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Sample records for light chemical effects

  1. Fungicidal effects of chemical disinfectants, UV light, desiccation and heat on the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Megan L; Berger, Lee; Philips, Lara; Speare, Richard

    2003-12-29

    The efficacy of a number of disinfection treatments was tested on in vitro cultures of the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the causative agent of chytridiomycosis in amphibians. The aim was to evaluate the fungicidal effects of chemical disinfectants, sterilising ultraviolet (UV) light, heat and desiccation, using methods that were feasible for either disinfection in the field, in amphibian husbandry or in the laboratory. The chemical disinfectants tested were: sodium chloride, household bleach (active ingredient: sodium hypochlorite), potassium permanganate, formaldehyde solution, Path-X agricultural disinfectant (active ingredient: didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, DDAC), quaternary ammonium compound 128 (DDAC), Dithane, Virkon, ethanol and benzalkonium chloride. In 2 series of experiments using separate isolates of B. dendrobatidis, the fungicidal effect was evaluated for various time periods and at a range of chemical concentrations. The end point measured was death of 100% of zoospores and zoosporangia. Nearly all chemical disinfectants resulted in 100%, mortality for at least one of the concentrations tested. However, concentration and time of exposure was critical for most chemicals. Exposure to 70% ethanol, 1 mg Virkon ml(-1) or 1 mg benzalkonium chloride ml(-1) resulted in death of all zoosporangia after 20 s. The most effective products for field use were Path-X and the quaternary ammonium compound 128, which can be used at dilutions containing low levels (e.g. 0.012 or 0.008%, respectively) of the active compound didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride. Bleach, containing the active ingredient sodium hypochlorite, was effective at concentrations of 1% sodium hypochlorite and above. Cultures did not survive complete drying, which occurred after <3 h at room temperature. B. dendrobatidis was sensitive to heating, and within 4 h at 37 degrees C, 30 min at 47 degrees C and 5 min at 60 degrees C, 100% mortality occurred. UV light (at 1000 mW m(-2) with a

  2. Effect of Light on Chemical Modification of Chloroplast Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Nestor; Lucero, Héctor A.; Vallejos, Rubén H.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical modification of spinach chloroplasts by phenylglyoxal and dansyl chloride resulted in inhibition of NADP photoreduction. The rate of inactivation was higher with both reagents when modification was carried out in the light with methylviologen or phenazine methosulfate present. Uncouplers prevent the effect of light. Electron transport from water to methylviologen was not affected by the modifiers. The presence of 10 millimolar NADP completely protected the membrane-bound reductase against inactivation by phenylglyoxal. With lower concentrations, protection was higher in the light than in the dark. The apparent dissociation constants of the enzyme-substrate complex for NADP were 0.9 and 0.1 millimolar for the dark and light inactivation, respectively. Inactivation of NADP photoreduction by dansyl chloride was completely prevented by ferredoxin, but only partially by nucleotides. The diaphorase activity was inhibited in chloroplasts modified by phenylglyoxal, but not when modified by dansyl chloride. The results suggest that energizing thylakoid membranes by light induces a conformational change in membrane-bound ferredoxin-NADP reductase, and that the reductase is an allotopic enzyme. PMID:16661221

  3. Manifestation of the light-induced drift effect in chemically peculiar stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    We have calculated the factor ( ν g - ν e )/ ν g in the temperature range T = 300-20 000 K for the ions Be+, Mg+, Ca+, C+ in atomic hydrogen and for the ions Mg+ in atomic argon using the known interaction potentials. Here ν e and ν g are the transport collision frequencies for excited- and ground-state particles respectively. Calculations have shown that at T = 10 000-20 000 K, typical temperatures of the atmospheres of chemically peculiar (CP) stars, the values | ν g - ν e |/ ν g ≈ 0.1-0.2 can be reached for ions. This causes the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of ions up to ˜0.1 cm/s in the atmospheres of CP stars with temperatures T < 10 000 K. Therefore the separation of chemical elements due to the LID of ions under the conditions of the atmospheres of such CP stars can be an order of magnitude more efficient in comparison with the separation caused by the radiation pressure. In the atmosphere of more hot stars (20 000 K > T > 10 000 K) it is possible to expect approximately identical magnitude of the LID effect and that of radiation pressure. In the very hot stars ( T >20 000 K) the LID effect is manifested very weakly.

  4. The effect of visible light stress on chemical signaling in two life stages of Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin-Alvarado, L.; Cooney, E.; Bright, K.; Strom, S.

    2016-02-01

    The cosmopolitan marine phytoplankton species Emiliania huxleyi presents a digenetic heteromorphic life cycle, with the non-motile diploid phase bearing coccoliths and the flagellated haploid phase being non-calcified. E. huxleyi contains high concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), the precursor of dimethylsulphide (DMS). DMSP is a multifactorial compound; it acts as a compatible solute in cell metabolism and as a chemical signal influencing bacterial and protist behavior. In the atmosphere DMS enhances cloud formation influencing climate. However, little has been documented on E. huxleyi chemical signal responses to high light stress, and how this relates to the heteromorphic life cycle. To this end, low light acclimated cultures of both haploid and diploid E. huxleyi were exposed to high light for 2 hr and allowed to recover in low light for 2 hr. During and after these treatments, growth, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), DMSP (intracellular and released) and cell chlorophyll content were measured. Our preliminary results suggest that presence of high light decreased Fv/Fm to a greater extent in haploid than in diploid (calcified) cells, while recovery of Fv/Fm was rapid in both life stages. The chlorophyll content and intracellular DMSP was not different in both life stages. However, the dissolved DMSP increased after light stress in diploid cells suggesting a possible advantage as antioxidant protection or another cellular function, such as grazing protection in this life stage.

  5. Effects of Atmosphere and Ultraviolet Light Irradiation on Chemical Mechanical Polishing Characteristics of SiC Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Osamu; Doi, Toshiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Uneda, Michio; Yin, Tao; Koshiyama, Isamu; Ichikawa, Koichiro; Aida, Hideo

    2012-05-01

    To establish a high-efficiency and high-quality polishing process by controlling the workpiece environment, a prototype chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) machine that can perform double-side CMP simultaneously in a sealed pressure chamber was developed. Using this new machine, polishing experiments on single crystalline silicon carbide (SiC) wafers were carried out. The results showed that applying a highly pressurized O2 gas and ultraviolet light irradiation were effective in SiC CMP.

  6. Infrared light actuated shape memory effects in crystalline polyurethane/graphene chemical hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, B. K.

    2014-02-01

    A series of crystalline shape memory polyurethanes (SMPUs) were synthesized from polycaprolactone diols and 4,4‧-methylenedicyclohexyl diisocyanate (H12MDI) with chemical incorporation of allyl isocyanate modified graphene oxide (iGO) into the PU. Actuation of hybrid SMPUs by infrared (IR) absorption of iGO as well as the direct heat actuated SMPUs has been studied in terms of the isothermal crystallization rate, near-IR absorption, and thermal, mechanical, and shape memory properties. It was found that iGO functions as a multifunctional cross-linker at low contents and a nucleating agent at high contents, and as a reinforcing filler, while light absorption by the iGO induced melting of the PU soft segment, giving rise to a shape recovery of over 90% at 1% iGO (G10).

  7. Optical properties of silicon nanowire arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching: evidences for light localization effect

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure and optical properties of arrays of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a mean diameter of approximately 100 nm and length of about 1–25 μm formed on crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates by using metal-assisted chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions. In the middle infrared spectral region, the reflectance and transmittance of the formed SiNW arrays can be described in the framework of an effective medium with the effective refractive index of about 1.3 (porosity, approximately 75%), while a strong light scattering for wavelength of 0.3 ÷ 1 μm results in a decrease of the total reflectance of 1%-5%, which cannot be described in the effective medium approximation. The Raman scattering intensity under excitation at approximately 1 μm increases strongly in the sample with SiNWs in comparison with that in c-Si substrate. This effect is related to an increase of the light-matter interaction time due to the strong scattering of the excitation light in SiNW array. The prepared SiNWs are discussed as a kind of ‘black silicon’, which can be formed in a large scale and can be used for photonic applications as well as in molecular sensing. PMID:23009051

  8. Optical properties of silicon nanowire arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching: evidences for light localization effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osminkina, Liubov A.; Gonchar, Kirill A.; Marshov, Vladimir S.; Bunkov, Konstantin V.; Petrov, Dmitry V.; Golovan, Leonid A.; Talkenberg, Florian; Sivakov, Vladimir A.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2012-09-01

    We study the structure and optical properties of arrays of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a mean diameter of approximately 100 nm and length of about 1-25 μm formed on crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates by using metal-assisted chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions. In the middle infrared spectral region, the reflectance and transmittance of the formed SiNW arrays can be described in the framework of an effective medium with the effective refractive index of about 1.3 (porosity, approximately 75%), while a strong light scattering for wavelength of 0.3 ÷ 1 μm results in a decrease of the total reflectance of 1%-5%, which cannot be described in the effective medium approximation. The Raman scattering intensity under excitation at approximately 1 μm increases strongly in the sample with SiNWs in comparison with that in c-Si substrate. This effect is related to an increase of the light-matter interaction time due to the strong scattering of the excitation light in SiNW array. The prepared SiNWs are discussed as a kind of `black silicon', which can be formed in a large scale and can be used for photonic applications as well as in molecular sensing.

  9. Optical properties of silicon nanowire arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching: evidences for light localization effect.

    PubMed

    Osminkina, Liubov A; Gonchar, Kirill A; Marshov, Vladimir S; Bunkov, Konstantin V; Petrov, Dmitry V; Golovan, Leonid A; Talkenberg, Florian; Sivakov, Vladimir A; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2012-09-25

    We study the structure and optical properties of arrays of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a mean diameter of approximately 100 nm and length of about 1-25 μm formed on crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates by using metal-assisted chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions. In the middle infrared spectral region, the reflectance and transmittance of the formed SiNW arrays can be described in the framework of an effective medium with the effective refractive index of about 1.3 (porosity, approximately 75%), while a strong light scattering for wavelength of 0.3 ÷ 1 μm results in a decrease of the total reflectance of 1%-5%, which cannot be described in the effective medium approximation. The Raman scattering intensity under excitation at approximately 1 μm increases strongly in the sample with SiNWs in comparison with that in c-Si substrate. This effect is related to an increase of the light-matter interaction time due to the strong scattering of the excitation light in SiNW array. The prepared SiNWs are discussed as a kind of 'black silicon', which can be formed in a large scale and can be used for photonic applications as well as in molecular sensing.

  10. Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

    2012-11-02

    We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

  11. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation and sandblasting treatment on bond strengths between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation and sandblasting treatment on the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin. Three types of commercial polyamides were treated using UV irradiation, sandblasting treatment, and a combining sandblasting and UV irradiation. The shear bond strength was measured and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Comparing shear bond strengths without surface treatment, from 4.1 to 5.7 MPa, the UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths except for Valplast, whose shear bond strengths ranged from 5.2 to 9.3 MPa. The sandblasting treatment also significantly increased the shear bond strengths (8.0 to 11.4 MPa). The combining sandblasting and UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths (15.2 to 18.3 MPa) comparing without surface treatment. This combined treatment was considered the most effective at improving the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

  12. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37°C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ≤ 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light.

  13. ADHESIVES WITH DIFFERENT PHS: EFFECT ON THE MTBS OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVATED AND LIGHT-ACTIVATED COMPOSITES TO HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallmann, André; de Melo, Renata Marques; Estrela, Verbênia; Pelogia, Fernanda; Campos, Laura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength between human dentin and composites, using two light-activated single-bottle total-etch adhesive systems with different pHs combined with chemically activated and light-activated-composites. The tested hypothesis was that the dentin bond strength is not influenced by an adhesive system of low pH, combined with chemically activated or light-activated composites. Material and Method: Flat dentin surfaces of twenty-eight human third molars were allocated in 4 groups (n=7), depending on the adhesive system: (One Step Plus-OS and Prime & Bond NT-PB) and composite (light-activated Filtek Z-100 [Z100] and chemically activated Bisfil 2B [B2B]). Each adhesive system was applied on acid-etched dentin and then one of the composites was added to form a 5 mm-high resin block. The specimens were stored in tap water (37°C/24 h) and sectioned into two axes, x and y. This was done with a diamond disk under coolant irrigation to obtain beams with a cross-section area of approximately 0.8 mm2. Each specimen was then attached to a custom-made device and submitted to the microtensile test (1 mm.min−1). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p<0.05). Results: The anticipated hypothesis was not confirmed (p<0.0001). The bond strengths (MPa) were not statistically different between the two adhesive systems when light-activated composite was used (OS+Z100 = 24.7±7.1ª; PB+Z100 = 23.8±5.7ª). However, with use of the chemically activated composite (B2B), PB (7.8±3.6b MPa) showed significantly lower dentin bond strengths than OS (32.2±7.6ª). Conclusion: The low pH of the adhesive system can affect the bond of chemically activated composite to dentin. On the other hand, under the present conditions, the low pH did not seem to affect the bond of light-activated composites to dentin significantly. PMID:19089142

  14. Effect of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens on survival of ultraviolet light-inactivated herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dokko, H.; Min, P.S.; Cherrick, H.M.; Park, N.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Low doses of ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, photodynamic treatment, or aflatoxins increase the survival of UV-irradiated virus in cells. This effect is postulated to occur by enhancement of the error-prone cellular repair function, which could also be associated with oncogenic cell transformation. The present study was designed to investigate whether treatment of green monkey kidney cells with water extract of snuff (snuff extract), benzo(a)pyrene, nicotine, or tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines would result in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Exposure of the cells with snuff extract, benzo(a)pyrene, N'-nitrosonornicotine, or 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone resulted in an enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated HSV type 1 compared with the control whereas exposure of the cells with nicotine did not. These data indicate that the water-extractable component of snuff and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens increase the cellular repair mechanism and provides for increased survival of UV-irradiated HSV.

  15. Chemical Dynamics at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Berrah, N.; Fadley, C.; Moore, C.B.; Neumark, D.M.; Ng, C.Y.; Ruscic, B.; Smith, N.V.; Suits, A.G.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1999-02-02

    A day-long retreat was held January 15, 1999 to chart the future directions for chemical dynamics studies at the Advanced Light Source. This represents an important period for the Chemical Dynamics Beamline, as the hardware is well-developed, most of the initial experimental objectives have been realized and the mission is now to identify the future scientific priorities for the beamline and attract users of the highest caliber. To this end, we have developed a detailed scientific program for the near term; identified and prioritized the long range scientific opportunities, identified essential new hardware, and outlined an aggressive outreach program to involve the chemical physics community.

  16. Effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on muscular growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of breast muscle in male broilers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H J; Qiao, X; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Yao, J H; Qi, G H

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on breast muscle growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of male broilers. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres; n = 1,320) were preweighed and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups in 3 modified incubators: 1) control group (in dark condition), 2) monochromatic green light group (560 nm), and 3) monochromatic blue light group (480 nm). The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps and were equalized at the intensity of 15 lx at eggshell level. After hatch, 120 male chicks from each group were placed in 6 replicates with 20 birds each. All of the birds were housed under white light (30 lx at bird-head level) with a light schedule of 23L:1D. At 21, 35, and 42 d of age, BW and breast muscle weight in the green light group were significantly increased compared with birds in the blue or dark groups (P < 0.05). The breast muscle weight and breast muscle percentages in birds incubated under green light were significantly elevated by 50.39 g (0.76%) and 54.07 g (1.20%) than those in the dark condition or blue group at 42 d of market age (P < 0.05), respectively. In the green light group, feed intake during 0~42 d was higher than that in the other 2 treatment groups (P < 0.05); feed conversion ratio during 0~35 and 0~42 d were lower than that in the dark condition (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the contents of breast moisture, CP, crude fat, and crude ash among all groups were observed (P > 0.05). Green light stimuli tended to increase cooking loss (P = 0.08) and L* value of 24-h meat color (P = 0.09). These results suggest that green light stimuli during embryogenesis enhanced the posthatch BW of male broilers, increased breast muscle growth, and improved the feed conversion ratio, but it did not cause any noticeable changes in breast chemical composition or overall meat quality characteristics.

  17. The Effects of UV Light on the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of a Transparent Epoxy-Diamine System in the Presence of an Organic UV Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Nikafshar, Saeid; Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Mirmohseni, Abdolreza; Taseidifar, Mojtaba; Naebe, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Despite several excellent properties including low shrinkage, good chemical resistance, curable at low temperatures and the absence of byproducts or volatiles, epoxy resins are susceptible to ultra violet (UV) damage and their durability is reduced substantially when exposed to outdoor environments. To overcome this drawback, UV absorbers have been usually used to decrease the rate of UV degradation. In this present study, the effects of UV light on the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of cured epoxy structure, as well as the effect of an organic UV absorber, Tinuvin 1130, on the epoxy properties were investigated. Chemical changes in a cured epoxy system as a result of the presence and absence of Tinuvin 1130 were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyses. The effect of Tinuvin 1130 on the surface morphology of the epoxy systems was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. Additionally, the glass transition temperatures (Tg) before and during UV radiation were measured. After an 800 h UV radiation, mechanical test results revealed that the lack of the UV absorber can lead to a ~30% reduction in tensile strength. However, in the presence of Tinuvin 1130, the tensile strength was reduced only by ~11%. It was hypothesized that the use of Tinuvin 1130, as an organic UV absorber in the epoxy-amine system, could decrease the undesirable effects, arising from exposure to UV light. PMID:28772538

  18. Quantum Chemical Studies of Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-01-25

    The design of optimal light-harvesting (supra)molecular systems and materials is one of the most challenging frontiers of science. Theoretical methods and computational models play a fundamental role in this difficult task, as they allow the establishment of structural blueprints inspired by natural photosynthetic organisms that can be applied to the design of novel artificial light-harvesting devices. Among theoretical strategies, the application of quantum chemical tools represents an important reality that has already reached an evident degree of maturity, although it still has to show its real potentials. This Review presents an overview of the state of the art of this strategy, showing the actual fields of applicability but also indicating its current limitations, which need to be solved in future developments.

  19. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides

  20. A chemical light meter for forest research

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis; George Yelenosky

    1961-01-01

    Light is one of the most important factors that influence the growth and development of forest trees. Not only is light necessary for the basic process of photosynthesis; light also regulates and modifies other factors of the environment such as temperature and moisture. Yet despite the importance of light, few investigators have succeeded in measuring it adequately in...

  1. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Formaggio, Stephanie Ellen Ferreira; Zambelli, Lígia França Aires; Palialol, Alan Rodrigo Muniz; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Saraceni, Cintia Helena Coury; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs) on the degree of conversion (DC) and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG), according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2) and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave). The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height) using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E) by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent. PMID:27847748

  2. Effects of chemical modifications on the surface- and protein-binding properties of the light chain of human high molecular weight kininogen.

    PubMed

    Retzios, A D; Rosenfeld, R; Schiffman, S

    1987-03-05

    The light chain of kallikrein-cleaved human high molecular weight kininogen is solely responsible for its cofactor activity in blood clotting. Sequencing of the NH2-terminal region of the light chain reported herein identified the third kallikrein cleavage site of high molecular weight kininogen as Arg-437. The co-factor activity of high molecular weight kininogen consists of the capacity to bind to negatively charged surfaces and to factor XI or prekallikrein. Chemical modification of the histidines by either photooxidation or ethoxyformic anhydride affected the equivalent of 14-16 of 23 histidines available and resulted in over 90% loss in procoagulant activity. The modified protein had drastically reduced surface- and zinc-binding capacity, but it bound successfully to either factor XI or prekallikrein. In contrast, modification of two carboxyl groups, which led to approximately 80-90% loss of procoagulant activity, seriously compromised protein binding but left surface binding unaffected. All 3 tryptophans were modified at pH 4.0 with N-bromosuccinimide with a 70% reduction in procoagulant activity, but only 1 tryptophan was available for reaction at pH 7.35, resulting in a 50% loss in activity. Tryptophan modification at acidic pH affected protein binding but did not modify surface or zinc binding. Modification of both available tyrosine and 9 of 18 available lysine residues did not have a significant effect on the procoagulant activity of the light chain. These studies indicate that histidines participate in surface binding and that free carboxyl groups and tryptophan side chains are involved in binding of high molecular weight kininogen to other clotting factors.

  3. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL PROCESSING AND OXIDE ETHYLENE STERILIZATION ON CORTICAL AND CANCELLOUS RAT BONE: A LIGHT AND ELECTRON SCANNING MICROSCOPY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; da Silva, Juliano Voltarelli F.; Frezarim Thomazini, José Armendir; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, under microscopic examination, the structural changes displayed by the trabecular and cortical bones after being processed chemically and sterilized by ethylene oxide. Methods: Samples of cancellous and cortical bones obtained from young female albinus rats (Wistar) were assigned to four groups according to the type of treatment: Group I- drying; Group II- drying and ethylene oxide sterilization; III- chemical treatment; IV- chemical treatment and ethylene oxide sterilization. Half of this material was analyzed under ordinary light microscope and the other half using scanning electron microscopy. Results: In all the samples, regardless the group, there was good preservation of the general morphology. For samples submitted to the chemical processing there was better preservation of the cellular content, whereas there was amalgamation of the fibres when ethylene oxide was used. Conclusion: Treatment with ethylene oxide caused amalgamation of the fibers, possibly because of heating and the chemical treatment contributed to a better cellular preservation of the osseous structure. PMID:26998450

  4. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL PROCESSING AND OXIDE ETHYLENE STERILIZATION ON CORTICAL AND CANCELLOUS RAT BONE: A LIGHT AND ELECTRON SCANNING MICROSCOPY STUDY.

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; da Silva, Juliano Voltarelli F; Frezarim Thomazini, José Armendir; Volpon, José Batista

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate, under microscopic examination, the structural changes displayed by the trabecular and cortical bones after being processed chemically and sterilized by ethylene oxide. Samples of cancellous and cortical bones obtained from young female albinus rats (Wistar) were assigned to four groups according to the type of treatment: Group I- drying; Group II- drying and ethylene oxide sterilization; III- chemical treatment; IV- chemical treatment and ethylene oxide sterilization. Half of this material was analyzed under ordinary light microscope and the other half using scanning electron microscopy. In all the samples, regardless the group, there was good preservation of the general morphology. For samples submitted to the chemical processing there was better preservation of the cellular content, whereas there was amalgamation of the fibres when ethylene oxide was used. Treatment with ethylene oxide caused amalgamation of the fibers, possibly because of heating and the chemical treatment contributed to a better cellular preservation of the osseous structure.

  5. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  6. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Investigation of the maximum quantum yield of PS II in Haematococcus pluvialis cell cultures during growth: effects of chemical or high-intensity light treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Chih; Cho, Man-Gi; Riznichenko, Galina; Rubin, Andrey B; Lee, Ji-Hyun

    2011-09-02

    In this study, we investigated the increase in photosynthetic quantum yield that occurs in advance of increased microalgal growth. Haematococcus pluvialis was cultivated under normal conditions; the number of cells, the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)), and optical density were measured. We observed an increase in F(v)/F(m) approximately 72h prior to the cell growth phase. To confirm the relationship between photosynthetic yield and growth, samples were treated with several chemicals under high-intensity light illumination and control conditions to inhibit photosystem II and induce a decrease in the quantum photosynthetic yield. The samples were exposed to high-intensity light at an irradiance of 400μmol photonsm(-2)s(-1) for varied amount of time and were treated with chemicals such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, nigericin sodium salt and valinomycin. We observed that both the photooxidation of photosystem II reaction centers and the formation of transmembrane electrochemical gradients led to an initial decrease in fluorescence yield after the onset of high-intensity light illumination. We also observed that treatment of high-intensity light illuminated cells with antibiotics after adaptation to moderate light intensities caused a difference in photosynthetic activity. In conclusion, the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II is obtained prior to the cell growth phase and can therefore be used as a prediction parameter for cell growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adhesives with different pHs: effect on the MTBS of chemically activated and light-activated composites to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, André; de Melo, Renata Marques; Estrela, Verbênia; Pelogia, Fernanda; Campos, Laura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the bond strength between human dentin and composites, using two light-activated single-bottle total-etch adhesive systems with different pHs combined with chemically activated and light-activated-composites. The tested hypothesis was that the dentin bond strength is not influenced by an adhesive system of low pH, combined with chemically activated or light-activated composites. Flat dentin surfaces of twenty-eight human third molars were allocated in 4 groups (n=7), depending on the adhesive system: (One Step Plus-OS and Prime & Bond NT-PB) and composite (light-activated Filtek Z-100 [Z100] and chemically activated Bisfil 2B [B2B]). Each adhesive system was applied on acid-etched dentin and then one of the composites was added to form a 5 mm-high resin block. The specimens were stored in tap water (37 degrees C/24 h) and sectioned into two axes, x and y. This was done with a diamond disk under coolant irrigation to obtain beams with a cross-section area of approximately 0.8 mm(2). Each specimen was then attached to a custom-made device and submitted to the microtensile test (1 mm*min-1). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p<0.05). The anticipated hypothesis was not confirmed (p<0.0001). The bond strengths (MPa) were not statistically different between the two adhesive systems when light-activated composite was used (OS+Z100 = 24.7+/-7.1 feminine; PB+Z100 = 23.8+/-5.7 feminine). However, with use of the chemically activated composite (B2B), PB (7.8+/-3.6b MPa) showed significantly lower dentin bond strengths than OS (32.2+/-7.6 feminine). The low pH of the adhesive system can affect the bond of chemically activated composite to dentin. On the other hand, under the present conditions, the low pH did not seem to affect the bond of light-activated composites to dentin significantly.

  9. Investigation, by single photon ionisation (SPI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS), of the effect of different cigarette-lighting devices on the chemical composition of the first cigarette puff.

    PubMed

    Adam, Thomas; Baker, Richard R; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Soft single-photon ionisation (SPI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) has been used to investigate the effect of different cigarette-lighting devices on the chemical composition of the mainstream smoke from the first cigarette puff. Lighting devices examined were a Borgwaldt electric lighter, a propane/butane gas lighter, a match, a candle, and the burning zone of another cigarette. To eliminate the effects of the different masses of tobacco burnt by use of the different lighting methods a normalisation procedure was performed which enabled investigation of changes in the chemical patterns of the resulting smoke. When another cigarette was used as the lighting device, elevated levels of ammonia and other nitrogen-containing substances were observed. These are high in the sidestream smoke of the cigarette used for lighting and would be drawn into the mainstream smoke of the cigarette being lit. In contrast, smoke from the cigarette lit by the electric lighter contained slightly higher normalised amounts of isoprene. Lighting the cigarette by use of a candle resulted in larger amounts of substances, e.g. benzene, which most probably originated from thermal decomposition of wax. The composition of the first puff of smoke obtained by use of the three lighting methods with open flames (gas lighter, match, and candle) was usually similar whereas the composition of the smoke produced by use of the electric lighter and the cigarette as the lighter were more unique. The chemical patterns generated by the different lighting devices could, however, be separated by principal-component analyses. Two additional test series were also studied. In the first the cigarette was lit with an electric lighter, then extinguished, the ash was cut off, and the cigarette was re-lit. In the second the cigarette was heated in an oven to 80 degrees C for 5 min before being lit. These treatments did not result in changes in the chemical composition compared with cigarettes lit in the

  10. Cost effective lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

    1987-07-01

    Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. The effect of mechanical and chemical polishing techniques on the surface roughness of heat-polymerized and visible light-polymerized acrylic denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kheraif, Abdul Aziz Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mechanical polishing (MP) and chemical polishing (CP) on the average surface roughness (Ra) of heat-cured (HC) and light-cured (LC) denture base acrylic resins. Methods A total of 120 specimens (30 × 15 × 3 mm) were prepared from one HC and one LC acrylic resin. To remove nodules and gross surface irregularities, all specimens were finished with a lathe-mounted small acrylic bur and 360-grit sandpaper. Ten finished specimens of each acrylic resin were randomly assigned to each of six polishing techniques: Resilit High-luster Polishing Liquid (RHPL), Universal Polishing Paste, Abraso-star K50, pumice, Jet Seal Liquid, or Acrypoint. MP was performed with an automatic polishing machine for 2 min, under 50 rpm and 500 g of load. CP was performed by immersing the HC and LC specimens in preheated methyl methacrylate at 75 ± 1 °C for 10 s. The surface roughness of the acrylic resin specimens was measured with a contact profilometer. The Ra values were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, post hoc Scheffe's test, and paired t-test (p ⩽ 0.05). Polished and tested acrylic resin surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Results MP was more effective than CP. The smoothest surface was obtained with the use of the RHPL on the LC (0.05 ± 0.01 μm) or HC (0.07 ± 0.01 μm) acrylic resin. Two-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between MP and CP. Conclusions MP produced the smoothest surface of denture base acrylic resin. The mean surface roughness values after MP and CP were not influenced by the type of acrylic resin. PMID:25408597

  12. Influence of temperature and storage time after light exposure on the quinine monohydrochloride chemical actinometric system.

    PubMed

    Christensen, K L; Christensen, J O; Frokjaer, S; Langballe, P; Hansen, L L

    2000-01-01

    The ICH guideline on photostability has proposed quinine monohydrochloride chemical actinometric system as a standard method for measuring light exposure during photostability testing. A change in the absorption at 400 nm of quinine monohydrochloride after light exposure corresponds to a defined dose of light. The present work investigated the effect of temperature, light exposure level and the dark reactions following light exposure on the change of absorbance obtained. The change in the absorbance was linear with respect to time, the rate increased threefold in the temperature range of 25-52 degrees C, and the calculated activation energy was 30 kJ/mol as calculated by the Arrhenius equation. For the dark reactions the change in absorbance was non-linear with respect to time. The rate of the dark reactions was smaller than during light exposure and dependent on the light exposure level prior to the dark reactions. The calculated activation energy of the dark reactions was 18 kJ/mol when calculated by the Arrhenius equation on the initial reaction rates. The different activation energy of the light reaction and the dark reactions indicated different degradation patterns of the two reactions. The present study shows that the absorbance change of quinine monohydrochloride chemical actinometric system is dependent on temperature during light exposure and on storage time and storage temperature after light exposure. The method proposed in the ICH guideline should therefore be optimized in terms of definition of temperature and limitations in storage time after light exposure.

  13. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  14. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  15. Chemical Structural Aging Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    prediction 20 AIISTRPACT (Continue for reverse aid@ It necessary and lpentity 6v blockA moso&-, Aging studies have been conducted upon one batch of ANB - 3066...correlations can indeed be employed which will allow the use of accelerated surveillance to predict chemical aging rates of ANB -3066 under silo storage...3.2.2 Kinetic Analysis of Parameter Aging Changes 2-4 1.2. 1 Temperature and Strain Dependence of Aging Rates " 3.2.4 Comparison With Other ANB -3066

  16. Detection of UV light based on chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, D. V.; Grankin, V. P.; Martysh, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency accommodation of heterogeneous-reaction energy via an electronic channel and the possibility of using this effect to design an ionizing (UV) radiation detector based on chemically stimulated luminescence have been investigated. Preliminary irradiation of a ZnS sample by UV light is found to cause a luminescence flash under subsequent exposure of the sample surface to a flux of hydrogen atoms. The flash intensity depends on the UV excitation level and increases by several orders of magnitude in comparison with an unirradiated sample. It is shown that a new method for detecting UV light using chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors accumulating light yield can be developed based on this effect.

  17. Light-soaking effects and capacitance profiling in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells with chemical-bath-deposited ZnS buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Jung; Lee, Woo-Jung; Wi, Jae-Hyung; Cho, Dae-Hyung; Han, Won Seok; Chung, Yong-Duck; Kim, Tae-Soo; Song, Jung-Hoon

    2016-12-07

    We fabricated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells with chemical-bath deposited (CBD) ZnS buffer layers with different deposition times. The conversion efficiency and the fill factor of the CIGS solar cells reveal a strong dependence on the deposition time of CBD-ZnS films. In order to understand the detailed relationship between the heterojunction structure and the electronic properties of CIGS solar cells with different deposition times of CBD-ZnS films, capacitance-voltage (C-V) profiling measurements with additional laser illumination were performed. The light-soaking effects on CIGS solar cells with a CBD-ZnS buffer layer were investigated in detail using current density-voltage (J-V) and C-V measurements with several different lasers with different emission wavelengths. After light-soaking, the conversion efficiency changed significantly and the double diode feature in J-V curves disappeared. We explain that the major reason for the improvement of efficiency by light-soaking is due to the fact that negatively charged and highly defective vacancies in the CIGS absorber near the interface of CBD-ZnS/CIGS were formed and became neutral due to carriers generated by ultra-violet absorption in the buffer layer.

  18. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical strength of mirrors on fluorite substrates subjected to cw radiation from a chemical CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, V. A.; Rukhin, V. B.

    1994-02-01

    Optimisation of the energy characteristics of a chemical CO laser revealed damage to the optical resonator mirrors. Estimates indicated that when the power density of the incident cw laser radiation was 2-2.5 kW cm-2 the induced thermoelastic stresses could reach the damage threshold of mirrors on fluorite substrates.

  19. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  20. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  1. Light-induced frequency shift in chemical spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V.; Ouyang, Q.; Li, G.; Swinney, H.L.

    1996-12-05

    Illumination of ruthenium-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction decreases the rotational frequency of spirals at low bromate concentrations but increases the frequency at high bromate concentrations. The effective diffusion coefficient D deduced from the Keener-Tyson relation for the spirals, D = {omega}/3k{sup 2}, is independent of light intensity (D = 2.5 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/ s.) 16 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Effects of road lighting on motorways.

    PubMed

    Wanvik, Per Ole

    2009-06-01

    The study has three objectives. The first is to investigate how the effect of road lighting on motorway accidents varies with different weather and road surface conditions. The second is to evaluate the future benefit of road lighting as a safety measure on motorways. The third is to evaluate the need for further research in the field of motorway lighting. This article presents a cross-sectional study of the effects of road lighting on motorways mainly in The Netherlands. The main source of data is a Dutch database of accidents covering the period 1987-2006, but British and Swedish data are also used. The effect of road lighting on motorways is found to be greater in The Netherlands than in Great Britain or Sweden. Reasons for this are not known. Effects are found to vary according to background characteristics and are lesser during precipitation than during fine weather and on wet road surfaces than on dry surfaces. No effect of road lighting is found during fog. Collision with light poles constitutes a large number of accidents on lit motorways and reduces the safety effect of road lighting. The effect of road lighting on injury accidents during darkness is found to be very high (-49%) on Dutch motorways. However, the effect seems to vary between countries. Collisions with light poles reduce the effect of road lighting. Road lighting will probably be an effective safety measures on motorways for many years. In the long term, however, the benefit of road lighting will probably be reduced along with the implementation of new vehicle and road technology. Modern technology permits a continuous adaptation of luminance levels to optimize the effect of road lighting on safety while at the same time minimizing energy consumption. However, more detailed knowledge concerning the effects of road lighting at different lighting levels is needed in order to use this technology effectively. Alternative or additional measures like LED guide lights and light road surfaces also

  3. Ship diesel emission aerosols: A comprehensive study on the chemical composition, the physical properties and the molecular biological and toxicological effects on human lung cells of aerosols from a ship diesel engine operated with heavy or light diesel fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Dietmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Paur, H.; Dilger, M.; Mülhopt, S.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Hirvonen, M.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Berube, K.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Arteaga Salas, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Reda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Gröger, T.; Weiss, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties, transformation processes and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. This is performed by thorough comprehensive chemical and physical characterization of combustion aerosols (including application of advantageous on-line methods) and studying of biological effects on human lung cell-cultures. A new ALI air-liquid-interface (ALI) exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for the HICE-measurements. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized (e.g. proteomics). By using stable isotope labeling technologies (13C-Glucose/metabolomics; 2H-Lysine/SILAC-proteomics), high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of molecular-biological effects is achievable even at sub-toxic effect dose levels. Aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine (heavy/light fuel oil) have been investigated. The effect of wood combustion and ship diesel PM e.g. on the protein expression of ALI-exposed A549 cells was compared. Filtered aerosol is used as gas-reference for the isotope labeling based method (SILAC). Therefore the effects of wood combustion- and shipping diesel-PM can be directly compared. Ship diesel aerosol causes a broader distribution in the observed fold changes (log2), i.e. more proteins are significantly up-/down-regulated in case of shipping diesel PM-exposure. This corresponds to a stronger biological reaction if compared to wood combustion-PM exposure. The chemical analysis results on wood combustion- and ship diesel-PM depict more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)/oxidized-PAH but less of some transition metals (V, Fe) in the wood combustion case. Interestingly, alkylated PAH are considerably more abundant in shipping PM, suggesting that PAH/Oxy-PAH may be less relevant for

  4. Relativistic Effects on Chemical Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how anomalous chemical properties may be explained by considering relativistic effects. Traces development of the relativistic wave equation (Dirac equation) starting with the Borh treatment of the hydrogen atom and discusses major consequences of the Dirac equation. Suggests that these topics receive greater attention in the…

  5. Relativistic Effects on Chemical Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how anomalous chemical properties may be explained by considering relativistic effects. Traces development of the relativistic wave equation (Dirac equation) starting with the Borh treatment of the hydrogen atom and discusses major consequences of the Dirac equation. Suggests that these topics receive greater attention in the…

  6. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  7. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  8. Regulation of senescence in bean leaf discs by light and chemical growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Goldthwaite, J J; Laetsch, W M

    1967-12-01

    The senescence of excised discs of primary leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris, L., var. Red Kidney was followed by measuring the net breakdown of protein and chlorophyll. The chemical growth regulators indoleacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, and 6-benzylaminopurine were relatively ineffective in retarding senescence in this tissue. White light, on the other hand, was very effective in senescence retardation. The response to light did not have the characteristics of a low energy (phytochrome) response and was blocked by concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea which inhibited photosynthesis in the leaf discs. The light-induced retardation of senescence was concluded to be dependent on photosynthesis.

  9. Light Pollution at Mount Wilson: Effect of Lighting Technology Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstang, R. H.

    2000-05-01

    In an earlier paper (Bull. AAS. 30, 838, 1998; Mem. Soc. Astr. Italia, in press, 2000) I studied the effects of population growth and of smog on the historical growth of light pollution at Mount Wilson. I have now done some very crude calculations to evaluate the effect of changes in lighting technology - the most important change being from incandescent lamps to mercury vapor lamps to high pressure sodium lamps in street lighting. I am greatly indebted to George Eslinger, lately Director of the Bureau of Public Lighting of the City of Los Angeles, for information on the numbers and types of street lights in that City. The ratio of numbers of lamps of different kinds throughout the Los Angeles basin at any given date has been assumed to be the same as in the City. The contributions to the photon output in the B and V photometric bands have been estimated. The calculations show a rate of increase of the V brightness greater than that obtained if lighting changes are neglected. The B brightness shows a maximum during the period when mercury vapor street lighting predominated. I hope to refine my calculations when additional information becomes available.

  10. Color and Light Effects on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grangaard, Ellen Mannel

    This study examined the effects of color and light on the learning of eleven 6-year-old elementary school students. The students were videotaped to identify off-task behaviors and had their blood pressure measured while in a standard classroom with white walls and cool-white fluorescent lights, as well as in a classroom with light blue walls and…

  11. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  12. Visible light Cr(VI) reduction and organic chemical oxidation by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Reddy, Ettireddy P; Smirniotis, Panagiotis G

    2005-08-15

    Here we report the simultaneous Cr(VI) reduction and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) oxidation in water under visible light (wavelength > 400 nm) using commercial Degussa P25 TiO2. This remarkable observation was attributed to a synergistic effect among TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP. It is well known that TiO2 alone cannot remove either 4-CP or Cr(VI) efficiently under visible light. Moreover, the interaction between Cr(VI) and 4-CP is minimal if not negligible. However, we found that the combination of TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP together can enable efficient Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation under visible light. The specific roles of the three ingredients in the synergistic system were studied parametrically. It was found that optimal concentrations of Cr(VI) and TiO2 exist for the Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation. Cr(VI) was compared experimentally with other metals such as Cu(ll), Fe(lll), Mn(IV), Ce(IV), and V(V). Among all these metal ions, only Cr(VI) promotes the photocatalytic oxidation of 4-CP. The amount of 4-CP removed was directly related to the initial concentration of Cr(VI). The system was also tested with four other chemicals (aniline, salicylic acid, formic acid, and diethyl phosphoramidate). We found that the same phenomenon occurred for organics containing acid and/or phenolic groups. Cr(VI) was reduced at the same time as the organic chemicals being oxidized during photoreaction under visible light. The synergistic effect was also found with pure anatase TiO2 and rutile TiO2. This study demonstrates a possible economical way for environmental cleanup under visible light.

  13. Light-Absorbing Carbonaceous Particles: Chemical Composition and Its Implications for Direct Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, B. L.; Henze, D. K.; Akhtar, F.; Pinder, R. W.; Loughlin, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles are understood to play a substantial role in direct climate forcing, but current estimates of this effect depend on very simple assumptions concerning the light absorbing properties of the materials from these particles are formed. The practice, to date is to classify all black (graphitic, combustion-derived) carbon as having a single mass absorption coefficient, with all other carbon consider only slightly- or completely non-absorbing. The substantial literature produced by the combustion sciences, biomass energy, and paper processing research communities suggest that particle carbon comprises a wide array of light-absorbing compounds having distinct light-absorbing properties of varying degrees of extinction efficiency. These materials accumulate in the particle phase, and are emitted at all stages of solid fuel pyrolysis and combustion. Filter-based measurements of carbonaceous PM collected from various solid fuel combustion sources show substantial variability in solar wavelength-dependent light absorption, with Angstrom Exponents ranging from as high as 12, down to 1. In this presentation, the fuel and combustion variables determining the degree of light absorption by carbonaceous particle components will be discussed, followed by a presentation of the results of a study applying the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to an estimation of the sensitivity of direct forcing by carbonaceous particles to variation in burning phase-specific AE values.

  14. Aerosol chemical composition and light scattering during a winter season in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Gao, Jian; Wang, Han; Chai, Faihe; Wang, Shulan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate PM2.5 contributions to light scattering under different air pollution levels, PM2.5 and its major chemical components, PM10, size-segregated water-soluble ions, and aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) under dry conditions were measured at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013 when heavy pollution events frequently occurred. Measurements were categorized into three pollution levels including heavy-polluted (Air Quality Index (AQI) ≥ 200), light-polluted (200 > AQI ≥ 100) and clean periods (AQI < 100). The average PM2.5 mass concentration was 248 μg m-3 during the heavy-polluted period, which was 2.4 and 5.6 times of those during the light-polluted (104 μg m-3) and clean (44 μg m-3) periods, respectively. The concentrations of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ increased much more than those of OC and EC during the heavy-polluted period compared with those during the light-polluted and clean periods. Good correlations between PM2.5 and bsp were found (R2 > 0.95) during the different pollution levels. The mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was 4.9 m2 g-1 during the heavy-polluted period, which was higher than those during the light-polluted (4.3 m2 g-1) and clean periods (3.6 m2 g-1). To further evaluate the impact of individual chemical components of PM2.5 on light scattering, a multiple linear regression equation of measured bsp against the mass concentration of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, Organic Matter (OM), EC, Fine Soil (FS), Coarse Matter (CM) and Other chemical compounds were performed. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and OM were the dominant species contributing to bsp under both dry and ambient conditions. OM contributed more to bsp than the sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 did under the dry condition during all the pollution periods and this was also the case under the ambient condition during the light-polluted and clean periods. However, the total contributions of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 to bsp under the ambient condition was 55%, much more than the 29% contribution

  15. Effects of light on brain and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, George C.

    1994-01-01

    It is obvious that light entering the eye permits the sensory capacity of vision. The human species is highly dependent on visual perception of the environment and consequently, the scientific study of vision and visual mechanisms is a centuries old endeavor. Relatively new discoveries are now leading to an expanded understanding of the role of light entering the eye in addition to supporting vision, light has various nonvisual biological effects. Over the past thirty years, animal studies have shown that environmental light is the primary stimulus for regulating circadian rhythms, seasonal cycles, and neuroendocrine responses. As with all photobiological phenomena, the wavelength, intensity, timing and duration of a light stimulus is important in determining its regulatory influence on the circadian and neuroendocrine systems. Initially, the effects of light on rhythms and hormones were observed only in sub-human species. Research over the past decade, however, has confirmed that light entering the eyes of humans is a potent stimulus for controlling physiological rhythms. The aim of this paper is to examine three specific nonvisual responses in humans which are mediated by light entering the eye: light-induced melatonin suppression, light therapy for winter depression, and enhancement of nighttime performance. This will serve as a brief introduction to the growing database which demonstrates how light stimuli can influence physiology, mood and behavior in humans. Such information greatly expands our understanding of the human eye and will ultimately change our use of light in the human environment.

  16. Effects of light on brain and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, G.C.

    1994-12-31

    It is obvious that light entering the eye permits the sensory capacity of vision. The human species is highly dependent on visual perception of the environment and consequently, the scientific study of vision and visual mechanisms is a centuries old endeavor. Relatively new discoveries are now leading to an expanded understanding of the role of light entering the eye - in addition to supporting vision, light has various nonvisual biological effects. Over the past thirty years, animal studies have shown that environmental light is the primary stimulus for regulating circadian rhythms, seasonal cycles, and neuroendocrine responses. As with all photobiological phenomena, the wavelength, intensity, timing and duration of a light stimulus is important in determining its regulatory influence on the circadian and neuroendocrine systems. Initially, the effects of light on rhythms and hormones were observed only in sub-human species. Research over the past decade, however, has confirmed that light entering the eyes of humans is a potent stimulus for controlling physiological rhythms. The aim of this paper is to examine three specific nonvisual responses in humans which are mediated by light entering the eye: light-induced melatonin suppression, light therapy for winter depression, and enhancement of nighttime performance. This will serve as a brief introduction to the growing database which demonstrates how light stimuli can influence physiology, mood and behavior in humans. Such information greatly expands our understanding of the human eye and will ultimately change our use of light in the human environment.

  17. Light history modulates antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to both natural (light) and chemical (herbicides) stressors.

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Sague, Irene Gallardo; Urrea, Gemma; Guasch, Helena

    2012-05-01

    In multiple stress situations, the co-occurrence of environmental and chemical factors can influence organisms' ability to cope with toxicity. In this context, the influence of light adaptation on the response of freshwater biofilms to sudden light changes or to herbicides exposure was investigated by determining various parameters: diatom community composition, photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll a content, antioxidant enzyme activities. Biofilms were grown in microcosms under sub-optimal, saturating, and high light intensities and showed already described characteristics of shade/light adaptation (community structure, photosynthetic adaptation, etc.). Light history modulated antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to the stress caused by short-term exposure to sudden light changes or to herbicides. First biofilms adapted to sub-optimal light intensity (shade-adapted) were found to be more sensitive to an increase in light intensity than high-light adapted ones to a reduction in light intensity. Second, while light history influenced biofilms' response to glyphosate, it had little influence on biofilms' response to copper and none on its response to oxyfluorfen. Indeed glyphosate exposure led to a stronger decrease in photosynthetic efficiency of shade-adapted biofilms (EC(50) = 11.7 mg L(-1)) than of high-light adapted communities (EC(50) = 35.6 mg L(-1)). Copper exposure led to an activation of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in biofilms adapted to sub-optimal and saturating light intensity while the protein content decreased in all biofilms exposed to copper. Oxyfluorfen toxicity was independent of light history provoking an increase in APX activity. In conclusion this study showed that both previous exposure to contaminants and physical habitat characteristics might influence community tolerance to disturbances strongly.

  18. Light Scattering from Systems with Chemical Oscillations and Dissipative Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    splitting in the chemical lines and dispersive (non-Lorentzian) contributions. Two model reaction mechanisms, the Volterra - Lotka model and the Prigogine-Lefever model, are examined in detail. (Author)

  19. Light Fighter Communication - On Today’s Chemical Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-03

    blue brigade against a red division level force. JANUS has a chemical package, but all game Page 27 ,* % , i i e ii I * % I II* ’S. *5 information is...to and including a -> blue brigade versus a red division. Smoke can be played, but there are no chemical simulations. S The Tactical Warfare Model...VSC 14 4. ta nC nmah s M~ bv_____CA_____11,1"____Q_____a_"Willam__.____WCa______v_ IlW ft.,. KO .1COMMmeUMSMma a4 owl & so 2. ’A u’s Ca-..ais 9* Pi

  20. Visible light effects in plasma plume ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2017-04-01

    The breakdown delay time of a closed plasma plume excited by a high-voltage pulse is investigated. The visible monochromatic light of 404, 532, and 662 nm wavelength and narrow-waveband light at a central wavelength of 400, 430, 450, 470, 500, 530, 570, 610, and 630 nm are used to pre-ionize the gas. It is found that the breakdown delay time decreases when the visible light illuminates the discharge tube. The light is most effective when it is applied at the position near the high-voltage electrode. Besides, the tube material and size are important for enhancing the effect. The jet using quartz tube and larger inner diameter make the effect stronger. The effect of visible light is found to inversely relate to the wavelength, manifested by the longer breakdown delay times for longer wavelengths. With increasing the frequency and the pulse width of the voltage, the visible light shortens the delay time more effectively. These observations can be explained by the visible light-enhanced generation of free electrons before the ignition. The proposed mechanisms of free-electron generation are the optically stimulated exoelectron emission from the inner surface of the discharge tube wall and the vibrational excitation of nitrogen molecules. The effects of visible light weaken with the addition of oxygen as a result of electron affinity to oxygen.

  1. Damaging effects of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. P.; Baker, B. N.

    1982-02-01

    The right eyes of anesthetized, ten week old albino rats are exposed to constant photon fluxes at 6 wavelengths for 6 hours. The left eye of each animal is patched during the exposure and is used as control. Histologic examination of retinal sections disclosed a region in the superior retina which is more damaged than are other areas. Attempting to ascertain an action spectrum by measuring outer nuclear layer (ONL) lost in this sensitive region fails. However, it is shown that when ONL thickness is integrated over the entire retinal sections, a rhodopsin action-spectrum emerges. It is concluded that retinal light damage in the albina rat under these conditions is rhodopsin mediated; and assessment of the extent of damage is best made by some method which integrates over the entire retinal section. The latter methodology is not routinely incorporated into studies of retinal light-damage but probably should be.

  2. Bactericidal effectiveness of modulated UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, H.L.; John, J.; Schmehl, M.K.; Dratch, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Studies were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed modulated UV light waveforms for killing bacteria. Exposure of five strains of bacteria to the modulated information encoded in the light decreased the colony population from a confluent lawn to less than 20 colonies. However, approximately 2,000 colonies survived treatment with the same intensity and time of exposure to UV light lacking the modulated information.

  3. Effects of visible light on the skin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Bassel H; Hexsel, Camile L; Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Lim, Henry W

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation has vast and diverse effects on human skin. Although photobiologic studies of sunlight date back to Sir Isaac Newton in 1671, most available studies focus on the UV radiation part of the spectrum. The effects of visible light and infrared radiation have not been, until recently, clearly elucidated. The goal of this review is to highlight the effects of visible light on the skin. As a result of advances in the understanding of skin optics, and comprehensive studies regarding the absorption spectrum of endogenous and exogenous skin chromophores, various biologic effects have been shown to be exerted by visible light radiation including erythema, pigmentation, thermal damage and free radical production. It has also been shown that visible light can induce indirect DNA damage through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, a number of photodermatoses have an action spectrum in the visible light range, even though most of the currently available sunscreens offer, if any, weak protection against visible light. Conversely, because of its cutaneous biologic effects, visible light is used for the treatment of a variety of skin diseases and esthetic conditions in the form of lasers, intense pulsed light and photodynamic therapy.

  4. Damaging effects of visible light. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress in studies of photodynamic damage of visual photoreceptors is presented. It was found the retina is not homogeneous in its susceptibility to light damage. Steady state rhodopsin levels have been evaluated in albino rats and in pigmented rats at several light intensities. Studies have continued of the effects of peroxidative photodynamic damage on the properties of rod outer segments. (ACR)

  5. Bright light therapy: Minimizing light induced side effects with an innovative light setup.

    PubMed

    Leichtfried, Veronika; Kantner-Rumplmair, Wilhelm; Bartenbach, Christian; Guggenbichler, Helmut; Gothe, Raffaella Matteucci; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Abstract Objective. Bright light therapy (BLT) is regarded to be an effective treatment against seasonal depression (SAD). Conventional BLT devices are reported to evoke few, but inconvenient symptoms. This study evaluated side effects associated with a new technology for BLT in a healthy population. Methods. In an uncontrolled study design 20 healthy Caucasians received 30 min light exposures on three consecutive mornings. Immediate side effects were evaluated using questionnaires. The new light cabin was equipped with fluorescent lamps (light colour 965 = 6,500 K, CRI >90) with a maximum illumination of 5,000 lux and a maximum luminance of 1,500 cd/m(2). Occurrence of headache was determined to be the main objective. Results. Nineteen volunteers completed the study. No headache was reported at any time. With a prevalence of 21.1% blurring was observed to occur more often after light exposure. Conclusion. With the evaluated light cabin the most prominent short-term side effects of BLT can be minimized, enhancing patients' adherence.

  6. Catalytic effect of light illumination on bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Gan, Min; Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jie, Shiqi; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of visible light exposure on chalcopyrite bioleaching was investigated using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The results indicated, in both shake-flasks and aerated reactors with 8500-lux light, the dissolved Cu was 91.80% and 23.71% higher, respectively, than that in the controls without light. The catalytic effect was found to increase bioleaching to a certain limit, then plateaued as the initial chalcopyrite concentration increased from 2% to 4.5%. Thus a balanced mineral concentration is highly amenable to bioleaching via offering increased available active sites for light adsorption while eschewing mineral aggregation and screening effects. Using semiconducting chalcopyrite, the light facilitated the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) as metabolic substrates for A.ferrooxidans, leading to better biomass, lower pH and redox potential, which are conducive to chalcopyrite leaching. The light exposure on iron redox cycling was further confirmed by chemical leaching tests using Fe(3+), which exhibited higher Fe(2+) levels in the light-induced system.

  7. Vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets: chemical vapor synthesis, ultraviolet light emission, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qin, Li; Hao, Yufeng; Kuang, Shengyong; Bai, Xuedong; Chong, Yat-Ming; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-26

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor with a wide band gap ( approximately 6 eV). Here, we report the synthesis of vertically aligned BN nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-N(2)-H(2). The size, shape, thickness, density, and alignment of the BNNSs were well-controlled by appropriately changing the growth conditions. With changing the gas flow rates of BF(3) and H(2) as well as their ratio, the BNNSs evolve from three-dimensional with branches to two-dimensional with smooth surface and their thickness changes from 20 to below 5 nm. The growth of the BNNSs rather than uniform granular films is attributed to the particular chemical properties of the gas system, mainly the strong etching effect of fluorine. The alignment of the BNNSs is possibly induced by the electrical field generated in plasma sheath. Strong UV light emission with a broad band ranging from 200 to 400 nm and superhydrophobicity with contact angles over 150 degrees were obtained for the vertically aligned BNNSs. The present BNNSs possess the properties complementary to carbon nanosheets such as intrinsically semiconducting, high temperature stability, and high chemical inertness and may find applications in ultraviolet nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, electron field emission, and self-cleaning coatings, etc., especially those working at high temperature and in harsh environments.

  8. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  9. Chemical sensing of in situ extracted organics by direct detection of mode-filtered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synovec, Robert E.; Bruckner, Carsten A.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Foster, M. D.

    1994-10-01

    A novel chemical analyzer is described in which an optical fiber is inserted into a transparent capillary tube, such that the inner diameter of the tube is only a few microns larger than the outer diameter of the fiber cladding. This configuration is referred to as a torus column. When a sample volume is introduced to the torus column at a low flow rate, propagated light is mode-filtered due to a change in the critical angle at the core/clad interface, as a result of in-situ extracted chemical species. Conventionally, chemical species extracted into the cladding are sensed as a change in the transmitted light at the end of the fiber. An alternative approach, measuring this mode-filtered light directly along the side of the fiber, is reported. The new approach has a signal-to-noise advantage over the conventional approach. The result is a low volume sensor that temporally separates, as well as detects, chemical species that partition into the fiber cladding. The temporal information enhances sensor performance, providing first order information for subsequent data analysis. We have examined the modulation of the critical angle by chemical species of interest at steady-state concentrations, and as transient concentration profiles that were shifted in time. In summary, the analyzer has chemical selectivity provided by differences in the refractive index, distribution coefficient, and transient time of the concentration profile of each chemical species in a sample. The chemical analyzer should be a promising tool for process and environmental monitoring.

  10. [The effect of polarized light on fibrinolysis].

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, S V

    2004-01-01

    In experiments in vitro on a man, cat and rat thrombocyte-free plasma it was determined that the polarized light over 5 cm distance from the object (6 min exposure) causes the inhibition of fibrinolytic activity of euglobulin fraction. It was shown that the fibrinolytic inhibition under the influence of the polarized light is connected with its antiplasmin effect. The importance of the fibrinolytic reaction for the course of inflammation process and tissue regeneration after injury and the role of therapy with polarized light in these reactions is discussed.

  11. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  12. Effective Interactions for Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bryan R.

    The G-matrix technique in which one is able to easily calculate ground and excited states of many-body systems is used to calculate the ground state energies and some excited levels of ^3H and ^4He. Energy independent effective interactions are obtained for these nuclei using the technique of Suzuki and Lee which requires the G-matrix and its derivatives with respect to starting energy. It is found that accurate energy derivatives of the G-matrix are necessary to obtain energy independence and thus analytic expressions are presented for these derivatives in both center-of-mass/relative and shell model coordinate systems. Several rules of thumb are given pertaining to the convergence criteria in both coordinate systems. Further, since the G-matrix includes only intra -channel two-body correlations outside the active space, we explore the effect on the binding energies when the active space is enlarged to include several major shells. By enlarging the active space, we hope to include the most important many-body correlations explicitly. It is found that when the active space includes more than 2 major shells, the effective interaction is well approximated by the G-matrix. Our results essentially agree with exact Faddeev calculations for ^3 H but underbind by about.5 MeV in ^4 He as compared to exact Yabukovsky and Green function Monte Carlo calculations. A possible reason for this underbinding, the inclusion of unlinked diagrams in the energy expansion, is studied. The energy independent G-matrix technique is then applied to the p-shell (^5He, ^6Li and ^7Li) where the active space includes all excitations up to 2 hbaromega. Zero, one, two and three -body effective interactions are extracted and it is found that a schematic two-parameter three-body potential can be used to approximate the effective three-body potential that results from the truncation of the active space.

  13. Effects of supplementary lighting by natural light for growth of Brassica chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shih-Chuan; Lee, Hui-Ping; Kao, Shih-Tse; Lu, Ju-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This paper present a model of cultivated chamber with supplementary natural colour light. We investigate the effects of supplementary natural red light and natural blue light on growth of Brassica chinensis under natural white light illumination. After 4 weeks of supplementary colour light treatment, the experiment results shown that the weight of fresh leaf were not affected by supplementary natural blue light. However, those Brassica chinensis were cultivated in the chambers with supplementary natural red light obtained a significant increasing of fresh weight of leaf under both white light illuminate models. The combination of natural white light with supplementary natural red light illumination will be benefits in growth for cultivation and energy saving.

  14. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in Si/SiGe nanostructures: Strain, chemical composition and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybeskov, L.; Mala, S. A.; Wang, X.; Baribeau, J.-M.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a review of recent studies of inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in two types of Si/SiGe nanostructures: planar superlattices and cluster (dot) multilayers including first- and second-order Raman scattering, polarized Raman scattering and low-frequency inelastic light scattering associated with folded acoustic phonons. The results are used in semi-quantitative analysis of chemical composition, strain and thermal conductivity in these technologically important materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Fracture toughness testing of visible light- and chemical-initiated provisional restoration resins.

    PubMed

    Gegauff, A G; Wilkerson, J J

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study determined the fracture toughness of four classes of resin using wet and dry test environments, following 48 hours of wet storage. Two of the resins were light initiated, while the other two were chemically initiated. No significant difference in fracture toughness was detected for the wet and dry test environments using miniature compact tension specimens. The light-initiated, urethane dimethacrylate resin demonstrated a significantly higher fracture toughness than the poly(methyl methacrylate) resin.

  16. An effective theory on the light shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjad, Aqil

    We describe work on the construction of an effective field theory on a spherical light shell. The motivation arises from classical electromagnetism: If a collision produces charged particles with zero net charge emerging simultaneously from a point and instantaneously accelerating to the speed of light, then the electromagnetic fields due to these charges lie entirely on a spherical shell expanding at the speed of light. We show that this also applies to classical color radiation from high-energy collisions that produce colored particles. Specifically, the color fields produced in such a process are associated with a non-linear sigma-model on the 2D light shell with specific symmetry-breaking terms. The quantum version of such a picture exhibits asymptotic freedom and should therefore be a useful starting point for a light-shell effective theory for QCD. We start in the simplified context of zero-flavor scalar quantum electrodynamics. Our effective theory has 3 major ingredients: breaking down the fields into soft and hard sectors with the large energy of the hard fields in the radial direction scaled out, a special gauge called light-shell gauge in which the picture simplifies, and a gauge-invariant source defined on a spherical light shell having infinitesimal radius. We match the fields between the effective theory and the full theory, meaning zero-flavor scalar QED. This allows us to compute the amplitude for the production of any number of scalars from the gauge-invariant source. We then find the tree-level amplitude for the emission of a photon using our effective theory and show that our result agrees with the full theory. To calculate loop effects in our effective theory, we need the photon propagator in light-shell gauge. We derive this propagator and use it to calculate the 1-loop correction to the amplitude for the production of a scalar and anti-scalar pair arising from virtual photon effects. This reduces to a pair of purely angular integrals in the

  17. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle A; Zahran, Elsayed M; Wilbon, Azaan S; Besmer, Alexander V; Cendan, Vincent J; Ranson, William A; Lawrence, Randy L; Cohn, Joshua L; Bachas, Leonidas G; Knecht, Marc R

    2016-07-31

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light.

  18. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light. PMID:27656687

  19. Surface Roughness Effects on Light Propagation in Optical Light Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngjin

    Solid- and hollow-core light pipes are commonly employed to shape the intensity profile of high power lasers for applications in various technology industries such as the automobile, medical, and communications. There are several loss mechanisms present in solid-core glass and polymer light pipes, including absorption, bulk scattering in the material, surface scattering at the material-air interface, and Fresnel Loss at the material-air interface. Fresnel reflection and surface scattering losses typically dominate over other loss mechanisms in solid-core light pipes made of high quality optical materials. In order to analyze the losses in the light pipe, an approximate model is developed and tested using glass and polymer light pipes. The experiements in this thesis focus on analysis of the scattering loss in several optical light pipes configurations. From this analysis, the surface roughness parameters can be determined based on models and comparing with other measurements.

  20. Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of poor lighting and glare on public safety are well-known, as are the harmful environmental effects on various species and the environment in general. What is less well-known is the potential harmful medical effects of excessive poor nighttime lighting. A significant body of research has been developed over the last few years regarding this problem. One of the most significant effects is the startling increased risk for breast cancer by excessive exposure to nighttime lighting. The mechanism is felt to be by disruption of the circadian rhythm and suppression of melatonin production from the pineal gland. Melatonin has an anticancer effect that is lost when its production is disrupted. I am in the process of developing a monograph that will summarize this important body of research, to be presented and endorsed by the American Medical Association, and its Council of Science and Public health. This paper is a brief overall summary of this little known potential harmful effect of poor and excessive nighttime lighting.

  1. Effect of exposure of tuberculin to light

    PubMed Central

    1955-01-01

    This paper reports two studies dealing with the effect of light on the potency of tuberculin. In each study light-exposed and unexposed (control) samples from the same tuberculin dilution were compared by duplicate intradermal Mantoux testing in groups of BCG-vaccinated schoolchildren. The difference in mean size between the children's reactions to the two samples was used as a measure of the light-effect. In the first study, carried out in Egypt, a 5 TU dilution was exposed in ordinary, clear, glass bottles to subtropical sunlight for a total of 12 hours. Duplicate testing in 154 children showed that the exposed dilution had lost all but a fraction of its original potency. To obtain information on the relative effect of different parts of the solar spectrum 10 TU dilutions were irradiated with artificial light of different wave-lengths in a second study comprising 727 children. Ultra-violet radiation was found to have a strong effect on the potency of tuberculin whereas medium- and long-wave radiation of the same intensity had little or no effect. It is of practical importance that ultra-violet rays of the wave-lengths used in this study are transmitted by ordinary clear glass. From the reported studies it seems that prolonged exposure of tuberculin to strong sunlight and daylight should be avoided. PMID:14351973

  2. Effects of light wavelength and coherence in structured light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Kevin; Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Zhai, Zirong; Han, Jie; Yang, Dongmin

    2016-05-01

    Structured light methods are used by many commercial products on the market today. Many such systems using white light projectors while many line gages use standard red laser diodes. However, in recent years there has been much claimed about using blue light, polarized light and partially coherent systems to obtain better performance. Unlike interferometers, moving from red to blue light for a system using only geometric shape information does not gain an automatic advantage from the shorter wavelength. The sensitivity metric does not have a wavelength component to it. But there are other factors that can improve gage performance. The ability to measure some feature is also a function of other parameters such as signal to noise ratio, reflectivity variations, and depth-of-field over which a clear pattern can be seen. This paper will explore the theoretical and experimental data relating to what works and what can be expected from variations on the old methods.

  3. Holographic heavy-light chiral effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2017-03-01

    We propose a variant of the D 4 -D 8 construction to describe the low-energy effective theory of heavy-light mesons, interacting with the lowest lying pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The heavy degrees of freedom are identified with the D 8L-D 8H string low-energy modes, and are approximated near the world volume of Nf-1 light D 8L branes, by fundamental vector field valued in U (Nf-1 ). The effective action follows from the reduction of the bulk Dirac-Born-Infeld and Chern-Simons actions, and is shown to exhibit both chiral and heavy-quark symmetry. The action interpolates continuously between the U (Nf) case with massless mesons, and the U (Nf-1 ) case with heavy-light mesons. The heavy-light meson radial spectrum is Regge-like. The one-pion and two-pion couplings to the heavy-light multiplets are evaluated. The partial widths for the charged decays G →H +π are shown to be comparable to the recently reported full widths for both the charm and bottom mesons.

  4. Chemical and light triggering of peptide networks under partial thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Dadon, Zehavit; Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Wagner, Nathaniel; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of novel dynamic libraries that operate via reversible replication is described. In these systems, selective product formation is governed by peptides autocatalytic efficiency and by differences in their unfolding stability. We suggest ways to significantly alter the network behavior by chemical inputs (templates) or physical triggers (light).

  5. Chemical arms treaty's effect on industry noted

    SciTech Connect

    Lois Ember

    1993-08-16

    The Chemical Weapons Convention is unique among arms control regimes in terms of its intrusive reach on private industry, especially chemical manufacturers. It requires, among other things, extensive reporting and, in some cases, on-site inspections of commercial facilities. Yet a surprising majority of affected companies are unaware of their obligations under the treaty that could become effective January 1995. A newly released background paper from the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) intends to correct this situation by fully documenting the effects of the treaty on the U.S. chemical industry. This paper summarizes some of the findings and outlines the legislation required to comply with the Chemical Weapons Convention while still protecting confidential business information and not creating a bureaucratic nightmare for the US chemical industry.

  6. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, S.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Freeland, E.; Foley, J.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Li, R.; Osborn, J.; Sugar, R. L.; Torok, A.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.

    2015-09-28

    Calculations studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons are reported. The calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in χPT; that is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. The non-compact formalism is used for photons. New results are obtained with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. The success of chiral perturbation theory in describing these results and the implications for light quark masses are considered.

  7. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Basak, S.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; ...

    2015-09-28

    Calculations studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons are reported. The calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in χPT; that is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. The non-compact formalism is used for photons. New results are obtained with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. The success of chiral perturbation theory in describing these results and the implications for light quark masses are considered.

  8. Global change effects on plant chemical defenses against insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Bidart-Bouzat, M Gabriela; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola

    2008-11-01

    This review focuses on individual effects of major global change factors, such as elevated CO2, O3, UV light and temperature, on plant secondary chemistry. These secondary metabolites are well-known for their role in plant defense against insect herbivory. Global change effects on secondary chemicals appear to be plant species-specific and dependent on the chemical type. Even though plant chemical responses induced by these factors are highly variable, there seems to be some specificity in the response to different environmental stressors. For example, even though the production of phenolic compounds is enhanced by both elevated CO2 and UV light levels, the latter appears to primarily increase the concentrations of flavonoids. Likewise, specific phenolic metabolites seem to be induced by O3 but not by other factors, and an increase in volatile organic compounds has been particularly detected under elevated temperature. More information is needed regarding how global change factors influence inducibility of plant chemical defenses as well as how their indirect and direct effects impact insect performance and behavior, herbivory rates and pathogen attack. This knowledge is crucial to better understand how plants and their associated natural enemies will be affected in future changing environments.

  9. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities.

  10. Efficient chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation using nickel complexes and salts as precatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui; Chen, Lingjing; Ng, Siu-Mui; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation catalyzed by a number of Ni complexes and salts have been investigated at pH 7-9 in borate buffer. For chemical oxidation, [Ru(bpy)3](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) was used as the oxidant, with turnover numbers (TONs) >65 and a maximum turnover frequency (TOFmax) >0.9 s(-1). Notably, simple Ni salts such as Ni(NO3 )2 are more active than Ni complexes that bear multidentate N-donor ligands. The Ni complexes and salts are also active catalysts for visible-light-driven water oxidation that uses [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as the photosensitizer and S2 O8 (2-) as the sacrificial oxidant; a TON>1200 was obtained at pH 8.5 by using Ni(NO3)2 as the catalyst. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed the formation of nanoparticles in chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation by the Ni catalysts. These nanoparticles aggregated during water oxidation to form submicron particles that were isolated and shown to be partially reduced β-NiOOH by various techniques, which include SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. These results suggest that the Ni complexes and salts act as precatalysts that decompose under oxidative conditions to form an active nickel oxide catalyst. The nature of this active oxide catalyst is discussed.

  11. Studying the Effect of Light Quality on the Size of the Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhoz, Romualdo; Quiles, Maria J.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the effect of light quality on the size of the photosystem II (PSII) light harvesting complex (LHCII) is studied by measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by leaf sections of oat ("Avena sativa," var. Prevision) plants previously treated with either white light or with light filtered through blue, green, red or farred…

  12. Building Twilight "Light Sensors" to Study the Effects of Light Pollution on Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thancharoen, Anchana; Branham, Marc A.; Lloyd, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Light pollution negatively affects many nocturnal organisms. We outline two experiments that can be conducted by students to examine the effects of light pollution on firefly behavior. Inexpensive electronic light sensors, which are easy to construct and calibrate, are used to sample light levels along transects in spaces where fireflies are…

  13. Building Twilight "Light Sensors" to Study the Effects of Light Pollution on Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thancharoen, Anchana; Branham, Marc A.; Lloyd, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Light pollution negatively affects many nocturnal organisms. We outline two experiments that can be conducted by students to examine the effects of light pollution on firefly behavior. Inexpensive electronic light sensors, which are easy to construct and calibrate, are used to sample light levels along transects in spaces where fireflies are…

  14. Studying the Effect of Light Quality on the Size of the Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhoz, Romualdo; Quiles, Maria J.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the effect of light quality on the size of the photosystem II (PSII) light harvesting complex (LHCII) is studied by measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by leaf sections of oat ("Avena sativa," var. Prevision) plants previously treated with either white light or with light filtered through blue, green, red or farred…

  15. Residual monomer leaching from chemically cured and visible light-cured orthodontic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Eliades, T; Eliades, G; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of residual monomer leached from chemically cured and visible light-cured orthodontic adhesives based on Bis-GMA/TEGDMA monomers, when bonded to ceramic and stainless steel brackets. The residual TEGDMA and Bis-GMA monomer concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of the extracts after specimen immersion in ethanol/water solution for 15 days at 37 +/- 1 degree C. According to the results the highest monomer concentrations eluted were obtained from the chemically cured adhesive. Direct (through the bracket) irradiation of stainless steel brackets bonded to the visible light-cured adhesive showed high monomer elution as well. A polycarbonate base ceramic bracket manifested significantly greater amount of monomer release compared with ceramic brackets when combined with the visible light-cured adhesive. Indirect (from the incisal and cervical edges of the bracket) irradiation of the visible light-cured adhesive bonded to the stainless steel brackets resulted in lower residual monomer elution compared to that of directly (through the bracket) irradiated metallic brackets. No statistical difference was found between direct or indirect irradiation of the ceramic brackets tested, with respect to monomer elution from the light-cured adhesive.

  16. Methylammonium Lead Bromide Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Leyden, Matthew R; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Yan; Ono, Luis K; Qiu, Longbin; Juarez-Perez, Emilio J; Qin, Chuanjiang; Adachi, Chihaya; Qi, Yabing

    2017-07-20

    Organo-lead-halide perovskites are promising materials for optoelectronic applications. Perovskite solar cells have reached power conversion efficiencies of over 22%, and perovskite light-emitting diodes have recently achieved over 11% external quantum efficiency. To date, most research on perovskite light-emitting diodes has focused on solution-processed films. There are many advantages of a vapor-based growth process to prepare perovskites, including ease of patterning, ability to batch process, and material compatibility. We investigated an all-vapor perovskite growth process by chemical vapor deposition and demonstrated luminance up to 560 cd/m(2).

  17. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  18. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  19. Photoassisted reaction of chemical warfare agent VX droplets under UV light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guo-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Xing; Li, Guo-Wen; Wang, Lian-Yuan; Chen, Hong

    2005-08-11

    A photoassisted reaction of O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) droplets in air was carried out. The experimental results indicated that VX droplets could be easily and chemically transformed into other compounds under irradiation of a germicidal lamp over sufficient time. Quantum chemical calculation results demonstrated that UV light less than 278 nm wavelength could possibly initiate photoreaction of VX and that both P-S and P=O bonds in the VX molecule were lengthened. The identification of reaction products by gas and liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the VX molecule in air under UV light irradiation could undergo isomerization of S-esters to O-esters, cleavage of P-S, S-C, and C-N bonds, and ozonation of tertiary amines.

  20. Preparation and Effect of Lighting on Structures and Properties of GSH Capped ZnSe QDs.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Peng, Zeze; Zhou, Peijiang; Cheng, Gary J; Nian, Qiong; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Jinhui; Liang, Yuhe

    2015-11-01

    L-glutathione (GSH) capped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis. Then, the resulting QDs were illuminated under dark, ultraviolet light and incandescent light, respectively. Thereby effect of lighting on the structures and properties of QDs were studied systematically. It was revealed that particle size and element content of QDs took a sharp change after irradiation, while the crystal structure maintains nearly unaffected. Comparing to the ZnSe QDs under dark condition, counterparts irradiated by UV light possessed outstanding sphericity, size distribution and dispersion. And the content of sulfur (S) in ZnSe QDs irradiated by UV light was much higher relatively. The effect of lighting on vibration peaks of O-H was considerable. However, this effect was observed to be weak on other chemical bonds. The possible explanation ascribes to photo-chemical interactions can occur between S-H and O-H bonds on the surface of GSH ligand. The lighting induced GSH to occur photocatalytic oxidation on the surface of ZnSe QDs, which improved the optical properties of QDs. The effects of lighting rely on irradiation types, the sequence is UV light, incandescent light and dark from high to low.

  1. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

  2. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-09

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  3. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  4. Spectral and temperature characteristics of light transmission in solutions of chemical indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichev, V. D.; Dmitriev, A. L.; Karacharov, G.; Nagibin, Yu. T.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral and temperature characteristics of light transmission in water solutions of chemical indicators— bromophenol blue, bromothymol blue, and cresol red—were measured in the wavelength range of 500-750 nm and the temperature range from 20 to 90°C. It was demonstrated that these solutions can be applied in optical fiber thermometers with continuous reading which are not affected by strong external electromagnetic fields.

  5. Photosynthetic Light Reactions in Chemically Fixed Anacystis nidulans, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Porphyridium cruentum1

    PubMed Central

    Hallier, U. W.; Park, R. B.

    1969-01-01

    The photochemical activities of various species of unicellular algae (Anacystis nidulans, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Porphyridium cruentum) were studied following chemical fixation. Fixation with formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde yielded cells which retained their ability to perform photosystem I and photosystem II reactions. The photochemical efficiencies of some fixed algae are as great as those of unfixed spinach chloroplasts. Fixed algae containing accessory pigments appear to be useful models for further studies of the light reactions of photosynthesis. PMID:16657097

  6. Predicting drugs side effects based on chemical-chemical interactions and protein-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  7. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine. PMID:24078917

  8. Effect of chemical degradation on BVOC fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T.; Petdjd, T. T.; Crowley, J.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    Analyses of flux data of volatile organic compounds are usually based on assumption that flux above canopy equals to the emission at the surface. This assumption requires chemical reactions to be slow compared to the turbulent transport, i.e. Damköhler number to be sufficiently low. We explore the effect of chemical degradation on fluxes using stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation is described as first order decay (SLT-C0). We study cases in which the VOC emission is in the canopy or in the ground level, and vary various parameters, such as chemical lifetime, canopy density, hydrostatic stability, in the model. The magnitude of the chemistry effect on fluxes depends strongly on chemical lifetime and friction velocity. With SLT-C0 model the above canopy fluxes were significantly decreased already at low Damköhler numbers. We will show an example on how much the above canopy flux of selected mono- and sesquiterpenes are decreased in Hyytiälä measurement site, according to SLT-C0 model and oxidant levels measured during HUMPPA-COPEC measurement campaign in August 2010.

  9. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  10. Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes NIPER's research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

  11. Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes NIPER`s research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

  12. Chemical nature of the light emitter of the Aequorea green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Niwa, H; Inouye, S; Hirano, T; Matsuno, T; Kojima, S; Kubota, M; Ohashi, M; Tsuji, F I

    1996-11-26

    The jellyfish Aequorea victoria possesses in the margin of its umbrella a green fluorescent protein (GFP, 27 kDa) that serves as the ultimate light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the animal. The protein is made up of 238 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain and produces a greenish fluorescence (lambda max = 508 nm) when irradiated with long ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of a chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67-. GFP has been used extensively as a reporter protein for monitoring gene expression in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, but relatively little is known about the chemical mechanism by which fluorescence is produced. To obtain a better understanding of this problem, we studied a peptide fragment of GFP bearing the chromophore and a synthetic model compound of the chromophore. The results indicate that the GFP chromophore consists of an imidazolone ring structure and that the light emitter is the singlet excited state of the phenolate anion of the chromophore. Further, the light emission is highly dependent on the microenvironment around the chromophore and that inhibition of isomerization of the exo-methylene double bond of the chromophore accounts for its efficient light emission.

  13. Chemical and thermodynamic control of the surface of semiconductor nanocrystals for designer white light emitters.

    PubMed

    Krause, Michael M; Mooney, Jonathan; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2013-07-23

    Small CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals with diameters below 2 nm are thought to emit white light due to random surface defects which result in a broad distribution of midgap emitting states, thereby preventing rational design of small nanocrystal white light emitters. We perform temperature dependent photoluminescence experiments before and after ligand exchange and electron transfer simulations to reveal a very simple microscopic picture of the origin of the white light. These experiments and simulations reveal that these small nanocrystals can be physically modeled in precisely the same way as normal-sized semiconductor nanocrystals; differences in their emission spectra arise from their surface thermodynamics. The white light emission is thus a consequence of the thermodynamic relationship between a core excitonic state and an optically bright surface state with good quantum yield. By virtue of this understanding of the surface and the manner in which it is coupled to the core excitonic states of these nanocrystals, we show both chemical and thermodynamic control of the photoluminescence spectra. We find that using both temperature and appropriate choice in ligands, one can rationally control the spectra so as to engineer the surface to target color rendering coordinates for displays and white light emitters.

  14. The difference of the PDT's effects between interstitial lighting and continuous lighting in low oxygen density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiumin; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Tiegen; Xu, Tao

    2008-02-01

    Tumor oxygen depletion plays an important role in the process of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). The paper focuses on the improvement of the lighting mode to carry out this cancer therapy more effectively in low oxygen content. The effect of interstitial lighting was compared with that of continuous lighting in different oxygen density measured with a homemade device in PDT. 90 mice were divided into 3 groups: the contrast group, the continuous lighting group and the interstitial lighting group. The initial oxygen content was measured with a homemade device before the treatment. To examine the different effects, both the interstitial lighting and the continuous lighting have the same fluent rates (30mW/cm2, 32.4J/ cm2). The continuous lighting lasted 18 minutes while the interstitial lighting lasted 36 minutes with 1 second's idle time and 1 second's effective time of each pulse. The result shows that the volume of tumor doubling duration in interstitial lighting group is longer in the condition of low initial oxygen content. Thus with low initial oxygen content, the interstitial lighting is more effective than the continuous lighting during PDT.

  15. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  16. Chemically unassisted phototherapy: dose effects via real-time optical monitoring of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Sylvie; Keeler, Werden

    2010-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light and short wavelength visible (VIS) light have been used to kill pathogens for many years. Although the adverse effects of UV radiation on living cells have been extensively studied using biochemical and biomolecular techniques, most of the light therapies used for medical treatment are chemically assisted (i.e., photodynamic therapy). However, the use of light alone could prove both cost and therapeutically effective as an alternative treatment modality for localized diseases. In this study, real-time oblique incidence reflection (OIR) microscopy and image analysis were used to visualize and quantify the effects of chemically unassisted light therapy on untagged live cancer cells in vitro. The incident radiation fluence (in mJ/cm^2) required to induce cell death was determined for selected quasi-monochromatic UV to VIS wavelengths ranging from 275nm to 460nm. A predictive mathematical equation quantifying the lethal fluence as a function of wavelength will be discussed.

  17. Damaging effects of visible light. Comprehensive progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on studies of retinal light damage. A myriad of variables effect the production of light damage. These include age, prior light history, body temperature, vitamin A status, intensity, wavelength and duration of light. The intensity-duration function and the age function have been studied in detail in rats. Studies have been begun on the wavelength variable. (ACR)

  18. Light Emitting Diode Flashlights as Effective and Inexpensive Light Sources for Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. Brian; Zhang, Yunfei; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2009-01-01

    Summary Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are becoming more commonly used as light sources for fluorescence microscopy. We describe the adaptation of a commercially available LED flashlight for use as a source for fluorescence excitation. This light source is long-lived, inexpensive, and is effective for excitation in the range of 440–600 nm. PMID:19772530

  19. Heavy and light pentaquark effective chiral Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-R.; Zhang, A.; Huang, P.-Z.; Deng, W.-Z.; Chen, X.-L.; Zhu Shilin

    2004-11-01

    Using the SU(3) flavor symmetry, we construct the effective chiral Lagrangians for the light and heavy pentaquarks. With the correction from the nonzero current quark mass, we derive the Gell-Mann-Okubo type relations for various pentaquark multiplet masses. We also derive Coleman-Glashow relations for antisextet heavy pentaquark magnetic moments. We study possible decays of pentaquarks into conventional hadrons and interactions between and within various pentaquark multiplets and derive their coupling constants in the SU(3) flavor symmetry limit. Possible kinematically allowed pionic decay modes are pointed out. Finally we discuss the possible mixing between different pentaquark multiplets induced by the quark mass which breaks SU(3) symmetry. The pentaquark decay patterns receive correction from this breaking effect.

  20. Chemical Pressure Effects in Layered Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Yousuke; Nakamura, Arao

    1998-03-01

    Lattice effects on the magnetic and transport properties have been investigated for layered-type doped mangaites. The insulator-to-metal transition temperature for La_1.2Sr_1.8Mn_2O7 (T_C=130 K) is significantly suppressed with chemical substitution of the trivalent La^3+ ions to smaller Nd^3+ (or Sm^3+) ions(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56(1997)R7057. Similarly, the charge-ordering temperature for La_0.5Sr_1.5MnO4 (T_CO=230 K) is suppresses with chemical substitution(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56, in press. Systematic x-ray as well as neutron diffraction measurements have revealed that above chemical pressure enhances the static Jahn-Teller distortion of the MnO6 octahedra in both the system. We will explain the suppressions of TC and T_CO in terms of the increasing d_3z^2-r^2 character in the occupied eg state. Our observation indicates that the chemical pressure effects are qualitatively different between the cubic and layered manganites systems. The authors are grateful to K. Ohoyama and M. Ohashi for their help in neutron diffraction measurements, and to S. Mori for his help in electron diffraction measurements. This work was supported by a Grant-In-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sport and Culture and from PRESTO, Japan Scienece and Technology Corporation (JST), Japan.

  1. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  2. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  3. Blue light effects on rose photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abidi, F; Girault, T; Douillet, O; Guillemain, G; Sintes, G; Laffaire, M; Ben Ahmed, H; Smiti, S; Huché-Thélier, L; Leduc, N

    2013-01-01

    Through its impact on photosynthesis and morphogenesis, light is the environmental factor that most affects plant architecture. Using light rather than chemicals to manage plant architecture could reduce the impact on the environment. However, the understanding of how light modulates plant architecture is still poor and further research is needed. To address this question, we examined the development of two rose cultivars, Rosa hybrida'Radrazz' and Rosa chinensis'Old Blush', cultivated under two light qualities. Plants were grown from one-node cuttings for 6 weeks under white or blue light at equal photosynthetic efficiencies. While plant development was totally inhibited in darkness, blue light could sustain full development from bud burst until flowering. Blue light reduced the net CO(2) assimilation rate of fully expanded leaves in both cultivars, despite increasing stomatal conductance and intercellular CO(2) concentrations. In 'Radrazz', the reduction in CO(2) assimilation under blue light was related to a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, while in both cultivars, the chl a/b ratio increased. Surprisingly, blue light could induce the same organogenetic activity of the shoot apical meristem, growth of the metamers and flower development as white light. The normal development of rose plants under blue light reveals the strong adaptive properties of rose plants to their light environment. It also indicates that photomorphogenetic processes can all be triggered by blue wavelengths and that despite a lower assimilation rate, blue light can provide sufficient energy via photosynthesis to sustain normal growth and development in roses.

  4. Chemical-Induced Inhibition of Blue Light-Mediated Seedling Development Caused by Disruption of Upstream Signal Transduction Involving Cryptochromes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wen-Dee; Okubo-Kurihara, Emiko; Kurihara, Yukio; Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Honda, Kaori; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Sudesh, Kumar; Matsui, Minami

    2017-01-01

    Plants have a remarkable ability to perceive and respond to various wavelengths of light and initiate regulation of different cascades of light signaling and molecular components. While the perception of red light and the mechanisms of its signaling involving phytochromes are largely known, knowledge of the mechanisms of blue light signaling is still limited. Chemical genetics involves the use of diverse small active or synthetic molecules to evaluate biological processes. By combining chemicals and analyzing the effects they have on plant morphology, we identified a chemical, 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3B7N), that promotes hypocotyl elongation of wild-type Arabidopsis only under continuous blue light. Further evaluation with loss-of-function mutants confirmed that 3B7N inhibits photomorphogenesis through cryptochrome-mediated light signaling. Microarray analysis demonstrated that the effect of 3B7N treatment on gene expression in cry1cry2 is considerably smaller than that in the wild type, indicating that 3B7N specifically interrupts cryptochrome function in the control of seedling development in a light-dependent manner. We demonstrated that 3B7N directly binds to CRY1 protein using an in vitro binding assay. These results suggest that 3B7N is a novel chemical that directly inhibits plant cryptochrome function by physical binding. The application of 3B7N can be used on other plants to study further the blue light mechanism and the genetic control of cryptochromes in the growth and development of plant species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Exploiting Collective Effects to Direct Light Absorption in Natural and Artificial Light-Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Christopher

    Photosynthesis---the conversion of sunlight to chemical energy---is fundamental for supporting life on our planet. Despite its importance, the physical principles that underpin the primary steps of photosynthesis, from photon absorption to electronic charge separation, remain to be understood in full. Electronic coherence within tightly-packed light-harvesting (LH) units or within individual reaction centers (RCs) has been recognized as an important ingredient for a complete understanding of the excitation energy transfer (EET) dynamics. However, the electronic coherence across units---RC and LH or LH and LH---has been consistently neglected as it does not play a significant role during these relatively slow transfer processes. Here, we turn our attention to the absorption process, which, as we will show, has a much shorter built-in timescale. We demonstrate that the---often overlooked---spatially extended but short-lived excitonic delocalization plays a relevant role in general photosynthetic systems. Most strikingly, we find that absorption intensity is, quite generally, redistributed from LH units to the RC, increasing the number of excitations which can effect charge separation without further transfer steps. A biomemetic nano-system is proposed which is predicted to funnel excitation to the RC-analogue, and hence is the first step towards exploiting these new design principles for efficient artificial light-harvesting.

  6. Chemical memory with states coded in light controlled oscillations of interacting Belousov-Zhabotinsky droplets.

    PubMed

    Gizynski, Konrad; Gorecki, Jerzy

    2017-03-01

    The information storing potential of droplets, in which an oscillatory, photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction proceeds, is investigated experimentally. We consider coupled oscillations in pairs and triplets of droplets. Droplets are surrounded by a solution of lipids in decane. Oscillations synchronize via diffusion of an activator through a lipid bilayer. The reaction in each droplet can be individually controlled by illumination with blue light through an optical fiber. We found that in pairs of BZ droplets, only the in-phase and the forcing oscillation modes are stable, however switching between these modes is not reliable. In triplets of droplets, switching between two different, stable rotational modes (clockwise and anticlockwise) can be easily implemented. Therefore, such a system is an excellent candidate for a light controlled, reliable, one bit chemical memory unit.

  7. Real-time detection of concealed chemical hazards under ambient light conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa; Izake, Emad L

    2013-07-01

    Current concerns regarding terrorism and international crime highlight the need for new techniques for detecting unknown and hazardous substances. A novel Raman spectroscopy-based technique, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), was recently devised for noninvasively probing the contents of diffusely scattering and opaque containers. Here, we demonstrate a modified portable SORS sensor for detecting concealed substances in-field under different background lighting conditions. Samples including explosive precursors, drugs, and an organophosphate insecticide (chemical warfare agent surrogate) were concealed inside diffusely scattering packaging including plastic, paper, and cloth. Measurements were carried out under incandescent and fluorescent light as well as under daylight to assess the suitability of the probe for different real-life conditions. In each case, it was possible to identify the substances against their reference Raman spectra in less than 1 min. The developed sensor has potential for rapid detection of concealed hazardous substances in airports, mail distribution centers, and customs checkpoints.

  8. Melanopsin Is Highly Resistant to Light and Chemical Bleaching in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Timothy J.; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin is the photopigment of mammalian intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, where it contributes to light entrainment of circadian rhythms, and to the pupillary light response. Previous work has shown that the melanopsin photocycle is independent of that used by rhodopsin (Tu, D. C., Owens, L. A., Anderson, L., Golczak, M., Doyle, S. E., McCall, M., Menaker, M., Palczewski, K., and Van Gelder, R. N. (2006) Inner retinal photoreception independent of the visual retinoid cycle. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 10426–10431). Here we determined the ability of apo-melanopsin, formed by ex vivo UV light bleaching, to use selected chromophores. We found that 9-cis-retinal, but not all-trans-retinal or 9-cis-retinol, is able to restore light-dependent ipRGC activity after bleaching. Melanopsin was highly resistant to both visible-spectrum photic bleaching and chemical bleaching with hydroxylamine under conditions that fully bleach rod and cone photoreceptor cells. These results suggest that the melanopsin photocycle can function independently of both rod and cone photocycles, and that apo-melanopsin has a strong preference for binding cis-retinal to generate functional pigment. The data support a model in which retinal is continuously covalently bound to melanopsin and may function through a reversible, bistable mechanism. PMID:22547062

  9. Effects of Full Spectrum Lighting in Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-09

    The subjects rated their health as being better under full-spectrum light, but this was not accompanied by higher ratings of mood or quality of sleep ...full-spectrum light and rated their health as being better under this light, but this was not accompanied by higher ratings of mood or quality of sleep ...the elderly in the northern United States (Neer, 1985) and must be due to insufficient exposure to sunlight (Holick, 1985). Light also indirectly

  10. Role of chemical reactions of arylamine hole transport materials in operational degradation of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondakov, Denis Y.

    2008-10-15

    We report that the representative arylamine hole transport materials undergo chemical transformations in operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. Although the underlying chemical mechanisms are too complex to be completely elucidated, structures of several identified degradation products point at dissociations of relatively weak carbon-nitrogen and carbon-carbon bonds in arylamine molecules as the initiating step. Considering the photochemical reactivities, the bond dissociation reactions of arylamines occur by the homolysis of the lowest singlet excited states formed by recombining charge carriers in the operating OLED device. The subsequent chemical reactions are likely to yield long-lived, stabilized free radicals capable of acting as deep traps--nonradiative recombination centers and fluorescence quenchers. Their presence in the hole transport layer results in irreversible hole trapping and manifests as a positive fixed charge. The extent and localization of chemical transformations in several exemplary devices suggest that the free radical reactions of hole transporting materials, arylamines, can be sufficient to account for the observed luminance efficiency loss and voltage rise in operating OLEDs. The relative bond strengths and excited state energies of OLED materials appear to have a determining effect on the operational stability of OLED devices.

  11. Multilayer Graphene with Chemical Modification as Transparent Conducting Electrodes in Organic Light-Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yilin; Yu, Haojian; Wang, Cong; Cao, Jin; Chen, Yigang; Ma, Zhongquan; You, Ying; Wan, Jixiang; Fang, Xiaohong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-12-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for the replacement of the typical transparent electrode indium tin oxide in optoelectronic devices. Currently, the application of polycrystalline graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition is limited for their low electrical conductivity due to the poor transfer technique. In this work, we developed a new method of preparing tri-layer graphene films with chemical modification and explored the influence of doping and patterning process on the performance of the graphene films as transparent electrodes. In order to demonstrate the application of the tri-layer graphene films in optoelectronics, we fabricated the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on them and found that plasma etching is feasible with certain influence on the quality of the graphene films and the performance of the OLEDs.

  12. Evaluation of assumptions for estimating chemical light extinction at U.S. national parks.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Douglas; Zielinska, Barbara; Samburova, Vera; Collins, Don; Taylor, Nathan; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-03-01

    Studies were conducted at Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) (GRSM), Tennessee, Mount Rainier NP (MORA), Washington, and Acadia NP (ACAD), Maine, to evaluate assumptions used to estimate aerosol light extinction from chemical composition. The revised IMPROVE equation calculates light scattering from concentrations of PM2.5 sulfates, nitrates, organic carbon mass (OM), and soil. Organics are assumed to be nonhygroscopic. Organic carbon (OC) is converted to OM with a multiplier of 1.8. Experiments were conducted to evaluate assumptions on aerosol hydration state, the OM/OC ratio, OM hygroscopicity, and mass scattering efficiencies. Sulfates were neutralized by ammonium during winter at GRSM (W, winter) and at MORA during summer but were acidic at ACAD and GRSM (S, summer) during summer. Hygroscopic growth was mostly smooth and continuous, rarely exhibiting hysteresis. Deliquescence was not observed except infrequently during winter at GRSM (W). Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was separated from bulk OC with solid-phase absorbents. The average OM/OC ratios were 2.0, 2.7, 2.1, and 2.2 at GRSM (S), GRSM (W), MORA, and ACAD, respectively. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at relative humidity (RH) 90% for aerosols generated from WSOC extracts averaged 1.19, 1.06, 1.13, and 1.16 at GRSM (S), GRSM (W), MORA, and ACAD, respectively. Thus, the assumption that OM is not hygroscopic may lead to underestimation of its contribution to light scattering. Studies at IMPROVE sites conducted in U.S. national parks showed that aerosol organics comprise more PM2.5 mass and absorb more water as a function of relative humidity than is currently assumed by the IMPROVE equation for calculating chemical light extinction. Future strategies for reducing regional haze may therefore need to focus more heavily on understanding the origins and control of anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols.

  13. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescent Chemical and Biological Sensors: An Organic Light-Emitting Diode-Based Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, J.; Shinar, R.

    The chapter describes the development, advantages, challenges, and potential of an emerging, compact photoluminescence-based sensing platform for chemical and biological analytes, including multiple analytes. In this platform, the excitation source is an array of organic light-emitting device (OLED) pixels that is structurally integrated with the sensing component. Steps towards advanced integration with additionally a thin-film-based photodetector are also described. The performance of the OLED-based sensing platform is examined for gas-phase and dissolved oxygen, glucose, lactate, ethanol, hydrazine, and anthrax lethal factor.

  14. Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

    1993-02-01

    Light hydrocarbon gases could be reacted with low cost alkaline earth metal oxide (CaO, MgO) in high-temperature plasma reactor to achieve very high ([le]100%) gas conversion to H[sub 2], CO, and the corresponding metal carbides. These carbides could be stored, transported, and hydrolyzed to acetylene or methyl acetylene, which in turn could be upgraded to a wide range of chemicals and premium liquid hydrocarbon fuels. An electric arc discharge reactor was built for converting methane. Literature reviews were made.

  15. Remote-controlling chemical reactions by light: towards chemistry with high spatio-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Göstl, Robert; Senf, Antti; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    The foundation of the chemical enterprise has always been the creation of new molecular entities, such as pharmaceuticals or polymeric materials. Over the past decades, this continuing effort of designing compounds with improved properties has been complemented by a strong effort to render their preparation (more) sustainable by implementing atom as well as energy economic strategies. Therefore, synthetic chemistry is typically concerned with making specific bonds and connections in a highly selective and efficient manner. However, to increase the degree of sophistication and expand the scope of our work, we argue that the modern aspiring chemist should in addition be concerned with attaining (better) control over when and where chemical bonds are being made or broken. For this purpose, photoswitchable molecular systems, which allow for external modulation of chemical reactions by light, are being developed and in this review we are covering the current state of the art of this exciting new field. These "remote-controlled synthetic tools" provide a remarkable opportunity to perform chemical transformations with high spatial and temporal resolution and should therefore allow regulating biological processes as well as material and device performance.

  16. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed data base of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photochemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colours than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.

  17. Combining Chemical Permeation Enhancers for Synergistic Effects.

    PubMed

    du Toit, Trizel; Malan, Maides M; Lemmer, Hendrik J R; Gouws, Chrisna; Aucamp, Marique E; Breytenbach, Wilma J; Hamman, Josias H

    2016-10-01

    Currently, macromolecular drugs such as proteins are mainly administered by means of injections due to their low intestinal epithelial permeability and poor stability in the gastrointestinal tract. This study investigated binary combinations of chemical drug absorption enhancers to determine if synergistic drug absorption enhancement effects exist. Aloe vera, Aloe ferox and Aloe marlothii leaf gel materials, as well as with N-trimethyl chitosan chloride (TMC), were combined in different ratios and their effects on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), as well as the transport of FITC-dextran across Caco-2 cell monolayers, were measured. The isobole method was applied to determine the type of interaction that exists between the absorption enhancers combinations. The TEER results showed synergism existed for the combinations between A. vera and A. marlothii, A. marlothii and A. ferox as well as A. vera and TMC. Antagonism interactions also occurred and can probably be explained by chemical reactions between the chemical permeation enhancers, such as complex formation. In terms of FITC-dextran transport, synergism was found for combinations between A. vera and A. marlothii, A. marlothii and A. ferox, A. vera and TMC, A. ferox and TMC and A. marlothii and TMC, whereas antagonism was observed for A. vera and A. ferox. The combinations where synergism was obtained have the potential to be used as effective drug absorption enhancers at lower concentrations compared to the single components.

  18. Effect of health messages about "Light" and "Ultra Light" cigarettes on beliefs and quitting intent

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, S.; Pillitteri, J.; Burton, S.; Rohay, J.; Gitchell, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the impact of three health messages focusing on vent holes, sensory effects of Light and Ultra Light cigarettes, or health consequences of smoking, respectively, on beliefs and quitting intentions.
DESIGN—In the course of a random digit dialed telephone survey, subjects were randomised to hear one of three messages. To test the effects of the messages, beliefs and quitting intentions were assessed both pre- and post-message.
PARTICIPANTS—Daily smokers (n = 2120) of Regular (46%), Light (39%), and Ultra Light (15%) cigarettes in the USA. The sample was weighted to match the US smoker population on age, sex, and ethnicity.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Beliefs were summarised on three dimensions: Safety (reduced health risk), Delivery (lower tar and nicotine delivery), and Sensation (less harsh). Quitting interest was captured by the "quit index", an aggregate measure of quitting interest and intent.
RESULTS—The message focusing on smokers' sensory perceptions of Light and Ultra Light cigarettes resulted in the most positive change in beliefs about safety, delivery, and intent to quit, and was particularly effective among those who believed that these cigarettes were less harsh. The effect was most pronounced among young adults, and among smokers of Light and Ultra Light brands who most endorsed their sensory benefits.
CONCLUSIONS—Addressing smokers' sensory experience that Light and Ultra Light cigarettes feel less harsh may be a promising strategy for changing their misconceptions about these cigarettes and enhancing their interest in quitting. Media counter-advertising on Lights and Ultra Lights, focusing on sensory aspects of these cigarettes, may be an important part of tobacco control efforts.


Keywords: Light; Ultra Light; smokers' beliefs; health messages; vent holes PMID:11740041

  19. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  20. Effectiveness of chemically enhanced solubilization of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, A.T.; Fu, G.; Tomson, M.B.; Hunter, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    Hydrocarbon spills and leaks are a major source of groundwater pollution for urban and industrial regions of the US. Cleanup is most often attempted using pump-and-treat methods with numerous wells and a central treatment facility. Such procedures are notoriously inefficient when hydrocarbons are trapped in oil ganglia or capillaries, or are irreversibly sorbed. The residual hydrocarbons cannot be displaced under reasonable hydraulic gradients. Therefore, it is important to develop a more efficient method of removing such a pollutant source. Miscible solvents and surfactants are often proposed as the chemical enhancer for pump and treat. Several researches have applied the surfactant flush in both the laboratory soil columns and field-test plots. The efficiency of surfactants usually diminished within 20 pore volumes and a significant fraction of contaminant was not mobilized. Some thermodynamic or kinetic limitations may exist in surfactant flush. Research has shown that surfactant often adsorbed to soil and altered the adsorption/desorption properties of soil. These processes may be reversed by controlling the pH and ionic strength. Miscible solvent has been shown very effective in laboratory tests. There are strong reasons to believe that a combination of several enhancement regimes will have substantial performance advantages. Just as with bioremediation, different chemical-enhancement methods will probably be better suited to particular combinations of contaminant types and aquifer characteristics. This paper discusses the effectiveness of chemical-enhancement treatments and possible limitations.

  1. Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on adipocyte development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Obesity is a growing concern in the US population. Current interest is high in the role played by environmental factors called obesogens that may contribute to obesity through developmental exposure. One class of potential obesogens is the family of perfluorinated chemicals used as surfactants in a variety of industrial applications. Given the importance of understanding the role these compounds play in lipid homeostasis we used pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblast cells (Zen-Bio, RTP NC) to study their effects on adipogenesis and lipid accumulation. These cells differentiate into adipocytes accumulating large lipid droplets. Cultures were treated with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (1-200uM), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) (5-lOOuM), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (5O-300uM), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) (40- 250uM). Cell size number, and lipid content were assessed using morphomeiric analysis. All four compounds decreased cell size compared to control, and PFNA was most potent, in terms of lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC), whereas PFOA was least potent. Cell number increased for all perfluorinated chemicals tested, most potently for PFNA and least for PFOS. Interestingly, average lipid area per cell for all four chemicals decreased compared to control, but PFOS and PFHxS had increased total lipid area. Additionally, significant increases in total triglyceride were noted for all compounds compared to controls. PFOA and PFNA increased trigly

  2. Optical and chemical characterization of aerosols emitted from coal, heavy and light fuel oil, and small-scale wood combustion.

    PubMed

    Frey, Anna K; Saarnio, Karri; Lamberg, Heikki; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Teinilä, Kimmo; Carbone, Samara; Tissari, Jarkko; Niemelä, Ville; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Kytömäki, Jorma; Artaxo, Paulo; Virkkula, Aki; Pirjola, Liisa; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Particle emissions affect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to know the physical and chemical characteristics of them. This work studied the chemical, physical, and optical characteristics of particle emissions from small-scale wood combustion, coal combustion of a heating and power plant, as well as heavy and light fuel oil combustion at a district heating station. Fine particle (PM1) emissions were the highest in wood combustion with a high fraction of absorbing material. The emissions were lowest from coal combustion mostly because of efficient cleaning techniques used at the power plant. The chemical composition of aerosols from coal and oil combustion included mostly ions and trace elements with a rather low fraction of absorbing material. The single scattering albedo and aerosol forcing efficiency showed that primary particles emitted from wood combustion and some cases of oil combustion would have a clear climate warming effect even over dark earth surfaces. Instead, coal combustion particle emissions had a cooling effect. Secondary processes in the atmosphere will further change the radiative properties of these emissions but are not considered in this study.

  3. Effect of inhomogeneity of light from light curing units on the surface hardness of composite resin.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Takahashi, Hideo; Ban, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of output light from different types of light curing units, and their effects on polymerization of light-activated composite resin. Three quartz-tungsten-halogen lamps, one plasma arc lamp, and one LED light curing unit were used. Intensity distribution of light emitted from the light guide tip was measured at 1.0-mm intervals across the guide tip. Distribution of Knoop hardness number on the surface of resin irradiated with the light curing units was also measured. For all units, inhomogeneous distribution of light intensity across the guide tip was observed. Minimum light intensity values were 19-80% of the maximum values. In terms of surface hardness, inhomogeneous distribution was also observed for the materials irradiated with the tested units. Minimum values were 53-92% of the maximum values. Our results indicated that markedly inhomogeneous light emitted from light curing unit could result in inhomogeneous polymerization in some areas of the restoration below the light guide tip.

  4. WO3/W Nanopores Sensor for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) Determination under Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Bai, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Li, Jianyong; Zhou, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and the results showed that taking NaNO3 solution at the concentration of 2.5 mol·L−1 as electrolyte under the light intensity of 214 μW·cm−2 and applied bias of 2.5 V, the proposed method is accurate and well reproducible, even in a wide range of pH values. Furthermore, the COD values obtained by the WO3 sensor were fitted well with the theoretical COD value in the range of 3–60 mg·L−1 with a limit value of 1 mg·L−1, which reveals that the proposed sensor may be a practical device for monitoring and controlling surface water quality as well as slightly polluted water. PMID:24940868

  5. WO₃/W nanopores sensor for chemical oxygen demand (COD) determination under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Bai, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Li, Jianyong; Zhou, Baoxue

    2014-06-17

    A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and the results showed that taking NaNO3 solution at the concentration of 2.5 mol·L(-1) as electrolyte under the light intensity of 214 μW·cm(-2) and applied bias of 2.5 V, the proposed method is accurate and well reproducible, even in a wide range of pH values. Furthermore, the COD values obtained by the WO3 sensor were fitted well with the theoretical COD value in the range of 3-60 mg·L(-1) with a limit value of 1 mg·L(-1), which reveals that the proposed sensor may be a practical device for monitoring and controlling surface water quality as well as slightly polluted water.

  6. Solid-state NMR chemical shift assignments for AL-09 VL immunoglobulin light chain fibrils.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Dennis W; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-04-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the formation of immunoglobulin light-chain fibrils in critical organs of the body. The light-chain protein AL-09 presents one severe case of cardiac AL amyloidosis, which contains seven mutations in the variable domain (VL) relative to its germline counterpart, κI O18/O8 VL. Three of these mutations are non-conservative-Y87H, N34I, and K42Q-and previous work has shown that they are responsible for significantly reducing the protein's thermodynamic stability, allowing fibril formation to occur with fast kinetics and across a wide-range of pH conditions. Currently, however, there is extremely limited structural information available which explicitly describes the residues that are involved in supporting the misfolded fibril structure. Here, we assign the site-specific (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of the rigid residues of AL-09 VL fibrils by solid-state NMR, reporting on the regions of the protein involved in the fibril as well as the extent of secondary structure.

  7. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  8. Effects of coloured lighting on the perception of interior spaces.

    PubMed

    Odabaşioğlu, Seden; Olguntürk, Nіlgün

    2015-02-01

    Use of coloured lighting in interior spaces has become prevalent in recent years. Considerable importance is ascribed to coloured lighting in interior and lighting design. The effects of colour on the perception of interior spaces have been studied as surface colour; but here, the effects of three different types of chromatic light were investigated. The lighting differed in colour (red, green and white) and perceptions of interior space were assessed. 97 participants (59 women, 38 men; M age = 21.4 yr.) evaluated the experiment room on a questionnaire assessing eight evaluative factors: Pleasantness, Arousal, Aesthetics, Usefulness, Comfort, Spaciousness, Colour, and Lighting quality. Perceptions of the room differed by colour of lighting for some of the evaluative factors, but there was no sex difference in perceptions. Interior spaces may be perceived as equally pleasant under white, green and red lighting. Under white lighting a space is perceived as more useful, spacious, clear, and luminous. Green lighting would make the same effect. Green and white lighting were perceived equally comfortable in an interior space. Chromatic coloured lighting was perceived to be more aesthetic than white lighting. The results support previous findings for some evaluative factors, but differed for others.

  9. Effect of Curing Light Barriers and Light Types on Radiant Exposure and Composite Conversion.

    PubMed

    Sword, Rhoda Joyner; Do, Uyen Ngoc; Chang, Jonathan Hu; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research investigated the effects of curing tip barriers on light output and composite properties, but no study has measured the effect of a wide variety of barriers and curing light types on delivered radiant exposure and the resulting composite cure 2 mm below the radiated surface. Six barrier materials and six curing light types were tested. Spectroradiometry was used to measure irradiance with and without barriers for each light type, and radiant exposure values were determined for a commercial camphorquinone-based dental composite material. Composite monomer conversion was measured at 10 minutes following exposure for each light type/barrier condition (N = 5) using infrared spectroscopy. Results were subjected to one-way analyses of variance for radiant exposure and conversion among barrier types within a given curing light: preset alpha 0.05. All barriers significantly reduced radiant exposure compared with the uncovered tip, but the use of the two polywave LEDs covered with a latex-based barrier demonstrated significantly lower conversion values. Although light-curing barriers reduce radiant exposure to a restorative material over a recommended exposure, this reduction is not sufficient to cause significant reduction in composite cure, except when using a latex-based barrier and a polywave LED curing light. Clinicians need to be aware of the possible interaction between curing light barriers and curing light type in order to optimally photocure restorative materials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Colour and Light Effects on Students' Achievement, Behavior and Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlfarth, H.

    A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was used to investigate the effects of full-spectrum light, prescribed color and light/color combinations, ultra-violet light, and electromagnetic radiation in an elementary school environment. Four schools in the Wetaskiwin School District, Alberta, were involved in the study; three served…

  11. Substrate effect in chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shigeyasu; Watanabe, Takeo; Adachi, Kouichirou; Fukushima, Takashi; Uda, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichi

    1996-06-01

    SiN substrate effect in chemically amplified (CA) resist has been investigated by surface analysis and evaluating the pattern profile of CA negative tone resist. Fine profile can be replicated on SiN substrate treated with oxygen plasma optimized condition. Undercut profile can be affected by adsorbed materials on SiN substrate from thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) analysis results. From the results of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), it is found that Si-N bonding is replaced to Si-O bonding while SiN substrate is treated with oxygen plasma. Relations between footing length and oxygen plasma treatment condition suggest that undercut profile due to the concentration of nitrogen on the surface of SiN substrate. At the interface between the SiN substrate and the CA resist, the SiN substrate works as base existing water, and quenches photo-generated-acids. The mechanism of substrate effect of SiN is clarified. Reducing the SiN-substrate effect by treating the surface with oxygen plasma, fine resist pattern without undercut and footing is formed on SiN substrate.

  12. The effect of sterilization methods on the light transmission characteristics and structure of light-curing tips.

    PubMed

    Kakaboura, A; Tzoutzas, J; Pitsinigos, D; Vougiouklakis, G

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various sterilization methods on the light transmission and the structural characteristics of two light-curing tips. Twenty tips from two light-curing devices [Elipar II (EL) and Heliolux II (HL)] were classified into four groups. The tips in groups A to C were subjected to sterilization with 0.2% sodium dichloroisacyanurate solution (Presept), 2% glutaraldehyde solution (Cidex) (2 h cycle(-1)) and water-steam autoclave (120 degrees C, 1 bar, 12 min cycle(-1)), respectively. A total of 2100 sterilization cycles was performed for all methods tested. The transmitted light intensity (TLI) was measured at specific sterilization time intervals by a curing radiometer (Model 100, Demetron). The final % TLI reduction of the sterilized tips was calculated relative to the corresponding control ones. The topography and composition of the front curing tip surfaces were determined using scanning electron microscopy combined with electron probe microanalyser. Autoclaving caused the lowest final TLI decrease (EL: 15%, HL: 19%) compared with Presept (EL: 60%, HL: 42%) and with Cidex (EL: 68%, HL: 52%). Cidex yielded higher TLI drop than Presept for both types of tips examined. Elipar tips were found to be more sensitive than Heliolux tips to both chemical sterilization techniques. Total or partial coating of the tip surfaces with insoluble salts after sterilization with Presept and Cidex was detected, mainly composed of Ca, Cl, Al, Pd and Mg traces. No changes were noted on the surfaces after autoclave. Water-steam autoclave is safer than the 0.2% sodium dicloroisocyanorate and 2% glutaraldehyde chemical sterilization agents regarding the light transmission characteristics and the structure of the light-curing tips.

  13. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  14. Effective communication of information about chemical hazards.

    PubMed

    Lee, T R

    1986-05-01

    Given that the best available means have been used to assess the risks arising from a chemical process or product, it is a crucial aspect of management to inform the employees and the public. This task of communicating may fall to industry, government, regulating authority, professional association or an environmental protection group. It requires some understanding of the public's perceptions of the risks involved and an ethical duty to try to modify attitudes judged to be either over-anxious or complacent. There is as yet no structured knowledge on communication about chemical hazards as such. Also, circumstances vary enormously. Hence, this paper deploys the general analytic framework constructed within social psychology and reviews the extensive experimental research (and some field studies) with the aim of providing understanding and some guidance. It considers the basic modelling of attitude change as induced by printed or verbal communications. The variables influencing the effectiveness of communications are divided into: the source (e.g. his/her credibility, power or attractiveness); the message (e.g. emotional versus logical; one-sided versus both-sided arguments); and modality or media effects (e.g. spoken versus written; the mass media; campaigns).

  15. Wet chemical controllable synthesis of hematite ellipsoids with structurally enhanced visible light property.

    PubMed

    Han, Chengliang; Han, Jie; Li, Qiankun; Xie, Jingsong

    2013-01-01

    A facile and economic route has been presented for mass production of micro/nanostructured hematite microcrystals based on the wet chemical controllable method. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the product was mesoporous α -Fe2O3 and nearly elliptical in shape. Each hematite ellipsoid was packed by many α -Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The values of vapor pressure in reaction systems played vital roles in the formation of porous hematite ellipsoids. Optical tests demonstrated that the micro/nanostructured elliptical hematite exhibited enhanced visible light property at room temperature. The formation of these porous hematite ellipsoids could be attributed to the vapor pressure induced oriented assembling of lots of α -Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

  16. Wet Chemical Controllable Synthesis of Hematite Ellipsoids with Structurally Enhanced Visible Light Property

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengliang; Han, Jie; Li, Qiankun; Xie, Jingsong

    2013-01-01

    A facile and economic route has been presented for mass production of micro/nanostructured hematite microcrystals based on the wet chemical controllable method. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the product was mesoporous α-Fe2O3 and nearly elliptical in shape. Each hematite ellipsoid was packed by many α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The values of vapor pressure in reaction systems played vital roles in the formation of porous hematite ellipsoids. Optical tests demonstrated that the micro/nanostructured elliptical hematite exhibited enhanced visible light property at room temperature. The formation of these porous hematite ellipsoids could be attributed to the vapor pressure induced oriented assembling of lots of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:24222735

  17. Effects of blue light and caffeine on mood.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Johan G; Beaven, C Martyn

    2014-09-01

    Both short wavelength (blue) light and caffeine have been studied for their mood enhancing effects on humans. The ability of blue light to increase alertness, mood and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways has been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for depression across a range of occupational settings. This experimental study compared blue light and caffeine and aimed to test the effects of blue light/placebo (BLU), white light/240-mg caffeine (CAF), blue light/240-mg caffeine (BCAF) and white light/placebo (PLA), on mood. A randomised, controlled, crossover design study was used, in a convenience population of 20 healthy volunteers. The participants rated their mood on the Swedish Core Affect Scales (SCAS) prior to and after each experimental condition to assess the dimensions of valence and activation. There was a significant main effect of light (p = 0.009), and the combination of blue light and caffeine had clear positive effects on core effects (ES, ranging from 0.41 to 1.20) and global mood (ES, 0.61 ± 0.53). The benefits of the combination of blue light and caffeine should be further investigated across a range of applications due to the observed effects on the dimensions of arousal, valence and pleasant activation.

  18. The Detailed Chemical Properties of M31 Star Clusters. I. Fe, Alpha and Light Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-01

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R M31 < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ~ - 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  19. THE DETAILED CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF M31 STAR CLUSTERS. I. Fe, ALPHA AND LIGHT ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-20

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R {sub M31} < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ∼ – 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope.

  20. Effect of Light Absorption in InGaN/GaN Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Junho; Jeon, Ki-Seong; Lee, Min Woo; Lee, Eun Ah; Kim, Seon Ock; Song, Hooyoung; Choi, Hwanjoon; Kang, Mingu; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Ryu, Han-Youl; O, Beom-Hoan; Lee, Jeong Soo

    2015-07-01

    For evaluating the effect of light absorption in vertically structured thin film light-emitting diodes (VLEDs), we investigate the dependence of the efficiencies on the several specific parameters including thickness and doping concentration (N(D)) of the n-GaN layer, a design of hetero-structures of the n-GaN layer, and a number of pairs of multi-quantum wells (MQWs). Generally, there is a complementary relation between internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and light extraction efficiency (LEE). However, we confirmed that LEE determined by light absorption is more dominant than IQE in VLED structures with a textured surface, from numerical simulation and experimental results. Effect of light absorption is more prominent in the vertical chip with a textured surface than in that with a flat surface, because a travel length of light extracted from the textured surface is longer. Minimizing light absorption in VLEDs is a key technology for improving light output, and light absorption speaks for the index of enhancement by the general technologies for improving LEE.

  1. Light-sensitized decontamination of ground-water hazardous chemicals. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; Schlauch, M.B.; Ellis, D.D.; Marley, K.A.; Ju, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of sunlight, oxygen, and dissolved organic compounds active as 'photosensitizers' (substances capable of absorbing sunlight and transforming it into chemically useful forms) is a promising treatment for contaminated waters. Light is absorbed by the sensitizing substance, raising it to a higher energy excited state. Reaction with the excited state substance converts molecular oxygen to a form much more reactive with dissolved compounds. Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), a naturally occurring compound and a known photosensitizer, was investigated for use in this process. A series of kinetic experiments explored its ability to photodegrade several aromatic compounds, phenols and anilines, that are related to some herbicides (such as carbaryl, 2, 4-D, alachlor, atrazine, and trifluralin) commonly found in polluted waters. It was found that riboflavin when added to solutions of phenols or anilines greatly accelerated the rate of their loss in the presence of light. The sensitized photolysis rates increased in the absence of oxygen, suggesting a mechanism involving direct energy or electron transfer between flavin excited states and acceptor molecules. In addition, it was found that some iron salts were very significant promoters of photodestruction of the triazine herbicide, atrazine.

  2. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  3. Vibrational spectra of chemical and isotopic variants of oxyluciferin, the light emitter of firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Yue, Ling; Rebarz, Mateusz; Hintermann, Lukas; Sliwa, Michel; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Pejov, Ljupčo; Liu, Ya-Jun; Naumov, Panče

    2014-08-18

    The chemical complexity of oxyluciferin (OxyLH2), the light-emitting molecule in the bioluminescence of fireflies, originates from the possibility of keto/enol tautomerism and single or double deprotonation. Herein, we present detailed infrared spectroscopic analysis of OxyLH2 and several of its chemical isomers and isotopomers. To facilitate the future characterization of its biogenic forms, we provide accurate assignments of the solid-state and solution FTIR spectra of OxyLH2 based on comparison to six isotopically labeled variants ([2-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [3-(15)N]-OxyLH2, [4-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [5-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [2'-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [3'-(15)N]-OxyLH2), five closely related structural analogues, and theoretically computed spectra. The computed DFT harmonic vibrational force fields (B3LYP and M06 functionals with basis sets of varying flexibility up to 6-311++G**) reproduce well the observed shifts in the IR spectra of both isotopically labeled and structurally related analogues.

  4. Hydrogel patterning by diffusion through the matrix and subsequent light-triggered chemical immobilization.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zheyi; Zhang, Yu; Kootala, Sujit; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2015-01-21

    A novel approach to hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel with a chemical gradient of the matrix-linked bisphosphonate (BP) groups is presented. The method consists of two steps, including initial generation of physical gradient patterns of BPs by diffusion of BP acrylamide reagent into HA matrix carrying thiol groups and subsequent chemical immobilization of the BP groups by UV light-triggered thiol-ene addition reaction. This gradient hydrogel permits spatial three-dimensional regulation of secondary interactions of different molecules with the polymer matrix. In particular, graded amounts of cytochrome c (cyt c) were reversibly absorbed in the hydrogel, thus enabling the subsequent spatially controlled release of the therapeutic protein. The obtained patterned hydrogel acts also as a unique reactor in which peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of a substrate is determined by spatial position of the enzyme (cyt c) in the matrix resulting in a range of product concentrations. As an example, matrix template-assisted oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetarmethylbenzydine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 occurs simultaneously at different rates within the gradient hydrogel. Moreover, calcium binding to the gradient HABP hydrogel reflects the pattern of immobilized BP groups eventually leading to the graded biomineralization of the matrix. This approach opens new possibilities for use of hydrogels as dynamic models for biologic three-dimensional structures such as extracellular matrix.

  5. Comparative sporicidal effects of liquid chemical agents.

    PubMed Central

    Sagripanti, J L; Bonifacino, A

    1996-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, cupric ascorbate (plus a sublethal amount of hydrogen peroxide), sodium hypochlorite, and phenol to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores under various conditions. Each chemical agent was distinctly affected by pH, storage time after activation, dilution, and temperature. Only three of the preparations (hypochlorite, peracetic acid, and cupric ascorbate) studied here inactivated more than 99.9% of the spore load after a 30-min incubation at 20 degrees C at concentrations generally used to decontaminate medical devices. Under similar conditions, glutaraldehyde inactivated approximately 90%, and hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, and phenol produced little killing of spores in suspension. By kinetic analysis at different temperatures, we calculated the rate of spore inactivation (k) and the activation energy of spore killing (delta E) for each chemical agent. Rates of spore inactivation had a similar delta E value of approximately 20 kcal/mol (ca.83.68 kJ/mol) for every substance tested. The variation among k values allowed a quantitative comparison of liquid germicidal agents. PMID:8593054

  6. Tumorigenesis in athymic nude mouse skin by chemical carcinogens and ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.M.; Rice, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of established skin tumorigenesis protocols were tested for efficacy on athymic nu/nu mice (BALB/c background) and compared on euthymic nu/+ counterparts. Chemical carcinogens and UV light were applied to the ears of 10 mice of each sex and genotype for each group. Treatments were: 0.5 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene ((DMBA) CAS: 57-97-6) to each ear; 0.125 mg DMBA to each ear, followed by 0.1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate ((TPA) CAS: 16561-29-8) twice weekly for 56 weeks; 0.2 mg N-nitroso-N-methylurea ((NMU) CAS: 684-93-5; 1% in acetone, 20 microliter) to each ear; 0.1 mg NMU to each ear weekly for 30 weeks; 0.2 mg NMU to each ear, followed by TPA twice weekly for 56 weeks; two ip doses of N-nitroso-N-ethylurea ((NEU) CAS: 759-73-9; 25 mg/kg each), followed by TPA twice weekly topically for 56 weeks; and exposure to sunlamps (250- to 400-nm emission) two or three times per week for 20 weeks, for a total dose of 3.7 X 10(5) J/m2. The chemical treatments caused mainly squamous papillomas and carcinomas, sebaceous adenomas and adenocarcinomas, and basal cell tumors, which appeared both on the skin of the ears and elsewhere. UV light caused squamous tumors, basal cell tumors, and sarcomas. Ear skin of the nu/nu mice developed significantly more squamous tumors than those of nu/+ mice after DMBA-TPA, NMU-TPA, NEU-TPA, repeated NMU, or UV light. Similar results were obtained for the skin of the heads and bodies. Even a single dose of NMU caused a few tumors on the nude, but not the euthymic, mice. A single dose of DMBA caused primarily sebaceous adenomas, distributed at random over the entire bodies. These results show that, contrary to previous reports, nude mice are sensitive to skin tumorigenesis, more so than euthymic nu/+ mice similarly exposed to diverse types of carcinogen and treatment protocols.

  7. Effect of ultraviolet light on toxicity of the PAH fluoranthene to freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Cox, D.; Kahl, M.; Spehar, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Certain polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be activated by irradiation with ultraviolet light in the near UV waveband to increase their biocidal qualities. Fluoranthene is one of the PAHs that has this capacity. Ten species of freshwater animals and one species of freshwater plant were acutely exposed to several concentrations of fluoranthene in the presence of additional UV light and to standard light conditions. Tests were conducted using flow-through static or renewal techniques. Fluoranthene concentrations were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. UV light was produced by UV-emitting fluorescent lamps. UV-C was removed from the spectrum by cellulose triacetate filters. Separate measurements were made of spectral ranges 310 to 390, 265 to 328 and < 320 nm. All species tested except for a dragonfly, Ophiogomphus sp. were more sensitive to fluoranthene in the presence of UV light ranging from 449 to 926 {mu}W/CM{sup 2} than the same species exposed to this chemical in tests using standard light conditions. Sensitivity increased by factors of {<=}32 times in these tests. Two species were tested for effects of UV light during chronic exposure. The cladoceran, Daphnia magna, showed a 17.1 fold increase in sensitivity to fluoranthene due to UV light and the fathead minnow showed a 5.77 fold increase. Results show that water quality criteria for fluoranthene should be adjusted for UV light effects.

  8. Acute alerting effects of light: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Souman, Jan L; Tinga, Angelica M; Te Pas, Susan F; van Ee, Raymond; Vlaskamp, Björn N S

    2017-09-12

    Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of empirical studies on direct, acute effects of light on alertness to evaluate the reliability of these effects. In total, we identified 68 studies in which either light intensity, spectral distribution, or both were manipulated, and evaluated the effects on behavioral measures of alertness, either subjectively or measured in reaction time performance tasks. The results show that increasing the intensity of polychromatic white light has been found to increase subjective ratings of alertness in a majority of studies, though a substantial proportion of studies failed to find significant effects, possibly due to small sample sizes or high baseline light intensities. The effect of the color temperature of white light on subjective alertness is less clear. Some studies found increased alertness with higher color temperatures, but other studies reported no detrimental effects of filtering out the short wavelengths from the spectrum. Similarly, studies that used monochromatic light exposure showed no systematic pattern for the effects of blue light compared to longer wavelengths. Far fewer studies investigated the effects of light intensity or spectrum on alertness as measured with reaction time tasks and of those, very few reported significant effects. In general, the small sample sizes used in studies on acute alerting effects of light make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions and better powered studies are needed, especially studies that allow for the construction of dose-response curves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation and light exercise on muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shinichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Uchida, Yuu; Yamaji, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of active warm-up by local muscle light exercise and passive warm-up by polarized light irradiation on skin and muscle temperatures and forearm muscle performance (muscle strength, power, endurance, and controlled force-exertion). Ten healthy males performed various grip tests before and after active (local muscle light exercise) and passive (linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation) warm-ups. An active warm-up involved intermittent gripping exercise (contraction: 1 second and relaxation: 1 second) for 10 minutes using a sponge. A passive warm-up consisted of polarized light irradiation to the forearm (superficial digital flexor) for 10 minutes (irradiation: 5 seconds and rest: 1 second). Skin and muscle temperatures were measured during both warm-ups. Skin and muscle temperatures increased significantly after 5 minutes of local muscle light exercise and after 10 minutes of polarized light irradiation. Temperatures were significantly higher after 6 minutes of local muscle light exercise than after 6 minutes of polarized light irradiation. There were no significant differences of muscle strength, power, and controlled force-exertion before and after either warm-up. Average force outputs in all conditions significantly decreased with exertion time, and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds they were higher in both warm-up conditions than in the non-warm-up condition. In conclusion, both warm-ups may contribute to improve muscle endurance performance in the decreasing force phase.

  10. Environmental effects of oilfield chemicals on composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sorem, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the effects of oilfield chemicals on composite materials. In this initial study only hydrochloric acid is considered. Initial attempts were made to test stressed specimens, but results were very poor. Subsequent testing was performed to determine how the composite material constituents reacted to the hydrochloric acid. The initial testing was performed on tubular specimens with axial and essentially hoop wound fibers of different materials with different resins. The specimens were loaded in bending to induce representative strains in the tubing. All specimens failed. The second tests consisted of only an environmental soak to determine the amount of mass uptake as well as the reduction in strength. The strength reduction results will be presented at a later time. Testing was performed on S-2 glass, carbon and Kevlar 49 as well as three different resins.

  11. Daytime intermittent bright light effects on processing of laterally exposed stimuli, mood, and light perception.

    PubMed

    Iskra-Golec, Irena; Smith, Lawrence

    2008-04-01

    Little is known about intermittent bright light (IBL) exposure during the daytime on oscillations in human performance and mood. The aims of this study were to determine whether the applied regime of IBL can differentially influence the daily oscillations of processing of laterally exposed stimuli, as well as the daily course of alertness and affective state, and the participants' perception of light conditions. A counter-balanced, within-subject study design was applied. Performance and mood of 20 student volunteers were measured every 30 min starting at 08:00 h and ending at 20:30 h in IBL and ordinary room light (ORL) conditions. Near to statistical significance, effects of the IBL regime on performance (i.e., main effect on speed of verbal logical task, and interactive effect of light conditions and measurement time on daily oscillations in speed of processing of spatial tasks) and mood (i.e., interactive effect of bright light and measurement time on global vigor assessment) were found. An assessment of IBL conditions as significantly less comfortable and natural and more glaring when compared to ORL conditions draws attention to the importance of participants' perception of the light, which may affect the application of bright light in real life situations.

  12. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  13. Comparative study of the sealing ability of light-cured versus chemically cured materials placed into furcation perforations.

    PubMed

    Alhadainy, H A; Himel, V T

    1993-09-01

    Two light-cured materials, Vitrebond and Prisma VLC Dycal, were compared with two chemically cured materials, Ketac Fil and Dycal, for ability to seal furcation perforations. Access openings and furcation perforations were prepared in 60 teeth and randomly divided into four equal groups. Furcation perforations were repaired with each of the tested materials, and the access openings were filled with composite resin. After teeth were immersed in 2% erythrocin B dye solution for 10 days, they were sectioned longitudinally and dye penetration was measured. The light-cured materials allowed statistically significant less dye leakage than did the chemically cured materials.

  14. Effects of School Lighting on Physical Development and School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1995-01-01

    This study collected data on the physical development, attendance, and school performance effects of four types of school lighting on elementary students over a two-year period. Results indicated that regular exposure to the lights had important nonvisual effects on students. Full-spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements were found…

  15. Conquering the Pumpkin Effect: A Lighting Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Gary B.

    1993-01-01

    Turning off all the interior and exterior lighting when school buildings are closed saves money. In a small Illinois school district, nearly $14,000 were saved in electrical expenditures for six buildings. Another Illinois district currently has 19 of its 32 buildings blacked out at night and saves over $150,000 annually. Vandalism and loitering…

  16. Conquering the Pumpkin Effect: A Lighting Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Gary B.

    1993-01-01

    Turning off all the interior and exterior lighting when school buildings are closed saves money. In a small Illinois school district, nearly $14,000 were saved in electrical expenditures for six buildings. Another Illinois district currently has 19 of its 32 buildings blacked out at night and saves over $150,000 annually. Vandalism and loitering…

  17. Protective effect of ascorbate in retinal light damage of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Organisciak, D.T.; Wang, H.M.; Li, Z.Y.; Tso, M.O.

    1985-11-01

    Cyclic light and dark-reared rats were exposed to intense visible light for various periods and then rhodopsin-measured following recovery in darkness for up to 14 days. Animals were injected with ascorbic acid or ascorbate derivatives at various doses prior to light exposure in green Plexiglas chambers. The results show that ascorbic acid administration elevates retinal ascorbate and reduces the loss of rhodopsin and photoreceptor cell nuclei resulting from intense light. When given in comparable doses, L-ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, and dehydroascorbate were equally effective in preserving rhodopsin. The ascorbate protective effect in the retina is also dose dependent in both cyclic light and dark-reared rats and exhibits a requirement for the L-stereoisomer of the vitamin. Ascorbic acid is effective when administered before, but not after, light exposure, suggesting that protection from light damage in the retina occurs during the light period. In some experiments, rod outer segments were isolated from rats immediately after light exposure, lipids extracted, and fatty acid composition determined. As judged by the preservation of rod outer segment docosahexaenoic acid in rats given ascorbate, the vitamin may act in an antioxidative fashion by inhibiting oxidation of membrane lipids during intense light.

  18. Effect of 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode Light On Neuronal Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Whelan, Harry T.

    2002-01-01

    Light close to and within the near infrared range has documented benefits for promoting wound healing in human and animal studies. Our preliminary results using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in this range have also demonstrated two-to five-fold increases in growth-phase-specific DNA synthesis in normal fibroblasts, muscle cells, osteoblasts, and mucosal epithelial cells in tissue cultures. However, the mechanisms of action of such light on cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the therapeutic effects of such light result from the stimulation of cellular events associated with increases in cytochrome oxidase activity. As a first step in testing our hypothesis, we subjected primary neuronal cultures to impulse blockade by tetrodotoxin (TTX), a voltage-dependent sodium channel blocker, and applied LED light at 670 nm to determine if it could partially or fully reverse the reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity by TTX. The wavelength and parameters were previously tested to be beneficial for wound healing.

  19. Competition between the tensor light shift and nonlinear Zeeman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chalupczak, W.; Wojciechowski, A.; Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.

    2010-08-15

    Many precision measurements (e.g., in spectroscopy, atomic clocks, quantum-information processing, etc.) suffer from systematic errors introduced by the light shift. In our experimental configuration, however, the tensor light shift plays a positive role enabling the observation of spectral features otherwise masked by the cancellation of the transition amplitudes and creating resonances at a frequency unperturbed either by laser power or beam inhomogeneity. These phenomena occur thanks to the special relation between the nonlinear Zeeman and light shift effects. The interplay between these two perturbations is systematically studied and the cancellation of the nonlinear Zeeman effect by the tensor light shift is demonstrated.

  20. Effect of Gravomagnetism on the Trajectory of Light Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sarani; Sen, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    It has been shown by various authors that gravomagnetic field can produce lensing effect. The effect of such a gravitational body with gravomagnetic mass on the trajectory of light ray is discussed in this paper. The light deflection angle has been calculated in the present works, considering upto fourth order terms. Schwarzschild light deflection angle can be obtained from this expression, by setting gravomagnetic mass equals to zero. However, for a hypothetical massless, gravomagnetic monopole, the light deflection angle does not reduce to zero.

  1. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  2. Improvement of the recombination and infrared light losses by rear surface chemical polishing in silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xueliang; Zhang, Yi; Li, Feng; Sun, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Rear surface chemical polishing (RSCP) was investigated for the improvement of the internal reflection and surface passivation of heterojunction solar cells with intrinsic thin layers (HIT). The HIT solar cells without or with RSCP treatment were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition techniques. Scanning electron microscopy results showed that rounding of the spires and V-groove bottom of the pyramid as well as smoothing of incline surface of the pyramid were achieved. These effects would decrease the loss of infrared light transmittance and interface recombination at the rear surface of the cells. To experimentally corroborate these two points, two special geometries, ITO/c-Si/hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)/ITO and a-Si:H/c-Si/a-Si:H, were introduced as a test of the reflectance/transmittance spectra and the minority carrier lifetime. Weakened transmittance and enhanced lifetime were observed for the sample with RSCP, which are responsible for the improvement of J sc and V oc, respectively. Therefore, RSCP is a promising candidate for improving the performance of HIT solar cells.

  3. A facile chemical conversion synthesis of Sb2S3 nanotubes and the visible light-driven photocatalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a simple chemical conversion and cation exchange technique to realize the synthesis of Sb2S3 nanotubes at a low temperature of 90°C. The successful chemical conversion from ZnS nanotubes to Sb2S3 ones benefits from the large difference in solubility between ZnS and Sb2S3. The as-grown Sb2S3 nanotubes have been transformed from a weak crystallization to a polycrystalline structure via successive annealing. In addition to the detailed structural, morphological, and optical investigation of the yielded Sb2S3 nanotubes before and after annealing, we have shown high photocatalytic activities of Sb2S3 nanotubes for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation. This approach offers an effective control of the composition and structure of Sb2S3 nanomaterials, facilitates the production at a relatively low reaction temperature without the need of organics, templates, or crystal seeds, and can be extended to the synthesis of hollow structures with various compositions and shapes for unique properties. PMID:22448960

  4. Effects of laryngoscope handle light source on the light intensity from disposable laryngoscope blades.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Brousseau, P A; Brousseau, C A

    2014-12-01

    A bench-top study was performed to assess the effects of different laryngoscope handles on the light intensity delivered from disposable metal or plastic laryngoscope blades. The light intensity from both the handle light sources themselves and the combined handle and laryngoscope blade sets was measured using a custom-designed testing system and light meter. Five samples of each disposable blade type were tested and compared with a standard re-usable stainless steel blade using three different handle/light sources (Vital Signs LED, Heine 2.5 V Xenon and 3.5 V Xenon). The light intensity delivered by the disposable blades ranged from 790 to 3846 lux for the different handle types. Overall, the 3.5 V Heine handle delivered the highest light output (p < 0.007) in comparison with the other handles. For the disposable blades, the overall light output was significantly higher from the plastic than the metal blades (p < 0.001).

  5. Damaging effects of visible light. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.P.; Baker, B.N.

    1982-02-01

    The right eyes of anesthetized, ten week old albino rats are exposed to constant photon fluxes at 6 wavelengths for 6 hours. The left eye of each animal is patched during the exposure and is used as control. Histologic examination of retinal sections disclosed a region in the superior retina which is more damaged than are other areas. Attempting to ascertain an action spectrum by measuring ONL lost in this sensative region fails. However, it is shown that, when ONL thickness is integrated over the entire retinal sections, a rhodopsin action-spectrum emerges. It is concluded that (i) retinal light damage in the albino rat under these conditions is rhodopsin mediated; and (ii) assessment of the extent of damage is best made by some method which integrates over the entire retinal section. The latter methodology is not routinely incorporated into studies of retinal light-damage but probably should be.

  6. Miniature chemical ionization mass spectrometer for light aircraft measurements of tropospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, J. A.; Bomse, D. S.; Massick, S. M.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    Tropospheric ammonia plays important roles in the nucleation, growth, composition, and chemistry of aerosol particles. Unfortunately, high frequency and sensitive measurements of gas phase ammonia are lacking in most airborne-based field campaigns. Chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) have shown great promise for ammonia measurements, but CIMS instruments typically consume large amounts of power, are highly labor intensive, and are very heavy for most airborne platforms. These characteristics of CIMS instruments severely limit their potential deployment on smaller and lighter aircraft, despite the strong desire for ammonia measurements in atmospheric chemistry field campaigns. To this end, a CIMS ammonia instrument for light aircraft is being developed using a double-focusing, miniature mass spectrometer. The size of the mass spectrometer, comparable to a small apple, allows for higher operating pressures (0.1 mTorr) and lower pumping requirements. Power usage, including pumps and electronics, is estimated to be around 300 W, and the overall instrument including pumps, electronics, and permeation cells is expected to be about the size of a small monitor. The ion source uses americium-241 to generate protonated water ions which proton transfer to form ammonium ions. The ion source is made with commercially available ion optics to minimize machining costs. Mass spectra over its working range (~ 5-120 amu) are well represented by Gaussian shaped peaks. By examining the peak widths as a function of mass location, the resolution of the instrument was determined experimentally to be around 110 (m/delta m). The sensitivity, selectivity, power requirements, size, and performance characteristics of the miniature mass spectrometer will be described along with the possibilities for CIMS measurements on light aircraft.

  7. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-04-07

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of the tet operator and Gal4 operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies.

  8. The spin Hall effect of light in moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hehe; Li, Xinzhong; Wang, Jingge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spin Hall effect of light in moving inhomogeneous medium using the Gordon metric and the Maxwell’s equations in the gravitational field. Light experiences a moving medium as a gravitational field by means of the Gordon metric. It is shown that the spin Hall effect of light is modified by the motion of medium, and the deflection of the ray trajectory is dependent on the polarization and the motion of the medium. It is interesting that there is no coupling of the spin angular momentum of light and the effective gravitational field when the medium is moving along the direction of the gradient ∇n(r). The results provide a potential method for controlling the spin Hall effect of light in medium.

  9. Geometric spin Hall effect of light with inhomogeneous polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Yi, Xunong

    2017-01-01

    The spin Hall effect of light originates from spin-orbit interaction of light, which manifests two types of geometric phases. In this paper, we report the observation of a geometric spin Hall effect by generating a light beam with inhomogeneous polarization distribution. Unlike the previously reported geometric spin Hall effect observed in a tilted beam-detector system, which is believed to result from an effective spin-redirection Berry geometric phase, the geometric spin Hall effect demonstrated here is attributed to an effective, spatially varying Pancharatnam-Berry geometric phase generated by the inhomogeneous polarization geometry. Our further experiments show that the geometric spin Hall effect can be tuned by tailoring the polarization geometry of light, demonstrating the spin states of photons can be steered with a great flexibility.

  10. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  11. Effects-based chemical category approach for prioritization of low affinity estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hornung, M W; Tapper, M A; Denny, J S; Kolanczyk, R C; Sheedy, B R; Hartig, P C; Aladjov, H; Henry, T R; Schmieder, P K

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory agencies are charged with addressing the endocrine disrupting potential of large numbers of chemicals for which there is often little or no data on which to make decisions. Prioritizing the chemicals of greatest concern for further screening for potential hazard to humans and wildlife is an initial step in the process. This paper presents the collection of in vitro data using assays optimized to detect low affinity estrogen receptor (ER) binding chemicals and the use of that data to build effects-based chemical categories following QSAR approaches and principles pioneered by Gilman Veith and colleagues for application to environmental regulatory challenges. Effects-based chemical categories were built using these QSAR principles focused on the types of chemicals in the specific regulatory domain of concern, i.e. non-steroidal industrial chemicals, and based upon a mechanistic hypothesis of how these non-steroidal chemicals of seemingly dissimilar structure to 17ß-estradiol (E2) could interact with the ER via two distinct binding types. Chemicals were also tested to solubility thereby minimizing false negatives and providing confidence in determination of chemicals as inactive. The high-quality data collected in this manner were used to build an ER expert system for chemical prioritization described in a companion article in this journal.

  12. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  13. Nutrition in the spotlight: metabolic effects of environmental light.

    PubMed

    Versteeg, Ruth I; Stenvers, Dirk J; Kalsbeek, Andries; Bisschop, Peter H; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-11-01

    Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the dominant Zeitgeber for the central circadian clock, which resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, and coordinates daily rhythm in feeding behaviour and metabolism. Eating during inappropriate light conditions may result in metabolic disease via changes in the biological clock. In this review, we describe the physiological role of light in the circadian timing system and explore the interaction between the circadian timing system and metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss the acute and chronic effects of artificial light exposure on food intake and energy metabolism in animals and human subjects. We propose that living in synchrony with the natural daily LD cycle promotes metabolic health and increased exposure to artificial light at inappropriate times of day has adverse effects on metabolism, feeding behaviour and body weight regulation. Reducing the negative side effects of the extensive use of artificial light in human subjects might be useful in the prevention of metabolic disease.

  14. Gap-gate field effect gas sensing device for chemical image generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippini, D.; Lundström, I.; Uchida, H.

    2004-04-01

    A field effect chemically sensitive device, specially suited for the generation of scanning light pulse technique chemical images, is demonstrated. The present approach provides a complete separation between the required electrical biasing and chemical sensing functions inherently coupled in all previous systems. The concept is demonstrated by sensing hydrogen with insensitive biasing electrodes, composing a so-called gap gate, combined with discontinuous palladium clusters usually unsuitable for sensing in conventional arrangements. A simple one-dimensional model is used to explain the observed behavior.

  15. Effects of light quality on the accumulation of phytochemicals in vegetables produced in controlled environments: a review.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhong Hua; Yang, Qi Chang; Liu, Wen Ke

    2015-03-30

    Phytochemicals in vegetables are important for human health, and their biosynthesis, metabolism and accumulation are affected by environmental factors. Light condition (light quality, light intensity and photoperiod) is one of the most important environmental variables in regulating vegetable growth, development and phytochemical accumulation, particularly for vegetables produced in controlled environments. With the development of light-emitting diode (LED) technology, the regulation of light environments has become increasingly feasible for the provision of ideal light quality, intensity and photoperiod for protected facilities. In this review, the effects of light quality regulation on phytochemical accumulation in vegetables produced in controlled environments are identified, highlighting the research progress and advantages of LED technology as a light environment regulation tool for modifying phytochemical accumulation in vegetables. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  17. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  18. Cytologic Effects of Air Force Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    amounts of methylated guanine residues in the DNA. The DNA samples were hydrolyzed and chromatographed using high pressure liquid chromatography ( HPLC ...induced in freshly isolated lymphocytes by four chemicals, 4NQO, MMS, HN2 and mitomycin C (MMC). The differences in DRS are probably due to the chemical

  19. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätzel, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-02-01

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that can be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter confinement potentials, can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters.

  20. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light

    PubMed Central

    Wätzel, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that can be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter confinement potentials, can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters. PMID:26900105

  1. Non-Visual Effects of Classroom Lighting on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1993-01-01

    A two-year study in Alberta on the effects of classroom lighting found that elementary school students exposed to full-spectrum lighting with measurable ultraviolet output had fewer dental caries, larger gains in height and weight, larger gains in achievement, and better attendance. Students exposed to high-pressure sodium vapor lamps had the…

  2. The Effects of Blue Light on Ocular Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchel, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    This review of the literature examines the effects of blue light (or near UV - ultraviolet), especially that given off by black-light tubes, often used with children with visual impairments. It finds a long-term danger of retinal and lens damage and offers six practical suggestions which emphasize using proper filters and limiting exposure to…

  3. Non-Visual Effects of Classroom Lighting on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1994-01-01

    Results from a pilot study of four different lighting systems indicate that over a two-year period, light had measurable and significant effects on students. Under full-spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet enhancement, students developed fewer dental cavities and had better attendance, achievement, and growth and development than students…

  4. The Effects of Blue Light on Ocular Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchel, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    This review of the literature examines the effects of blue light (or near UV - ultraviolet), especially that given off by black-light tubes, often used with children with visual impairments. It finds a long-term danger of retinal and lens damage and offers six practical suggestions which emphasize using proper filters and limiting exposure to…

  5. Non-Visual Effects of Classroom Lighting on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1993-01-01

    A two-year study in Alberta on the effects of classroom lighting found that elementary school students exposed to full-spectrum lighting with measurable ultraviolet output had fewer dental caries, larger gains in height and weight, larger gains in achievement, and better attendance. Students exposed to high-pressure sodium vapor lamps had the…

  6. Effect of various visible light photoinitiators on the polymerization and color of light-activated resins.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideo; Kanie, Takahito; Ban, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of various visible light photoinitiators on the polymerization efficiency and color of the light-activated resins. Four photoinitiators, including camphorquinone, phenylpropanedione, monoacrylphosphine oxide (TPO), and bisacrylphosphine oxide (Ir819), were used. Each photoinitiator was dissolved in a Bis-GMA and TEGDMA monomer mixture. Materials were polymerized using dental quartz-tungsten halogen lamp (QTH), plasma-ark lamp and blue LED light-curing units, and a custom-made violet LED light unit. The degree of monomer conversion and CIE L*a*b* color values of the resins were measured using a FTIR and spectral transmittance meter. The degree of monomer conversions of TPO- and Ir819-containing resins polymerized with the violet-LED unit were higher than camphorquinone-containing resin polymerized with the QTH light-curing unit. The lowest color values were observed for the TPO-containing resin. Our results indicate that the TPO photoinitiator and the violet-LED light unit may provide a useful and improved photopolymerization system for dental light-activated resins.

  7. Effects of lateralized light flash and color on unilateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Wu, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Keh-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Bottom-up-based sensory stimulation has been useful in promoting recovery from post-stroke neglect. Light and color are salient stimuli for guiding our orienting behaviors and influence the degree of spatial bias. This study evaluated the effects of lateralized light flash and color on spatial bias in unilateral neglect (UN). We enrolled 15 individuals with UN as a consequence of a right hemispheric stroke of less than 65 d. This was a 3 × 3 design study with three conditions of lens color (colorless, red, and blue) and three conditions of flash light locations (no flash, left, and right). All participants showed a decrease in ipsilesional spatial bias under left-side light flash and a red lens. Right-side light flash and a blue lens induced more rightward bias than other conditions. This evidence confirms the use of sensory stimulation to complement post-stroke UN remediation. Lateralized light flash to the contralesional space and red-colored lenses have beneficial effects on amelioration of UN, whereas ipsilesional light flash and the color blue may exacerbate ipsilesional spatial bias in stroke survivors with UN. Implications for Rehabilitation Contralesional light flash and the color red may ameliorate ipsilesional spatial bias in stroke survivors with unilateral neglect (UN). Ipsilesional flash of light and the color blue may worsen ipsilesional spatial bias in stroke survivors with UN.

  8. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  9. Effects of light sources and visible light-activated titanium dioxide photocatalyst on bleaching.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; Otsuki, Masayuki; Ogisu, Shinichiro; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Tagami, Junji; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurata, Hiroshi; Cho, Takahiro

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, using methylene blue (MB), the effects of various light sources on the bleaching action of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with two titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalysts - an ultraviolet light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (UVTiO(2)) versus a visible light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)). Five experimental solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), H(2)O(2), VL-TiO(2), UV-TiO(2)) were prepared by mixing varying concentrations of H(2)O(2 )and/or TiO(2 )photocatalyst with MB solution. For H(2)O(2)-containing solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), and H(2)O(2)), the concentration of H(2)O(2) was adjusted to 3.5%. For the four different light sources, low- and high-intensity halogen lamps and blue LED LCUs were used. All the experimental solutions were irradiated by each of the light sources for 7 minutes, and the absorbance at 660 nm was measured every 30 seconds to determine the concentration of MB as an indicator of the bleaching effect. On the interaction between the effects of light source and bleaching treatment, the high-intensity halogen with VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2) caused the most significant reduction in MB concentration. On the effect of light sources, the halogen lamps resulted in a greater bleaching effect than the blue LED LCUs.

  10. Quantifying phosphorus and light effects in stream algae

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Walter; Fanta, S.E.; Roberts, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous gradients of phosphorus and light were applied in experimental streams to develop quantitative relationships between these two important abiotic variables and the growth and composition of benthic microalgae. Algal biovolume and whole-stream metabolism responded hyperbolically to phosphorus enrichment, increasing approximately two-fold over the 5-300 g L-1 range of experimental phosphorus concentrations. The saturation threshold for phosphorus effects occurred at 25 g L-1 of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP). Light effects were much stronger than those of phosphorus, resulting in a nearly ten-fold increase in algal biovolume over the 10-400 mol photons m-2 s-1 range of experimental irradiances. Biovolume accrual was light-saturated at 100 mol photons m-2 s-1 (5 mol photons m-2 d-1). Light effects were diminished by low phosphorus concentrations, and phosphorus effects were diminished by low irradiances, but evidence of simultaneous limitation by both phosphorus and light at subsaturating irradiances was weak. Contrary to the light:nutrient hypothesis, algal phosphorus content was not significantly affected by light, even in the lowest SRP treatments. However, algal nitrogen content increased substantially at lower irradiances, and it was very highly correlated with algal chlorophyll a content. Phosphorus enrichment in streams is likely to have its largest effect at concentrations <25 g L-1 SRP, but the effect of enrichment is probably minimized when streambed irradiances are kept below 2 mol photons m-2 d-1 by riparian shading or turbidity

  11. Effects of weather conditions, light conditions, and road lighting on vehicle speed.

    PubMed

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Sjöbergh, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Light conditions are known to affect the number of vehicle accidents and fatalities but the relationship between light conditions and vehicle speed is not fully understood. This study examined whether vehicle speed on roads is higher in daylight and under road lighting than in darkness, and determined the combined effects of light conditions, posted speed limit and weather conditions on driving speed. The vehicle speed of passenger cars in different light conditions (daylight, twilight, darkness, artificial light) and different weather conditions (clear weather, rain, snow) was determined using traffic and weather data collected on an hourly basis for approximately 2 years (1 September 2012-31 May 2014) at 25 locations in Sweden (17 with road lighting and eight without). In total, the data included almost 60 million vehicle passes. The data were cleaned by removing June, July, and August, which have different traffic patterns than the rest of the year. Only data from the periods 10:00 A.M.-04:00 P.M. and 06:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. were used, to remove traffic during rush hour and at night. Multivariate adaptive regression splines was used to evaluate the overall influence of independent variables on vehicle speed and nonparametric statistical testing was applied to test for speed differences between dark-daylight, dark-twilight, and twilight-daylight, on roads with and without road lighting. The results show that vehicle speed in general depends on several independent variables. Analyses of vehicle speed and speed differences between daylight, twilight and darkness, with and without road lighting, did not reveal any differences attributable to light conditions. However, vehicle speed decreased due to rain or snow and the decrease was higher on roads without road lighting than on roads with lighting. These results suggest that the strong association between traffic accidents and darkness or low light conditions could be explained by drivers failing to adjust their

  12. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  13. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth.

  14. Effect of light wavelength on polymerization of light-cured resins.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R

    1997-06-01

    Experimental light-cured composite resins were exposed to a narrow-band light at a constant quantum number using a narrow-band interference filter. The IR spectra of the cured resin specimens were measured before and after extraction of residual monomers. Degree of conversion (DC) and polymerization conversion (PC) were calculated from these IR spectra. The light in 410-550 nm could be polymerized. With a brief exposure (5 s), DC and PC were affected by the wavelength. The effect of wavelength between 410 and 490 nm decreased with increasing duration of exposure. The most efficient wavelength was 470 nm and the most adequate wavelength was in the 450-490 nm wavelength range. The absorbance of camphorquinone strongly affected polymerization, especially during the initial stage. However, from the relationship between DC or PC and exposure energy, polymerization depended not only on the wavelength of the light, but also on the exposure energy.

  15. Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light.

    PubMed

    Inger, Richard; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Gaston, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.

  16. [Effect of Light Color Temperature on Human Concentration and Creativity].

    PubMed

    Weitbrecht, W U; Bärwolff, H; Lischke, A; Jünger, S

    2015-06-01

    Light has different biological effects depending on the color temperature and intensity. This may be the reason for its differing effects. We investigated the influence of color temperature (3000 K, 4500 K, 6000 K) under constant high intensity (1000 Lux) on concentration and creativity of 50 students and employees of the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Campus Gummersbach (age: 30.9 +/- 10.8y.). As test method we used d2-bq-test, creativity test (mean of the number of ideas on 5 themes), word test and logic test. In addition, test subjects were asked to evaluate their impression of light by means of a questionnaire. To exclude the circadian influence and learning effects on the result, we performed tests at the same time of the day using a random order of color temperature. We found that creativity was better under warm light (3000 K) than under colder light (4500 K, 6000 K). Concentration was best under cold light (6000 K). Under the same light intensity conditions, subjects judged blue light (6000 K) to be brighter than red light (3000 K).

  17. Potential Biological and Ecological Effects of Flickering Artificial Light

    PubMed Central

    Inger, Richard; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered. PMID:24874801

  18. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  19. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  20. The Effectiveness of Light Shelf in Tropical Urban Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binarti, Floriberta; Dewi, Sinta

    2016-12-01

    Light shelf was developed to create uniform indoor illuminance. However, in hot climates the unshaded clerestory above the shelf transmits high solar heat gain. In dense urban context, these advantages and disadvantages might vary regarding the context and position of the fenestration. This study employed an integrated energy simulation software to investigate the effectiveness of light shelf application in a tropical urban context in terms of building energy consumption. Radiance and EnergyPlus based simulations performed the effects of urban canyon aspect ratio and external surface albedo on the daylighting performances, space cooling load, as well as the lighting energy consumption of the building equipped with lightshelves in 2 humid tropical cities. Comparison of the energy performances of 3 fenestration systems, i.e. fenestration without any shading device, with overhangs, and with light shelves, yielded some recommendations concerning the best application of light shelf on the certain floor levels and aspect ratio of the urban context.

  1. Chemical leasing business models: a contribution to the effective risk management of chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Cornelia; Moser, Frank

    2007-08-01

    Chemicals indisputably contribute greatly to the well-being of modern societies. Apart from such benefits, however, chemicals often pose serious threats to human health and the environment when improperly handled. Therefore, the European Commission has proposed a regulatory framework for the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) that requires companies using chemicals to gather pertinent information on the properties of these substances. In this article, we argue that the crucial aspect of this information management may be the honesty and accuracy of the transfer of relevant knowledge from the producer of a chemical to its user. This may be particularly true if the application of potentially hazardous chemicals is not part of the user's core competency. Against this background, we maintain that the traditional sales concept provides no incentives for transferring this knowledge. The reason is that increased user knowledge of a chemical's properties may raise the efficiency of its application. That is, excessive and unnecessary usage will be eliminated. This, in turn, would lower the amount of chemicals sold and in competitive markets directly decrease profits of the producer. Through the introduction of chemical leasing business models, we attempt to present a strategy to overcome the incentive structure of classical sales models, which is counterproductive for the transfer of knowledge. By introducing two models (a Model A that differs least and a Model B that differs most from traditional sales concepts), we demonstrate that chemical leasing business models are capable of accomplishing the goal of Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals: to effectively manage the risk of chemicals by reducing the total quantity of chemicals used, either by a transfer of applicable knowledge from the lessor to the lessee (Model A) or by efficient application of the chemical by the lessor him/herself (Model B).

  2. Role of the retinal detector array in perceiving the superposition effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2006-08-01

    The perception of light in nature comes through the photopigment molecules of our retina. The objective of this paper is to relate our modern understanding of the quantum mechanical chemical processes in the retinal molecules with our observation of superposition ("interference") fringes due to multiple light beams. The issue of "interference" is important for two subtle reasons. First, we do not perceive light except though the response of the light detecting molecules. Second, EM fields do not operate on each other to create the "interference" (superposition) effects. When the intrinsic molecular properties of a detector allows it to respond simultaneously to all the superposed light beams on them, they sum the effects and report the corresponding "fringes" of superposition. In the human eye the "seeing" (or perception) is initiated by photo-isomerization of retinal, the chromophore of the opsin molecule. There exists several orders of magnitude difference between the characteristic times for the molecular processes of light absorption and the visual signal generation through the photochemical cascade. This allows us to function in the daily chores of walking and visual identification of objects and enjoy the beauty of the natural sceneries even though the retinal layer is bombarded simultaneously by innumerable beams of light with same and different frequencies, which will normally produce a flood of electronic "white noise" over a very wide range of temporal frequencies, namely the heterodyne beat signal. How do the eyes completely suppress this wide range of heterodyne beat signal?

  3. Chemically Tunable, All-Inorganic-Based White-Light Emitting 0D-1D Heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Shiyu; Zhou, Yuchen; Zou, Shihui; ...

    2017-08-21

    In this study, we initially created one-dimensional (1D) Mn2+-doped ZnS (ZnS: Mn) nanowires (NWs) with a unique optical signature. Specifically, these nanostructures coupled (i) ZnS defect-related self-activated emission spanning from wavelengths of 400 nm to 500 nm with (ii) Mn2+ dopant-induced emission centered at ~580 nm. These doped ZnS nanostructures were initially fabricated for the first time via a template-based co-precipitation approach followed by a post-synthesis annealing process. We subsequently formed novel 1D - zero-dimensional (0D) heterostructures incorporating ZnS: Mn NWs and AET (2-amino-ethanethiol) - CdSe quantum dots (QDs) by assembling annealed ZnS: Mn NWs with AET- capped CdSe QDsmore » as building blocks via a simple technique, involving physical sonication and stirring. Optical analyses of our heterostructures were consistent with charge (hole) and energy transfer-induced quenching of ZnS self-activated emission coupled with hole transfer-related quenching of Mn2+ emission by the QDs. The CdSe QD emission itself was impacted by competing charge (electron) and energy transfer processes occurring between the underlying ZnS host and the immobilized CdSe QDs. Chromaticity analysis revealed the significance of controlling both QD coverage density and Mn2+ dopant ratios in predictably influencing the observed color of our all-inorganic heterostructures. For example, white-light emitting behavior was especially prominent in composites, simultaneously characterized by (i) a 2.22% Mn2+ doping level and (ii) a molar compositional ratio of [ZnS: Mn2+]: [AET-capped CdSe QDs]) of 1: 1.5. Moreover, using these independent chemical ‘knobs’, we have been able to reliably tune for a significant shift within our composites from ‘cold-white’ (9604 K) to ‘warm-white’ (4383 K) light emission.« less

  4. Demonstrating the Effects of Light Quality on Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitesell, J. H.; Garcia, Maria

    1977-01-01

    Describes a lab demonstration that illustrates the effect of different colors or wavelengths of visible light on plant growth and development. This demonstration is appropriate for use in college biology, botany, or plant physiology courses. (HM)

  5. Demonstrating the Effects of Light Quality on Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitesell, J. H.; Garcia, Maria

    1977-01-01

    Describes a lab demonstration that illustrates the effect of different colors or wavelengths of visible light on plant growth and development. This demonstration is appropriate for use in college biology, botany, or plant physiology courses. (HM)

  6. Effect of light on tuberculin purified protein derivative solutions.

    PubMed

    Landi, S; Held, H R

    1975-01-01

    The effect of light on the biologic potency of tuberculin purified protein derivative solutions at the concentrations commonly used in tuberculin skin testing programs in human and veterinary medicin was studied. Guinea pigs sensitized with bacille Calmette-Guerin were used to evaluate the potency of these solutions after exposure to light. The biologic potencies of solutions dispensed in colorless glass vials and exposed to daylight, fluorescent light, and ultraviolet light (366 nm) decreased significantly when compared to those of control solutions kept in the dark; solutions exposed to light assumed a deep brown color, whereas control solutions remained unaltered. The percentage loss of biologic potency decreased, whereas the absolute loss of potency, i.e., the loss expressed in tuberculin units, increased with tuberculin purified protein derivative concentration. In addition, after exposure to ultravoilet and, to a lesser degree, fluorescent light, the rubber stoppers of the colorless glass vials became sticky and adhered tightly to the glass. By contrast, the biologic potency of identical solutions dispensed in amber glass vials did not decrease significantly during 1 year of exposure to fluorescent or ultraviolet light. The solutions remained unaltered, and the rubber stoppers from all of the amber vials, whether exposed or not exposed to light, were not adversely affected. It is recommended that for storage of tuberculin the use of colorless glass or other containers that transmit ultraviolet light be discontinued.

  7. The NMR Chemical Shift: - and Intermolecular Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, Angel Cagandahan

    1992-01-01

    Gas phase NMR measurements were performed to provide a more accurate description of the shielding. These experiments were aimed to provide the finer details of shielding: its dependence on the geometry of the molecule and intermolecular factors. Together with these experiments were ab initio calculations of the shielding designed to deepen our understanding of how the shielding is affected by the internal motions of the molecule as well as interactions among the molecules. The exceptional cases of ^{15 }N in NH_3 and ^{31}P in PH_3 were rigorously studied. The deuterium-induced isotope shifts were found to be dominated by contributions arising from bond extension. The temperature dependence is found to be a combination of contributions coming from centrifugal stretching and bond angle distortion. These cases were compared with ^{13}C in CH_4 and ^{17 }O in H_2O revealing some general characteristics of shielding surfaces. As a model for the intermolecular shift for rare gas atoms, the argon dimer was used. Through a scaling scheme, measured second virial coefficients of the shielding of ^{129}Xe in various collision partners were satisfactorily reproduced from the ab initio shielding function of the argon dimer. The intermolecular shielding function also helped in interpreting gas-to-solution shifts of rare gases and the ^ {129}Xe NMR results from adsorption studies. Lastly, an attempt was made to develop a theory that would explain both intramolecular and intermolecular effects on the chemical shifts. It was discovered that a general shape for the shielding function was possible.

  8. The investigation of chemical structure of coal macerals via transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuguang, Sun

    2005-11-01

    The Late Permian coals from South China are characterized by high content of the unique maceral "barkinite" and elemental hydrogen, typically produce high yields of tar, and exhibit significant oil-producing potential. "Barkinite" has been identified as suberinite for a long time, but now many Chinese workers have concluded that "barkinite" is not suberinite, rather it is a distinct maceral. The term "barkinite" was formally certified and named by the State Bureau of Technical Supervision of PR China in 1991, 1995, and 1999, however, it has not been recognized as a scientific term by international coal geologists and the ICCP. Transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy and curve-fitting analysis were used to investigate the chemical structure of "barkinite"; at the same time, parallel studies were also carried out on vitrinite, fusinite, and sporinite. In comparison with other maceral types, the micro-FT-IR spectra of "barkinite" are characterized by very strong intensities of aliphatic CH x stretching vibrations at 3000-2800 cm -1 and deformations at 1460-1450 cm -1, less intense bands from aromatic C dbnd C ring stretching at 1610-1600 cm -1 and aromatic CH out-of-plane deformations at 900-700 cm -1. The aliphatic side-chains in the molecular structure of "barkinite" are longer and less branched. In addition, there also appear intense aliphatic ether C sbnd O sbnd C and alcohol C sbnd O stretching bands at 1100-1000 cm -1, notable aromatic CH stretching vibrations at 3050-3030 cm -1, weak OH stretching bands of water in the 3600-3200 cm -1 range, and rare acid C dbnd O group absorption at 1740-1700 cm -1. Collectively the IR spectral characteristics indicate that "barkinite" is composed of great numbers of long chain aliphatics, a fewer of aromatics and rare of oxygenate components. The chemical structure of "barkinite" show that the high tar yields and the relatively high oil-producing potential of the Late Permian coals from South China are attributable to the

  9. Effect of light source and regimen on growing broilers.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; Robinzon, B; Rosenstrauch, A

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different light sources and light schedules on the growth and quality of commercial broilers. In each experiment 810 broiler chicks were divided into 3 groups, 3 replicates per group. All were reared at 20 lux. Body weight and food consumption were recorded weekly. Experiment 1. Birds were reared under 3 light sources: incandescent light bulb, warm-white fluorescent light tube or warm-white mini-fluorescent light bulb. Experiment 2. Birds were reared on 3 light schedules. 23 h light and 1 h dark (23L: 1D) throughout; an increasing light schedule with initial 23L:1D then 8L: 16D increasing daylight gradually to 16L:8D or an intermittently increasing daylight schedule (16:8P) where light and dark periods were shorter but portioned to achieve the same total hours per day up to 16L:8D. Broilers reared under mini-fluorescent light bulb were heavier than those under fluorescent tubes or incandescent bulbs by 49 d. Until 42 d of age, photoperiod had no effect on growth. However, at 49 d broilers reared under 16:8P and 16L:8D regimens were heavier than those or 23L:1D. At 42 d, female broilers on 23L:1D, were heavier than those on 16L:8D and 16:8P. Mortality was higher in groups on 23L:1D than on 16L:8D on 16:8P. At 49 d incidence of leg condemnation was higher in the 16:8P group. However, skin damage was lower in this group than in those on 23L: 1D and 16L:8D.

  10. Visible-light sensitization of TiO2 photocatalysts via wet chemical N-doping for the degradation of dissolved organic compounds in wastewater treatment: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Jia, Baoping; Wang, Qiuze; Dionysiou, Dionysois

    2015-05-01

    Increased pollution of ground and surface water and emerging new micropollutants from a wide variety of industrial, municipal, and agricultural sources has increased demand on the development of innovative new technologies and materials whereby challenges associated with the provision of safe potable water can be addressed. Heterogeneous photocatalysis using visible-light sensitized TiO2 photocatalysts has attracted a lot of attention as it can effectively remove dissolved organic compound in water without generating harmful by-products. On this note, recent progress on visible-light sensitive TiO2 synthesis via wet chemical N-doping method is reviewed. In a typical visible-light sensitive TiO2 preparation via wet chemical methods, the chemical (e.g., N-doping content and states) and morphological properties (e.g., particle size, surface area, and crystal phase) of TiO2 in as-prepared resultants are sensitively dependent on many experimental variables during the synthesis. This has also made it very difficult to provide a universal guidance at this stage with a certainty for each variable of N-doping preparation. Instead of one-factor-at-a-time style investigation, a statistically valid parameter optimization investigation for general optima of photocatalytic activity will be certainly useful. Optimization of the preparation technique is envisaged to be beneficial to many environmental applications, i.e., dissolved organic compounds removal in wastewater treatment.

  11. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2).

  12. Advanced Strategies for Outdoor LED Lighting Applications and Technologies to Curtail Regional Light Pollution Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrad, Christian Karl; Benya, James R.

    2015-08-01

    LED lighting systems for outdoor lighting applications continue to evolve as do strategies to mitigate related effects upon regional astronomical and ecological assets. The improving availability and relative lumen-per-watt efficiencies of blue-suppressed low correlated color temperature emitters, narrow band amber, phosphor converted amber, and various combinations of broadband emitters and sub-550NM and sub-500NM filters allow for a wide palette of choices to be assessed to suit site-specific and task-specific lighting needs. In addition to static spectral content options, readily available luminaire designs also include precise geometric beam shape selections and adaptive controls to include dimming, dynamic spectral shifting, motion detection, and dynamic beam shaping to minimize total environmental lumen emissions throughout the course of the nighttime hours.Regional and international light pollution mitigation regulations will also be briefly addressed in the context of luminaire shielding and spectral content control efforts to better protect human quality of life issues as well as astronomical and ecological interests.The presentation will include numerous spectral content graphs for various luminaire options as well as project-specific case studies to document comparisons of legacy lighting systems versus high-performance LED systems with regard to total lumen emissions, skyglow contributions, energy efficiency, and end-user satisfaction with the installed LED lighting systems. Physical samples of various luminaires will also be available for hands-on assessments.

  13. Effects of exothermic chemical reaction on the photoacoustic effect from particulate suspensions.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Jung; Wu, Binbin; Diebold, Gerald J

    2011-03-28

    Irradiation of chemically reactive particulate suspensions by high power, pulsed laser radiation initiates reactions at the sites of the particles so that besides the absorbed optical energy, chemical energy is liberated. In addition to the release of chemical energy, chemical reaction can result in gas production both of which result in enhancement in the amplitude of the photoacoustic effect. Here we report photoacoustic and transient grating experiments with colloidal C in mixtures of H(2)O(2) with H(2)O. The inclusion of H(2)O(2) in an aqueous C suspension changes the normally endothermic reaction of C with H(2)O into the highly exothermic reaction of C with H(2)O(2) leading to both an enhanced photoacoustic effect and an increase in light emission from the suspension. As well, laser-initiated exothermic reactions in suspensions of C with CH(3)NO(2) and particulate Hg(CNO)(2) in H(2)O are shown to result in greatly enhanced photoacoustic signal amplitudes.

  14. Deep brain light stimulation effects on glutamate and dopamine concentration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Shih-Shian; Liu, Janelle; Chen, Shih-How; Chio, Chung-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Compared to deep brain electrical stimulation, which has been applied to treating pathological brain diseases, little work has been done on the effect of deep brain light stimulation. A fiber-coupled laser stimulator at 840 nm wavelength and 130 Hz pulse repetition rate is developed in this work for deep brain light stimulation in a rat model. Concentration changes in glutamate and dopamine in the striatum are observed using a microdialysis probe when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at various optical power levels. Experimental results show that light stimulation causes the concentration of glutamate to decrease while that of dopamine is increased. This suggests that deep brain light stimulation of the STN is a promising therapeutic strategy for dopamine-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The stimulator developed for this work is useful for deep brain light stimulation in biomedical research.

  15. Contraction stress and bond strength to dentinfor compatible and incompatible combinations of bonding systems and chemical and light-cured core build-up resin composites.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Peter B; de Gee, Anton J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; El Zohairy, Ahmed A; Feilzer, Albert J

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that adhesives containing acidic monomers combined with composites can adversely effect the polymerization reaction producing low bond strengths. This phenomenon may also occur in making composite build-ups, jeopardizing one of the key factors for a successful core build-up restoration. The aim of this study was to investigate the contraction stress development and bond strength to dentin of core build-up resin composites combined with adhesives of various acidities. In addition the hypothesis tested was that light irradiation through chemical-cured composites during curing does not influence contraction stress or bond strength to dentin. The chemical-cured (Clearfil Core) and light-cured (Clearfil Photo Core) core build-up resin composites were combined with two light-cured adhesives, Clearfil SE Bond (pH=1.8) and One-Step Bond (pH=4.3) and two dual-cured adhesives, Clearfil Photo Bond (pH=2.5) and All-Bond 2 (pH=6.1). Contraction stress development (at C=3) was determined for a period of 30 min in a universal testing machine where the opposing bonding surfaces were glass and dentin. After the 30 min period, the specimens were loaded in tension to determine the bond strength to dentin. To test the hypothesis, the combinations of the chemical-cured composites with the four bonding systems were also light irradiated for 40s right at the start of curing. For all composite-adhesive combinations tested, the adhesion to dentin resisted the developing polymerization contraction stresses. Both, dentin as a substrate to bond at and the use of adhesives, were showed to play an important role in keeping the contraction stresses low. The chemical-cured composite (Clearfil Core) combined with the light-cured adhesive SE Bond (pH=1.8) showed for both contraction stress and bond strength significant lower values than the other combinations. The hypothesis was accepted for combinations of the chemical-cured composite with All-Bond 2 and One-Step Bond

  16. GaN nanorod light emitting diodes with suspended graphene transparent electrodes grown by rapid chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kun; Xu, Chen Deng, Jun; Zhu, Yanxu; Guo, Weiling; Mao, Mingming; Xun, Meng; Chen, Maoxing; Zheng, Lei; Xie, Yiyang; Sun, Jie

    2013-11-25

    Ordered and dense GaN light emitting nanorods are studied with polycrystalline graphene grown by rapid chemical vapor deposition as suspended transparent electrodes. As the substitute of indium tin oxide, the graphene avoids complex processing to fill up the gaps between nanorods and subsequent surface flattening and offers high conductivity to improve the carrier injection. The as-fabricated devices have 32% improvement in light output power compared to conventional planar GaN-graphene diodes. The suspended graphene remains electrically stable up to 300 °C in air. The graphene can be obtained at low cost and high efficiency, indicating its high potential in future applications.

  17. Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, In Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-09-28

    Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids highly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation are synthesized by self-assembly between oppositely charged 2D nanosheets of Zn-Cr-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Cr-LDH) and layered titanium oxide. The layer-by-layer ordering of two kinds of 2D nanosheets is evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution-transmission electron microscopy. Upon the interstratification process, the original in-plane atomic arrangements and electronic structures of the component nanosheets remain intact. The obtained heterolayered nanohybrids show a strong absorption of visible light and a remarkably depressed photoluminescence signal, indicating an effective electronic coupling between the two component nanosheets. The self-assembly between 2D inorganic nanosheets leads to the formation of highly porous stacking structure, whose porosity is controllable by changing the ratio of layered titanate/Zn-Cr-LDH. The resultant heterolayered nanohybrids are fairly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation with a rate of ∼1.18 mmol h(-1) g(-1), which is higher than the O(2) production rate (∼0.67 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) by the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH material, that is, one of the most effective visible light photocatalysts for O(2) production, under the same experimental condition. This result highlights an excellent functionality of the Zn-Cr-LDH-layered titanate nanohybrids as efficient visible light active photocatalysts. Of prime interest is that the chemical stability of the Zn-Cr-LDH is significantly improved upon the hybridization, a result of the protection of the LDH lattice by highly stable titanate layer. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the layer-by-layer-ordered assembly between inorganic 2D nanosheets is quite effective not only in improving the photocatalytic activity of the component semiconductors but also in synthesizing novel porous LDH-based hybrid materials with improved chemical

  18. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring.

  19. Early Birds by Light at Night: Effects of Light Color and Intensity on Daily Activity Patterns in Blue Tits.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maaike; Caro, Samuel P; Gienapp, Phillip; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Visser, Marcel E

    2017-08-01

    Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of green, red, or white light at night. Birds advanced their onset of activity in the morning under all light colors but more under red and white light than under green light. Offset of activity was slightly delayed in all light colors. The total activity over a 24-h period did not change but birds moved a part of their daily activity into the night. Since the effect of red and white lights are comparable, we tested the influence of light intensity in a follow-up experiment, where we compared the activity of the birds under different intensities of green and white light only. While in the higher range of intensities, the effects of white and green light were comparable; at lower intensities, green light had a less disturbing effect as compared with white light on daily rhythms in blue tits. Our results show that the extent of this disturbance can be mitigated by modulating the spectral characteristics and intensity of outdoor lighting, which is now feasible through the use of LED lighting.

  20. Chemical biology based on target-selective degradation of proteins and carbohydrates using light-activatable organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-05-01

    Proteins and carbohydrates play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes, including serious diseases. The development of novel and innovative methods for selective control of specific proteins and carbohydrates functions has attracted much attention in the field of chemical biology. In this account article, the development of novel chemical tools, which can degrade target proteins and carbohydrates by irradiation with a specific wavelength of light under mild conditions without any additives, is introduced. This novel class of photochemical agents promise bright prospects for finding not only molecular-targeted bioprobes for understanding of the structure-activity relationships of proteins and carbohydrates but also novel therapeutic drugs targeting proteins and carbohydrates.

  1. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  2. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  3. Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on adipocyte development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obesity is a growing concern in the US population. Current interest is high in the role played by environmental factors called obesogens that may contribute to obesity through developmental exposure. One class of potential obesogens is the family of perfluorinated chemicals used ...

  4. Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on adipocyte development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obesity is a growing concern in the US population. Current interest is high in the role played by environmental factors called obesogens that may contribute to obesity through developmental exposure. One class of potential obesogens is the family of perfluorinated chemicals used ...

  5. Computer simulation of bulk and surface chemical diffusion of light atoms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Murch, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The lattice gas as a model for interstitial solid solution and adsorption systems is reviewed with emphasis on the generation of ordered structures. Then, as a prelude to the main discourse on chemical diffusion, the tracer diffusion coefficient is discussed in conjunction with the presentation of Monte Carlo results. Next, chemical diffusion is treated in detail with emphasis on the Danken equation. Monte Carlo results are then presented for the chemical diffusion coefficient. The large maximum in the chemical diffusivity observed within the ordered phase is traced back to the very strong driving force provided by the chemical potential derivative.

  6. Effects of stocking density, light and perches on broiler growth.

    PubMed

    Velo, Ramón; Ceular, Angel

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of stocking density, light intensity and light color on broiler growth. The experiment consisted of four 35-day phases during each of which 320 chickens were surveyed. The research was performed at stocking densities of four and six birds/m(2) . Illuminances of 15 and 30 lx were obtained through commercial lamps with 4000 K and 6000 K color temperatures. Lighting was used 17 h a day, between 06.00 and 23.00 hours (17 L:7 D). The results showed a decrease in body, carcass, breast and thighs weight (P < 0.05) with the increase in stocking density. Body weight decreased by 10.5% and carcass weight decreased by 9.4% at six birds/m(2) stocking density. Contrastingly, no differences were found for the tested light colors. Increasing illuminance from 15 to 30 lx caused a 1.9% decrease in body weight. The analysis of the effect of perches revealed that using perches significantly increased body (2.5%) and breast weight (11.8%). The interactions between light intensity or color and stocking density and between light intensity and light color were analyzed.

  7. Effect of Pulsing in Low-Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. PMID:20662021

  8. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten.

  9. Engineering a Chemical Switch into the Light-driven Proton Pump Proteorhodopsin by Cysteine Mutagenesis and Thiol Modification.

    PubMed

    Harder, Daniel; Hirschi, Stephan; Ucurum, Zöhre; Goers, Roland; Meier, Wolfgang; Müller, Daniel J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-25

    For applications in synthetic biology, for example, the bottom-up assembly of biomolecular nanofactories, modules of specific and controllable functionalities are essential. Of fundamental importance in such systems are energizing modules, which are able to establish an electrochemical gradient across a vesicular membrane as an energy source for powering other modules. Light-driven proton pumps like proteorhodopsin (PR) are excellent candidates for efficient energy conversion. We have extended the versatility of PR by implementing an on/off switch based on reversible chemical modification of a site-specifically introduced cysteine residue. The position of this cysteine residue in PR was identified by structure-based cysteine mutagenesis combined with a proton-pumping assay using E. coli cells overexpressing PR and PR proteoliposomes. The identified PR mutant represents the first light-driven proton pump that can be chemically switched on/off depending on the requirements of the molecular system.

  10. Effects of various LED light wavelengths and light intensity supply strategies on synthetic high-strength wastewater purification by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cheng; Zhao, Yongjun; Zheng, Zheng; Luo, Xingzhang

    2013-09-01

    Chemical fertilizer agricultural wastewater is a typical high-strength wastewater that has dramatically triggered numerous environmental problems in China. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system used in this study can effectively decontaminate the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater under an optimum light wavelength and light intensity supply strategy. The descending order of both the dry weight for C. vulgaris reproduction and wastewater nutrient removal efficiency is red > white > yellow > purple > blue > green, which indicates that red light is the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, rather than constant light, optimal light intensity is used for the incremental light intensity strategy. The phases for the optimal light intensity supply strategy are as follows: Phase 1 from 0 to 48 h at 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1); Phase 2 from 48 to 96 h at 1,200 μmol m(-2) s(-1); and Phase 3 from 96 to 144 h at 1,600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Additionally, the optimal cultivation time is 144 h.

  11. Blue light dose–responses of leaf photosynthesis, morphology, and chemical composition of Cucumis sativus grown under different combinations of red and blue light

    PubMed Central

    Hogewoning, Sander W.; Trouwborst, Govert; Maljaars, Hans; Poorter, Hendrik; van Ieperen, Wim; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The blue part of the light spectrum has been associated with leaf characteristics which also develop under high irradiances. In this study blue light dose–response curves were made for the photosynthetic properties and related developmental characteristics of cucumber leaves that were grown at an equal irradiance under seven different combinations of red and blue light provided by light-emitting diodes. Only the leaves developed under red light alone (0% blue) displayed dysfunctional photosynthetic operation, characterized by a suboptimal and heterogeneously distributed dark-adapted Fv/Fm, a stomatal conductance unresponsive to irradiance, and a relatively low light-limited quantum yield for CO2 fixation. Only 7% blue light was sufficient to prevent any overt dysfunctional photosynthesis, which can be considered a qualitatively blue light effect. The photosynthetic capacity (Amax) was twice as high for leaves grown at 7% blue compared with 0% blue, and continued to increase with increasing blue percentage during growth measured up to 50% blue. At 100% blue, Amax was lower but photosynthetic functioning was normal. The increase in Amax with blue percentage (0–50%) was associated with an increase in leaf mass per unit leaf area (LMA), nitrogen (N) content per area, chlorophyll (Chl) content per area, and stomatal conductance. Above 15% blue, the parameters Amax, LMA, Chl content, photosynthetic N use efficiency, and the Chl:N ratio had a comparable relationship as reported for leaf responses to irradiance intensity. It is concluded that blue light during growth is qualitatively required for normal photosynthetic functioning and quantitatively mediates leaf responses resembling those to irradiance intensity. PMID:20504875

  12. [Thermal effects of a short light pulse on biological tissues. II. Light and heat fields].

    PubMed

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2005-01-01

    A set of heat conduction equations for a two-component medium simulating biological tissues were formulated. Their solutions were obtained, and the spatial distribution of light and temperature over tissue depth at different times after irradiation by a short light pulse was studied. The local absorption of light by blood vessels and the influence of this effect on the optical parameters of the medium, a more intense heating of blood as compared with its surrounding tissue, heat exchange between them, and heat transfer at the interface with different environments were accounted for. The solutions are expressed via characteristic times of the respective thermal processes to enable one to easily and vividly analyze the features of tissue heating and the influence of optical and thermal parameters on the temperature distributions of the components. The calculations are illustrated by examples.

  13. Shining light on memory: Effects of bright light on working memory performance.

    PubMed

    Huiberts, L M; Smolders, K C H J; de Kort, Y A W

    2015-11-01

    This study examined whether diurnal non-image forming (NIF) effects of illuminance level on cognitive task performance depend on task difficulty and time of day. We employed a balanced crossover design with two 60-min sessions of 200 vs. 1000 lux at eye level. Digit-span task difficulty was manipulated within subjects (forward (FDST) vs. backward (BDST) digit-span task), n-back task difficulty was manipulated between subjects (n=1, 2, or 3). Bright light exposure improved FDST performance during the final measurement block, especially in the afternoon. In contrast, BDST performance deteriorated slightly under bright light in the afternoon. Two-back performance was significantly worse under bright light in the afternoon, while no effect of illuminance level was found on 3-back performance. Thus, the more difficult BDST was affected differently by light intensity as compared to the easier FDST. N-back accuracy, however, did not confirm this role of task difficulty. Future studies should investigate whether similar results hold for other types of tasks and how other variables (e.g., time of day, physiological arousal, or other task characteristics) may influence the direction and magnitude of NIF effects on performance.

  14. The effects of light on man and other mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The present article describes the best-studied extravisual effects of visible and ultraviolet light on humans and other mammals. It also considers the possible biological consequences to man of living in artificially lighted environments that differ significantly from the milieu in which he evolved. Cumulative evidence favors the beneficial influences of sunlight: vitamin D activation, plasma bilirubin elimination, inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis, etc.

  15. The effects of light on man and other mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The present article describes the best-studied extravisual effects of visible and ultraviolet light on humans and other mammals. It also considers the possible biological consequences to man of living in artificially lighted environments that differ significantly from the milieu in which he evolved. Cumulative evidence favors the beneficial influences of sunlight: vitamin D activation, plasma bilirubin elimination, inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis, etc.

  16. Chemicals of military deployments: revisiting Gulf War Syndrome in light of new information.

    PubMed

    Brimfield, A A

    2012-01-01

    Despite the amount of hard work that has gone into elucidating a toxicological basis for Gulf War Illness, we do not appear to have reached a mechanistic understanding. Investigation of long-term low-level exposure as a basis does not seem to have provided an answer. Nor does the deployment-related toxic soup idea, where exposure to a mixture of toxic chemicals not usually encountered in the same physical vicinity, seems to have explained the symptoms developed by Gulf War Veterans. The idea that an overabundance of CNS acetylcholine leftover from excessive cholinesterase inhibition is at the basis of this syndrome is intellectually appealing and offers a level of neurochemical complexity that may be just beyond the reach of our technical understanding. But no one has yet assembled a coherent mechanism from it either. It seems reasonable that chemical warfare agents were involved. They were not included in early work because it was felt that the toxicant plumes produced during the destruction of stockpiled Iraqi chemical weapons had not been large enough to cause an exposure of US forces and those of our allies. That misconception was disproven, and it is now accepted that people could very well have been exposed to low levels of massive quantities of sarin, cyclosarin, and sulfur mustard. It also seems reasonable that excess acetylcholine or neurological consequences of its presence that we do not fully understand were involved. The combination of nerve agents and the insecticidal anticholinesterases plus the pyridostigmine bromide given prophylactically were probably sufficient to cause the problem. However, the most notable thing is the result of recent work on the toxic mechanism of sulfur mustard showing that it can inhibit the microsomal electron transport chain as a result of sulfonium ion reduction to carbon free radicals by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. This information was not available during the work on Gulf War Illness. So this provides an

  17. Variability in Leaf Morphology and Chemical Composition as a Function of Canopy Light Environment in Coexisting Deciduous Trees.

    PubMed

    Niinemets; Kull; Tenhunen

    1999-09-01

    Morphology, chemical composition, and photosynthetic capacity of leaf laminas were investigated in Populus tremula L. and Tilia cordata Mill. along a canopy light gradient. Variables determining the thickness of boundary layer for heat and water exchange at a given wind speed-effective leaf width (Ww) and length (Wd)-scaled positively with daily integrated quantum flux density averaged over the season (Qint, mol m-2 d-1) in T. cordata, but Wd decreased and Ww was constant with increasing Qint in P. tremula, bringing about a moderately improved capacity for convective cooling at greater irradiances in the latter species. Foliar stable carbon isotope discrimination (Delta) decreased with increasing Qint, demonstrating that, possibly because of more severe foliar water stress, leaves operated at a lower intercellular CO2 concentration in the upper canopy. Further analysis of foliar characteristics provided additional evidence of the interaction between water stress and Qint. Leaf dry matter content and both components of lamina dry mass per area (MA)-lamina thickness and density (dry mass per unit volume, rhoB)-increased with increasing Qint in both species. The rhoB and lamina dry matter content were also positively related to lamina carbon concentration, variability in which along the canopy was related to changes in carbon-rich lignin concentration. Since both increases in lamina density and lignin concentration improve leaf tolerance of low-water potentials, these foliar modifications were interpreted as indicative of acclimation to enhanced water limitations in high light. For the whole material, foliar nitrogen concentrations decreased with increasing rhoB, suggesting that an improvement of foliar mechanical strength may result in declining foliar assimilative potential. However, foliar photosynthetic electron transport capacity per unit area increased with increasing rhoB, possibly because increases in rhoB with light are not only attributable to greater cell

  18. Evolution of light hydrocarbon gases in subsurface processes: Constraints from chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Nagamine, Koichiro

    1995-06-01

    The behaviour of CH 4, C 2H 6 and C 3H 8 in subsurface processes such as magma intrusion, volcanic gas discharge and natural gas generation have been examined from the viewpoint of chemical equilibrium. It seems that equilibrium among these three hydrocarbons is attainable at about 200°C. When a system at high temperatures is cooled, re-equilibration is continued until a low temperature is reached. The rate at which re-equilibration is achieved, however, steadily diminishes and, below 200°C, the reaction between the hydrocarbons stops and the gas composition at this time is frozen in, and it remains unchanged in a metastable state for a long period of geological time. Natural gas compositions from various fields have shown that, when a hydrocarbon system out of chemical equilibrium is heated, it gradually approaches equilibrium above 150°C. On the way towards equilibration, compositions of thermogenic gases apparently temporarily show a thermodynamic equilibrium constant at a temperature that is higher than the real equilibrium temperature expected from the ambient temperature of the samples; in contrast, biogenic gases indicate a lower temperature. In lower temperature regions, kinetic effects probably control the gas composition; the compositions are essentially subjected to genetic processes operating on the gases (such as pyrolysis of organic material and bacterial activity) and they fluctuate substantially. Examination of volcanic gases and pyrolysis experimental data, however, have suggested that the equilibration rate of these hydrocarbons is sluggish in comparison with that of reactive inorganic species such as H 2S and SO 2. The view presented in this study will be helpful in understanding the genetic processes that create oil and gas and the migration of these hydrocarbons and in interpreting the origins of magmatic gases.

  19. Dopamine and light: effects on facial emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Elizabeth; Tippler, Maria; Coupland, Nicholas J; Benkelfat, Chawki; Boivin, Diane B; Aan Het Rot, Marije; Leyton, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Bright light can affect mood states and social behaviours. Here, we tested potential interacting effects of light and dopamine on facial emotion recognition. Participants were 32 women with subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder tested in either a bright (3000 lux) or dim light (10 lux) environment. Each participant completed two test days, one following the ingestion of a phenylalanine/tyrosine-deficient mixture and one with a nutritionally balanced control mixture, both administered double blind in a randomised order. Approximately four hours post-ingestion participants completed a self-report measure of mood followed by a facial emotion recognition task. All testing took place between November and March when seasonal symptoms would be present. Following acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD), compared to the nutritionally balanced control mixture, participants in the dim light condition were more accurate at recognising sad faces, less likely to misclassify them, and faster at responding to them, effects that were independent of changes in mood. Effects of APTD on responses to sad faces in the bright light group were less consistent. There were no APTD effects on responses to other emotions, with one exception: a significant light × mixture interaction was seen for the reaction time to fear, but the pattern of effect was not predicted a priori or seen on other measures. Together, the results suggest that the processing of sad emotional stimuli might be greater when dopamine transmission is low. Bright light exposure, used for the treatment of both seasonal and non-seasonal mood disorders, might produce some of its benefits by preventing this effect.

  20. Two chemically distinct light-absorbing pools of urban organic aerosols: A comprehensive multidimensional analysis of trends.

    PubMed

    Paula, Andreia S; Matos, João T V; Duarte, Regina M B O; Duarte, Armando C

    2016-02-01

    The chemical and light-absorption dynamics of organic aerosols (OAs), a master variable in the atmosphere, have yet to be resolved. This study uses a comprehensive multidimensional analysis approach for exploiting simultaneously the compositional changes over a molecular size continuum and associated light-absorption (ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence) properties of two chemically distinct pools of urban OAs chromophores. Up to 45% of aerosol organic carbon (OC) is soluble in water and consists of a complex mixture of fluorescent and UV-absorbing constituents, with diverse relative abundances, hydrophobic, and molecular weight (Mw) characteristics between warm and cold periods. In contrast, the refractory alkaline-soluble OC pool (up to 18%) is represented along a similar Mw and light-absorption continuum throughout the different seasons. Results suggest that these alkaline-soluble chromophores may actually originate from primary OAs sources in the urban site. This work shows that the comprehensive multidimensional analysis method is a powerful and complementary tool for the characterization of OAs fractions. The great diversity in the chemical composition and optical properties of OAs chromophores, including both water-soluble and alkaline-soluble OC, may be an important contribution to explain the contrasting photo-reactivity and atmospheric behavior of OAs.

  1. A rule-based expert system for chemical prioritization using effects-based chemical categories.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, P K; Kolanczyk, R C; Hornung, M W; Tapper, M A; Denny, J S; Sheedy, B R; Aladjov, H

    2014-01-01

    A rule-based expert system (ES) was developed to predict chemical binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) patterned on the research approaches championed by Gilman Veith to whom this article and journal issue are dedicated. The ERES was built to be mechanistically transparent and meet the needs of a specific application, i.e. predict for all chemicals within two well-defined inventories (industrial chemicals used as pesticide inerts and antimicrobial pesticides). These chemicals all lack structural features associated with high affinity binders and thus any binding should be low affinity. Similar to the high-quality fathead minnow database upon which Veith QSARs were built, the ERES was derived from what has been termed gold standard data, systematically collected in assays optimized to detect even low affinity binding and maximizing confidence in the negatives determinations. The resultant logic-based decision tree ERES, determined to be a robust model, contains seven major nodes with multiple effects-based chemicals categories within each. Predicted results are presented in the context of empirical data within local chemical structural groups facilitating informed decision-making. Even using optimized detection assays, the ERES applied to two inventories of >600 chemicals resulted in only ~5% of the chemicals predicted to bind ER.

  2. Aluminum-coated hollow glass fibers for ArF-excimer laser light fabricated by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Y; Miyagi, M

    1999-04-20

    A hollow fiber composed of a glass capillary tube and a metal thin film upon the inside of the tube is proposed for the delivery of ArF-excimer laser light. From theoretical analysis, aluminum is chosen as the metal layer. A thin aluminum film is deposited by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition, with dimethylethylamine alane employed as the source material. Measured loss spectra in vacuum-ultraviolet and ultraviolet regions and losses for ArF-excimer laser light show the low-loss property of the aluminum-coated fiber at the 193-nm wavelength of ArF-excimer laser light. The straight loss of the 1-m long, 1-mm-bore fiber is 1.0 dB.

  3. Aluminum-Coated Hollow Glass Fibers for ArF-Excimer Laser Light Fabricated by Metallorganic Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    1999-04-01

    A hollow fiber composed of a glass capillary tube and a metal thin film upon the inside of the tube is proposed for the delivery of ArF-excimer laser light. From theoretical analysis, aluminum is chosen as the metal layer. A thin aluminum film is deposited by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition, with dimethylethylamine alane employed as the source material. Measured loss spectra in vacuum-ultraviolet and ultraviolet regions and losses for ArF-excimer laser light show the low-loss property of the aluminum-coated fiber at the 193-nm wavelength of ArF-excimer laser light. The straight loss of the 1-m long, 1-mm-bore fiber is 1.0 dB.

  4. Motorcycle conspicuity: effects of age and daytime running lights.

    PubMed

    Smither, Janan Al-Awar; Torrez, Lorenzo I

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated variables that may contribute to motorcycle conspicuity within a high-fidelity simulated environment. The variables included motorcycle lighting, vehicular daytime running lights (DRLs), and age of the driver of the other vehicle. Research suggests that decreased levels of conspicuity associated with riding a small two-wheeled vehicle reduce the ability of other drivers to detect and respond to that vehicle effectively. This lack of conspicuity is often responsible for the frequent injuries and fatalities incurred by motorcycle riders. The 75 participants who took part in this study watched a series of video clips of roadway traffic and were asked to indicate when they saw a hazardous situation, such as the presence of pedestrians, motorcycles, or traffic cones. Both motorcycle and following-vehicle lights were manipulated, and participant reaction times were collected and analyzed. Analyses indicated main effects for all three variables as well as interaction effects between motorcycle lighting and vehicle-following conditions. Overall, findings showed a link between DRLs and the effective detection of motorcycles and suggested that age-related changes affect the ability to detect and respond to a motorcycle effectively. Although our laboratory findings corroborated previous correlational studies, further research in real-world settings, such as those with high-density traffic or under adverse environmental conditions, needs to be conducted. Potential applications of this research include the assessment of appropriate lighting technology to enhance conspicuity of motorcycles and reduce the high rate of fatalities and injuries related to motorcycle crashes.

  5. The phantom light effects in modern car taillight combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Norbert; Klinger, Karsten; Manz, Karl; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-04-01

    There are some interfering elements, which are able to influence the signal functions of a car's rear light. One of these elements is the sensitivity to external light sources, which is able to affect the intensity of the rear lamps by the impact of direct sunrays in a flat angle. Recognition of the signals could be made more difficult or impossible. This effect is called phantom light effect. Today the regulations of the ECE do not contain these influences. To investigate the meaning of the effects to the traffic safety, there has been a test with a sun simulator. The task of this test is to measure the luminance of signals from different actual taillights with and without sunlight. Another part of the investigations are some psychophysical tests involving about 20 persons. The dimension of phantom light effects at taillights will be quantified by the analysis of the luminance pictures. With these cognitions some possibilities to reduce the phantom light effect with little changes in the optical design of taillights will be performed. One example will be shown.

  6. Diurnal Spectral Sensitivity of the Acute Alerting Effects of Light

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shadab A.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Brainard, George C.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity for the acute alerting response to nocturnal light exposure. We assessed daytime spectral sensitivity in alertness, performance, and waking electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Between-subjects (n = 8 per group). Setting: Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit. Participants: Sixteen healthy young adults (mean age ± standard deviation = 23.8 ± 2.7 y). Interventions: Equal photon density exposure (2.8 × 1013 photons/cm2/s) to monochromatic 460 nm (blue) or 555 nm (green) light for 6.5 h centered in the middle of the 16-h episode of wakefulness during the biological day. Results were compared retrospectively to 16 individuals who were administered the same light exposure during the night. Measurements and Results: Daytime and nighttime 460-nm light exposure significantly improved auditory reaction time (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and reduced attentional lapses (P < 0.05), and improved EEG correlates of alertness compared to 555-nm exposure. Whereas subjective sleepiness ratings did not differ between the two spectral conditions during the daytime (P > 0.05), 460-nm light exposure at night significantly reduced subjective sleepiness compared to 555-nm light exposure at night (P < 0.05). Moreover, nighttime 460-nm exposure improved alertness to near-daytime levels. Conclusions: The alerting effects of short-wavelength 460-nm light are mediated by counteracting both the circadian drive for sleepiness and homeostatic sleep pressure at night, but only via reducing the effects of homeostatic sleep pressure during the day. Citation: Rahman SA; Flynn-Evans EE; Aeschbach D; Brainard GC; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Diurnal spectral sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of light. SLEEP 2014;37(2):271-281. PMID:24501435

  7. Effects of light on the gravitropic response in plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Suzuki, G.; Ohgishi, M.; Saji, K.; Okada, K.

    Plants show changing of growth pattern responding to the environmental stimuli to adapt themselves to the environment. Our research purpose is to elucidate the function of genes participating in light-induced change of growth and movement in plants. By isolation and analyses of mutants showing defects in light-induced responses in model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana, genes involved in the response are identified. Previous studies reported that the negative gravitropic response in hypocotyl of Arabidopsis is suppressed by red light irradiation. We isolated a red-light hypersensitive mutant, flabby, which shows a random-hypocotyl bending by red light irradiation. The FLABBY gene encodes a protein, which is involved in the auxin transport in hypocotyls. On the other hand, our recent analysis showed that cryptochromes also induce a blue-light dependent, random-hypocotyl bending in the phototropins-defective mutants. Now we are studying on the genetic interactions between FLABBY and photoreceptors (phytochromes, cryptochromes, and phototropins). We discuss the effects of light on the gravitropic response in plants.

  8. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-12-18

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  9. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2009-04-20

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  10. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via HPLC-MS/MS quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a three stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; >70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC while the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were pre-stimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2,060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for six-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into five distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A d

  11. Nanochemistry-derived Bi2WO6 nanostructures: towards production of sustainable chemicals and fuels induced by visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Pagliaro, Mario; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2014-08-07

    Low cost and easily made bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) could be one of the key technologies to make chemicals and fuels from biomass, atmospheric carbon dioxide and water at low cost using solar radiation as an energy source. Its narrow band gap (2.8 eV) enables ideal visible light (λ > 400 nm) absorption. Yet, it is the material's shape, namely the superstructure morphology wisely created via a nanochemistry approach, which leads to better electron-hole separation and much higher photoactivity. Recent results coupled to the versatile photochemistry of this readily available semiconductor suggest that the practical application of nanochemistry-derived Bi2WO6 nanostructures for the synthesis of value-added fine chemicals and fuel production is possible. We describe progress in this important field of chemical research from a nanochemistry viewpoint, and identify opportunities for further progress.

  12. Effects of habitat light intensity on mammalian eye shape.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Lewis, Rebecca J

    2011-05-01

    Many aspects of mammalian visual anatomy vary with activity pattern, reflecting the divergent selective pressures imposed by low light and high light visual environments. However, ambient light intensity can also differ substantially between and within habitats due to differences in foliage density. We explored the effects of interhabitat and intrahabitat variation in light intensity on mammalian visual anatomy. Data on relative cornea size, activity pattern, and habitat type were collected from the literature for 209 terrestrial mammal species. In general, mammalian relative cornea size significantly varied by habitat type. In within-order and across-mammal analyses, diurnal and cathemeral mammals from forested habitats exhibited relatively larger corneas than species from more open habitats, reflecting an adaptation to increase visual sensitivity in forest species. However, in all analyses, we found no habitat-type effect in nocturnal species, suggesting that nocturnal mammals may experience selection to maximize visual sensitivity across all habitats. We also examined whether vertical strata usage affected relative cornea size in anthropoid primates. In most analyses, species occupying lower levels of forests and woodlands did not exhibit relatively larger corneas than species utilizing higher levels. Thus, unlike differences in intensity between habitat types, differences in light intensity between vertical forest strata do not appear to exert a strong selective pressure on visual morphology. These results suggest that terrestrial mammal visual systems reflect specializations for habitat variation in light intensity, and that habitat type as well as activity pattern have influenced mammalian visual evolution.

  13. Effects of continuous exposure to light on behavioral dopaminergic supersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Abílio, V C; Freitas, F M; Dolnikoff, M S; Castrucci, A M; Frussa-Filho, R

    1999-06-15

    This study examines the effects of long-term continuous exposure to light on dopaminergic supersensitivity induced by repeated treatment with haloperidol in rats. Spontaneous general activity in an open-field (SGA) and stereotyped behavior induced by apomorphine (SB-APO) or amphetamine (SB-AMP) were used as experimental parameters. Rats were allocated to four groups in each experiment: saline-treated animals kept under a 12-hour light/dark cycle (LD) or 24-hour light/light cycle (LL), and 2 mg/kg haloperidol-treated animals kept under the above cycles. Plasma corticosterone concentration was also measured by radioimmunoassay in saline-treated rats kept under a LD or LL cycle. All the behavioral parameters used showed the development of central dopaminergic supersensitivity in rats kept under both cycles. Continuous exposure to light enhanced SGA and SB-AMP in both saline- and haloperidol-treated rats, but did not modify SB-APO. Animals kept under the LL cycle presented an increased plasma corticosterone concentration. Our results suggest that continuous exposure to light leads to an increase in dopaminergic function in both normal and "supersensitive" rats. This effect seems to be mediated by a presynaptic mechanism possibly involving corticosterone actions.

  14. Photoregulation of Anthocyanin Synthesis : VIII. Effect of Light Pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, A L

    1984-06-01

    A comparative study of the spectral sensitivity of anthocyanin production in dark-grown and light-pretreated systems was carried out in Brassica oleracea L., Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Secale cereale L. and Spirodela polyrrhiza L. Light pretreatments bring about an enhancement of the inductive, red-far red reversible response in all systems, a decrease of the continuous irradiation response in cabbage, rye, and tomato seedlings, and an enhancement of the continuous irradiation response in cabbage leaf disks. Light pretreatments also bring about a marked change in the spectral sensitivity of the continuous irradiation response. The different effect of light pretreatments on the photosensitivity of the response to short and long wavelength irradiations suggests that two photoreceptors, phytochrome and cryptochrome, may be involved in the photoregulation of anthocyanin production.

  15. Algorithm to illustrate context using dynamic lighting effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Roshy M.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2007-09-01

    With the invention of Ultra-Bright LED, solid state lighting has come to something which is much more efficient and energy saving when compared to conventional incandescent or fluorescent lighting. With the use of proper driver electronics now a days it is possible to install solid state lighting systems with the cost same as that of any other lighting technology. This paper is a part of the research project we are doing in our lab, which deals with using ultra bright LEDs of different colors for lighting applications. The driver electronics are made in such a way that, the color and brightness of the lights will change according to context. For instance, if one of the users is reading a story or listening to music in a Personal Computer or in a hand held device such as a PDA, the lighting systems and the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air-conditioning) systems will change dramatically according to the content of the story or the music. The vulnerability of solid-state lighting helps to accomplish such an effect. Such a type of system will help the reader to feel the story mentally and physically as well. We developed complete driver electronics for the system using multiple microcomputers and a full software suite which uses complex algorithms to decode the context from text or music and synchronize it to lighting and HVAC information. The paper also presents some case-study statistics which shows the advantage of using the system to teach kindergarten children, deaf and dumb children and for language learning classes.

  16. Chemiluminescent Oscillating Demonstrations: The Chemical Buoy, the Lighting Wave, and the Ghostly Cylinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prypsztejn, Hernan E.; Mulford, Douglas R.; Stratton, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Oscillating reactions have been extensively used in chemical demonstrations. They involve several chemical concepts about kinetics, catalysts, and thermodynamics. The spontaneous cyclic color change of a solution is an attraction in any educational-level course. Chemiluminescent reactions are also among the most fascinating demonstrations and have…

  17. Chemiluminescent Oscillating Demonstrations: The Chemical Buoy, the Lighting Wave, and the Ghostly Cylinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prypsztejn, Hernan E.; Mulford, Douglas R.; Stratton, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Oscillating reactions have been extensively used in chemical demonstrations. They involve several chemical concepts about kinetics, catalysts, and thermodynamics. The spontaneous cyclic color change of a solution is an attraction in any educational-level course. Chemiluminescent reactions are also among the most fascinating demonstrations and have…

  18. Polyoxometalates in oxidative delignification of chemical pulps: effect on lignin

    Treesearch

    Biljana Bujanovic; Sally Ralph; Richard Reiner; Kolby Hirth; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pulps are produced by chemical delignification of lignocelluloses such as wood or annual non-woody plants. After pulping (e.g., kraft pulping), the remaining lignin is removed by bleaching to produce a high quality, bright paper. The goal of bleaching is to remove lignin from the pulp without a negative effect on the cellulose; for this reason, delignification...

  19. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  20. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  1. Modeling food matrix effects on chemical reactivity: Challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Edoardo; Oliviero, Teresa; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2017-06-29

    The same chemical reaction may be different in terms of its position of the equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamics) and its kinetics when studied in different foods. The diversity in the chemical composition of food and in its structural organization at macro-, meso-, and microscopic levels, that is, the food matrix, is responsible for this difference. In this viewpoint paper, the multiple, and interconnected ways the food matrix can affect chemical reactivity are summarized. Moreover, mechanistic and empirical approaches to explain and predict the effect of food matrix on chemical reactivity are described. Mechanistic models aim to quantify the effect of food matrix based on a detailed understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in food. Their applicability is limited at the moment to very simple food systems. Empirical modeling based on machine learning combined with data-mining techniques may represent an alternative, useful option to predict the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactivity and to identify chemical and physical properties to be further tested. In such a way the mechanistic understanding of the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactions can be improved.

  2. Observation of the geometric spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Korger, Jan; Aiello, Andrea; Chille, Vanessa; Banzer, Peter; Wittmann, Christoffer; Lindlein, Norbert; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-03-21

    The spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) is the photonic analogue of the spin Hall effect occurring for charge carriers in solid-state systems. This intriguing phenomenon manifests itself when a light beam refracts at an air-glass interface (conventional SHEL) or when it is projected onto an oblique plane, the latter effect being known as the geometric SHEL. It amounts to a polarization-dependent displacement perpendicular to the plane of incidence. In this work, we experimentally investigate the geometric SHEL for a light beam transmitted across an oblique polarizer. We find that the spatial intensity distribution of the transmitted beam depends on the incident state of polarization and its centroid undergoes a positional displacement exceeding one wavelength. This novel phenomenon is virtually independent from the material properties of the polarizer and, thus, reveals universal features of spin-orbit coupling.

  3. Effects of Irradiation on Albite's Chemical Durability.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; La Plante, Erika Callagon; Krishnan, N M Anoop; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2017-10-04

    Albite (NaAlSi3O8), a framework silicate of the plagioclase feldspar family and a common constituent of felsic rocks, is often present in the siliceous mineral aggregates that compose concrete. When exposed to radiation (e.g., in the form of neutrons) in nuclear power plants, the crystal structure of albite can undergo significant alterations. These alterations may degrade its chemical durability. Indeed, careful examinations of Ar(+)-implanted albite carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular dynamics simulations show that albite's crystal structure, upon irradiation, undergoes progressive disordering, resulting in an expansion in its molar volume (i.e., a reduction of density) and a reduction in the connectivity of its atomic network. This loss of network connectivity (i.e., rigidity) results in an enhancement of the aqueous dissolution rate of albite-measured using vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) in alkaline environments-by a factor of 20. This enhancement in the dissolution rate (i.e., reduction in chemical durability) of albite following irradiation has significant impacts on the durability of felsic rocks and of concrete containing them upon their exposure to radiation in nuclear power plant (NPP) environments.

  4. [Combined biological effect of electromagnetic fields and chemical substances (toxic)].

    PubMed

    Kamedula, M; Kamedula, T

    1996-01-01

    The authors present results of own measurements and examinations as well as the literature data on the occurrence and effect of direct, low and high frequency electromagnetic fields and chemicals. In real working conditions and in experimental conditions, the following relations can be observed: 1) concomitant occurrence of electromagnetic fields and chemicals, e.g. processes of electrolysis, inductive and dielectric heating; 2) experimental studies of combined effect of electromagnetic fields and chemicals on e.g. cancer development: 3) drug effect modified by electromagnetic fields; 4) effect of chemicals produced in materials under the influence of electromagnetic fields. There are only a few publications on medical examinations of workers exposed simultaneously to electromagnetic fields and chemicals. However, even in those reported studies, an attempt to distinguish changes in the health state due to electromagnetic fields, and due to chemicals has field. The studies of the effect of electromagnetic fields which modify the effect of carcinogenic substances have not yielded unequivocal results. Electromagnetic fields may modify significantly the effect of some psychotropic and hormonal drugs. Under the influence of pyrolisis, induced by thermal effect of electromagnetic fields, toxic substances or substances with harmful biological effect may occur in some materials.

  5. Automatic instrument for chemical processing to detect microorganism in biological samples by measuring light reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated apparatus is reported for sequentially assaying urine samples for the presence of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that comprises a rotary table which carries a plurality of sample containing vials and automatically dispenses fluid reagents into the vials preparatory to injecting a light producing luciferase-luciferin mixture into the samples. The device automatically measures the light produced in each urine sample by a bioluminescence reaction of the free bacterial adenosine triphosphate with the luciferase-luciferin mixture. The light measured is proportional to the concentration of bacterial adenosine triphosphate which, in turn, is proportional to the number of bacteria present in the respective urine sample.

  6. The Effects of CW (Chemical Warfare)-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    g-o3oi 9\\a AD- The Effects of CW-Related Che~icala onne k So1ial Behavior and Performancec 0) 0o Annual Report Bradford N. Punnell W. Ben Iturrian...11. TITLE (include Security Classification) The Effects of CW-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Bradford N...performance that will be sensitive to the effects Ofb/C•4 -related chemicals considered Tor use as l antidotes or prophyractics against-a agents

  7. Bactericidal effects and mechanisms of visible light-responsive titanium dioxide photocatalysts on pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2012-08-01

    This review focuses on the antibacterial activities of visible light-responsive titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalysts. These photocatalysts have a range of applications including disinfection, air and water cleaning, deodorization, and pollution and environmental control. Titanium dioxide is a chemically stable and inert material, and can continuously exert antimicrobial effects when illuminated. The energy source could be solar light; therefore, TiO(2) photocatalysts are also useful in remote areas where electricity is insufficient. However, because of its large band gap for excitation, only biohazardous ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation can excite TiO(2), which limits its application in the living environment. To extend its application, impurity doping, through metal coating and controlled calcination, has successfully modified the substrates of TiO(2) to expand its absorption wavelengths to the visible light region. Previous studies have investigated the antibacterial abilities of visible light-responsive photocatalysts using the model bacteria Escherichia coli and human pathogens. The modified TiO(2) photocatalysts significantly reduced the numbers of surviving bacterial cells in response to visible light illumination. They also significantly reduced the activity of bacterial endospores; reducing their toxicity while retaining their germinating abilities. It is suggested that the photocatalytic killing mechanism initially damages the surfaces weak points of the bacterial cells, before totally breakage of the cell membranes. The internal bacterial components then leak from the cells through the damaged sites. Finally, the photocatalytic reaction oxidizes the cell debris. In summary, visible light-responsive TiO(2) photocatalysts are more convenient than the traditional UV light-responsive TiO(2) photocatalysts because they do not require harmful UV light irradiation to function. These photocatalysts, thus, provide a promising and feasible approach for

  8. Ultraviolet-light-driven doping modulation in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M Z; Iqbal, M W; Khan, M F; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-08-28

    The tuning of charge carrier density of graphene is an essential factor to achieve the integration of high-efficiency electronic and optoelectronic devices. We demonstrate the reversible doping in graphene using deep ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and treatment with O2 and N2 gases. The Dirac point shift towards a positive gate voltage of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene field-effect transistors confirms the p-type doping, which is observed under UV irradiation and treatment with O2 gas, while it restores its pristine state after treatment with N2 gas under UV irradiation. The emergence of an additional peak in the X-ray photoelectron spectra during UV irradiation and treatment with O2 gas represents the oxidation of graphene, and the elimination of this peak during UV irradiation and treatment with N2 gas reveals the restoration of graphene in its pristine state. The shift in the G and 2D bands in Raman spectra towards higher and then lower wavenumber also suggests p-type doping and then reversible doping in graphene. The controlled doping and its reversibility in large area grown graphene offer a new vision for electronic applications.

  9. Controlling the optical spin Hall effect with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafont, O.; Luk, S. M. H.; Lewandowski, P.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Galopin, E.; Lemaitre, A.; Tignon, J.; Schumacher, S.; Baudin, E.; Binder, R.

    2017-02-01

    The optical spin Hall effect is a transport phenomenon of exciton polaritons in semiconductor microcavities, caused by the polaritonic spin-orbit interaction, which leads to the formation of spin textures. The control of the optical spin Hall effect via light injection in a double microcavity is demonstrated. Angular rotations of the polarization pattern up to 22° are observed and compared to a simple theoretical model. The device geometry is responsible for the existence of two polariton branches which allows a robust independent control of the polariton spin and hence the polarization state of the emitted light field, a solution technologically relevant for future spin-optronic devices.

  10. Is part-night lighting an effective measure to limit the impacts of artificial lighting on bats?

    PubMed

    Azam, Clémentine; Kerbiriou, Christian; Vernet, Arthur; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Plichard, Laura; Maratrat, Julie; Le Viol, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    As light pollution is currently considered to be a major threat to biodiversity, different lighting management options are being explored to mitigate the impact of artificial lighting on wildlife. Although part-night lighting schemes have been adopted by many local authorities across Europe to reduce the carbon footprint and save energy, their effects on biodiversity are unknown. Through a paired, in situ experiment, we compared the activity levels of 8 bat species under unlit, part-night, and full-night lighting treatments in a rural area located 60 km south of Paris, France. We selected 36 study locations composed of 1 lit site and a paired unlit control site; 24 of these sites were located in areas subject to part-night lighting schemes, and 12 sites were in areas under standard, full-night lighting. There was significantly more activity on part-night lighting sites compared to full-night lighting sites for the late-emerging, light-sensitive Plecotus spp., and a similar pattern was observable for Myotis spp., although not significant. In contrast, part-night lighting did not influence the activity of early emerging bat species around streetlights, except for Pipistrellus pipistrellus for which there was significantly less activity on part-night lighting sites than on full-night lighting sites. Overall, no significant difference in activity between part- and full-night lighting sites were observed in 5 of the 8 species studied, suggesting that current part-night lighting schemes fail to encompass the range of activity of most bat species. We recommend that such schemes start earlier at night to effectively mitigate the adverse effects of artificial lighting on light-sensitive species, particularly along ecological corridors that are especially important to the persistence of biodiversity in urban landscapes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of chemical degradation on fluxes of reactive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Petäjä, T.; Keronen, P.; Tang, M. J.; Crowley, J. N.; Rannik, Ü.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    In the analyses of VOC fluxes measured above plant canopies, one usually assumes the flux above canopy to equal the emission at the surface. Thus one assumes the chemical degradation to be much slower than the turbulent transport. We used a stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation was described as first order decay in order to study the effect of the chemical degradation on above canopy fluxes of chemically reactive species. With the model we explored the sensitivity of the ratio of the above canopy flux to the surface emission on several parameters such as chemical lifetime of the compound, friction velocity, stability, and canopy density. Our results show that friction velocity and chemical lifetime affected the loss during transport the most. The canopy density had a significant effect if the chemically reactive compound was emitted from the forest floor. We used the results of the simulations together with oxidant data measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 campaign at a Scots pine site to estimate the effect of the chemistry on fluxes of three typical biogenic VOCs, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene. Of these, the chemical degradation had a~major effect on the fluxes of the most reactive species β-caryophyllene, while the fluxes of α-pinene were affected during nighttime. For these two compounds representing the mono- and sesquiterpenes groups, the effect of chemical degradation had also a significant diurnal cycle with the highest chemical loss at night. The different day and night time loss terms need to be accounted for, when measured fluxes of reactive compounds are used to reveal relations between primary emission and environmental parameters.

  12. Effects of VDT workstation lighting conditions on operator visual workload.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Feng, Wen-Yang; Chao, Chin-Jung; Tseng, Feng-Yi

    2008-04-01

    Industrial lighting covers a wide range of different characteristics of working interiors and work tasks. This study investigated the effects of illumination on visual workload in visual display terminal (VDT) workstation. Ten college students (5 males and 5 females) were recruited as participants to perform VDT signal detection tasks. A randomized block design was utilized with four light colors (red, blue, green and white), two ambient illumination levels (20 lux and 340 lux), with the subject as the block. The dependent variables were the change of critical fusion frequency (CFF), visual acuity, reaction time of targets detection, error rates, and rating scores in a subjective questionnaire. The study results showed that both visual acuity and the subjective visual fatigue were significantly affected by the color of light. The illumination had significant effect on CFF threshold change and reaction time. Subjects prefer to perform VDT task under blue and white lights than green and red. Based on these findings, the study discusses and suggests ways of color lighting and ambient illumination to promote operators' visual performance and prevent visual fatigue effectively.

  13. Light-emitting silicon nanowires obtained by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrera, Alessia; Josè Lo Faro, Maria; D’Andrea, Cristiano; Alessio Leonardi, Antonio; Artoni, Pietro; Fazio, Barbara; Picca, Rosaria Anna; Cioffi, Nicola; Trusso, Sebastiano; Franzò, Giorgia; Musumeci, Paolo; Priolo, Francesco; Iacona, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    This review reports on a new process for the synthesis of Si nanowires (NWs), based on the wet etching of Si substrates assisted by a thin metal film. The approach exploits the thickness-dependent morphology of the metal layers to define uncovered nanometric Si regions, which behave as precursor sites for the formation of very dense (up to 1 × 1012 NW cm‑2) arrays of long (up to several μm) and ultrathin (diameter of 5–9 nm) NWs. Intense photoluminescence (PL) peaks, characterized by maxima in the 640–750 nm range and by an external quantum efficiency of 0.5%, are observed when the Si NWs are excited at room temperature. The spectra show a blueshift if the size of the NW is decreased, in agreement with the occurrence of quantum confinement effects. The same etching process can be used to obtain ultrathin Si/Ge NWs from a Si/Ge multi-quantum well. The Si/Ge NWs exhibit—in addition to the Si-related PL peak—a signal at about 1240 nm due to Ge nanostructures. The huge surface area of the Si NW arrays can be exploited for sensing and analytical applications. The dependence of the PL intensity on the chemical composition of the surface indeed suggests interesting perspectives for the detection of gaseous molecules. Moreover, Si NWs decorated with Ag nanoparticles can be effectively employed in the interference-free laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of low-molecular-weight analytes. A device based on conductive Si NWs, showing intense and stable electroluminescence at an excitation voltage as low as 2 V, is also presented. The unique features of the proposed synthesis (the process is cheap, fast, maskless and compatible with Si technology) and the unusual optical properties of the material open the route towards new and unexpected perspectives for semiconductor NWs in photonics.

  14. Integrated chemical treatment of municipal wastewater using waste hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmed; Mahmood, Qaisar; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Malik, Amir Haider; Rashid, Naim; Wu, Donglei

    Dilemmas like water shortage, rapid industrialization, growing human population and related issues have seriously affected human health and environmental sustainability. For conservation and sustainable use of our water resources, innovative methods for wastewater treatment are continuously being explored. Advance Oxidation Processes (AOPs) show a promising approach to meet specific objectives of municipal wastewater treatment (MWW). The MWW samples were pretreated with Al 2(SO 4) 4·8H 2O (Alum) at different doses 4, 8, 12-50 mg/L to enhance the sedimentation. The maximum COD removal was observed at alum treatments in range of 28-32 mg/L without increasing total dissolved solids (TDS). TDS were found to increase when the alum dose was increased from 32-40 mg/L. In the present study, the optimum alum dose of 30 mg/L for 3 h of sedimentation and subsequent integrated H 2O 2/UV treatment was applied (using 2.5 mL/L of 40% waste H 2O 2 and 35% fresh H 2O 2 separately). Organic and inorganic pollutants, contributing towards chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity and total dissolved solids were degraded by H 2O 2/UV. About 93% COD, 90% BOD and 83% turbidity reduction occurred when 40% waste H 2O 2 was used. When using fresh H 2O 2, 63% COD, 68% BOD and 86% turbidity reduction was detected. Complete disinfection of coliform bacteria occurred by using 40% H 2O 2/UV. The most interesting part of this research was to compare the effectiveness of waste H 2O 2 with fresh H 2O 2. Waste H 2O 2 generated from an industrial process of disinfection was found more effective in the treatment of MWW than fresh 35% H 2O 2.

  15. Optical effects of experimental light-activated bleaching procedures.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Marcius, Marijan; Ristic, Mira; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of experimental light-activated bleaching procedures. The improved color effect may be attributed to the potential photochemical effect of light-emitting diode (LED405), organic LED (OLED), and femtosecond laser rather than to the photothermal effect of conventional lights used for tooth bleaching. Specially made pastilles of hydroxylapatite were immersed in green tea for 8 h and randomly divided into four groups (n=50) specified by the type of light source applied during a 30 min bleaching treatment: LED405, OLED, and femtosecond laser, or its absence (control group). Each group was treated with five bleaching gels: 10%, 16%, and 30% carbamide peroxide (CP), and 25% and 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Changes in color were determined by red-green-blue (RGB) colorimeter and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV/Vis/NIR) spectroscopy. Regardless of the applied bleaching gel, LED405 produced a larger increase in the value of RGB index than did OLED and bleaching without light activation (p<0.05). Femtosecond laser also produced significantly better results in combination with 16% CP and 38% HP. Furthermore, application of a bleaching agent with a higher concentration of peroxide boosted the value of the RGB index. Spectroscopic measurements revealed similar results, although treatments with OLED were rated relatively better than in RGB analysis. The mechanisms of light-activated bleaching procedures had a significant effect on the color change. The bleaching activation with LED405 and higher concentrations of peroxide in bleaching agents promoted better whitening effect.

  16. Effects on the Liver of Chemicals Encountered in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Susan M.

    1982-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in toxicology. It is the primary organ of detoxification and elimination by metabolism of many chemicals. Many workplace chemicals can affect the liver in animals; fewer have been proved to do so in humans. The diverse hepatic effects observed in humans from occupational exposure to chemicals range from fatty infiltration, acute hepatitis and cholestasis to cirrhosis and angiosarcoma. Three important workplace chemicals, prototypes for the toxicities of many others, are carbon tetrachloride, vinyl chloride and the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's). These three are described in some detail to highlight principles of occupational toxicology. Most of the hepatic effects produced by chemicals in the workplace have clinical, laboratory and morphological features common to many other forms of liver disease. Therefore, only an astute physician who takes an occupational history will recognize the association between a patient's workplace and liver disease. PMID:6819718

  17. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective Light Directed Assembly of Building Blocks with Microscale Control.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Ngoc-Duy; Luo, Rongcong; Christine, Maria Tankeh Asuncion; Lin, Weikang Nicholas; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Goh, James Cho-Hong; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2017-06-01

    Light-directed forces have been widely used to pattern micro/nanoscale objects with precise control, forming functional assemblies. However, a substantial laser intensity is required to generate sufficient optical gradient forces to move a small object in a certain direction, causing limited throughput for applications. A high-throughput light-directed assembly is demonstrated as a printing technology by introducing gold nanorods to induce thermal convection flows that move microparticles (diameter = 40 µm to several hundreds of micrometers) to specific light-guided locations, forming desired patterns. With the advantage of effective light-directed assembly, the microfluidic-fabricated monodispersed biocompatible microparticles are used as building blocks to construct a structured assembly (≈10 cm scale) in ≈2 min. The control with microscale precision is approached by changing the size of the laser light spot. After crosslinking assembly of building blocks, a novel soft material with wanted pattern is approached. To demonstrate its application, the mesenchymal stem-cell-seeded hydrogel microparticles are prepared as functional building blocks to construct scaffold-free tissues with desired structures. This light-directed fabrication method can be applied to integrate different building units, enabling the bottom-up formation of materials with precise control over their internal structure for bioprinting, tissue engineering, and advanced manufacturing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  20. Chemical effects on clay farbric and hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Fritz T.; Mitchell, James K.

    Hydraulic conductivity and its susceptibility to changes with time or exposure to chemicals are major factors in selection of clay for use in waste containment barriers. Available concepts of clay-chemical interactions and data permit development of conclusions useful for prediction of clay barrier performance in waste containment applications. Among the most important conclusions are that (1) the influences of the many factors that can cause changes in hydraulic conductivity can be understood from the perspective of their effects on the soil fabric, (2) the influences of chemicals on high water content clays, such as in slurry walls, are likely to be much greater than on lower water content compacted clays, (3) the effects of inorganic chemicals are consistent with their effects on particle surface double layers, their effects on surface and edge charges, and on pH, and (4) the effects of organic chemicals are influenced primarily by their water solubility, their dielectric constant, their polarity, and whether the clay is exposed to the pure chemical or a dilute solution. The type of test used may have a very significant effect on the values of hydraulic conductivity that are measured. In almost all cases pure organic liquids will interact adversely with clays by causing some shrinking and cracking, with concurrent large hydraulic conductivity increases; however, dilute solutions of organics have essentially no effect.

  1. Effect of light exposure on fracture toughness and flexural strength of light-cured composites.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K; Onose, H

    1996-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the curing characteristics of light-cured composites and their related mechanical properties. Single-edge notch specimens [25 mm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm with a 5 mm notch (a/W = 0.5)] were prepared for fracture toughness measurements. For flexural strength testing, a stainless steel mold (25 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) was used. Light-cured composites were condensed into the mold, and the middle third of the specimen was first activated for 30 s with 400 mW/cm2, for 60 s with 200 mW/cm2, or for 120 s with 100 mW/cm2. Then the remaining thirds were activated at the same intensity and curing time as the middle third. After 24 h storage in 37 degrees C water, three-point bending tests were performed with a span length of 20 mm at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. A one-way ANOVA, followed by a Newman-Keuls test (p < 0.05), were used to compare the data obtained from each group to test the effect of the curing conditions. Fracture toughness, flexural strength, and flexural modulus varied with resin composites. Among the three curing conditions for each material, there were no significant differences in fracture toughness, flexural strength, or flexural modulus. The fracture toughness and the flexural strength were the same when irradiations with the same amount of energy (light intensity multiplied by curing time) were used. It was found that, at lower light intensity, longer curing was required to provide comparable mechanical properties. An accumulated irradiation energy obtained through a product of the light intensity and curing time may serve as a guideline to produce samples exhibiting equivalent fracture toughness as well as flexural strengths.

  2. Setting the Research Agenda on the Health Effects of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Keri; Herman, Gibb

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, World Health Organization (WHO) scientists reported that a significant percentage of global deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2004 could be attributed to chemicals. The 2011 review focused only on certain chemicals, however, and concluded that the global burden of disease was underestimated because of serious data gaps. While various chemical assessment documents have identified research needs for individual chemicals, a systematic review of such documents to identify research themes that could be applied to the multitude of chemicals for which there is little information has not been done. Even for chemicals for which there are considerable data, the information is not sufficient to make an estimate of the chemical’s contribution to the burden of disease. The WHO Environmental Health Criteria (EHC) documents and Concise International Chemical Assessment Documents (CICADs) identify research needs or data gaps in our knowledge of chemicals. We identified several common themes in these documents and in documents prepared by WHO on 10 chemicals of major public health concern. These themes include biomarkers, longitudinal epidemiological studies, mechanisms of disease, reproductive and developmental effects and exposure assessment. Specific examples of data gaps culled from more than 300 WHO documents provide researchers with specific topics for further research. PMID:24424283

  3. Prediction of Harmful Human Health Effects of Chemicals from Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Mark T. D.

    There is a great need to assess the harmful effects of chemicals to which man is exposed. Various in silico techniques including chemical grouping and category formation, as well as the use of (Q)SARs can be applied to predict the toxicity of chemicals for a number of toxicological effects. This chapter provides an overview of the state of the art of the prediction of the harmful effects of chemicals to human health. A variety of existing data can be used to obtain information; many such data are formalized into freely available and commercial databases. (Q)SARs can be developed (as illustrated with reference to skin sensitization) for local and global data sets. In addition, chemical grouping techniques can be applied on "similar" chemicals to allow for read-across predictions. Many "expert systems" are now available that incorporate these approaches. With these in silico approaches available, the techniques to apply them successfully have become essential. Integration of different in silico approaches with each other, as well as with other alternative approaches, e.g., in vitro and -omics through the development of integrated testing strategies, will assist in the more efficient prediction of the harmful health effects of chemicals

  4. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Esplandiu, Maria J; Farniya, Ali Afshar; Bachtold, Adrian

    2015-11-24

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids.

  5. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids. PMID:26349036

  6. Effects of chemical carcinogens on bacteria and yeast: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, R.L.; Gerritsen, N.; Meadows, H.

    1981-03-01

    Early studies and reviews of the effects of carcinogens on bacteria and yeast are noted, after which a brief discussion deals specifically with chemical carcinogens and their relations with mutagenesis, deficiencies in DNA repair, RNA synthesis and function, and respiration-deficient mutants. Specific chemical carcinogens are then reviewed as to their mode of action, mutagenic and carcinogenic potency, and biochemical effects, including induced biological alterations such as cytogenetic variants. Structure-function relations are discussed for some types of compounds.

  7. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  8. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-09-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  9. Ion transport across model lipid membranes containing light-harvesting complex II: an effect of light.

    PubMed

    Iwaszko, Ewa; Wardak, Anna; Krupa, Zbigniew; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2004-03-19

    The effect of light on proton transport across lipid membranes of small unilamellar liposomes containing incorporated major light-harvesting pigment-protein complex of Photosystem II (LHCII) has been studied with the application of pH-sensitive dyes entrapped inside vesicles. Proton permeability coefficient for LHCII-modified membranes was found to be about twice as high as in the case of the control pure lipid vesicles. Illumination of the samples with light absorbed by the LHCII-bound photosynthetic pigments considerably affects the kinetics of proton transport: it increases the rate and decreases the steady-state level of proton gradient across the membranes. The effect was interpreted in terms of heat-induced conformational changes of LHCII molecular structures that affect proton buffering capacity of this protein. Both the control and the LHCII-modified lipid membranes have been found to be practically impermeable to Ca(++) ions, as demonstrated by fluorescence of liposome-entrapped calcium-sensitive probe calcium crimson. The slight differences in the proton transport across the LHCII-containing membranes under the presence of Ca(++) suggest calcium binding to this antenna protein.

  10. Effectiveness of light emitting diode and halogen light curing units for curing microhybrid and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shwetha; Suprabha, BS

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the polymerization efficacy of micro-hybrid and nanocomposites cured with Quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) and light emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCUs). The effectiveness of pulse cure mode in LED LCU was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Both micro-hybrid and nanocomposite specimens were cured using four different curing protocols giving a total of eight experimental groups. Ten cylindrical specimens were prepared for each group, and light cured for 40 s on the top surface, thus giving a total of eighty specimens. Vicker hardness measurements were carried out on the top and bottom surfaces after 24 h and hardness ratio was calculated. Results: For both micro-hybrid and nanocomposites, highest mean VHN was observed for the group cured with QTH LCU, and the lowest was observed for the group cured with second LED LCU in standard mode but the difference was significant only in case of nanocomposite. Conclusion: Curing nanocomposites with QTH LCU results in better micro hardness. Pulse cure mode does not effectively increase polymerization efficacy than the standard mode of curing. PMID:23833457

  11. Recognising faces: effects of lighting direction, inversion, and brightness reversal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alan; Hill, Harold; Carman, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    When information about three-dimensional shape obtained from shading and shadows is ambiguous, the visual system favours an interpretation of surface geometry which is consistent with illumination from above. If pictures of top-lit faces are rotated the resulting stimulus is both figurally inverted and illuminated from below. In this study the question of whether the effects of figural inversion and lighting orientation on face recognition are independent or interactive is addressed. Although there was a clear inversion effect for faces illuminated from the front and above, the inversion effect was found to be reduced or eliminated for faces illuminated from below. A strong inversion effect for photographic negatives was also found but in this case the effect was not dependent on the direction of illumination. These findings are interpreted as evidence to suggest that lighting faces from below disrupts the formation of surface-based representations of facial shape.

  12. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  13. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  14. Quality of light and quality of life--the effect of lighting adaptation among people with low vision.

    PubMed

    Brunnström, Gunilla; Sörensen, Stefan; Alsterstad, Karin; Sjöstrand, Johan

    2004-07-01

    The study has investigated the effect of lighting on the daily activities (ADL) of the visually impaired in their homes by comparison before and after light adjustments were made in the kitchen, hall and bathroom. It has also investigated the additional effects on the quality of life after providing task lighting in the living room. A total of 56 people were consecutively recruited from those receiving lighting adaptation help by the Low Vision Clinic in Göteborg. Ten persons did not complete the study. After medical examinations, lighting standards and psychosocial factors were charted. After lighting improvements were carried out in the kitchen, hall and bathroom, the subjects were randomly divided into two groups, an intervention and a comparison group. The task lighting in the living room was also improved for those included in the intervention group. Follow-up interviews to determine ADL and quality of life were performed 6 months after lighting adaptation. A marked effect on quality of life of the lighting in the living room was found for the intervention group. The effect on ADL of the basic lighting adaptation in kitchen, hall and bathroom for both groups was significant for tasks carried out on the working surface in the kitchen. Other activities in the kitchen and in the bathroom tended to improve but changes were not significant. The results confirm that it is possible to increase quality of life by improving the lighting conditions.

  15. Chemical Hypoxia Brings to Light Altered Autocrine Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenqi; Moreno-Nieves, Uriel; Di Battista, John A.; Fernandes, Maria J.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in various aspects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In this study we compared the effect of chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on the expression of S1P metabolic enzymes and cytokine/chemokine secretion in normal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and RAFLS. RAFLS incubated with CoCl2, but not S1P, produced less IL-8 and MCP-1 than normal FLS. Furthermore, incubation with the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor antagonists, JTE-013 and CAY10444, reduced CoCl2-mediated chemokine production in normal FLS but not in RAFLS. RAFLS showed lower levels of intracellular S1P and enhanced mRNA expression of S1P phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) and S1P lyase (SPL), the enzymes that are involved in intracellular S1P degradation, when compared to normal FLS. Incubation with CoCl2 decreased SGPP1 mRNA and protein and SPL mRNA as well. Inhibition of SPL enhanced CoCl2-mediated cytokine/chemokine release and restored autocrine activation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors in RAFLS. The results suggest that the sphingolipid pathway regulating the intracellular levels of S1P is dysregulated in RAFLS and has a significant impact on cell autocrine activation by S1P. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in FLS from patients with advanced RA raises the issue of synovial cell burnout due to chronic inflammation. PMID:26556954

  16. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs.

  17. Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jounhong Ryan; Joo, Eun Yeon; Koo, Dae Lim; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-12-01

    Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Spectral analysis was performed to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs to reveal any light-induced differences in background brain rhythms. Lights-on sleep was associated with increased stage 1 sleep (N1), decreased slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased arousal index. Spectral analysis revealed that theta power (4-8Hz) during REM sleep and slow oscillation (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), and spindle (10-16Hz) power during NREM sleep were decreased in lights-on sleep conditions. Sleeping with the light on not only causes shallow sleep and frequent arousals but also has a persistent effect on brain oscillations, especially those implicated in sleep depth and stability. Our study demonstrates additional hazardous effect of light pollution on health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  19. Chemical characteristics and light-absorbing property of water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing: Biomass burning contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Caiqing; Zheng, Mei; Sullivan, Amy P.; Bosch, Carme; Desyaterik, Yury; Andersson, August; Li, Xiaoying; Guo, Xiaoshuang; Zhou, Tian; Gustafsson, Örjan; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    Emissions from biomass burning contribute significantly to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon). Ambient atmospheric samples were collected at an urban site in Beijing during winter and summer, along with source samples from residential crop straw burning. Carbonaceous aerosol species, including organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), WSOC and multiple saccharides as well as water-soluble potassium (K+) in PM2.5 (fine particulate matter with size less than 2.5 μm) were measured. Chemical signatures of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing during winter and summer days with significant biomass burning influence were identified. Meanwhile, light absorption by WSOC was measured and quantitatively compared to EC at ground level. The results from this study indicated that levoglucosan exhibited consistently high concentrations (209 ± 145 ng m-3) in winter. Ratios of levoglucosan/mannosan (L/M) and levoglucosan/galacosan (L/G) indicated that residential biofuel use is an important source of biomass burning aerosol in winter in Beijing. Light absorption coefficient per unit ambient WSOC mass calculated at 365 nm is approximately 1.54 ± 0.16 m2 g-1 in winter and 0.73 ± 0.15 m2 g-1 in summer. Biomass burning derived WSOC accounted for 23 ± 7% and 16 ± 7% of total WSOC mass, and contributed to 17 ± 4% and 19 ± 5% of total WSOC light absorption in winter and summer, respectively. It is noteworthy that, up to 30% of total WSOC light absorption was attributed to biomass burning in significant biomass-burning-impacted summer day. Near-surface light absorption (over the range 300-400 nm) by WSOC was about ∼40% of that by EC in winter and ∼25% in summer.

  20. Effects of bright light treatment on psychomotor speed in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tulppo, Mikko P.; Jurvelin, Heidi; Roivainen, Eka; Nissilä, Juuso; Hautala, Arto J.; Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Kiviniemi, Vesa J.; Takala, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north) when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days). A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both) treatment was given every morning between 8 and 12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time × group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024) but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308). Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year. PMID:24860513

  1. The Enhanced Light Absorptance and Device Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon Fabricated by Metal-assisted Chemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hao; Guo, Anran; Guo, Guohui; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    We use metal-assisted chemical etching (MCE) method to fabricate nanostructured black silicon on the surface of C-Si. The Si-PIN photoelectronic detector based on this type of black silicon shows excellent device performance with a responsivity of 0.57 A/W at 1060 nm. Silicon nanocone arrays can be created using MCE treatment. These modified surfaces show higher light absorptance in the near-infrared range (800 to 2500 nm) compared to that of C-Si with polished surfaces, and the variations in the absorption spectra of the nanostructured black silicon with different etching processes are obtained. The maximum light absorptance increases significantly up to 95 % in the wavelength range of 400 to 2500 nm. Our recent novel results clearly indicate that nanostructured black silicon made by MCE has potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic detectors.

  2. Recent advances in the spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Huang, Kun; Liu, Yachao; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-06-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light, as an analogue of the SHE in electronic systems, is a promising candidate for investigating the SHE in semiconductor spintronics/valleytronics, high-energy physics and condensed matter physics, owing to their similar topological nature in the spin-orbit interaction. The SHE of light exhibits unique potential for exploring the physical properties of nanostructures, such as determining the optical thickness, and the material properties of metallic and magnetic thin films and even atomically thin two-dimensional materials. More importantly, it opens a possible pathway for controlling the spin states of photons and developing next-generation photonic spin Hall devices as a fundamental constituent of the emerging spinoptics. In this review, based on the viewpoint of the geometric phase gradient, we give a detailed presentation of the recent advances in the SHE of light and its applications in precision metrology and future spin-based photonics.

  3. The effects of clouds on the light produced by lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Krider, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of finite clouds on the light impulses was produced by point and finite lightning sources within cubical, cylindrical, and spherical clouds. It is shown that absorption is essentially negligible in the visible and near infrared. The fractions of photons which escape various cloud surfaces are a function of position and geometry of the source. The light emission is high for intracloud discharges and the incloud portion of cloud to ground discharges. It is concluded that the characteristic dimensions of the light escaping from a cloud surface are typically 60 to 70% of the cloud dimensions while the time broadening of an impulse by multiple scattering can be tens of microseconds or more.

  4. Recent advances in the spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Huang, Kun; Liu, Yachao; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-03-30

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light, as an analogue of the SHE in electronic systems, is a promising candidate for investigating the SHE in semiconductor spintronics/valleytronics, high-energy physics and condensed matter physics, owing to their similar topological nature in the spin-orbit interaction. The SHE of light exhibits unique potential for exploring the physical properties of nanostructures, such as determining the optical thickness, and the material properties of metallic and magnetic thin films and even atomically thin two-dimensional materials. More importantly, it opens a possible pathway for controlling the spin states of photons and developing next-generation photonic spin Hall devices as a fundamental constituent of the emerging spinoptics. In this review, based on the viewpoint of the geometric phase gradient, we give a detailed presentation of the recent advances in the SHE of light and its applications in precision metrology and future spin-based photonics.

  5. Reflective liquid crystal light valve with hybrid field effect mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Donald D. (Inventor); Grinberg, Jan (Inventor); Jacobson, Alexander D. (Inventor); Myer, Gary D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is disclosed a high performance reflective mode liquid crystal light valve suitable for general image processing and projection and particularly suited for application to real-time coherent optical data processing. A preferred example of the device uses a CdS photoconductor, a CdTe light absorbing layer, a dielectric mirror, and a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes deposited on optical quality glass flats. The non-coherent light image is directed onto the photoconductor; this reduces the impedance of the photoconductor, thereby switching the AC voltage that is impressed across the electrodes onto the liquid crystal to activate the device. The liquid crystal is operated in a hybrid field effect mode. It utilizes the twisted nematic effect to create a dark off-state (voltage off the liquid crystal) and the optical birefringence effect to create the bright on-state. The liquid crystal thus modulates the polarization of the coherent read-out or projection light responsively to the non-coherent image. An analyzer is used to create an intensity modulated output beam.

  6. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: plasma mixing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward; Lasenby, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on light scalars and vectors with a variety of SM couplings. In particular, we improve the bounds on light ( m ≲ keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors. Scalars with mass ≲ 2 keV that couple through the Higgs portal are constrained to mixing angle sin θ ≲ 3 × 10-10, which gives the dominant bound for scalar masses above ˜ 0 .2eV.

  7. Optical polarizer based on the mechanical effect of light.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Kong, Cui; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Based on the recent experimental progress in chip-scale silicon photonics, a nontrivial polarizing effect arising from the mechanical effect of light is present in an optomechanical crystal, which enables a new nanophotonic polarizer with excellent functionality. Unlike previously reported optical polarizers, the polarizer proposed here can be adjusted rapidly by tuning polarization and intensity of the control field and may enable on-chip optical control of polarization management with remarkable applications, due to the improvement of nanofabrication techniques.

  8. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  9. Nonlithographic patterning and metal-assisted chemical etching for manufacturing of tunable light-emitting silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Chern, Winston; Hsu, Keng; Chun, Ik Su; Azeredo, Bruno P de; Ahmed, Numair; Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-min; Fang, Nick; Ferreira, Placid; Li, Xiuling

    2010-05-12

    Semiconductor nanowires have potential applications in photovoltaics, batteries, and thermoelectrics. We report a top-down fabrication method that involves the combination of superionic-solid-state-stamping (S4) patterning with metal-assisted-chemical-etching (MacEtch), to produce silicon nanowire arrays with defined geometry and optical properties in a manufacturable fashion. Strong light emission in the entire visible and near infrared wavelength range at room temperature, tunable by etching condition, attributed to surface features, and enhanced by silver surface plasmon, is demonstrated.

  10. Effects of blue light on pigment biosynthesis of Monascus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xue, Chunmao; Chen, Mianhua; Wu, Shufen; Li, Zhenjing; Wang, Changlu

    2016-04-01

    The influence of different illumination levels of blue light on the growth and intracellular pigment yields of Monascus strain M9 was investigated. Compared with darkness, constant exposure to blue light of 100 lux reduced the yields of six pigments, namely, rubropunctatamine (RUM), monascorubramine (MOM), rubropunctatin (RUN), monascorubrin (MON), monascin (MS), and ankaflavin (AK). However, exposure to varying levels of blue light had different effects on pigment production. Exposure to 100 lux of blue light once for 30 min/day and to 100 lux of blue light once and twice for 15 min/day could enhance RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production and reduce RUN and MON compared with non-exposure. Exposure to 100 lux twice for 30 min/day and to 200 lux once for 45 min/day decreased the RUM, MOM, MS, and AK yields and increased the RUN and MON. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pigment biosynthetic genes were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results indicated that gene MpPKS5, mppR1, mppA, mppB, mmpC, mppD, MpFasA, MpFasB, and mppF were positively correlated with the yields of RUN and MON, whereas mppE and mppR2 were associated with RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production.

  11. The Red Light District and Its Effects on Zebrafish Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Isaac; Krug, Lauren; Zon, Leonard Ira

    2016-06-01

    Light-dark cycles mimicking natural settings in a zebrafish facility are crucial for maintaining fish with an entrained circadian clock making them an ideal vertebrate model to study such rhythms. However, failure to provide optimal conditions to include complete darkness can lead to a disturbed circadian pacemaker affecting physiology and behavior in zebrafish. To meet building code requirements, the aquatics facility in use was outfitted with EXIT signs emitting a constant light. To determine if light radiating from the EXIT sign has an effect on zebrafish embryo production, 100 fish (1:1 m/f ratio) were split and housed at 10 fish/L. Half were housed directly in front of the EXIT sign, whereas the other half (control) were housed under a true 14-h light-10-h dark cycle. Reproductive success was evaluated by recording fecundity and viability from 10 weekly matings under two light colors: red (640 nm) and green (560 nm). On average the control group spawned twice as many embryos compared to those housed in front of a red EXIT sign, whereas green EXIT sign showed no difference. This suggests the importance of providing a complete dark environment within the night cycle and a recommendation toward dim green EXIT signs to avoid a decline in reproductive performance.

  12. Visible light enhances the antimicrobial effect of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Calvo, María Soledad; Codony, Francesc; Agustí, Gemma; Lahera, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    The photodisinfection is a topical, broad spectrum antimicrobial technology, targeting bacteria, virus, fungi, and protozoa effective for single cells as for biofilms. Natural molecules have been studied less than synthetic agents in the process but they are currently receiving great interest. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate for the first time if non-coherent blue and red light enhances the antimicrobial activity of some essential oils when standard strains for antibiotic or fungicide tests are enlightened in vitro. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans collection strains were irradiated with monochromatic visible light from light emitting diodes in the presence of 5% and 0.5% eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), clove (Eugenia caryophyllata), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) essential oils. Microbial levels were measured by plate count on culture media. In this preliminary report, the results differ according to the kind and concentration of antimicrobial oils, the wavelength of light, and the prokaryotic or eukaryotic microorganism. The results support the idea that mainly blue light enhances the innate antimicrobial activity of the essential oils, especially phenols, and could offer a very efficient and natural way to combat microorganisms in several industries and medical applications (cutaneous and oral infections, medical textiles, foodstuffs and fruit surface, etc.).

  13. Articulation effects in lightness: historical background and theoretical implications.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Alan L; Annan, Vidal

    2002-01-01

    The concept of articulation was first introduced by Katz [1935 The World of Colour (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co)] to refer to the degree of complexity within a field. Katz, who created the basic research methods for studying lightness constancy, found that the greater the degree of articulation within a field of illumination, the greater the degree of constancy. Even though this concept has been largely forgotten, there is much empirical evidence for Katz's principle, and the effects on lightness are very strong. However, when articulation is increased within a framework that does not coincide with a region of illumination, constancy is weakened. Kardos (1934 Zeitschrift für Psychologie Ergänzungband 23) advanced the concept of co-determination, according to which the lightness of a surface is determined relative to more than one field of illumination. Gilchrist et al (1999 Psychological Review 106 795-834) argue that the fields concept should be replaced by the more operational frameworks concept and that a wide variety of lightness errors can be explained by a modification of the Katz principle: the greater the articulation within a perceptual framework, the stronger the anchoring of lightness values within that framework.

  14. Light-enhanced chemical whitening of teeth: new in vitro investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovska, R.; Dimitrov, S.; Pavlova, P.; Todorov, G.

    2007-03-01

    We report new results on the light enhanced teeth whitening obtained in a research collaboration financed by the Medical Science Council of the Medical University of Sofia. The project is an extension of previous research and its basic goal is to develop new teeth bleaching substances and procedures, in which the activators are diode lamps (LED).

  15. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UV LAMP TO DECOMPOSE OXALATES

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Huff, T.; Sudduth, C.

    2010-01-19

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning is a new process scheduled to begin cleaning Savannah River Site High Level Waste Tanks in 2012. It is an improvement over the current chemical cleaning method, in that it minimizes downstream impacts on the High Level Waste System. It is based on a state of the art scale removal process used on the secondary side of nuclear power plants, with modifications to accommodate the unique constraints created by the tanks. Both Enhanced Chemical Cleaning and the scale removal process are founded on dissolving metal oxides/hydroxides using oxalic acid, with subsequent oxalate decomposition via hydroxylation using ozone or peroxide, and UV light as a catalyst. A divergence Enhanced Chemical Cleaning has from nuclear power scale removal is the significantly increased solids concentration during oxalate decomposition. These solids can limit the ability of the UV light to create hydroxyl radicals, either by limiting the ability of the light to penetrate through the solution, or by increasing the fouling rate on the UV light. Both will decrease the overall catalytic effectiveness, thereby decreasing the concentration of formed hydroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are the driving force behind the oxalate decomposition. To understand the impact of increased solids, testing was performed using a medium pressure UV light inside an ozone supplied Oxalate Decomposition Reactor. Using a dissolved metal sludge simulant with an initial oxalate concentration greater than 12,000 ppm, and an initial pH of about 2.0, the spent acid solution was recirculated through the reactor, while the UV light was allowed to foul. For the first few hours, the oxalate decomposition rate was about 1,300 ppm/hour. After about 3 hours, enough time for the UV lamp to foul, the oxalate decomposition rate decreased to about 500 ppm/hour. The decomposition rate then remained roughly constant for the next 16 hours. Overall, testing showed that the oxalate destruction rate decreased

  16. Edge oxidation effect of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene nanoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Jin, Xiaozhan; Hwang, Chanyong; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-03-26

    The edge oxidation effects of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene devices with nanoconstrictions of different sizes are presented. The effects of edge oxidation on the doping level of a nanoconstriction graphene device were identified by Raman spectroscopy and using the back-gate-voltage-dependent resistance. Strong p-type doping was observed as the size of nanoconstriction decreased. The Dirac point of the graphene device shifted toward positive voltage, and the positions of the G and 2D peaks in Raman spectroscopy shifted toward a higher wave number, indicating the p-type doping effect of the graphene device. p-type doping was lifted by deep-ultraviolet light illumination under a nitrogen atmosphere at room temperature. p-type doping was restored by deep-ultraviolet light illumination under an oxygen atmosphere at room temperature. Edge oxidation in the narrow structures explains the origin of the p-type doping effect widely observed in graphene nanodevices.

  17. Effect of polarized light emitting diode irradiation on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kaoru; Ikeda, Kazuo; Tomita, Katsuro

    2009-11-01

    We propose a new phototherapy using polarized light from light emitting diode (LED). The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of polarized LED irradiation on wound healing. Five groups were classified: control (C), unpolarized (U), linearly polarized (L), right circularly polarized (RC), and left circularly polarized (LC) LED irradiation. In vitro study, fibroblast cell cultures were irradiated, and cellular proliferation was evaluated with a WST-8 assay. In vivo study, full-thickness skin defect of 20 mm diameter was created on the dorsal side of rats. The ratio of the residual wound area was measured, and expression of type 1 and type 3 procollagen mRNA in granulation tissue was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. The cellular proliferation rates of group RC and L were significantly higher than other groups. The ratio of the residual wound area of group RC and L was significantly reduced than group C and U. Expression of type 1 procollagen mRNA in group RC was found to be significantly increased about 1.5-fold in comparison with the group C. There were no significant differences for type 3 procollagen. The right circularly polarized light and linearly polarized light promoted the process of wound healing by increasing the proliferation of fibroblasts, and the right circularly polarized light increased the expression of type 1 procollagen mRNA. The effectiveness of right circularly polarized light suggests that some optical active material, which has a circular dichroic spectrum, takes part in a biochemical reaction.

  18. Chemical hair relaxers have adverse effects a myth or reality.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vinma H; Shetty, Narendra J; Nair, Dhanya Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Hair plays an important role in one's personality and builds confidence. Now-a-days, chemical hair relaxers are used very commonly in the society. We document the adverse effects reported by the sample that have used any one of the professional chemical hair relaxers. To study the adverse effects reported by the sample who underwent repeated chemical hair relaxing. Cross-sectional questionnaire based study done on a sample taken from a medical college and hospital campus in Mangalore. The sample was restricted to females and to those who underwent it more than once. A questionnaire was given to a sample of 90, which matched our criteria. SPSS software 17. Adverse effects reported by the sample after undergoing the procedure were found to be a high 95.56%, out of which the following are the common adverse effects reported; frizzy hair in 67%, dandruff in 61%, hair loss in 47%, thinning and weakening of hair in 40%, greying of hair 22%, and split ends in only 17%. Very few studies have been conducted on the adverse effects of hair straightening products in India. From our study, it can be stated that most of the samples had adverse effects, which was as high as 95.56%. Hence from the details elicited from this study, we can conclude that, usage of chemical hair relaxers does cause adverse effects and is "not a myth." Thus, it is necessary to make available a less harmful chemical hair relaxer to the society.

  19. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A−1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color. PMID:27048887

  20. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-04-06

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A(-1) and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color.

  1. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A-1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color.

  2. Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent?

    PubMed

    Raap, Thomas; Sun, Jiachen; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2017-09-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration (≈-40min) as animals woke up earlier (≈-24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effects of blue-enriched light treatment compared to standard light treatment in Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gordijn, M C M; 't Mannetje, D; Meesters, Y

    2012-01-01

    One of the most frequently investigated hypotheses of the pathophysiology underlying Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a disturbance of circadian rhythms. Since the circadian system as well as other non-visual effects is especially sensitive to blue light, a new light therapy device with blue enriched polychromatic light was tested for its efficacy to treat SAD. Within one winter 52 patients were treated in one of three conditions: 30 min full spectrum light (9000 lx, 5000 K), 30 min blue-enriched light (9000 lx, 17,000 K), or 20 min blue-enriched light. The study lasted 22 days with 10 days of morning-light treatment on weekdays during the first 2 weeks. Depressive symptoms (SIGH SAD) diminished over the 3-week period in all conditions, with no significant differences between conditions. The percentage responders were high, differing from 75%, 59% and 71% for the standard-LT, 30 min blue-enriched-LT, and 20 min blue-enriched-LT, respectively. The lack of superiority of high intensity blue-enriched light over standard bright light treatment does not clearly support nor rule out the possibility of an important role for the circadian system or the blue sensitive non-visual image forming system in general, in the pathophysiology of SAD. The lack of a difference between conditions may also be the result of a saturated response to the high light intensities used. Recent data indeed suggest that low intensity blue-enriched light may be as effective as standard bright light treatment. The possibility of improving light therapy for SAD patients by applying light of shorter duration or at lower light intensities is highly relevant for optimizing treatment and will help to clarify the role of the circadian system and/or the non-image forming photoreceptors in SAD pathophysiology. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01048294. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the human health effects of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David O; Arcaro, Kathleen; Spink, David C

    2002-01-01

    Most research on the effects of chemicals on biologic systems is conducted on one chemical at a time. However, in the real world people are exposed to mixtures, not single chemicals. Although various substances may have totally independent actions, in many cases two substances may act at the same site in ways that can be either additive or nonadditive. Many even more complex interactions may occur if two chemicals act at different but related targets. In the extreme case there may be synergistic effects, in which case the effects of two substances together are greater than the sum of either effect alone. In reality, most persons are exposed to many chemicals, not just one or two, and therefore the effects of a chemical mixture are extremely complex and may differ for each mixture depending on the chemical composition. This complexity is a major reason why mixtures have not been well studied. In this review we attempt to illustrate some of the principles and approaches that can be used to study effects of mixtures. By the nature of the state of the science, this discussion is more a presentation of what we do not know than of what we do know about mixtures. We approach the study of mixtures at three levels, using specific examples. First, we discuss several human diseases in relation to a variety of environmental agents believed to influence the development and progression of the disease. We present results of selected cellular and animal studies in which simple mixtures have been investigated. Finally, we discuss some of the effects of mixtures at a molecular level. PMID:11834461

  5. Chemical mixtures and health effects at Superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Robert S

    2002-03-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, EPA's Office of Research and Development conducted a small health effects research program dedicated to the problem of chemical mixtures at Superfund sites. This paper summarizes key findings from the program. The studies covered a wide range of endpoints, several chemical classes, and mixture complexities ranging from two to five chemicals. Additivity and antagonism were far more common than synergy. Departures from additivity seemed to be on the order of a factor of two or less, an observation that may provide some bounds for concern.

  6. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    A. Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  7. Light-Emitting Diode Phototherapy Reduces Nocifensive Behavior Induced by Thermal and Chemical Noxious Stimuli in Mice: Evidence for the Involvement of Capsaicin-Sensitive Central Afferent Fibers.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Glauce Regina; Coelho, Igor Santos; Aquino, Rosane Schenkel; Bauermann, Liliane Freitas; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2016-04-07

    Low-intensity phototherapy using light fonts, like light-emitting diode (LED), in the red to infrared spectrum is a promising alternative for the treatment of pain. However, the underlying mechanisms by which LED phototherapy reduces acute pain are not yet well understood. This study investigated the analgesic effect of multisource LED phototherapy on the acute nocifensive behavior of mice induced by thermal and chemical noxious stimuli. The involvement of central afferent C fibers sensitive to capsaicin in this effect was also investigated. Mice exposed to multisource LED (output power 234, 390, or 780 mW and power density 10.4, 17.3, and 34.6 mW/cm(2), respectively, from 10 to 30 min of stimulation with a wavelength of 890 nm) showed rapid and significant reductions in formalin- and acetic acid-induced nocifensive behavior. This effect gradually reduced but remained significant for up to 7 h after LED treatment in the last model used. Moreover, LED (390 mW, 17.3 mW/cm(2)/20 min) irradiation also reduced nocifensive behavior in mice due to chemical [endogenous (i.e., glutamate, prostaglandins, and bradykinin) or exogenous (i.e., formalin, acetic acid, TRPs and ASIC agonist, and protein kinase A and C activators)] and thermal (hot plate test) stimuli. Finally, ablating central afferent C fibers abolished LED analgesia. These experimental results indicate that LED phototherapy reduces the acute painful behavior of animals caused by chemical and thermal stimuli and that LED analgesia depends on the integrity of central afferent C fibers sensitive to capsaicin. These findings provide new information regarding the underlying mechanism by which LED phototherapy reduces acute pain. Thus, LED phototherapy may be an important tool for the management of acute pain.

  8. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  9. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  10. Local and systemic effects of mechanico-chemical retraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Goodchild, Jason H

    2013-09-01

    The process of recording an acceptable fixed prosthodontic impression must include appropriate tissue management. This article reviews the effects of mechanical and chemical tissue retraction for fixed prosthodontics, specifically discussing the use of retraction cord with or without chemicals to control sulcular hemorrhage and moisture. Common astringents, hemostatics, and vasoconstrictors used in dentistry as gingival retraction agents are discussed, and recommendations for modification of patient and treatment management are provided.

  11. Seeing Chemistry through Sound: A Submersible Audible Light Sensor for Observing Chemical Reactions for Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supalo, Cary A.; Kreuter, Rodney A.; Musser, Aaron; Han, Josh; Briody, Erika; McArtor, Chip; Gregory, Kyle; Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    In order to enable students who are blind and visually impaired to observe chemical changes in solutions, a hand-held device was designed to output light intensity as an audible tone. The submersible audible light sensor (SALS) creates an audio signal by which one can observe reactions in a solution in real time, using standard laboratory…

  12. Plasmonic and catalytic AuPd nanowheels for the efficient conversion of light into chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yongjia; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-06-03

    Reinventing the wheel: Bimetallic AuPd nanowheels, a freestanding form of 2D AuPd nanostructures, were synthesized in a one-pot process. The well-defined and tunable surface plasmon resonance displayed by these nanowheels was exploited in a unique catalytic process in which light energy was used to drive catalytic reactions, such as the Suzuki coupling, with much higher efficiency than that of the conventional heating process.

  13. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  14. Aging of printing and writing paper upon exposure to light. Part 2, Mechanical and chemical properties

    Treesearch

    Chris Hunt; Xiaochun Yu; James Bond; Umesh Agarwal; Raj Atalla

    2003-01-01

    Data is presented on chemical and physical changes observed on a series of 15 specially made writing papers as part of the development of the new ASTM standard D6789-02. Papers were exposed to north window, fluorescent, and halogen illumination for several years. Furnish covered the span from stone groundwood to textile cotton, pH 5 to 8.1, with and without alkaline...

  15. Modeling the Role of Selected Light Nonmethane Hydrocarbons on the Chemical Composition of Natural and Perturbed Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohan Lal

    The original Oslo 2-dimensional global tropospheric photochemical model is modified by extending its vertical domain to 24.5 km with new transport coefficients to deduce the annual global source strengths of parent hydrocarbons (C-1 to C-3, or LHCs) and to study the role of photochemistry of these hydrocarbons and isoprene (rm C _5H_8) on the chemical composition of natural and perturbed troposphere. Model transport features are studied by comparing simulated atmospheric distributions and trends of CFC-11, CFC-12 and ^{85}Kr with corresponding long term observations. Four different photochemical schemes PC-1, PC -2, PC-3, and PC-5, that include C-1, C-2, C-3 hydrocarbons and rm C_5H_8 respectively, are developed. OH radical distributions calculated using these schemes and averaged surface observation data of LHCs as their respective lower boundary conditions are validated by comparing simulated atmospheric distribution and trends of rm CH_3CCl_3 with ALE/GAGE observations. Annual steady state source strengths of LHCs and rm C_2Cl _4 are calculated from their surface observations and above stated OH distributions. Comparison of modeled concentrations of C-2 and C-3 hydrocarbons in the lowest model layer with their corresponding observations shows that the sources of these species are seasonal in nature. The effects of photochemistry of light nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) on distributions of selected tropospheric species and ratio distributions of key species and on the budgets of O_3, CO, NOx and HNO _3 are also evaluated. Simulations of multiple changes in individual source strengths of NOx, CH_4, CO, NMHCs suggest that per molecule injected, NOx from aircraft emissions is the most efficient, the magnitude of which decreases with increase in emissions, in changing the global averaged O_3 concentration. Among NMHCs, changes in propane and ethane emissions are the most effective in changing the global average O _3 concentration and steady state lifetime of CH_4

  16. Integrated Light Chemical Abundance Analyses of 7 M31 Outer Halo Globular Clusters from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli; Venn, Kim; Mackey, Dougal; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Wallerstein, George

    2015-01-01

    Detailed chemical abundances of globular clusters provide insight into the formation and evolution of galaxies and their globular cluster systems. This talk presents detailed chemical abundances for seven M31 outer halo globular clusters (with projected radii greater than 30 kpc), as derived from high resolution integrated light spectra. Five of these clusters were recently discovered in the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). The integrated abundances show that 4 of these clusters are metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1.5) while the other 3 are more metal-rich. The most metal-poor globular clusters are α-enhanced, though 3 of the 4 are possibly less α-enhanced than MW stars (at the 1σ level). Other chemical abundance ratios ([Ba/Eu], [Eu/Ca], and [Ni/Fe]) are consistent with origins in low mass dwarf galaxies (similar to Fornax). The most metal-rich cluster ([Fe/H] ~ -1) stands out as being chemically distinct from Milky Way field stars of the same metallicity---its chemical abundance ratios agree best with the stars and clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr) than with the Milky Way field stars. The other metal-rich clusters, H10 and H23, look similar to the LMC and Milky Way field stars in all abundance ratios. These results indicate that M31's outer halo is being at least partially built up by the accretion of dwarf satellites, in agreement with previous observations.

  17. Light-Induced Changes of the Circadian Clock of Humans: Increasing Duration is More Effective than Increasing Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of increasing the intensity and/or duration of exposure on light-induced changes in the timing of the circadian clock of humans. Design: Multifactorial randomized controlled trial, between and within subject design Setting: General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) of an academic medical center Participants: 56 healthy young subjects (20-40 years of age) Interventions: Research subjects were admitted for 2 independent stays of 4 nights/3 days for treatment with bright or dim-light (randomized order) at a time known to induce phase delays in circadian timing. The intensity and duration of the bright light were determined by random assignment to one of 9 treatment conditions (duration of 1, 2, or 3 hours at 2000, 4000, or 8000 lux). Measurements and Results: Treatment-induced changes in the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and dim light melatonin offset (DLMOff) were measured from blood samples collected every 20-30 min throughout baseline and post-treatment nights. Comparison by multi-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) of light-induced changes in the time of the circadian melatonin rhythm for the 9 conditions revealed that changing the duration of the light exposure from 1 to 3 h increased the magnitude of light-induced delays. In contrast, increasing from moderate (2,000 lux) to high (8,000 lux) intensity light did not alter the magnitude of phase delays of the circadian melatonin rhythm. Conclusions: Results from the present study suggest that for phototherapy of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in humans, a longer period of moderate intensity light may be more effective than a shorter exposure period of high intensity light. Citation: Dewan K; Benloucif S; Reid K; Wolfe LF; Zee PC. Light-induced changes of the circadian clock of humans: increasing duration is more effective than increasing light intensity. SLEEP 2011;34(5):593-599. PMID:21532952

  18. Effect of wavelength and beam width on penetration in light-tissue interaction using computational methods.

    PubMed

    Ash, Caerwyn; Dubec, Michael; Donne, Kelvin; Bashford, Tim

    2017-09-12

    Penetration depth of ultraviolet, visible light and infrared radiation in biological tissue has not previously been adequately measured. Risk assessment of typical intense pulsed light and laser intensities, spectral characteristics and the subsequent chemical, physiological and psychological effects of such outputs on vital organs as consequence of inappropriate output use are examined. This technical note focuses on wavelength, illumination geometry and skin tone and their effect on the energy density (fluence) distribution within tissue. Monte Carlo modelling is one of the most widely used stochastic methods for the modelling of light transport in turbid biological media such as human skin. Using custom Monte Carlo simulation software of a multi-layered skin model, fluence distributions are produced for various non-ionising radiation combinations. Fluence distributions were analysed using Matlab mathematical software. Penetration depth increases with increasing wavelength with a maximum penetration depth of 5378 μm calculated. The calculations show that a 10-mm beam width produces a fluence level at target depths of 1-3 mm equal to 73-88% (depending on depth) of the fluence level at the same depths produced by an infinitely wide beam of equal incident fluence. Meaning little additional penetration is achieved with larger spot sizes. Fluence distribution within tissue and thus the treatment efficacy depends upon the illumination geometry and wavelength. To optimise therapeutic techniques, light-tissue interactions must be thoroughly understood and can be greatly supported by the use of mathematical modelling techniques.

  19. Effect of hyperfine splitting on light-induced drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    1986-09-01

    The influence of the hyperfine structure (hfs) of the levels upon the light-induced drift (LID) effect is investigated. It is shown that hfs considerably affects the dependence of the LID velocity upon the radiation frequency. It is concluded that for decreasing separation between the hfs components the LID effect can both increase and decrease depending upon the relationship of the system parameters (collision frequencies in different levels, the pressure of a buffer gas, etc.). A considerable decrease of the effect however is highly unlikely. It is shown that a change in the buffer gas pressure can lead to reversal of the LID velocity direction.

  20. EEG sensitivity to television: effects of ambient lighting.

    PubMed

    Binnie, C D; Darby, C E; De Korte, R A; Veldhuizen, R; Wilkins, A J

    1980-11-01

    The effect of ambient lighting on EEG sensitivity to television has been tested in 16 photosensitive epileptic patients. Those who were not sensitive to 50 Hz IPS responded to TV at a viewing distance of 1 m or less and showed a consistent increase of EEG activation by television when the room was brightly lit. Most of those who were sensitive to 50 Hz IPS were also TV-sensitive at viewing distances greater than 1 m and the effect was most marked with lights off. The results are discussed in the context of previous work showing that some patients with TV epilepsy respond to the raster pattern of the screen and some, at greater distance, to 50 Hz flicker.

  1. Managing major chemical accidents in China: towards effective risk information.

    PubMed

    He, Guizhen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yonglong; Mol, Arthur P J

    2011-03-15

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major contributor to environmental and health risks in China. This calls for the establishment of an effective chemical risk management system, which requires reliable, accurate and comprehensive data in the first place. However, the current chemical accident-related data system is highly fragmented and incomplete, as different responsible authorities adopt different data collection standards and procedures for different purposes. In building a more comprehensive, integrated and effective information system, this article: (i) reviews and assesses the existing data sources and data management, (ii) analyzes data on 976 recorded major hazardous chemical accidents in China over the last 40 years, and (iii) identifies the improvements required for developing integrated risk management in China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Light controllable surface coating for effective photothermal killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Han; Kang, Eun Bi; Jeong, Chan Jin; Sharker, Shazid Md; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2015-07-22

    Although the electronic properties of conducting films have been widely explored in optoelectronic fields, the optical absorption abilities of surface-coated films for photothermal conversion have been relatively less explored in the production of antibacterial coatings. Here, we present catechol-conjugated poly(vinylpyrrolidone) sulfobetaine (PVPS) and polyaniline (PANI) tightly linked by ionic interaction (PVPS:PANI) as a novel photothermal antibacterial agent for surface coating, which can absorb broadband near-infrared (NIR) light. Taking advantage of the NIR light absorption, this coating film can release eminent photothermal heat for the rapid killing of surface bacteria. The NIR light triggers a sharp rise in photothermal heat, providing the rapid and effective killing of 99.9% of the Gram-positive and -negative bacteria tested within 3 min of NIR light exposure when used at the concentration of 1 mg/mL. Although considerable progress has been made in the design of antibacterial coatings, the user control of NIR-irradiated rapid photothermal destruction of surface bacteria holds increasing attention beyond the traditional boundaries of typical antibacterial surfaces.

  3. Impact of light on organic solar cells: evolution of the chemical structure, morphology, and photophysical properties of the active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivaton, Agnès; Chambon, Sylvain; Manceau, Matthieu; Gardette, Jean-Luc; Firon, Muriel; Lemaître, Noëlla; Guillerez, Stéphane; Cros, Stéphane

    2008-04-01

    Organic photovoltaic represents an emerging technology thanks to its ability to give flexible, light weight and large-area devices, with low production cost by simple solution process or printing technologies. But these devices are known to exhibit low resistance to the combined action of sunlight, oxygen and water. This paper is focused on the behaviour of the active layer of the devices under illumination in the presence and absence of oxygen. The monitoring of the evolution of the chemical structure of MDMO-PPV submitted to accelerated artificial ageing permitted the elucidation of the mechanisms by which the polymer degrades. Extrapolation of the data to natural ageing suggested that, if well protected from oxygen (encapsulation), MDMO-PPV:PCBM based active layer is photochemically stable for several years in use conditions. In addition the charge transfer between the two materials was observed to remain efficient under exposure. The study of P3HT:PCBM blends allowed to point out the Achilles heel of P3HT towards the impact of light. In addition, P3HT:PCBM blends were shown to be much more stable under illumination than MDMO:PCBM blends. Preliminary results devoted to the AFM monitoring of the morphological modifications of P3HT:PCBM blends under the impact of light are also reported.

  4. Effects of extracellular calcium and of light adaptation on the response to dim light in honey bee drone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Raggenbass, M

    1983-11-01

    Light responses in honey bee drone photoreceptors were recorded with intracellular micro-electrodes in superfused slices of retina. The effects of changes in extracellular calcium on the size and the shape of the response to dim light were studied and compared with the effects of light adaptation. Dim light stimuli were used so that the amplitude of the response was linearly related to the number of the photons absorbed, the effects of voltage-dependent mechanisms were negligible and no detectable light adaptation was produced by the stimulus. Lowering the extracellular calcium concentration increased the amplitude and the duration of the response. Raising the extracellular calcium concentration produced the opposite effects. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration modified the response without altering either the linearity of the intensity--response relation or the resting membrane potential in the dark. Light adaptation decreased the amplitude and the duration of the response in a manner that could be quantitatively simulated, in the same photoreceptors, by an increase in the extracellular calcium concentration. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration, or light-adapting the preparation, modified the response without altering its early depolarizing phase. Lowering external calcium either did not affect, or slightly increased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization; raising external calcium, or light-adapting the preparation, either did not affect, or slightly decreased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization. The experimental data can be quantitatively described by a mathematical model with the basic assumption that calcium acts in the process of light adaptation by decreasing the mean open time of the light-activated channels.

  5. Health and environmental effects of complex chemical mixtures: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Department of Energy supports a broad long-term research program on human health and environmental effects from potential exposure to energy-related complex chemical mixtures. The program seeks basic mechanistic data on the effects of complex mixtures at the cellular, molecular, and whole animal levels to aid in predicting human health effects and seeks ecological data on biological and physical transformations in the mixtures, concentrations of the mixtures in various compartments of the environment, and potential routes for human exposure to these mixtures (e.g., food chain). On June 17-18, 1985, OHER held its First Annual Technical Meeting on the Complex Chemical Mixtures Program in Chicago, IL. The primary purpose of the meeting was to enable principal investigators to report the research status and accomplishments of ongoing complex chemical mixture studies supported by OHER. To help focus future research directions round table discussions were conducted.

  6. An in vitro comparative SEM study of marginal adaptation of IRM, light- and chemically-cured glass ionomer, and amalgam in furcation perforations.

    PubMed

    Rajablou, N; Azimi, S

    2001-12-01

    The furcation regions of 30 human mandibular molars were perforated and sealed using four different materials: IRM, light- and chemically-cured glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam. The materials were compared for marginal gaps in coronal, mid, and apical regions after routine SEM processing. While light-cured GIC showed the smallest gaps in the three regions, in mid and coronal regions chemically-cured GIC, and in apical regions amalgam, showed the largest gaps. IRM cases showed the highest rate of fillings with a good "fit", whereas the majority of amalgam cases and none of the chemically-cured GIC cases were overfilled.

  7. Effects of light quality on somatic embryogenesis in Araujia sericifera.

    PubMed

    Torné, Josep M.; Moysset, Luisa; Santos, Mireya; Simón, Esther

    2001-03-01

    The effects of photoperiod, light quality and end-of-day (EOD) phytochrome photoconversion on somatic embryogenesis (SE) of Araujia sericifera petals have been studied. Petals from immature flowers were cultured under 8- and 16-h photoperiods using Gro-lux fluorescent lamps. The photon fluence rate was 90-100 µmol m-2 s-1 and the red (R):far-red (FR) ratio was 98. R, FR, R followed by FR (R-FR) and FR followed by R (FR-R) light treatments were applied for 3 weeks at the end of the photoperiods. In a set of experiments, DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) or methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), both inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, were added to the culture medium in order to study the involvement of polyamine metabolism. The level of SE was the same in long (LD) and short (SD) days. Thus, the light effect was accomplished after 8 h. All EOD treatments that decreased the Pfr level inhibited SE when applied after SD, but not after LD. The FR-R treatment after LD caused an additional stimulatory effect on SE, even in the presence of polyamine inhibitors. DFMA inhibited SE in both SD and LD, but MGBG did not modify SE in either SD or LD. The R, FR and R-FR treatments did not alter the level of SE when applied after LD in the presence of DFMA or MGBG. However, these treatments decreased SE after SD when the medium contained polyamine inhibitors. Our results suggest that Gro-lux lamps, which produce an extremely high R:FR ratio, promote SE in A. sericifera and a timing response to phytochrome photoconversion during photoperiodic induction. Thus, our data corroborate the involvement of phytochromes and polyamines in SE in A. sericifera, which responded as a light-dominant long-day plant.

  8. Spectral effects of light-emitting diodes on plant growth and development: The importance of green and blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, K. R.; Bugbee, B.

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an emerging technology for plant growth lighting. Due to their narrow spectral output, colored LEDs provide many options for studying the spectral effects of light on plants. Early on, efficient red LEDs were the primary focus of photobiological research; however, subsequent studies have shown that normal plant growth and development cannot be achieved under red light without blue light supplementation. More recent studies have shown that red and blue (RB) LEDs supplemented with green light increase plant dry mass. This is because green light transmits more effectively through the leaf canopy than red and blue light, thus illuminating lower plant leaves and increasing whole-plant photosynthesis. Red, green and blue (RGB) light can be provided by either a conventional white light source (such as fluorescent lights), a combination of RGB LEDs, or from recently developed white LEDs. White LEDs exceed the efficiency of fluorescent lights and have a comparable broad spectrum. As such, they have the potential to replace fluorescent lighting for growth-chamber-based crop production both on Earth and in space. Here we report the results of studies on the effects of three white LED types (warm, neutral and cool) on plant growth and development compared to combinations of RB and RGB LEDs. Plants were grown under two constant light intensities (200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1). Temperature, environmental conditions and root-zone environment were uniformly maintained across treatments. Phytochrome photoequilbria and red/far-red ratios were similar among treatments and were comparable to conventional fluorescent lights. Blue light had a significant effect on both plant growth (dry mass gain) and development (dry mass partitioning). An increase in the absolute amount (μmol m-2 s-1) of blue light from 0-80 μmol m-2 s-1 resulted in a decrease in stem elongation, independent of the light intensity. However, an increase in the relative amount (%) of blue

  9. Photo and Chemical Reduction of Copper onto Anatase-Type TiO2 Nanoparticles with Enhanced Surface Hydroxyl Groups as Efficient Visible Light Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Hamed; Badiei, Alireza; Behnajady, Mohammad A; Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic efficiency of anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized using the sol-gel low-temperature method, were enhanced by a combined process of copper reduction and surface hydroxyl groups enhancement. UV-light-assisted photo and NaBH4 -assisted chemical reduction methods were used for deposition of copper onto TiO2. The surface hydroxyl groups of TiO2 were enhanced with the assistance of NaOH modification. The prepared catalysts were immobilized on glass plates and used as the fixed-bed systems for the removal of phenazopyridine as a model drug contaminant under visible light irradiation. NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated higher photocatalytic efficiency than that of pure TiO2 due to the extending of the charge carriers lifetime and enhancement of the adsorption capacity of TiO2 toward phenazopyridine. The relationship of structure and performance of prepared nanoparticles has been established by using various techniques, such as XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, XRF, TGA, DRS and PL. The effects of preparation variables, including copper content, reducing agents rate (NaBH4 concentration and UV light intensity) and NaOH concentration were investigated on the photocatalytic efficiency of NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles.

  10. Linking chemical contamination to biological effects in coastal pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beiras, Ricardo; Durán, Iria; Parra, Santiago; Urrutia, Miren B; Besada, Victoria; Bellas, Juan; Viñas, Lucía; Sánchez-Marín, Paula; González-Quijano, Amelia; Franco, María A; Nieto, Óscar; González, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    To establish the connection between pollutant levels and their harmful effects on living resources, coastal monitoring programmes have incorporated biological tools, such as the scope for growth (SFG) in marine mussels and benthic macrofauna community indices. Although the relation between oxygen-depleting anthropogenic inputs and the alteration of benthic communities is well described, the effects of chemical pollutants are unknown because they are not expected to favour any particular taxa. In this study, the combined efforts of five research teams involved in the investigative monitoring of marine pollution allowed the generation of a multiyear data set for Ría de Vigo (NW Iberian Peninsula). Multivariate analysis of these data allowed the identification of the chemical-matrix combinations responsible for most of the variability among sites and the construction of a chemical pollution index (CPI) that significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with biological effects at both the individual and the community levels. We report a consistent reduction in the physiological fitness of local populations of mussels as chemical pollution increases. The energy balance was more sensitive to pollution than individual physiological rates, but the reduction in the SFG was primarily due to significantly decreased clearance rates. We also found a decrease in benthic macrofauna diversity as chemical pollution increases. This diversity reduction resulted not from altered evenness, as the classic paradigm might suggest, but from a loss of species richness.

  11. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J J

    2001-12-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, a number of researchers have speculated that the changes in cognitive function are mediated by the endocrine-like actions of these chemicals. In this paper we review the evidence that cognitive effects of chemicals classified as environmental endocrine disruptors are mediated by changes in hormonal function. We begin by briefly reviewing the role of gonadal steroids, thyroid hormones, and glucocorticoids in brain development and brain function. We then review the endocrine changes and cognitive effects that have been reported for selected endocrine-disrupting chemicals, discuss the evidence for causal relationships between endocrine disruption and cognitive effects, and suggest directions for future research.

  12. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J J

    2001-01-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, a number of researchers have speculated that the changes in cognitive function are mediated by the endocrine-like actions of these chemicals. In this paper we review the evidence that cognitive effects of chemicals classified as environmental endocrine disruptors are mediated by changes in hormonal function. We begin by briefly reviewing the role of gonadal steroids, thyroid hormones, and glucocorticoids in brain development and brain function. We then review the endocrine changes and cognitive effects that have been reported for selected endocrine-disrupting chemicals, discuss the evidence for causal relationships between endocrine disruption and cognitive effects, and suggest directions for future research. PMID:11748026

  13. Ultraviolet light photobiology of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis and chemical reactivation of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The tunable dye laser was developed in order to perform UV-B and UV-C (254-320 nm) action spectra studies on several different organisms. Using the laser, action spectra studies have been performed for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces, Chlamydomonas, Caenorhabditis elegans, Paramecium, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Studies generally indicate increasing LD{sub 50} values with increasing wavelength. Two notable findings were made: (1) The action spectra does not follow the DNA absorption spectra at 280, 290 and 295 nm; (2) The repair competent/repair defective sensitization factor does not remain constant throughout the wavelength region. In addition it was found that the repair defective strain of E. coli, Bs-1, showed an increase in survival with increasing UV irradiation, at certain dose levels. Further experiments were designed to better characterize the reactivation. Tetrahymena were exposed to UV-C and reactivated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and 4-nitro quinoline oxide (4-NQO). In both cases survival was seen to increase after chemical exposure. Likewise, UV-C was found to reactivate chemical damage (MMS).

  14. The Origins of Light and Heavy R-process Elements Identified by Chemical Tagging of Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-01

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration γ-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A > 130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process production site. We conclude that the tight correlation by a large fraction of halo stars is attributable to the fact that core-collapse supernovae produce light r-process elements while heavy r-process elements such as Eu and Ba are produced by NS mergers. On the other hand, stars in the outlier, composed of r-enhanced stars ([Eu/Fe] gsim +1) such as CS22892-052, were exclusively enriched by matter ejected by a subclass of NS mergers that is inclined to be massive and consist of both light and heavy r-process nuclides.

  15. THE ORIGINS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY R-PROCESS ELEMENTS IDENTIFIED BY CHEMICAL TAGGING OF METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-01

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration γ-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A > 130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process production site. We conclude that the tight correlation by a large fraction of halo stars is attributable to the fact that core-collapse supernovae produce light r-process elements while heavy r-process elements such as Eu and Ba are produced by NS mergers. On the other hand, stars in the outlier, composed of r-enhanced stars ([Eu/Fe] ≳ +1) such as CS22892-052, were exclusively enriched by matter ejected by a subclass of NS mergers that is inclined to be massive and consist of both light and heavy r-process nuclides.

  16. Origin of light scattering variations of a latent flaw through light scattering measurement with applied stress effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Sakai, Kazufumi; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-11-01

    The stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM) was proposed for inspecting surface to detect polishing induced latent flaws. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of the light scattering intensity variation of latent flaws using SILSM, we have investigated stress effect of light scattering intensities using polarized light system and calculated the reflectance and the retardation using Jones matrix. As the results, we evaluated the change in the birefringence around a tip of a latent flaw between before and after stress were applied.

  17. Direct Effects of Light on Alertness, Vigilance, and the Waking Electroencephalogram in Humans Depend on Prior Light History

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Light can induce an acute alerting response in humans; however, it is unknown whether the magnitude of this response is simply a function of the absolute illuminance of the light itself, or whether it depends on illuminance history preceding the stimulus. Here, we compared the effects of illuminance history on the alerting response to a subsequent light stimulus. Design: A randomized, crossover design was used to compare the effect of two illuminance histories (1 lux vs. 90 lux) on the alerting response to a 6.5-h 90-lux light stimulus during the biological night. Setting: Intensive Physiologic Monitoring Unit, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. Participants: Fourteen healthy young adults (6 F; 23.5 ± 2.9 years). Interventions: Participants were administered two 6.5-h light exposures (LE) of 90 lux during the biological night. For 3 days prior to each LE, participants were exposed to either 1 lux or 90 lux during the wake episode. Measurements and Results: The alerting response to light was assessed using subjective sleepiness ratings, lapses of attention, and reaction times as measured with an auditory psychomotor vigilance task, as well as power density in the delta/theta range of the waking EEG. The alerting response to light was greater and lasted longer when the LE followed exposure to 1 lux compared to 90 lux light. Conclusion: The magnitude and duration of the alerting effect of light at night depends on the illuminance history and appears to be subject to sensitization and adaptation. Citation: Chang AM; Scheer FAJL; Czeisler CA; Aeschbach D. Direct effects of light on alertness, vigilance, and the waking electroencephalogram in humans depend on prior light history. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1239-1246. PMID:23904684

  18. Light-controlled modulation of gene expression by chemical optoepigenetic probes.

    PubMed

    Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J Adam; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatiotemporal control. Here we present a generalizable approach, referred to as 'chemo-optical modulation of epigenetically regulated transcription' (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may be translated into new therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required.

  19. Chemical alloying and light-induced collapse of intermediate phases in chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Boolchand, P.; Jackson, K. A.; Micoulaut, M.

    2007-06-01

    The elastic behaviour of binary GexSe1-x glasses, examined in Raman scattering experiments earlier, has shown glasses at x<0.20 to be in the flexible phase, those at x>0.25 to be in the stressed-rigid phase and those in the 0.20light (647 nm) power (\\bcal {P}) in Ge1/4Se3/4-yIy glasses shows the IP to systematically collapse and to vanish once \\bcal {P} increases to 1.5 × 106 W cm-2. Here, an intense beam of near-bandgap light serves to optically pump the delicate intermediate range order prevailing in the IP and reversibly destroy it.

  20. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  1. Effect of recycled light in two-beam interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnero, Giovanni; Mana, Giovanni; Massa, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    We developed a laser interferometer allowing parts per million resolution to be achieved in fringe division for the measurement of the Si (220) lattice spacing by combined x-ray and optical interferometry. With the aim of obtaining 10{sup -9} measurement uncertainty, we pursued the study of a troublesome noise in interferometer operation and eventually identified its origin in a minute interferometer optical feedback. We investigated mathematically the feedback effect and verified predictions experimentally. Imperfect isolation and light recycling having been identified and subsequently experimentally proved, we took remedial steps in order to improve measurement capabilities. This investigation has brought into light and has made it possible to quantify an interferometer noise up to now overlooked.

  2. Effects of light extraction efficiency to the efficiency droop of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Zheng, Haiyang; Guo, Enqing; Cheng, Yan; Ma, Jun; Wang, Liancheng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin

    2013-01-01

    Light extraction efficiency (LEE) droop as an important factor contributing to the efficiency droop of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been demonstrated and investigated in detail. The LEE droop effect is induced by the spatial dependence of the extraction efficiency of photons inside of the LED devices and the aggravating crowding effect of the injection electrons around n-type electrodes as injection current increases. A current blocking layer is introduced to alleviate the LEE droop effect. And the light output power of the LEDs is also improved by 43% at an injection current of 350 mA.

  3. Chemical Hair Relaxers Have Adverse Effects a Myth or Reality

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vinma H; Shetty, Narendra J; Nair, Dhanya Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Context: Hair plays an important role in one's personality and builds confidence. Now-a-days, chemical hair relaxers are used very commonly in the society. We document the adverse effects reported by the sample that have used any one of the professional chemical hair relaxers. Aim: To study the adverse effects reported by the sample who underwent repeated chemical hair relaxing. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire based study done on a sample taken from a medical college and hospital campus in Mangalore. Materials and Methods: The sample was restricted to females and to those who underwent it more than once. A questionnaire was given to a sample of 90, which matched our criteria. Statistical Analysis: SPSS software 17. Results: Adverse effects reported by the sample after undergoing the procedure were found to be a high 95.56%, out of which the following are the common adverse effects reported; frizzy hair in 67%, dandruff in 61%, hair loss in 47%, thinning and weakening of hair in 40%, greying of hair 22%, and split ends in only 17%. Conclusions: Very few studies have been conducted on the adverse effects of hair straightening products in India. From our study, it can be stated that most of the samples had adverse effects, which was as high as 95.56%. Hence from the details elicited from this study, we can conclude that, usage of chemical hair relaxers does cause adverse effects and is “not a myth.” Thus, it is necessary to make available a less harmful chemical hair relaxer to the society. PMID:23960393

  4. Effect of light and sweeteners on color in an amaretto-type liqueur.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Olivares, F; Pless, R C; González-Jasso, E

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the color loss in an amaretto-type liqueur under controlled light conditions showed a clear dependence of the decoloration rate on the light intensity, and complete color stability in the absence of light. The principal sweetener used in the preparation of the liqueur strongly affected the rate of color loss under irradiation, color stability being much greater for the formulations containing sucrose or no added sweetener instead of fructose 42. These differences were more pronounced in experiments conducted with chemically well-defined mixtures that contained either of the 2 azo dyes used in the coloration of the amaretto, tartrazine, and Allura Red, and various alternative sweeteners, in 28% (v/v) ethanol solution: D-fructose and, to a lesser extent, D-glucose, at concentrations of 14% (w/v), were effective in bringing about photodecoloration, while no color loss was detected in the presence of sucrose, or in the absence of any added sugar. The results are interpreted in terms of a redox reaction of reducing sugars with the diarylazo compounds, the function of the light being the conversion of the azo compound from the predominant trans configuration to the cis configuration, which on geometric grounds lends itself better to a concerted, cyclical redox reaction with the reducing sugar.

  5. Ocean Acidification: Coccolithophore's Light Controlled Effect on Alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, W.

    2015-12-01

    Coccolithophorids, which play a significant role in the flux of calcite and organic carbon from the photic region to deeper pelagic and benthic zones, are potentially far more useful than siliceous phytoplankton for ocean fertilization projects designed to sequester CO2. However, the production of H+ ions during calcification (HCO3 + Ca+ —> CaCO3 + H+) has resulted in localized acidification around coccolithophore blooms. It has been hypothesized that under the correct light conditions photosynthesis could proceed at a rate such that CO2 is removed in amounts equimolar or greater than the H+ produced by calcification, allowing stable or increasing alkalinity despite ongoing calcification. Previously, this effect had not been demonstrated under laboratory conditions. Fifteen Emiliania huxleyi cultures were separated into equal groups with each receiving: 0, 6, 12, 18, or 24 hours of light each day for 24 days. Daily pH, cell density, and temperature measurements revealed a strong positive correlation between light exposure and pH, and no significant decline in pH in any of the cultures. Alkalinity increases were temperature independent and not strongly correlated with cell density, implying photosynthetic removal of carbon dioxide as the root cause. The average pH across living cultures increased from 7.9 to 8.3 over the first week and changed little for the reminder of the 24-day period. The results demonstrate coccolithophorids can increase alkalinity across a broad range of cell densities, despite the acidification inherent to the calcification process. If the light-alkalinity effect reported here proves scalable to larger cultures, Emiliania huxleyi are a strong candidate for carbon sequestration via targeted ocean fertilization.

  6. Differential effects of light quantity and spectral light quality on growth, morphology and development of two stoloniferous Potentilla species.

    PubMed

    Stuefer, Josef F; Huber, Heidrun

    1998-11-01

    Plant species from open habitats often show pronounced responses to shading. Apart from a reduction in growth, shading can lead to marked changes in morphology and architecture, and it may affect the rate of plant development. Natural shade comprises two basically different features, a reduction in light quantity (amount of radiation) and changes in the spectral light quality. The first aspect represents changes in resource availability, while the latter acts as a source of information for plants and can prompt morphogenetic responses. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to study the effects of changes in light quality and quantity on the growth, morphology and development of two stoloniferous Potentilla species. Individual plants were subjected to three light treatments: (1) full daylight (control); and two shade treatments, in which (2) light quantity (photon flux density) and (3) light spectral quality (red/far-red ratio) were changed independently. Plant development was followed throughout the study. Morphological parameters, biomass and clonal offspring production were measured at the end of the experiment. Morphological traits such as petiole length, leaf blade characteristics and investment patterns into spacers showed high degrees of shade-induced plasticity in both species. With a few exceptions, light quality mainly affected morphological variables, while production parameters were most responsive to changes in light quantity. Potentilla anserina allocated resources preferentially to established rosettes at the cost of stolon growth and branching, while in P. reptans, all parameters related to development and allocation were slowed down to the same extent by light limitation. Light quality changes also positively affected biomass production via changes in leaf allocation. Changes in the spectral light quality had major effects on the size of modular structures (leaves, ramets), whereas changes in light quantity mainly affected their numbers.

  7. Effect of temperature in titanium chemical mechanical planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Jiao, Yubo; Sampurno, Yasa; Zhuang, Yun; Theng, Siannie; Philipossian, Ara

    2015-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the tribological and kinetic attributes of Ti chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) was investigated. Results indicated that processes at platen temperatures of 25 and 50 °C behaved similarly in terms of their tribological mechanism. At both temperatures, average coefficient of friction (COF) ranged from 0.19 to 0.41, indicating that boundary lubrication was the dominant tribological mechanism. Results also showed that average COF decreased with increasing platen temperature likely due to softening of pad asperities and lower slurry viscosity at the higher temperature. Due to exponentially accelerated chemical effects, Ti removal rate was higher when platen temperature was set at 50 °C. A two-step modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was used to simulate Ti removal rate and the chemical and mechanical rate constants under different polishing conditions. Simulated values of removal rate agreed well with experimental data. Simulated chemical rate to mechanical rate constant ratios suggested that the removal mechanism shifted from a more chemically-controlled to a more mechanically-controlled process as platen temperature was raised.

  8. Chemical contaminants in feedlot wastes: concentrations, effects and attenuation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S J; Roser, D J; Davies, C M; Peters, G M; Stuetz, R M; Tucker, R; Ashbolt, N J

    2008-08-01

    Commercial feedlots for beef cattle finishing are potential sources of a range of trace chemicals which have human health or environmental significance. To ensure adequate protection of human and environmental health from exposure to these chemicals, the application of effective manure and effluent management practices is warranted. The Australian meat and livestock industry has adopted a proactive approach to the identification of best management practices. Accordingly, this review was undertaken to identify key chemical species that may require consideration in the development of guidelines for feedlot manure and effluent management practices in Australia. Important classes of trace chemicals identified include steroidal hormones, antibiotics, ectoparasiticides, mycotoxins, heavy metals and dioxins. These are described in terms of their likely sources, expected concentrations and public health or environmental significance based on international data and research. Androgenic hormones such as testosterone and trenbolone are significantly active in feedlot wastes, but they are poorly understood in terms of fate and environmental implications. The careful management of residues of antibiotics including virginiamycin, tylosin and oxytetracycline appears prudent in terms of minimising the risk of potential public health impacts from resistant strains of bacteria. Good management of ectoparasiticides including synthetic pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones, fluazuron, and amitraz is important for the prevention of potential ecological implications, particularly towards dung beetles. Very few of these individual chemical contaminants have been thoroughly investigated in terms of concentrations, effects and attenuation in Australian feedlot wastes.

  9. Chemical release and radiation effects experiment advanced planning and coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, William W.; Alzmann, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    The efforts conducted to provide assessments and planning support for the Chemical Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) Experiments are summarized. Included are activities regarding scientific working group and workshop development including the preparation of descriptive information on the CRRES Project.

  10. Environmental chemical mixtures: Assessing ecological exposure and effects in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a USGS fact sheet that describes a collaborative effort between USGS and US EPA to characterize exposures to chemical mixtures and associated biological effects for a diverse range of US streams representing varying watershed size, land-use patterns, and ecotypes.

  11. EFFECTIVE RISK MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WORKSHOP NEWMEDIA CD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a CD-ROM version of the workshop, Effective Risk Management of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, held in January 2002, in Cincinnati, Ohio. The goal of this workshop was to introduce the science and engineering behind managing the potential risk of suspected endocri...

  12. Environmental chemical mixtures: Assessing ecological exposure and effects in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a USGS fact sheet that describes a collaborative effort between USGS and US EPA to characterize exposures to chemical mixtures and associated biological effects for a diverse range of US streams representing varying watershed size, land-use patterns, and ecotypes.

  13. Chemically modified amino porphyrin/TiO2 for the degradation of Acid Black 1 under day light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, Balu; Balakrishna, Avula; Arranja, Cláudia T.; Dias, Carlos M. F.; Sobral, Abilio J. F. N.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, for the first time, chemically modified 5,10,15,20-meso-tetra-(para-amino)-phenyl-porphyrin/TiO2 (TPAPP/TiO2) was prepared and used for the degradation of an azo dye Acid Black 1 (AB 1) under direct sunlight. Initially, TiO2 was prepared by sol-gel method. Before making a TPAPP/TiO2 composite, the surface modification of TiO2 was carried out with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS) which acts as a coupling agent. This is an epoxy terminated silane and could easily bond to the amino group of TPAPP through epoxy cleavage. The formation of TPAPP/TiO2 was confirmed by different characterization techniques such as FT-IR, XRD, SEM and DRS. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 was highly influenced by TPAPP. A mechanism was proposed for AB 1 degradation by TPAPP/TiO2 under sun light.

  14. Chemically modified amino porphyrin/TiO2 for the degradation of Acid Black 1 under day light illumination.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Balu; Balakrishna, Avula; Arranja, Cláudia T; Dias, Carlos M F; Sobral, Abilio J F N

    2017-04-05

    In this paper, for the first time, chemically modified 5,10,15,20-meso-tetra-(para-amino)-phenyl-porphyrin/TiO2 (TPAPP/TiO2) was prepared and used for the degradation of an azo dye Acid Black 1 (AB 1) under direct sunlight. Initially, TiO2 was prepared by sol-gel method. Before making a TPAPP/TiO2 composite, the surface modification of TiO2 was carried out with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS) which acts as a coupling agent. This is an epoxy terminated silane and could easily bond to the amino group of TPAPP through epoxy cleavage. The formation of TPAPP/TiO2 was confirmed by different characterization techniques such as FT-IR, XRD, SEM and DRS. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 was highly influenced by TPAPP. A mechanism was proposed for AB 1 degradation by TPAPP/TiO2 under sun light.

  15. Performance of the VUV high resolution and high flux beamline for chemical dynamics studies at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Koike, M. Hsu, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    At the Advanced Light Source an undulator beamline, with an energy range from 6 to 30 eV, has been constructed for chemical dynamics experiments. The higher harmonics of the undulator are suppressed by a novel, windowless gas filter. In one branchline high flux, 2 % bandwidth radiation is directed toward an end station for photodissociation and crossed molecular beam experiments. A photon flux of photon/sec has been measured at this end station. In a second branchline a 6.65 m off- plane Eagle monochromator delivers narrow bandwidth radiation to an end station for photoionization studies. At this second end station a peak flux of 3 x 10{sup 11} was observed for 25,000 resolving power. This monochromator has achieved a resolving power of 70,000 using a 4800 grooves/mm grating, one of the highest resolving powers obtained by a VUV monochromator.

  16. Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Liu, Jiang; Engquist, Isak; Ederth, Thomas

    2017-01-25

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

  17. Light at the end of the channel: optical manipulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability with chemical photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    Mourot, Alexandre; Tochitsky, Ivan; Kramer, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that control the movement of ions across the cell membrane. They are the molecular machines that make neurons excitable by enabling the initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs). Rapid signaling within and between neurons requires complex molecular processes that couple the sensing of membrane voltage or neurotransmitter release to the fast opening and closing of the ion channel gate. Malfunction of an ion channel's sensing or gating module can have disastrous pathological consequences. However, linking molecular changes to the modulation of neural circuits and ultimately to a physiological or pathological state is not a straightforward task. It requires precise and sophisticated methods of controlling the function of ion channels in their native environment. To address this issue we have developed new photochemical tools that enable the remote control of neuronal ion channels with light. Due to its optical nature, our approach permits the manipulation of the nervous system with high spatial, temporal and molecular precision that will help us understand the link between ion channel function and physiology. In addition, this strategy may also be used in the clinic for the direct treatment of some neuronal disorders. PMID:23518818

  18. Non-Visual Effects of Light on Melatonin, Alertness and Cognitive Performance: Can Blue-Enriched Light Keep Us Alert?

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi; Steiner, Roland; Blattner, Peter; Oelhafen, Peter; Götz, Thomas; Cajochen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background Light exposure can cascade numerous effects on the human circadian process via the non-imaging forming system, whose spectral relevance is highest in the short-wavelength range. Here we investigated if commercially available compact fluorescent lamps with different colour temperatures can impact on alertness and cognitive performance. Methods Sixteen healthy young men were studied in a balanced cross-over design with light exposure of 3 different light settings (compact fluorescent lamps with light of 40 lux at 6500K and at 2500K and incandescent lamps of 40 lux at 3000K) during 2 h in the evening. Results Exposure to light at 6500K induced greater melatonin suppression, together with enhanced subjective alertness, well-being and visual comfort. With respect to cognitive performance, light at 6500K led to significantly faster reaction times in tasks associated with sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance and GO/NOGO Task), but not in tasks associated with executive function (Paced Visual Serial Addition Task). This cognitive improvement was strongly related with attenuated salivary melatonin levels, particularly for the light condition at 6500K. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the sensitivity of the human alerting and cognitive response to polychromatic light at levels as low as 40 lux, is blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system. Thus, the selection of commercially available compact fluorescent lights with different colour temperatures significantly impacts on circadian physiology and cognitive performance at home and in the workplace. PMID:21298068

  19. Effect of mechanical stress on biofilms challenged by different chemicals.

    PubMed

    Simões, Manuel; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Vieira, Maria João

    2005-12-01

    In this study a methodology was applied in order to ascertain the mechanical stability of biofilms, by using a stainless-steel (SS) rotating device immersed in a biological reactor where biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens were allowed to grow for 7 days at a Reynolds number of agitation of 2400. The biofilms developed with this system were characterised in terms of amount of total, extracellular and intracellular proteins and polysaccharides, amount of mass, metabolic activity and mechanical stability, showing that the biofilms were active, had a high content of extracellular constituents and an inherent mechanical stability. In order to assess the role of chemical agents on the mechanical stability, the biofilms were exposed to chemical agents followed by mechanical treatments by submission to increase Reynolds number of agitation. Seven different chemical agents were tested (two non-oxidising biocides, three surfactants and two oxidising biocides) and their effects on the biofilm mechanical stability were evaluated. The increase in the Reynolds number increased the biofilm removal, but total biofilm removal was not found for all the conditions tested. For the experiment without chemical addition (only mechanical treatment), the biofilm remaining on the surface was about 76%. The chemical treatment followed by the subsequent mechanical treatment did not remove all the biofilms from the surface. The biofilm remaining on the SS cylinder ranged from 3% to 62%, depending on the chemical treatment, showing that the chemical treatment is far from being a cause that induces massive biofilm detachment and even the synergistic chemical and mechanical treatments did not promote biofilm removal. Some chemical agents promoted an increase in the biofilm mechanical stability such as glutaraldehyde (GTA), benzalkonium chloride (BC), except for the lower concentration tested, and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), except for the higher concentration tested. Treatments that

  20. Using light to shape chemical gradients for parallel and automated analysis of chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Yang, Hee Won; Bonger, Kimberly M; Guignet, Emmanuel G; Wandless, Thomas J; Meyer, Tobias

    2015-04-23

    Numerous molecular components have been identified that regulate the directed migration of eukaryotic cells toward sources of chemoattractant. However, how the components of this system are wired together to coordinate multiple aspects of the response, such as directionality, speed, and sensitivity to stimulus, remains poorly understood. Here we developed a method to shape chemoattractant gradients optically and analyze cellular chemotaxis responses of hundreds of living cells per well in 96-well format by measuring speed changes and directional accuracy. We then systematically characterized migration and chemotaxis phenotypes for 285 siRNA perturbations. A key finding was that the G-protein Giα subunit selectively controls the direction of migration while the receptor and Gβ subunit proportionally control both speed and direction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that neutrophils chemotax persistently in response to gradients of fMLF but only transiently in response to gradients of ATP. The method we introduce is applicable for diverse chemical cues and systematic perturbations, can be used to measure multiple cell migration and signaling parameters, and is compatible with low- and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. Aquatic environmental assessment of Lake Balaton in the light of physical-chemical water parameters.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Vitkor; Németh, József; Juzsakova, Tatjana; Domokos, Endre; Kovács, Zsófia; Rédey, Ákos

    2017-09-20

    One of the issues of the Hungarian Water Management Strategy is the improvement and upgrading of the water of Lake Balaton. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) specifies and sets forth the achievement of the good ecological status. However, the assessment of the water quality of the lake as a complex system requires a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation procedure. Measurements were carried out around the Lake Balaton at ten different locations/sites and 13 physical-chemical parameters were monitored at each measurement site.For the interpretation of the water chemistry parameters the Aquatic Environmental Assessment (AEA) method devised by authors was used for the water body of the Lake Balaton. The AEA method can be used for all types of the water bodies since it is flexible and using individual weighting procedure for the water chemistry parameters comprehensive information can be obtain. The AEA method was compared with existing EIA methods according to a predefined criterion system and proved to be the most suitable tool for evaluating the environmental impacts in our study.On the basis of the results it can be concluded that the status of the quality of studied area on the Lake Balaton can be categorized as proper quality (from the outcome of the ten measurement sites this conclusion was reached at seven sites).

  2. Qualifying lighting remodelling in a Hungarian city based on light pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolláth, Z.; Dömény, A.; Kolláth, K.; Nagy, B.

    2016-09-01

    The public lighting system has been remodelled in several Hungarian cities. In some cases the majority of the old luminaries were fitted with high pressure sodium lamps and they were replaced with white LED lighting with a typical correlated colour temperature of about 4500 K. Therefore, these remodelling works provide a testbed for methods in measurements and modelling. We measured the luminance of the light domes of selected cities by DSLR photometry before and after the remodelling. Thanks to the full cut off design of the new lighting fixtures we obtained a slight decrease even in the blue part of the sky dome spectra of a tested city. However, we have to note that this positive change is the result of the bad geometry (large ULR) of the previous lighting system. Based on Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations we provide a comparison of different indicators that can be used to qualify the remodelling, and to predict the possible changes in light pollution.

  3. The effects of environmental chemicals on renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Anglina; Trasande, Leonardo; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The global incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing among individuals of all ages. Despite advances in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there remains a lack of safe and effective drugs to reverse or stabilize renal function in patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial causes of CKD. Consequently, modifiable risk factors that are associated with a progressive decline in kidney function need to be identified. Numerous reports have documented the adverse effects that occur in response to graded exposure to a wide range of environmental chemicals. This Review summarizes the effects of such chemicals on four aspects of cardiorenal function: albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure and serum uric acid concentration. We focus on compounds that individuals are likely to be exposed to as a consequence of normal consumer activities or medical treatment, namely phthalates, bisphenol A, polyfluorinated alkyl acids, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. Environmental exposure to these chemicals during everyday life could have adverse consequences on renal function and might contribute to progressive cumulative renal injury over a lifetime. Regulatory efforts should be made to limit individual exposure to environmental chemicals in an attempt to reduce the incidence of cardiorenal disease. PMID:26100504

  4. The effects of environmental chemicals on renal function.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Anglina; Trasande, Leonardo; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The global incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing among individuals of all ages. Despite advances in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there remains a lack of safe and effective drugs to reverse or stabilize renal function in patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial causes of CKD. Consequently, modifiable risk factors that are associated with a progressive decline in kidney function need to be identified. Numerous reports have documented the adverse effects that occur in response to graded exposure to a wide range of environmental chemicals. This Review summarizes the effects of such chemicals on four aspects of cardiorenal function: albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure and serum uric acid concentration. We focus on compounds that individuals are likely to be exposed to as a consequence of normal consumer activities or medical treatment, namely phthalates, bisphenol A, polyfluorinated alkyl acids, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. Environmental exposure to these chemicals during everyday life could have adverse consequences on renal function and might contribute to progressive cumulative renal injury over a lifetime. Regulatory efforts should be made to limit individual exposure to environmental chemicals in an attempt to reduce the incidence of cardiorenal disease.

  5. Effect of Chemical Composition on Texture Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velmanirajan, K.; Narayanasamy, R.; Anuradha, K.

    2013-11-01

    This study explores the effect of annealing temperature and chemical composition on crystallographic texture evolution of commercially pure aluminium alloy sheets using response surface methodology (RSM). The orientation of the crystal structure in Euler space using Bunge notation has been studied to know the behavior of the metal and estimate its volume fraction. The experimental procedure involves texture analysis with respect to annealing temperature and chemical composition in correlation with the results of formability and use of RSM. The effect of important input parameters, namely, annealing temperature and chemical composition (impurities) was used for predicting the numerical models using the volume fraction of texture output from the crystallographic study using Design Expert 8.0.7.1, trial software. Also this study explains the effect of individual chemical components, namely, iron, silicon, and copper in evolution of texture components. The volume fraction of Cube {1 0 0} <0 0 1>, Bs {1 1 0} <1 1 2>, and S {1 2 3} <6 3 4> components increase, whenever iron and copper content increase and silicon component decreases.

  6. Synergistic health effects between chemical pollutants and electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ledoigt, Gérard; Sta, Chaima; Goujon, Eric; Souguir, Dalila; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2015-01-01

    Humans and ecosystems are exposed to highly variable and unknown cocktail of chemicals and radiations. Although individual chemicals are typically present at low concentrations, they can interact with each other resulting in additive or potentially synergistic mixture effects. This was also observed with products obtained by radiation actions such as sunlight or electromagnetic fields that can change the effects of chemicals, such as pesticides, and metal trace elements on health. Concomitant presence of various pesticides and their transformation products adds further complexity to chemical risk assessment since chronic inflammation is a key step for cancer promotion. Degradation of a parent molecule can produce several by-products which can trigger various toxic effects with different impacts on health and environment. For instance, the cocktail of sunlight irradiated sulcotrione pesticide has a greater cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than parent molecule, sulcotrione, and questions about the impact of photochemical process on environment. Adjuvants were shown to modify the biological features of pesticides. Addition of other elements, metals or biological products, can differently enhance cell toxicity of pesticides or electromagnetic radiations suggesting a synergy in living organisms. Electromagnetic fields spreading, pesticide by-products and mixtures monitoring become greater for environmental contamination evaluations.

  7. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  8. Effects of chemically contaminated sewage sludge on an aphid population

    SciTech Connect

    Culliney, T.W.; Pimentel, D.

    1986-12-01

    Survival and fecundity of green peach aphids, Myzus persicae, were markedly reduced when they were fed on collard plants grown in pots of soil treated with chemically contaminated sewage sludge, as compared to populations on potted plants grown in uncontaminated sludge or on fertilized soil (control). Calculated demographic parameters differed significantly between the contaminated sludge and uncontaminated sludge populations and between the contaminated sludge and control populations. No significant differences were detected between the uncontaminated sludge and control populations. The ecological effects on the aphids suggest that plant uptake and translocation of chemicals from the contaminated sludge affected aphid fitness through direct toxicity and/or reduced nutritional value of the plant. These results indicate that phytophagous insects may be affected by chemical contaminants in sewage sludge used in agriculture.

  9. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-04-09

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  10. The darkening of zinc yellow: XANES speciation of chromium in artist;s paints after light and chemical exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Zanella, Luciana; Casadio, Francesca; Gray, Kimberly A.; Warta, Richard; Ma, Qing; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2012-03-14

    The color darkening of selected brushstrokes of the masterpiece A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - 1884 (by Georges Seurat) has been attributed to the alteration of the chromate pigment zinc yellow. The pigment originally displays a bright greenish-yellow color but may undergo, after aging, darkening to a dull, ocher tone. We used XANES to probe the oxidation state of Cr on paint reconstructions, and show that color changes are associated with the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Paint mixtures containing the pigment and linseed oil to mimic mixtures used in La Grande Jatte were subjected to artificial aging in the presence of light, SO{sub 2}, and variable air humidity - 50 and 90% relative humidity. High relative humidity led to the largest degree of Cr(VI) reduction whereas low relative humidity promoted light-induced alterations. These results are corroborated by visible reflectance measurements on the same laboratory samples and contribute to a better understanding of the chemical reactivity of chromate pigments, which are present in many historical works of art.

  11. Single crystalline ZnO radial homojunction light-emitting diodes fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Ahmed, Towfiq; Tang, Wei; ...

    2017-09-05

    ZnO radial p–n junction architecture has the potential for forward-leap of light-emitting diode (LED) technology in terms of higher efficacy and economical production. Here, we report on ZnO radial p–n junction-based light emitting diodes prepared by full metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with hydrogen-assisted p-type doping approach. The p-type ZnO(P) thin films were prepared by MOCVD with the precursors of dimethylzinc, tert-butanol, and tertiarybutylphosphine. Controlling the precursor flow for dopant results in the systematic change of doping concentration, Hall mobility, and electrical conductivity. Moreover, the approach of hydrogen-assisted phosphorous doping in ZnO expands the understanding of doping behaviour in ZnO.more » Ultraviolet and visible electroluminescence of ZnO radial p–n junction was demonstrated through a combination of position-controlled nano/microwire and crystalline p-type ZnO(P) radial shell growth on the wires. Lastly, the reported research opens a pathway of realisation of production-compatible ZnO p–n junction LEDs.« less

  12. Single crystalline ZnO radial homojunction light-emitting diodes fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Ahmed, Towfiq; Tang, Wei; Kim, Yong-Jin; Hong, Young Joon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2017-09-01

    ZnO radial p–n junction architecture has the potential for forward-leap of light-emitting diode (LED) technology in terms of higher efficacy and economical production. We report on ZnO radial p–n junction-based light emitting diodes prepared by full metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with hydrogen-assisted p-type doping approach. The p-type ZnO(P) thin films were prepared by MOCVD with the precursors of dimethylzinc, tert-butanol, and tertiarybutylphosphine. Controlling the precursor flow for dopant results in the systematic change of doping concentration, Hall mobility, and electrical conductivity. Moreover, the approach of hydrogen-assisted phosphorous doping in ZnO expands the understanding of doping behaviour in ZnO. Ultraviolet and visible electroluminescence of ZnO radial p–n junction was demonstrated through a combination of position-controlled nano/microwire and crystalline p-type ZnO(P) radial shell growth on the wires. The reported research opens a pathway of realisation of production-compatible ZnO p–n junction LEDs.

  13. Single crystalline ZnO radial homojunction light-emitting diodes fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Ahmed, Towfiq; Tang, Wei; Kim, Yong-Jin; Joon Hong, Young; Lee, Chul-Ho; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2017-09-27

    ZnO radial p-n junction architecture has the potential for forward-leap of light-emitting diode (LED) technology in terms of higher efficacy and economical production. We report on ZnO radial p-n junction-based light emitting diodes prepared by full metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with hydrogen-assisted p-type doping approach. The p-type ZnO(P) thin films were prepared by MOCVD with the precursors of dimethylzinc, tert-butanol, and tertiarybutylphosphine. Controlling the precursor flow for dopant results in the systematic change of doping concentration, Hall mobility, and electrical conductivity. Moreover, the approach of hydrogen-assisted phosphorous doping in ZnO expands the understanding of doping behaviour in ZnO. Ultraviolet and visible electroluminescence of ZnO radial p-n junction was demonstrated through a combination of position-controlled nano/microwire and crystalline p-type ZnO(P) radial shell growth on the wires. The reported research opens a pathway of realisation of production-compatible ZnO p-n junction LEDs.

  14. Once the Light Touch to the Brain: Cytotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Gamma-Ray, Laser Light, and Visible Light on Rat Neuronal Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murteza; Colak, Abdullah; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Taspinar, Numan; Sagsoz, Mustafa Erdem; Kadioglu, Hakan Hadi; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Seven, Sabriye

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma-ray, laser light, and visible light, which neurons are commonly exposed to during treatment of various cranial diseases, on the viability of neurons. Materials and Methods: Neuronal cell culture was prepared from the frontal cortex of 9 newborn rats. Cultured cells were irradiated with gamma-ray for 1–10 min by 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, visible light for 1–160 min, and laser light for 0.2–2 seconds. The MTT tetrazolium reduction assay was used to assess the number of viable cells in the neuronal cell cultures. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to determine Na, K, and Ca levels in cellular fluid obtained from neuronal cell culture plaques. Results: Under low-dose radiation with 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, cell viability insignificantly decreased with time (p>0.05). On the other hand, exposure to visible light produced statistically significant decrease in cell viability at both short- (1–10 min) and long-term (20–160 min). Cell viability did not change with 2 seconds of laser exposure. Na, K, and Ca levels significantly decreased with gamma-ray and visible light. The level of oxidative stress markers significantly changed with gamma-ray. Conclusion: In conclusion, while low dose gamma-ray has slight to moderate apoptotic effect in neuronal cell cultures by oxidative stress, long-term visible light induces remarkable apoptosis and cell death. Laser light has no significant effect on neurons. Further genetic studies are needed to clarify the chronic effect of visible light on neuronal development and functions. PMID:27551168

  15. Characteristics of vanadium-doped indium oxide thin films for organic light-emitting diodes fabricated by spray chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Yoshiyuki; Seki, Shigeyuki; Hoshi, Yoichi; Uchida, Takayuki; Sawada, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    An indium oxide transparent electrode for organic light-emitting diodes was fabricated by the inexpensive spray chemical vapor deposition method. The high work function (5.1 eV) necessary for a transparent anode and a hole-injection layer was successfully achieved with a vanadium doping concentration of 1.5 at. % V without any significant increase in resistivity and surface roughness or loss of transparency. The effect of vanadium doping on indium oxide was systematically investigated. The resistivity, average transmittance in the visible range, and surface roughness (Ra) were 1.08 × 10-3 Ω·cm, 84%, and 4.0 nm, respectively, for the vanadium-doped indium oxide.

  16. Chemical characterization of emissions from advanced technology light-duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Lisa

    Results of detailed emissions measurements of seven 2000 model year advanced technology vehicles are reported. Six of the seven vehicles were imported from Europe and Japan and are not yet available for sale in Canada. Three of the vehicles were with direct injection diesel (DDI) technology, three with gasoline direct injection (GDI) technology and one vehicle was a gasoline-electric hybrid. It is expected that vehicles with these technologies will be forming a larger fraction of the Canadian light-duty vehicle fleet in the coming years in response to requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector in support of Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol; and as a result of improving fuel quality (most notably reducing the sulphur content of both diesel and gasoline). It is therefore important to understand the potential impacts on air quality of such changes in the composition of the vehicle fleet. The emissions from these vehicles were characterized over four test cycles representing different driving conditions. Samples of the exhaust were collected for determining methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds for the purposes of comparing ozone-forming potential of the emissions. Although these vehicles were not certified to Canadian emissions standards as tested, all vehicles met the then current Tier 1 emission standards, except for one diesel vehicle which did not meet the particulate matter (PM) standard. The DDI vehicles had the highest NO X emissions, the highest specific reactivity and the highest ozone-forming potential of the vehicles tested. When compared to conventional gasoline vehicles, the ozone-forming potential was equivalent. The GDI vehicles had lower NO X emissions, lower specific reactivity and lower ozone-forming potential than the conventional gasoline vehicles. Both the diesel and GDI vehicles had higher PM emissions than the conventional gasoline vehicles. The gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle

  17. Geometric phase gradient and spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light originates from the spin-orbit interaction, which can be explained in terms of two geometric phases: the Rytov-Vladimirskii-Berry phase and the Pancharatnam-Berry phase. Here we present a unified theoretical description of the SHE based on the two types of geometric phase gradients, and observe experimentally the SHE in structured dielectric metasurfaces induced by the PB phase. Unlike the weak real-space spin-Hall shift induced by the SRB phase occurring at interfacial reflection/refraction, the observed SHE occurs in momentum space is large enough to be measured directly.

  18. Measurement of spin Hall effect of reflected light.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Li, Yan; He, Huanyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent nanometer-sized displacements of the spin Hall effect of the reflected light from a planar air-glass interface. In the case of the vertical polarization, the displacement is found to increase with the incident angle and subsequently decrease after approximately 48 deg, while in the case of the horizontal polarization, it changes rapidly near the Brewster angle. For a fixed incident angle of 30 deg, the displacement decreases to zero as the polarization angle approaches approximately 39 deg from 0 deg (the horizontal polarization) and then increases in the opposite direction until 90 deg (the vertical polarization).

  19. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater. PMID:26405833

  20. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater.

  1. Expert review for GHS classification of chemicals on health effects.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takeshi; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Intoxication as a result of chemical accidents is a major issue in industrial health. The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) provides a framework for hazard communication on chemicals using labelling or safety data sheets. The GHS will be expected to reduce the number of chemical accidents by communicating the hazards posed and prompting safety measures to be taken. One of the issues which may be a barrier to effective implementation of the GHS results from discrepancies in GHS classifications of chemicals across countries/regions. The main reasons are the differences in information sources used and in the expertise of people making the classification (Classifiers). The GHS requests expert judgment in a weight of evidence (WOE) approach in the application of the criteria of classification. A WOE approach is an assessment method that considers all available information bearing on the determination of toxicity. The quality and consistency of the data, study design, mechanism or mode of action, dose-effect relationships and biological relevance should be taken into account. Therefore, expert review should be necessary to classify chemicals accurately. However, the GHS does not provide any information on the required level of expertise of the Classifiers, definition of who qualifies as an expert, evaluation methods of WOE or data quality, and the timing of expert judgment and the need for updating/re-classification as new information becomes available. In this paper, key methods and issues in expert reviews are discussed. Examples of expert reviews and recommendations for harmonized classification are also presented.

  2. High-resolution characterization of the diffusion of light chemical elements in metallic components by scanning microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Optasanu, Virgil; Bourillot, Eric; Vitry, Pauline; Plassard, Cédric; Beaurenaut, Laure; Jacquinot, Pierre; Herbst, Frédéric; Berger, Pascal; Lesniewska, Eric; Montessin, Tony

    2014-11-01

    An original sub-surface, high spatial resolution tomographic technique based on scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used to visualize in-depth materials with different chemical compositions. A significant phase difference in SMM between aluminum and chromium buried patterns has been observed. Moreover this technique was used to characterize a solid solution of a light chemical element (oxygen) in a metal lattice (zirconium). The large solubility of the oxygen in zirconium leads to modifications of the properties of the solid solution that can be measured by the phase shift signal in the SMM technique. The signal obtained in cross-section of an oxidized Zr sample shows the excellent agreement between phase shift profiles measured at different depths. Such a profile can reveal the length of diffusion of the oxygen in zirconium under the surface. The comparison with the oxygen concentration measured by nuclear reaction analysis shows excellent agreement in terms of length of diffusion and spatial distribution of the oxygen. A rapid calibration shows a linear dependence between the phase shift and the oxygen concentration. The SMM method opens up new possibilities for indirect measurements of the oxygen concentration dissolved in the metal lattice.

  3. Amoebas as mimivirus bunkers: increased resistance to UV light, heat and chemical biocides when viruses are carried by amoeba hosts.

    PubMed

    Boratto, Paulo V M; Dornas, Fábio P; Andrade, Kétyllen R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Peixoto, Felipe; Silva, Lorena C F; La Scola, Bernard; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; de Almeida, Gabriel Magno Freitas; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-05-01

    Amoebas of the genus Acanthamoeba are protists that are associated with human disease and represent a public health concern. They can harbor pathogenic microorganisms, acting as a platform for pathogen replication. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV), the type species of the genus Mimivirus, family Mimiviridae, represents the largest group of amoeba-associated viruses that has been described to date. Recent studies have demonstrated that APMV and other giant viruses may cause pneumonia. Amoebas can survive in most environments and tolerate various adverse conditions, including UV light irradiation, high concentrations of disinfectants, and a broad range of temperatures. However, it is unknown how the amoebal intracellular environment influences APMV stability and resistance to adverse conditions. Therefore, in this work, we evaluated the stability of APMV, either purified or carried by the amoeba host, under extreme conditions, including UV irradiation, heat and exposure to six different chemical biocides. After each treatment, the virus was titrated in amoebas using the TCID50 method. APMV was more stable in all resistance tests performed when located inside its host. Our results demonstrate that Acanthamoeba acts as a natural bunker for APMV, increasing viral resistance to extreme physical and chemical conditions. The data raise new questions regarding the survival of APMV in nature and in hospital environments.

  4. Multiple stressor effects of high light irradiance and photosynthetic herbicides on growth and survival of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Rüfenacht, Karin; Dannenhauer, Kerstin; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2010-10-01

    Exposure of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard to a combination of environmental stress by high light irradiance and chemical stress by each of the three herbicides paraquat, atrazine, and norflurazon resulted in diverse multiple stressor effects on growth and survival of the cells. Under low light conditions, growth analyzed by cell numbers was generally more sensitive to herbicide treatment than optical density-based growth rates or colony-forming unit endpoints, which both also analyzed the viability of the cells. However, growth analyzed by optical density and colony-forming units in herbicide-treated cultures was affected much more strongly by high light irradiance, as shown by reduced 50% effective concentrations, indicating extensive multiple stressor effects of the combined treatment on the viability of the cells. None of the currently used concepts for mixture toxicity (concentration addition, independent action, or effect summation) could accurately describe the effects measured by the two stressors in combination. Both synergistic and antagonistic interactions seem to occur depending on the light conditions and the parameter analyzed. The strong stimulation of toxicity by the combined stresses can be explained by the similar mode of toxic action of the treatments, all increasing the production of reactive oxygen species. Antagonistic effects, conversely, are probably attributable to the various protection mechanisms of photosynthetic organisms to increased light irradiance, which help the cells acclimate to specific light conditions and defend against the deleterious effects of excess light. These protection mechanisms can affect growth and viability under increased light conditions and also might influence the toxicity of the photosynthetic herbicides. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2211-2219. © 2010 SETAC.

  5. Towards an effective field theory on the light-shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Kestin, Greg; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-03-01

    We discuss our work toward the construction of a light-shell effective theory (LSET), an effective field theory for describing the matter emerging from high-energy collisions and the accompanying radiation. We work in the highly simplified venue of 0-flavor scalar quantum electrodynamics, with a gauge invariant product of scalar fields at the origin of space-time as the source of high-energy charged particles. Working in this simple gauge theory allows us to focus on the essential features of LSET. We describe how the effective theory is constructed and argue that it can reproduce the full theory tree-level amplitude. We study the 1-loop radiative corrections in the LSET and suggest how the leading double-logs in the full theory at 1-loop order can be reproduced by a purely angular integral in the LSET.

  6. Effect of visible light treatments on postharvest senescence of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Büchert, Agustin M; Gómez Lobato, Maria E; Villarreal, Natalia M; Civello, Pedro M; Martínez, Gustavo A

    2011-01-30

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) is a rapidly perishable vegetable crop. Several postharvest treatments have been applied in order to delay de-greening. Since light has been shown to have an effect on pigment accumulation during development and darkness is known to induce senescence, the effect of continuous and periodic exposure to low-intensity white light at 22 °C on postharvest senescence of broccoli heads was assayed. Exposure to a constant dose of 12 micromol m(-2) s(-1) was selected as the most suitable treatment and was employed for subsequent experiments. During the course of the treatments, hue and L* values as well as chlorophyll content and visual observation of florets indicated an evident delay in yellowing in treated samples compared with controls. No statistically significant differences in total protein content were found, but soluble protein content was higher in treated samples. Total and reducing sugar as well as starch levels decreased during postharvest senescence, with lower values in control samples. The results of this study indicate that storage under continuous low-intensity light is an efficient and low-cost treatment that delays postharvest senescence while maintaining the quality of harvested broccoli florets. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Effect of mercuric ion on attraction to light of artemia sp nauplii.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J P; Trieff, N M; Kalmaz, E E; Uchida, T

    1985-02-01

    Living organisms exhibit a phototactic response which can be altered by certain environmental toxic chemical species. The analysis of photobehavior can help in elucidating environmental factors that influence photomotility reactions of the organisms. A method has been developed that measures the phototactic response of Artemia nauplii under the influence of mercuric ion (Hg2+) in synthetic seawater. The phototactic response of Artemia nauplii was manifested by movement of the organisms from a darkened half to lighted half of an experimental vessel containing synthetic seawater. The density as a function of time of Artemia nauplii is determined by removing aliquots from both light and dark sides and then plating on agar for counting under the dissecting microscope. Measurements consistently show a significant movement of nauplii to the lighted side within 45 min of the start of the experiments. The present investigation demonstrated that at concentrations as low as 0.010 mg HgCl2/liter there is an enhancement of phototactic effect on Artemia nauplii by mercuric ion as compared with control. The phototactic response of Artema nauplii is altered by mercuric ion in a dose-related manner, but the mechanism of this effect is presently unknown.

  8. [Effects of household chemicals on infested Toxocara canis eggs].

    PubMed

    Shchuchinova, L D; Pautova, E A; Dovgalev, A S

    2013-01-01

    Six household chemicals were tested for effects on cultured Toxocara canis eggs in the mobile larval stage. The cleansing gel Comet (Double Effect) and its 10%, 25%, and 50% aqueous solutions have the most pronounced ovicidal and larvicidal effects under laboratory conditions (+19-22 degrees C). Domestos and Belizna (Bleach) are also effective. These agents are recommended for the disinvasion and washing of premises for canids: aviaries of dog-breeding centers; farms for silver and polar foxes; shelters for stray dogs; rooms in veterinary clinics; and apartments where domestic animals (dogs) are present.

  9. Finding the effective Polyakov line action for SU(3) gauge theories at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff; Langfeld, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    Motivated by the sign problem, we calculate the effective Polyakov line action corresponding to certain SU(3) lattice gauge theories on a 163×6 lattice via the "relative weights" method introduced in our previous papers. The calculation is carried out at β =5.6, 5.7 for the pure gauge theory and at β=5.6 for the gauge field coupled to a relatively light scalar particle. In the latter example we determine the effective theory also at finite chemical potential and show how observables relevant to phase structure can be computed in the effective theory via mean field methods. In all cases a comparison of Polyakov line correlators in the effective theory and the underlying lattice gauge theory, computed numerically at zero chemical potential, shows accurate agreement down to correlator magnitudes of order 10-5. We also derive the effective Polyakov line action corresponding to a gauge theory with heavy quarks and large chemical potential and apply mean field methods to extract observables.

  10. Effect of Monochromic Light-emitting Diode Light with Different Color on the Growth and Reproductive Performances of Breeder Geese.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Lin, M J; Zhuang, Z X; Huang, S Y; Lin, T Y; Jea, Y S; Fan, Y K; Lee, T T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of monochromic light-emitting diode (LED) light with different color on the growth and reproductive performances of white Roman breeder geese. A randomized complete batch design was utilized for the trial, and the replicate was regarded as one batch. Twenty ganders and fifty-five dames were used in batch 1 (started on 2011/6/17 and ended on 2012/1/31), thirty ganders and eighty-four dames were used in batch 2 (started on 2012/3/23 and ended on 2012/10/26), and thirty ganders and seventy-two dames were used in batch 3 (started on 2013/3/12 and ended on 2013/12/20). Two hundred and ninety-one geese were randomly assigned to 6 rooms in an environmentally controlled house. They were randomly allotted into one of three monochromatic light treatments: Blue, red, or white. The results showed that there was no significant difference in body weight among the three lighting groups at any point throughout the experimental period. However, compared to the blue light group, significantly more eggs were produced by the red and white light groups (p<0.05). Furthermore, the laying period of the red light group was significantly longer than that of other two groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results suggested that red LED-light has the best effect on reproductive performance (i.e. longer laying period and higher total eggs number) at 30 lux light intensity, and is therefore a better choice for the management of breeding geese than blue or white LED-light.

  11. Effect of Monochromic Light-emitting Diode Light with Different Color on the Growth and Reproductive Performances of Breeder Geese

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S. C.; Lin, M. J.; Zhuang, Z. X.; Huang, S. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Jea, Y. S.; Fan, Y. K.; Lee, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of monochromic light-emitting diode (LED) light with different color on the growth and reproductive performances of white Roman breeder geese. A randomized complete batch design was utilized for the trial, and the replicate was regarded as one batch. Twenty ganders and fifty-five dames were used in batch 1 (started on 2011/6/17 and ended on 2012/1/31), thirty ganders and eighty-four dames were used in batch 2 (started on 2012/3/23 and ended on 2012/10/26), and thirty ganders and seventy-two dames were used in batch 3 (started on 2013/3/12 and ended on 2013/12/20). Two hundred and ninety-one geese were randomly assigned to 6 rooms in an environmentally controlled house. They were randomly allotted into one of three monochromatic light treatments: Blue, red, or white. The results showed that there was no significant difference in body weight among the three lighting groups at any point throughout the experimental period. However, compared to the blue light group, significantly more eggs were produced by the red and white light groups (p<0.05). Furthermore, the laying period of the red light group was significantly longer than that of other two groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results suggested that red LED-light has the best effect on reproductive performance (i.e. longer laying period and higher total eggs number) at 30 lux light intensity, and is therefore a better choice for the management of breeding geese than blue or white LED-light. PMID:26954165

  12. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light.

  13. Cumulative effects in inflation with ultra-light entropy modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achúcarro, Ana; Atal, Vicente; Germani, Cristiano; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2017-02-01

    In multi-field inflation one or more non-adiabatic modes may become light, potentially inducing large levels of isocurvature perturbations in the cosmic microwave background. If in addition these light modes are coupled to the adiabatic mode, they influence its evolution on super horizon scales. Here we consider the case in which a non-adiabatic mode becomes approximately massless (``ultralight") while still coupled to the adiabatic mode, a typical situation that arises with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons or moduli. This ultralight mode freezes on super-horizon scales and acts as a constant source for the curvature perturbation, making it grow linearly in time and effectively suppressing the isocurvature component. We identify a Stückelberg-like emergent shift symmetry that underlies this behavior. As inflation lasts for many e-folds, the integrated effect of this source enhances the power spectrum of the adiabatic mode, while keeping the non-adiabatic spectrum approximately untouched. In this case, towards the end of inflation all the fluctuations, adiabatic and non-adiabatic, are dominated by a single degree of freedom.

  14. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G.; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S.; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A.; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C.; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Anna Maria; Bisson, William H.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be considered. Disruptive chemicals may also contribute to multiple stages of tumor development through effects on the tumor microenvironment. In turn, the tumor microenvironment consists of a complex interaction among blood vessels that feed the tumor, the extracellular matrix that provides structural and biochemical support, signaling molecules that send messages and soluble factors such as cytokines. The tumor microenvironment also consists of many host cellular effectors including multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cell precursors, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and innate immune cells. Carcinogens can influence the tumor microenvironment through effects on epithelial cells, the most common origin of cancer, as well as on stromal cells, extracellular matrix components and immune cells. Here, we review how environmental exposures can perturb the tumor microenvironment. We suggest a role for disrupting chemicals such as nickel chloride, Bisphenol A, butyltins, methylmercury and paraquat as well as more traditional carcinogens, such as radiation, and pharmaceuticals, such as diabetes medications, in the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Further studies interrogating the role of chemicals and their mixtures in dose-dependent effects on the tumor microenvironment could have important general mechanistic implications for the etiology and prevention of tumorigenesis. PMID:26106136

  15. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Casey, Stephanie C; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C; Krishnakumar, P K; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Annamaria; Bisson, William H; Felsher, Dean W

    2015-06-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be considered. Disruptive chemicals may also contribute to multiple stages of tumor development through effects on the tumor microenvironment. In turn, the tumor microenvironment consists of a complex interaction among blood vessels that feed the tumor, the extracellular matrix that provides structural and biochemical support, signaling molecules that send messages and soluble factors such as cytokines. The tumor microenvironment also consists of many host cellular effectors including multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cell precursors, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and innate immune cells. Carcinogens can influence the tumor microenvironment through effects on epithelial cells, the most common origin of cancer, as well as on stromal cells, extracellular matrix components and immune cells. Here, we review how environmental exposures can perturb the tumor microenvironment. We suggest a role for disrupting chemicals such as nickel chloride, Bisphenol A, butyltins, methylmercury and paraquat as well as more traditional carcinogens, such as radiation, and pharmaceuticals, such as diabetes medications, in the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Further studies interrogating the role of chemicals and their mixtures in dose-dependent effects on the tumor microenvironment could have important general mechanistic implications for the etiology and prevention of tumorigenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effect of hydrothermal treatment on light transmission of translucent zirconias.

    PubMed

    Putra, Armand; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Kuykendall, Tuesday; Zheng, Cheng; Harada, Kosuke; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2017-09-01

    Studies of the light transmission of translucent zirconias after hydrothermal treatment are limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the light transmission of translucent zirconias for monolithic restorations. Four commercially available zirconia products, BruxZir Anterior Solid Zirconia (BruxAnt, BA), Lava Plus High Translucency (LPHT), Katana Zirconia Super Translucent (KST), and Katana Zirconia Ultra Translucent (KUT) were assessed and 1 type of lithium disilicate, e.max Press LT (LDLT) was used as a control. Plate specimens, 20×20×1 mm (n=80) for the translucency assessment were sectioned from postsintered zirconia bulk materials and ground with a #400-grit diamond wheel and coolant. The specimens were placed under hydrothermal conditions of 134°C at 0.2 MPa (n=5 per group at 0, 5, 50, and 100 hours). Percentage of total transmittance of light (Tt%) of each specimen was measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. X-ray diffraction analyses were used to measure tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation. Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). The Tt% ranged from 6.5% to 28.3%. Group LDLT obtained significantly higher transmittance than other tested groups, whereas groups KST and KUT had significantly higher Tt% than groups BA and LPHT (P<.05). A statistically significant increase in the amount of monoclinic phase was revealed within all translucent zirconia groups (P<.05), and the increase in group LPHT was significantly higher than those of the other 3 translucent zirconias (P<.05). Minimal changes in the percentages of light transmittance were revealed after 100-hour hydrothermal treatment for all tested translucent zirconias and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic control. Hydrothermal treatment had minimal effects on the translucency of translucent

  17. Observations of collective effects at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.N.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1995-10-01

    We present a summary of measurements of single beam collective effects in the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We describe measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities, including some recent results using the newly commissioned feedback systems and the results of an initial search for the fast ion instability. Single bunch effects include bunch lengthening, energy spread increase, HOM loss measurements, head-tail damping rates, current dependent tune shifts, and transverse mode coupling instability threshold. The longitudinal measurements are consistent with a broadband impedance {vert_bar}{Zeta}{sub {parallel}}/{eta}{vert_bar}{sub eff} = 0.22{plus_minus}0.07 {Omega} and transverse measurements indicate broadband impedances of {Zeta}{sub y,eff} = 155 k{Omega}/m and Z{sub x,eff} = 58 k{Omega}/m.

  18. Spin Hall effect of light in photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Hailu; Wen Shuangchun; Shu Weixing; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-10-15

    We resolve the breakdown of angular momentum conservation on two-dimensional photon tunneling by considering the spin Hall effect (SHE) of light. This effect manifests itself as polarization-dependent transverse shifts of the field centroid when a classic wave packet tunnels through a prism-air-prism barrier. For the left or the right circularly polarized component, the transverse shift can be modulated by altering the refractive index gradient associated with the two prisms. We find that the SHE in conventional beam refraction can be evidently enhanced via photon tunneling mechanism. The transverse spatial shift is governed by the total angular momentum conservation law, while the transverse angular shift is governed by the total linear momentum conservation law. These findings open the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  19. Chemical generation of acoustic waves: A giant photoacoustic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Diebold, G.

    1995-11-10

    An anomalous photoacoustic effect is produced when a suspension of carbon particles in water is irradiated by a high-power, pulsed laser. The photoacoustic effect has an amplitude on the order of 2000 times that produced by a dye solution with an equivalent absorption coefficient and gives a distinctly audible sound above an uncovered cell. Transient grating experiments with carbon suspensions show a doubling of the acoustic frequency corresponding to the optical fringe spacing of the grating. The effect is thought to originate in high-temperature chemical reactions between the surface carbon and the surrounding water. 26 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fry, D M

    1995-10-01

    Environmental contamination by agricultural chemicals and industrial waste disposal results in adverse effects on reproduction of exposed birds. The diversity of pollutants results in physiological effects at several levels, including direct effects on breeding adults as well as developmental effects on embryos. The effects on embryos include mortality or reduced hatchability, failure of chicks to thrive (wasting syndrome), and teratological effects producing skeletal abnormalities and impaired differentiation of the reproductive and nervous systems through mechanisms of hormonal mimicking of estrogens. The range of chemical effects on adult birds covers acute mortality, sublethal stress, reduced fertility, suppression of egg formation, eggshell thinning, and impaired incubation and chick rearing behaviors. The types of pollutants shown to cause reproductive effects include organochlorine pesticides and industrial pollutants, organophosphate pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and in a fewer number of reports, herbicides, and fungicides. o,p'-DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mixtures of organochlorines have been identified as environmental estrogens affecting populations of gulls breeding in polluted "hot spots" in southern California, the Great Lakes, and Puget Sound. Estrogenic organochlorines represent an important class of toxicants to birds because differentiation of the avian reproductive system is estrogen dependent.

  1. Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.M.

    1995-10-01

    Environmental contamination by agricultural chemicals and industrial waste disposal results in adverse effects on reproduction of exposed birds. The diversity of pollutants results in physiological effects at several levels, including direct effects on breeding adults as well as developmental effects on embryos. The effects on embryos include mortality or reduced hatchability, failure of chicks to thrive (wasting syndrome), and teratological effects producing skeletal abnormalities and impaired differentiation of the reproductive and nervous systems through mechanisms of hormonal mimicking of estrogens. The range of chemical effects on adult birds covers acute mortality, sublethal stress, reduced fertility, suppression of egg formation, eggshell thinning, and impaired incubation and chick rearing behaviors. The types of pollutants shown to cause reproductive effects include organochlorine pesticides and industrial pollutants, organophosphate pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and in a fewer number of reports, herbicides, and fungicides. o,p`-DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mixtures of organochlorines have been identified as environmental estrogens affecting populations of gulls breeding in polluted {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} in southern California, the Great Lakes, and Puget Sound. Estrogenic organochlorines represent an important class of toxicants to birds because differentiation of the avian reproductive system is estrogen dependent. 85 refs.

  2. Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, D M

    1995-01-01

    Environmental contamination by agricultural chemicals and industrial waste disposal results in adverse effects on reproduction of exposed birds. The diversity of pollutants results in physiological effects at several levels, including direct effects on breeding adults as well as developmental effects on embryos. The effects on embryos include mortality or reduced hatchability, failure of chicks to thrive (wasting syndrome), and teratological effects producing skeletal abnormalities and impaired differentiation of the reproductive and nervous systems through mechanisms of hormonal mimicking of estrogens. The range of chemical effects on adult birds covers acute mortality, sublethal stress, reduced fertility, suppression of egg formation, eggshell thinning, and impaired incubation and chick rearing behaviors. The types of pollutants shown to cause reproductive effects include organochlorine pesticides and industrial pollutants, organophosphate pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and in a fewer number of reports, herbicides, and fungicides. o,p'-DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mixtures of organochlorines have been identified as environmental estrogens affecting populations of gulls breeding in polluted "hot spots" in southern California, the Great Lakes, and Puget Sound. Estrogenic organochlorines represent an important class of toxicants to birds because differentiation of the avian reproductive system is estrogen dependent. PMID:8593865

  3. The effect of nocturnal blue light exposure from light-emitting diodes on wakefulness and energy metabolism the following morning.

    PubMed

    Kayaba, Momoko; Iwayama, Kaito; Ogata, Hitomi; Seya, Yumi; Kiyono, Ken; Satoh, Makoto; Tokuyama, Kumpei

    2014-09-01

    The control of sleep/wakefulness is associated with the regulation of energy metabolism. The present experiment was designed to assess the effect of nocturnal blue light exposure on the control of sleep/wakefulness and energy metabolism until next noon. In a balanced cross-over design, nine young male subjects sitting in a room-size metabolic chamber were exposed either to blue LEDs or to no light for 2 h in the evening. Wavelength of monochromatic LEDs was 465 nm and its intensity was 12.1 μW/cm(2). During sleep, sleep architecture and alpha and delta power of EEG were similar in the two experimental conditions. However, the following morning, when subjects were instructed to stay awake in a sitting position, duration judged as sleep at stages 1 and 2 was longer for subjects who received than for those who received no light exposure. Energy metabolism during sleep was not affected by evening blue light exposure, but the next morning energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and the thermic effect of breakfast were significantly lower in subjects who received blue light exposure than in those who received no light exposure. Exposure to low intensity blue light in the evening, which does not affect sleep architecture and energy metabolism during sleep, elicits drowsiness and suppression of energy metabolism the following morning.

  4. The Effect of Surface Chemical Functionality Upon Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Doss, Jereme; Spence, Destiny; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Knuth, Taylor; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougal, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, anti-freeze proteins present in fish utilize specific organic functionalities to disrupt ice crystal formation and propagation. Based on these structures, surfaces with controlled chemical functionality and chain length were evaluated both experimentally and computationally to assess the effect of both parameters in mitigating ice formation. Linear aliphatic dimethylethoxysilanes terminated with methyl or hydroxyl groups were prepared, characterized, and used to coat aluminum. The effect upon icing using a microdroplet freezing apparatus and the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand found hydroxyl-terminated materials exhibited a greater propensity for ice formation and adhesion. Molecular dynamics simulations of a silica substrate bearing functionalized species of similar composition were brought into contact with a pre-equilibrated ice crystal. Several parameters including chain mobility were monitored to ascertain the size of a quasi-liquid layer. The studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition.

  5. Bio-inspired, colorful, flexible, defrostable light-scattering hybrid films for the effective distribution of LED light.

    PubMed

    An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Kim, Yong Il; Song, Kyo Yong; Kim, Min-Woo; Lee, Kyu Bum; Yarin, Alexander L; Yoon, Sam S

    2017-07-06

    Bioluminescent jellyfish has a unique structure derived from fiber/polymer interfaces that is advantageous for effective light scattering in the dark, deep sea water. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of bio-inspired hybrid films by mimicry of the jellyfish's structure, leading to excellent light-scattering performance and defrosting capability. A haze value reaching 59.3% and a heating temperature of up to 292 °C were achieved with the films. Accordingly, the developed surface constitutes an attractive optical device for lighting applications, especially for street or vehicle luminaries for freezing Arctic-climate countries. The morphological details of the hybrid films were revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The light-scattering properties of these films were examined by ultraviolet-visible-infrared spectrophotometry and anti-glare effect analyses. The defrosting performance of the hybrid films was evaluated via heating tests and infra-red observations.

  6. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification -- the epitranscriptome -- is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles.

  7. Inhomogeneous broadening effects in multimode CW chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirels, H.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a multiple longitudinal mode CW chemical laser is investigated with reference to the effects of inhomogeneous broadening for the case where the longitudinal mode spacing is small compared with the characteristic Doppler and homogeneous widths of the lasing medium. Both a Fabry-Perot resonator and a saturated amplifier are considered, using a two-vibrational-level model. Closed form solutions are obtained which are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results of Bullock and Lipkis (1979).

  8. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. [Effects of light quality and germplasm on growth and effective ingredients of Dendrobium officinale germchit].

    PubMed

    Gao, Tingting; Si, Jinping; Zhu, Yuqiu; Huang, Huahong

    2012-01-01

    Effects of light quality and germplasm on the growth and effective ingredients of Dendrobium officinale germchit were studied. Under 8 light qualities (red, blue, yellow, green and three different red blue mix light), test-tube plantlets of different families (9 x 66, 17 x 30, 78 x 68) were used in the experiment to measure economical character and determine the content of chlorophyll, polysaccharides and total alkaloids. The results showed that light quality, germplasm and their interaction had a significant effect on the growth of D. officinale germchit. The maximal root length and height of seedling were obtained under red light, under blue light, the stem diameter was thickest and the content of total alkaloids were highest, the content of chlorophyll and polysaccharides of test-tube plantlets under red blue mix light were higher than that of other treatments. This work has laid a foundation for the high quality, low carbon and efficient production of D. officinale, and gives useful tips on production of high quality ingredients.

  10. [Stressful effects of chemical toxins at low concentrations].

    PubMed

    Parfeniuk, S B; Khrenov, M O; Novoselova, T V; Glushkova, O V; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E; Novoselova, E G

    2010-01-01

    Effects of three chemical compounds: ammonia, diethyl ether, and acetic acid, known as common environmental contaminants in technogenic accidents, were investigated in vivo and in vitro in low concentrations. When added in cultivation media, each of the chemicals has affected peritoneal macrophages and spleen lymphocytes isolated from male NMRI mice and led to a rise in the production of several cytokines, particularly the tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, as well as the expression of the inducible form of heat shock proteins (HSP72 and HSP90-alpha) and in the activation of signal cascades NF-kappaB and SAPK/JNK. The increase of the nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages has been observed only when ammonia was added in cultivation media. Also, low concentrations of all compounds investigated led to the activation of the expression of receptor protein TLR4. When mice were exposed to airborne toxic contaminants in a hermetically sealed experimental chamber, an increase in the concentrations of cytokines, heat shock proteins, and signal proteins in immune cells was also observed in response to low concentrations of all chemicals investigated. Similarly to in vitro experiments, the NO production was augmented only in the presence of the airborne ammonia. The results indicate the environmental hazard of chemical contaminants even in rather low concentrations, which nevertheless lead to the stress response.

  11. Mechanical and chemical effects of ion-texturing biomedical polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Cenkus, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    To determine whether sputter etching may provide substantial polymer surface texturing with insignificant changes in chemical and mechanical properties, an 8 cm beam diameter, electron bombardment, argon ion source was used to sputter etch (ion-texture process) nine biomedical polymers. The materials included silicone rubber, 32% carbon impregnated polyolefin, polyoxymethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, ultrahigh molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene, UHMW polyethylene with carbon fibers (10%), and several polyurethanes (bioelectric, segmented, and cross linked). Ion textured microtensile specimens of each material except UHMW polyethylene and UHMW polyethylene with 10% carbon fibers were used to determine the effect of ion texturing on tensile properties. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to analyze the near surface chemical changes that result from ion texturing. Ion energies of 500 eV with beam current densities ranging from 0.08 to 0.19 mA/sq cm were used to ion texture the various materials. Standard microtensile specimens of seven polymers were exposed to a saline environment for 24 hours prior to and during the tensile testing. The surface chemical changes resulting from sputter etching are minimal in spite of the often significant changes in the surface morphology.

  12. Effect of explosion pressure on pipe collapse in chemical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashiki, Tetsusei; Zako, Masaru

    1995-12-31

    Once a big earthquake attacks the chemical plant and tanks are broken, the disaster will extend due to the dangerous materials in tanks. In addition, the destructive explosion pressure leads to the collapse of pipes, structures and missiles from these broken pieces. Therefore, simulating the disasters in chemical plants is very important for the safety and the reliability evaluation. In this study, a computer program to analyze the behavior of pipe and chemical equipment under explosion pressure on a personal computer has been developed. The outline of the algorithm is as follows: (1) Three-dimensional pressure applied on pipes at the explosion is calculated. (2) The effect of interception of explosion pressure by oil dike is quantified. (3) Mechanical behavior of pipe is analyzed by FEM using beam element, and pipe collapse is evaluated from the result of FEM. (4) Cumulative damage caused by sequential explosion of tanks is calculated. As an example, the developed system was applied to practical plant model, and the damaged zone in the plant and the dangerous location of pipes after the explosion of a tank have been analyzed. As a result, it is revealed that the proposed computer program is very useful not only for safety and reliability evaluation but for the installation of pipes in chemical plants as well.

  13. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-03-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm-2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA-1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers.

  14. Effect of accelerated global expansion on the bending of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, Mir Emad; Bolen, Brett; Bombelli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In 2007 Rindler and Ishak showed that, contrary to previous claims, the value of the cosmological constant does have an effect on light deflection by a gravitating object in an expanding universe. In their work they considered a Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) spacetime, which has a constant asymptotic expansion rate H_0. A model with a time-dependent H( t) was studied by Kantowski et al., who consider in their 2010 paper a "Swiss-cheese" model of a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime with an embedded SdS bubble. In this paper, we generalize the Rindler and Ishak model to time-varying H( t) in another way, by considering light bending in a McVittie metric representing a gravitating object in a FLRW cosmological background. We carry out numerical simulations of the propagation of null geodesics in different McVittie spacetimes, in which we keep the values of the distances from the observer to the lensing object and to the source fixed, and vary the form of H( t).

  15. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  16. Plasmon-assisted water splitting using two sides of the same SrTiO₃ single-crystal substrate: conversion of visible light to chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuqing; Ueno, Kosei; Mori, Yuko; Shi, Xu; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Murakoshi, Kei; Inoue, Haruo; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2014-09-22

    A plasmon-induced water splitting system that operates under irradiation by visible light was successfully developed; the system is based on the use of both sides of the same strontium titanate (SrTiO3) single-crystal substrate. The water splitting system contains two solution chambers to separate hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). To promote water splitting, a chemical bias was applied by regulating the pH values of the chambers. The quantity of H2 evolved from the surface of platinum, which was used as a reduction co-catalyst, was twice the quantity of O2 evolved from an Au-nanostructured surface. Thus, the stoichiometric evolution of H2 and O2 was clearly demonstrated. The hydrogen-evolution action spectrum closely corresponds to the plasmon resonance spectrum, indicating that the plasmon-induced charge separation at the Au/SrTiO3 interface promotes water oxidation and the subsequent reduction of a proton on the backside of the SrTiO3 substrate. The chemical bias is significantly reduced by plasmonic effects, which indicates the possibility of constructing an artificial photosynthesis system with low energy consumption. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interfacial chemical reaction and multiple gap state formation on three layer cathode in organic light-emitting diode: Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Gun; Kim, Jeong Won; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin; Lee, Seung Mi

    2015-07-14

    A three layer cathode is a promising stack structure for long lifetime and high efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. The interfacial chemical reactions and their effects on electronic structures for alkaline-earth metal (Ca, Ba)/Alq{sub 3} [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum] and Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3} are investigated using in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as molecular model calculation. The BaF{sub 2} interlayer initially prevents direct contact between Alq{sub 3} and the reactive Ca metal, but it is dissociated into Ba and CaF{sub 2} by the addition of Ca. As the Ca thickness increases, the Ca penetrates the interlayer to directly participate in the reaction with the underlying Alq{sub 3}. This series of chemical reactions takes place irrespective of the BaF{sub 2} buffer layer thickness as long as the Ca overlayer thickness is sufficient. The interface reaction between the alkaline-earth metal and Alq{sub 3} generates two energetically separated gap states in a sequential manner. This phenomenon is explained by step-by-step charge transfer from the alkaline-earth metal to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Alq{sub 3}, forming new occupied states below the Fermi level.

  18. Artificial light sources differ in effect on birch seedling growth

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis

    1965-01-01

    The use of artificial lights to grow tree seedlings for research and even for commercial uses is becoming common. With this has come an increasing awareness that not all types of artificial lights produce the same results (2, 3, 5). The presence or absence of particular wavelengths in the light source may cause large differences in height growth and morphological...

  19. The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on the toxicity of fire-fighting chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactive effects of ultraviolet (UV) and fire-retardant chemicals were evaluated by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) juveniles and tadpoles of southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to six fire-retardant formulations with and without sodium ferrocyanide (yellow prussiate of soda [YPS]) and to YPS alone under three simulated UV light treatments. Yellow prussiate of soda is used as a corrosion inhibitor in some of the fire-retardant chemical formulations. The underwater UV intensities measured were about 2 to 10% of surface irradiance measured in various aquatic habitats and were within tolerance limits for the species tested. Mortality of trout and tadpoles exposed to Fire-Trol?? GTS-R, Fire-Trol 300-F, Fire-Trol LCA-R, and Fire-Trol LCA-F was significantly increased in the presence of UV radiation when YPS was present in the formulation. The boreal toad (Bufo boreas), listed as endangered by the state of Colorado (USA), and southern leopard frog were similar in their sensitivity to these chemicals. Photoenhancement of fire-retardant chemicals can occur in a range of aquatic habitats and may be of concern even when optical clarity of water is low; however, other habitat characteristics can also reduce fire retardant toxicity.

  20. The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on the toxicity of fire-fighting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Calfee, Robin D; Little, Edward E

    2003-07-01

    The interactive effects of ultraviolet (UV) and fire-retardant chemicals were evaluated by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) juveniles and tadpoles of southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to six fire-retardant formulations with and without sodium ferrocyanide (yellow prussiate of soda [YPS]) and to YPS alone under three simulated UV light treatments. Yellow prussiate of soda is used as a corrosion inhibitor in some of the fire-retardant chemical formulations. The underwater UV intensities measured were about 2 to 10% of surface irradiance measured in various aquatic habitats and were within tolerance limits for the species tested. Mortality of trout and tadpoles exposed to Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol 300-F, Fire-Trol LCA-R, and Fire-Trol LCA-F was significantly increased in the presence of UV radiation when YPS was present in the formulation. The boreal toad (Bufo boreas), listed as endangered by the state of Colorado (USA), and southern leopard frog were similar in their sensitivity to these chemicals. Photoenhancement of fire-retardant chemicals can occur in a range of aquatic habitats and may be of concern even when optical clarity of water is low; however, other habitat characteristics can also reduce fire retardant toxicity.

  1. Road crossing behavior under traffic light conflict: Modulating effects of green light duration and signal congruency.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Haiduk, Michael; Boos, Moritz; Tinschert, Peter; Schwarze, Anke; Eggert, Frank

    2016-10-01

    A large number of pedestrians and cyclists regularly ignore the traffic lights to cross the road illegally. In a recent analysis, illegal road crossing behavior has been shown to be enhanced in the presence of incongruent stimulus configurations. Pedestrians and cyclists are more likely to cross against a red light when exposed to an irrelevant conflicting green light. Here, we present experimental and observational data on the factors moderating the risk associated with incongruent traffic lights. In an observational study, we demonstrated that the conflict-related increase in illegal crossing rates is reduced when pedestrian and cyclist green light periods are long. In a laboratory experiment, we manipulated the color of the irrelevant signals to expose participants to different degrees of incongruency. Results revealed that individuals' performance gradually varied as a function of incongruency, suggesting that the negative impact of a conflicting green light can be reduced by slightly adjusting its color. Our findings highlight that the observation of real-world behavior at intersections and the experimental analysis of psychological processes under controlled laboratory conditions can complement each other in identifying risk factors of risky road crossing behavior. Based on this combination, our study elaborates on promising measures to improve safety at signalized intersections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, and light extinction before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; He, Kebin; Li, Chengcai; Yang, Fumo; Zhao, Qing; Ma, Yongliang; Cheng, Yuan; Ouyang, Wenjuan; Chen, Gangcai

    2013-11-01

    contrast of air quality and visibility before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games provides a rare opportunity to investigate the links between PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, and light extinction in this megacity. Twenty-four hour integrated PM2.5 samples were collected, and light scattering coefficients and the concentrations of black carbon were measured at urban Beijing for this purpose during a measurement campaign from 1 July to 20 September 2008, which was classed into four stages according to the levels of emission control measures. Daily PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 15.9 to 156.7 µg m-3 with an average of 66.0 ± 35.1 µg m-3. The average PM2.5 mass during the Olympics decreased by 49% from the second stage (20 July to 7 August), mainly due to the reduction of secondary inorganic aerosols (i.e., sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium (SNA)). The counterintuitive increase of PM2.5 mass (by 27% on average) during the second stage with two most serious haze episodes, although more rigorous emission control measures were in place, compared to the first stage (1-19 July), was mainly explained by the unfavorable meteorology and input of sulfate aerosols. A daily PM2.5 mass threshold of 50 µg m-3 was extracted for frequent haze occurrence. The extinction fractions of SNA and organic material were each approximately 30% during the 20% best visibility days but changed to 81.7% and 8.4%, respectively, during the 20% worst visibility days. The results indicated that the role of SNA was magnified in haze formation during the 2008 summer in Beijing.

  3. Exposure to blue light during lunch break: effects on autonomic arousal and behavioral alertness.

    PubMed

    Yuda, Emi; Ogasawara, Hiroki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Hayano, Junichiro

    2017-07-11

    Exposures to melanopsin-stimulating (melanopic) component-rich blue light enhance arousal level. We examined their effects in office workers. Eight healthy university office workers were exposed to blue and orange lights for 30 min during lunch break on different days. We compared the effects of light color on autonomic arousal level assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) and behavioral alertness by psychomotor vigilance tests (PVT). Heart rate was higher and high-frequency (HF, 0.150.45 Hz) power of HRV was lower during exposure to the blue light than to orange light. No significant difference with light color was observed, however, in any HRV indices during PVT or in PVT performance after light exposure. Exposure to blue light during lunch break, compared with that to orange light, enhances autonomic arousal during exposure, but has no sustained effect on autonomic arousal or behavioral alertness after exposure.

  4. [Effects of different LED light qualities on photosynthetic characteristics, fruit production and quality of strawberry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Lian, Hai-feng; Liu, Shi-qi; Sun, Ya-li; Yu, Xin-hui; Guo, Hui-ping

    2015-06-01

    Taking 'Miaoxiang No.7' strawberry as material, full red light, full blue light, full yellow light, full white light, red/blue/yellow (7/2/1), red/blue (7/2) light generated by light emitting diode (LED) was applied to accurately modulate with white light generated as control. The indicators of photosynthetic and fluorescence parameters, pigment content, fruit production and quality, root activity were investigated. The effects of light quality under the light intensity (500 µmol · m(-2) · s(-1)) on the photosynthetic characteristic, fruit production and quality of strawberry were studied. The results showed that the red light could increase photosynthetic parameters (Pn, Tr), while blue light had inhibitory effect. Intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and conductance (g(s)) were the highest under blue light. The fluorescence parameters were significantly affected by light quality, Fo, Fm and Φ PS II the highest under red light, but values of the maximal photochemical of PS II (Fv/Fm), Fv/Fo and Fm/Fo highest under red/blue/yellow (7/2/1). In addition, the soluble solids content and vitamin C were highest under red light, the blue light could increase protein and titratable acid, sugar-acid ratio was the highest under red/blue/yellow (7/2/1). Comprehensive analysis indicated that red/blue/yellow (7/2/1) was more beneficial to the increase of pigment contents of leaves, fruit production and some qualities of strawberry.

  5. [Effects of different water, fertility, and light conditions on allelopathic traits of rice].

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Kong, Chuihua; Chen, Xonghui; Zhang, Zhaoxian

    2003-12-01

    The allelochemicals and allelopathic potentials of rice (Huahang No. 1) were investigated under different water, fertility, and light conditions with pot culture. The results showed that the allelopathic potential of Huahang No. 1 was stronger at high levels of water and fertility, but its specific allelochemicals contents had no significant variation at both levels. The numbers of the total secondary metabolites and the contents of some anti-pathogenic chemicals were increased at low level of water or fertility. Furthermore, the contents of specific allelochemicals in Huahang No. 1 were lower under strong light than under weak light condition. Similarity, the allelopathic potential decreased, and the contents of some anti-pathogenic chemicals maintained unchanged under weak light condition. No matter what levels of water, fertility or light conditions were, the allelopathic potential of Huahang No. 1 on associated weeds was weaker than that on non-associated ones.

  6. Integrated light chemical tagging analyses of seven M31 outer halo globular clusters from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli M.; Venn, Kim A.; Mackey, Dougal; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Dotter, Aaron; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Huxor, Avon

    2015-04-01

    Detailed chemical abundances are presented for seven M31 outer halo globular clusters (with projected distances from M31 greater than 30 kpc), as derived from high-resolution integrated light spectra taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Five of these clusters were recently discovered in the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS) - this paper presents the first determinations of integrated Fe, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, and Eu abundances for these clusters. Four of the target clusters (PA06, PA53, PA54, and PA56) are metal poor ([Fe/H] < -1.5), α-enhanced (though they are possibly less α-enhanced than Milky Way stars at the 1σ level), and show signs of star-to-star Na and Mg variations. The other three globular clusters (H10, H23, and PA17) are more metal rich, with metallicities ranging from [Fe/H] = -1.4 to -0.9. While H23 is chemically similar to Milky Way field stars, Milky Way globular clusters, and other M31 clusters, H10 and PA17, have moderately low [Ca/Fe], compared to Milky Way field stars and clusters. Additionally, PA17's high [Mg/Ca] and [Ba/Eu] ratios are distinct from Milky Way stars, and are in better agreement with the stars and clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. None of the clusters studied here can be conclusively linked to any of the identified streams from PAndAS; however, based on their locations, kinematics, metallicities, and detailed abundances, the most metal-rich PAndAS clusters H23 and PA17 may be associated with the progenitor of the Giant Stellar Stream, H10 may be associated with the SW cloud, and PA53 and PA56 may be associated with the eastern cloud.

  7. Effects of type of light on mouse circadian behaviour and stress levels.

    PubMed

    Alves-Simoes, Marta; Coleman, Georgia; Canal, Maria Mercè

    2016-02-01

    Light is the principal synchronizing environmental factor for the biological clock. Light quantity (intensity), and light quality (type of light source) can have different effects. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the type of light experienced from the time of birth on mouse growth, circadian behaviour and stress levels. We raised pigmented and albino mice under 24 h light-dark cycles of either fluorescent or white light-emitting diode (LED) light source during the suckling stage, and the animals were then exposed to various light environments after weaning and their growth rate, locomotor activity and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured. We found that the type of light the animals were exposed to did not affect the animals' growth rates or stress levels. However, we observed significant effects on the expression of the locomotor activity rhythm under low contrast light-dark cycles in pigmented mice, and under constant light in both albino and pigmented mice. These results highlight the importance of environmental light quality (light source) on circadian behavioural rhythms, and the need for close monitoring of light environments in animal facilities.

  8. Comparison of Marginal Gap and Microleakage in Copy-Milled and Cad-Milled Zirconia Copings Bonded Using Light Cure and Chemical Cure Resin Bonding Systems.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Manoj; Rajalakshmi, S; Krishna Prasad, D

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study assessed the marginal gap and marginal microleakage in zirconia copings fabricated using two computer aided techniques- CAD milling and Copy milling and cemented to respective tooth preparations using two resin bonding systems, light cure and self-cure resin bonding systems. 32 extracted premolars were prepared to receive zirconia copings fabricated using CAD/CAM and Copy milling techniques. Once the copings were fabricated, the samples were evaluated for marginal fit prior to cementation through microscopic observation. Evaluation of marginal gap was done again after cementation, in order to incorporate the influence of the resin bonding system on the marginal microgap. The specimens were evaluated under the stereomicroscope for micro-leakage using commercial software. A comparative statistical analysis was done following data collection using Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test and chi-square test. The data collected regarding marginal gap was well within 120 µ, which is in accordance with previous studies. However, Copy milled specimens showed statistically lesser marginal gap when compared to CAD milled specimens. While comparing microleakage, it was observed that the microleakage in Copy milled specimens bonded with light cure resin bonded cement was statistically lesser than that of specimens cemented with chemical cure resin cement.(P = 0.003). This in vitro study concluded that Copy milling technique fabricated zirconia restorations with lesser marginal gap and microleakage score in comparison to CAD milled samples. Light cure resin bonding system also proved to be more effective option compared to self cure resin bonding systems. However, the limitations of this study should be taken into concern and further research should be aimed at a larger sample size to validate the results.

  9. Reduced product yield in chemical processes by second law effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Funk, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of second law effects in chemical processes, where product yield is explicitly related to the individual irreversibilities within the process to indicate a maximum theoretical yield, is presented. Examples are given that indicate differences between first and second law approaches toward process efficiency and process yield. This analysis also expresses production capacity in terms of the heating value of a product. As a result, it is particularly convenient in analyzing fuel conversion plants and their potential for improvement. Relationships are also given for the effects of irreversibilities on requirements for process heat and for feedstocks.

  10. Light-induced effects in liquid crystals: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we outline that light-induced effects in liquid crystals are still able to provide scientific and technological novelty in spite of a long time investigation started more than thirty years ago. Here we review some recent achievements related to new phenomena that have been studied in the past few years. In the first part of our report we discuss optical trapping of nematic colloids whose origin relies on the elastic properties of liquid crystals rather than on the field gradient that is on the basis of conventional optical tweezing. In the second part we present some recent results obtained in studying the self-phase modulation in bent core nematic liquid crystals, pointing out a peculiar two regimes behavior.

  11. Conformational Effects of UV Light on DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haorong; Li, Ruixin; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2017-02-01

    The responses of DNA origami conformation to UV radiation of different wavelengths and doses are investigated. Short- and medium-wavelength UV light can cause photo-lesions in DNA origami. At moderate doses, the lesions do not cause any visible defects in the origami, nor do they significantly affect the hybridization capability. Instead, they help relieve the internal stress in the origami structure and restore it to the designed conformation. At high doses, staple dissociation increases which causes structural disintegration. Long-wavelength UV does not show any effect on origami conformation by itself. We show that this UV range can be used in conjunction with photoactive molecules for photo-reconfiguration, while avoiding any damage to the DNA structures.

  12. Ginger: Measuring Gravitomagnetic Effects by Means of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    GINGER is a proposal for a new experiment aimed to the detection of the gravito-magnetic Lense-Thirring effect at the surface of the Earth. A three-dimensional set of ring lasers will be mounted on a rigid "monument". In a ring laser a light beam traveling counterclockwise is superposed to another beam traveling in the opposite sense. The anisotropy in the propagation leads to standing waves with slightly different frequencies in the two directions; the resulting beat frequency is proportional to the absolute rotation rate in space, including the gravito-magnetic drag. The experiment is planned to be built in the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy and is based on an international collaboration among four Italian groups, the Technische Universität München and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch (NZ).

  13. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  14. Blue light-induced immunosuppression in Bactrocera dorsalis adults, as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

    PubMed

    Tariq, K; Noor, M; Hori, M; Ali, A; Hussain, A; Peng, W; Chang, C-J; Zhang, H

    2017-05-09

    Detrimental effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on living organisms are well understood, little is known about the effects of blue light irradiation. Although a recent study revealed that blue light caused more harmful effects on insects than UV light and blue light irradiation killed insect pests of various orders including Diptera, the effects of blue light on physiology of insects are still largely unknown. Here we studied the effects of blue light irradiation on cuticular melanin in larval and the immune response in adult stage of Bactrocera dorsalis. We also evaluated the effects of blue light exposure in larval stage on various age and mass at metamorphosis and the mediatory role of cuticular melanin in carryover effects of larval stressors across metamorphosis. We found that larvae exposed to blue light decreased melanin contents in their exoskeleton with smaller mass and delayed metamorphosis than insects reared without blue light exposure. Across metamorphosis, lower melanotic encapsulation response and higher susceptibility to Beauveria bassiana was detected in adults that had been exposed to blue light at their larval stage, thereby constituting the first evidence that blue light impaired adult immune function in B. dorsalis as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

  15. Dose-dependent effects of light on hyperthymic temperament.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Kentaro; Baba, Hajime; Inoue, Takeshi; Nakai, Yukiei; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Toshihito; Hatano, Koji; Arai, Heii; Terao, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    In a previous study examining the association of hyperthymic temperament and daily light exposure (illuminance), we compared hyperthymic scores of the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-auto questionnaire version (TEMPS-A) acquired from residents in Sapporo and Oita in Japan, which are located at 43° and 33° of latitude. We found that residents of Oita had significantly higher hyperthymic scores than residents of Sapporo. Moreover, a comparison of 3 regions rather than 2 regions may show a dose-response relationship in hyperthymic temperament and illuminance. Japan has 4 large islands-Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu. Sapporo is in Hokkaido and Oita is in Kyushu. As the 3rd location, we recently collected TEMPS-A data from 125 residents in Koshigaya which is located in Honshu at 36°. We combined the data of the Koshigaya residents with the data of 94 residents from Sapporo and 95 from Oita. The mean yearly total sunshine of the past 20 years (1993-2012) was 1684.6h in Sapporo, 1862.9h in Koshigaya, and 2002.9h in Oita. Multiple regression analyses revealed that sunshine predicted significant variance of hyperthymic temperament in a dose-dependent manner. The limitation of the present study is the lack of the consideration of the effects of temperature on hyperthymic temperament. Since correlations are fairly small, other factors are also at work for hyperthymic temperament. The present findings suggest that higher illuminance may maintain hyperthymic temperament via light effects in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Is it a biological response or chemical process? Chemical and transcriptional regulation experiments probe the cause for the increased accumulation of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in carrot root slices exposed to UV-B light

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We recently demonstrated that wounded carrot roots subjected to a brief UV-B light treatment accumulate large quantities of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in the treated tissues. Chlorogenic acid is an intermediate in the phenylpropanoid pathway and a potent anti-oxidant. Chemical analysis and real-time P...

  17. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of additives on the ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow them to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Polyoxometalates in Oxidative Delignification of Chemical Pulps: Effect on Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Bujanovic, Biljana; Ralph, Sally; Reiner, Richard; Hirth, Kolby; Atalla, Rajai

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pulps are produced by chemical delignification of lignocelluloses such as wood or annual non-woody plants. After pulping (e.g., kraft pulping), the remaining lignin is removed by bleaching to produce a high quality, bright paper. The goal of bleaching is to remove lignin from the pulp without a negative effect on the cellulose; for this reason, delignification should be performed in a highly selective manner. New environmentally-friendly alternatives to conventional chlorine-based bleaching technologies (e.g., oxygen, ozone, or peroxide bleaching) have been suggested or implemented. In an attempt to find inorganic agents that mimic the action of highly selective lignin-degrading enzymes and that can be applicable in industrial conditions, the researchers have focused on polyoxometalates (POMs), used either as regenerable redox reagents (in anaerobic conditions) or as catalysts (in aerobic conditions) of oxidative delignification. The aim of this paper is to review the basic concepts of POM delignification in these two processes.

  19. Investigating the effect of chemical stress and resource ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeling exposure and recovery of fish and wildlife populations after stressor mitigation serves as a basis for evaluating population status and remediation success. The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding the effects of pollutants and other stressors in estuarine and marine ecosystems. Herein, we develop a density dependent matrix population model for Atlantic killifish that analyzes both size-structure and age class-structure of the population so that we could readily incorporate output from a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model currently under development. This population modeling approach emphasizes application in conjunction with field monitoring efforts (e.g., through effects-based monitoring programs) and/or laboratory analysis to link effects due to chemical stress to adverse outcomes in whole organisms and populations. We applied the model using data for killifish exposed to dioxin-like compounds, taken from a previously published study. Specifically, the model was used to investigate population trajectories for Atlantic killifish with dietary exposures to 112, 296, and 875 pg/g of dioxin with effects on fertility and survival rates. All effects were expressed relative to control fish. Further, the population model was employed to examine age and size distributions of a population exposed to resource limitation in addition to chemical stress. For each dietary exposure concentration o

  20. Synthetic ultraviolet light filtering chemical contamination of coastal waters of Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.; Alvarez, David; Garrison, Virginia H.

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of surface waters by synthetic ultraviolet light (UV) filtering chemicals is a concern for the Virgin Islands National Park (VINP). Discrete water samples were collected from VINP bays to determine UV filter chemical presence in the coastal waters. Spatial distribution and the potential for partitioning between subsurface waters and the sea surface microlayer (SML) were also examined. The UV filter chemicals 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene were detected at concentrations up to 6073 ng/L (benzophenone-3). Concentrations for benzophenone-3 and homosalate declined exponentially (r2 = 0.86 to 0.98) with distance from the beach. Limited data indicate that some UV filter chemicals may partition to the SML relative to the subsurface waters. Contamination of VINP coastal waters by UV filter chemicals may be a significant issue, but an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variability of their concentrations would be necessary to better understand the risk they present.

  1. Synthetic ultraviolet light filtering chemical contamination of coastal waters of Virgin Islands national park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A; Alvarez, David A; Garrison, Virginia H

    2015-12-15

    Contamination of surface waters by synthetic ultraviolet light (UV) filtering chemicals is a concern for the Virgin Islands National Park (VINP). Discrete water samples were collected from VINP bays to determine UV filter chemical presence in the coastal waters. Spatial distribution and the potential for partitioning between subsurface waters and the sea surface microlayer (SML) were also examined. The UV filter chemicals 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene were detected at concentrations up to 6073 ng/L (benzophenone-3). Concentrations for benzophenone-3 and homosalate declined exponentially (r(2)=0.86 to 0.98) with distance from the beach. Limited data indicate that some UV filter chemicals may partition to the SML relative to the subsurface waters. Contamination of VINP coastal waters by UV filter chemicals may be a significant issue, but an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variability of their concentrations would be necessary to better understand the risk they present.

  2. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  3. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  4. Modeling complex chemical effects in turbulent nonpremixed combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nigel S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all of the energy derived from the consumption of combustibles occurs in systems which utilize turbulent fluid motion. Since combustion is largely related to the mixing of fluids and mixing processes are orders of magnitude more rapid when enhanced by turbulent motion, efficiency criteria dictate that chemically powered devices necessarily involve fluid turbulence. Where combustion occurs concurrently with mixing at an interface between two reactive fluid bodies, this mode of combustion is called nonpremixed combustion. This is distinct from premixed combustion where flame-fronts propagate into a homogeneous mixture of reactants. These two modes are limiting cases in the range of temporal lag between mixing of reactants and the onset of reaction. Nonpremixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to zero, while premixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to infinity. Many combustion processes are hybrids of these two extremes with finite non-zero lag times. Turbulent nonpremixed combustion is important from a practical standpoint because it occurs in gas fired boilers, furnaces, waste incinerators, diesel engines, gas turbine combustors, and afterburners etc. To a large extent, past development of these practical systems involved an empirical methodology. Presently, efficiency standards and emission regulations are being further tightened (Correa 1993), and empiricism has had to give way to more fundamental research in order to understand and effectively model practical combustion processes (Pope 1991). A key element in effective modeling of turbulent combustion is making use of a sufficiently detailed chemical kinetic mechanism. The prediction of pollutant emission such as oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) and sulphur (SO(x)) unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates demands the use of detailed chemical mechanisms. It is essential that practical models for turbulent nonpremixed combustion are capable of handling large numbers of 'stiff' chemical species

  5. [Effects of light intensity on photosynthetic characteristics and seedling growth of Prunella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijun; Shi, Hongzhuan; Guo, Qiaosheng; Han, Biqun; Xian, Weiyan

    2011-07-01

    To study the effect of light intensity on photosynthetic characteristics and seedling growth of Prunella vulgaris under different light intensity. The seedling of P. vulgaris was shaded with shading net, and relative parameters were measured. The data was statistically processed. With the reducing light intensity, the young plant stems became slender, the leaf long increased. The plant height and net growth under 42% full light condition were significantly higher than those under the other light intensity, chlorophy II and carotenoid contents increased, as well as Chl a/b decreased under low light. Photosynthetic indicators of P(n), T(r) decreased under low light, but CO2 concentration increased, and G(s) content decreases and then increased under 10% full light intensity. P. vulgaris manifested the different plasticity and adaptability under different light intensities. The 42% light intensity was the best and the proper shading would promote the growth of seedlings.

  6. Theory of photoselection by intense light pulses. Influence of reorientational dynamics and chemical kinetics on absorbance measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, A; Szabo, A

    1993-01-01

    The theory of absorbance measurements on a system (e.g., chromophore(s) in a protein) that undergoes a sequence of reactions initiated by a linearly polarized light pulse is developed for excitation pulses of arbitrary intensity. This formalism is based on a set of master equations describing the time evolution of the orientational distribution function of the various species resulting from excitation, reorientational dynamics, and chemical kinetics. For intense but short excitation pulses, the changes in absorbance (for arbitrary polarization directions of the excitation and probe pulses) and the absorption anisotropy are expressed in terms of reorientational correlation functions. The influence of the internal motions of the chromophore as well as the overall motions of the molecules is considered. When the duration of the excitation pulse is long compared to the time-scale of internal motions but comparable to the overall correlation time of the molecule that is reorienting isotropically, the problem of calculating the changes in absorbance is reduced to the solution of a set of first-order coupled differential equations. Emphasis is placed on obtaining explicit results for quantities that are measured in photolysis and fluorescence experiments so as to facilitate the analysis of experimental data. PMID:8471729

  7. Counteracting chemical chaperone effects on the single-molecule α-synuclein structural landscape.

    PubMed

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M; Moosa, Mahdi Muhammad; Gambin, Yann; Deniz, Ashok A

    2012-10-30

    Protein structure and function depend on a close interplay between intrinsic folding energy landscapes and the chemistry of the protein environment. Osmolytes are small-molecule compounds that can act as chemical chaperones by altering the environment in a cellular context. Despite their importance, detailed studies on the role of these chemical chaperones in modulating structure and dimensions of intrinsically disordered proteins have been limited. Here, we used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to test the counteraction hypothesis of counterbalancing effects between the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and denaturing osmolyte urea for the case of α-synuclein, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein whose monomer exhibits significant disorder. The single-molecule experiments, which avoid complications from protein aggregation, do not exhibit clear solvent-induced cooperative protein transitions for these osmolytes, unlike results from previous studies on globular proteins. Our data demonstrate the ability of TMAO and urea to shift α-synuclein structures towards either more compact or expanded average dimensions. Strikingly, the experiments directly reveal that a 21 [urea][TMAO] ratio has a net neutral effect on the protein's dimensions, a result that holds regardless of the absolute osmolyte concentrations. Our findings shed light on a surprisingly simple aspect of the interplay between urea and TMAO on α-synuclein in the context of intrinsically disordered proteins, with potential implications for the biological roles of such chemical chaperones. The results also highlight the strengths of single-molecule experiments in directly probing the chemical physics of protein structure and disorder in more chemically complex environments.

  8. The chemical functionalized platinum nanodendrites: The effect of chemical molecular weight on electrocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Rui; Han, Shu-He; Liu, Zong-Huai; Chen, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The surface chemical functionalization of noble metal nanocrystals is a promising strategy for improving the catalytic/electrocatalytic activity and selectivity of noble metal nanocrystals. In this work, we successfully synthesize the polyallylamine (PAA) with different molecular weight functionalized Pt nanodendrites (Pt-NDs) using a facile hydrothermal reduction method. The morphology and surface composition are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, element map, and thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, we detailedly investigate the effect of the molecular weight of PAA on the electrochemical property of the functionalized Pt-NDs. Electrochemical measurements show only low molecular weight PAA functionalized Pt-NDs allow electrolytes to access freely the Pt sites. Meanwhile, the low molecular weight PAA functionalized Pt-NDs show the excellent selectivity and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in the presence of methanol.

  9. Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Ian; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400–490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health. PMID:26900325

  10. Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology.

    PubMed

    Tosini, Gianluca; Ferguson, Ian; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400-490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health.

  11. The effect of monochromatic light on broiler growth and development.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; Biran, I; Uni, Z; Robinzon, B; Halevy, O

    1999-01-01

    Artificial illumination, including light quality, is crucial in modem broiler management. In the present study, a new, highly efficient, monochromatic light system has been developed for broilers. One hundred and eighty male broiler chicks (Anak) were divided into four light treatment groups (n = 45) in three replicates each. All birds were housed in a single room previously divided by wooden bars into 12 sealed cells of 1 m2. Feed and water were provided for ad libitum consumption. Light intensity was 0.1 W/m2 at the height of birds' heads and was scheduled for 23 h of light and 1 h of dark during the entire experimental period. Light treatments were: control white (mini-incandescent light bulbs), blue (480 nm), green (560 nm), and red (660 nm). Body weight was recorded periodically, feed consumption was measured daily, and feed efficiency was calculated. Blood samples were taken at 1, 9, and 32 d of age and plasma testosterone was determined. Two necropsies were conducted, at 23 and 35 d of age, and selected glands and organs were weighed. In the group reared under green light, a significant enhancement in weight gain was observed as early as 3 d of age; this gain was maintained during the entire experimental period. Broilers reared under blue light had a later onset of growth enhancement and were significantly heavier than those reared under white and red light at 20 d of age. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly higher in birds reared under blue light. Breast muscle weights were significantly higher in the birds reared under green light at 23 and 35 d of age. These results suggest that green and blue light stimulate growth.

  12. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Podhorodecki, A; Zatryb, G; Misiewicz, J; Wojcik, J; Wilson, P R J; Mascher, P

    2012-11-30

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  13. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  14. Properties of TCO anodes deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and their application to OLED lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, R. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Doped ZnO is one of the materials currently being considered in commercial optoelectronic applications as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement for the transparent conducting oxide (TCO). The properties of doped ZnO anodes prepared at Arkema Inc. are analyzed using spectroscopic ellipsometer (230 to 1700 nm) and Hall-effect. The modeling of the refractive indexes is conducted using a double oscillator model. The model parameters are tested on a double layer: undoped and doped structure deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) on glass substrates. Excellent correlation between calculated and experimental parameters was obtained.

  15. Blue light effect on retinal pigment epithelial cells by display devices.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jiyoung; Yun, Jieun; Yoon, Yeo Dae; Park, Sang-Il; Seo, Young-Jun; Park, Won-Sang; Chu, Hye Yong; Park, Keun Hong; Lee, Myung Yeol; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Kwak, Young-Shin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kang, Jong Soon

    2017-04-07

    Blue light has high photochemical energy and induces cell apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Due to its phototoxicity, retinal hazard by blue light stimulation has been well demonstrated using high intensity light sources. However, it has not been studied whether blue light in the displays, emitting low intensity light, such as those used in today's smartphones, monitors, and TVs, also causes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. We attempted to examine the blue light effect on human adult retinal epithelial cells using display devices with different blue light wavelength ranges, the peaks of which specifically appear at 449 nm, 458 nm, and 470 nm. When blue light was illuminated on A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells using these displays, the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength resulted in an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the reduction of cell viability and induction of caspase-3/7 activity were more evident in A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells after illumination by the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength, especially at 449 nm. Additionally, white light was tested to examine the effect of blue light in a mixed color illumination with red and green lights. Consistent with the results obtained using only blue light, white light illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength also triggered increased cell death and apoptosis compared to that illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at longer wavelength. These results show that even at the low intensity utilized in the display devices, blue light can induce ROS production and apoptosis in retinal cells. Our results also suggest that the blue light hazard of display devices might be highly reduced if the display devices contain less short wavelength blue light.

  16. The effect of operating lights on laminar flow: an experimental study using neutrally buoyant helium bubbles.

    PubMed

    Refaie, R; Rushton, P; McGovern, P; Thompson, D; Serrano-Pedraza, I; Rankin, K S; Reed, M

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between surgical lighting and laminar airflow is poorly understood. We undertook an experiment to identify any effect contemporary surgical lights have on laminar flow and recommend practical strategies to limit any negative effects. Neutrally buoyant bubbles were introduced into the surgical field of a simulated setup for a routine total knee arthroplasty in a laminar flow theatre. Patterns of airflow were observed and the number of bubbles remaining above the surgical field over time identified. Five different lighting configurations were assessed. Data were analysed using simple linear regression after logarithmic transformation. In the absence of surgical lights, laminar airflow was observed, bubbles were cleared rapidly and did not accumulate. If lights were placed above the surgical field laminar airflow was abolished and bubbles rose from the surgical field to the lights then circulated back to the surgical field.