in the C-terminal domain, as well as recruiting thioester-bound E2 enzymes via a RING domain. Recent three-dimensional structures and biochemical findings of the RBRs have revealed novel protein domain folds not previously envisioned and some surprising modes of regulation that have raised many questions. This has required renaming two of the domains in the RBR E3 ligases to more accurately reflect their structures and functions: the C-terminal Rcat (required-for-catalysis) domain, essential for catalytic activity, and a central BRcat (benign-catalytic) domain that adopts the same fold as the Rcat, but lacks a catalytic cysteine residue and ubiquitination activity. The present review discusses how three-dimensional structures of RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) E3 ligases have provided new insights into our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of these important enzymes in ubiquitin biology. PMID:24576094

  9. C-Terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  10. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  11. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions.

  12. Exploring Peptide Ligase Orthologs in Actinobacteria-Discovery of Pseudopeptide Natural Products, Ketomemicins.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kawata, Junpei; Noike, Motoyoshi; Satoh, Yasuharu; Furihata, Kazuo; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-06-17

    We recently identified a novel peptide ligase (PGM1), an ATP-grasp-ligase, that catalyzes amide bond formation between (S)-2-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-guanidinoacetic acid and ribosomally supplied oligopeptides in pheganomycin biosynthesis. This was the first example of an ATP-grasp-ligase utilizing peptides as nucleophiles. To explore the potential of this type of enzyme, we performed a BLAST search and identified many orthologs. The orthologs of Streptomyces mobaraensis, Salinispora tropica, and Micromonospora sp. were found in similar gene clusters consisting of six genes. To probe the functions of these genes, we heterologously expressed each of the clusters in Streptomyces lividans and detected novel and structurally similar pseudotripeptides in the broth of all transformants. Moreover, a recombinant PGM1 ortholog of Micromonospora sp. was demonstrated to be a novel dipeptide ligase catalyzing amide bond formation between amidino-arginine and dipeptides to yield tripeptides; this is the first report of a peptide ligase utilizing dipeptides as nucleophiles.

  13. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses*

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Juston C.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Hall, Shawn M.; McLaird, Merry B.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  14. ATLs and BTLs, plant-specific and general eukaryotic structurally-related E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-02-01

    Major components of the ubiquitin proteasome system are the enzymes that operate on the transfer of ubiquitin to selected target substrate, known as ubiquitin ligases. The RING finger is a domain that is present in key classes of ubiquitin ligases. This domain coordinates the interaction with a suitable E2 conjugase and the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to protein targets. Additional domains coupled to the same polypeptide are important for modulating the function of these ubiquitin ligases. Plants contain several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases that in many cases have expanded as multigene families. Some families are specific to the plant lineage, whereas others may have a common ancestor among plants and other eukaryotic lineages. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATLs) and BCA2 zinc finger ATLs (BTLs) are two families of ubiquitin ligases that share some common structural features. These are intronless genes that encode a highly related RING finger domain, and yet during evolutionary history, their mode of gene expansion and function is rather different. In each of these two families, the co-occurrence of transmembrane helices or C2/C2 (BZF finger) domains with a selected variation on the RING finger has been subjected to strong selection pressure in order to preserve their unique domain architectures during evolution.

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circular Substrates for an Archaeal RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hubert F; Heliou, Alice; Djaout, Kamel; Lestini, Roxane; Regnier, Mireille; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2017-03-09

    It is only recently that the abundant presence of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in all kingdoms of Life, including the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has emerged. This led us to investigate the physiological significance of a previously observed weak intramolecular ligation activity of Pab1020 RNA ligase. Here we demonstrate that this enzyme, despite sharing significant sequence similarity with DNA ligases, is indeed an RNA-specific polynucleotide ligase efficiently acting on physiologically significant substrates. Using a combination of RNA immunoprecipitation assays and RNA-seq, our genome-wide studies revealed 133 individual circRNA loci in P. abyssi. The large majority of these loci interacted with Pab1020 in cells and circularization of selected C/D Box and 5S rRNA transcripts was confirmed biochemically. Altogether these studies revealed that Pab1020 is required for RNA circularization. Our results further suggest the functional speciation of an ancestral NTase domain and/or DNA ligase towards RNA ligase activity and prompt for further characterization of the widespread functions of circular RNAs in prokaryotes. Detailed insight into the cellular substrates of Pab1020 may facilitate the development of new biotechnological applications e.g. in ligation of preadenylated adaptors to RNA molecules.

  16. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch controls the protein stability of p63.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mario; Aqeilan, Rami I; Neale, Michael; Candi, Eleonora; Salomoni, Paolo; Knight, Richard A; Croce, Carlo M; Melino, Gerry

    2006-08-22

    p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors, plays an important role in epithelial development, regulating both cell cycle and apoptosis. Even though p63 activity is regulated mainly at the posttranslational level, the control of p63 protein stability is far from being fully understood. Here, we show that the Hect (homologous to the E6-associated protein C terminus)-containing Nedd4-like ubiquitin protein ligase Itch binds, ubiquitylates, and promotes the degradation of p63. The physical interaction occurs at the border between the PY and the SAM (sterile alpha motif) domains; a single Y504F mutation significantly affects p63 degradation. Itch and p63 are coexpressed in the epidermis and in primary keratinocytes where Itch controls the p63 protein steady-state level. Accordingly, p63 protein levels are significantly increased in Itch knockout keratinocytes. These data suggest that Itch has a fundamental role in the mechanism that controls endogenous p63 protein levels and therefore contributes to regulation of p63 in physiological conditions.

  17. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  18. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface.

    PubMed

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-03-11

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference-NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity.

  19. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface

    PubMed Central

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference - NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity. PMID:26964677

  20. Role of a ribosome-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase in protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Mario H; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2010-09-23

    Messenger RNA lacking stop codons ('non-stop mRNA') can arise from errors in gene expression, and encode aberrant proteins whose accumulation could be deleterious to cellular function. In bacteria, these 'non-stop proteins' become co-translationally tagged with a peptide encoded by ssrA/tmRNA (transfer-messenger RNA), which signals their degradation by energy-dependent proteases. How eukaryotic cells eliminate non-stop proteins has remained unknown. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ltn1 RING-domain-type E3 ubiquitin ligase acts in the quality control of non-stop proteins, in a process that is mechanistically distinct but conceptually analogous to that performed by ssrA: Ltn1 is predominantly associated with ribosomes, and it marks nascent non-stop proteins with ubiquitin to signal their proteasomal degradation. Ltn1-mediated ubiquitylation of non-stop proteins seems to be triggered by their stalling in ribosomes on translation through the poly(A) tail. The biological relevance of this process is underscored by the finding that loss of Ltn1 function confers sensitivity to stress caused by increased non-stop protein production. We speculate that defective protein quality control may underlie the neurodegenerative phenotype that results from mutation of the mouse Ltn1 homologue Listerin.

  1. Force Dependent Biotinylation of Myosin IIA by α-Catenin Tagged with a Promiscuous Biotin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M.; Macway, Katherine G.; Renner, Derrick J.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  2. Natural variation and dosage of the HEI10 meiotic E3 ligase control Arabidopsis crossover recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Underwood, Charles J.; Lambing, Christophe; Martinez-Garcia, Marina; Lawrence, Emma J.; Ziolkowska, Liliana; Griffin, Catherine; Choi, Kyuha; Franklin, F. Chris H.; Martienssen, Robert A.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which creates genetic diversity and balances homolog segregation. Despite these critical functions, crossover frequency varies extensively within and between species. Although natural crossover recombination modifier loci have been detected in plants, causal genes have remained elusive. Using natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified two major recombination quantitative trait loci (rQTLs) that explain 56.9% of crossover variation in Col×Ler F2 populations. We mapped rQTL1 to semidominant polymorphisms in HEI10, which encodes a conserved ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates crossovers. Null hei10 mutants are haploinsufficient, and, using genome-wide mapping and immunocytology, we show that transformation of additional HEI10 copies is sufficient to more than double euchromatic crossovers. However, heterochromatic centromeres remained recombination-suppressed. The strongest HEI10-mediated crossover increases occur in subtelomeric euchromatin, which is reminiscent of sex differences in Arabidopsis recombination. Our work reveals that HEI10 naturally limits Arabidopsis crossovers and has the potential to influence the response to selection. PMID:28223312

  3. The Highwire Ubiquitin Ligase Promotes Axonal Degeneration by Tuning Levels of Nmnat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xin; Hao, Yan; Sun, Kan; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Xia; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Wu, Chunlai; Hume, Richard I.; Collins, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a hallmark of many neuropathies, neurodegenerative diseases, and injuries. Here, using a Drosophila injury model, we have identified a highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, Highwire (Hiw), as an important regulator of axonal and synaptic degeneration. Mutations in hiw strongly inhibit Wallerian degeneration in multiple neuron types and developmental stages. This new phenotype is mediated by a new downstream target of Hiw: the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyltransferase (Nmnat), which acts in parallel to a previously known target of Hiw, the Wallenda dileucine zipper kinase (Wnd/DLK) MAPKKK. Hiw promotes a rapid disappearance of Nmnat protein in the distal stump after injury. An increased level of Nmnat protein in hiw mutants is both required and sufficient to inhibit degeneration. Ectopically expressed mouse Nmnat2 is also subject to regulation by Hiw in distal axons and synapses. These findings implicate an important role for endogenous Nmnat and its regulation, via a conserved mechanism, in the initiation of axonal degeneration. Through independent regulation of Wnd/DLK, whose function is required for proximal axons to regenerate, Hiw plays a central role in coordinating both regenerative and degenerative responses to axonal injury. PMID:23226106

  4. Sensitive detection of point mutation by electrochemiluminescence and DNA ligase-based assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huijuan; Wu, Baoyan

    2008-12-01

    The technology of single-base mutation detection plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and prognosis of genetic-based diseases. Here we reported a new method for the analysis of point mutations in genomic DNA through the integration of allele-specific oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) with magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection scheme. In this assay the tris(bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR) labeled probe and the biotinylated probe are designed to perfectly complementary to the mutant target, thus a ligation can be generated between those two probes by Taq DNA Ligase in the presence of mutant target. If there is an allele mismatch, the ligation does not take place. The ligation products are then captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of the TBR label. Results showed that the new method held a low detection limit down to 10 fmol and was successfully applied in the identification of point mutations from ASTC-α-1, PANC-1 and normal cell lines in codon 273 of TP53 oncogene. In summary, this method provides a sensitive, cost-effective and easy operation approach for point mutation detection.

  5. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference - NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity.

  6. Composition, Roles, and Regulation of Cullin-Based Ubiquitin E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christina M.; Gray, William M.; Mooney, Sutton; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants depend on flexible regulatory systems that allow them to adequately regulate developmental and physiological processes in context with environmental cues. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which targets a great number of proteins for degradation, is cellular tool that provides the necessary flexibility to accomplish this task. Ubiquitin E3 ligases provide the needed specificity to the pathway by selectively binding to particular substrates and facilitating their ubiquitylation. The largest group of E3 ligases known in plants is represented by CULLIN-REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) E3 ligases (CRLs). In recent years, a great amount of knowledge has been generated to reveal the critical roles of these enzymes across all aspects of plant life. This review provides an overview of the different classes of CRLs in plants, their specific complex compositions, the variety of biological processes they control, and the regulatory steps that can affect their activities. PMID:25505853

  7. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  8. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations.

  9. The transcription factor Krox20 is an E3 ligase that sumoylates its Nab coregulators

    PubMed Central

    García-Gutiérrez, Pablo; Juárez-Vicente, Francisco; Gallardo-Chamizo, Francisco; Charnay, Patrick; García-Domínguez, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to proteins regulates many processes in the eukaryotic cell. This reaction is similar to ubiquitination and usually requires an E3 ligase for substrate modification. However, only a few SUMO ligases have been described so far, which frequently facilitate sumoylation by bringing together the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and the target protein. Ubc9 is an interaction partner of the transcription factor Krox20, a key regulator of hindbrain development. Here, we show that Krox20 functions as a SUMO ligase for its coregulators—the Nab proteins—and that Nab sumoylation negatively modulates Krox20 transcriptional activity in vivo. PMID:21836637

  10. Structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from Bacillus anthracis (BA4489)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Christoph; Carter, Lester G.; Winter, Graeme; Owens, Ray J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2007-03-01

    The structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from B. anthracis determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.6 Å is described. Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium and the causative agent of the disease anthrax. The Oxford Protein Production Facility has been targeting proteins from B. anthracis in order to develop high-throughput technologies within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase (BA4489) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure, solved in complex with magnesium-ion-bound ADP and phosphate, gives a detailed picture of the proposed catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Chemical differences from other cyclo-ligase structures close to the active site that could be exploited to design specific inhibitors are also highlighted.

  11. Identification and Validation of Human DNA Ligase Inhibitors Using Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shijun; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Bachman, Kurtis E.; Ellenberger, Tom; Ballin, Jeff D.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Linking together of DNA strands by DNA ligases is essential for DNA replication and repair. Since many therapies used to treat cancer act by causing DNA damage, there is growing interest in the development of DNA repair inhibitors. Accordingly, virtual database screening and experimental evaluation were applied to identify inhibitors of human DNA ligase I (hLigI). When a DNA binding site within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of hLigI was targeted, more than 1 million compounds were screened from which 192 were chosen for experimental evaluation. In DNA joining assays, 10 compounds specifically inhibited hLigI, 5 of which also inhibited the proliferation of cultured human cell lines. Analysis of the 10 active compounds revealed the utility of including multiple protein conformations and chemical clustering in the virtual screening procedure. The identified ligase inhibitors are structurally diverse and have druglike physical and molecular characteristics making them ideal for further drug development studies. PMID:18630893

  12. Ubiquitin ligase EL5 maintains the viability of root meristems by influencing cytokinin-mediated nitrogen effects in rice

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Root formation is dependent on meristematic activity and is influenced by nitrogen supply. We have previously shown that ubiquitin ligase, EL5, in rice (Oryza sativa) is involved in the maintenance of root meristematic viability. When mutant EL5 protein is overexpressed to dominantly inhibit the endogenous EL5 function in rice, primordial and meristematic necrosis ia observed. Here, we analysed the cause of root cell death in transgenic rice plants (mEL5) overexpressing EL5V162A, which encodes a partly inactive ubiquitin ligase. The mEL5 mutants showed increased sensitivity to nitrogen that was reflected in the inhibition of root formation. Treatment of mEL5 with nitrate or nitrite caused meristematic cell death accompanied by browning. Transcriptome profiling of whole roots exhibited overlaps between nitrite-responsive genes in non-transgenic (NT) rice plants and genes with altered basal expression levels in mEL5. Phytohormone profiling of whole roots revealed that nitrite treatment increased cytokinin levels, but mEL5 constitutively contained more cytokinin than NT plants and showed increased sensitivity to exogenous cytokinin. More superoxide was detected in mEL5 roots after treatment with nitrite or cytokinin, and treatment with an inhibitor of superoxide production prevented mEL5 roots from both nitrite- and cytokinin-induced meristematic cell death. These results indicate a nitrogen-triggered pathway that leads to changes in root formation through the production of cytokinin and superoxide, on which EL5 acts to prevent meristematic cell death. PMID:24663342

  13. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  14. Broad nucleotide cofactor specificity of DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Hyperthermus butylicus and its evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Kang-Keun; Sun, Younguk; Seo, Gang-Jin; Cho, Sung Suk; Kwon, Suk Hyung; Kwon, Suk-Tae

    2013-05-01

    The nucleotide cofactor specificity of the DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Hyperthermus butylicus (Hbu) was studied to investigate the evolutionary relationship of DNA ligases. The Hbu DNA ligase gene was expressed under control of the T7lac promoter of pTARG in Escherichia coli BL21-CodonPlus(DE3)-RIL. The expressed enzyme was purified using the IMPACT™-CN system (intein-mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag) and cation-ion (Arg-tag) chromatography. The optimal temperature for Hbu DNA ligase activity was 75 °C, and the optimal pH was 8.0 in Tris-HCl. The activity was highly dependent on MgCl2 or MnCl2 with maximal activity above 5 mM MgCl2 and 2 mM MnCl2. Notably, Hbu DNA ligase can use ADP and GTP in addition to ATP. The broad nucleotide cofactor specificity of Hbu DNA ligase might exemplify an undifferentiated ancestral stage in the evolution of DNA ligases. This study provides new evidence for possible evolutionary relationships among DNA ligases.

  15. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  16. Biochemical and structural characterization of DNA ligases from bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Wagner, Gerd K.; Bowater, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are enzymes that seal breaks in the backbones of DNA, leading to them being essential for the survival of all organisms. DNA ligases have been studied from many different types of cells and organisms and shown to have diverse sizes and sequences, with well conserved specific sequences that are required for enzymatic activity. A significant number of DNA ligases have been isolated or prepared in recombinant forms and, here, we review their biochemical and structural characterization. All DNA ligases contain an essential lysine that transfers an adenylate group from a co-factor to the 5′-phosphate of the DNA end that will ultimately be joined to the 3′-hydroxyl of the neighbouring DNA strand. The essential DNA ligases in bacteria use β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD+) as their co-factor whereas those that are essential in other cells use adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) as their co-factor. This observation suggests that the essential bacterial enzyme could be targeted by novel antibiotics and the complex molecular structure of β-NAD+ affords multiple opportunities for chemical modification. Several recent studies have synthesized novel derivatives and their biological activity against a range of DNA ligases has been evaluated as inhibitors for drug discovery and/or non-natural substrates for biochemical applications. Here, we review the recent advances that herald new opportunities to alter the biochemical activities of these important enzymes. The recent development of modified derivatives of nucleotides highlights that the continued combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical techniques will be useful in targeting these essential cellular enzymes. PMID:27582505

  17. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  18. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    agents including sulfur mustard (SM). We observed concurrent activation of PARP and DNA ligase in SM-exposed human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK...Previous reports from other laboratories suggested that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. In humans, there are three distinct...DNA ligases, I, II and IV of which DNA ligase I participates in DNA replication and repair. By metabolically labeling HEK using 3H-adenosine

  19. TRIM E3 ligases in HIV infection: can these intrinsic immunity factors be harnessed for novel vaccines or therapies?

    PubMed

    Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) E3 ligases are a recently identified family of proteins with potent antiviral activity in mammalian cells. The prototype TRIM E3 ligase, TRIM5α was initially identified as a species-specific antiviral restriction factor but subsequent studies suggest some antiviral activity by several TRIM E3 ligases in human cells. However, the mechanisms of antiviral activity by these proteins and their transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation are poorly understood. Furthermore, the contribution of TRIM E3 ligases to relative resistance or viral control in vivo is largely unknown. Emerging data from our laboratory and other groups suggests that these proteins may have antiviral activity in vivo and contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Considering the significant difficulties so far encountered in developing an effective HIV vaccine and with the use of antiretroviral therapies, it will be important to further investigate the potential of TRIM E3 ligases as novel prophylactics or therapies.

  20. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Baehr, Leslie M

    2014-09-15

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered.

  1. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 is involved in ethylene regulation of leaf expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghee; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as flowering, senescence, abscission, and fruit ripening. In particular, leaf expansion is also controlled by ethylene in Arabidopsis. Exogenous treatment with ethylene inhibits leaf expansion, and consistently, ethylene insensitive mutants show increased leaf area. Here, we report that the RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1) regulates leaf expansion in an ethylene signaling pathway. The HOS1-deficient mutant showed reduced leaf area and was insensitive to ethylene perception inhibitor, silver thiosulfate (STS). Accordingly, genes encoding ethylene signaling components were significantly up-regulated in hos1-3. This study demonstrates that the HOS1 protein is involved in ethylene signal transduction for the proper regulation of leaf expansion possibly under environmentally stressful conditions.

  2. The E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1 functions in seed germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Il; Kwak, Jun Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-11-01

    Seed germination is an important stage in the lifecycle of a plant because it determines subsequent vegetative growth and reproduction. Here, we show that the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1 regulates seed dormancy and germination. The germination rates of the siz1 mutants were less than 50%, even after a short period of ripening. However, their germination rates increased to wild-type levels after cold stratification or long periods of ripening. In addition, exogenous gibberellin (GA) application improved the germination rates of the siz1 mutants to the wild-type level. In transgenic plants, suppression of AtSIZ1 caused rapid post-translational decay of SLEEPY1 (SLY1), a positive regulator of GA signaling, during germination, and inducible AtSIZ1 overexpression led to increased SLY1 levels. In addition, overexpressing wild-type SLY1 in transgenic sly1 mutants increased their germination ratios to wild-type levels, whereas the germination ratio of transgenic sly1 mutants overexpressing mSLY1 was similar to that of sly1. The germination ratios of siz1 mutant seeds in immature developing siliques were much lower than those of the wild-type. Moreover, SLY1 and DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) transcript levels were reduced in the siz1 mutants, whereas the transcript levels of DELLA and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3) were higher than those of the wild-type. Taken together, these results indicate that the reduced germination of the siz1 mutants results from impaired GA signaling due to low SLY1 levels and activity, as well as hyperdormancy due to high levels of expression of dormancy-related genes including DOG1.

  3. Partial complementation of a DNA ligase I deficiency by DNA ligase III and its impact on cell survival and telomere stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Le Chalony, Catherine; Hoffschir, Françoise; Gauthier, Laurent R; Gross, Julia; Biard, Denis S; Boussin, François D; Pennaneach, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    DNA ligase I (LigI) plays a central role in the joining of strand interruptions during replication and repair. In our current study, we provide evidence that DNA ligase III (LigIII) and XRCC1, which form a complex that functions in single-strand break repair, are required for the proliferation of mammalian LigI-depleted cells. We show from our data that in cells with either dysfunctional LigI activity or depleted of this enzyme, both LigIII and XRCC1 are retained on the chromatin and accumulate at replication foci. We also demonstrate that the LigI and LigIII proteins cooperate to inhibit sister chromatid exchanges but that only LigI prevents telomere sister fusions. Taken together, these results suggest that in cells with dysfunctional LigI, LigIII contributes to the ligation of replication intermediates but not to the prevention of telomeric instability.

  4. Mitochondrial E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase 1 Mediates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Endothelial Cell Death and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Mi Kyeong; Huh, Jin Won; Park, Hye Yun; Ha, Sang Yun; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yun-Song

    2016-02-01

    By virtue of the critical roles of Akt in vascular endothelial cell (EC) survival and function, cigarette smoke-induced Akt reduction may contribute to EC death and dysfunction in smokers' lungs. One of the negative Akt regulatory mechanisms is K48-linked Akt ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Here, we assessed the involvement of mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (MUL1), recently revealed as a novel Akt ubiquitin E3 ligase, in cigarette smoke-induced Akt ubiquitination and its contribution to pulmonary EC death and dysfunction. In human lung microvascular ECs (HLMVECs), cigarette smoke extract (CSE) noticeably elevated MUL1 expression and K48-linked Akt ubiquitination, whereas Akt, p-Akt, eNOS, and p-eNOS levels were decreased. MUL1 knockdown suppressed CSE-induced Akt ubiquitination/degradation and cytoplasmic reductions of Akt and p-Akt. Furthermore, MUL1 knockdown attenuated reductions of eNOS and p-eNOS and alleviated EC survival, migration, and tube formation in the presence of CSE exposure. In addition, overexpression of K284R Akt, a mutant for a MUL1-ubiquitination site, produced similar effects. In HLMVECs exposed to CSE, Akt-MUL1 interaction was increased in coimmunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assays. Similarly, the proximity ligation assay signals were elevated in rat lungs exposed to cigarette smoke for 3 months, during which Mul1 levels were noticeably increased. Finally, we found that CSE-mediated MUL1 induction in HLMVECs is mediated by retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α. Taken together, these data suggest that cigarette smoke-induced MUL1 elevation mediates Akt ubiquitination/degradation, potentially leading to pulmonary EC death and functional impairment.

  5. SAG/ROC-SCF beta-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes pro-caspase-3 degradation as a mechanism of apoptosis protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingjia; Gallegos, Jayme R; Gu, Qingyang; Huang, Yuanhui; Li, Jun; Jin, Yetao; Lu, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2006-12-01

    Skp1-cullin-F-box protein (SCF) is a multicomponent E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that ubiquitinates a number of important biologic molecules such as p27, beta-catenin, and IkappaB for proteasomal degradation, thus regulating cell proliferation and survival. One SCF component, SAG/ROC2/Rbx2/Hrt2, a RING finger protein, was first identified as a redox-inducible protein, which, when overexpressed, inhibited apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. We report here that sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), as well as its family member ROC1/Rbx1, bound to the proinactive form of caspase-3 (pro-caspase-3). Binding was likely mediated through F-box protein, beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), which binds to the first 38 amino acids of pro-caspase-3. Importantly, beta-TrCP1 expression significantly shortened the protein half-life of pro-caspase-3, whereas expression of a dominant-negative beta-TrCP1 mutant with the F-box domain deleted extended it. An in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) promoted ubiquitination of pro-caspase-3. Furthermore, endogenous levels of pro-caspase-3 were decreased by overexpression of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligases, but increased on siRNA silencing of SAG, regulator of cullin-1 (ROC1), or beta-TrCPs, leading to increased apoptosis by etoposide and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand through increased activation of caspase-3. Thus, pro-caspase-3 appears to be a substrate of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligase, which protects cells from apoptosis through increased apoptosis threshold by reducing the basal level of pro-caspase-3.

  6. The expression of the ubiquitin ligase subunit Cks1 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slotky, Merav; Shapira, Ma'anit; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Linn, Shai; Futerman, Boris; Tsalic, Medy; Hershko, Dan D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Loss of the cell-cycle inhibitory protein p27Kip1 is associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. The decrease in the levels of this protein is the result of increased proteasome-dependent degradation, mediated and rate-limited by its specific ubiquitin ligase subunits S-phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2) and cyclin-dependent kinase subunit 1 (Cks1). Skp2 was recently found to be overexpressed in breast cancers, but the role of Cks1 in these cancers is unknown. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of Cks1 expression in breast cancer and its relation to p27Kip1 and Skp2 expression and to tumor aggressiveness. Methods The expressions of Cks1, Skp2, and p27Kip1 were examined immunohistochemically on formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissue sections from 50 patients with breast cancer and by immunoblot analysis on breast cancer cell lines. The relation between Cks1 levels and patients' clinical and histological parameters were examined by Cox regression and the Kaplan–Meier method. Results The expression of Cks1 was strongly associated with Skp2 expression (r = 0.477; P = 0.001) and inversely with p27Kip1 (r = -0.726; P < 0.0001). Overexpression of Cks1 was associated with loss of tumor differentiation, young age, lack of expression of estrogen receptors and of progesterone receptors, and decreased disease-free (P = 0.0007) and overall (P = 0.041) survival. In addition, Cks1 and Skp2 expression were increased by estradiol in estrogen-dependent cell lines but were down-regulated by tamoxifen. Conclusion These results suggest that Cks1 is involved in p27Kip1 down-regulation and may have an important role in the development of aggressive tumor behavior in breast cancer. PMID:16168119

  7. Yeast Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase affects the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Joanna; Spiess, Matthias; Stawiecka-Mirota, Marta; Monkaityte, Rasa; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Urban-Grimal, Daniele; Winsor, Barbara; Zoladek, Teresa

    2011-12-01

    Yeast Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase is involved in several cellular processes, including endocytosis. Actin patches are sites of endocytosis, a process involving actin assembly and disassembly. Here we show Rsp5 localization in cortical patches and demonstrate its involvement in actin cytoskeleton organization and dynamics. We found that the Rsp5-F1-GFP2 N-terminal fragment and full length GFP-Rsp5 were recruited to peripheral patches that temporarily co-localized with Abp1-mCherry, a marker of actin patches. Actin cytoskeleton organization was defective in a strain lacking RSP5 or overexpressing RSP5, and this phenotype was accompanied by morphological abnormalities. Overexpression of RSP5 caused hypersensitivity of cells to Latrunculin A, an actin-depolymerizing drug and was toxic to cells lacking Las17, an activator of actin nucleation. Moreover, Rsp5 was required for efficient actin polymerization in a whole cell extract based in vitro system. Rsp5 interacted with Las17 and Las17-binding proteins, Lsb1 and Lsb2, in a GST-Rsp5-WW2/3 pull down assay. Rsp5 ubiquitinated Lsb1-HA and Lsb2-HA without directing them for degradation. Overexpression of RSP5 increased the cellular level of HA-Las17 in wild type and in lsb1Δ lsb2Δ strains in which the basal level of Las17 was already elevated. This increase was prevented in a strain devoid of Las17-binding protein Sla1 which is also a target of Rsp5 ubiquitination. Thus, Rsp5 together with Lsb1, Lsb2 and Sla1 regulate the level of Las17, an important activator of actin polymerization.

  8. Role of β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase receptor in UVB mediated responses in skin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Neehar; Demmer, Tara A.; Sharma, Alok K.; Elcheva, Irina; Spiegelman, Vladimir S.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancers are the most common cancers in the United States. Exposure to UVB radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase has been found to be involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and transformation. Aberrant up-regulation of beta-transducin repeats-containing proteins (β-TrCP) is often found in cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We have previously demonstrated that β-TrCP2 is over-expressed in chemically induced mouse skin tumors [1]. Various cellular stress stimuli, including UVB, induce an increase in β-TrCP1 mRNA and protein levels in human cells [2]. We have previously shown that inhibition of β-TrCP function, by induction of dominant negative β-TrCP2 (β-TrCP2ΔF), in vitro in hTERT immortalized normal keratinocytes, results in increase in UVB induced apoptosis [3]. We have generated transgenic mice with inducible, selective expression of dominant negative β-TrCP2 in epidermis with the Keratin 5 promoter (K5-rTA × TRE-HA-β-TrCPΔF). Here we report that inhibition of β-TrCP function in mouse epidermis results in decrease in UVB-induced edema, hyperplasia, and inflammatory response and increment in UVB-induced apoptosis in skin. Our results suggest that β-TrCP may be an essential player in UVB induced responses in skin and can be a potential therapeutic target for skin cancer. PMID:21187057

  9. Evolution of DNA ligases of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA viruses of eukaryotes: a case of hidden complexity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) encode most if not all of the enzymes involved in their DNA replication. It has been inferred that genes for these enzymes were already present in the last common ancestor of the NCLDV. However, the details of the evolution of these genes that bear on the complexity of the putative ancestral NCLDV and on the evolutionary relationships between viruses and their hosts are not well understood. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-dependent and NAD-dependent DNA ligases encoded by the NCLDV reveals an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history. The NAD-dependent ligases are encoded only by a minority of NCLDV (including mimiviruses, some iridoviruses and entomopoxviruses) but phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated that all viral NAD-dependent ligases are monophyletic. Combined with the topology of the NCLDV tree derived by consensus of trees for universally conserved genes suggests that this enzyme was represented in the ancestral NCLDV. Phylogenetic analysis of ATP-dependent ligases that are encoded by chordopoxviruses, most of the phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus failed to demonstrate monophyly and instead revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectory. The ligases of the majority of phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus seem to have evolved from bacteriophage or bacterial homologs; the ligase of one phycodnavirus, Emiliana huxlei virus, belongs to the eukaryotic DNA ligase I branch; and ligases of chordopoxviruses unequivocally cluster with eukaryotic DNA ligase III. Conclusions Examination of phyletic patterns and phylogenetic analysis of DNA ligases of the NCLDV suggest that the common ancestor of the extant NCLDV encoded an NAD-dependent ligase that most likely was acquired from a bacteriophage at the early stages of evolution of eukaryotes. By contrast, ATP-dependent ligases from different prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources displaced the ancestral NAD-dependent ligase at different

  10. HDAC7 Ubiquitination by the E3 Ligase CBX4 Is Involved in Contextual Fear Conditioning Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xu; Sui, Wen-Hai; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Xu-Feng; Yuan, Rong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Rong; Ma, Hui-Xian; Zhu, Ying-Xiao; Sun, Jin-Kai; Yi, Fan; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Wang, Yue

    2017-04-05

    Histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification, plays an important role in long-term memory formation. Recently, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors were demonstrated to promote memory formation, which raises the intriguing possibility that they may be used to rescue memory deficits. However, additional research is necessary to clarify the roles of individual HDACs in memory. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC7, within the dorsal hippocampus of C57BL6J mice, had a late and persistent decrease after contextual fear conditioning (CFC) training (4-24 h), which was involved in long-term CFC memory formation. We also showed that HDAC7 decreased via ubiquitin-dependent degradation. CBX4 was one of the HDAC7 E3 ligases involved in this process. Nur77, as one of the target genes of HDAC7, increased 6-24 h after CFC training and, accordingly, modulated the formation of CFC memory. Finally, HDAC7 was involved in the formation of other hippocampal-dependent memories, including the Morris water maze and object location test. The current findings facilitate an understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HDAC7 in the regulation of hippocampal-dependent memory.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current findings demonstrated the effects of histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) on hippocampal-dependent memories. Moreover, we determined the mechanism of decreased HDAC7 in contextual fear conditioning (CFC) through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. We also verified that CBX4 was one of the HDAC7 E3 ligases. Finally, we demonstrated that Nur77, as one of the important targets for HDAC7, was involved in CFC memory formation. All of these proteins, including HDAC7, CBX4, and Nur77, could be potential therapeutic targets for preventing memory deficits in aging and neurological diseases.

  11. A Sporadic Parkinson Disease Model via Silencing of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome/E3 Ligase Component SKP1A*

    PubMed Central

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Mandel, Silvia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G0/G1 phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for γ-tubulin, α-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration. PMID:19748892

  12. A sporadic Parkinson disease model via silencing of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase component SKP1A.

    PubMed

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mandel, Silvia A

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for gamma-tubulin, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration.

  13. SILENCING OF 4-COUMARATE-CoA LIGASE IN PINUS RADIATA, A CONIFEROUS GYMNOSPERM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL) is involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway and provides monolignol precursors such as p-coumaroyl-CoA, ultimately for the biosynthesis of lignin. Recombinant studies designed to assess the role of 4CL in the lignification process have focused on angios...

  14. A Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Caspase Activation During Sperm Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Arama, Eli; Bader, Maya; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E; Steller, Hermann

    2007-01-01

    In both insects and mammals, spermatids eliminate their bulk cytoplasm as they undergo terminal differentiation. In Drosophila, this process of dramatic cellular remodeling requires apoptotic proteins, including caspases. To gain further insight into the regulation of caspases, we screened a large collection of sterile male flies for mutants that block effector caspase activation at the onset of spermatid individualization. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a testis-specific, Cullin-3–dependent ubiquitin ligase complex that is required for caspase activation in spermatids. Mutations in either a testis-specific isoform of Cullin-3 (Cul3Testis), the small RING protein Roc1b, or a Drosophila orthologue of the mammalian BTB-Kelch protein Klhl10 all reduce or eliminate effector caspase activation in spermatids. Importantly, all three genes encode proteins that can physically interact to form a ubiquitin ligase complex. Roc1b binds to the catalytic core of Cullin-3, and Klhl10 binds specifically to a unique testis-specific N-terminal Cullin-3 (TeNC) domain of Cul3Testis that is required for activation of effector caspase in spermatids. Finally, the BIR domain region of the giant inhibitor of apoptosis–like protein dBruce is sufficient to bind to Klhl10, which is consistent with the idea that dBruce is a substrate for the Cullin-3-based E3-ligase complex. These findings reveal a novel role of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases in caspase regulation. PMID:17880263

  15. Identification of dynamical hinge points of the L1 ligase molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Sosa, Carlos P.; Robertson, Michael P.; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2010-01-01

    The L1 ligase is an in vitro selected ribozyme that uses a noncanonically base-paired ligation site to catalyze regioselectively and regiospecifically the 5′ to 3′ phosphodiester bond ligation, a reaction relevant to origin of life hypotheses that invoke an RNA world scenario. The L1 ligase crystal structure revealed two different conformational states that were proposed to represent the active and inactive forms. It remains an open question as to what degree these two conformers persist as stable conformational intermediates in solution, and along what pathway are they able to interconvert. To explore these questions, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent of the inactive–active conformational switch in L1 ligase. Four simulations were performed departing from both conformers in both the reactant and product states, in addition to a simulation where local unfolding in the active state was induced. From these simulations, along with crystallographic data, a set of four virtual torsion angles that span two evolutionarily conserved and restricted regions were identified as dynamical hinge points in the conformational switch transition. The ligation site visits three distinct states characterized by hydrogen bond patterns that are correlated with the formation of specific contacts that may promote catalysis. The insights gained from these simulations contribute to a more detailed understanding of the coupled catalytic/conformational switch mechanism of L1 ligase that may facilitate the design and engineering of new catalytic riboswitches. PMID:20167653

  16. USP19-Mediated Deubiquitination Facilitates the Stabilization of HRD1 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kumi; Kato, Masako; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded and unfolded proteins are eliminated by a process called ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in order to maintain cell homeostasis. In the ERAD pathway, several ER-localized E3 ubiquitin ligases target ERAD substrate proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. However, little is known about how the functions of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases are regulated. Recently, USP19, an ER-anchored deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of ERAD. In this study, HRD1, an ERAD ubiquitin ligase, is shown to be a novel substrate for USP19. We demonstrate that USP19 rescues HRD1 from proteasomal degradation by deubiquitination of K48-linked ubiquitin chains. In addition, the altered expression of USP19 affects the steady-state levels of HRD1. These results suggest that USP19 regulates the stability of HRD1 and provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases. PMID:27827840

  17. The TRC8 E3 ligase ubiquitinates MHC class I molecules before dislocation from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, Helen R.; Thomas, Mair; van den Boomen, Dick; Wiertz, Emmanuel J.H.J.; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The US2 and US11 gene products of human cytomegalovirus promote viral evasion by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. US2 and US11 initiate dislocation of newly translocated major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) from the ER to the cytosol for proteasome-mediated degradation, thereby decreasing cell surface MHC I. Despite being instrumental in elucidating the mammalian ERAD pathway, the responsible E3 ligase or ligases remain unknown. Using a functional small interfering RNA library screen, we now identify TRC8 (translocation in renal carcinoma, chromosome 8 gene), an ER-resident E3 ligase previously implicated as a hereditary kidney cancer gene, as required for US2-mediated MHC I ubiquitination. Depletion of TRC8 prevents MHC I ubiquitination and dislocation by US2 and restores cell surface MHC I. TRC8 forms an integral part of a novel multiprotein ER complex that contains MHC I, US2, and signal peptide peptidase. Our data show that the TRC8 E3 ligase is required for MHC I dislocation from the ER and identify a new complex associated with mammalian ERAD. PMID:19720873

  18. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-08-08

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp.

  19. Effective interaction studies for inhibition of DNA ligase protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, Periyasamy; Daisy, Pitchai

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important human pathogen for more than 100 years. It is among the most important causative agent of human infections in the twenty-first century. DNA ligase is the main protein responsible for the replication of S. aureus. In order to control the replication mechanism, DNA ligase is a successive drug target, hence we have chosen this protein for this study. We performed virtual screening using ZINC database for identification of potent inhibitor against DNA ligase. Based on the scoring methods, we have selected best five compounds from the ZINC database. In order to improve the accuracy, selected compounds were subjected into Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) docking, for which the results showed high docking score, compared to glide docking score. QPLD is more accurate as it includes charges in the scoring function, which was not available in the glide docking. Binding energy calculation results also indicated that selected compounds have good binding capacity with the target protein. In addition, these compounds on screening have good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity property. In this study, we identified few compounds that particularly work against DNA ligase protein, having better interaction phenomenon and it would help further the experimental analysis.

  20. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  1. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Interaction Between the E3 Ligase VHL and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Dennis L.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Van Molle, Inge; Roth, Anke G.; Tae, Hyun Seop; Gareiss, Peter C.; Jorgensen, William L.; Ciulli, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases, such as the therapeutically relevant VHL, are challenging targets for traditional medicinal chemistry, as their modulation requires targeting protein-protein interactions. We report novel small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between VHL and its molecular target HIF1α, a transcription factor involved in oxygen sensing. PMID:23065727

  3. THE ROLE OF E3 LIGASES IN THE UBIQUITIN-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF SPERMATOGENESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Richburg, John H.; Myers, Jessica L.; Bratton, Shawn B.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins is a post-translational modification that was first described as a means to target misfolded or unwanted proteins for degradation by the proteasome. It is now appreciated that the ubiquitination of proteins also serves as a mechanism to modify protein function and cellular functions such as protein trafficking, cell signaling, DNA repair, chromatin modifications, cell-cycle progression and cell death. The ubiquitination of proteins occurs through the hierarchal transfer of ubiquitin from an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and finally to an E3 ubiquitin ligase that transfers the ubiquitin to its target protein. It is the final E3 ubiquitin ligase that confers the substrate specificity for ubiquitination and is the focus of this review. Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process by which spermatogonial stem cells undergo mitotic proliferation and expansion of the diploid spermatogonial population, differentiate into spermatocytes and progress through two meiotic divisions to produce haploid spermatids that proceed through a final morphogenesis to generate mature spermatozoa. The ubiquitination of proteins in the cells of the testis occurs in many of the processes required for the progression of mature spermatozoa. Since it is the E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes the target protein and provides the specificity and selectivity for ubiquitination, this review highlights known examples of E3 ligases in the testis and the differing roles that they play in maintaining functional spermatogenesis. PMID:24632385

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Discovery of bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: optimization of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Huynh, Hoan; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Albert, Robert; Cavero-Tomas, Marta; Chen, Brendan; Harang, Jenna; Loch, James T; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Zhao, Shannon; Liu, Ce-Feng; Mills, Scott D

    2011-08-01

    Optimization of adenosine analog inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was improved by modification of the 2-position substituent on the adenine ring and 3'- and 5'-substituents on the ribose. Compounds with logD values 1.5-2.5 maximized potency and maintained drug-like physical properties.

  6. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid ligase in a doxyribonucleic acid membrane fraction extracted from pneumococci.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, M; Firshein, W

    1976-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ligase has been detected in a DNA membrane fraction extracted from Pneumococcus. The specific activity of the enzyme in this fraction is 10-fold greater than in the remaining cell extract. It remains firmly bound (with other enzymes) to the complex after a purification procedure in which a considerable percentage of the macromolecules are dissociated. The ligase acts in two ways in the DNA membrane fraction in vitro. One, it catalyzes the linkage of small-molecular-weight pieces of newly synthesized DNA into heavier-molecular-weight DNA strands as shown by others (M Gellert, 1976; R. Okazaki, A. Sugino, S. Hirose, T. Okazaki, Y. Imae, R. Kainuma-Kuroda, T. Ogawa, M. Arisawa, and Y. Kurosowa, 1973; B. Olivera and I. Lehman, 14; and A. Sugino, S. Hirose, and R. Okazaki, 1972) and, two, it protects DNA from degradation by deoxyribonucleases. This latter effect is due to a competition between the ability of the nucleases to degrade DNA and the ability of DNA ligase to seal the nicks produced by these degradative enzymes. The ligase acts cooperatively with other enzymes in the DNA membrane fraction to synthesize DNA. PMID:4433

  7. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-08-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes.

  8. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-01-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes. PMID:22827943

  9. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  10. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  11. Use of adenylate kinase as a solubility tag for high level expression of T4 DNA ligase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Huang, Anliang; Luo, Dan; Liu, Haipeng; Han, Huzi; Xu, Yang; Liang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of T4 DNA ligase in 1960s was pivotal in the spread of molecular biotechnology. The enzyme has become ubiquitous for recombinant DNA routinely practiced in biomedical research around the globe. Great efforts have been made to express and purify T4 DNA ligase to meet the world demand, yet over-expression of soluble T4 DNA ligase in E. coli has been difficult. Here we explore the use of adenylate kinase to enhance T4 DNA ligase expression and its downstream purification. E.coli adenylate kinase, which can be expressed in active form at high level, was fused to the N-terminus of T4 DNA ligase. The resulting His-tagged AK-T4 DNA ligase fusion protein was greatly over-expressed in E. coli, and readily purified to near homogeneity via two purification steps consisting of Blue Sepharose and Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified AK-T4 DNA ligase not only is fully active for DNA ligation, but also can use ADP in addition to ATP as energy source since adenylate kinase converts ADP to ATP and AMP. Thus adenylate kinase may be used as a solubility tag to facilitate recombinant protein expression as well as their downstream purification.

  12. Role of SKP1-CUL1-F-Box-Protein (SCF) E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell death depend precisely on the timely synthesis and degradation of key regulatory proteins. While protein synthesis can be regulated at multiple levels, protein degradation is mainly controlled by the ubiquitin—proteasome system (UPS), which consists of two distinct steps: (1) ubiquitylation of targeted protein by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and E3 ubiquitin ligase, and (2) subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Among all E3 ubiquitin ligases, the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ligases are the largest family and are responsible for the turnover of many key regulatory proteins. Aberrant regulation of SCF E3 ligases is associated with various human diseases, such as cancers, including skin cancer. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of all currently published data to define a promoting role of SCF E3 ligases in the development of skin cancer. The future directions in this area of research are also discussed with an ultimate goal to develop small molecule inhibitors of SCF E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of human skin cancer. Furthermore, altered components or substrates of SCF E3 ligases may also be developed as the biomarkers for early diagnosis or predicting prognosis. PMID:23522382

  13. Effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songyun; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Jie; Wang, Ruiying; Wang, Mian

    2017-02-15

    Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between diabetes and hippocampal neuron damage. This study aimed to determine the effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits (GCLM and GCLC) in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) rats. At 12weeks after streptozotocin injection, T1DM rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15 each group) to receive no treatment (T1DM), saline (T1DM+saline), alpha-lipoic acid (T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid), and troxerutin (T1DM+troxerutin), respectively, for 6weeks. Meanwhile, 10 control animals (NC group) were assessed in parallel. Learning performance was evaluated by the Morris water maze. After treatment, hippocampi were collected for pathological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Next, hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were assessed. Finally, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA and protein levels were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Compared with T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, escape latency was overtly reduced in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Significantly increased GCLM and GCLC mRNA levels, GCLC protein amounts, SOD activity, and GSH levels, and reduced MDA amounts were observed in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. In T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, H&E staining showed less pyramidal cells in the hippocampus, with disorganized layers, karyopyknosis, decreased endochylema, and cavitation, effects relieved in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Troxerutin alleviates oxidative stress and promotes learning in streptozotocin-induced T1DM rats, a process involving GCLC expression.

  14. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline. PMID:21233842

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA ligase IV supports imprecise end joining independently of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Liang, Zhuobin; Birkeland, Shanda R; Basrur, Venkatesha; Wilson, Thomas E

    2013-06-01

    DNA ligase IV (Dnl4 in budding yeast) is a specialized ligase used in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although point and truncation mutations arise in the human ligase IV syndrome, the roles of Dnl4 in DSB repair have mainly been examined using gene deletions. Here, Dnl4 catalytic point mutants were generated that were severely defective in auto-adenylation in vitro and NHEJ activity in vivo, despite being hyper-recruited to DSBs and supporting wild-type levels of Lif1 interaction and assembly of a Ku- and Lif1-containing complex at DSBs. Interestingly, residual levels of especially imprecise NHEJ were markedly higher in a deletion-based assay with Dnl4 catalytic mutants than with a gene deletion strain, suggesting a role of DSB-bound Dnl4 in supporting a mode of NHEJ catalyzed by a different ligase. Similarly, next generation sequencing of repair joints in a distinct single-DSB assay showed that dnl4-K466A mutation conferred a significantly different imprecise joining profile than wild-type Dnl4 and that such repair was rarely observed in the absence of Dnl4. Enrichment of DNA ligase I (Cdc9 in yeast) at DSBs was observed in wild-type as well as dnl4 point mutant strains, with both Dnl4 and Cdc9 disappearing from DSBs upon 5' resection that was unimpeded by the presence of catalytically inactive Dnl4. These findings indicate that Dnl4 can promote mutagenic end joining independently of its catalytic activity, likely by a mechanism that involves Cdc9.

  16. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline.

  17. A systems-wide screen identifies substrates of the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Low, Teck Yew; Peng, Mao; Magliozzi, Roberto; Mohammed, Shabaz; Guardavaccaro, Daniele; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-16

    Cellular proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in a precise and timely fashion. Such precision is conferred by the high substrate specificity of ubiquitin ligases. Identification of substrates of ubiquitin ligases is crucial not only to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which the UPS controls protein degradation but also for drug discovery purposes because many established UPS substrates are implicated in disease. We developed a combined bioinformatics and affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) workflow for the system-wide identification of substrates of SCF(βTrCP), a member of the SCF family of ubiquitin ligases. These ubiquitin ligases are characterized by a multisubunit architecture typically consisting of the invariable subunits Rbx1, Cul1, and Skp1 and one of 69 F-box proteins. The F-box protein of this member of the family is βTrCP. SCF(βTrCP) binds, through the WD40 repeats of βTrCP, to the DpSGXX(X)pS diphosphorylated motif in its substrates. We recovered 27 previously reported SCF(βTrCP) substrates, of which 22 were verified by two independent statistical protocols, thereby confirming the reliability of this approach. In addition to known substrates, we identified 221 proteins that contained the DpSGXX(X)pS motif and also interacted specifically with the WD40 repeats of βTrCP. Thus, with SCF(βTrCP), as the example, we showed that integration of structural information, AP-MS, and degron motif mining constitutes an effective method to screen for substrates of ubiquitin ligases.

  18. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway.

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase UBR5 drives the growth and metastasis of triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Liqiu; Song, Mei; Li, Xin; Tang, Lili; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Lixing; Pan, Yihang; Chouchane, Lotfi; Ma, Xiaojing

    2017-03-22

    Patients with triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) are at high risk for recurrence and metastasis at an early time despite standard treatment, underscoring the need for novel therapeutic modalities. Here we report for the first time a distinctive and profound role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBR5 in the growth and metastasis of TNBC. An analysis of primary TNBC specimen by whole exon sequencing revealed strong gene amplifications of UBR5 associated with the disease. UBR5 overexpression in TNBC tissues was confirmed at mRNA and protein levels. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of ubr5 in an experimental murine mammary carcinoma model of TNBC dramatically abrogated tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, which could be reversed completely via reconstitution with wild type UBR5 but not a catalytically inactive mutant. Loss of UBR5 caused an impairment in angiogenesis within the tumor, associated with increased apoptosis, necrosis, and growth arrest. Absence of UBR5 in the tumor triggered aberrant epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), principally via abrogated expression of E-cadherin, which resulted in severely reduced tumor metastasis to secondary organs. Use of NOD/SCID mice revealed that tumor-derived UBR5 facilitated tumor growth in a manner completely dependent upon immune cells in the microenvironment, whereas it promoted metastasis in a tumor cell-autonomous fashion. Our findings unveil UBR5 as a novel and critical regulator of tumor growth, metastasis, and immune response, and highlight the potential for UBR5 as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of highly aggressive breast and ovarian cancers that fail conventional therapy.

  20. M. tuberculosis Sliding β-Clamp Does Not Interact Directly with the NAD+ -Dependent DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Khanam, Taran; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Nidhi; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    The sliding β-clamp, an important component of the DNA replication and repair machinery, is drawing increasing attention as a therapeutic target. We report the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis β-clamp (Mtbβ-clamp) to 3.0 Å resolution. The protein crystallized in the space group C2221 with cell-dimensions a = 72.7, b = 234.9 & c = 125.1 Å respectively. Mtbβ-clamp is a dimer, and exhibits head-to-tail association similar to other bacterial clamps. Each monomer folds into three domains with similar structures respectively and associates with its dimeric partner through 6 salt-bridges and about 21 polar interactions. Affinity experiments involving a blunt DNA duplex, primed-DNA and nicked DNA respectively show that Mtbβ-clamp binds specifically to primed DNA about 1.8 times stronger compared to the other two substrates and with an apparent Kd of 300 nM. In bacteria like E. coli, the β-clamp is known to interact with subunits of the clamp loader, NAD+ -dependent DNA ligase (LigA) and other partners. We tested the interactions of the Mtbβ-clamp with MtbLigA and the γ-clamp loader subunit through radioactive gel shift assays, size exclusion chromatography, yeast-two hybrid experiments and also functionally. Intriguingly while Mtbβ-clamp interacts in vitro with the γ-clamp loader, it does not interact with MtbLigA unlike in bacteria like E. coli where it does. Modeling studies involving earlier peptide complexes reveal that the peptide-binding site is largely conserved despite lower sequence identity between bacterial clamps. Overall the results suggest that other as-yet-unidentified factors may mediate interactions between the clamp, LigA and DNA in mycobacteria. PMID:22545130

  1. Mechanistic Assessment of DNA Ligase as an Antibacterial Target in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Podos, Steven D.; Thanassi, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of a known pyridochromanone inhibitor with antibacterial activity to assess the validity of NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA) as an antibacterial target in Staphylococcus aureus. Potent inhibition of purified LigA was demonstrated in a DNA ligation assay (inhibition constant [Ki] = 4.0 nM) and in a DNA-independent enzyme adenylation assay using full-length LigA (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 28 nM) or its isolated adenylation domain (IC50 = 36 nM). Antistaphylococcal activity was confirmed against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA) strains (MIC = 1.0 μg/ml). Analysis of spontaneous resistance potential revealed a high frequency of emergence (4 × 10−7) of high-level resistant mutants (MIC > 64) with associated ligA lesions. There were no observable effects on growth rate in these mutants. Of 22 sequenced clones, 3 encoded point substitutions within the catalytic adenylation domain and 19 in the downstream oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold and helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. In vitro characterization of the enzymatic properties of four selected mutants revealed distinct signatures underlying their resistance to inhibition. The infrequent adenylation domain mutations altered the kinetics of adenylation and probably elicited resistance directly. In contrast, the highly represented OB fold domain mutations demonstrated a generalized resistance mechanism in which covalent LigA activation proceeds normally and yet the parameters of downstream ligation steps are altered. A resulting decrease in substrate Km and a consequent increase in substrate occupancy render LigA resistant to competitive inhibition. We conclude that the observed tolerance of staphylococcal cells to such hypomorphic mutations probably invalidates LigA as a viable target for antistaphylococcal chemotherapy. PMID:22585221

  2. Iduna is a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Yun-Il; Shin, Joo-Ho; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Chi, Zhikai; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Yunjong; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Byoung Dae; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation is crucial for regulation of cell signaling and protein quality control. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a cell-signaling molecule that mediates changes in protein function through binding at PAR binding sites. Here we characterize the PAR binding protein, Iduna, and show that it is a PAR-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity requires PAR binding because point mutations at Y156A and R157A eliminate Iduna’s PAR binding and Iduna’s E3 ligase activity. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity also requires an intact really interesting new gene (RING) domain because Iduna possessing point mutations at either H54A or C60A is devoid of ubiquitination activity. Tandem affinity purification reveals that Iduna binds to a number of proteins that are either PARsylated or bind PAR including PAR polymerase-1, 2 (PARP1, 2), nucleolin, DNA ligase III, KU70, KU86, XRCC1, and histones. PAR binding to Iduna activates its E3 ligase function, and PAR binding is required for Iduna ubiquitination of PARP1, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, and KU70. Iduna’s PAR-dependent ubiquitination of PARP1 targets it for proteasomal degradation. Via PAR binding and ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, Iduna protects against cell death induced by the DNA damaging agent N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and rescues cells from G1 arrest and promotes cell survival after γ-irradiation. Moreover, Iduna facilitates DNA repair by reducing apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after MNNG exposure and facilitates DNA repair following γ-irradiation as assessed by the comet assay. These results define Iduna as a PAR-dependent E3 ligase that regulates cell survival and DNA repair. PMID:21825151

  3. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  4. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D S; Walter, C A; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA ligase III-beta cDNA, which encodes a 96-kDa polypeptide, is expressed only in the testis. During male germ cell differentiation, elevated expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA is restricted, beginning only in the latter stages of meiotic prophase and ending in the round spermatid stage. In 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta, the C-terminal 77 amino acids of DNA ligase III-alpha are replaced by a different 17- to 18-amino acid sequence. As reported previously, the 103-kDa DNA ligase III-alpha interacts with the DNA strand break repair protein encoded by the human XRCC1 gene. In contrast, the 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta does not interact with XRCC1, indicating that DNA ligase III-beta may play a role in cellular functions distinct from the DNA repair pathways involving the DNA ligase III-alpha x XRCC1 complex. The distinct biochemical properties of DNA ligase III-beta, in combination with the tissue- and cell-type-specific expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA, suggest that this form of DNA ligase III is specifically involved in the completion of homologous recombination events that occur during meiotic prophase. PMID:9001252

  5. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  6. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 regulates proteolysis of centromeric histone H3 variant Cse4 and prevents its mislocalization to euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Fulp, Alyona; Lawrimore, Josh; Au, Wei-Chun; Pasupala, Nagesh; Levy-Myers, Reuben; Warren, Jack; Strunnikov, Alexander; Baker, Richard E.; Kerscher, Oliver; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2016-01-01

    Centromeric histone H3, CENP-ACse4, is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. Stringent regulation of cellular levels of CENP-ACse4 restricts its localization to centromeres. Mislocalization of CENP-ACse4 is associated with aneuploidy in yeast and flies and tumorigenesis in human cells; thus defining pathways that regulate CENP-A levels is critical for understanding how mislocalization of CENP-A contributes to aneuploidy in human cancers. Previous work in budding yeast shows that ubiquitination of overexpressed Cse4 by Psh1, an E3 ligase, partially contributes to proteolysis of Cse4. Here we provide the first evidence that Cse4 is sumoylated by E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in vivo and in vitro. Ubiquitination of Cse4 by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 plays a critical role in proteolysis of Cse4 and prevents mislocalization of Cse4 to euchromatin under normal physiological conditions. Accumulation of sumoylated Cse4 species and increased stability of Cse4 in slx5∆ strains suggest that sumoylation precedes ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4. Slx5-mediated Cse4 proteolysis is independent of Psh1, since slx5∆ psh1∆ strains exhibit higher levels of Cse4 stability and mislocalization than either slx5∆ or psh1∆ strains. Our results demonstrate a role for Slx5 in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4 to prevent its mislocalization and maintain genome stability. PMID:26960795

  7. Muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases are involved in muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Han, Jun; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Han, Yusong; Zhang, Bo; Fang, Jing; Wu, Guohao

    2015-05-01

    Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 and muscle ring-finger-1 (MuRF-1) have been identified as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle during muscle atrophy. However, the role of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases during the process of muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia remains largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant and benign disease. The possible mechanisms were studied both in a colon 26-induced cancer cachexia mouse model and in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced atrophy C2C12 cells. Our results demonstrated that atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 tended to be increased in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant disease even before weight loss. Non-tumor body weights and gastrocnemius weights were significantly decreased while expression levels of ubiquitin proteasome pathway associated genes (atrogin-1, MuRF-1, ubiquitin and E2-14K) were upregulated in cancer cachexia mice. Significant myotube atrophy with atrogin-1 overexpression was observed in the C2C12 cells treated with TNF-α. Meanwhile, knockdown of atrogin-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) protected C2C12 cells from the adverse effect of TNF-α. In conclusion, muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases were upregulated during cancer cachexia, and atrogin-1 may be a potential molecular target for treating muscle atrophy induced by cancer cachexia.

  8. BTB-BACK Domain Protein POB1 Suppresses Immune Cell Death by Targeting Ubiquitin E3 ligase PUB17 for Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mesmar, Joelle; McLellan, Hazel; Yang, Chengwei; Craig, Adam; Zhang, Cunjin; Moore, Jonathan David; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.; Sadanandom, Ari

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitive response programmed cell death (HR-PCD) is a critical feature in plant immunity required for pathogen restriction and prevention of disease development. The precise control of this process is paramount to cell survival and an effective immune response. The discovery of new components that function to suppress HR-PCD will be instrumental in understanding the regulation of this fundamental mechanism. Here we report the identification and characterisation of a BTB domain E3 ligase protein, POB1, that functions to suppress HR-PCD triggered by evolutionarily diverse pathogens. Nicotiana benthamiana and tobacco plants with reduced POB1 activity show accelerated HR-PCD whilst those with increased POB1 levels show attenuated HR-PCD. We demonstrate that POB1 dimerization and nuclear localization are vital for its function in HR-PCD suppression. Using protein-protein interaction assays, we identify the Plant U-Box E3 ligase PUB17, a well established positive regulator of plant innate immunity, as a target for POB1-mediated proteasomal degradation. Using confocal imaging and in planta immunoprecipitation assays we show that POB1 interacts with PUB17 in the nucleus and stimulates its degradation. Mutated versions of POB1 that show reduced interaction with PUB17 fail to suppress HR-PCD, indicating that POB1-mediated degradation of PUB17 U-box E3 ligase is an important step for negative regulation of specific immune pathways in plants. Our data reveals a new mechanism for BTB domain proteins in suppressing HR-PCD in plant innate immune responses. PMID:28056034

  9. Non-thermal plasma induces AKT degradation through turn-on the MUL1 E3 ligase in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Kim, Haeng-Jun; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Keunho; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on non-thermal plasma (NTP, an ionized gas) has identified it as a novel cancer therapeutic tool. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated NTP induced cell death of head and neck cancer (HNC) through the AKT ubiquitin–proteasome system. NTP increased the gene expression of mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (MUL1), an E3 ligase for AKT, and NTP-induced HNC cell death was prevented by MUL1 siRNA. We also showed that MUL1 inhibited the level of AKT and p-AKT and MUL1 expression was increased by NTP-induced ROS. Furthermore, we optimized and manufactured a new type of NTP, a liquid type of NTP (LTP). In syngeneic and xenograft in vivo tumor models, LTP inhibited tumor progression by increasing the MUL1 level and reducing p-AKT levels, indicating that LTP also has an anti-cancer effect through the same mechanism as that of NTP. Taken together, our results suggest that NTP and LTP have great potential for HNC therapy. PMID:26450902

  10. Parkin is a component of an SCF-like ubiquitin ligase complex and protects postmitotic neurons from kainate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Staropoli, John F; McDermott, Caroline; Martinat, Cécile; Schulman, Brenda; Demireva, Elena; Abeliovich, Asa

    2003-03-06

    Mutations in parkin, which encodes a RING domain protein associated with ubiquitin ligase activity, lead to autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease characterized by midbrain dopamine neuron loss. Here we show that parkin functions in a multiprotein ubiquitin ligase complex that includes the F-box/WD repeat protein hSel-10 and Cullin-1. HSel-10 serves to target the parkin ubiquitin ligase activity to cyclin E, an hSel-10-interacting protein previously implicated in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. Consistent with the notion that cyclin E is a substrate of the parkin ubiquitin ligase complex, parkin deficiency potentiates the accumulation of cyclin E in cultured postmitotic neurons exposed to the glutamatergic excitotoxin kainate and promotes their apoptosis. Furthermore, parkin overexpression attenuates the accumulation of cyclin E in toxin-treated primary neurons, including midbrain dopamine neurons, and protects them from apoptosis.

  11. Efficient gene targeting in ligase IV-deficient Monascus ruber M7 by perturbing the non-homologous end joining pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway is a well established method to increase gene replacement frequency (GRF) in filamentous fungi because NHEJ is predominant for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), while gene targeting is based on homologous recombination (HR). DNA ligase IV, a component of the NHEJ system, is strictly required for the NHEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. To enhance the GRF in Monascus ruber M7, we deleted the Mrlig4 gene encoding a homolog of N. crassa DNA ligase IV. The obtained mutant (MrΔlig4) showed no apparent defects in vegetative growth, colony phenotype, microscopic morphology, spore yield, and production of Monascus pigments and citrinin compared with the wild-type strain (M. ruber M7). Gene targeting of ku70 and triA genes revealed that GRF in the MrΔlig4 strain increased four-fold compared with that in the wild-type strain, reached 68 % and 85 %, respectively. Thus, the MrΔlig4 strain is a promising host for efficient genetic manipulation. In addition, the MrΔlig4 strain is more sensitive than M. ruber M7 to a DNA-damaging agent, methyl methanesulfonate.

  12. A forward genetic approach in Arabidopsis thaliana identifies a RING-type ubiquitin ligase as a novel determinant of seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Bueso, Eduardo; Ibañez, Carla; Sayas, Enric; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Gonzalez-Guzmán, Miguel; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Serrano, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Seed longevity is important to preserve crops and wild plants and it is limited by progressive cellular damage (aging) during storage. The induction of cellular stress defenses and the formation of the seed coat are crucial protecting events during seed development, a process mediated in Arabidopsis thaliana by the transcription factors LEC1, LEC2, FUS3 and the abscisic acid-activated ABI3. In order to identify novel determinants of seed longevity we have screened an activation-tagging mutant collection of Arabidopsis and isolated a dominant mutant with increased seed longevity under both natural and accelerated aging conditions. Molecular characterization indicates that the mutant phenotype is caused by over-expression of the At2g26130 gene encoding a RING-type zinc finger putative ubiquitin ligase. Loss of function of this gene in a T-DNA insertion mutant resulted in decreased seed longevity. We named this important gene for seed longevity RSL1 (from Ring finger of Seed Longevity1) and we could demonstrate ubiquitin ligase activity with the recombinant protein. Morphological alterations in shoot tissues of the RSL1 over-expressing plants and analysis of gibberellins levels suggest that RSL1 may increase gibberellins responses by some unknown mechanism. These results validate the forward genetic approach to seed longevity and anticipate the identification of many novel determinants of this important trait.

  13. Structural Characterization of Modified Lignin in Transgenic Tobacco Plants in Which the Activity of 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase Is Depressed.

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, S.; Hishiyama, S.; Tomimura, Y.; Katayama, Y.; Omori, S.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants in which the activity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase is very low contain a novel lignin in their xylem. Details of changes in hydroxycinnamic acids bound to cell walls and in the structure of the novel lignin were identified by base hydrolysis, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. In the brownish tissue of the transgenic plants, the levels of three hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric, ferulic, and sinapic, which were bound to cell walls, were apparently increased as a result of down-regulation of the expression of the gene for 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. Some of these hydroxycinnamic acids were linked to cell walls via ester and ether linkages. The accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids also induced an increase in the level of condensed units in the novel lignin of the brownish tissue. Our data indicate that the behavior of some of the incorporated hydroxycinnamic acids resembles lignin monomers in the brownish tissue, and their accumulation results in dramatic changes in the biosynthesis of lignin in transgenic plants. PMID:12223748

  14. Nuclear localization of glutamate-cysteine ligase is associated with proliferation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dequanter, Didier; VAN DE Velde, Maureen; Bar, Isabelle; Nuyens, Vincent; Rousseau, Alexandre; Nagy, Nathalie; Vanhamme, Luc; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Brohée, Dany; Delrée, Paul; Boudjeltia, Karim; Lothaire, Philippe; Uzureau, Pierrick

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the keystone of the cellular response toward oxidative stress. Elevated GSH content correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck (HN) tumors. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate whether the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) accounts for the increased GSH availability observed in HN squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). For that purpose, the messenger (m)RNA levels of the modifier (M) and catalytic (C) subunits of GCL and its putative regulators (namely, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1 and nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha) were monitored in 35 surgical resections of untreated HNSCC. The localization of GCLM was evaluated using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GCLM expression was significantly increased in tumor samples, compared with normal mucosa, both at the mRNA and protein level (P=0.029), but the pathway of GCLM activation remains to be elucidated. Protein expression of GCLM was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus. GCLM and the proliferation marker Ki-67 displayed a similar distribution, being both mainly expressed at the periphery of tumor lobules. The present study reported increased expression of GCL and the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis, within HNSCC. The nuclear localization of GCLM and the concomitant expression of Ki-67 suggested that the localization of GSH synthesis contributes to the protection against oxidative stress within hotspots of cell proliferation.

  15. Efficient in situ detection of mRNAs using the Chlorella virus DNA ligase for padlock probe ligation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nils; Meier, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Padlock probes are single-stranded DNA molecules that are circularized upon hybridization to their target sequence by a DNA ligase. In the following, the circulated padlock probes are amplified and detected with fluorescently labeled probes complementary to the amplification product. The hallmark of padlock probe assays is a high detection specificity gained by the ligation reaction. Concomitantly, the ligation reaction is the largest drawback for a quantitative in situ detection of mRNAs due to the low affinities of common DNA or RNA ligases to RNA-DNA duplex strands. Therefore, current protocols require that mRNAs be reverse transcribed to DNA before detection with padlock probes. Recently, it was found that the DNA ligase from Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is able to efficiently ligate RNA-splinted DNA. Hence, we designed a padlock probe assay for direct in situ detection of mRNAs using the PBCV-1 DNA ligase. Experimental single-cell data were used to optimize and characterize the efficiency of mRNA detection with padlock probes. Our results demonstrate that the PBCV-1 DNA ligase overcomes the efficiency limitation of current protocols for direct in situ mRNA detection, making the PBCV-1 DNA ligase an attractive tool to simplify in situ ligation sequencing applications.

  16. Enzyme-adenylate structure of a bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a minimized DNA-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Rothweiler, Ulli; Leiros, Hanna Kirsti Schrøder

    2014-11-01

    DNA ligases are a structurally diverse class of enzymes which share a common catalytic core and seal breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of double-stranded DNA via an adenylated intermediate. Here, the structure and activity of a recombinantly produced ATP-dependent DNA ligase from the bacterium Psychromonas sp. strain SP041 is described. This minimal-type ligase, like its close homologues, is able to ligate singly nicked double-stranded DNA with high efficiency and to join cohesive-ended and blunt-ended substrates to a more limited extent. The 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme-adenylate complex reveals no unstructured loops or segments, and suggests that this enzyme binds the DNA without requiring full encirclement of the DNA duplex. This is in contrast to previously characterized minimal DNA ligases from viruses, which use flexible loop regions for DNA interaction. The Psychromonas sp. enzyme is the first structure available for the minimal type of bacterial DNA ligases and is the smallest DNA ligase to be crystallized to date.

  17. Functional characterization of EI24-induced autophagy in the degradation of RING-domain E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Sushil; Jeong, Hyobin; Kim, Yunmi; Ali, Muhammad; Roh, Jae-il; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Han-Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy pathways were believed to be independent; however, recent data indicate that these pathways engage in crosstalk. To date, the players mediating this crosstalk have been elusive. Here, we show experimentally that EI24 (EI24, autophagy associated transmembrane protein), a key component of basal macroautophagy/autophagy, degrades 14 physiologically important E3 ligases with a RING (really interesting new gene) domain, whereas 5 other ligases were not degraded. Based on the degradation results, we built a statistical model that predicts the RING E3 ligases targeted by EI24 using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Of 381 RING E3 ligases examined computationally, our model predicted 161 EI24 targets. Those targets are primarily involved in transcription, proteolysis, cellular bioenergetics, and apoptosis and regulated by TP53 and MTOR signaling. Collectively, our work demonstrates that EI24 is an essential player in UPS-autophagy crosstalk via degradation of RING E3 ligases. These results indicate a paradigm shift regarding the fate of E3 ligases. PMID:27541728

  18. Identification of HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase family genes involved in stem cell regulation and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jordana M; Nisperos, Sean V; Weeks, Joi; Ghulam, Mahjoobah; Marín, Ignacio; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-08-15

    E3 ubiquitin ligases constitute a large family of enzymes that modify specific proteins by covalently attaching ubiquitin polypeptides. This post-translational modification can serve to regulate protein function or longevity. In spite of their importance in cell physiology, the biological roles of most ubiquitin ligases remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the function of the HECT domain family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians. Using bioinformatic searches, we identified 17 HECT E3 genes that are expressed in the Schmidtea mediterranea genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments showed that HECT genes were expressed in diverse tissues and most were expressed in the stem cell population (neoblasts) or in their progeny. To investigate the function of all HECT E3 ligases, we inhibited their expression using RNA interference (RNAi) and determined that orthologs of huwe1, wwp1, and trip12 had roles in tissue regeneration. We show that huwe1 RNAi knockdown led to a significant expansion of the neoblast population and death by lysis. Further, our experiments showed that wwp1 was necessary for both neoblast and intestinal tissue homeostasis as well as uncovered an unexpected role of trip12 in posterior tissue specification. Taken together, our data provide insights into the roles of HECT E3 ligases in tissue regeneration and demonstrate that planarians will be a useful model to evaluate the functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell regulation.

  19. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Jekel, Peter A; Wijma, Hein J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-03-23

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best substrates, but the proteinogenic amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, as well as the non-proteinogenic amino acids D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine and (R)- and (S)-β-phenylalanine were also accepted. Of these amino acids, the highest activity was found for (R)-β-phenylalanine, forming (R)-β-phenylalanyl-CoA. Homology modeling suggested that alanine 312 is part of the active site cavity, and mutagenesis (A312G) yielded a variant that has an enhanced catalytic efficiency with β-phenylalanines and D-α-phenylalanine.

  20. An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C.; Noble, Kyle A.; KC, Birendra; Roux, Kenneth H.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    The BioID method uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein–protein associations as well as proximate proteins in living cells. Here we report improvements to the BioID method centered on BioID2, a substantially smaller promiscuous biotin ligase. BioID2 enables more-selective targeting of fusion proteins, requires less biotin supplementation, and exhibits enhanced labeling of proximate proteins. Thus BioID2 improves the efficiency of screening for protein–protein associations. We also demonstrate that the biotinylation range of BioID2 can be considerably modulated using flexible linkers, thus enabling application-specific adjustment of the biotin-labeling radius. PMID:26912792

  1. TRIMmunity: The roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A.

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM-family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, sub-cellular localization, and in cell-type specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research. PMID:24333484

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF185 facilitates the cGAS-mediated innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhongshi; Mao, Zhaomin; Tang, Yijun; Kong, Xiufang; Li, Senlin; Cui, Ye; Liu, Heng; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Xiaojie; Jiang, Lindi; Zhou, Qin

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), upon cytosolic DNA stimulation, catalyzes the formation of the second messenger 2′3′-cGAMP, which then binds to stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and activates downstream signaling. It remains to be elucidated how the cGAS enzymatic activity is modulated dynamically. Here, we reported that the ER ubiquitin ligase RNF185 interacted with cGAS during HSV-1 infection. Ectopic-expression or knockdown of RNF185 respectively enhanced or impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression. Mechanistically, RNF185 specifically catalyzed the K27-linked poly-ubiquitination of cGAS, which promoted its enzymatic activity. Additionally, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients displayed elevated expression of RNF185 mRNA. Collectively, this study uncovers RNF185 as the first E3 ubiquitin ligase of cGAS, shedding light on the regulation of cGAS activity in innate immune responses. PMID:28273161

  3. The COP9 signalosome and cullin-RING ligases in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejun; Martin, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediated protein degradation has been implicated in the progression from a large subset of heart disease to congestive heart failure, rendering it extremely important to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the UPS is regulated. Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) represent the largest family of ubiquitin ligases crucial for UPS-dependent proteolysis. Serving as a cullin deneddylase, the COP9 signalosome (CSN) regulates the activity and assembly of CRLs. In the past several years, emerging studies have begun to unveil the role of the CSN and some of the CRLs in cardiomyocytes or the heart under physiological and pathological conditions. This review article will highlight and analyze these recent progresses and provide the author’s perspective on the future directions for this research field. PMID:26064789

  4. Formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase is involved in the virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chengkun; Xu, Jiali; Shi, Guolin; Zhao, Xigong; Ren, Sujing; Li, Jinquan; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe infections in pigs and humans. However, the pathogenesis of S. suis remains unclear. The present study targeted a putative virulence-associated factor (fhs, encoding the formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase) of S. suis. To investigate the role of fhs in the virulence potential of S. suis serotype 2, an fhs deletion mutant (Δfhs) and the corresponding complementation strain (CΔfhs) were generated. The Δfhs mutant displayed similar growth compared to that of the wild-type and complementation strains. Using murine and pig infection models, we demonstrated for the first time that the formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase is required for the full virulence of S. suis 2. Our findings provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of S. suis 2.

  5. Purification of histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing S; Unrau, Peter J

    2002-12-01

    Here we report the construction of a histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase expression plasmid (pRHT4). The construct, when overexpressed in BL21 (DE3) cells, allows the preparation of large quantities of T4 RNA ligase in high purity using only a single purification column. The histidine affinity tag does not inhibit enzyme function, and we were able to purify 1-3 mg pure protein/g cell pellet. A simple purification procedure ensures that the enzyme is de-adenylated to levels comparable to those found for many commercial preparations. The purified protein has very low levels of RNase contamination and functioned normally in a variety of activity assays.

  6. Neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish by a large AAA+ ATPase/ubiquitin ligase, mysterin/RNF213

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Satoru; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Kawakami, Koichi; Takashima, Seiji; Hirata, Hiromi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Mysterin (also known as RNF213) is a huge intracellular protein with two AAA+ ATPase modules and a RING finger ubiquitin ligase domain. Mysterin was originally isolated as a significant risk factor for the cryptogenic cerebrovascular disorder moyamoya disease, and was found to be involved in physiological angiogenesis in zebrafish. However, the function and the physiological significance of mysterin in other than blood vessels remain largely unknown, although mysterin is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues. In this study, we performed antisense-mediated suppression of a mysterin orthologue in zebrafish larvae and revealed that mysterin-deficient larvae showed significant reduction in fast myofibrils and immature projection of primary motoneurons, leading to severe motor deficits. Fast muscle-specific restoration of mysterin expression cancelled these phenotypes, and interestingly both AAA+ ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities of mysterin were indispensable for proper fast muscle formation, demonstrating an essential role of mysterin and its enzymatic activities in the neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish. PMID:26530008

  7. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  8. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  9. Identification of TRIM22 as a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Zhijian; Gao Bo; Xu Wei; Xiong Sidong

    2008-09-26

    TRIM22, a member of the TRIM family proteins which contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains, has been reported as a transcriptional regulator and involved in various cellular processes. In this study, the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, a novel property of TRIM22, was demonstrated. It was found that TRIM22 underwent self-ubiquitylation in vitro in combination with the E2 enzyme UbcH5B and the ubiquitylation was dependent on its RING finger domain. Further evidences showed that TRIM22 could also be self-ubiquitylated in vivo. Importantly, TRIM22 was conjugated with poly-ubiquitin chains and stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor in 293T cells, suggesting that TRIM22 targeted itself for proteasomal degradation through the poly-ubiquitylation. We also found that TRIM22 was located in the nucleus, indicating that TRIM22 might function as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  10. TRIMmunity: the roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A

    2014-03-20

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, by sub-cellular localization and in cell-type-specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research.

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is an LC3-interactive protein and regulates autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Childress, Chandra; Shaw Iv, John H; Peng, Ke; Shao, Genbao; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2017-01-13

    The MAP1LC3/LC3 family plays an essential role in autophagosomal biogenesis and transport. In this report, we show that the HECT family E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 interacts with LC3 and is involved in autophagosomal biogenesis. NEDD4 binds to LC3 through a conserved WXXL LC3-binding motif in a region between the C2 and the WW2 domains. Knockdown of NEDD4 impaired starvation- or rapamycin-induced activation of autophagy and autophagosomal biogenesis and caused aggregates of the LC3 puncta colocalized with endoplasmic reticulum membrane markers. Electron microscopy observed gigantic deformed mitochondria in NEDD4 knockdown cells, suggesting that NEDD4 might function in mitophagy. Furthermore, SQSTM1 is ubiquitinated by NEDD4 while LC3 functions as an activator of NEDD4 ligase activity. Taken together, our studies define an important role of NEDD4 in regulation of autophagy.

  12. Structurally complex and highly active RNA ligases derived from random RNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekland, E. H.; Szostak, J. W.; Bartel, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Seven families of RNA ligases, previously isolated from random RNA sequences, fall into three classes on the basis of secondary structure and regiospecificity of ligation. Two of the three classes of ribozymes have been engineered to act as true enzymes, catalyzing the multiple-turnover transformation of substrates into products. The most complex of these ribozymes has a minimal catalytic domain of 93 nucleotides. An optimized version of this ribozyme has a kcat exceeding one per second, a value far greater than that of most natural RNA catalysts and approaching that of comparable protein enzymes. The fact that such a large and complex ligase emerged from a very limited sampling of sequence space implies the existence of a large number of distinct RNA structures of equivalent complexity and activity.

  13. Restoration by T4 ligase of DNA sequences sensitive to "flush" cleaving restriction enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mottes, M; Morandi, C; Cremaschi, S; Sgaramella, V

    1977-07-01

    Fouteen "flush"-ended segments originate from the action of the restriction endonuclease Hae III of Haemophilus aegiptius on the DNA of the colicinogenic factor ColE 1 (A. Oka and M. Takanami, Nature, 264, 191, 1976). They are joined by the T4 polynucleotide ligase. The reaction can be monitored by gel electrophoresis, electron microscopy and resistance to phosphatase of the 5'-32P labelled ends. The joined products are a random recombination of the original segments, and can be cleaved by the same Hae III endonuclease to restore the exact electrophoretic pattern of the Hae III-cut ColE 1 DNA. In a properly diluted mixture of 5'-32P segments treated with T4 ligase, the level of phosphatase resistance is very close to the frequency of circle-formation as determined by electron microscopy: thus, the joining of the "flush"-ends involves the formation of circular structures covalently closed in both strands.

  14. Ligation reaction specificities of an NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Tong, J; Barany, F; Cao, W

    2000-03-15

    An NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is most active in slightly alkaline pH conditions with either Mg(2+)or Mn(2+)as the metal cofactor. Ca(2+)and Ni(2+)mainly support formation of DNA-adenylate intermediates. The catalytic cycle is characterized by a low k (cat)value of 2 min(-1)with concomitant accumulation of the DNA - adenylate intermediate when Mg(2+)is used as the metal cofactor. The ligation rates of matched substrates vary by up to 4-fold, but exhibit a general trend of T/A < or = G/C < C/G < A/T on both the 3'- and 5'-side of the nick. Consistent with previous studies on Thermus ligases, this Aquifex ligase exhibits greater discrimination against a mismatched base pair on the 3'-side of the nick junction. The requirement of 3' complementarity for a ligation reaction is reaffirmed by results from 1 nt insertions on either the 3'- or 5'-side of the nick. Furthermore, most of the unligatable 3' mismatched base pairs prohibit formation of the DNA-adenylate intermediate, indicating that the substrate adenylation step is also a control point for ligation fidelity. Unlike previously studied ATP ligases, gapped substrates cannot be ligated and intermediate accumulation is minimal, suggesting that complete elimination of base pair complementarity on one side of the nick affects substrate adenylation on the 5'-side of the nick junction. Relationships among metal cofactors, ligation products and intermediate, and ligation fidelity are discussed.

  15. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  16. Substrate Trapping Proteomics Reveals Targets of the βTrCP2/FBXW11 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tai Young; Siesser, Priscila F.; Rossman, Kent L.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Mackinnon, Kathryn; Yan, Feng; Yi, XianHua; MacCoss, Michael J.; Moon, Randall T.; Der, Channing J.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the full complement of substrates for each ubiquitin ligase remains an important challenge. Improvements in mass spectrometry instrumentation and computation and in protein biochemistry methods have resulted in several new methods for ubiquitin ligase substrate identification. Here we used the parallel adapter capture (PAC) proteomics approach to study βTrCP2/FBXW11, a substrate adaptor for the SKP1–CUL1–F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The processivity of the ubiquitylation reaction necessitates transient physical interactions between FBXW11 and its substrates, thus making biochemical purification of FBXW11-bound substrates difficult. Using the PAC-based approach, we inhibited the proteasome to “trap” ubiquitylated substrates on the SCFFBXW11 E3 complex. Comparative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified FBXW11 protein complexes before and after proteasome inhibition revealed 21 known and 23 putatively novel substrates. In focused studies, we found that SCFFBXW11 bound, polyubiquitylated, and destabilized RAPGEF2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates the small GTPase RAP1. High RAPGEF2 protein levels promoted cell-cell fusion and, consequently, multinucleation. Surprisingly, this occurred independently of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) catalytic activity and of the presence of RAP1. Our data establish new functions for RAPGEF2 that may contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. More broadly, this report supports the continued use of substrate trapping proteomics to comprehensively define targets for E3 ubiquitin ligases. All proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001062. PMID:25332235

  17. Discovery of bacterial NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: improvements in clearance of adenosine series.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huynh, Hoan; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Chen, Brendan; Albert, Robert; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rooney, Michael T; Hu, Haiqing; Newman, Joseph V; Mills, Scott D

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of clearance of adenosine inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. To reduce Cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic clearance, many strategies were explored; however, most modifications resulted in compounds with reduced antibacterial activity and/or unchanged total clearance. The alkyl side chains of the 2-cycloalkoxyadenosines were fluorinated, and compounds with moderate antibacterial activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rat and dog were identified.

  18. ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Interacts with Ebola Virus VP40 To Regulate Budding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Sudol, Marius

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) belong to the Filoviridae family and can cause outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever, with high mortality rates in humans. The EBOV VP40 (eVP40) and MARV VP40 (mVP40) matrix proteins play a central role in virion assembly and egress, such that independent expression of VP40 leads to the production and egress of virus-like particles (VLPs) that accurately mimic the budding of infectious virus. Late (L) budding domains of eVP40 recruit host proteins (e.g., Tsg101, Nedd4, and Alix) that are important for efficient virus egress and spread. For example, the PPxY-type L domain of eVP40 and mVP40 recruits the host Nedd4 E3 ubiquitin ligase via its WW domains to facilitate budding. Here we sought to identify additional WW domain host interactors and demonstrate that the PPxY L domain motif of eVP40 interacts specifically with the WW domain of the host E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH. ITCH, like Nedd4, is a member of the HECT class of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and the resultant physical and functional interaction with eVP40 facilitates VLP and virus budding. Identification of this novel eVP40 interactor highlights the functional interplay between cellular E3 ligases, ubiquitination, and regulation of VP40-mediated egress. IMPORTANCE The unprecedented magnitude and scope of the recent 2014-2015 EBOV outbreak in West Africa and its emergence here in the United States and other countries underscore the critical need for a better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this emerging pathogen. We have identified a novel and functional EBOV VP40 interactor, ITCH, that regulates VP40-mediated egress. This virus-host interaction may represent a new target for our previously identified small-molecule inhibitors of virus egress. PMID:27489272

  19. The Role of beta-TrCP Ubiquitin Ligase Receptor in the Development of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Receptor in the Development of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vladimir Spiegelman, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of beta-TrCP Ubiquitin Ligase Receptor in the Development of Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0415 5c...apoptosis of cancer cells induced by various pro-apoptotic stimuli. These and other data indicate that NF-kappaB inhibiting agents could become useful

  20. Identification of Arabidopsis MYB56 as a novel substrate for CRL3(BPM) E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyuan; Bernhardt, Anne; Lee, JooHyun; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2015-02-01

    Controlled stability of proteins is a highly efficient mechanism to direct diverse processes in living cells. A key regulatory system for protein stability is given by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which uses E3 ligases to mark specific proteins for degradation. In this work, MYB56 is identified as a novel target of a CULLIN3 (CUL3)-based E3 ligase. Its stability depends on the presence of MATH-BTB/POZ (BPM) proteins, which function as substrate adaptors to the E3 ligase. Genetic studies have indicated that MYB56 is a negative regulator of flowering, while BPMs positively affect this developmental program. The interaction between BPMs and MYB56 occurs at the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), a key regulator in initiating flowering in Arabidopsis, and results in instability of MYB56. Overall the work establishes MYB transcription factors as substrates of BPM proteins, and provides novel information on components that participate in controlling flowering time in plants.

  1. The SCF Slimb ubiquitin ligase regulates Plk4/Sak levels to block centriole reduplication.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Gregory C; Rusan, Nasser M; Roberts, David M; Peifer, Mark; Rogers, Stephen L

    2009-01-26

    Restricting centriole duplication to once per cell cycle is critical for chromosome segregation and genomic stability, but the mechanisms underlying this block to reduplication are unclear. Genetic analyses have suggested an involvement for Skp/Cullin/F box (SCF)-class ubiquitin ligases in this process. In this study, we describe a mechanism to prevent centriole reduplication in Drosophila melanogaster whereby the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase in complex with the F-box protein Slimb mediates proteolytic degradation of the centrosomal regulatory kinase Plk4. We identified SCF(Slimb) as a regulator of centriole duplication via an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases. We found that Plk4 binds to Slimb and is an SCF(Slimb) target. Both Slimb and Plk4 localize to centrioles, with Plk4 levels highest at mitosis and absent during S phase. Using a Plk4 Slimb-binding mutant and Slimb RNAi, we show that Slimb regulates Plk4 localization to centrioles during interphase, thus regulating centriole number and ensuring the block to centriole reduplication.

  2. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  3. Structure of the DDB1-CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase in complex with thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Böhm, Kerstin; Lydeard, John R; Yang, Haidi; Stadler, Michael B; Cavadini, Simone; Nagel, Jane; Serluca, Fabrizio; Acker, Vincent; Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Tichkule, Ritesh B; Schebesta, Michael; Forrester, William C; Schirle, Markus; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Ottl, Johannes; Hild, Marc; Beckwith, Rohan E J; Harper, J Wade; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2014-08-07

    In the 1950s, the drug thalidomide, administered as a sedative to pregnant women, led to the birth of thousands of children with multiple defects. Despite the teratogenicity of thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide, these immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) recently emerged as effective treatments for multiple myeloma and 5q-deletion-associated dysplasia. IMiDs target the E3 ubiquitin ligase CUL4-RBX1-DDB1-CRBN (known as CRL4(CRBN)) and promote the ubiquitination of the IKAROS family transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3 by CRL4(CRBN). Here we present crystal structures of the DDB1-CRBN complex bound to thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide. The structure establishes that CRBN is a substrate receptor within CRL4(CRBN) and enantioselectively binds IMiDs. Using an unbiased screen, we identified the homeobox transcription factor MEIS2 as an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Our studies suggest that IMiDs block endogenous substrates (MEIS2) from binding to CRL4(CRBN) while the ligase complex is recruiting IKZF1 or IKZF3 for degradation. This dual activity implies that small molecules can modulate an E3 ubiquitin ligase and thereby upregulate or downregulate the ubiquitination of proteins.

  4. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  5. Structure of a BMI-1-Ring1B Polycomb Group Ubiquitin Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Z.; Cao, R.; Wang, M.; Myers, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins Bmi-1 and Ring1B are core subunits of the PRC1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of Hox gene expression, X-chromosome inactivation, tumorigenesis and stem cell self-renewal. The RING finger protein Ring1B is an E3 ligase that participates in the ubiquitination of lysine 119 of histone H2A, and the binding of Bmi-1 stimulates the E3 ligase activity. We have mapped the regions of Bmi-1 and Ring1B required for efficient ubiquitin transfer and determined a 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Bmi-1-Ring1B core domain complex. The structure reveals that Ring1B 'hugs' Bmi-1 through extensive RING domain contacts and its N-terminal tail wraps around Bmi-1. The two regions of interaction have a synergistic effect on the E3 ligase activity. Our analyses suggest a model where the Bmi-1-Ring1B complex stabilizes the interaction between the E2 enzyme and the nucleosomal substrate to allow efficient ubiquitin transfer.

  6. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  7. Stabilization of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nrdp1 by the Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuli; Yen, Lily; Irwin, Lisa; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2004-01-01

    Nrdp1 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that physically interacts with and regulates steady-state cellular levels of the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinases and has been implicated in the degradation of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein BRUCE. Here we demonstrate that the Nrdp1 protein undergoes efficient proteasome-dependent degradation and that mutations in its RING finger domain that disrupt ubiquitin ligase activity enhance stability. These observations suggest that Nrdp1 self-ubiquitination and stability could play an important role in regulating the activity of this protein. Using affinity chromatography, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 (also called Ubpy) as a protein that physically interacts with Nrdp1. Nrdp1 and USP8 could be coimmunoprecipitated, and in transfected cells USP8 specifically bound to Nrdp1 but not cbl, a RING finger E3 ligase involved in ligand-stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation. The USP8 rhodanese and catalytic domains mediated Nrdp1 binding. USP8 markedly enhanced the stability of Nrdp1, and a point mutant that disrupts USP8 catalytic activity destabilized endogenous Nrdp1. Our results indicate that Nrdp1 is a specific target for the USP8 deubiquitinating enzyme and are consistent with a model where USP8 augments Nrdp1 activity by mediating its stabilization. PMID:15314180

  8. Stabilization of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuli; Yen, Lily; Irwin, Lisa; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2004-09-01

    Nrdp1 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that physically interacts with and regulates steady-state cellular levels of the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinases and has been implicated in the degradation of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein BRUCE. Here we demonstrate that the Nrdp1 protein undergoes efficient proteasome-dependent degradation and that mutations in its RING finger domain that disrupt ubiquitin ligase activity enhance stability. These observations suggest that Nrdp1 self-ubiquitination and stability could play an important role in regulating the activity of this protein. Using affinity chromatography, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 (also called Ubpy) as a protein that physically interacts with Nrdp1. Nrdp1 and USP8 could be coimmunoprecipitated, and in transfected cells USP8 specifically bound to Nrdp1 but not cbl, a RING finger E3 ligase involved in ligand-stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation. The USP8 rhodanese and catalytic domains mediated Nrdp1 binding. USP8 markedly enhanced the stability of Nrdp1, and a point mutant that disrupts USP8 catalytic activity destabilized endogenous Nrdp1. Our results indicate that Nrdp1 is a specific target for the USP8 deubiquitinating enzyme and are consistent with a model where USP8 augments Nrdp1 activity by mediating its stabilization.

  9. A Small Molecule That Switches a Ubiquitin Ligase From a Processive to a Distributive Enzymatic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kathman, Stefan G; Span, Ingrid; Smith, Aaron T; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Statsyuk, Alexander V

    2015-10-07

    E3 ligases are genetically implicated in many human diseases, yet E3 enzyme mechanisms are not fully understood, and there is a strong need for pharmacological probes of E3s. We report the discovery that the HECT E3 Nedd4-1 is a processive enzyme and that disruption of its processivity by biochemical mutations or small molecules switches Nedd4-1 from a processive to a distributive mechanism of polyubiquitin chain synthesis. Furthermore, we discovered and structurally characterized the first covalent inhibitor of Nedd4-1, which switches Nedd4-1 from a processive to a distributive mechanism. To visualize the binding mode of the Nedd4-1 inhibitor, we used X-ray crystallography and solved the first structure of a Nedd4-1 family ligase bound to an inhibitor. Importantly, our study shows that processive Nedd4-1, but not the distributive Nedd4-1:inhibitor complex, is able to synthesize polyubiquitin chains on the substrate in the presence of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8. Therefore, inhibition of E3 ligase processivity is a viable strategy to design E3 inhibitors. Our study provides fundamental insights into the HECT E3 mechanism and uncovers a novel class of HECT E3 inhibitors.

  10. Functional role of TRIM E3 ligase oligomerization and regulation of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, Marios G; Esposito, Diego; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Taylor, Ian A; Rittinger, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate a wide variety of cellular processes and are particularly important during innate immune signalling events. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif in their N-terminal portion which comprises a canonical RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region that mediates ligase dimerization. Self-association via the coiled-coil has been suggested to be crucial for catalytic activity of TRIMs; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this observation remains elusive. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the TRIM ligases TRIM25 and TRIM32 and show how their oligomeric state is linked to catalytic activity. The crystal structure of a complex between the TRIM25 RING domain and an ubiquitin-loaded E2 identifies the structural and mechanistic features that promote a closed E2~Ub conformation to activate the thioester for ubiquitin transfer allowing us to propose a model for the regulation of activity in the full-length protein. Our data reveal an unexpected diversity in the self-association mechanism of TRIMs that might be crucial for their biological function.

  11. Ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 binds to connexin43 by a phosphorylation-modulated process.

    PubMed

    Leykauf, Kerstin; Salek, Mojibrahman; Bomke, Jörg; Frech, Matthias; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Dürst, Matthias; Alonso, Angel

    2006-09-01

    Connexin43 is degraded by the proteasomal as well as the lysosomal pathway with ubiquitin playing a role in both degradation pathways. So far, no ubiquitin protein ligase has been identified for any of the connexins. By using pull-down assays, here we show binding of a ubiquitin protein ligase, Nedd4, to the C-terminus of connexin43. This observation was confirmed in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, showing colocalization of Nedd4 and connexin43. Binding of Nedd4 to its interaction partners is generally carried out by its WW domains. Our results indicate that the interaction with connexin43 occurs through all three WW domains of Nedd4. Furthermore, whereas WW1 and WW2 domains mainly interact with the unphosphorylated form of connexin43, WW3 binds phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms equally. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance approach we show that only the WW2 domain binds to the PY motif located at the C-terminus of connexin43. Suppression of Nedd4 expression with siRNA resulted in an accumulation of gap junction plaques at the plasma membrane, suggesting an involvement of the ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 in gap junction internalization.

  12. Disinhibition of the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 by polymerized Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Thomas; Graeb, Michael; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Gammons, Melissa; Pelham, Hugh R. B.; Bienz, Mariann

    2015-01-01

    Dishevelled is a pivot in Wnt signal transduction, controlling both β-catenin-dependent transcription to specify proliferative cell fates, and cell polarity and other non-nuclear events in post-mitotic cells. In response to Wnt signals, or when present at high levels, Dishevelled forms signalosomes by dynamic polymerization. Its levels are controlled by ubiquitylation, mediated by various ubiquitin ligases, including NEDD4 family members that bind to a conserved PPxY motif in Dishevelled (mammalian Dvl1–3). Here, we show that Dvl2 binds to the ubiquitin ligase WWP2 and unlocks its ligase activity from autoinhibition. This disinhibition of WWP2 depends on several features of Dvl2 including its PPxY motif and to a lesser extent its DEP domain, but crucially on the ability of Dvl2 to polymerize, indicating that WWP2 is activated in Wnt signalosomes. We show that Notch intracellular domains are substrates for Dvl-activated WWP2 and their transcriptional activity is consequently reduced, providing a molecular mechanism for cross-talk between Wnt and Notch signalling. These regulatory interactions are conserved in Drosophila whose WWP2 orthologue, Suppressor-of-deltex, downregulates Notch signalling upon activation by Dishevelled in developing wing tissue. Attentuation of Notch signalling by Dishevelled signalosomes could be important during the transition of cells from the proliferative to the post-mitotic state. PMID:26701932

  13. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  14. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RLIM Negatively Regulates c-Myc Transcriptional Activity and Restrains Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Cai, Hao; Zhu, Jingjing; Yu, Long

    2016-01-01

    RNF12/RLIM is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase whose function has only begun to be elucidated recently. Although RLIM was reported to play important roles in some biological processes such as imprinted X-chromosome inactivation and regulation of TGF-β pathway etc., other functions of RLIM are largely unknown. Here, we identified RLIM as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc, one of the most frequently deregulated oncoproteins in human cancers. RLIM associates with c-Myc in vivo and in vitro independently of the E3 ligase activity of RLIM. Moreover, RLIM promotes the polyubiquitination of c-Myc protein independently of Ser62 and Thr58 phosphorylation of c-Myc. However, RLIM-mediated ubiquitination does not affect c-Myc stability. Instead, RLIM inhibits the transcriptional activity of c-Myc through which RLIM restrains cell proliferation. Our results suggest that RLIM may function as a tumor suppressor by controlling the activity of c-Myc oncoprotein. PMID:27684546

  15. Functional analysis of the mammalian RNA ligase for IRE1 in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Tirasophon, Witoon; Kaufman, Randal J

    2017-04-30

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved signalling pathway activated on the accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed ER stress. Upon ER stress, HAC1/XBP1 undergoes exon/intron-specific excision by inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) to remove an intron and liberate the 5' and 3' exons. In yeast, the 5' and 3' HAC1 exons are subsequently ligated by tRNA ligase (Rlg1p), whereas XBP1 ligation in mammalian cells is catalysed by a recently identified ligase, RtcB. In the present study, RNA ligase activity of the human RtcB (hRtcB) involved in the unconventional splicing of XBP1/HAC1 mRNA was explored in an rlg1-100 mutant yeast strain. Distinct from Escherichia coli RtcB and Rlg1p, expression of hRtcB alone inefficiently complemented HAC1/XBP1 splicing and the hRtcB cofactor (archease) was required to promote enzymatic activity of hRtcB to catalyse RNA ligation.

  16. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-11-15

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

  17. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. PMID:25350971

  18. The CCTL (Cpf1-assisted Cutting and Taq DNA ligase-assisted Ligation) method for efficient editing of large DNA constructs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chao; Li, Shi-Yuan; Liu, Jia-Kun; Zheng, Xuan; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2017-01-23

    As Cpf1 cleaves double-stranded DNA in a staggered way, it can be used in DNA assembly. However, the Cpf1 cleavage was found to be inaccurate, which may cause errors in DNA assembly. Here, the Cpf1 cleavage sites were precisely characterized, where the cleavage site on the target strand was around the 22nd base relative to the protospacer adjacent motif site, but the cleavage on the non-target strand was affected by the spacer length. When the spacer length was 20 nt or longer, Cpf1 mainly cleaved around the 14th and the 18th bases on the non-target strand; otherwise, with a shorter spacer (i.e. 17-19 nt), Cpf1 mainly cleaved after the 14th base, generating 8-nt sticky ends. With this finding, Cpf1 with a 17-nt spacer crRNA were employed for in vitro substitution of the actII-orf4 promoter in the actinorhodin biosynthetic cluster with a constitutively expressing promoter. The engineered cluster yielded more actinorhodin and produced actinorhodin from an earlier phase. Moreover, Taq DNA ligase was further employed to increase both the ligation efficiency and the ligation accuracy of the method. We expect this CCTL (Cpf1-assisted Cutting and Taq DNA ligase-mediated Ligation) method can be widely used in in vitro editing of large DNA constructs.

  19. The ubiquitin ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA (SINA) ubiquitinates a defense-related NAC transcription factor and is involved in defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Miao, Min; Niu, Xiangli; Kud, Joanna; Du, Xinran; Avila, Julian; Devarenne, Timothy P; Kuhl, Joseph C; Liu, Yongsheng; Xiao, Fangming

    2016-07-01

    We recently identified a defense-related tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factor, NAC1, that is subjected to ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent degradation in plant cells. In this study, we identified a tomato ubiquitin ligase (termed SEVEN IN ABSENTIA3; SINA3) that ubiquitinates NAC1, promoting its degradation. We conducted coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation to determine that SINA3 specifically interacts with the NAC1 transcription factor in the nucleus. Moreover, we found that SINA3 ubiquitinates NAC1 in vitro and promotes NAC1 degradation via polyubiquitination in vivo, indicating that SINA3 is a ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates NAC1, promoting its degradation. Our real-time PCR analysis indicated that, in contrast to our previous finding that NAC1 mRNA abundance increases upon Pseudomonas infection, the SINA3 mRNA abundance decreases in response to Pseudomonas infection. Moreover, using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, we found that overexpression of SINA3 interferes with the hypersensitive response cell death triggered by multiple plant resistance proteins. These results suggest that SINA3 ubiquitinates a defense-related NAC transcription factor for degradation and plays a negative role in defense signaling.

  20. Characterization of a long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase 1 gene and association between its SNPs and growth traits in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ping; Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Lu, Xia; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-07-25

    Long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligases (ACSLs) play crucial roles in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. They convert free long-chain FA into acyl-CoAs, which are key intermediates in both anabolic and catabolic pathways. A long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase gene was cloned in the clam Meretrix meretrix (MmeACSL1), with a full-length cDNA of 1865 bp encoding 475 amino acids. Its expression was only detected in hepatopancreas by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Expression level of MmeACSL1 exhibited a significant increase in a starvation experiment (P<0.05). This indicates that MmeACSL1 plays an important role in normal metabolism of M. meretrix and may be involved in energy supply and storage. Two exon SNPs and six intron SNPs were developed in this gene by direct sequencing. A marker-trait association analysis showed that five of these SNPs were significantly associated with growth traits (P<0.05). Also, haplotypes comprised of the five SNPs were revealed to be significantly growth-related (P<0.05), which further corroborates the relationship of this gene to growth traits of M. meretrix.

  1. Curcumin-induced degradation of ErbB2: A role for the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and the Michael reaction acceptor activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yunjin; Xu, Wanping; Kim, Heejung; Ha, Namchul; Neckers, Len

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying curcumin depletion of ErbB2 protein. Curcumin induced ErbB2 ubiquitination but pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors neither prevented curcumin depletion of ErbB2 protein nor further accumulated ubiquitinated ErbB2. Curcumin increased association of endogenous and ectopically expressed CHIP, a chaperone-dependent ubiquitin ligase, with ErbB2. In COS7 cells cotransfected with ErbB2 and various CHIP plasmids followed by curcumin treatment, CHIP-H260Q (a mutant lacking ubiquitin ligase activity) promoted less curcumin-induced ErbB2 ubiquitination than did wild type CHIP, and CHIP-K30A (a mutant incapable of binding Hsp90 and Hsp70) neither associated with ErbB2 nor promoted its ubiquitination. ErbB2 mutants lacking the kinase domain failed to associate with CHIP and were completely resistant to ubiquitination and depletion induced by curcumin. Finally, curcumin's Michael reaction acceptor functionality was required for both covalent association of curcumin with ErbB2 and curcumin-mediated ErbB2 depletion. These data suggest (1) that CHIP-dependent ErbB2 ubiquitination is implicated in curcumin-stimulated ErbB2 depletion, and (2) that covalent modification of ErbB2 by curcumin is the proximal signal which initiates this process.

  2. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  3. The RING Finger E3 Ligase SpRing is a Positive Regulator of Salt Stress Signaling in Salt-Tolerant Wild Tomato Species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shilian; Lin, Qingfang; Zhu, Huishan; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Wenhao; Hua, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Protein ubiquitination in plants plays critical roles in many biological processes, including adaptation to abiotic stresses. Previously, RING finger E3 ligase has been characterized during salt stress response in several plant species, but little is known about its function in tomato. Here, we report that SpRing, a stress-inducible gene, is involved in salt stress signaling in wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium 'PI365967'. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that SpRing is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and the RING finger conserved region is required for its activity. SpRing is expressed in all tissues of wild tomato and up-regulated by salt, drought and osmotic stresses, but repressed by low temperature. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion analysis showed that SpRing is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing of SpRing through a virus-induced gene silencing approach led to increased sensitivity to salt stress in wild tomato. Overexpression of SpRing in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in enhanced salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling development. The expression levels of certain key stress-related genes are altered both in SpRing-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants and virus-induced gene silenced tomato seedlings. Taken together, our results indicate that SpRing is involved in salt stress and functions as a positive regulator of salt tolerance.

  4. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL Induces the Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Family Members VLDLR and ApoER2*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cynthia; Duit, Sarah; Jalonen, Pilvi; Out, Ruud; Scheer, Lilith; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Boyadjian, Rima; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Foley, Edan; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Nimpf, Johannes; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Tontonoz, Peter; Zelcer, Noam

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase-inducible degrader of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (Idol) as a post-translational modulator of LDLR levels. Idol is a direct target for regulation by liver X receptors (LXRs), and its expression is responsive to cellular sterol status independent of the sterol-response element-binding proteins. Here we demonstrate that Idol also targets two closely related LDLR family members, VLDLR and ApoE receptor 2 (ApoER2), proteins implicated in both neuronal development and lipid metabolism. Idol triggers ubiquitination of the VLDLR and ApoER2 on their cytoplasmic tails, leading to their degradation. We further show that the level of endogenous VLDLR is sensitive to cellular sterol content, Idol expression, and activation of the LXR pathway. Pharmacological activation of the LXR pathway in mice leads to increased Idol expression and to decreased Vldlr levels in vivo. Finally, we establish an unexpected functional link between LXR and Reelin signaling. We demonstrate that LXR activation results in decreased Reelin binding to VLDLR and reduced Dab1 phosphorylation. The identification of VLDLR and ApoER2 as Idol targets suggests potential roles for this LXR-inducible E3 ligase in the central nervous system in addition to lipid metabolism. PMID:20427281

  5. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum-resident E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 controls B-cell immunity through degradation of the death receptor CD95/Fas

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sinyi; Yang, Yi; Xu, Yuanming; Wang, Yajun; Zhang, Yusi; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Xu, Xiangping; Gao, Beixue; Thorp, Edward B.; Zhang, Donna D.; Zhang, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Zhang, Kezhong; Zhang, Jianning; Zhang, Jinping; Li, Huabin; Fang, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Humoral immunity involves multiple checkpoints during B-cell development, maturation, and activation. The cell death receptor CD95/Fas-mediated apoptosis plays a critical role in eliminating the unwanted activation of B cells by self-reactive antigens and in maintaining B-cell homeostasis through activation-induced B-cell death (AICD). The molecular mechanisms controlling AICD remain largely undefined. Herein, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 protected B cells from activation-induced cell death by degrading the death receptor Fas. Hrd1-null B cells exhibited high Fas expression during activation and rapidly underwent Fas-mediated apoptosis, which could be largely inhibited by FasL neutralization. Fas mutation in Hrd1 KO mice abrogated the increase in B-cell AICD. We identified Hrd1 as the first E3 ubiquitin ligase of the death receptor Fas and Hrd1-mediated Fas destruction as a molecular mechanism in regulating B-cell immunity. PMID:27573825

  7. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2)*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)1 and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  8. The F-box protein Skp2 is a ubiquitylation target of a Cul1-based core ubiquitin ligase complex: evidence for a role of Cul1 in the suppression of Skp2 expression in quiescent fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wirbelauer, C; Sutterlüty, H; Blondel, M; Gstaiger, M; Peter, M; Reymond, F; Krek, W

    2000-10-16

    The ubiquitin protein ligase SCF(Skp2) is composed of Skp1, Cul1, Roc1/Rbx1 and the F-box protein Skp2, the substrate-recognition subunit. Levels of Skp2 decrease as cells exit the cell cycle and increase as cells re-enter the cycle. Ectopic expression of Skp2 in quiescent fibroblasts causes mitogen-independent S-phase entry. Hence, mechanisms must exist for limiting Skp2 protein expression during the G(0)/G(1) phases. Here we show that Skp2 is degraded by the proteasome in G(0)/G(1) and is stabilized when cells re-enter the cell cycle. Rapid degradation of Skp2 in quiescent cells depends on Skp2 sequences that contribute to Cul1 binding and interference with endogenous Cul1 function in serum-deprived cells induces Skp2 expression. Furthermore, recombinant Cul1-Roc1/Rbx1-Skp1 complexes can catalyse Skp2 ubiquitylation in vitro. These results suggest that degradation of Skp2 in G(0)/G(1) is mediated, at least in part, by an autocatalytic mechanism involving a Skp2-bound Cul1-based core ubiquitin ligase and imply a role for this mechanism in the suppression of SCF(Skp2) ubiquitin protein ligase function during the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle.

  9. NEDD4 E3 ligase inhibits the activity of the Hippo pathway by targeting LATS1 for degradation.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Cohen, Sherri; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-12-15

    Proper regulation of cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell death are vital for the development and survival of living organisms. Failure or dysfunction of any of these processes can have devastating effects, including cancer. The Hippo pathway, first discovered in Drosophila, has been found to be a major growth-regulatory signaling pathway that controls these crucial processes and has been implicated in cell-progress regulation and organ size determination. Abnormal regulation of this pathway has been found in several cancer types. However, the mechanisms that regulate the pathway and its core members yet have to be elucidated. One of the main core components of this pathway is LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase. Therefore, understanding how LATS1 activity is regulated is expected to shed light on new mechanisms that regulate the Hippo pathway. In the current work, we identified several potential LATS1 regulators and proved that NEDD4 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls LATS1 stability. We demonstrate that NEDD4 directly interacts with LATS1, leading to ubiquitination and decreased levels of LATS1 and, thus, increased YAP localization in the nucleus, which subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of YAP. As such, we show that NEDD4 acts as an additional regulator of the Hippo pathway on the protein level via interactions between WW domain-containing and PPxY motif-containing proteins. These findings might be applied in the development of new therapeutic approaches through the activation of LATS1.

  10. Negative regulation of the Hippo pathway by E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH is sufficient to promote tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Melino, Gerry; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2011-03-01

    The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, originally defined in fruit flies, regulates cellular proliferation and survival and exerts profound effects on normal mammalian cell fate and tumorigenesis. The present understanding of Hippo pathway components and mechanisms remains incomplete in cancer. WW domain-containing proteins regulate diverse biological processes through interaction with proline-tyrosine (PPxY)-containing targets. In this study, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH regulates stability of LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase in the Hippo pathway, through protein-protein interaction of the PPxY motifs of LATS1 with the WW domains of ITCH. Ubiquitination of LATS1 catalyzed by ITCH stimulated the proteasomal degradation of LATS1. Furthermore, ITCH-mediated degradation of LATS1 was associated with enhanced cell growth, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and increased tumorigenicity. Conversely, ITCH depletion increased LATS1 levels, enhancing FAS-induced apoptosis and reducing proliferation, survival, and migration. These phenotypes were rescued when both ITCH and LATS1 were depleted. Together, our results reveal a novel functional link between ITCH and the Hippo pathway, deepening their critical roles in tumorigenesis.

  11. NEDD4 E3 ligase inhibits the activity of the Hippo pathway by targeting LATS1 for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zaidoun; Cohen, Sherri; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-01-01

    Proper regulation of cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell death are vital for the development and survival of living organisms. Failure or dysfunction of any of these processes can have devastating effects, including cancer. The Hippo pathway, first discovered in Drosophila, has been found to be a major growth-regulatory signaling pathway that controls these crucial processes and has been implicated in cell-progress regulation and organ size determination. Abnormal regulation of this pathway has been found in several cancer types. However, the mechanisms that regulate the pathway and its core members yet have to be elucidated. One of the main core components of this pathway is LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase. Therefore, understanding how LATS1 activity is regulated is expected to shed light on new mechanisms that regulate the Hippo pathway. In the current work, we identified several potential LATS1 regulators and proved that NEDD4 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls LATS1 stability. We demonstrate that NEDD4 directly interacts with LATS1, leading to ubiquitination and decreased levels of LATS1 and, thus, increased YAP localization in the nucleus, which subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of YAP. As such, we show that NEDD4 acts as an additional regulator of the Hippo pathway on the protein level via interactions between WW domain-containing and PPxY motif-containing proteins. These findings might be applied in the development of new therapeutic approaches through the activation of LATS1. PMID:24107629

  12. E3 ubiquitin ligase Pirh2 enhances tumorigenic properties of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga; Shuvalov, Oleg; Merkulov, Valeriy; Vasileva, Elena; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2016-01-01

    The product of RCHY1 human gene, Pirh2, is a RING-finger containing E3 ligase that modifies p53 with ubiquitin residues resulting in its subsequent degradation in proteasomes. Transcription of RCHY1 is regulated by p53 itself thus forming a negative regulatory feedback loop. Functionally, by eliminating p53, Pirh2 facilitates tumorigenesis. However, the role of Pirh2 in cancer cells lacking p53 is yet not well understood. Therefore, we decided to elucidate the role of Pirh2 in p53-negative human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells, H1299. We found that ectopic expression of Pirh2 enhanced cell proliferation, resistance to doxorubicin, and increased migration potential. Ablation of Pirh2 by specific shRNA reversed these phenotypes. Mechanistically, Pirh2 increased mRNA and protein levels of the c-Myc oncogene. The bioinformatics data indicate that co-expression of both c-Myc and Pirh2 strongly correlated with poor survival of lung cancer patients. Collectively, our results suggest that Pirh2 can be considered as a potential pharmacological target for developing anticancer therapies to treat p53-negative cancers. PMID:28191284

  13. Clomipramine causes osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis via E3 ligase Itch, which is prevented by Zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Sun, Wen; Li, Jinbo; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Hengwei; Pei, Lingpeng; Boyce, Brendan F.; Wang, Zhiyu; Xing, Lianping

    2017-01-01

    Patients taking antidepressants, including Clomipramine (CLP), have an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. However, the effects of CLP on bone metabolism are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that WT mice treated with CLP for 2 weeks had significantly reduced trabecular bone volume and cortical bone thickness, associated with increased osteoclast (OC) numbers, but had no change in osteoblast numbers or bone formation rate. Bone marrow cells from CLP-treated mice had normal OC precursor frequency, but formed significantly more OCs when they were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF. CLP promoted OC formation and bone resorption and expression of OC-associated genes. CLP-induced bone loss was prevented by Zoledronic acid. At the molecular level, CLP inhibited the activity of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Itch. CLP did not promote OC formation from bone marrow cells of Itch−/− mice in vitro nor induce bone loss in Itch−/− mice. Our findings indicate that CLP causes bone loss by enhancing Itch-mediated osteoclastogenesis, which was prevented by Zoledronic acid. Thus, anti-resorptive therapy could be used to prevent bone loss in patients taking antidepressants, such as CLP. PMID:28145497

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RAD18 regulates ubiquitylation and chromatin loading of FANCD2 and FANCI.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stacy A; Longerich, Simonne; Sung, Patrick; Vaziri, Cyrus; Kupfer, Gary M

    2011-05-12

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital abnormalities, and an increased risk for cancer and leukemia. Components of the FA-BRCA pathway are thought to function in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Central to this pathway is the monoubiquitylation and chromatin localization of 2 FA proteins, FA complementation group D2 (FANCD2) and FANCI. In the present study, we show that RAD18 binds FANCD2 and is required for efficient monoubiquitylation and chromatin localization of both FANCD2 and FANCI. Human RAD18-knockout cells display increased sensitivity to mitomycin C and a delay in FANCD2 foci formation compared with their wild-type counterparts. In addition, RAD18-knockout cells display a unique lack of FANCD2 and FANCI localization to chromatin in exponentially growing cells. FANCD2 ubiquitylation is normal in cells containing a ubiquitylation-resistant form of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and chromatin loading of FA core complex proteins appears normal in RAD18-knockout cells. Mutation of the RING domain of RAD18 ablates the interaction with and chromatin loading of FANCD2. These data suggest a key role for the E3 ligase activity of RAD18 in the recruitment of FANCD2 and FANCI to chromatin and the events leading to their ubiquitylation during S phase.

  15. SOX9 is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the E3 ligase FBW7 in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xuehui; Liu, Wenyu; Song, Ruipeng; Shah, Jamie J.; Feng, Xing; Tsang, Chi Kwan; Morgan, Katherine M.; Bunting, Samuel F.; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Zheng, X. F. Steven; Shen, Zhiyuan; Sabaawy, Hatem E.; Liu, LianXin; Pine, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    SOX9 encodes a transcription factor that governs cell fate specification throughout development and tissue homeostasis. Elevated SOX9 is implicated in the genesis and progression of human tumors by increasing cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We found that in response to UV irradiation or genotoxic chemotherapeutics, SOX9 is actively degraded in various cancer types and in normal epithelial cells, through a pathway independent of p53, ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. SOX9 is phosphorylated by GSK3β, facilitating the binding of SOX9 to the F-box protein FBW7α, an E3 ligase that functions in the DNA damage response pathway. The binding of FBW7α to the SOX9 K2 domain at T236-T240 targets SOX9 for subsequent ubiquitination and proteasomal destruction. Exogenous overexpression of SOX9 after genotoxic stress increases cell survival. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for SOX9 stability and uncover a unique function of SOX9 in the cellular response to DNA damage. This new mechanism underlying a FBW7-SOX9 axis in cancer could have implications in therapy resistance. PMID:27566146

  16. SOX9 is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the E3 ligase FBW7 in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuehui; Liu, Wenyu; Song, Ruipeng; Shah, Jamie J; Feng, Xing; Tsang, Chi Kwan; Morgan, Katherine M; Bunting, Samuel F; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Zheng, X F Steven; Shen, Zhiyuan; Sabaawy, Hatem E; Liu, LianXin; Pine, Sharon R

    2016-10-14

    SOX9 encodes a transcription factor that governs cell fate specification throughout development and tissue homeostasis. Elevated SOX9 is implicated in the genesis and progression of human tumors by increasing cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We found that in response to UV irradiation or genotoxic chemotherapeutics, SOX9 is actively degraded in various cancer types and in normal epithelial cells, through a pathway independent of p53, ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. SOX9 is phosphorylated by GSK3β, facilitating the binding of SOX9 to the F-box protein FBW7α, an E3 ligase that functions in the DNA damage response pathway. The binding of FBW7α to the SOX9 K2 domain at T236-T240 targets SOX9 for subsequent ubiquitination and proteasomal destruction. Exogenous overexpression of SOX9 after genotoxic stress increases cell survival. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for SOX9 stability and uncover a unique function of SOX9 in the cellular response to DNA damage. This new mechanism underlying a FBW7-SOX9 axis in cancer could have implications in therapy resistance.

  17. Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-10-24

    To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

  18. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  19. NAD+-dependent DNA Ligase (Rv3014c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crystal structure of the adenylation domain and identification of novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-08-26

    DNA ligases utilize either ATP or NAD+ as cofactors to catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds in nicked DNA. Those utilizing NAD+ are attractive drug targets because of the unique cofactor requirement for ligase activity. We report here the crystal structure of the adenylation domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent ligase with bound AMP. The adenosine nucleoside moiety of AMP adopts a syn-conformation. The structure also captures a new spatial disposition between the two subdomains of the adenylation domain. Based on the crystal structure and an in-house compound library, we have identified a novel class of inhibitors for the enzyme using in silico docking calculations. The glycosyl ureide-based inhibitors were able to distinguish between NAD+- and ATP-dependent ligases as evidenced by in vitro assays using T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I. Moreover, assays involving an Escherichia coli strain harboring a temperature-sensitive ligase mutant and a ligase-deficient Salmonella typhimurium strain suggested that the bactericidal activity of the inhibitors is due to inhibition of the essential ligase enzyme. The results can be used as the basis for rational design of novel antibacterial agents.

  20. p63 threonine phosphorylation signals the interaction with the WW domain of the E3 ligase Itch.

    PubMed

    Melino, Sonia; Bellomaria, Alessia; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    Both in epithelial development as well as in epithelial cancers, the p53 family member p63 plays a crucial role acting as a master transcriptional regulator. P63 steady state protein levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, via a physical interaction between the PPxY consensus sequence (PY motif) of p63 and one of the 4 WW domains of Itch; this substrate recognition process leads to protein-ubiquitylation and p63 proteasomal degradation. The interaction of the WW domains, a highly compact protein-protein binding module, with the short proline-rich sequences is therefore a crucial regulatory event that may offer innovative potential therapeutic opportunity. Previous molecular studies on the Itch-p63 recognition have been performed in vitro using the Itch-WW2 domain and the peptide interacting fragment of p63 (pep63), which includes the PY motif. Itch-WW2-pep63 interaction is also stabilized in vitro by the conformational constriction of the S-S cyclization in the p63 peptide. The PY motif of p63, as also for other proteins, is characterized by the nearby presence of a (T/S)P motif, which is a potential recognition site of the WW domain of the IV group present in the prolyl-isomerase Pin1. In this study, we demonstrate, by in silico and spectroscopical studies using both the linear pep63 and its cyclic form, that the threonine phosphorylation of the (T/S)PPPxY motif may represent a crucial regulatory event of the Itch-mediated p63 ubiquitylation, increasing the Itch-WW domains-p63 recognition event and stabilizing in vivo the Itch-WW-p63 complex. Moreover, our studies confirm that the subsequently trans/cis proline isomerization of (T/S)P motif by the Pin1 prolyl-isomerase, could modulate the E3-ligase interaction, and that the (T/S)pPtransPPxY motif represent the best conformer for the ItchWW-(T/S)PPPxY motif recognition.

  1. p63 threonine phosphorylation signals the interaction with the WW domain of the E3 ligase Itch

    PubMed Central

    Melino, Sonia; Bellomaria, Alessia; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    Both in epithelial development as well as in epithelial cancers, the p53 family member p63 plays a crucial role acting as a master transcriptional regulator. P63 steady state protein levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, via a physical interaction between the PPxY consensus sequence (PY motif) of p63 and one of the 4 WW domains of Itch; this substrate recognition process leads to protein-ubiquitylation and p63 proteasomal degradation. The interaction of the WW domains, a highly compact protein-protein binding module, with the short proline-rich sequences is therefore a crucial regulatory event that may offer innovative potential therapeutic opportunity. Previous molecular studies on the Itch-p63 recognition have been performed in vitro using the Itch-WW2 domain and the peptide interacting fragment of p63 (pep63), which includes the PY motif. Itch-WW2-pep63 interaction is also stabilized in vitro by the conformational constriction of the S-S cyclization in the p63 peptide. The PY motif of p63, as also for other proteins, is characterized by the nearby presence of a (T/S)P motif, which is a potential recognition site of the WW domain of the IV group present in the prolyl-isomerase Pin1. In this study, we demonstrate, by in silico and spectroscopical studies using both the linear pep63 and its cyclic form, that the threonine phosphorylation of the (T/S)PPPxY motif may represent a crucial regulatory event of the Itch-mediated p63 ubiquitylation, increasing the Itch-WW domains-p63 recognition event and stabilizing in vivo the Itch-WW-p63 complex. Moreover, our studies confirm that the subsequently trans/cis proline isomerization of (T/S)P motif by the Pin1 prolyl-isomerase, could modulate the E3-ligase interaction, and that the (T/S)pPtransPPxY motif represent the best conformer for the ItchWW-(T/S)PPPxY motif recognition. PMID:25485500

  2. ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519 displays a new arrangement of the OB-fold domain.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T; Bezsudnova, E Y; Boyko, K M; Mardanov, A V; Polyakov, K M; Volkov, V V; Kozin, M; Ravin, N V; Shabalin, I G; Skryabin, K G; Stekhanova, T N; Kovalchuk, M V; Popov, V O

    2012-12-01

    DNA ligases join single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA by catalyzing the formation of a phosphodiester bond between adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini. Their function is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the replication, recombination and repair of DNA. High flexibility is important for the function of DNA ligase molecules. Two types of overall conformations of archaeal DNA ligase that depend on the relative position of the OB-fold domain have previously been revealed: closed and open extended conformations. The structure of ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519 (LigTh1519) in the crystalline state determined at a resolution of 3.02 Å shows a new relative arrangement of the OB-fold domain which is intermediate between the positions of this domain in the closed and the open extended conformations of previously determined archaeal DNA ligases. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements indicate that in solution the LigTh1519 molecule adopts either an open extended conformation or both an intermediate and an open extended conformation with the open extended conformation being dominant.

  3. A Family of Salmonella Virulence Factors Functions as a Distinct Class of Autoregulated E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    SciTech Connect

    Quezada, C.; Hicks, S; Galan, J; Stebbins, C

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E{sub 3} ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E{sub 3} Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E{sub 3} ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function.

  4. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1–CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy. PMID:26460955

  5. Overexpression of a Soybean Ariadne-Like Ubiquitin Ligase Gene GmARI1 Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolian; Wang, Ning; Chen, Pei; Gao, Mengmeng; Liu, Juge; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Tuanjie; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2014-01-01

    Ariadne (ARI) subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers) proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2–4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress. PMID:25364908

  6. Structure of a Fbw7-Skp1-Cyclin E Complex: Multisite-Phosphorylated Substrate Recognition by SCF Ubiquitin Ligases

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,B.; Oehlmann, S.; Sowa, M.; Harper, J.; Pavletich, N.

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of cyclin E plays a central role in cell-cycle progression, and cyclin E accumulation is a common event in cancer. Cyclin E degradation is triggered by multisite phosphorylation, which induces binding to the SCFFbw7 ubiquitin ligase complex. Structures of the Skp1-Fbw7 complex bound to cyclin E peptides identify a doubly phosphorylated pThr380/pSer384 cyclin E motif as an optimal, high-affinity degron and a singly phosphorylated pThr62 motif as a low-affinity one. Biochemical data indicate that the closely related yeast SCFCdc4 complex recognizes the multisite phosphorylated Sic1 substrate similarly and identify three doubly phosphorylated Sic1 degrons, each capable of high-affinity interactions with two Cdc4 phosphate binding sites. A model that explains the role of multiple cyclin E/Sic1 degrons is provided by the findings that Fbw7 and Cdc4 dimerize, that Fbw7 dimerization enhances the turnover of a weakly associated cyclin E in vivo, and that Cdc4 dimerization increases the rate and processivity of Sic1 ubiquitination in vitro.

  7. Regulating ehrlich and demethiolation pathways for alcohols production by the expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Jia, Kai-Zhi; Xia, Shi-Tao; Xu, Yang-Hua; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways as two competing branches converted amino acid into alcohols. Controlling both pathways offers considerable potential for industrial applications including alcohols overproduction, flavor-quality control and developing new flavors. While how to regulate ehrlich and demethiolation pathways is still not applicable. Taking the conversion of methionine into methionol and methanethiol for example, we constructed two suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of Clonostachys rosea by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology for screening regulators controlling the conversion. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1 screened from forward SSH library was validated to be related with the biosynthesis of end products. Overexpressing HUWE1 in C. rosea and S. cerevisiae significantly increased the biosynthesis of methanethiol and its derivatives in demethiolation pathway, while suppressed the biosynthesis of methional and methionol in ehrlich pathway. These results attained the directional regulation of both pathways by overexpressing HUWE1. Thus, HUWE1 has potential to be a key target for controlling and enhancing alcohols production by metabolic engineering. PMID:26860895

  8. Kinetics of T3-DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Phosphodiester Bond Formation Measured Using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cherie S; Riedl, Jan; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-12-27

    The latch region of the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) protein channel can be used to distinguish single base modifications in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) via ion channel measurements upon electrophoretic capture of dsDNA in the vestibule of α-HL. Herein, we investigated the use of the latch region to detect a nick in the phosphodiester DNA backbone. The presence of a nick in the phosphodiester backbone of one strand of the duplex results in a significant increase in both the blockade current and noise level relative to the intact duplex. Differentiation between the nicked and intact duplexes based on blockade current or noise, with near baseline resolution, allows real-time monitoring of the rate of T3-DNA ligase-catalyzed phosphodiester bond formation. Under low ionic strength conditions containing divalent cations and a molecular crowding agent (75 mg mL(-1) PEG), the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reaction in the bulk solution was continuously monitored by electrophoretically capturing reaction substrate or product dsDNA in the α-HL protein channel vestibule. Enzyme kinetic results obtained from the nanopore experiments match those from gel electrophoresis under the same reaction conditions, indicating the α-HL nanopore measurement provides a viable approach for monitoring enzymatic DNA repair activity.

  9. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-06-26

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes.

  10. The Steroidogenic Enzyme AKR1C3 Regulates Stability of the Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 in Prostate Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lingling; Peng, Guihong; Hussain, Arif; Fazli, Ladan; Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Re-activation of androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main driver for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously reported that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 enhanced AR transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell growth. Among the genes we found to be regulated by Siah2 was AKR1C3, which encodes a key androgen biosynthetic enzyme implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer development. Here, we found that Siah2 inhibition in CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells decreased AKR1C3 expression as well as intracellular androgen levels, concomitant with inhibition of cell growth in vitro and in orthotopic prostate tumors. Re-expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive forms of AKR1C3 partially rescued AR activity and growth defects in Siah2 knockdown cells, suggesting a nonenzymatic role for AKR1C3 in these outcomes. Unexpectedly, AKR1C3 re-expression in Siah2 knockdown cells elevated Siah2 protein levels, whereas AKR1C3 knockdown had the opposite effect. We further found that AKR1C3 can bind Siah2 and inhibit its self-ubiquitination and degradation, thereby increasing Siah2 protein levels. We observed parallel expression of Siah2 and AKR1C3 in human prostate cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings identify a new role for AKR1C3 in regulating Siah2 stability and thus enhancing Siah2-dependent regulation of AR activity in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26160177

  11. Overexpression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and 4-coumaroyl CoA ligase prompted flavone accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seon; Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, YeJi; Lee, Mi Young; Park, Sang Un

    2014-06-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a species of the Lamiaceae family, is considered as one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine. In order to enhance flavone (baicalein, baicalin, and wogonin) content in S. baicalensis roots, we overexpressed a single gene of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumaroyl coenzyme A ligase (4CL) using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated system. SbC4H- and Sb4CL-overexpressed hairy root lines enhanced the transcript levels of SbC4H and Sb4CL compared with those in the control and also increased flavones contents by approximately 3- and 2.5-fold, respectively. We successfully engineered the flavone biosynthesis pathway for the production of beneficial flavones in S baicalensis hairy roots. The importance of upstream gene C4H and 4CL in flavone biosynthesis and the efficiency of metabolic engineering in promoting flavone biosynthesis in S. baicalensis hairy roots have been indicated in this study.

  12. The Steroidogenic Enzyme AKR1C3 Regulates Stability of the Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lingling; Peng, Guihong; Hussain, Arif; Fazli, Ladan; Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-08-21

    Re-activation of androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main driver for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously reported that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 enhanced AR transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell growth. Among the genes we found to be regulated by Siah2 was AKR1C3, which encodes a key androgen biosynthetic enzyme implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer development. Here, we found that Siah2 inhibition in CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells decreased AKR1C3 expression as well as intracellular androgen levels, concomitant with inhibition of cell growth in vitro and in orthotopic prostate tumors. Re-expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive forms of AKR1C3 partially rescued AR activity and growth defects in Siah2 knockdown cells, suggesting a nonenzymatic role for AKR1C3 in these outcomes. Unexpectedly, AKR1C3 re-expression in Siah2 knockdown cells elevated Siah2 protein levels, whereas AKR1C3 knockdown had the opposite effect. We further found that AKR1C3 can bind Siah2 and inhibit its self-ubiquitination and degradation, thereby increasing Siah2 protein levels. We observed parallel expression of Siah2 and AKR1C3 in human prostate cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings identify a new role for AKR1C3 in regulating Siah2 stability and thus enhancing Siah2-dependent regulation of AR activity in prostate cancer cells.

  13. The Brain Proteome of the Ubiquitin Ligase Peli1 Knock-Out Mouse during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lereim, Ragnhild Reehorst; Oveland, Eystein; Xiao, Yichuan; Torkildsen, Øivind; Wergeland, Stig; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Sun, Shao-Cong; Berven, Frode S

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase Peli1 has previously been suggested as a potential treatment target in multiple sclerosis. In the multiple sclerosis disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Peli1 knock-out led to less activated microglia and less inflammation in the central nervous system. Despite being important in microglia, Peli1 expression has also been detected in glial and neuronal cells. In the present study the overall brain proteomes of Peli1 knock-out mice and wild-type mice were compared prior to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction, at onset of the disease and at disease peak. Brain samples from the frontal hemisphere, peripheral from the extensive inflammatory foci, were analyzed using TMT-labeling of sample pools, and the discovered proteins were verified in individual mice using label-free proteomics. The greatest proteomic differences between Peli1 knock-out and wild-type mice were observed at the disease peak. In Peli1 knock-out a higher degree of antigen presentation, increased activity of adaptive and innate immune cells and alterations to proteins involved in iron metabolism were observed during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These results unravel global effects to the brain proteome when abrogating Peli1 expression, underlining the importance of Peli1 as a regulator of the immune response also peripheral to inflammatory foci during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The proteomics data is available in PRIDE with accession PXD003710. PMID:27746629

  14. Sequential Poly-ubiquitylation by Specialized Conjugating Enzymes Expands the Versatility of a Quality Control Ubiquitin Ligase.

    PubMed

    Weber, Annika; Cohen, Itamar; Popp, Oliver; Dittmar, Gunnar; Reiss, Yuval; Sommer, Thomas; Ravid, Tommer; Jarosch, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    The Doa10 quality control ubiquitin (Ub) ligase labels proteins with uniform lysine 48-linked poly-Ub (K48-pUB) chains for proteasomal degradation. Processing of Doa10 substrates requires the activity of two Ub conjugating enzymes. Here we show that the non-canonical conjugating enzyme Ubc6 attaches single Ub molecules not only to lysines but also to hydroxylated amino acids. These Ub moieties serve as primers for subsequent poly-ubiquitylation by Ubc7. We propose that the evolutionary conserved propensity of Ubc6 to mount Ub on diverse amino acids augments the number of ubiquitylation sites within a substrate and thereby increases the target range of Doa10. Our work provides new insights on how the consecutive activity of two specialized conjugating enzymes facilitates the attachment of poly-Ub to very heterogeneous client molecules. Such stepwise ubiquitylation reactions most likely represent a more general cellular phenomenon that extends the versatility yet sustains the specificity of the Ub conjugation system.

  15. Complementary genetic screens identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLC, as a modifier of PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Hodny, Zdenek; Ashworth, Alan; Bartek, Jiri; Lord, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a series of basic, preclinical and clinical studies, the Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor, olaparib, has recently been approved for use in ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. By identifying novel predictive biomarkers of tumour cell sensitivity to olaparib, it is possible that the utility of PARP inhibitors could be extended beyond this patient subgroup. Many of the known genetic determinants of PARP inhibitor response have key roles in DNA damage response (DDR) pathways. Although protein ubiquitylation is known to play an important role in regulating the DDR, the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. Using two parallel RNA interference-based screening approaches, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, CBLC, as a candidate biomarker of response to olaparib. We validated this observation by demonstrating that silencing of CBLC causes increased sensitivity to olaparib in breast cancer cell line models and that defective homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair is the likely cause. This data provides an example of how defects in the ubiquitin machinery have the potential to influence the response of tumour cells to PARP inhibitors. PMID:25883215

  16. Structural and Functional Impact of Parkinson Disease-Associated Mutations in the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Fiesel, Fabienne C; Caulfield, Thomas R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Ogaki, Kotaro; Dourado, Daniel F A R; Flores, Samuel C; Ross, Owen A; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN/PARK2 gene that result in loss-of-function of the encoded, neuroprotective E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin cause recessive, familial early-onset Parkinson disease. As an increasing number of rare Parkin sequence variants with unclear pathogenicity are identified, structure-function analyses will be critical to determine their disease relevance. Depending on the specific amino acids affected, several distinct pathomechanisms can result in loss of Parkin function. These include disruption of overall Parkin folding, decreased solubility, and protein aggregation. However pathogenic effects can also result from misregulation of Parkin autoinhibition and of its enzymatic functions. In addition, interference of binding to coenzymes, substrates, and adaptor proteins can affect its catalytic activity too. Herein, we have performed a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of 21 PARK2 missense mutations distributed across the individual protein domains. Using this combined approach, we were able to pinpoint some of the pathogenic mechanisms of individual sequence variants. Similar analyses will be critical in gaining a complete understanding of the complex regulations and enzymatic functions of Parkin. These studies will not only highlight the important residues, but will also help to develop novel therapeutics aimed at activating and preserving an active, neuroprotective form of Parkin.

  17. A genomic survey of HECT ubiquitin ligases in eukaryotes reveals independent expansions of the HECT system in several lineages.

    PubMed

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by the ubiquitination pathway is an important regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. To date, however, studies on the evolutionary history of the proteins involved in this pathway have been restricted to E1 and E2 enzymes, whereas E3 studies have been focused mainly in metazoans and plants. To have a wider perspective, here we perform a genomic survey of the HECT family of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases, an important part of this posttranslational pathway, in genomes from representatives of all major eukaryotic lineages. We classify eukaryotic HECTs and reconstruct, by phylogenetic analysis, the putative repertoire of these proteins in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Furthermore, we analyze the diversity and complexity of protein domain architectures of HECTs along the different extant eukaryotic lineages. Our data show that LECA had six different HECTs and that protein expansion and N-terminal domain diversification shaped HECT evolution. Our data reveal that the genomes of animals and unicellular holozoans considerably increased the molecular and functional diversity of their HECT system compared with other eukaryotes. Other eukaryotes, such as the Apusozoa Thecanomas trahens or the Heterokonta Phytophthora infestans, independently expanded their HECT repertoire. In contrast, plant, excavate, rhodophyte, chlorophyte, and fungal genomes have a more limited enzymatic repertoire. Our genomic survey and phylogenetic analysis clarifies the origin and evolution of different HECT families among eukaryotes and provides a useful phylogenetic framework for future evolutionary studies of this regulatory pathway.

  18. SCF E3 ligase PP2-B11 plays a positive role in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wang, Chunyan; Huang, Jinguang; Yang, Guodong; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases are essential to the post-translational regulation of many important factors involved in cellular signal transduction. In this study, we identified an F-box protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtPP2-B11, which was remarkably induced with increased duration of salt treatment in terms of both transcript and protein levels. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPP2-B11 exhibited obvious tolerance to high salinity, whereas the RNA interference line was more sensitive to salt stress than wild-type plants. Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification analysis revealed that 4311 differentially expressed proteins were regulated by AtPP2-B11 under salt stress. AtPP2-B11 could upregulate the expression of annexin1 (AnnAt1) and function as a molecular link between salt stress and reactive oxygen species accumulation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, AtPP2-B11 influenced the expression of Na+ homeostasis genes under salt stress, and the AtPP2-B11 overexpressing lines exhibited lower Na+ accumulation. These results suggest that AtPP2-B11 functions as a positive regulator in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:26041321

  19. Two transgenic mouse models for β-subunit components of succinate-CoA ligase yielding pleiotropic metabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Doczi, Judit; Németh, Beáta; Madgar, Ory; Saada, Ann; Ilin, Polina; Miller, Chaya; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Iordanov, Iordan; Adams, Daniel; Vargedo, Zsuzsanna; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Nakahara, Mai; Ito, Haruka; Gál, Aniko; Molnár, Mária J.; Nagy, Zsolt; Patocs, Attila; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Succinate-CoA ligase (SUCL) is a heterodimer enzyme composed of Suclg1 α-subunit and a substrate-specific Sucla2 or Suclg2 β-subunit yielding ATP or GTP, respectively. In humans, the deficiency of this enzyme leads to encephalomyopathy with or without methylmalonyl aciduria, in addition to resulting in mitochondrial DNA depletion. We generated mice lacking either one Sucla2 or Suclg2 allele. Sucla2 heterozygote mice exhibited tissue- and age-dependent decreases in Sucla2 expression associated with decreases in ATP-forming activity, but rebound increases in cardiac Suclg2 expression and GTP-forming activity. Bioenergetic parameters including substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) were not different between wild-type and Sucla2 heterozygote mice unless a submaximal pharmacological inhibition of SUCL was concomitantly present. mtDNA contents were moderately decreased, but blood carnitine esters were significantly elevated. Suclg2 heterozygote mice exhibited decreases in Suclg2 expression but no rebound increases in Sucla2 expression or changes in bioenergetic parameters. Surprisingly, deletion of one Suclg2 allele in Sucla2 heterozygote mice still led to a rebound but protracted increase in Suclg2 expression, yielding double heterozygote mice with no alterations in GTP-forming activity or SLP, but more pronounced changes in mtDNA content and blood carnitine esters, and an increase in succinate dehydrogenase activity. We conclude that a partial reduction in Sucla2 elicits rebound increases in Suclg2 expression, which is sufficiently dominant to overcome even a concomitant deletion of one Suclg2 allele, pleiotropically affecting metabolic pathways associated with SUCL. These results as well as the availability of the transgenic mouse colonies will be of value in understanding SUCL deficiency. PMID:27496549

  20. Post-translational Activation of Glutamate Cysteine Ligase with Dimercaprol: A Novel Mechanism of Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in vitro.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Pallavi B; Sri Hari, Ashwini; Day, Brian J; Patel, Manisha

    2017-02-15

    Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are hallmarks of various neurological diseases. However, whether and how the redox processes control neuroinflammation is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that increasing cellular glutathione (GSH) levels would inhibit neuroinflammation. A series of thiol compounds were identified to elevate cellular GSH levels by a novel approach i.e. post-translational activation of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. These small thiolcontaining compounds were examined for their ability to increase intracellular GSH levels in a murine microglial cell line (BV2), of which dimercaprol [2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol (DMP)] was found to be the most effective compound. DMP increased GCL activity, decreased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS induction in BV2 cells in a concentrationdependent manner. DMP's ability to elevate GSH levels and attenuate LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was inhibited by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GCL. DMP increased the expression of GCL holoenzyme without altering the expression of its subunits or Nrf2 target proteins (NQO1 and HO-1), suggesting a post-translational mechanism. DMP attenuated LPS-induced mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in BV2 cells suggesting the MAP kinase pathway as the signaling mechanism underlying DMP's effect. Finally, DMP's ability to increase GSH via GCL activation was observed in mixed cerebrocortical cultures and N27 dopaminergic cells. Together, the data demonstrate a novel mechanism of GSH elevation by posttranslational activation of GCL. Post-translational activation of GCL offers a novel targeted approach to control inflammation in chronic neuronal disorders associated with impaired adaptive responses.

  1. E2 conjugating enzyme selectivity and requirements for function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Soss, Sarah E; Yue, Yuanyuan; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-06-17

    The transfer of ubiquitin (Ub) to a substrate protein requires a cascade of E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligating enzymes. E3 Ub ligases containing U-box and RING domains bind both E2∼Ub conjugates and substrates to facilitate transfer of the Ub molecule. Although the overall mode of action of E3 ligases is well established, many of the mechanistic details that determine the outcome of ubiquitination are poorly understood. CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) is a U-box E3 ligase that serves as a co-chaperone to heat shock proteins and is critical for the regulation of unfolded proteins in the cytosol. We have performed a systematic analysis of the interactions of CHIP with E2 conjugating enzymes and found that only a subset bind and function. Moreover, some E2 enzymes function in pairs to create products that neither create individually. Characterization of the products of these reactions showed that different E2 enzymes produce different ubiquitination products, i.e. that E2 determines the outcome of Ub transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis on the E2 enzymes Ube2D1 and Ube2L3 (UbcH5a and UbcH7) established that an SPA motif in loop 7 of E2 is required for binding to CHIP but is not sufficient for activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate and consequent ubiquitination activity. These data support the proposal that the E2 SPA motif provides specificity for binding to CHIP, whereas activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate is derived from other molecular determinants.

  2. Targeting the mTOR-DEPTOR Pathway by CRL E3 Ubiquitin Ligases: Therapeutic Application1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals and serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, survival, and autophagy. The mTOR pathway is frequently activated in many human cancers, mainly resulting from alterations in the upstream regulators, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation, PTEN loss or dysregulation of mTOR-negative regulators (e.g., TSC1/2), leading to uncontrolled proliferation. Thus, inhibiting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways is widely considered as an effective approach for targeted cancer therapy. Recently, we and others found that DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, was degraded by SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase, the founding member of cullin-RING-ligases (CRLs), resulting in mTOR activation and cell proliferation. In addition to DEPTOR, previous studies have demonstrated that several other negative regulators of mTOR pathway are also substrates of CRL/SCF E3s. Thus, targeting CRL/SCF E3s is expected to cause the accumulation of these mTOR signal inhibitors to effectively block the mTOR pathway. In this review, we will discuss mTOR signaling pathway, how DEPTOR regulates mTOR/AKT axis, thus acting as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in some cases, how DEPTOR is ubiquitinated and degraded by SCFβ-TrCP E3, and how MLN4924, a small-molecule indirect inhibitor of CRL/SCF E3 ligases through blocking cullin neddylation, might be useful as a novel approach of mTOR pathway targeting for cancer therapy. PMID:22745582

  3. Targeting Neddylation Pathways to Inactivate Cullin-RING Ligases for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein neddylation is catalyzed by an E1 NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), an E2 NEDD8-conjugating enzyme, and an E3 NEDD8 ligase. Known physiological substrates of neddylation are cullin family members. Cullin neddylation leads to activation of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for ubiquitylation and degradation of many key signaling/regulatory proteins. Thus, through modulating CRLs, neddylation regulates many biological processes, including cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. Given that NEDD8 is overexpressed and CRLs are abnormally activated in many human cancers, targeting protein neddylation, in general, and cullin neddylation, in particular, appears to be an attractive anticancer approach. Recent Advances: MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NAE, was discovered that inactivates CRLs and causes accumulation of CRL substrates to suppress tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Promising preclinical results advanced MLN4924 to several clinical trials for anticancer therapy. Critical Issues: In preclinical settings, MLN4924 effectively suppresses tumor cell growth by inducing apoptosis, senescence, and autophagy, and causes sensitization to chemoradiation therapies in a cellular context-dependent manner. Signal molecules that determine the cell fate upon MLN4924 treatment, however, remain elusive. Cancer cells develop MLN4924 resistance by selecting target mutations. Future Directions: In the clinical side, several Phase 1b trials are under way to determine the safety and efficacy of MLN4924, acting alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, against human solid tumors. In the preclinical side, the efforts are being made to develop additional neddylation inhibitors by targeting NEDD8 E2s and E3s. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2383–2400. PMID:24410571

  4. DD-ligases as a potential target for antibiotics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, I; Colacino, E; Tulkens, P M; Poupaert, J H; Prévost, M; Van Bambeke, F

    2009-01-01

    DD-ligases catalyze the synthesis of the D-Ala-D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Ser dipeptides or the D Ala-D-Lac depsipeptide in an early step of peptidoglycan synthesis. Their function is essential for bacterial growth and specific to bacteria, making them attractive targets for the development of novel antibiotics. This review examines the biochemical and structural features of these enzymes and presents the main families of inhibitors described so far. Over the last 20 years, 7 structures of DD-ligases have been solved by X-ray crystallography, giving a detailed view of the general topology of the active site and of the residues in the catalytic pocket that play a central role in substrate recognition. This has paved the way to the rational design of inhibitors, which can be classified as (i) analogues of substrates, (ii) analogues of the product of the reaction, (iii) analogues of the transition state, and (iv) original scaffolds discovered by screening or by rational computer-aided design. The three first strategies have led to molecules that are polar by nature and have therefore poor access to their cytosolic target. The fourth one is potentially most promising as it yields more diverse structures. The most active molecules show affinity constants in the microM range, but microbiological evaluation remains scarce (typical MIC 1-8 mg/L for the tested compounds). These data strongly suggest targeting DD-ligases is a promising approach for discovery of new antibiotics. Future research should, however, aim at finding more potent inhibitors endowed with the appropriate pharmacokinetic properties that ensure access to their intracellular target.

  5. Ku stimulation of DNA ligase IV-dependent ligation requires inward movement along the DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Kysela, Boris; Doherty, Aidan J; Chovanec, Miroslav; Stiff, Thomas; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Jeggo, Penny A

    2003-06-20

    The DNA ligase IV.XRCC4 complex (LX) functions in DNA non-homologous-end joining, the main pathway for double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. We show that, in contrast to ligation by T4 ligase, the efficiency of LX ligation of double-stranded (ds) ends is critically dependent upon the length of the DNA substrate. The effect is specific for ds ligation, and LX/DNA binding is not influenced by the substrate length. Ku stimulates LX ligation at concentrations resulting in 1-2 Ku molecules bound per substrate, whereas multiply Ku-bound DNA molecules inhibit ds ligation. The combined footprint of DNA with Ku and LX bound is the sum of each individual footprint suggesting that the two complexes are located in tandem at the DNA end. Inhibition of Ku translocation by the presence of cis-platinum adducts on the DNA substrate severely inhibits ligation by LX. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis using fluorophore-labeled Ku and DNA molecules showed that, as expected, Ku makes close contact with the DNA end and that addition of LX can disrupt this close contact. Finally, we show that recruitment of LX by Ku is impaired in an adenylation-defective mutant providing further evidence that LX interacts directly with the DNA end, possibly via the 5'-phosphate as shown for prokaryotic ligases. Taken together, our results suggest that, when LX binds to a Ku-bound DNA molecule, it causes inward translocation of Ku and that freedom to move inward on the DNA is essential to Ku stimulation of LX activity.

  6. Pathogenic Role of the CRL4 Ubiquitin Ligase in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2012-01-01

    The cullin 4-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) family employs multiple DDB1–CUL4 associated factors substrate receptors to direct the degradation of proteins involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions. Aberrant expression of the cullin 4A (CUL4A) gene is found in many tumor types, while mutations of the cullin 4B (CUL4B) gene are causally associated with human X-linked mental retardation. This focused review will summarize our current knowledge of the two CUL4 family members in the pathogenesis of human malignancy and neuronal disease, and discuss their potential as new targets for cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:22649780

  7. Primary structure and genetic organization of phage T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J; Brown, R S; Tsugita, A

    1983-01-01

    The primary structure of phage T4 DNA ligase has been determined by DNA sequencing of a cloned restriction fragment containing its gene, and partial amino acid sequence analysis of the protein. The molecule has a Mr of 55,230, and contains 487 amino acids. The DNA sequence may also encode all of one and parts of two other, hitherto unidentified, T4 proteins. The four genes are closely packed, with overlaps between terminator and initiator codons of adjacent genes. Potential terminator and promoter sites for transcription are located within the coding sequence of one of the genes. PMID:6314278

  8. Effects of DNA-binding drugs on T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, A; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Lestingi, M; Ciarrocchi, G

    1990-01-01

    A number of DNA intercalating and externally binding drugs have been found to inhibit nick sealing, cohesive and blunt end ligation, AMP-dependent DNA topoisomerization and EDTA-induced DNA nicking mediated by bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase. The inhibition seems to arise from drug-substrate interaction so that formation of active DNA-Mg2(+)-AMP-enzyme complex is impaired while assembled and active complexes are not disturbed by drug binding to the substrate. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2156493

  9. Viral modulators of cullin RING ubiquitin ligases: culling the host defense.

    PubMed

    Barry, Michele; Früh, Klaus

    2006-05-16

    Cullin RING ubiquitin ligases (CRULs) are found in all eukaryotes and play an essential role in targeting proteins for ubiquitin-mediated destruction, thus regulating a plethora of cellular processes. Viruses manipulate CRULs by redirecting this destruction machinery to eliminate unwanted host cell proteins, thus allowing viruses to slip past host immune barriers. Depending on the host organism, virus-modified CRULs can perform an amazing range of tasks, including the elimination of crucial signal transduction molecules in the human interferon pathway and suppression of virus-induced gene silencing in plants. This Perspective summarizes recent advances in our understanding of how viral proteins manipulate the function of CRULs.

  10. Control of cell growth by the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagano, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays key roles in the control of cell growth. The cell cycle in particular is highly regulated by the functions of the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases, and perturbation of their function can result in tumorigenesis. Although the SCF and APC/C complexes are well-established in growth control pathways, many aspects of their function remain unknown. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanism of SCF-mediated ubiquitination and new functions for the SCF complex and APC/C. Our expanding understanding of the roles of the SCF and APC/C complexes highlight the potential for targeted molecular therapies. PMID:19775879

  11. Structural insight into SUMO chain recognition and manipulation by the ubiquitin ligase RNF4

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingqi; Plechanovová, Anna; Simpson, Peter; Marchant, Jan; Leidecker, Orsolya; Kraatz, Sebastian; Hay, Ronald T.; Matthews, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) can form polymeric chains that are important signals in cellular processes such as meiosis, genome maintenance and stress response. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 engages with SUMO chains on linked substrates and catalyses their ubiquitination, which targets substrates for proteasomal degradation. Here we use a segmental labelling approach combined with solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and biochemical characterization to reveal how RNF4 manipulates the conformation of the SUMO chain, thereby facilitating optimal delivery of the distal SUMO domain for ubiquitin transfer. PMID:24969970

  12. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  13. Properties of bacteriophage T4 mutants defective in gene 30 (deoxyribonucleic acid ligase) and the rII gene.

    PubMed

    Karam, J D; Barker, B

    1971-02-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12 strains infected with phage T4 which is defective in gene 30 [deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ligase] and in the rII gene (product unknown), near normal levels of DNA and viable phage were produced. Growth of such T4 ligase-rII double mutants was less efficient in E. coli B strains which show the "rapidlysis" phenotype of rII mutations. In pulse-chase experiments coupled with temperature shifts and with inhibition of DNA synthesis, it was observed that DNA synthesized by gene 30-defective phage is more susceptible to breakdown in vivo when the phage is carrying a wild-type rII gene. Breakdown was delayed or inhibited by continued DNA synthesis. Mutations of the rII gene decreased but did not completely abolish the breakdown. T4 ligase-rII double mutants had normal sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation.

  14. Cloning and expression analysis of the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase activator of NF-κB (MULAN) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Casadei, Elisa; Bickerdike, Ralph; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including many involved in bacterial and viral infections. NF-κB is normally sequestered by inhibitory proteins (IκBs) in the cytoplasm of non-stimulated cells. The degradation of IκBs by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway leads to the rapid translocation of NF-κB to the nucleous where it regulates gene transcription. The Mitochondrial Ubiquitin Ligase Activator of NF-κB, (MULAN), is an E3 ubiquitin ligase believed to be central in controlling activation of NF-κB, and regulating the mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis process. We report, for the first time in fish, the characterization of a MULAN cDNA in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The salmonid MULAN sequences encode predicted proteins of 352 amino acids. The mRNA of MULAN was expressed in multiple tissues, with the highest abundance in brain and white muscle. An Aeromonas salmonicida bacterial challenge increased expression of this gene in head kidney, liver and gill both at 6 and at 24h following the infection. In vitro experiments using the salmonid cell line RTG-2 indicated MULAN was increased in expression following 4h stimulation with LPS and recombinant trout IL-1β. MULAN expression remained increased 24h post-stimulation with both LPS and IL-1β, but was down regulated by PolyI:C at this time. These results suggest an active role of the MULAN gene in the activation of the NF-κB pathway during piscine immune responses.

  15. Development of β-Hairpin Peptides for the Measurement of SCF-Family E3 Ligase Activity in Vitro via Ornithine Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) to treat select types of cancer has become a popular area of drug discovery research. The FDA approval of proteasome inhibitors Bortezomib and Carfilzomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma has led to an increased need for chemical reporters capable of detecting and quantifying protein ubiquitination and the activity of members of the UPS including E3 ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome in the tumor cells of the patients. One limitation of peptide-based reporters is their rapid degradation in the cellular environment by cytosolic peptidases. Conversely, β-hairpin “protectides” exhibit a pronounced secondary structure that significantly increases their lifetime under cellular conditions. The goal of this work was to develop a family of novel, ornithine-rich protectides that could act as primary degrons serving as substrates for in vitro ubiquitination. The fluorescent peptide-based reporters were demonstrated to be highly resistant to degradation in multiple myeloma cell lysates. The most stable β-hairpin primary degron, containing a single ornithine residue at the N-terminus, OWRWR [Ac-OWVRVpGO(FAM)WIRQ-NH2], demonstrated rapid ubiquitination kinetics and a 20-fold increase in stability when compared with an unstructured primary degron. A screen of E1 and E3 enzyme inhibitors in cell lysates showed that ubiquitination of OWRWR was significantly impaired by inhibitors of the SCF family of E3 ligases. Furthermore, this is the first report demonstrating the use of an ornithine residue on a primary degron as a ubiquitination site. This study serves as a strong foundation for the development of stable, fluorescent, peptide-based reporters capable of quantifying protein ubiquitination and the enzymatic activity of members of the UPS. PMID:28393136

  16. DNA Ligase I is an In Vivo Substrate of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase and is Activated by Phosphorylation in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    anlysis. to the procedure described by Malanga and Althaus (8). Gel Electrophoresis and A utoradiography. Immunopre- DNA Ligase and Protein Assays. DNA...by casein kinase 11, EMBO J. 11, 2925-2933. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that DNA ligase I 8. Malanga , M., and Althaus, F. R. (1994) Poly (ADP

  17. DNA ligase C1 mediates the LigD-independent nonhomologous end-joining pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3' phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo.

  18. DNA Ligase C1 Mediates the LigD-Independent Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3′ phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. PMID:24957619

  19. Transfection with replicating DNA from the temperate Bacillus bacteriophage phi 105 and with T4-ligase treated phi105 DNA: the importance in transfection of being longer than genome-length.

    PubMed

    Flock, J I

    1978-07-06

    Replicating phage DNA extracted from Bacillus subtilis infected with phage phi 105 has a higher activity in transfection than mature DNA. By heteroduplex analysis it was shown that this DNA contains concatemeric molecules. Concatemers, constructed in vitro by treatment of mature DNA with T4-ligase also have an increased activity in transfection. DNA showing an increased activity in transfection does not have a requirement for more than one molecule per transfection event as is typically found for transfection with mature phi 105 DNA. An explanation is given for this difference suggesting that the structure of the ends of the transfecting molecules play an important role intransfection.

  20. Canalicular membrane MRP2/ABCC2 internalization is determined by Ezrin Thr567 phosphorylation in human obstructive cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jin; Cai, Shi-Ying; Liu, Xiaocong; Lian, Wei; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Liangjun; Feng, Xinchan; Cheng, Ying; He, Xiaochong; He, Yu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Rongquan; Wang, Huaizhi; Boyer, James L.; Chen, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Multidrug resistance–associated protein 2 (MRP2) excretes conjugated organic anions including bilirubin and bile acids. Malfunction of MRP2 leads to jaundice in patients. Studies in rodents indicate that Radixin plays a critical role in determining Mrp2 canalicular membrane expression. However, it is not known how human hepatic MRP2 expression is regulated in cholestasis. Methods We assessed liver MRP2 expression in patients with obstructive cholestasis caused by gallstone blockage of bile ducts, and investigated the regulatory mechanism in HepG2 cells. Results Western blot detected that liver MRP2 protein expression in obstructive cholestatic patients (n=30) was significantly reduced to 25% of the non-cholestatic controls (n=23). Immunoprecipitation identified Ezrin but not Radixin associating with MRP2 in human livers, and the increased amount of phospho-Ezrin Thr567 was positively correlated with the amount of co-precipitated MRP2 in cholestatic livers, whereas Ezrin and Radixin total protein levels were unchanged in cholestasis. Further detailed studies indicate that Ezrin Thr567 phosphorylation plays an important role in MRP2 internalization in HepG2 cells. Since increased expression of PKCα, δ and ε were detected in these cholestatic livers, we further confirmed that these PKCs stimulated Ezrin phosphorylation and reduced MRP2 membrane expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, we identified GP78 as the key ubiquitin ligase E3 involved in MRP2 proteasome degradation. Conclusions Activation of liver PKCs during cholestasis leads to Ezrin Thr567 phosphorylation resulting in MRP2 internalization and degradation where ubiquitin ligase E3 GP78 is involved. This process provides a mechanistic explanation for jaundice seen in patients with obstructive cholestasis. PMID:26212029

  1. The accessibility of thiophosphorylated groups in DNA fragments to the enzymatic activity of ligases and restriction endonuclease Bbs I.

    PubMed

    Schenk, J A; Heymann, S; Micheel, B

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the possibility to ligate and hydrolyse DNA sequences containing thiomodified ends and bonds. T4 DNA ligase was shown to ligate DNA fragments regardless of whether it contains phosphorylated or thiophosphorylated 5'-end. But the cleavage of an internally thiomodified phosphodiester bond was found to be totally inhibited when using the non-palindromic restrictase Bbs I. The special properties of this restriction endonuclease should allow the development of an oriented cloning strategy when combined with T4 ligase and a thiophosphorylation of DNA fragments.

  2. Inhibition of SCF ubiquitin ligases by engineered ubiquitin variants that target the Cul1 binding site on the Skp1–F-box interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, Maryna; Orlicky, Stephen; Sartori, Maria A.; Tang, Xiaojing; Marcon, Edyta; Kurinov, Igor; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Tyers, Mike; Moffat, Jason; Sicheri, Frank; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-03-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome components are often misregulated in numerous diseases, encouraging the search for drug targets and inhibitors. E3 ligases that specify ubiquitination targets are of particular interest. Multimeric Skp1–Cul1–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases constitute one of the largest E3 families connected to every cellular process and multiple diseases; however, their characterization as therapeutic targets is impeded by functional diversity and poor characterization of its members. Herein we describe a strategy to inhibit SCF E3 ligases using engineered ubiquitin-based binders. We identify a previously uncharacterized inhibitory site and design ubiquitin-based libraries targeting this site. Our strategy to target SCF E3 ligases with small-molecule–like agents will have broad applications for basic research and drug development relating to SCF E3 ligase function.

  3. Hypoxia-induced SUMOylation of E3 ligase HAF determines specific activation of HIF2 in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Mei Yee; Nguyen, Vuvi; Lemos, Robert; Darnay, Bryant G; Kiriakova, Galina; Abdelmelek, Mena; Ho, Thai H; Karam, Jose; Monzon, Federico A; Jonasch, Eric; Powis, Garth

    2015-01-15

    Clear-cell renal cell cancer (CRCC) is initiated typically by loss of the tumor-suppressor VHL, driving constitutive activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1) and HIF2. However, whereas HIF1 has a tumor-suppressor role, HIF2 plays a distinct role in driving CRCC. In this study, we show that the HIF1α E3 ligase hypoxia-associated factor (HAF) complexes with HIF2α at DNA to promote HIF2-dependent transcription through a mechanism relying upon HAF SUMOylation. HAF SUMOylation was induced by hypoxia, whereas HAF-mediated HIF1α degradation was SUMOylation independent. HAF overexpression in mice increased CRCC growth and metastasis. Clinically, HAF overexpression was associated with poor prognosis. Taken together, our results show that HAF is a specific mediator of HIF2 activation that is critical for CRCC development and morbidity.

  4. New Insights into the RNA-Binding and E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activities of Roquins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fan, Lixin; Hou, Feng; Dong, Aiping; Wang, Yun-Xing; Tong, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Roquins are a family of highly conserved RNA-binding proteins that also contain a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase domain. They repress constitutive decay elements containing mRNAs and play a critical role in RNA homeostasis and immunological self-tolerance. Here we present the crystal structures of the RNA-binding region of Roquin paralog RC3H2 in both apo- and RNA-bound forms. The RNA-binding region has a bipartite architecture composed of ROQ and HEPN domains, and can bind to stem-loop and double-stranded RNAs simultaneously. The two domains undergo a large orientation change to accommodate RNA duplex binding. We profiled E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that pair with Roquins and found that RC3H1 and RC3H2 interact with two sets of overlapping but not identical E2 enzymes to drive the assembly of polyubiquitin chains of different linkages. Crystal structures, small-angle X-ray scattering, and E2 profiling revealed that while the two paralogs are highly homologous, RC3H2 and RC3H1 are different in their structures and functions. We also demonstrated that RNA duplex binding to RC3H2 cross-talks with its E3 ubiquitin ligase function using an in vitro auto-ubiquitination assay. PMID:26489670

  5. PEX2 is the E3 ubiquitin ligase required for pexophagy during starvation

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Graeme; van Zutphen, Tim; Shatseva, Tatiana; Zhang, Ling; Di Giovanni, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are metabolic organelles necessary for anabolic and catabolic lipid reactions whose numbers are highly dynamic based on the metabolic need of the cells. One mechanism to regulate peroxisome numbers is through an autophagic process called pexophagy. In mammalian cells, ubiquitination of peroxisomal membrane proteins signals pexophagy; however, the E3 ligase responsible for mediating ubiquitination is not known. Here, we report that the peroxisomal E3 ubiquitin ligase peroxin 2 (PEX2) is the causative agent for mammalian pexophagy. Expression of PEX2 leads to gross ubiquitination of peroxisomes and degradation of peroxisomes in an NBR1-dependent autophagic process. We identify PEX5 and PMP70 as substrates of PEX2 that are ubiquitinated during amino acid starvation. We also find that PEX2 expression is up-regulated during both amino acid starvation and rapamycin treatment, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway regulates pexophagy by regulating PEX2 expression levels. Finally, we validate our findings in vivo using an animal model. PMID:27597759

  6. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  7. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency.

  8. Single-particle EM reveals extensive conformational variability of the Ltn1 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Doamekpor, Selom K; Bengtson, Mario H; Lee, Joong-Won; Toro, Tasha B; Petroski, Matthew D; Lima, Christopher D; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2013-01-29

    Ltn1 is a 180-kDa E3 ubiquitin ligase that associates with ribosomes and marks certain aberrant, translationally arrested nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. In addition to its evolutionarily conserved large size, Ltn1 is characterized by the presence of a conserved N terminus, HEAT/ARM repeats predicted to comprise the majority of the protein, and a C-terminal catalytic RING domain, although the protein's exact structure is unknown. We used numerous single-particle EM strategies to characterize Ltn1's structure based on negative stain and vitreous ice data. Two-dimensional classifications and subsequent 3D reconstructions of electron density maps show that Ltn1 has an elongated form and presents a continuum of conformational states about two flexible hinge regions, whereas its overall architecture is reminiscent of multisubunit cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes. We propose a model of Ltn1 function based on its conformational variability and flexibility that describes how these features may play a role in cotranslational protein quality control.

  9. The role of the E3 ligase Not4 in cotranslational quality control

    PubMed Central

    Panasenko, Olesya O.

    2014-01-01

    Cotranslational quality control (QC) is the mechanism by which the cell checks the integrity of newly synthesized proteins and mRNAs. In the event of mistakes these molecules are degraded. The Ccr4-Not complex has been proposed to play a role in this process. It contains both deadenylation and ubiquitination activities, thus it may target both aberrant proteins and mRNAs. Deadenylation is the first step in mRNA degradation. In yeast it is performed by the Ccr4 subunit of the Ccr4-Not complex. Another complex subunit, namely Not4, is a RING E3 ligase and it provides the ubiquitination activity of the complex. It was found associated with translating ribosomes. Thus, it has been suggested that Not4 is involved in ribosome-associated ubiquitination and degradation of aberrant peptides. However, several other E3 ligases have been associated with peptide ubiquitination on the ribosome and the relevance of Not4 in this process remains unclear. In this review we summarize the recent data and suggest a role for Not4 in cotranslational protein QC. PMID:24904641

  10. A complex ligase ribozyme evolved in vitro from a group I ribozyme domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, L.; Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Like most proteins, complex RNA molecules often are modular objects made up of distinct structural and functional domains. The component domains of a protein can associate in alternative combinations to form molecules with different functions. These observations raise the possibility that complex RNAs also can be assembled from preexisting structural and functional domains. To test this hypothesis, an in vitro evolution procedure was used to isolate a previously undescribed class of complex ligase ribozymes, starting from a pool of 10(16) different RNA molecules that contained a constant region derived from a large structural domain that occurs within self-splicing group I ribozymes. Attached to this constant region were three hypervariable regions, totaling 85 nucleotides, that gave rise to the catalytic motif within the evolved catalysts. The ligase ribozymes catalyze formation of a 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage between adjacent template-bound oligonucleotides, one bearing a 3' hydroxyl and the other a 5' triphosphate. Ligation occurs in the context of a Watson-Crick duplex, with a catalytic rate of 0.26 min(-1) under optimal conditions. The constant region is essential for catalytic activity and appears to retain the tertiary structure of the group I ribozyme. This work demonstrates that complex RNA molecules, like their protein counterparts, can share common structural domains while exhibiting distinct catalytic functions.

  11. Detection and Quantification of MicroRNAs by Ligase-Assisted Sandwich Hybridization on a Microarray.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Ryo; Ueno, Taro; Funatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) in body fluids have been identified as promising biomarkers for different human diseases. The high-throughput, multiplexed detection and quantification of these miRNAs are highly beneficial for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of diseases. Here, we developed a simple and convenient microarray-based technique, named ligase-assisted sandwich hybridization (LASH), for the detection and quantification of miRNAs. The LASH assay involves the hybridization of capture and detection probe pairs with the target miRNA to form a double-stranded structure which is then nick-sealed by T4 DNA ligase. Using this assay, we successfully demonstrated the multiplexed detection and quantification of different miRNAs in total RNA samples derived from blood obtained within 3 h. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the LASH assay to detect a specific miRNA, as a model for the detection and quantification of extracellular miRNAs.

  12. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  13. Genomic and Phenomic Screens for Flower Related RING Type Ubiquitin E3 Ligases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pavicic, Mirko; Mouhu, Katriina; Wang, Feng; Bilicka, Marcelina; Chovanček, Erik; Himanen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time control integrates endogenous as well as environmental signals to promote flower development. The pathways and molecular networks involved are complex and integrate many modes of signal transduction. In plants ubiquitin mediated protein degradation pathway has been proposed to be as important mode of signaling as phosphorylation and transcription. To systematically study the role of ubiquitin signaling in the molecular regulation of flowering we have taken a genomic approach to identify flower related Ubiquitin Proteasome System components. As a large and versatile gene family the RING type ubiquitin E3 ligases were chosen as targets of the genomic screen. The complete list of Arabidopsis RING E3 ligases were retrieved and verified in the Arabidopsis genome v11 and their differential expression was used for their categorization into flower organs or developmental stages. Known regulators of flowering time or floral organ development were identified in these categories through literature search and representative mutants for each category were purchased for functional characterization by growth and morphological phenotyping. To this end, a workflow was developed for high throughput phenotypic screening of growth, morphology and flowering of nearly a thousand Arabidopsis plants in one experimental round.

  14. Ubiquitination and regulation of AURKA identifies a hypoxia-independent E3 ligase activity of VHL.

    PubMed

    Hasanov, E; Chen, G; Chowdhury, P; Weldon, J; Ding, Z; Jonasch, E; Sen, S; Walker, C L; Dere, R

    2017-01-23

    The hypoxia-regulated tumor-suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an E3 ligase that recognizes its substrates as part of an oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) reaction, with hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) being its most notable substrate. Here we report that VHL has an equally important function distinct from its hypoxia-regulated activity. We find that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a novel, hypoxia-independent target for VHL ubiquitination. In contrast to its hypoxia-regulated activity, VHL mono-, rather than poly-ubiquitinates AURKA, in a PHD-independent reaction targeting AURKA for degradation in quiescent cells, where degradation of AURKA is required to maintain the primary cilium. Tumor-associated variants of VHL differentiate between these two functions, as a pathogenic VHL mutant that retains intrinsic ability to ubiquitinate HIFα is unable to ubiquitinate AURKA. Together, these data identify VHL as an E3 ligase with important cellular functions under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Oncogene advance online publication, 23 January 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.495.

  15. Early Origin and Evolution of the Angelman Syndrome Ubiquitin Ligase Gene Ube3a

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The human Ube3a gene encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and exhibits brain-specific genomic imprinting. Genetic abnormalities that affect the maternal copy of this gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), which is characterized by severe mental retardation, speech impairment, seizure, ataxia and some unique behavioral phenotypes. In this review article, I highlight the evolution of the Ube3a gene and its imprinting to provide evolutionary insights into AS. Recent comparative genomic studies have revealed that Ube3a is most phylogenetically similar to HECTD2 among the human HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and its distant evolutionary origin can be traced to common ancestors of fungi and animals. Moreover, a gene more similar to Ube3a than HECTD2 is found in a range of eukaryotes from amoebozoans to basal metazoans, but is lost in later lineages. Unlike in mice and humans, Ube3a expression is biallelic in birds, monotremes, marsupials and insects. The imprinting domain that governs maternal expression of Ube3a was formed from non-imprinted elements following multiple chromosomal rearrangements after diversification of marsupials and placental mammals. Hence, the evolutionary origins of Ube3a date from long before the emergence of the nervous system, although its imprinted expression was acquired relatively recently. These observations suggest that exogenous expression and functional analyses of ancient Ube3a orthologs in mammalian neurons will facilitate the evolutionary understanding of AS. PMID:28326016

  16. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  17. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  18. E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 regulates peroxisome biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ronghui; Satkovich, John; Hu, Jianping

    2016-10-31

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles that play pivotal roles in a suite of metabolic processes and often act coordinately with other organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Peroxisomes import proteins to the peroxisome matrix by peroxins (PEX proteins), but how the function of the PEX proteins is regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we identified the Arabidopsis RING (really interesting new gene) type E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 [suppressor of plastid protein import locus 1 (ppi1) 1] as a peroxisome membrane protein with a regulatory role in peroxisome protein import. SP1 interacts physically with the two components of the peroxisomemore » protein docking complex PEX13–PEX14 and the (RING)-finger peroxin PEX2. Loss of SP1 function suppresses defects of the pex14-2 and pex13-1 mutants, and SP1 is involved in the degradation of PEX13 and possibly PEX14 and all three RING peroxins. An in vivo ubiquitination assay showed that SP1 has the ability to promote PEX13 ubiquitination. Our study has revealed that, in addition to its previously reported function in chloroplast biogenesis, SP1 plays a role in peroxisome biogenesis. The same E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes the destabilization of components of two distinct protein-import machineries, indicating that degradation of organelle biogenesis factors by the ubiquitin–proteasome system may constitute an important regulatory mechanism in coordinating the biogenesis of metabolically linked organelles in eukaryotes.« less

  19. Huwe1 ubiquitin ligase is essential to synchronize neuronal and glial differentiation in the developing cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    D’Arca, Domenico; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Wenming; Ramirez-Martinez, Nadya C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna

    2010-01-01

    We have generated a knockout mouse strain in which the gene coding for the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 has been inactivated in cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) and radial glia. These mice have a high rate of postnatal lethality and profound cerebellar abnormalities. The external granule layer of the cerebellum, which contains CGNPs, is expanded and displays aberrant proliferation and impaired differentiation of the progenitor cell population. The uncontrolled proliferation of the CGNPs is associated with accumulation of the N-Myc oncoprotein, a substrate of Huwe1, and con-sequent activation of the signaling events downstream to N-Myc. Furthermore, loss of Huwe1 in Bergmann glia leads to extensive disorganization of this cell population with layering aberrations, severe granule neuron migration defects, and persistence of ectopic clusters of granule neurons in the external granule layer. Our findings uncover an unexpected role for Huwe1 in regulating Berg-mann glia differentiation and indicate that this ubiquitin ligase orchestrates the programming of the neural progenitors that give rise to neurons and glia in the cerebellum. PMID:20231446

  20. Huwe1 ubiquitin ligase is essential to synchronize neuronal and glial differentiation in the developing cerebellum.

    PubMed

    D'Arca, Domenico; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Wenming; Ramirez-Martinez, Nadya C; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna

    2010-03-30

    We have generated a knockout mouse strain in which the gene coding for the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 has been inactivated in cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) and radial glia. These mice have a high rate of postnatal lethality and profound cerebellar abnormalities. The external granule layer of the cerebellum, which contains CGNPs, is expanded and displays aberrant proliferation and impaired differentiation of the progenitor cell population. The uncontrolled proliferation of the CGNPs is associated with accumulation of the N-Myc oncoprotein, a substrate of Huwe1, and con-sequent activation of the signaling events downstream to N-Myc. Furthermore, loss of Huwe1 in Bergmann glia leads to extensive disorganization of this cell population with layering aberrations, severe granule neuron migration defects, and persistence of ectopic clusters of granule neurons in the external granule layer. Our findings uncover an unexpected role for Huwe1 in regulating Berg-mann glia differentiation and indicate that this ubiquitin ligase orchestrates the programming of the neural progenitors that give rise to neurons and glia in the cerebellum.

  1. Defective in Mitotic Arrest 1 (Dma1) Ubiquitin Ligase Controls G1 Cyclin Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Bru, Samuel; Ricco, Natalia; Ramírez, Sara; Casals, Núria; Jiménez, Javier; Isasa, Marta; Crosas, Bernat; Clotet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is controlled by diverse cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that might be associated to numerous cyclin isoforms. Given such complexity, regulation of cyclin degradation should be crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SCF is the only E3 ligase known to date to be involved in G1 cyclin degradation. Here, we report the design of a genetic screening that uncovered Dma1 as another E3 ligase that targets G1 cyclins in yeast. We show that the cyclin Pcl1 is ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo by Dma1, and accordingly, is stabilized in dma1 mutants. We demonstrate that Pcl1 must be phosphorylated by its own CDK to efficiently interact with Dma1 and undergo degradation. A nonphosphorylatable version of Pcl1 accumulates throughout the cell cycle, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the proposed mechanism. Finally, we present evidence that the levels of Pcl1 and Cln2 are independently controlled in response to nutrient availability. This new previously unknown mechanism for G1 cyclin degradation that we report here could help elucidate the specific roles of the redundant CDK-cyclin complexes in G1. PMID:23264631

  2. The bacterial effector Cif interferes with SCF ubiquitin ligase function by inhibiting deneddylation of Cullin1.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Hanako; Kim, Minsoo; Mimuro, Hitomi; Punginelli, Claire; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagai, Shinya; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2010-10-15

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of the effectors delivered into epithelial cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) via the type III secretion system (TTSS). Cif family proteins, which inhibit host cell-cycle progression via mechanisms not yet precisely understood, are highly conserved among EPEC, EHEC, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Levels of several proteins relevant to cell-cycle progression are modulated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which in turn are activated by conjugation and deconjugation of NEDD8 to Cullins. Here we show that Cif interacts with NEDD8 and interferes with SCF (Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein) complex ubiquitin ligase function. We found that neddylated Cullin family proteins accumulated and ubiquitination of p27 decreased in cells infected with EPEC. Consequently, Cif stabilized SCF substrates such as CyclinD1, Cdt1, and p27, and caused G1 cell-cycle arrest. Using time-lapse-imaging of fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci)-expressing cells, we were able to monitor cell-cycle progression during EPEC infection and confirmed the arrest of infected cells at G1. Our in vitro and in vivo data show that Cif-NEDD8 interaction inhibits deneddylation of Cullins, suppresses CRL activity and induces G1 arrest. We thus conclude that the bacterial effector Cif interferes with neddylation-mediated cell-cycle control.

  3. RING finger ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase Nrdp1/FLRF regulates parkin stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ling; Tan, Ying; Zhou, An; Yu, Qingming; Zhou, Jianhua

    2005-03-11

    Parkin is a ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase. It has been suggested that loss of function in parkin causes accumulation and aggregation of its substrates, leading to death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we isolated a RING finger protein that interacted with the N terminus of parkin in a Drosophila cDNA library. Interaction between human parkin and the mammalian RING finger protein homologue Nrdp1/FLRF, a ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase that ubiquitinates ErbB3 and ErbB4, was validated by in vitro binding assay, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence co-localization. Significantly, pulse-chase experiments showed that cotransfection of Nrdp1 and parkin reduced the half-life of parkin from 5 to 2.5 h. Consistent with these findings, we further observed that degradation of CDCrel-1, a parkin substrate, was facilitated by overexpression of parkin protein. However, co-transfection of Nrdp1 with parkin reversed the effects of parkin on CDCrel-1 degradation. We conclude that Nrdp1 is a parkin modifier that accelerates degradation of parkin, resulting in a reduction of parkin activity.

  4. SUMO E3 ligase HIGH PLOIDY2 regulates endocycle onset and meristem maintenance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Fujiwara, Sumire; Miura, Kenji; Stacey, Nicola; Yoshimura, Mika; Schneider, Katja; Adachi, Sumiko; Minamisawa, Kazunori; Umeda, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2009-08-01

    Endoreduplication involves a doubling of chromosomal DNA without corresponding cell division. In plants, many cell types transit from the mitotic cycle to the endoreduplication cycle or endocycle, and this transition is often coupled with the initiation of cell expansion and differentiation. Although a number of cell cycle regulators implicated in endocycle onset have been identified, it is still largely unknown how this transition is developmentally regulated at the whole organ level. Here, we report that a nuclear-localized SUMO E3 ligase, HIGH PLOIDY2 (HPY2), functions as a repressor of endocycle onset in Arabidopsis thaliana meristems. Loss of HPY2 results in a premature transition from the mitotic cycle to the endocycle, leading to severe dwarfism with defective meristems. HPY2 possesses an SP-RING domain characteristic of MMS21-type SUMO E3 ligases, and we show that the conserved residues within this domain are required for the in vivo and in vitro function of HPY2. HPY2 is predominantly expressed in proliferating cells of root meristems and it functions downstream of meristem patterning transcription factors PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2. These results establish that HPY2-mediated sumoylation modulates the cell cycle progression and meristem development in the PLT-dependent signaling pathway.

  5. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan Yin; Goh, Germaine; Chia, Joanne; Boey, Adrian; Gunko, Natalia V; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  6. Deficiency for the ubiquitin ligase UBE3B in a blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual-disability syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Segref, Alexandra; Thiele, Holger; Edwards, Andrew; Arends, Mark J; Miró, Xavier; White, Jacqueline K; Désir, Julie; Abramowicz, Marc; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Lepri, Francesca; Hofmann, Kay; Har-Zahav, Adi; Ryder, Edward; Karp, Natasha A; Estabel, Jeanne; Gerdin, Anna-Karin B; Podrini, Christine; Ingham, Neil J; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Frommolt, Peter; Abdelhak, Sonia; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Konen, Osnat; Kelley, Richard I; Shohat, Mordechai; Nürnberg, Peter; Flint, Jonathan; Steel, Karen P; Hoppe, Thorsten; Kubisch, Christian; Adams, David J; Borck, Guntram

    2012-12-07

    Ubiquitination plays a crucial role in neurodevelopment as exemplified by Angelman syndrome, which is caused by genetic alterations of the ubiquitin ligase-encoding UBE3A gene. Although the function of UBE3A has been widely studied, little is known about its paralog UBE3B. By using exome and capillary sequencing, we here identify biallelic UBE3B mutations in four patients from three unrelated families presenting an autosomal-recessive blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual-disability syndrome characterized by developmental delay, growth retardation with a small head circumference, facial dysmorphisms, and low cholesterol levels. UBE3B encodes an uncharacterized E3 ubiquitin ligase. The identified UBE3B variants include one frameshift and two splice-site mutations as well as a missense substitution affecting the highly conserved HECT domain. Disruption of mouse Ube3b leads to reduced viability and recapitulates key aspects of the human disorder, such as reduced weight and brain size and a downregulation of cholesterol synthesis. We establish that the probable Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of UBE3B, oxi-1, functions in the ubiquitin/proteasome system in vivo and is especially required under oxidative stress conditions. Our data reveal the pleiotropic effects of UBE3B deficiency and reinforce the physiological importance of ubiquitination in neuronal development and function in mammals.

  7. Characterization of the mammalian family of DCN-type NEDD8 E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Keuss, Matthew J.; Thomas, Yann; Mcarthur, Robin; Wood, Nicola T.; Knebel, Axel; Kurz, Thimo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cullin-RING ligases (CRL) are ubiquitin E3 enzymes that bind substrates through variable substrate receptor proteins and are activated by attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to the cullin subunit. DCNs are NEDD8 E3 ligases that promote neddylation. Mammalian cells express five DCN-like (DCNL) proteins but little is known about their specific functions or interaction partners. We found that DCNLs form stable stoichiometric complexes with CAND1 and cullins that can only be neddylated in the presence of a substrate adaptor. These CAND–cullin–DCNL complexes might represent ‘reserve’ CRLs that can be rapidly activated when needed. We further found that all DCNLs interact with most cullin subtypes, but that they are probably responsible for the neddylation of different subpopulations of any given cullin. This is consistent with the fact that the subcellular localization of DCNLs in tissue culture cells differs and that they show unique tissue-specific expression patterns in mice. Thus, the specificity between DCNL-type NEDD8 E3 enzymes and their cullin substrates is only apparent in well-defined physiological contexts and related to their subcellular distribution and restricted expression. PMID:26906416

  8. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is essential for sulfur mustard-induced DNA damage repair, but has no role in DNA ligase activation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K Ramachandra; Benton, Betty J; Ray, Radharaman

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA ligase was observed in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) exposed to the DNA alkylating compound sulfur mustard (SM), suggesting that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. Using HEK, intracellular 3H-labeled NAD+ (3H-adenine) was metabolically generated and then these cells were exposed to SM (1 mM). DNA ligase I isolated from these cells was not 3H-labeled, indicating that DNA ligase I is not a substrate for (ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP. In HEK, when PARP was inhibited by 3-amino benzamide (3-AB, 2 mM), SM-activated DNA ligase had a half-life that was four-fold higher than that observed in the absence of 3-AB. These results suggest that DNA repair requires PARP, and that DNA ligase remains activated until DNA damage repair is complete. The results show that in SM-exposed HEK, DNA ligase I is activated by phosphorylation catalysed by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Therefore, the role of PARP in DNA repair is other than that of DNA ligase I activation. By using the DNA ligase I phosphorylation assay and decreasing PARP chemically as well as by PARP anti-sense mRNA expression in the cells, it was confirmed that PARP does not modify DNA ligase I. In conclusion, it is proposed that PARP is essential for efficient DNA repair; however, PARP participates in DNA repair by altering the chromosomal structure to make the DNA damage site(s) accessible to the repair enzymes.

  9. Expression of DNA ligase IV is linked to poor prognosis and characterizes a subset of prostate cancers harboring TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletion.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Katharina; Roettger, Laura; Kluth, Martina; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Simon, Ronald; Lebok, Patrick; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Adam, Meike; Haese, Alexander; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till

    2015-09-01

    DNA ligases are essential for the maintenance of genome integrity as they are indispensable for DNA replication, recombination and repair. The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the prevalence and clinical significance of ligase IV (LIG4) expression in prostate cancer. A total of 11,152 prostate cancer specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for LIG4 expression. Results were compared to follow-up data, ERG status and deletions at PTEN, 3p13, 5q21 and 6q15. LIG4 expression was predominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells with increased intensities in malignant as compared to benign prostate epithelium. In prostate cancer, LIG4 expression was found in 91% of interpretable tumors, including 12% cancers with weak, 23% with moderate and 56% with strong LIG4 positivity. Strong LIG4 expression was tightly linked to advanced Gleason score (P<0.0001) and positive nodal involvement (P=0.03). There was a remarkable accumulation of strong LIG4 expression in tumors harboring TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletions (P<0.0001 each). High LIG4 expression was also tightly related to early biochemical recurrence when all tumors (P<0.0001) or the subsets of ERG-negative (P=0.0004) or ERG-positive prostate cancers (P=0.006) were analyzed. Multivariate analysis including parameters that are available before surgery demonstrated independent association with biochemical recurrence for advanced Gleason grade on biopsy, high preoperative PSA level, high clinical stage (P<0.0001 each) and for LIG4 immunostaining (P=0.03). Our study identifies LIG4 as a predictor of an increased risk for early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer. Moreover, the strong association with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletions suggest important interactions between these pathways in prostate cancers.

  10. MULAN related gene (MRG): a potential novel ubiquitin ligase activator of NF-kB involved in immune response in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Casadei, Elisa; Bickerdike, Ralph; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is a transcription factor that plays a central role in the regulation of a variety of genes including many involved in bacterial and viral infections. NF-kB is normally sequestered by inhibitory proteins (IkBs) in the cytoplasm of non-stimulated cells. The degradation of IkBs by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway releases NF-kB allowing its translocation to the nucleus where it regulates gene transcription. The Mitochondrial Ubiquitin Ligase Activator of NF-kB, (MULAN), is an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in controlling activation of NF-kB, and regulating mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis. We report the characterisation of a novel piscine-specific MULAN related gene (MRG) sequence, its mRNA tissue distribution and expression following in vivo and in vitro challenges. MRG cDNA was identified in Atlantic salmon and its sequence encodes a predicted protein of 274 amino acids. The mRNA of MRG was expressed in multiple tissues, with the highest abundance head kidney. An Aeromonas salmonicida bacterial challenge increased expression of this gene in head kidney, liver and gill tissue at 6 h and 24 h. In vitro stimulation of a salmonid cell line indicated MRG was increased in expression following stimulation with LPS, PolyI:C and recombinant trout IL-1β for 4 h and 24 h. These results suggest an active role of MRG in the activation of the NF-kB pathway during early immune responses.

  11. Recognition mechanism of p63 by the E3 ligase Itch: novel strategy in the study and inhibition of this interaction.

    PubMed

    Bellomaria, Alessia; Barbato, Gaetano; Melino, Gerry; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Sonia

    2012-10-01

    The HECT-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch mediates the degradation of several proteins, including p63 and p73, involved in cell specification and fate. Itch contains four WW domains, which are essential for recognition on the target substrate, which contains a short proline-rich sequence. Several signaling complexes containing these domains have been associated with human diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's or Huntington's diseases. To gain further insight into the structural determinants of the Itch-WW2 domain, we investigated its interaction with p63. We assigned, by 3D heteronuclear NMR experiments, the backbone and side chains of the uniformly (13)C-(15)N-labeled Itch-WW2. In vitro interaction of Itch-WW2 domain with p63 was studied using its interactive p63 peptide, pep63. Pep63 is an 18-mer peptide corresponding to the region from 534-551 residue of p63, encompassing the PPxY motif that interacts with the Itch-WW domains, and we identified the residues involved in this molecular recognition. Moreover, here, a strategy of stabilization of the conformation of the PPxY peptide has been adopted, increasing the WW-ligand binding. We demonstrated that cyclization of pep63 leads to an increase of both the biological stability of the peptide and of the WW-ligand complex. Stable metal-binding complexes of the pep63 have been also obtained, and localized oxidative damage on Itch-WW2 domain has been induced, demonstrating the possibility of use of metal-pep63 complexes as models for the design of metal drugs to inhibit the Itch-WW-p63 recognition in vivo. Thus, our data suggest a novel strategy to study and inhibit the recognition mechanism of Itch E3-ligase.

  12. Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL80 is negatively involved in phosphate mobilization and cold stress response in sufficient phosphate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-08-07

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization in plants is critical to continuous growth and development. AtATL80 is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized RING E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that belongs to the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family. AtATL80 was upregulated by long-term low Pi (0-0.02 mM KH2PO4) conditions in Arabidopsis seedlings. AtATL80-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:AtATL80-sGFP) displayed increased phosphorus (P) accumulation in the shoots and lower biomass, as well as reduced P-utilization efficiency (PUE) under high Pi (1 mM KH2PO4) conditions compared to wild-type plants. The loss-of-function atatl80 mutant line exhibited opposite phenotypic traits. The atatl80 mutant line bolted earlier than wild-type plants, whereas AtATL80-overexpressors bloomed significantly later and produced lower seed yields than wild-type plants under high Pi conditions. Thus, AtATL80 is negatively correlated not only with P content and PUE, but also with biomass and seed yield in Arabidopsis. In addition, AtATL80-overexpressors were significantly more sensitive to cold stress than wild-type plants, while the atatl80 mutant line exhibited an increased tolerance to cold stress. Taken together, our results suggest that AtATL80, a PM-localized ATL-type RING E3 Ub ligase, participates in the Pi mobilization and cold stress response as a negative factor in Arabidopsis.

  13. The E3 ligase APC/C(Cdh1) promotes ubiquitylation-mediated proteolysis of PAX3 to suppress melanocyte proliferation and melanoma growth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Juxiang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Wan, Lixin; Wang, Hongshen; Zhang, Jinfang; Goff, Philip S; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Xuan, Zhenyu; Xu, Zhixiang; Xu, Xiaowei; Hinds, Philip; Flaherty, Keith T; Faller, Douglas V; Goding, Colin R; Wang, Yongjun; Wei, Wenyi; Cui, Rutao

    2015-09-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome with the subunit Cdh1 (APC/C(Cdh1)) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the control of the cell cycle. Here, we identified sporadic mutations occurring in the genes encoding APC components, including Cdh1, in human melanoma samples and found that loss of APC/C(Cdh1) may promote melanoma development and progression, but not by affecting cell cycle regulatory targets of APC/C. Most of the mutations we found in CDH1 were those associated with ultraviolet light (UV)-induced melanomagenesis. Compared with normal human skin tissue and human or mouse melanocytes, the abundance of Cdh1 was decreased and that of the transcription factor PAX3 was increased in human melanoma tissue and human or mouse melanoma cell lines, respectively; Cdh1 abundance was further decreased with advanced stages of human melanoma. PAX3 was a substrate of APC/C(Cdh1) in melanocytes, and APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated ubiquitylation marked PAX3 for proteolytic degradation in a manner dependent on the D-box motif in PAX3. Either mutating the D-box in PAX3 or knocking down Cdh1 prevented the ubiquitylation and degradation of PAX3 and increased proliferation and melanin production in melanocytes. Knocking down Cdh1 in melanoma cells in culture or before implantation in mice promoted doxorubicin resistance, whereas reexpressing wild-type Cdh1, but not E3 ligase-deficient Cdh1 or a mutant that could not interact with PAX3, restored doxorubicin sensitivity in melanoma cells both in culture and in xenografts. Thus, our findings suggest a tumor suppressor role for APC/C(Cdh1) in melanocytes and that targeting PAX3 may be a strategy for treating melanoma.

  14. Salicylic acid-mediated innate immunity in Arabidopsis is regulated by SIZ1 SUMO E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoung; Nam, Jaesung; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Na, Gunnam; Miura, Kenji; Jin, Jing Bo; Yoo, Chan Yul; Baek, Dongwon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kim, Donggiun; Lee, Sang Yeol; Salt, David E; Mengiste, Tesfaye; Gong, Qingqiu; Ma, Shisong; Bohnert, Hans J; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Bressan, Ray A; Hasegawa, Paul M; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Reversible modifications of target proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins are involved in many cellular processes in yeast and animals. Yet little is known about the function of sumoylation in plants. Here, we show that the SIZ1 gene, which encodes an Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase, regulates innate immunity. Mutant siz1 plants exhibit constitutive systemic-acquired resistance (SAR) characterized by elevated accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), increased expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, and increased resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Transfer of the NahG gene to siz1 plants results in reversal of these phenotypes back to wild-type. Analyses of the double mutants, npr1 siz1, pad4 siz1 and ndr1 siz1 revealed that SIZ1 controls SA signalling. SIZ1 interacts epistatically with PAD4 to regulate PR expression and disease resistance. Consistent with these observations, siz1 plants exhibited enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 expressing avrRps4, a bacterial avirulence determinant that responds to the EDS1/PAD4-dependent TIR-NBS-type R gene. In contrast, siz1 plants were not resistant to Pst DC3000 expressing avrRpm1, a bacterial avirulence determinant that responds to the NDR1-dependent CC-NBS-type R gene. Jasmonic acid (JA)-induced PDF1.2 expression and susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea were unaltered in siz1 plants. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SIZ1 is required for SA and PAD4-mediated R gene signalling, which in turn confers innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

  15. Down-regulation of intestinal apical calcium entry channel TRPV6 by ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Na, Tao; Wu, Guojin; Jing, Haiyan; Peng, Ji-Bin

    2010-11-19

    Nedd4-2 is an archetypal HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase that disposes target proteins for degradation. Because of the proven roles of Nedd4-2 in degradation of membrane proteins, such as epithelial Na(+) channel, we examined the effect of Nedd4-2 on the apical Ca(2+) channel TRPV6, which is involved in transcellular Ca(2+) transport in the intestine using the Xenopus laevis oocyte system. We demonstrated that a significant amount of Nedd4-2 protein was distributed to the absorptive epithelial cells in ileum, cecum, and colon along with TRPV6. When co-expressed in oocytes, Nedd4-2 and, to a lesser extent, Nedd4 down-regulated the protein abundance and Ca(2+) influx of TRPV6 and TRPV5, respectively. TRPV6 ubiquitination was increased, and its stability was decreased by Nedd4-2. The Nedd4-2 inhibitory effects on TRPV6 were partially blocked by proteasome inhibitor MG132 but not by the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine. The rate of TRPV6 internalization was not significantly altered by Nedd4-2. The HECT domain was essential to the inhibitory effect of Nedd4-2 on TRPV6 and to their association. The WW1 and WW2 domains interacted with TRPV6 terminal regions, and a disruption of the interactions by D204H and D376H mutations in the WW1 and WW2 domains increased TRPV6 ubiquitination and degradation. Thus, WW1 and WW2 may serve as a molecular switch to limit the ubiquitination of TRPV6 by the HECT domain. In conclusion, Nedd4-2 may regulate TRPV6 protein abundance in intestinal epithelia by controlling TRPV6 ubiquitination.

  16. CRL4Cdt2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) cooperate to degrade thymine DNA glycosylase in S phase.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Etsuko; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya

    2014-08-15

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is an essential enzyme playing multiple roles in base excision repair, transcription regulation, and DNA demethylation. TDG mediates the cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by prolonging S phase, generating DNA strand breaks, and inducing DNA damage signaling. During S phase of the cell cycle, TDG is degraded via the proteasomal pathway. Here we show that CRL4(Cdt2) E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TDG in S phase in a reaction that is dependent on the interaction of TDG with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). siRNA-mediated depletion of PCNA or components of CRL4(Cdt2), specifically cullin4A/B or substrate adaptor Cdt2, stabilizes TDG in human cells. Mutations in the PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif of TDG that disrupt the interaction of TDG with PCNA or change critical basic residues essential for the action of the PIP degron prevent the ubiquitination and degradation of TDG. Thus physical interaction of TDG with PCNA through the PIP degron is required for targeting TDG to the CRL4(Cdt2) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Compared with forced expression of wild type TDG, CRL4(Cdt2)- resistant TDG (ΔPIP) slows cell proliferation and slightly increases the toxicity of 5-FU. Thus, CRL4(Cdt2)-dependent degradation of TDG occurs in S phase because of the requirement for TDG to interact with chromatin-loaded PCNA, and this degradation is important for preventing toxicity from excess TDG.

  17. The ubiquitin E3 ligase LOSS OF GDU2 is required for GLUTAMINE DUMPER1-induced amino acid secretion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Guerra, Damian D; Yu, Shi; Wogulis, Mark; Kraft, Edward; Frommer, Wolf B; Callis, Judy; Pilot, Guillaume

    2012-04-01

    Amino acids serve as transport forms for organic nitrogen in the plant, and multiple transport steps are involved in cellular import and export. While the nature of the export mechanism is unknown, overexpression of GLUTAMINE DUMPER1 (GDU1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) led to increased amino acid export. To gain insight into GDU1's role, we searched for ethyl-methanesulfonate suppressor mutants and performed yeast-two-hybrid screens. Both methods uncovered the same gene, LOSS OF GDU2 (LOG2), which encodes a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase. The interaction between LOG2 and GDU1 was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down, in vitro ubiquitination, and in planta coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation indicated that LOG2 and GDU1 both localized to membranes and were enriched at the plasma membrane. LOG2 expression overlapped with GDU1 in the xylem and phloem tissues of Arabidopsis. The GDU1 protein encoded by the previously characterized intragenic suppressor mutant log1-1, with an arginine in place of a conserved glycine, failed to interact in the multiple assays, suggesting that the Gdu1D phenotype requires the interaction of GDU1 with LOG2. This hypothesis was supported by suppression of the Gdu1D phenotype after reduction of LOG2 expression using either artificial microRNAs or a LOG2 T-DNA insertion. Altogether, in accordance with the emerging bulk of data showing membrane protein regulation via ubiquitination, these data suggest that the interaction of GDU1 and the ubiquitin ligase LOG2 plays a significant role in the regulation of amino acid export from plant cells.

  18. Heterologous expression of OsSIZ1, a rice SUMO E3 ligase, enhances broad abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic creeping bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Hu, Qian; Zhou, Man; Vandenbrink, Joshua; Li, Dayong; Menchyk, Nick; Reighard, Shane; Norris, Ayla; Liu, Haibo; Sun, Dongfa; Luo, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Sumoylation is a posttranslational regulatory process in higher eukaryotes modifying substrate proteins through conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs). Sumoylation modulates protein stability, subcellular localization and activity; thus, it regulates most cellular functions including response to environmental stress in plants. To study the feasibility of manipulating SUMO E3 ligase, one of the important components in the sumoylation pathway in transgenic (TG) crop plants for improving overall plant performance under adverse environmental conditions, we have analysed TG creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) plants constitutively expressing OsSIZ1, a rice SUMO E3 ligase. Overexpression of OsSIZ1 led to increased photosynthesis and overall plant growth. When subjected to water deficiency and heat stress, OsSIZ1 plants exhibited drastically enhanced performance associated with more robust root growth, higher water retention and cell membrane integrity than wild-type (WT) controls. OsSIZ1 plants also displayed significantly better growth than WT controls under phosphate-starvation conditions, which was associated with a higher uptake of phosphate (Pi) and other minerals, such as potassium and zinc. Further analysis revealed that overexpression of OsSIZ1 enhanced stress-induced SUMO conjugation to substrate in TG plants, which was associated with modified expression of stress-related genes. This strongly supports a role sumoylation plays in regulating multiple molecular pathways involved in plant stress response, establishing a direct link between sumoylation and plant response to environmental adversities. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genetic manipulation of sumoylation process in TG crop species for improved resistance to broad abiotic stresses.

  19. The Archipelago Ubiquitin Ligase Subunit Acts in Target Tissue to Restrict Tracheal Terminal Cell Branching and Hypoxic-Induced Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Moberg, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene archipelago (ago) encodes the F-box/WD-repeat protein substrate specificity factor for an SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box)-type polyubiquitin ligase that inhibits tumor-like growth by targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome. The Ago protein is expressed widely in the fly embryo and larva and promotes degradation of pro-proliferative proteins in mitotically active cells. However the requirement for Ago in post-mitotic developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Ago is an antagonist of the physiologic response to low oxygen (hypoxia). Reducing Ago activity in larval muscle cells elicits enhanced branching of nearby tracheal terminal cells in normoxia. This tracheogenic phenotype shows a genetic dependence on sima, which encodes the HIF-1α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor dHIF and its target the FGF ligand branchless (bnl), and is enhanced by depletion of the Drosophila Von Hippel Lindau (dVHL) factor, which is a subunit of an oxygen-dependent ubiquitin ligase that degrades Sima/HIF-1α protein in metazoan cells. Genetic reduction of ago results in constitutive expression of some hypoxia-inducible genes in normoxia, increases the sensitivity of others to mild hypoxic stimulus, and enhances the ability of adult flies to recover from hypoxic stupor. As a molecular correlate to these genetic data, we find that Ago physically associates with Sima and restricts Sima levels in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify Ago as a required element of a circuit that suppresses the tracheogenic activity of larval muscle cells by antagonizing the Sima-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia. PMID:23459416

  20. HECT E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Itch Functions as a Novel Negative Regulator of Gli-Similar 3 (Glis3) Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    ZeRuth, Gary T.; Williams, Jason G.; Cole, Yasemin C.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Gli-similar 3 (Glis3) plays a critical role in the generation of pancreatic ß cells and the regulation insulin gene transcription and has been implicated in the development of several pathologies, including type 1 and 2 diabetes and polycystic kidney disease. However, little is known about the proteins and posttranslational modifications that regulate or mediate Glis3 transcriptional activity. In this study, we identify by mass-spectrometry and yeast 2-hybrid analyses several proteins that interact with the N-terminal region of Glis3. These include the WW-domain-containing HECT E3 ubiquitin ligases, Itch, Smurf2, and Nedd4. The interaction between Glis3 and the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligases was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays and mutation analysis. All three proteins interact through their WW-domains with a PPxY motif located in the Glis3 N-terminus. However, only Itch significantly contributed to Glis3 polyubiquitination and reduced Glis3 stability by enhancing its proteasomal degradation. Itch-mediated degradation of Glis3 required the PPxY motif-dependent interaction between Glis3 and the WW-domains of Itch as well as the presence of the Glis3 zinc finger domains. Transcription analyses demonstrated that Itch dramatically inhibited Glis3-mediated transactivation and endogenous Ins2 expression by increasing Glis3 protein turnover. Taken together, our study identifies Itch as a critical negative regulator of Glis3-mediated transcriptional activity. This regulation provides a novel mechanism to modulate Glis3-driven gene expression and suggests that it may play a role in a number of physiological processes controlled by Glis3, such as insulin transcription, as well as in Glis3-associated diseases. PMID:26147758

  1. Differential response between the p53 ubiquitin-protein ligases Pirh2 and MdM2 following DNA damage in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Wenrui; Gao, Li; Wu Xin; Zhang Yang; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A. . E-mail: Miguel.villalona@osumc.edu

    2006-10-15

    Pirh2, a recently identified ubiquitin-protein ligase, has been reported to promote p53 degradation. Pirh2 physically interacts with p53 and promotes ubiquitination of p53 independently of MDM2. Like MDM2, Pirh2 is thought to participate in an autoregulatory feedback loop that controls p53 function. We have previously reported that Pirh2 was overexpressed in human and murine lung cancers as compared to uninvolved lung tissue. Pirh2 increase could potentially cause degradation of wildtype p53 and reduce its tumor suppression function in the lung tumor cells. Since Pirh2 has been reported to be transactivated by p53, however, the mechanisms by which a high level of Pirh2 expression is maintained in tumor cells despite low level of wildtype p53 protein are unclear. In order to evaluate p53 involvement in the transactivation of Pirh2, we evaluated Pirh2, MDM2, p53 and p21 expression with Western blot analysis and real time PCR after {gamma} irradiation or cisplatin DNA damage treatment using human cancer cell lines containing wildtype (A549, MCF-7), mutant (H719) and null (H1299) p53. Surprisingly, Pirh2 expression was not affected by the presence of wildtype p53 in the cancer cells. In contrast, MDM2 was upregulated by wildtype p53 in A549 and MCF-7 cells and was absent from the H1299 and the H719 cells. We conclude that Pirh2 operates in a distinct manner from MDM2 in response to DNA damage in cancer cells. Pirh2 elevation in p53 null cells indicates the existence of additional molecular mechanisms for Pirh2 upregulation and suggests that p53 is not the sole target of Pirh2 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  2. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy involves an Akt-forkhead box O3-E3 ubiquitin ligase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasumasa; Imao, Mizuki; Satoh, Akiho; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamano, Hirofumi; Horinouchi, Yuya; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Licht; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting or sarcopenia is a critical health problem. Skeletal muscle atrophy is induced by an excess of iron, which is an essential trace metal for all living organisms. Excessive amounts of iron catalyze the formation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. However, the molecular mechanism of iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy has remained unclear. In this study, 8-weeks-old C57BL6/J mice were divided into 2 groups: vehicle-treated group and the iron-injected group (10 mg iron day(-1)mouse(-1)) during 2 weeks. Mice in the iron-injected group showed an increase in the iron content of the skeletal muscle and serum and ferritin levels in the muscle, along with reduced skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle showed elevated mRNA expression of the muscle atrophy-related E3 ubiquitin ligases, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1(MuRF1), on days 7 and 14 of iron treatment. Moreover, iron-treated mice showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3a) in skeletal muscles. Inhibition of FOXO3a using siRNA in vitro in C2C12 myotube cells inhibited iron-induced upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and reversed the reduction in myotube diameters. Iron-load caused oxidative stress, and an oxidative stress inhibitor abrogated iron-induced muscle atrophy by reactivating the Akt-FOXO3a pathway. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is suggested to involve the E3 ubiquitin ligase mediated by the reduction of Akt-FOXO3a signaling by oxidative stress.

  3. Sorghum Brown midrib 2 (Bmr2) gene encodes the major 4-coumarate Coenzyme A ligase involved in lignin synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful modification of plant cell wall composition without compromising plant integrity is dependent on being able to modify the expression of specific genes, but can be very challenging when the target genes are members of multigene families. 4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formatio...

  4. Regulation of 4CL, encoding 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase, expression in kenaf under diverse stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We cloned the full length 4CL ortholog encoding 4-coumarate: coenzymeA ligase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabiuns) using degenerate primers and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) systems. The 4CL is a key regulatory enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that regulates the activation of cinnamic ac...

  5. LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenyapin, V.; Boyko, A.; Kolker, D.; Isaenko, L.; Lobanov, S.; Kostyukova, N.; Yelisseyev, A.; Zondy, J.-J.; Petrov, V.

    2016-11-01

    Optical parametric oscillation is demonstrated for the first time with the chalcogenide nonlinear crystal LiGaSe2 pumped by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. Angle tuning provides coverage of the 4.8-9.9 µm spectral range in the mid-IR by idler pulses.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-02-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  7. High throughput screening for inhibitors of the HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH identifies antidepressant drugs as regulators of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Rotblat, B; Ansell, K; Amelio, I; Caraglia, M; Misso, G; Bernassola, F; Cavasotto, C N; Knight, R A; Ciechanover, A; Melino, G

    2014-05-01

    Inhibition of distinct ubiquitin E3 ligases might represent a powerful therapeutic tool. ITCH is a HECT domain-containing E3 ligase that promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of several proteins, including p73, p63, c-Jun, JunB, Notch and c-FLIP, thus affecting cell fate. Accordingly, ITCH depletion potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs, revealing ITCH as a potential pharmacological target in cancer therapy. Using high throughput screening of ITCH auto-ubiquitylation, we identified several putative ITCH inhibitors, one of which is clomipramine--a clinically useful antidepressant drug. Previously, we have shown that clomipramine inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagolysosomal fluxes and thus could potentiate chemotherapy in vitro. Here, we found that clomipramine specifically blocks ITCH auto-ubiquitylation, as well as p73 ubiquitylation. By screening structural homologs of clomipramine, we identified several ITCH inhibitors and putative molecular moieties that are essential for ITCH inhibition. Treating a panel of breast, prostate and bladder cancer cell lines with clomipramine, or its homologs, we found that they reduce cancer cell growth, and synergize with gemcitabine or mitomycin in killing cancer cells by blocking autophagy. We also discuss a potential mechanism of inhibition. Together, our study (i) demonstrates the feasibility of using high throughput screening to identify E3 ligase inhibitors and (ii) provides insight into how clomipramine and its structural homologs might interfere with ITCH and other HECT E3 ligase catalytic activity in (iii) potentiating chemotherapy by regulating autophagic fluxes. These results may have direct clinical applications.

  8. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  9. The pineal gland: A model for adrenergic modulation of ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Reiter, Russel J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A recent study of the pineal gland of the rat found that the expression of more than 3000 genes showed significant day/night variations (The Hartley dataset). The investigators of this report made available a supplemental table in which they tabulated the expression of many genes that they did not discuss, including those coding for components of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Herein we identify the genes of the ubiquitin proteasome system whose expression were significantly influenced by environmental lighting in the Hartley dataset, those that were stimulated by DBcAMP in pineal glands in culture, and those that were stimulated by norepinephrine. Purpose Using the Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Conjugation Database (UUCA) we identified ubiquitin ligases and conjugases, and deubiquitinases in the Hartley dataset for the purpose of determining whether expression of genes of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway were significantly influenced by day/night variations and if these variations were regulated by autonomic innervation of the pineal gland from the superior cervical ganglia. Methods In the Hartley experiments pineal glands groups of rats sacrificed during the day and groups sacrificed during the night were examined for gene expression. Additional groups of rats had their superior cervical ganglia removed surgically or surgically decentralized and the pineal glands likewise examined for gene expression. Results The genes with at least a 2-fold day/night significant difference in expression included genes for 5 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes, genes for 58 ubiquitin E3 ligases and genes for 6 deubiquitinases. A 35-fold day/night difference was noted in the expression of the gene Sik1, which codes for a protein containing both an ubiquitin binding domain (UBD) and an ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain. Most of the significant differences in these genes were prevented by surgical removal, or disconnection, of the superior cervical ganglia, and most were

  10. Interaction of the Ku heterodimer with the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex and its regulation by DNA-PK.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Silvia; Woodbine, Lisa; Andreoli, Lucia; Jeggo, Penny A; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major mechanism for repairing DNA double-stranded (ds) breaks in mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the interaction between two key components of the NHEJ machinery, the Ku heterodimer and the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Our results demonstrate that Ku interacts with DNA ligase IV via its tandem BRCT domain and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of Xrcc4 and dsDNA. Moreover, residues 644-748 of DNA ligase IV encompassing the first BRCT motif are necessary for binding. We show that Ku needs to be in its heterodimeric form to bind DNA ligase IV and that the C-terminal tail of Ku80, which mediates binding to DNA-PKcs, is dispensable for DNA ligase IV recognition. Although the interaction between Ku and DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 occurs in the absence of DNA-PKcs, the presence of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK kinase enhances complex formation. Previous studies have shown that DNA-PK kinase activity causes disassembly of DNA-PKcs from Ku at the DNA end. Here, we show that DNA-PK kinase activity also results in disassembly of the Ku/DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Collectively, our findings provide novel information on the protein-protein interactions that regulate NHEJ in cells.

  11. The Streptomyces coelicolor lipoate-protein ligase is a circularly permuted version of the Escherichia coli enzyme composed of discrete interacting domains.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyun; Cronan, John E

    2015-03-13

    Lipoate-protein ligases are used to scavenge lipoic acid from the environment and attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are generally the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The enzymes use ATP to activate lipoate to its adenylate, lipoyl-AMP, which remains tightly bound in the active site. This mixed anhydride is attacked by the ϵ-amino group of a specific lysine present on a highly conserved acceptor protein domain, resulting in the amide-linked coenzyme. The Streptomyces coelicolor genome encodes only a single putative lipoate ligase. However, this protein had only low sequence identity (<25%) to the lipoate ligases of demonstrated activity and appears to be a circularly permuted version of the known lipoate ligase proteins in that the canonical C-terminal domain seems to have been transposed to the N terminus. We tested the activity of this protein both by in vivo complementation of an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain and by in vitro assays. Moreover, when the domains were rearranged into a protein that mimicked the arrangement found in the canonical lipoate ligases, the enzyme retained complementation activity. Finally, when the two domains were separated into two proteins, both domain-containing proteins were required for complementation and catalysis of the overall ligase reaction in vitro. However, only the large domain-containing protein was required for transfer of lipoate from the lipoyl-AMP intermediate to the acceptor proteins, whereas both domain-containing proteins were required to form lipoyl-AMP.

  12. Cloning of linear DNAs in vivo by overexpressed T4 DNA ligase: construction of a T4 phage hoc gene display vector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z J; Baumann, R G; Black, L W

    1997-08-22

    A method was developed to clone linear DNAs by overexpressing T4 phage DNA ligase in vivo, based upon recombination deficient E. coli derivatives that carry a plasmid containing an inducible T4 DNA ligase gene. Integration of this ligase-plasmid into the chromosome of such E. coli allows standard plasmid isolation following linear DNA transformation of the strains containing high levels of T4 DNA ligase. Intramolecular ligation allows high efficiency recircularization of cohesive and blunt-end terminated linear plasmid DNAs following transformation. Recombinant plasmids could be constructed in vivo by co-transformation with linearized vector plus insert DNAs, followed by intermolecular ligation in the T4 ligase strains to yield clones without deletions or rearrangements. Thus, in vitro packaged lox-site terminated plasmid DNAs injected from phage T4 were recircularized by T4 ligase in vivo with an efficiency comparable to CRE recombinase. Clones that expressed a capsid-binding 14-aa N-terminal peptide extension derivative of the HOC (highly antigenic outer capsid) protein for T4 phage hoc gene display were constructed by co-transformation with a linearized vector and a PCR-synthesized hoc gene. Therefore, the T4 DNA ligase strains are useful for cloning linear DNAs in vivo by transformation or transduction of DNAs with nonsequence-specific but compatible DNA ends.

  13. MAGE-A Cancer/Testis Antigens Inhibit MDM2 Ubiquitylation Function and Promote Increased Levels of MDM4

    PubMed Central

    Marcar, Lynnette; Ihrig, Bianca; Hourihan, John; Bray, Susan E.; Quinlan, Philip R.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Hupp, Ted R.; Meek, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A (MAGE-A) proteins comprise a structurally and biochemically similar sub-family of Cancer/Testis antigens that are expressed in many cancer types and are thought to contribute actively to malignancy. MAGE-A proteins are established regulators of certain cancer-associated transcription factors, including p53, and are activators of several RING finger-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligases. Here, we show that MAGE-A2 associates with MDM2, a ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates ubiquitylation of more than 20 substrates including mainly p53, MDM2 itself, and MDM4, a potent p53 inhibitor and MDM2 partner that is structurally related to MDM2. We find that MAGE-A2 interacts with MDM2 via the N-terminal p53-binding pocket and the RING finger domain of MDM2 that is required for homo/hetero-dimerization and for E2 ligase interaction. Consistent with these data, we show that MAGE-A2 is a potent inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2, yet it does not have any significant effect on p53 turnover mediated by MDM2. Strikingly, however, increased MAGE-A2 expression leads to reduced ubiquitylation and increased levels of MDM4. Similarly, silencing of endogenous MAGE-A expression diminishes MDM4 levels in a manner that can be rescued by the proteasomal inhibitor, bortezomid, and permits increased MDM2/MDM4 association. These data suggest that MAGE-A proteins can: (i) uncouple the ubiquitin ligase and degradation functions of MDM2; (ii) act as potent inhibitors of E3 ligase function; and (iii) regulate the turnover of MDM4. We also find an association between the presence of MAGE-A and increased MDM4 levels in primary breast cancer, suggesting that MAGE-A-dependent control of MDM4 levels has relevance to cancer clinically. PMID:26001071

  14. DNA Ligase III is critical for mtDNA integrity but not Xrcc1-mediated nuclear DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yankun; Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Zhao, Jingfeng; Rehg, Jerold E.; Russell, Helen R.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication and repair in mammalian cells involves three distinct DNA ligases; ligase I (Lig1), ligase III (Lig3) and ligase IV (Lig4)1. Lig3 is considered a key ligase during base excision repair because its stability depends upon its nuclear binding partner Xrcc1, a critical factor for this DNA repair pathway2,3. Lig3 is also present in the mitochondria where its role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is independent of Xrcc14. However, the biological role of Lig3 is unclear as inactivation of murine Lig3 results in early embryonic lethality5. Here we report that Lig3 is essential for mtDNA integrity but dispensable for nuclear DNA repair. Inactivation of Lig3 in the mouse nervous system resulted in mtDNA loss leading to profound mitochondrial dysfunction, disruption of cellular homeostasis and incapacitating ataxia. Similarly, inactivation of Lig3 in cardiac muscle resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and defective heart pump function leading to heart failure. However, Lig3 inactivation did not result in nuclear DNA repair deficiency, indicating essential DNA repair functions of Xrcc1 can occur in the absence of Lig3. Instead, we found that Lig1 was critical for DNA repair, but in a cooperative manner with Lig3. Additionally, Lig3 deficiency did not recapitulate the hallmark features of neural Xrcc1 inactivation such as DNA damage-induced cerebellar interneuron loss6, further underscoring functional separation of these DNA repair factors. Therefore, our data reveal that the critical biological role of Lig3 is to maintain mtDNA integrity and not Xrcc1-dependent DNA repair. PMID:21390131

  15. Novel bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors with broad-spectrum activity and antibacterial efficacy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mills, Scott D; Eakin, Ann E; Buurman, Ed T; Newman, Joseph V; Gao, Ning; Huynh, Hoan; Johnson, Kenneth D; Lahiri, Sushmita; Shapiro, Adam B; Walkup, Grant K; Yang, Wei; Stokes, Suzanne S

    2011-03-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable enzymes playing a critical role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair in all living organisms. Bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA) was evaluated for its potential as a broad-spectrum antibacterial target. A novel class of substituted adenosine analogs was discovered by target-based high-throughput screening (HTS), and these compounds were optimized to render them more effective and selective inhibitors of LigA. The adenosine analogs inhibited the LigA activities of Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus, with inhibitory activities in the nanomolar range. They were selective for bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, showing no inhibitory activity against ATP-dependent human DNA ligase 1 or bacteriophage T4 ligase. Enzyme kinetic measurements demonstrated that the compounds bind competitively with NAD+. X-ray crystallography demonstrated that the adenosine analogs bind in the AMP-binding pocket of the LigA adenylation domain. Antibacterial activity was observed against pathogenic Gram-positive and atypical bacteria, such as S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and M. pneumoniae, as well as against Gram-negative pathogens, such as H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. The mode of action was verified using recombinant strains with altered LigA expression, an Okazaki fragment accumulation assay, and the isolation of resistant strains with ligA mutations. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated in a murine S. aureus thigh infection model and a murine S. pneumoniae lung infection model. Treatment with the adenosine analogs reduced the bacterial burden (expressed in CFU) in the corresponding infected organ tissue as much as 1,000-fold, thus validating LigA as a target for antibacterial therapy.

  16. Ligase-independent cloning of amylase gene from a local Bacillus subtilis isolate and biochemical characterization of the purified enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu Ozturk, Merve; Akbulut, Nagihan; Issever Ozturk, Saliha; Gumusel, Fusun

    2013-09-01

    Five hundred ninety-seven bacterial isolates from Turkish hot spring water sources were screened for their ability to produce extracellular α-amylase. Among