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Sample records for light coagulation

  1. [Ssp DnaB intein-mediated ligation of heavy and light chains of coagulation factor VIII in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fuxiang; Liu, Zelong; Qu, Huige; Xin, Xiaolin; Dong, Hongxin; Liu, Xiangqin

    2009-07-01

    We studied the ligation of coagulation factor VIII heavy and light chains in Escherichia coli by utilizing the intein-mediated protein trans-splicing. A B-domain deleted factor VIII (BDD-FVIII) gene was broken into two halves of heavy and light chains before Ser1657 which meets the splicing required conserved residue and then fused to 106 and 48 amino acid-containing N-part termed Int-N and C-part termed Int-C coding sequences of split mini Ssp DnaB intein respectively. These two fusion genes were constructed into a prokaryotic expression vector pBV220. Through induction for expression of recombinant protein it displayed an obvious protein band as predicted size of BDD-FVIII protein on SDS-PAGE gel. Western blotting using factor VIII specific antibodies confirmed that this protein band is BDD-FVIII produced by protein trans-splicing. It demonstrated that the heavy and light chains of BDD-FVIII can be efficiently ligated with the Ssp DnaB intein-mediated protein trans-splicing. These results provided evidence for encouraging our ongoing investigation with intein as a means in dual AAV vectors carrying the factor VIII gene to overcome the packaging size limitation of a single AAV vector in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  2. New clotting disorders that cast new light on blood coagulation and may play a role in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Girolami, A; Cosi, E; Ferrari, S; Lombardi, A M; Girolami, B

    2017-03-01

    Recently several variants of clotting factors have shown a peculiar behavior so that they appear as new defects. The factors involved are FII, FV and FIX. Prothrombin deficiency is usually associated with bleeding. Recently a few prothrombin abnormalities involving Arg396 mutations, have been demonstrated to show antithrombin resistance with the consequent appearance of a thrombophilic state and venous thromboses in young age. The same is true for an abnormal FIX (FIX Padua). The thrombotic manifestations in the latter condition are also venous. The abnormal FIX (FIX Padua) is characterized by a great increase in FIX activity whereas FIX antigen is only slightly increased. The condition is due to an Arg338Lys mutation. The increased intrinsic clotting activity of this abnormal FIX is being investigated as a useful therapeutic approach in homophile B patients. Another new clotting disorder is represented by two abnormal FV (FV East Texas and FV Amsterdam). These are characterized by a deletion of part of the B domain of FV resulting in a "short" FV. The condition is characterized by a mild bleeding tendency due to high levels of Tissue Factor pathway inhibitor. The "short" factor V is in fact resistant to the action of Tissue Factor pathway inhibitor which is sharply increased in these patients. These new clotting entities have again demonstrated that the study of patients who show a tendency to venous thrombosis or a mild bleeding condition that cannot be explained on the basis of our current concepts of blood coagulation, may represent "new" coagulation disorders. All persons interested in thrombotic or hemorrhagic disorders should be informed about these new clinical and laboratory conditions.

  3. Dust coagulation in ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  4. [Coagulation disorders in cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Téllez-Avila, Felix I; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the clotting process. In this organ are sintetizated the major part of the coagulation factors. Historically, was considered that alteration in liver function causes important bleeding disorders. However, actual evidence is not in agreement with this asseveration. Decreased synthesis of clotting and inhibitor factors, decrease clearance of activated factors, quantitative and qualitative platelet defects, hyperfibrinolysis and intravascular coagulation are some of the defects observed in liver diseases. Thrombotic events, even if rare in cirrhotic patients, occur manly in the portal and mesenteric veins. The aim of the present work is to review the present evidence in coagulation disorders and liver disease.

  5. The Mechanisms of Coagulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard; Jesty, Jolyon

    1994-01-01

    Several topics such as heart disease, strokes, biochemical reactions, blood components, and genetics can be related to blood clotting. Introduces a simple, safe and inexpensive hands-on demonstration using bovine (cattle) blood plasma of normal and abnormal coagulation. (ZWH)

  6. Coagulation Factors Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: Factor Assays; Blood Clotting Factors; Clotting Factors [or by the individual factor ... person has enough coagulation activity to control the blood clotting process. It is used by healthcare practitioners to ...

  7. [Diagnostic of blood coagulation].

    PubMed

    Barthels, M

    2008-12-01

    A survey is given on the peculiar characteristics of laboratory methods for analyzing the blood coagulation system with special regard to the preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical phase. Routinely used methods are described.

  8. Coagulation and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis is almost invariably associated with systemic activation of coagulation. There is ample evidence that demonstrates a wide-ranging cross-talk between hemostasis and inflammation, which is probably implicated in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in patients with sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to initiation and propagation of coagulation activity, but coagulation also markedly influences inflammation. Molecular mechanisms that play a role in inflammation-induced effects on coagulation have been recognized in much detail. Pro-inflammatory cells and cyto- and chemokines can activate the coagulation system and downregulate crucial physiological anticoagulant mechanisms. Initiation of coagulation activation and consequent thrombin generation is caused by expression of tissue factor on activated monocytes and endothelial cells and is ineffectually offset by tissue factor pathway inhibitor. At the same time, endothelial-associated anticoagulant pathways, in particular the protein C system, is impaired by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also, fibrin removal is severely obstructed by inactivation of the endogenous fibrinolytic system, mainly as a result of upregulation of its principal inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin generation and impaired break down lead to deposition of (micro)vascular clots, which may contribute to tissue ischemia and ensuing organ dysfunction. The foundation of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the explicit and thorough treatment of the underlying disorder by antibiotic treatment and source control measures. Adjunctive strategies focused at the impairment of coagulation, including anticoagulants and restoration of physiological anticoagulant mechanisms, may supposedly be indicated and have been found advantageous in experimental and initial clinical trials.

  9. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  10. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-05

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  11. Coagulation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane

    2015-07-01

    The liver plays a key role in hemostasis as the site of synthesis of many of the proteins involved in the coagulation, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems that interact to both establish hemostasis, and preventing thrombosis. The common laboratory tests, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), evolved from studies of plasma clotting in test tubes. Such studies laid the basis for the coagulation cascade model of hemostasis. However, thought has evolved to place a greater emphasis on the active roles of cells in localizing and regulating hemostasis. The PT and aPTT do not reflect the roles of cellular elements in hemostasis, nor do they reflect the crucial roles of antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems. Thus, though the PT may indeed reflect the synthetic capacity of the liver, it does not accurately reflect the risk of bleeding or thrombosis in patients with liver failure.

  12. Systems Biology of Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate computer simulation of blood function can inform drug target selection, patient-specific dosing, clinical trial design, biomedical device design, as well as the scoring of patient-specific disease risk and severity. These large-scale simulations rely on hundreds of independently measured physical parameters and kinetic rate constants. However, the models can be validated against large scale, patient-specific laboratory measurements. By validation with high dimensional data, modelling becomes a powerful tool to predict clinically complex scenarios. Currently, it is possible to accurately predict the clotting rate of plasma or blood in a tube as it is activated with a dose of tissue factor, even as numerous coagulation factors are altered by exogenous attenuation or potentiation. Similarly, the dynamics of platelet activation, as indicated by calcium mobilisation or inside-out signalling, can now be numerically simulated with accuracy in cases where platelets are exposed to combinations of agonists. Multiscale models have emerged to combine platelet function and coagulation kinetics into complete physics-based descriptions of thrombosis under flow. Blood flow controls platelet fluxes, delivery and removal of coagulation factors, adhesive bonding, and von Willebrand factor conformation. The field of Blood Systems Biology has now reached a stage that anticipates the inclusion of contact, complement, and fibrinolytic pathways along with models of neutrophil and endothelial activation. Along with “-omics” data sets, such advanced models seek to predict the multifactorial range of healthy responses and diverse bleeding and clotting scenarios, ultimately to understand and improve patient outcomes. PMID:23809126

  13. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  14. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  15. Blood Coagulation, Inflammation and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Seydel, Karl B.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2010-01-01

    I. ABSTRACT Malaria remains a highly prevalent disease in more than 90 countries and accounts for at least 1 million deaths every year. Plasmodium falciparum infection is often associated with a procoagulant tonus characterized by thrombocytopenia and activation of the coagulation cascade and fibrinolytic system; however, bleeding and hemorrhage are uncommon events, suggesting that a compensated state of blood coagulation activation occurs in malaria. This article i) reviews the literature related to blood coagulation and malaria in a historic perspective, ii) describes basic mechanisms of coagulation, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis, iii) explains the laboratory changes in acute and compensated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), iv) discusses the implications of tissue factor (TF) expression in the endothelium of P. falciparum-infected patients, and v) emphasizes the pro-coagulant role of parasitized erythrocytes (pRBC) and activated platelets in the pathogenesis of malaria. This article also presents the ‘Tissue Factor Model’ (TFM) for malaria pathogenesis, which places TF as the interface between sequestration, endothelial cell activation, blood coagulation disorder and inflammation often associated with the disease. The relevance of the coagulation-inflammation cycle for the multiorgan dysfunction and coma is discussed in the context of malaria pathogenesis. PMID:18260002

  16. Platelet coagulation-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N

    2004-08-01

    The biochemical mechanisms by which activated platelets participate in exposing receptors for the assembly of enzyme-cofactor-substrate complexes at all stages of the blood coagulation cascade are reviewed. Information derived from studies conducted during the last 30 years supports the concept that the initiation of blood coagulation is triggered by exposure of tissue factor at injury sites, leading to the generation of minute quantities of thrombin (limited by tissue factor pathway inhibitor), sufficient to activate platelets, factors XI, VIII, and V, and trigger the consolidation pathway (i.e., the sequential activation of factors XI, IX, X, and prothrombin on the activated platelet surface), leading to the generation of sufficient thrombin to convert fibrinogen to fibrin and effect hemostasis. Platelets localize coagulation to the hemostatic thrombus and protect coagulation enzymes from inhibition by both plasma and platelet inhibitors (e.g., protease nexin 2), thus preventing disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  17. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  18. Thermophoretically modified aerosol brownian coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arias-Zugasti, Manuel; Rosner, Daniel E

    2011-08-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation rates resulting from continuum-regime brownian coagulation in the presence of size-dependent particle thermophoresis is developed and explored here. We are motivated by a wide variety of applications in which particle brownian coagulation occurs in a nonisothermal gas where differential thermophoretic drift contributes to, but does not dominate, the encounter frequency between suspended spherical particles (e.g., mist droplets) of different sizes. We employ a Smoluchowski-like population-balance to demonstrate the relative roles of brownian diffusion and thermophoresis in shaping the short and long time (asymptotic or "coagulation-aged") mist-droplet size distribution (DSD) function. To carry out these combined-mechanism DSD-evolution calculations we developed a rational "coupled" coagulation rate constant (allowing for simultaneous brownian diffusion and relative thermophoretic drift) rather than simply adding the relevant individual coagulation "kernels." Dimensionless criteria are provided to facilitate precluding other coagulation mechanisms not considered here (such as simultaneous sedimentation or Marangoni-flow-induced mist-droplet phoresis) and potential complications not included in the present model [as finite-rate coalescence, initial departures from the continuum (Stokes drag-) limit, and even dense (nonideal) vapor effects].

  19. Thermophoretically modified aerosol Brownian coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Zugasti, Manuel; Rosner, Daniel E.

    2011-08-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation rates resulting from continuum-regime Brownian coagulation in the presence of size-dependent particle thermophoresis is developed and explored here. We are motivated by a wide variety of applications in which particle Brownian coagulation occurs in a nonisothermal gas where differential thermophoretic drift contributes to, but does not dominate, the encounter frequency between suspended spherical particles (e.g., mist droplets) of different sizes. We employ a Smoluchowski-like population-balance to demonstrate the relative roles of Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis in shaping the short and long time (asymptotic or “coagulation-aged”) mist-droplet size distribution (DSD) function. To carry out these combined-mechanism DSD-evolution calculations we developed a rational “coupled” coagulation rate constant (allowing for simultaneous Brownian diffusion and relative thermophoretic drift) rather than simply adding the relevant individual coagulation “kernels.” Dimensionless criteria are provided to facilitate precluding other coagulation mechanisms not considered here (such as simultaneous sedimentation or Marangoni-flow-induced mist-droplet phoresis) and potential complications not included in the present model [as finite-rate coalescence, initial departures from the continuum (Stokes drag-) limit, and even dense (nonideal) vapor effects].

  20. [Proteins influencing the blood coagulation].

    PubMed

    Alberio, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    This review describes some natural proteins, which can be employed, either as factor concentrates derived from human plasma or as recombinant drug, to modulate the coagulation system. I will address some biochemical characteristics and the physiological role of von Willebrand factor, the coagulation factors of the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, and the physiological anticoagulant protein C. In addition, I will detail the pharmacological compounds, which are available for influencing or substituting the coagulation proteins: desmopressin (DDAVP), single coagulation factor concentrates, prothrombin complex concentrates, and protein C concentrate. In particular, I will address some treatment topics of general medical interest, such as the treatment of massive bleeding, the correction of the coagulopathy induced by vitamin K-antagonists in patients with cerebral haemorrhage, and of the coagulopathy of meningococcemia. Finally, I will describe some properties and practical clinical applications of the recombinant anticoagulans lepirudin and bivalirudin, which are derived from hirudin, the natural anticoagulant of the medical leech.

  1. Disorders of coagulation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Katz, D; Beilin, Y

    2015-12-01

    The process of haemostasis is complex and is further complicated in the parturient because of the physiological changes of pregnancy. Understanding these changes and the impact that they have on the safety profile of the anaesthetic options for labour and delivery is crucial to any anaesthetist caring for the parturient. This article analyses current theories on coagulation and reviews the physiological changes to coagulation that occur during pregnancy and the best methods with which to evaluate coagulation. Finally, we examine some of the more common disorders of coagulation that occur during pregnancy, including von Willebrand disease, common factor deficiencies, platelet disorders, the parturient on anticoagulants, and the more rare acute fatty liver of pregnancy, with a focus on their implications for neuraxial anaesthesia.

  2. Whole blood coagulation analyzers.

    PubMed

    1997-08-01

    Whole blood Coagulation analyzers (WBCAs) are widely used point-of-care (POC) testing devices found primarily in cardiothoracic surgical suites and cardia catheterization laboratories. Most of these devices can perform a number of coagulation tests that provide information about a patient's blood clotting status. Clinicians use the results of the WBCA tests, which are available minutes after applying a blood sample, primarily to monitor the effectiveness of heparin therapy--an anticoagulation therapy used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, angioplasty, hemodialysis, and other clinical procedures. In this study we evaluated five WBCAs from four suppliers. Our testing focused on the applications for which WBCAs are primarily used: Monitoring moderate to high heparin levels, as would be required, for example, during CPB are angioplasty. For this function, WCBAs are typically used to perform an activated clotting time (ACT) test or, as one supplier refers to its test, a heparin management test (HMT). All models included in this study offered an ACT test or an HMT. Monitoring low heparin levels, as would be required, for example,during hemodialysis. For this function, WBCAs would normally be used to perform either a low-range ACT (LACT) test or a whole blood activated partial thromboplastin time (WBAPTT) test. Most of the evaluated units could perform at least one of these tests; one unit did not offer either test and was therefore not rated for this application. We rated and ranked each evaluated model separately for each of these two applications. In addition, we provided a combined rating and ranking that considers the units' appropriateness for performing both application. We based our conclusions on a unit's performance and humans factor design, as determined by our testing, and on its five-year life-cycle cost, as determined by our net present value (NPV) analysis. While we rated all evaluated units acceptable for each appropriate category, we did

  3. Inherited disorders of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-08-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as a physiological response to blood vessel injury and bleeding, which entails a co-ordinated process involving the blood vessel, platelets, and blood clotting proteins (i.e. coagulation factors). Hemostasis can be divided into primary and secondary components. The former rapidly initiates after endothelial damage and is characterized by vascular contraction, platelet adhesion, and formation of a soft aggregate plug. The latter is initiated following the release of tissue factor and involves a complex sequence of events known as the blood coagulation cascade, encompassing serial steps where each coagulation factor activates another in a chain reaction that culminates in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Patients carrying abnormalities of the coagulation cascade (i.e. deficiencies of coagulation factors) have an increased bleeding tendency, where the clinical severity is mostly dependent upon the type and the plasma level of the factor affected. These disorders also impose a heavy medical and economic burden on individual patients and society in general. The aim of this article is to provide a general overview on the pathophysiology, clinics, diagnostics, and therapy of inherited disorders of coagulation factors.

  4. Comparison of coagulation performance and floc properties of a novel zirconium-glycine complex coagulant with traditional coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhilin; Wu, Chunde; Wu, Yue; Hu, Caixia

    2014-05-01

    A new inorganic-organic hybrid material zirconium-glycine complex (ZGC) was firstly used as a coagulant in a coagulation process to treat Pearl River raw water. Its coagulation performance was compared with commonly used aluminum (Al) coagulants such as aluminum sulfate (Al2(SO4)3) and polyaluminum chloride (PAC), in terms of water quality parameters and floc properties. ZGC coagulation achieved higher removal of turbidity (93.8%) than other traditional coagulants. Charge neutralization was proven to act as a dominant mechanism during ZGC coagulation. The aggregated flocs with ZGC showed the fastest growth rate and good recovery ability compared with the other coagulants and achieved the largest floc size within 5 min. The ZGC coagulant can decrease the hydraulic retention time and increase removal efficiency.

  5. [Coagulation disorders in the intensive care station].

    PubMed

    Hart, C; Spannagl, M

    2014-05-01

    Coagulation disorders are frequently encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU) and are challenging due to a variety of potential etiologies. Critically ill patients with coagulation abnormalities may present with an increased risk of bleeding, show coagulation activation resulting in thromboembolism, or have no specific symptoms. Hemostatic abnormalities observed in ICU patients range from isolated thrombocytopenia or prolonged global clotting tests to complex and life-threatening coagulation defects. Successful management of coagulation disorders requires prompt and accurate identification of the underlying cause. This review describes the most frequently occurring diagnoses found in intensive care patients with thrombocytopenia and coagulation test abnormalities and summarizes appropriate diagnostic interventions and current approaches to differential diagnosis.

  6. Advances of Coagulation Factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Da-Yu; Wang, Shu-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To provide a comprehensive literature review on roles of coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) in coagulation, wound healing, neoplasm, bone metabolism, and pregnancy. Data Sources: All articles in PubMed with key words Coagulation factor XIII, wound, leukemia, tumor, bone, and pregnancy with published date from 2001 to 2016 were included in the study. Frequently cited publications before 2000 were also included. Study Selection: We reviewed the role of FXIII in biologic processes as documented in clinical, animal, and in vitro studies. Results: FXIII, a member of the transglutaminase (TG) family, plays key roles in various biological processes. Besides its well-known function in coagulation, the cross-linking of small molecules catalyzed by FXIII has been found in studies to help promote wound healing, improve bone metabolism, and prevent miscarriages. The study has also shown that FXIII concentration level differs in the blood of patients with leukemia and solid tumors and offers promises as a diagnostic indicator. Conclusions: FXIII has many more biologic functions besides being known as coagulation factor. The TG activity of FXIII contributes to several processes, including wound healing, bone extracellular matrix stabilization, and the interaction between embryo and decidua of uterus. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between FXIII and leukemia and solid tumors. PMID:28091415

  7. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    PubMed

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  8. Depinning as a coagulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İşeri, M.; Kaspar, D.; Mungan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a one-dimensional model that describes the depinning of an elastic string of particles in a strongly pinning, phase-disordered periodic environment under a slowly increasing force. The evolution towards depinning occurs by the triggering of avalanches in regions of activity which are at first isolated, but later grow and merge. For large system sizes the dynamically critical behavior is dominated by the coagulation of these active regions. Our analysis and numerical simulations show that the evolution of the sizes of active regions is well described by a Smoluchowski coagulation equation, allowing us to predict correlation lengths and avalanche sizes in terms of certain moments of the size distribution.

  9. [Coagulation behavior of Al13 species].

    PubMed

    Hu, Cheng-zhi; Liu, Hui-juan; Qu, Jiu-hui

    2006-12-01

    Coagulation behavior of Al13 species was examined in synthetic water with high alkalinity and high humic acid concentration from viewpoint of the transformation of Al hydrolysis products during the coagulation process. The results indicated that coagulation efficiency of Al coagulants positively correlated with the content of Al13 in the coagulation process. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) was more effective than polyaluminum chloride (PACI) in removing turbidity and dissolved organic matter in the synthetic water because AlCl3 could not only generate Al13 species but also function as pH control agent in the coagulation process. During coagulation process pH control can improve coagulation process through regulating Al speciation, and AlCl3 benefited most from pH control.

  10. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  11. International reference standards in coagulation.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sanj; Hubbard, Anthony R

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of coagulation factor activity using absolute physico-chemical techniques is not possible and estimation therefore relies on comparative bioassay relative to a reference standard with a known or assigned potency. However the inherent variability of locally prepared and calibrated reference standards can give rise to poor agreement between laboratories and methods. Harmonisation of measurement between laboratories at the international level relies on the availability of a common source of calibration for local reference standards and this is provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) International Standards which define the International Unit for the analyte. This article describes the principles, practices and problems of biological standardisation and the development and use of reference standards for assays of coagulation factors, with particular emphasis on WHO International Standards for both concentrates and plasma.

  12. [Monitoring of blood coagulation in perioperative care].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisanari

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation disorders often occur perioperatively and monitoring of blood coagulation should be fast and adequate to treat these disorders to protect patients from massive bleeding. Control of hemostasis is one of the main issues in major surgeries. Coagulation test results from a central laboratory may delay making such a perioperative decision. Recently, point-of-care monitoring (POCM), which is able to examine coagulation disorder in an operation theater with short waiting time, has become important. Both prothrombin time (PT) and activated clotting time (ACT) are very useful and popular, but also criticized because they can be monitored only until fibrin formation. On the other hand, viscoelastic monitorings of whole blood, are able to estimate fibrin formation, clot fixation, platelet function and fibrinolysis. In this review article, among variable perioperative POCMs of blood coagulation, three thromboelastographic monitorings, such as TEG ROTEM, and Sonoclot as well as PT and ACT, are described along with their utilities and limits to examine perioperative coagulation.

  13. The reciprocal relationship between inflammation and coagulation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mauria

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation and coagulation constitute two host defense systems with complementary roles in eliminating invading pathogens, limiting tissue damage, and restoring homeostasis. Extensive cross talk exists between these 2 systems, whereby inflammation leads to activation of coagulation, and coagulation considerably affects inflammatory activity. Infection leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines that, in turn, stimulate the production of tissue factor. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation are dependent on the expression of tissue factor. Conversely, activated coagulation proteases may affect specific receptors on inflammatory cells and endothelial cells and thereby modulate the inflammatory response. Activation of coagulation with the simultaneous down-regulation of endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanisms and endogenous fibrinolysis characterizes the pathophysiology of sepsis. The mechanisms by which these highly complex and codependent defense strategies are linked together both in health and disease is the focus of this review.

  14. [Effects of UV Radiation on the Physicochemical Properties and Coagulation Properties of Humic Acid Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Zhang, Ke; Fan, Qing-hai; Zheng, Dan

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the mechanism of UV light in promoting the removal of humic acid ( HA) by coagulation, the variations of the physical and chemical properties of the HA solution before and after UV light radiation were investigated. The effects of the changes in water quality conditions on the removal performance of HA in coagulation were also observed. Experimental results showed that except zeta potential, pH, chromaticity and viscosity of the HA solution exhibited varying degrees of decline after UV radiation. Further study showed that the impact of changes in viscosity of the solution on humic acid coagulation performance was relatively small. Under acidic conditions, the coagulation performance of HA significantly increased. The increase of zeta potential led to easy gathering of colloidal particles and improved the coagulation performance. Furthermore, except for HA with relative molecular mass of between (10-30) x 10³ and less than 10³, there was little variation in the proportion of low molecular weight HA, which may be an important reason that the coagulation performance of the humic acid solution increased after UV radiation.

  15. Change of coagulation parameters after double plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mustafa; Dikmen, Tamer; Sonmez, Mehmet; Akdogan, Elif; Durmus, Ahmet; Omay, Serdar Bedii; Ovali, Ercument

    2007-10-01

    In the previous studies, some authors reported that automated apheresis leads to a hypercoagulable state. We tried to find out changes in coagulation parameters after double plateletpheresis in this study. Forty-five donors were recruited to the study, and coagulation parameters were assessed before and after double plateletpheresis. After double plateletpheresis, fibrinogen, factor V, factor VIII and factor IX were decreased compared with the values before apheresis. Although serum levels of this coagulation parameters are decreasing, they are still in the normal limits. Therefore, we suggest that double plateletpheresis is a safe procedure for healthy volunteers taking into account these coagulation parameters.

  16. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways.

  17. Two-wavelength approach for control of coagulation depth during laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin; Aden, Mirko; Toedter, Nina; Rosenkranz, Beate

    2015-03-01

    In laser tissue soldering (LTS) protein solutions are used for closing of incisions or fixation of wound dressings. During coagulation and thermal denaturation of the protein solutions their morphology changes significantly such that light is strongly scattered. When scattering becomes major component extinction increases and the optical penetration depth shrinks which could lead to unsufficient coagulation and bonding. For adaption of extinction during coagulation we are investigating a two-wavelength approach. A strongly absorbed laser wavelength (1540 nm) and weakly absorbed wavelength (980 nm) can be applied simultaneously. Simulation of beam propagation is performed in natural and coagulated state of the solder. The model describes a three-layer system consisting of membrane, solder and phantom. The optical properties are determined by spectrometric measurements both in natural and coagulated state. The absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs and anisotropy factor γ are determined by numerical analysis from the spectrometric data. Beam propagation is simulated for 980 nm and 1540 nm radiation with ZEMAX® software based on the Monte Carlo method. For both wavelengths the beginning of the process with a clear solder layer, and the final state characterized by a coagulated solder layer are examined. The optical penetration depth depends mainly on the optical properties of the solder, which change in the course of coagulation process. The coagulation depth can be varied between 1.5 mm to 3.5 mm by changing the proportion of both laser sources. This leads to concepts for minimizing heat input while maintaining a constant coagulation depth.

  18. Genetic engineering and coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Fass, D N; Toole, J J

    1985-06-01

    It is unfortunate that we cannot report, in the area of coagulation, advances that have been seen in related fields such as thrombolytic therapy. The reported progress (Gold et al, 1984; Van de Werf et al, 1984) with human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Pennica et al, 1983) augers well for the application of recombinant technology to the problems faced by patients with coagulation defects. While plasminogen activator is being assessed in an acute therapeutic setting, its use signals a beginning of the application of the technology to abnormalities of the haemostatic mechanism. Chronic administration of coagulation factors for prophylaxis and replacement therapy would appear to be just one more step down the pathway illuminated by the biochemists, microbiologists and cell biologists who have preceded the clinicians in this promising area. There is no record of the use of genetically engineered materials in the treatment of coagulation defects, primarily because the body of knowledge and refined techniques have only recently been acquired. For this reason we have had to project developments in other areas onto the problems that exist for the haemostatically compromised patient. In describing the potential usefulness of these technologies, it is difficult to ascertain where the logical projection, from a fully investigated model system, diverges from flights of imaginative fancy. Cloning projects considered overly ambitious and grandiose at the beginning of this decade are already accomplished feats. The feasibility of gene therapy in the mammalian system has been demonstrated, and trade publications now discuss governmental approval for investigative use of this procedure in 1985. Panels of physicians, scientists and even politicians now seriously contemplate and promulgate views and regulations pertaining to the efficacy and ethics of the use of genetic engineering in the treatment of human disease. The haemophilias will certainly be among the first

  19. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity.

  20. A Numerical Study on Microwave Coagulation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    improvement of therapeutic effect. References [1] P. Prakash, “Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation ,” The Open Biomedical...A Numerical Study on Microwave Coagulation Therapy Amy J. Liu † , Hong Zhou * and Wei Kang * Department of Applied Mathematics Naval...is properly cited. Abstract Microwave coagulation therapy is a clinical technique for treating hepatocellular carcinoma (small size liver

  1. [Blood coagulation disorders in oncological patients].

    PubMed

    von Depka Prondzinski, M

    2005-01-01

    Patients with malignancies often experience acute disorders of coagulation. They may manifest as thromboembolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation or a tendency to bleed. Either disorder carries a high rate of complications and a difficult task in diagnosing and treating them. Some complications typical for patients with malignancies are discussed. Among these are tumor associated thrombophilia, acquired von Willebrand's disease, and thrombocytopenia.

  2. Textile wastewater purification through natural coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, M. T.

    2011-09-01

    A new coagulant obtained through polymerization of Acacia mearnsii de Wild tannin extract has been characterized in the removal of two dangerous dye pollutants: Alizarin Violet 3R and Palatine Fast Black WAN. This coagulant is lab-synthesized according to the etherification of tannins with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and formaldehyde and its performance in dye removal in terms of efficiency was high. Reasonably low coagulant dosages (ca. 50 mg L-1) reaches high capacity levels (around 0.8 for Alizarin Violet 3R and 1.6 for Palatine Fast Black WAN mg dye mg-1 of coagulant) and pH and temperature are not extremely affecting variables. The systems coagulant dyes were successfully modeled by applying the Langmuir hypothesis. q max and b parameters were obtained with an adjusted correlation factor ( r 2) above 0.8.

  3. Immunoassays for diagnosis of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Kappel, A; Ehm, M

    2010-11-01

    Immunoassays play a pivotal role in the clinical laboratory. In the coagulation section of the laboratory, they are used as an aid for diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, thrombophilia screening, or detection of coagulation factor deficiencies, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and latex agglutination immunoassay technologies are currently most widely used, while Luminescent Oxygen Channeling Immunoassay (LOCI®) and other chemiluminescence-based immunoassays are emerging technologies for the coagulation laboratory. However, not all immunoassay technologies employed are compatible with the workflow requirements of the coagulation laboratory, and, not all technologies are suitable for detection or quantification of every marker. This review focuses on technical and performance aspects of those immunoassay technologies that are most widely used in the coagulation laboratory, and provides a description of markers that are typically tested by immunoassays.

  4. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  5. Dust grain coagulation modelling : From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruta, P.; Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    In molecular clouds, stars are formed from a mixture of gas, plasma and dust particles. The dynamics of this formation is still actively investigated and a study of dust coagulation can help to shed light on this process. Starting from a pre-existing discrete coagulation model, this work aims to mathematically explore its properties and its suitability for numerical validation. The crucial step is in our reinterpretation from its original discrete to a well-defined continuous form, which results in the well-known Smoluchowski coagulation equation. This opens up the possibility of exploiting previous results in order to prove the existence and uniqueness of a mass conserving solution for the evolution of dust grain size distribution. Ultimately, to allow for a more flexible numerical implementation, the problem is rewritten as a non-linear hyperbolic integro-differential equation and solved using a finite volume discretisation. It is demonstrated that there is an exact numerical agreement with the initial discrete model, with improved accuracy. This is of interest for further work on dynamically coupled gas with dust simulations.

  6. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  7. Novel ferromagnetic nanoparticle composited PACls and their coagulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Xiao, F; Xu, X Z; Wang, D S

    2012-01-01

    Effects of magnetic nanoparticles on inorganic coagulants and their coagulation performances were studied in the present work. The Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) core-shell particle (FSCSP) and superfine iron (SI), were compounded with polyaluminium chloride of basicity 2.0 (PACl2.0), providing magnetic PACl2.0s (MPACl2.0s). The physiochemical properties of ferromagnetic nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the BET method and a zeta potentiometric analyzer. The Al species distributions of the MPACl2.0s and PACl2.0 were examined by liquid (27)Al NMR. Jar tests were employed to evaluate the coagulation performances. Floc properties were assessed by use of the electromotive microscope (EM) and small angle laser light scattering (SALLS). The results showed that modified layers of nanoparticles mitigated agglomeration. FSCSP had a larger specific area and pore volume than SI. The addition of ferromagnetic nanoparticles obviously increased the content of Al(un). MPACl2.0s performed better than PACl2.0 in turbidity removal and DOC removal when dosed less than 0.06 mmol/L as Al. Generally, PACl2.0 + FSCSP (50 mg/L) performed best. Large, loose and weak flocs were produced by MPACl2.0s, which were preferred for the magnetic powder recycling. A plausible structure, Al species-nanoparticles cluster, contributing to the unique properties of MPACl2.0 flocs, was proposed.

  8. Interconnections between autophagy and the coagulation cascade in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, K-D; Wang, C-C; Tsai, M-C; Wu, C-H; Yang, H-J; Chen, L-Y; Nakano, T; Goto, S; Huang, K-T; Hu, T-H; Chen, C-L; Lin, C-C

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has an important role in tumor biology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies demonstrated that tissue factor (TF) combined with coagulation factor VII (FVII) has a pathological role by activating a G-protein-coupled receptor called protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) for tumor growth. The present study aimed to investigate the interactions of autophagy and the coagulation cascade in HCC. Seventy HCC patients who underwent curative liver resection were recruited. Immunohistochemical staining and western blotting were performed to determine TF, FVII, PAR2 and light chain 3 (LC3A/B) expressions in tumors and their contiguous normal regions. We found that the levels of autophagic marker LC3A/B-II and coagulation proteins (TF, FVII and PAR2) were inversely correlated in human HCC tissues. Treatments with TF, FVII or PAR2 agonist downregulated LC3A/B-II with an increased level of mTOR in Hep3B cells; in contrast, knockdown of TF, FVII or PAR2 increased LC3A/B. Furthermore, mTOR silencing restored the impaired expression of LC3A/B-II in TF-, FVII- or PAR2-treated Hep3B cells and activated autophagy. Last, as an in vivo correlate, we administered TF, FVII or PAR2 agonist in a NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model and showed decreased LC3A/B protein levels in HepG2 tumors with treatments. Overall, our present study demonstrated that TF, FVII and PAR2 regulated autophagy mainly via mTOR signaling. The interaction of coagulation and autophagic pathways may provide potential targets for further therapeutic application in HCC. PMID:24853422

  9. Interconnections between autophagy and the coagulation cascade in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, K-D; Wang, C-C; Tsai, M-C; Wu, C-H; Yang, H-J; Chen, L-Y; Nakano, T; Goto, S; Huang, K-T; Hu, T-H; Chen, C-L; Lin, C-C

    2014-05-22

    Autophagy has an important role in tumor biology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies demonstrated that tissue factor (TF) combined with coagulation factor VII (FVII) has a pathological role by activating a G-protein-coupled receptor called protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) for tumor growth. The present study aimed to investigate the interactions of autophagy and the coagulation cascade in HCC. Seventy HCC patients who underwent curative liver resection were recruited. Immunohistochemical staining and western blotting were performed to determine TF, FVII, PAR2 and light chain 3 (LC3A/B) expressions in tumors and their contiguous normal regions. We found that the levels of autophagic marker LC3A/B-II and coagulation proteins (TF, FVII and PAR2) were inversely correlated in human HCC tissues. Treatments with TF, FVII or PAR2 agonist downregulated LC3A/B-II with an increased level of mTOR in Hep3B cells; in contrast, knockdown of TF, FVII or PAR2 increased LC3A/B. Furthermore, mTOR silencing restored the impaired expression of LC3A/B-II in TF-, FVII- or PAR2-treated Hep3B cells and activated autophagy. Last, as an in vivo correlate, we administered TF, FVII or PAR2 agonist in a NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model and showed decreased LC3A/B protein levels in HepG2 tumors with treatments. Overall, our present study demonstrated that TF, FVII and PAR2 regulated autophagy mainly via mTOR signaling. The interaction of coagulation and autophagic pathways may provide potential targets for further therapeutic application in HCC.

  10. Comparison of a novel polytitanium chloride coagulant with polyaluminium chloride: coagulation performance and floc characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Phuntsho, S; Gao, B Y; Yang, Y Z; Kim, J-H; Shon, H K

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized inorganic coagulants are increasingly being used in the water supply and wastewater treatment process, yet there is limited research on the development of polytitanium coagulants. The aim of this study is to synthesize polytitanium chloride (PTC) coagulants and investigate their coagulation behavior and floc characteristics for humic acid removal in comparison to polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The PTC samples with different B (molar ratios of OH/Ti) values were prepared using an instantaneous base-feeding method, employing sodium carbonate as the basification agent. The coagulation efficiency was significantly influenced by different B values. The results suggest that the humic acid removal increased with the increasing B value for PAC, while the inverse trend was observed for PTC. The optimum B value was chosen at 1.0 and 2.0 for PTC and PAC, respectively. Under the optimum coagulant dose and initial solution pH conditions, the PTC coagulant performed better than the PAC coagulant and the floc properties were significantly improved in terms of floc growth rate and floc size. However, the PAC coagulants produced flocs with better floc recoverability than the PTC coagulants.

  11. Coagulation abnormalities in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Muciño-Bermejo, Jimena; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-01-01

    The clotting process is a dynamic array of multiple processes which can be described in four phases: platelet plug initiation and formation, clotting process propagation by the coagulation cascade, clotting termination by antithrombotic mechanisms and clot removal by fibrinolysis. The liver plays a central role in each of these phases of clotting process, as it synthesizes the majority of coagulation factors and proteins involved in fibrinolysis as well as thrombopoeitin, which is responsible for platelet production from megakaryocytes. Many pathological processes associated with cirrhosis, such as portal hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, as well as co-morbid conditions, may also alter the coagulation process. Consequently, patients with liver disease have a disturbed balance of procoagulant and anti-coagulant factors which deviates from the normal coagulation cascade. This situation poses an additional problem in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this group of patients, since traditional coagulation test may not be reliable for assessing bleeding or thrombotic risk and traditional transfusional strategies may not be applicable in cirrhotic patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiological bases of coagulation abnormalities, in cirrhotic patients, the diagnostic therapeutic strategies to be followed and its impact on the clinical outcome in the cirrhotic patient.

  12. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation.

  13. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  14. Evaluation of whole blood coagulation process by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia

    2010-11-01

    This study was to investigate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate whole blood coagulation process. Attenuation coefficients and 1/e light penetration depth (D1/e) against time of human whole blood during in vitro clot formation under static were measured from the OCT profiles of reflectance vs depth. The results obtained clearly showed that the optical parameters are able to identify three stages during the in vitro blood clotting process. It is concluded that D1/e measured by OCT is a potential parameter to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  15. Reaction-diffusion waves of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Bouchnita, Anass; Kurbatova, Polina; Volpert, Vitaly

    2017-03-24

    One of the main characteristics of blood coagulation is the speed of clot growth. In the current work we consider a mathematical model of the coagulation cascade and study existence, stability and speed of propagation of the reaction-diffusion waves of blood coagulation. We also develop a simplified one-equation model that reflects the main features of the thrombin wave propagation. For this equation we estimate the wave speed analytically. The resulting formulas provide a good approximation for the speed of wave propagation in a more complex model as well as for the experimental data.

  16. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  17. A simple method for estimation of coagulation efficiency in mixed aerosols. [environmental pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Boyd, A.; Wolochow, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aerosols of KBr and AgNO3 were mixed, exposed to light in a glass tube and collected in the dark. About 15% of the collected material was reduced to silver upon development. Thus, two aerosols of particles that react to form a photo-reducible compound can be used to measure coagulation efficiency.

  18. Ferric coagulant recovered from coagulation sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Yan, Z C; Wang, N; Li, G B

    2009-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of ferric coagulant recovery from chemical sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) to make the process more cost-effective, as well as reduce sludge volume. The optimum conditions and efficiency of the acidification for ferric coagulant recovery from coagulation sludge were investigated. Experimental results showed that the recovered coagulants can be used in CEPT and the pollutants removal efficiency is similar to that of fresh coagulant, and for some aspects the effect of recovered coagulants is better than that of fresh ones, such as turbidity removal. Although some substances will be enriched during recycle, they have little effect on treated wastewater quality. Acidification condition also had significant influence on reduction of sludge volume. The efficiency of coagulant recovery had a linear relationship with sludge reduction. Experiments verify that it would be a sustainable and cost-effective way to recover ferric coagulant from coagulation sludge in water treatment and chemical wastewater treatment, and then recycle it to CEPT, as well as reduce sludge volume.

  19. Effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency of coagulants recovery by acidification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jui; Wang, Wen-May; Wei, Ming-Jun; Chen, Jiann-Long; He, Ju-Liang; Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Wu, Chih-Chao

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency ofcoagulant recovery by acidification with H2SO4. Two sludge characteristics were studied: types of coagulant and textures of the suspended solid in raw water. The coagulant types are aluminium sulphate and polyaluminium chloride (PACl); the textures of the suspended solid are sand-based and clay-based. Efficiency of aluminium recovery at a pH of 2 was compared for different sludges obtained from water treatment plants in Taiwan. The results showed that efficiency of aluminium recovery from sludge containing clayey particles was higher than that from sludge containing sandy particles. As for the effect of coagulant types, the aluminium recovery efficiency for sludge using PACl ranged between 77% and 100%, whereas it ranged between 65% and 72% for sludge using aluminium sulphate as the coagulant. This means using PACl as the coagulant could result in higher recovery efficiency of coagulant and be beneficial for water treatment plants where renewable materials and waste reduction as the factors for making decisions regarding plant operations. However, other metals, such as manganese, could be released with aluminium during the acidification process and limit the use of the recovered coagulants. It is suggested that the recovered coagulants be used in wastewater treatment processes.

  20. Coagulation testing in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatarajan, Venkatesan; Pruett, Ashlee; Adhikary, Sanjib Das

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative coagulation management is a complex task that has a significant impact on the perioperative journey of patients. Anaesthesia providers play a critical role in the decision-making on transfusion and/or haemostatic therapy in the surgical setting. Various tests are available in identifying coagulation abnormalities in the perioperative period. While the rapidly available bedside haemoglobin measurements can guide the transfusion of red blood cells, blood product administration is guided by many in vivo and in vitro tests. The introduction of newer anticoagulant medications and the implementation of the modified in vivo coagulation cascade have given a new dimension to the field of perioperative transfusion medicine. A proper understanding of the application and interpretation of the coagulation tests is vital for a good perioperative outcome.

  1. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  2. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  3. Effect of fibrinogen on blood coagulation detected by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Teng, Xiangshuai

    2015-05-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique and the parameter 1/e light penetration depth (d1/e) were able to characterize the whole blood coagulation process in contrast to existing optical tests that are performed on plasma samples. To evaluate the feasibility of the technique for quantifying the effect of fibrinogen (Fbg) on blood coagulation, a dynamic study of d1/e of blood in various Fbg concentrations was performed in static state. Two groups of blood samples of hematocrit (HCT) in 35, 45, and 55% were reconstituted of red blood cells with: 1) treated plasma with its intrinsic Fbg removed and commercial Fbg added (0-8 g L-1) and 2) native plasma with commercial Fbg added (0-8 g L-1). The results revealed a typical behavior due to coagulation induced by calcium ions and the clotting time is Fbg concentration-dependent. The clotting time was decreased by the increasing amount of Fbg in both groups. Besides, the blood of lower HCT with various levels of Fbg took shorter time to coagulate than that of higher HCT. Consequently, the OCT method is a useful and promising tool for the detection of blood-coagulation processes induced with different Fbg levels.

  4. Effects of haemodilution on the optical properties of blood during coagulation studied by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Liu, Y.; Wei, H.; Yang, X.; Wu, G.; Guo, Z.; Yang, H.; He, Y.; Xie, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of blood dilution with hypertonic (7.5 %) and normal (0.9 %) saline on its optical properties during coagulation in vitro using optical coherence tomography. The light penetration depth and attenuation coefficient are obtained from the dependences of reflectance on the depth. Normal whole blood has served as the control group. The average coagulation time is equal to 420 +/- 16, 418 +/- 16 and 358 +/- 14 {\\text{s}} with blood volume replacement of 2 %, 11 %, and 20 % by 0.9 % normal saline, respectively. With 2 %, 11% and 20% blood volume replacement with 7.5 % hypertonic saline, the average coagulation time is 422 +/- 17, 1160 +/- 45 and 1730 +/- 69 {\\text{s}}, respectively. For normal whole blood, the average coagulation time amounts to 425 +/- 19 {\\text{s}}. it is shown that dilution with normal saline has a procoagulant effect when it replaces 20 % of blood volume, and hypertonic saline has an anticoagulant effect if it replaces 11 % or more of blood volume. It is concluded that optical coherence tomography is a potential technique to quantify and monitor the liquid - gel transition during the coagulation process of blood diluted by normal and hypertonic saline.

  5. Effect of fibrinogen on blood coagulation detected by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Teng, Xiangshuai

    2015-05-21

    Our previous work demonstrated that an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique and the parameter 1/e light penetration depth (d1/e) were able to characterize the whole blood coagulation process in contrast to existing optical tests that are performed on plasma samples. To evaluate the feasibility of the technique for quantifying the effect of fibrinogen (Fbg) on blood coagulation, a dynamic study of d1/e of blood in various Fbg concentrations was performed in static state. Two groups of blood samples of hematocrit (HCT) in 35, 45, and 55% were reconstituted of red blood cells with: 1) treated plasma with its intrinsic Fbg removed and commercial Fbg added (0-8 g L(-1)); and 2) native plasma with commercial Fbg added (0-8 g L(-1)). The results revealed a typical behavior due to coagulation induced by calcium ions and the clotting time is Fbg concentration-dependent. The clotting time was decreased by the increasing amount of Fbg in both groups. Besides, the blood of lower HCT with various levels of Fbg took shorter time to coagulate than that of higher HCT. Consequently, the OCT method is a useful and promising tool for the detection of blood-coagulation processes induced with different Fbg levels.

  6. Micro-electromechanical film bulk acoustic sensor for plasma and whole blood coagulation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Song, Shuren; Ma, Jilong; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Peng; Liu, Weihui; Guo, Qiuquan

    2017-05-15

    Monitoring blood coagulation is an important issue in the surgeries and the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we reported a novel strategy for the blood coagulation monitoring based on a micro-electromechanical film bulk acoustic resonator. The resonator was excited by a lateral electric field and operated under the shear mode with a frequency of 1.9GHz. According to the apparent step-ladder curves of the frequency response to the change of blood viscoelasticity, the coagulation time (prothrombin time) and the coagulation kinetics were measured with the sample consumption of only 1μl. The procoagulant activity of thromboplastin and the anticoagulant effect of heparin on the blood coagulation process were illustrated exemplarily. The measured prothrombin times showed a good linear correlation with R(2)=0.99969 and a consistency with the coefficient of variation less than 5% compared with the commercial coagulometer. The proposed film bulk acoustic sensor, which has the advantages of small size, light weight, low cost, simple operation and little sample consumption, is a promising device for miniaturized, online and automated analytical system for routine diagnostics of hemostatic status and personal health monitoring.

  7. Determining the efficiency of subjecting finely dispersed emulsions to physical coagulation in a packed layer under turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Basharov, M. M.; Farakhova, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The process through which small droplets contained in emulsions are physically coagulated on the surface of random packing elements is considered. The theory of turbulent migration of a finely dispersed phase is used for determining the coagulation efficiency. Expressions for calculating coagulation efficiency and turbulent transfer rate are obtained by applying models of a turbulent boundary layer. An example of calculating the enlargement of water droplets in hydrocarbon medium represented by a wide fraction of light hydrocarbons (also known as natural gas liquid) is given. The process flowchart of a system for removing petroleum products from effluent waters discharged from the Kazan TETs-1 cogeneration station is considered. Replacement of the mechanical filter by a thin-layer settler with a coagulator is proposed.

  8. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  9. [Investigation of coagulation time: PT and APTT].

    PubMed

    Ramakers, Christian; van der Heul, Cees; van Wijk, Eduard M

    2012-01-01

    The first case report describes an extremely prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. Heparin use was excluded. The APTT mixing study combined with the medical history suggests a deficiency in one of the non-essential coagulation factors. This was confirmed by factor XII activity of <1%. The second case report describes a prolonged APTT in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. The negative bleeding tendency in combination with a failure of the mixing study to correct the coagulation assay results suggests a factor inhibitor, most probably lupus anticoagulant. Indeed, the lupus anticoagulant was positive and the anti-cardiolipin antibody titre was also positive. Aberrations in the process of haemostasis can be efficiently screened using a platelet count, an APTT, a PT and a thorough physical examination combined with a thorough medical history taking. Common causes of prolonged PT and/or APTT are the use of oral anticoagulants or heparin, vitamin K deficiency and liver disease. Other causes include coagulation factor deficiencies, coagulation factor inhibitors and diffuse intravascular coagulation.

  10. Microrheological Coagulation Assay Exploiting Micromechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Francesco; Duffy, James; Hegner, Martin

    2017-01-03

    Rheological measurements in biological liquids yield insights into homeostasis and provide information on important molecular processes that affect fluidity. We present a fully automated cantilever-based method for highly precise and sensitive measurements of microliter sample volumes of human blood plasma coagulation (0.009 cP for viscosity range 0.5-3 cP and 0.0012 g/cm(3) for density range 0.9-1.1 g/cm(3)). Microcantilever arrays are driven by a piezoelectric element, and resonance frequencies and quality factors of sensors that change over time are evaluated. A highly accurate approximation of the hydrodynamic function is introduced that correlates resonance frequency and quality factor of cantilever beams immersed in a fluid to the viscosity and density of that fluid. The theoretical model was validated using glycerol reference solutions. We present a surface functionalization protocol that allows minimization of unspecific protein adsorption onto cantilevers. Adsorption leads to measurement distortions and incorrect estimation of the fluid parameters (viscosity and density). Two hydrophilic terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) sensor surfaces are compared to a hydrophobic terminated SAM coating. As expected, the hydrophobic modified surfaces induced the highest mass adsorption and could promote conformational changes of the proteins and subsequent abnormal biological activity. Finally, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assay was performed, and the viscosity, density, and coagulation rate of human blood plasma were measured along with the standard coagulation time. The method could extend and improve current coagulation testing.

  11. Fibrinolysis and the control of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Chapin, John C; Hajjar, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin plays an essential role in hemostasis as both the primary product of the coagulation cascade and the ultimate substrate for fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis efficiency is greatly influenced by clot structure, fibrinogen isoforms and polymorphisms, the rate of thrombin generation, the reactivity of thrombus-associated cells such as platelets, and the overall biochemical environment. Regulation of the fibrinolytic system, like that of the coagulation cascade, is accomplished by a wide array of cofactors, receptors, and inhibitors. Fibrinolytic activity can be generated either on the surface of a fibrin-containing thrombus, or on cells that express profibrinolytic receptors. In a widening spectrum of clinical disorders, acquired and congenital defects in fibrinolysis contribute to disease morbidity, and new assays of global fibrinolysis now have potential predictive value in multiple clinical settings. Here, we summarize the basic elements of the fibrinolytic system, points of interaction with the coagulation pathway, and some recent clinical advances.

  12. Fibrinolysis and the control of blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, John C.; Hajjar, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin plays an essential role in hemostasis as both the primary product of the coagulation cascade and the ultimate substrate for fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis efficiency is greatly influenced by clot structure, fibrinogen isoforms and polymorphisms, the rate of thrombin generation, the reactivity of thrombus-associated cells such as platelets, and the overall biochemical environment. Regulation of the fibrinolytic system, like that of the coagulation cascade, is accomplished by a wide array of cofactors, receptors, and inhibitors. Fibrinolytic activity can be generated either on the surface of a fibrin-containing thrombus, or on cells that express profibrinolytic receptors. In a widening spectrum of clinical disorders, acquired and congenital defects in fibrinolysis contribute to disease morbidity, and new assays of global fibrinolysis now have potential predictive value in multiple clinical settings. Here, we summarize the basic elements of the fibrinolytic system, points of interaction with the coagulation pathway, and some recent clinical advances. PMID:25294122

  13. Prostate cancer: beware of disseminated intravascular coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mihir; John, Babbin; Evans, Gillian; Eddy, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a pathological systemic condition resulting from aberrant activation of the coagulation system. It is characterised by the release and activation of procoagulants into the blood, with an associated consumption coagulopathy. Its association with solid and haematological malignancies is well described in literature. This case describes an elderly man, known to have prostate cancer, who following transurethral resection of the prostate developed DIC with haematuria, spontaneous ecchymoses and mucosal bleeding. Subsequent investigations revealed a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >1000 µg/L, and staging CT showed multiple sclerotic metastatic lesions affecting the thoracic and lumbar vertebra, as well as infiltration into his left femur. Coagulation normalised with blood products and vitamin K within 1 week, and the patient responded to antiandrogen therapy with a reduction in pain and PSA on discharge. PMID:25819815

  14. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth.

  15. Post-treatment of sanitary landfill leachate by coagulation-flocculation using chitosan as primary coagulant.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Inara Oliveira do Carmo; Guedes, Ana Rosa Pinto; Perelo, Louisa Wessels; Queiroz, Luciano Matos

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan was chosen as an alternative primary coagulant in a complementary coagulation-flocculation treatment of sanitary landfill leachate with the aim of removing recalcitrant organic matter. In order to optimize the process conditions, central composite design and response surface methodology were applied. To evaluate the performance of the process using chitosan, we also carried out tests with aluminium sulphate (Al(2) (SO(4))(3).14 H(2)O) as coagulant. In addition, acute toxicity tests were carried using the duckweed Lemna minor and the guppy fish Poecilia reticulata as test organisms. The analytic hierarchy process was employed for selecting the most appropriate coagulant. Mean values of true colour removal efficiency of 80% and turbidity removal efficiency of 91.4% were reached at chitosan dosages of 960 mg L(-1) at pH 8.5. The acute toxicity tests showed that organisms were sensitive to all samples, mainly after coagulation-flocculation using chitosan. CE(50) for L. minor was not determined because there was no inhibition of the average growth rate and biomass production; LC(50) for P. reticulata was 23% (v v(-1)). Multi-criteria analysis showed that alum was the most appropriate coagulant. Therefore, chitosan as primary coagulant was not considered to be a viable alternative in the post-treatment of landfill leachate.

  16. Computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation for BPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Barrett, Adrian R. W.; Ng, Wan S.; Lim, Liam G.; Cheng, Wai S.

    2001-06-01

    Interstitial laser thermotherapy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that utilizes laser to coagulate and treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. This study explores the use of a computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation system to aid surgeons in performing this procedure.

  17. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  18. Coagulation removal of humic acid-stabilized carbon nanotubes from water by PACl: influences of hydraulic condition and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si; Liu, Changli; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2012-11-15

    Discharged carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can adsorb the widely-distributed humic acid (HA) in aquatic environments and thus be stabilized. HA-stabilized CNTs can find their way into and challenge the potable water treatment system. This study investigated the efficiency of coagulation and sedimentation techniques in the removal of the HA-stabilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) as a coagulant, with a focus on the effects of hydraulic conditions and water chemistry. Stirring speeds in the mixing and reacting stages were gradually changed to examine the effect of the hydraulic conditions on the removal rate. The stirring speed in the reacting stage affected floc formation and thereby had a greater impact on the removal rate than the stirring speed in the mixing stage. Water chemistry factors such as pH and ionic strength had a significant effect on the stability of MWCNT suspension and the removal efficiency. Low pH (4-7) was favorable for saving the coagulant and maintaining high removal efficiency. High ionic strength facilitated the destabilization of the HA-stabilized MWCNTs and thereby lowered the required PACl dosage for the coagulation. However, excessively high ionic strength (higher than the critical coagulation concentration) decreased the maximum removal rate, probably by inhibiting ionic activity of PACl hydrolyzate in water. These results are expected to shed light on the potential improvement of coagulation removal of aqueous stabilized MWCNTs in water treatment systems.

  19. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  20. Roles for vitamin K beyond coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent interest in vitamin K has been motivated by evidence of physiological roles beyond that of coagulation. Vitamin K and vitamin K-dependent proteins may be involved in regulation of calcification, energy metabolism, and inflammation. However, the evidence for many of these proposed roles in the...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  5. Milestones and perspectives in coagulation and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2009-02-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as the physiologic process whereby bleeding is antagonized and possibly stopped to minimize blood loss. The first medical description of the clinical and inherited features of hemostasis can be dated back more than 1000 years, when Abu al-Qasim Khalaf ibn 'Abbas al-Andalusi al-Zahrawi' medical treatise provided some initial insights into this puzzling process. Since then, continuous and revolutionary scientific developments have contributed to decoding several aspects of this intricate but essential physiologic phenomenon, providing a reliable model to explain the leading mechanisms involved. Although the point at which bleeding stops is commonly referred to as "coagulation," blood coagulation is actually only one part of a two-part hemostatic process that develops through sequential steps referred to as primary and secondary hemostasis. Throughout its activation and development, the coagulation cascade is strictly regulated by a series of natural inhibitors, which prevent unnecessary and excessive clotting. The aim of this article is to provide a concise overview of the major discoveries and past and current perspectives in coagulation and hemostasis.

  6. Different Recovery Profiles of Coagulation Factors, Thrombin Generation, and Coagulation Function After Hemorrhagic Shock in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-06

    Different recovery profiles of coagulation factors, thrombin generation, and coagulation function after hemorrhagic shock in pigs Wenjun Z. Martini ...Defense. Address for reprints: Wenjun Z. Martini , PhD, The US Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Ft. Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martini W. Z., Cortez D. S., Dubick M. A., Blackbourne L. H., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  7. Dynamic analysis of coagulation of low turbidity water sources using Al- and Fe-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Ebie, K; Kawaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, D

    2006-01-01

    The direct filtration system is widely used in the treatment of source waters with low and stable turbidity. We have previously indicated the importance of optimizing agitation strength GR and time TR in rapid mixing tanks in order to decrease filter head loss and treated water turbidity in direct filtration. In the present study, we employ a batch-type coagulation experimental apparatus that incorporates a high-sensitivity particle counter, where the particulate concentrations are measured continuously after injection of coagulant, in order to clarify the fundamental coagulation and microfloc formation dynamics. Specifically, it is shown that, after injection of the coagulant, coagulation and microfloc formation occur through distinct periods: an agglomeration preparation period, followed by an agglomeration progression period, and then finally an agglomeration stabilization period, and that optimization of the GR value is the most important consideration, although both the coagulant concentration and GR influence the time at which agglomeration begins in the preparatory period, the time at which agglomeration stabilizes after the progression period, and the concentration of initial particles with diameters of 1-3 microm at completion of agglomeration.

  8. Enhanced coagulation for improving coagulation performance and reducing residual aluminum combining polyaluminum chloride with diatomite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenchao; Wu, Chunde

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of using enhanced coagulation, which combined polyaluminum chloride (PAC) with diatomite for improving coagulation performance and reducing the residual aluminum (Al), was discussed. The effects of PAC and diatomite dosage on the coagulation performance and residual Al were mainly investigated. Results demonstrated that the removal efficiencies of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV254 were significantly improved by the enhanced coagulation, compared with PAC coagulation alone. Meaningfully, the five forms of residual Al (total Al (TAl), total dissolved Al (TDAl), dissolved organic Al (DOAl), dissolved monomeric Al (DMAl), and dissolved organic monomeric Al (DOMAl)) all had different degrees of reduction in the presence of diatomite and achieved the lowest concentrations (0.185, 0.06, 0.053, 0.014, and 0 mg L(-1), respectively) at a PAC dose of 15 mg L(-1) and diatomite dose of 40 mg L(-1). In addition, when PAC was used as coagulant, the majority of residual Al existed in dissolved form (about 31.14-70.16%), and the content of DOMAl was small in the DMAl.

  9. Novel Ion-Exchange Coagulants Remove More Low Molecular Weight Organics than Traditional Coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huazhang; Wang, Lei; Hanigan, David; Westerhoff, Paul; Ni, Jinren

    2016-04-05

    Low molecular weight (MW) charged organic matter is poorly removed by conventional coagulants but contributes to disinfection byproduct formation during chlorination of drinking waters. We hypothesized that CIEX, a new Al-based hybrid coagulant with ion-exchange functional groups, would be new mechanistic approach to remove low MW organic matter during coagulation and would perform better than polyaluminum chloride (PACl) or metal-salt based coagulants. We measured coagulation performance using dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a high hardness surface water. CIEX achieved excellent turbidity removal and removed 20% to 46% more DOC than FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, or PACl, depending on dose. The improved DOC removal was attributable to better removal of low MW organic matter (<2 kDa). We further studied removal mechanisms in a model water containing a low MW organic acid (salicylic acid (SA)). CIEX achieved high removal of organic acids (>90% of SA) independent of pH, whereas removal by metal salts was lower (<15%) and was strongly pH dependent. CIEX ion-exchange capability is facilitated by its covalently bound quaternary ammonium group, which conventional coagulants lack. Plus, unlike other cationic polymers that react with chloramines to form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), CIEX has a low molar yield (9.3 × 10(-7) mol NDMA per mol CIEX-N).

  10. Study on the removal of acid dyes using chitosan as a natural coagulant/coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zonoozi, M H; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Arami, M

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan was selected as a natural coagulating agent for the removal of acid dyes (Acid Blue 292; AB292, and Acid Red 398; AR398) from dye-containing solutions. The study was organised in two phases. In phase 1, chitosan was used alone as a natural coagulant for the removal of the dyes. For this purpose, the effect of different parameters including pH, chitosan dosage and initial dye concentration on the dye removal efficiency was examined. In phase 2 of the study, the application of chitosan as a natural coagulant aid in conjunction with polyaluminium chloride (PAC) was assessed. According to the results of phase 1, the best removal efficiencies occurred in an acidic pH range (less than 6) for both of the dyes. Also, excellent dye removal results (about 90%) were achieved with relatively low dosages of chitosan (30-35 mg L(-1) for AB292 and 50-60 mg L(-1) for AR398). However, the initial concentration of the dyes severely influenced the coagulation performance of chitosan, which can constrain the performance of chitosan as a natural coagulant. On the basis of the results of phase 2, chitosan, as a natural coagulant aid, noticeably enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC, especially in the case of AB292. Small amounts of chitosan (3 or 5 mg L(-1)) enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC up to 2.5 times for AB292.

  11. Unidentified coagulation disorders in post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Chen, Yue-Shih; Remmert, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 6,966 patients who had undergone tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy to evaluate the incidence and clinical features of previously unidentified coagulation disorders in patients who experienced postoperative hemorrhage (n = 201). We found that post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage secondary to unidentified coagulation disorders is extremely rare. However, normal coagulation values and an insignificant history do not rule out coagulation disorders. If diffuse, persistent, and bilateral bleeding is not related to arterial hypertension, dissection technique, or local infection, a rapid and detailed analysis of coagulation factors should be considered.

  12. Application of particle-size analysis in coagulation/flocculation for reclamation of a secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Sun, Liping; Wang, Yan; Xia, Siqing; Le, Linshen

    2009-01-01

    Reclaimed secondary effluent is an important alternative water resource for urban areas; the particle-size distribution approach was applied in this study for purpose of screening and evaluating treatment processes for reclamation of a secondary effluent. Two particle-size analysing technologies namely (1) the laser light scattering technology and (2) the sequential membrane filtration technology were used in this study; particulate characteristics of the secondary effluent, of the reclaimed water by coagulation and of the reclaimed water by combined coagulation/flocculation were investigated. Optimisation of coagulation and/or combined coagulation/flocculation technologies were carried out with the help of particulate analysis of priority pollutants, following which studies on turbidity removing mechanisms of both processes were discussed. Comparison studies indicated that increase of turbidity removal efficiency by flocculation happened mainly in the particulate range of 0.2-0.3 microm and 5-8 microm; flocculation did not help or even slightly deteriorated turbidity removal of particles whose sizes are smaller than 0.2 microm and/or in the range of 0.3-5 microm.

  13. Coagulative and ablative characteristics of a novel diode laser system (1470nm) for endonasal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, C. S.; Havel, M.; Janda, P.; Leunig, A.; Sroka, R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Being practical, efficient and inexpensive, fibre guided diode laser systems are preferable over others for endonasal applications. A new medical 1470 nm diode laser system is expected to offer good ablative and coagulative tissue effects. Methods: The new 1470 nm diode laser system was compared to a conventional 940 nm system with regards to laser tissue effects (ablation, coagulation, carbonization zones) in an ex vivo setup using fresh liver and muscle tissue. The laser fibres were fixed to a computer controlled stepper motor, and the light was applied using comparable power settings and a reproducible procedure under constant conditions. Clinical efficacy and postoperative morbidity was evaluated in two groups of 10 patients undergoing laser coagulation therapy of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. Results: In the experimental setup, the 1470 nm laser diode system proved to be more efficient in inducing tissue effects with an energy factor of 2-3 for highly perfused hepatic tissue to 30 for muscular tissue. In the clinical case series, the higher efficacy of the 1470 nm diode laser system led to reduced energy settings as compared to the conventional system with comparable clinical results. Postoperative crusting was less pronounced in the 1470 nm laser group. Conclusion: The 1470 nm diode laser system offers a highly efficient alternative to conventional diode laser systems for the coagulation of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. According to the experimental results it can be furthermore expected that it disposes of an excellent surgical potential with regards to its cutting abilities.

  14. Laser tissue coagulation and concurrent optical coherence tomography through a double-clad fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Kathy; Baac, Hyoung Won; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Villiger, Martin; Godbout, Nicolas; Bouma, Brett E; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Double-clad fiber (DCF) is herein used in conjunction with a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) to enable simultaneous and co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser tissue coagulation. The DCF allows a single channel fiber-optic probe to be shared: i.e. the core propagating the OCT signal while the inner cladding delivers the coagulation laser light. We herein present a novel DCFC designed and built to combine both signals within a DCF (>90% of single-mode transmission; >65% multimode coupling). Potential OCT imaging degradation mechanisms are also investigated and solutions to mitigate them are presented. The combined DCFC-based system was used to induce coagulation of an ex vivo swine esophagus allowing a real-time assessment of thermal dynamic processes. We therefore demonstrate a DCFC-based system combining OCT imaging with laser coagulation through a single fiber, thus enabling both modalities to be performed simultaneously and in a co-registered manner. Such a system enables endoscopic image-guided laser marking of superficial epithelial tissues or laser thermal therapy of epithelial lesions in pathologies such as Barrett's esophagus.

  15. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water.

  16. Blood coagulation disorders in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Knoebl, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Host defense and blood coagulation are tightly connected and interacting systems, necessary for the integrity of an organism. Complex mechanisms regulate the intensity of a host response to invading pathogens or other potentially dangerous situations. Under regular conditions, this response is limited in time and located to the site of injury. Sometimes, however, systemic host response is overwhelming and disproportional and causes damage, not cure. Dependent on the genetical predisposition of the host, its current immunocompetence, or the type of injury, the reaction leads to the clinical picture of the different degrees of sepsis. Septic organ dysfunction is caused by intravascular fibrin deposition as a result of coagulation activation, anticoagulant breakdown, and shut down of fibrinolysis. This article describes the major pathophysiologic reactions in these situations and presents www.SepDIC.eu, an online tool on sepsis and associated coagulopathy.

  17. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  18. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  19. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  20. Cellular proteins of Microcystis aeruginosa inhibiting coagulation with polyaluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Takaara, Tomoko; Sano, Daisuke; Konno, Hiroshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-04-01

    Cyanobacterial growth in semi-closed water areas such as reservoirs brings about a coagulation inhibition in a drinking water treatment system, but the inhibitory substances and mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this study, proteins having a high affinity with polyaluminum chloride (PACl) were isolated from organic substances produced by Microcystis aeruginosa with the affinity chromatography technique. Both extracellular organic matter (EOM) and cellular organic matter (COM) disturbed the flocculation of suspended kaolin with PACl, but it was likely that nonproteinous substances in EOM cause the reduction of coagulation effciency. In contrast, proteins in COM were obtained as possible inhibitory substances for the coagulation with PACl. These proteins could consume PACl in the coagulation process due to the formation of chelate complexes between these inhibitory proteins and the coagulant. The consumption of PACl by cyanobacterial proteins could be one of the important causes of the increase in coagulant demand.

  1. The Interface between Inflammation and Coagulation in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demetz, Gabriele; Ott, Ilka

    2012-01-01

    The intimate connection between coagulation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular disease has moved more and more into focus of clinical research. This paper focuses on the essential components of this interplay in the settings of cardiovascular disease and acute coronary syndrome. Tissue factor, the main initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway, plays a central role via causing a proinflammatory response through activation of coagulation factors and thereby initiating coagulation and downstream cellular signalling pathways. Regarding activated clotting factors II, X, and VII, protease-activated receptors provide the molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. Hereby, PAR-1 displays deleterious as well as beneficial properties. Unravelling these interrelations may help developing new strategies to ameliorate the detrimental reciprocal aggravation of inflammation and coagulation. PMID:22518344

  2. Coagulation Defects in Experimental Hepatic Injury in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Osbaldiston, G. W.; Hoffman, Marcia W.

    1971-01-01

    Alteration in activity of blood coagulation factors in dogs with acute hepatic injury caused by oral carbon tetrachloride dosing was studied. Coagulation Factors II, VII and IX were dramatically reduced within 48 hours but recovered to normal in the next five days. Because surgery is rarely performed on dogs with hepatic necrosis, the use of fresh whole blood tranfusion to improve the coagulation defect in hepatic injury was also studied. Transfusion was found to have only a temporary beneficial effect. PMID:4253461

  3. Recovery of struvite via coagulation and flocculation using natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Latifian, Maryam; Liu, Jing; Mattiasson, Bo

    2014-01-01

    One of the major setbacks of struvite recovery processes is the difficulty in harvesting struvite crystals. This study evaluates the use of different coagulants to improve precipitation of struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H20) crystals. Chitosan and poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (Poly-DADMAC) as a coagulant-flocculent and alginate and bentonite as a coagulant aid have been examined in jar tests. Also, a continuous three-phase process, i.e., struvite crystallization, coagulation/flocculation and precipitation process, was set up for real wastewater. Addition of chitosan as the coagulant and bentonite as the coagulant aid was significantly more efficient in forming struvite flocs in comparison to Poly-DADMAC alone or with coagulant aid, which did not show any positive effect. The calculated average settling velocity of struvite with chitosan-bentonite addition in synthetic and in real wastewater increased by approximately 5.3 and 2.8 folds, respectively, compared with that of no coagulant/flocculent addition. Phosphorus recovery of over 70% was achieved by the continuous process. Findings in this study clearly confirmed the possibility of using chitosan and bentonite as an efficient coagulant-flocculent to enhance the recovery of struvite crystals.

  4. Improving the efficiency of clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. N.; Smirnov, B. A.; Zhadan, A. V.; Avan, V. K.

    2010-08-01

    Technological and design possibilities of improving clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water are considered. The results obtained from implementing these possibilities in real devices are presented.

  5. Innate immunity, coagulation and placenta-related adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Huang, S Joseph

    2009-12-01

    Maternal immunity undergoes subtle adjustment in order to tolerate the semi-allogeneic embryo and maintain the host defense against potential pathogens. Concomitantly, coagulation systems change from an anti-coagulant state to a pro-coagulant state to meet the hemostatic challenge of placentation and delivery. Innate immunity and blood coagulation systems are the first line of defense to protect a host against exogenous challenges, including alloantigens and mechanical insults, and preserve the integrity of an organism. The interactions between coagulation and immune systems have been extensively studied. Immune cells play a pivotal role in the initiation of the coagulation cascade, whereas coagulation proteases display substantial immuno-modulatory effects. Upon exogenous challenges, the immune and coagulation systems are capable of potentiating each other leading to a vicious cycle. Natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages (Mphis) and dendritic cells (DCs) are three major innate immune cells that have been demonstrated to play essential roles in early pregnancy. However, immune maladaptation and hemostatic imbalance have been suggested to be responsible for adverse pregnant outcomes, such as preeclampsia (PE), miscarriage, recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). In this review, we will summarize the mutual regulation between blood coagulation and innate immune systems as well as their roles in the maintenance of normal pregnancy and in the pathogenesis of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  6. Compound bioflocculant and polyaluminum chloride in kaolin-humic acid coagulation: factors influencing coagulation performance and floc characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihua; Gao, Baoyu; Huang, Xin; Dong, Hongyu; Li, Xiaochen; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of coagulant dosage and pH on coagulation performance and floc properties using polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and compound bioflocculant (CBF) dual-coagulant in kaolin-humic acid (HA) treatment. Results showed that as PAC dosage rose, comparatively better coagulation efficiencies and floc characteristics were achieved due to stronger charge neutralization and sweeping effect. Addition of CBF could enhance coagulation performance and floc properties, including size, strength and recoverability, except fractal dimension. Solution pH had a significant effect on coagulation efficiencies and flocs formation. Under acidic condition, flocs showed higher strength and recoverability but lower fractal dimension, where charge neutralization was the foremost mechanism. More compact flocs were generated under alkaline condition due to the sweeping effect of hydrolyzed Al species.

  7. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Erwin A; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2009-04-01

    This opinion identifies inconsistencies in the generally-accepted surface biophysics involved in contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation, reviews recent experimental work aimed at resolving inconsistencies, and concludes that this standard paradigm requires substantial revision to accommodate new experimental observations. Foremost among these new findings is that surface-catalyzed conversion of the blood zymogen factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) to the enzyme FXIIa (FXII [surface] --> FXIIa, a.k.a. autoactivation) is not specific for anionic surfaces, as proposed by the standard paradigm. Furthermore, it is found that surface activation is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII autoactivation occurs by what appears to be a protein-adsorption-competition effect. Both of these findings argue against the standard view that contact activation of plasma coagulation is potentiated by the assembly of activation-complex proteins (FXII, FXI, prekallikrein, and high-molecular weight kininogen) directly onto activating surfaces (procoagulants) through specific protein/surface interactions. These new findings supplement the observation that adsorption behavior of FXII and FXIIa is not remarkably different from a wide variety of other blood proteins surveyed. Similarity in adsorption properties further undermines the idea that FXII and/or FXIIa are distinguished from other blood proteins by unusual adsorption properties resulting in chemically-specific interactions with activating anionic surfaces. IMPACT STATEMENT: This review shows that the consensus biochemical mechanism of contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation that has long served as a rationale for poor hemocompatibility is an inadequate basis for surface engineering of advanced cardiovascular biomaterials.

  8. [Clinical cases of acquired coagulation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Hino, M; Ota, K; Akahori, M; Hirai, M; Inoue, T; Mugitani, A; Tatsumi, N

    2000-12-01

    The acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are classified into alloantibodies, which appear in association with supplementary treatment for congenital coagulation factor deficiency, and autoantibodies, which are spontaneously produced. We report here 2 cases of acquired factor VIII inhibitor and 1 case of factor V inhibitor. Case 1: A 52-year-old woman noted swelling of the right parotid region in March 1988. Though contrast examination was scheduled, she was admitted for detailed examination due to a markedly prolonged coagulation time. An APTT correction test suggested that decreased factor VIII activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. Since antinuclear antibody and SS-A antibody were positive and infiltration by lymphocytes in the salivary gland acini in a lip biopsy specimen was detected, Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed. Case 2: A 33-year-old woman had normal delivery of her second child in February 1998. In June 1998, she suffered slight contusion in the left lower limb. The affected site became swollen and painful, making walking difficult. Since both upper limbs became markedly swollen after 1 week, she visited our hospital. Prolonged APTT and a marked decrease in factor VIII activity were observed. Factor VIII inhibitor titer was high at 19 Bethesda units. Case 3: A 64-year-old man had had asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria since the beginning of August 1998 but was placed under observation since no abnormal findings were observed on various imaging tests. However, he was admitted to Osaka City General Medical Center because of vesicular tamponade. Factor V activity was markedly decreased to 1.0%. PT correction test suggested that decreased factor V activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. The underlying disease could not be determined in this case. In patients with acquired coagulation inhibitors, bleeding symptoms are reported to be mild in many cases, and severe bleeding is rare. However, cases of death without severe bleeding or

  9. A new approach using coagulation rate constant for evaluation of turbidity removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sameraiy, Mukheled

    2015-09-01

    Coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation processes for treating three levels of bentonite synthetic turbid water using date seeds (DS) and alum (A) coagulants were investigated in the previous research work. In the current research, the same experimental results were used to adopt a new approach on a basis of using coagulation rate constant as an investigating parameter to identify optimum doses of these coagulants. Moreover, the performance of these coagulants to meet (WHO) turbidity standard was assessed by introducing a new evaluating criterion in terms of critical coagulation rate constant (kc). Coagulation rate constants (k2) were mathematically calculated in second order form of coagulation process for each coagulant. The maximum (k2) values corresponded to doses, which were obviously to be considered as optimum doses. The proposed criterion to assess the performance of coagulation process of these coagulants was based on the mathematical representation of (WHO) turbidity guidelines in second order form of coagulation process stated that (k2) for each coagulant should be ≥ (kc) for each level of synthetic turbid water. For all tested turbid water, DS coagulant could not satisfy it. While, A coagulant could satisfy it. The results obtained in the present research are exactly in agreement with the previous published results in terms of finding optimum doses for each coagulant and assessing their performances. On the whole, it is recommended considering coagulation rate constant to be a new approach as an indicator for investigating optimum doses and critical coagulation rate constant to be a new evaluating criterion to assess coagulants' performance.

  10. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to <1 mg/L but in practice, this option would incur significant costs. The treatment performance of the purified recovered coagulants was compared to that of virgin reagent with reference to key water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material.

  11. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased (“pure”) THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ’s ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  12. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  13. Inherited coagulation disorders in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Ardeshiri, R; Yarmohammadi, Hooman

    2002-11-01

    A comprehensive survey concerning the Shiraz Hemophilia Society and the associated haemophilia treatment centre was undertaken in April 2002 to collect data on demographics, signs and symptoms in the southern Iranian population with haemophilia and allied disorders. The total number of patients with coagulation disorders was 367. Haemophilia A (factor [F] VIII deficiency) was found in 271, 39 had haemophilia B (FIX deficiency) and 24 had von Willebrand disease. The rare coagulation disorders (n = 33) included 11 patients with FX deficiency; 10 with FVII; six with FXIII; two with afibrinogenaemia; two with FXI; one with combined FVIII and FV; and one with combined FVII, FVIII and FIX deficiency. The prevalence was 6.64 per 100,000 inhabitants. The most common symptoms were haemarthrosis, haematomas and epistaxis. None of the patients were human immunodeficiency virus positive but 47 (15%) were hepatitis C virus positive and two (0.7%) were hepatitis B positive, so that the rate of transfusion-transmitted infections was lower compared with other populations.

  14. Analysis and optimization of coagulation and flocculation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, V.; Srinivas, N.; Srikanth Vuppala, N. V.

    2015-02-01

    Natural coagulants have been the focus of research of many investigators through the last decade owing to the problems caused by the chemical coagulants. Optimization of process parameters is vital for the effectiveness of coagulation process. In the present study optimization of parameters like pH, dose of coagulant and mixing speed were studied using natural coagulants sago and chitin in comparison with alum. Jar test apparatus was used to perform the coagulation. The results showed that the removal of turbidity was up to 99 % by both alum and chitin at lower doses of coagulant, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L, whereas sago has shown a reduction of 70-100 % at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 g/L. The optimum conditions observed for sago were 6 and 7 whereas chitin was stable at all pH ranges, lower coagulant doses, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L and mixing speed—rapid mixing at 100 rpm for 10 min and slow mixing 20 rpm for 20 min. Hence, it can be concluded that sago and chitin can be used for treating water even with large seasonal variation in turbidity.

  15. Metals in airpollution particles decrease whole blood coagulation time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism underlying the pro-coagulative effect of air pollution particle exposure is not known. We tested the postulate that 1) the soluble fraction ofan air pollution particle can affect whole blood coagulation time and 2) metals included in the soluble fraction are respons...

  16. Characteristics of particle coagulation in an underground parking lot.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Kato, Shinsuke; Zhao, Jianing

    2015-12-01

    Particles in vehicle exhaust plumes in underground parking lots have adverse health effects due to the enclosed environment in which they are released and the temperature difference between the tailpipe and ambient environment; at the same time, particle coagulation might be obvious near the tailpipe in an underground parking lot. In the present study, airflow and temperature fields were calculated using the Realizable k-ε model, and the Eulerian particle transport model was selected in the numerical simulation of particle concentration dispersion. Polydisperse thermal coagulation due to Brownian collisions was employed to calculate the particle coagulation. The results show that particle coagulation rate and half-time were significant within 1 m from the tailpipe. The variations in the particle coagulation rate and half-time were similar, but their directions were opposite. Air exhaust time was nearly four times longer than averaged half-time and 40 times longer than minimum half-time. The peak particle diameter increased approximately 1.43 times due to coagulation. A double particle concentration at the tailpipe caused the fourfold rise in the particle coagulation rate in the distance ranging less than 1 m from the tailpipe. An increase in exhaust velocity at the tailpipe could shorten the obvious range of particle coagulation along the centerline of the tailpipe from 1 to 0.8 m in the study.

  17. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute myocardial necrosis caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Ekoé, J M; Cunningham, M; Jaques, O; Balague, F; Baumann, R P; Humair, L; de Torrenté, A

    1985-01-01

    A 24-year-old woman was struck by lightning and suffered 20% second degree burns. She was admitted after cardiac and respiratory arrest. Despite intensive supportive care she died 24 h later of cardiogenic shock complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation. At autopsy there was myocardial necrosis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial necrosis are only rarely described as complications of lightning.

  19. Performance and characterization of a new tannin-based coagulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Gómez-Muñoz, C.

    2012-09-01

    Diethanolamine and formaldehyde were employed to cationize tannins from black wattle. This novel coagulant called CDF was functionally characterized in removing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (anionic surfactant) and Palatine Fast Black WAN (azoic dye). Refined tannin-derived commercial coagulants exhibited similar efficiency, while CDF presented higher coagulant ability than alum, a usual coagulant agent. Low doses of CDF (ca. 100 mg L-1) were able to remove more than 70 % of surfactant and more than 85 % of dye (initial pollutant concentration of ca. 100 mg L-1) and it presented no temperature affection and worked at a relatively wide pH range. Surfactant and dye removal responded to the classical coagulant-and-adsorption models, such as Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim or Gu and Zhu in the case of surfactant, and Langmuir and Freundlich in the case of dye.

  20. Analysis of Coagulation Processes for the Groundwater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrektiene, Ramune; Rimeika, Mindaugas; Jurkiene, Anzelika

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation process is widely used for removal of natural organic matters (NOM) and for water color intensity reduction. The efficiency of coagulation process depends on many different factors. Aim of this research is to investigate coagulation process under different conditions. During the research coagulation process was held at different pH values (5.5; 6.0; 6.5), at different water alkalinity and at different water turbidity. It was found that removal of NOM and water color intensity reduction is most effective at pH values from 5.5 to 6.0. At these conditions water color intensity reduction is most efficient, but removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the lowest. During the research it was also found that different water alkalinity and turbidity do not make significant influence on efficiency of coagulation process.

  1. Coagulation disorders and inhibitors of coagulation in children from Mansoura, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazik, Nabil; Rashad, Hayam; Selim, Tarek; Tharwat, Layla

    2007-08-01

    Disorders of coagulation in children often prove challenging to the medical care team. The aims of this study were to assess the spectrum and prevalence of coagulation disorders among children attending Mansoura University Children Hospital (MUCH), Mansoura, Egypt. A total of 105 pediatric patients were referred to MUCH. They were divided into two groups: congenital coagulation disorders (75 cases, age 45.36 +/- 48.59 months), and acquired coagulation disorders (30 cases, age 56.13 +/- 61.61 months). All patients were subjected to thorough history taking including the nature of bleeding, family, past history, mode of inheritance, and detailed physical findings. Hemostatic tests included: platelet count, bleeding time (BT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT). Specific tests in the congenital group include assay of coagulation factors according to each disorder, Von Willebrand factor assay, ristocetin aggregation test, APTT mixing study for detection of inhibitors in complicated hemophilia cases, F VIII C to VWAg ratio with cut off 0.7 for detection of carriers in some hemophilia A families. Congenital disorders constituted 71.4% of the studied cases vs. 28.6% for acquired disorders. Hemophilia A (42.85%), hemophilia B (14.28%) and liver diseases (14.28%) represented the majority of the studied cases. Mild and moderate cases of hemophilia A and B are more frequent than severe cases in both types. Male sex is more frequent than female in the congenital group (94.7 vs. 5.3%, P < 0.001). Direct correlation existed between factor level assay and severity of hemophilia (r = 0.73, P = 0.006). Three mothers and one sister were identified as carrier out of four families. Anti-clotting factors inhibitor was detected in 18.2% of patients with hemophilia A and in 9.1% with hemophilia B. In conclusion, our study found that hemophilias are the most prevalent congenital coagulation disorders among children. Attention must be

  2. The Role for Coagulation Markers in Mild Snakebite Envenomations

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Risa S; Dryer, Sylvia; Replogle, William; Summers, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The majority of patients seeking medical treatment for snakebites do not suffer from severe envenomation. However, no guidelines exist for ordering coagulation markers in patients with minimal or moderate envenomation, nor in those who do not receive antivenom. In this study, we sought to determine whether it was possible to limit the practice of ordering coagulation studies to those patients suffering severe envenomation, rattlesnake envenomation, or both. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on all cases of crotalid snakebite presenting to an adult emergency department (ED) from April 1998 to June 2006. Each chart was abstracted for patient's age, gender, type of snake (if known), severity of envenomation at initial presentation, coagulation test results, whether antivenom was administered, and whether the patient was admitted. Results Over an approximately 8-year period, 131 snakebite cases presented that met the inclusion criteria, of which 35 (26.7%) had some type of coagulation marker abnormality. Limiting coagulation testing to patients suffering severe envenomation or rattlesnake envenomation would have resulted in failure to identify 89% or 77%, respectively, of the 35 patients who were found to have at least 1 abnormal coagulation marker. Conclusion Our study failed to identify a subset of patients that could be defined as low risk or for whom coagulation marker testing could be foregone. This study suggests that coagulation tests should be routinely performed on all patients presenting to the ED with complaints of envenomation by copperheads, moccasins, or rattlesnakes. Further clarification of when coagulation markers are indicated may require a prospective study that standardizes snake identification and the timing of coagulation marker testing. PMID:22461925

  3. A hitherto undescribed plasma factor acting at the contact phase of blood coagulation (Flaujeac factor): case report and coagulation studies.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, M J; Varet, B; Levy, J P

    1975-11-01

    This paper reports an asymptomatic coagulation defect responsible for an abnormality at the contact phase of blood coagulation in vitro, distinct from Hageman factor and Fletcher factor deficiencies. Coagulation studies in a 50-yr-old French woman without bleeding tendency revealed the following results: whole-blood clotting time in glass tubes and activated partial thromboplastin time with kaolin and ellagic acid were greatly prolonged; one-stage prothrombin was normal; no circulating anticoagulant was detected, and the infusion of normal plasma corrected the coagulation defect with an estimated half-life of 6.5 days; the levels of factor VIII, IX, XI, and XII were normal; mutual correction was obtained with a Fletcher factor-deficient plasma; the level of whole complement was normal. Studies of the contact phase of blood coagulation and contact-induced fibrinolysis showed the same abnormalities as in Hageman factor- and Fletcher-deficient plasmas. These results indicate that the patient's plasma is deficient in a previously undescribed coagulation factor, which participates in the initial stage of the blood coagulation process in vitro. Family studies revealed consanguinity in the propositus' parents. The assay of this newly described factor in the propositus' children revealed a partial defect, compatible with a heterozygous state, in three of the four tested children. This indicates a recessive inheritance of this new blood coagulation defect.

  4. Predictive factors for beneficial application of high-frequency electromagnetics for tumour vaporization and coagulation in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Rainer; Heckl, Stefan; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Feigl, Guenther C; Krischek, Boris; Lüdemann, Wolf; Mirzayan, Javed M; Koerbel, Andrei; Samii, Madjid; Tatagiba, Marcos; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify preoperative and intraoperative factors and conditions that predicts the beneficial application of a high-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) system for tumor vaporization and coagulation. Methods One hundred three subsequent patients with brain tumors were microsurgically treated using the EMF system in addition to the standard neurosurgical instrumentarium. A multivariate analysis was performed regarding the usefulness (ineffective/useful/very helpful/essential) of the new technology for tumor vaporization and coagulation, with respect to tumor histology and location, tissue consistency and texture, patients' age and sex. Results The EMF system could be used effectively during tumor surgery in 83 cases with an essential contribution to the overall success in 14 cases. In the advanced category of effectiveness (very helpful/essential), there was a significant difference between hard and soft tissue consistency (50 of 66 cases vs. 3 of 37 cases). The coagulation function worked well (very helpful/essential) for surface (73 of 103 cases) and spot (46 of 103 cases) coagulation when vessels with a diameter of less than one millimeter were involved. The light-weight bayonet hand piece and long malleable electrodes made the system especially suited for the resection of deep-seated lesions (34 of 52 cases) compared to superficial tumors (19 of 50 cases). The EMF system was less effective than traditional electrosurgical devices in reducing soft glial tumors. Standard methods where also required for coagulation of larger vessels. Conclusion It is possible to identify factors and conditions that predict a beneficial application of high-frequency electromagnetics for tumor vaporization and coagulation. This allows focusing the use of this technology on selective indications. PMID:18445296

  5. Evaluation of optical coherence tomography for the measurement of the effects of activators and anticoagulants on the blood coagulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Geng, Jinhai; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-08-01

    Optical properties of human blood during coagulation were studied using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the parameter of clotting time derived from the 1/e light penetration depth (d(1/e)) versus time was developed in our previous work. In this study, in order to know if a new OCT test can characterize the blood-coagulation process under different treatments in vitro, the effects of two different activators (calcium ions and thrombin) and anticoagulants, i.e., acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, a well-known drug aspirin) and melagatran (a direct thrombin inhibitor), at various concentrations are evaluated. A swept-source OCT system with a 1300 nm center wavelength is used for detecting the blood-coagulation process in vitro under a static condition. A dynamic study of d1/e reveals a typical behavior due to coagulation induced by both calcium ions and thrombin, and the clotting time is concentration-dependent. Dose-dependent ASA and melagatran prolong the clotting times. ASA and melagatran have different effects on blood coagulation. As expected, melagatran is much more effective than ASA in anticoagulation by the OCT measurements. The OCT assay appears to be a simple method for the measurement of blood coagulation to assess the effects of activators and anticoagulants, which can be used for activator and anticoagulant screening.

  6. Effect of speciation transformation on the coagulation behavior of Al(13) and Al(13) aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ye, Changqing; Wang, Dongsheng; Ge, Xiaopeng; Tang, Hongxiao

    2009-01-01

    Flocculation of kaolin suspension with aluminium fractal polycations was investigated as a function of aluminium concentration and pH. Aluminium flocculants included Al(13) and Al(13) aggregates with OH/Al ratio of 2.6 and 2.8, respectively. The flocculation kinetics and floc size distribution were monitored by light scattering. The characterization of flocculants showed that the tridecatmer Al(13) and bridged [Al(13)](n) with out-sphere structure were the dominant species for all flocculants in a wide pH range. The coagulation results indicated that the pre and in situ-formed [Al(13)](n) play a key role in removing particles. With the increasing concentration of [Al(13)](n), coagulation mechanisms were transformed from charge-neutralization, electro-patch coagulation to bridge-aggregation. Moreover, sweep-flocculation was involved at higher dosage besides other three mechanisms when amorphous aluminium oxides formed. Hence, chemical interaction between particles and flocculants evolved from surface adsorption to surface precipitation for aluminium polycations by virtue of species transformation.

  7. Comparison of coagulants and coagulation aids for treatment of meat processing wastewater by column flotation.

    PubMed

    de Sena, Rênnio F; Moreira, Regina F P M; José, Humberto J

    2008-11-01

    The physicochemical treatment of the wastewater from a meat processing industry was studied using three ferric salts as coagulants in conjunction with four different polymers as coagulation aids by batch column flotation. The effluent was characterized in terms of pH (6.5-6.7), turbidity (1000-12000 NTU), total solids (TS) (2300-7000mgl(-1)), oils and greases (OG) (820-1050mgl(-1)), and biochemical and chemical oxygen demands (BOD(5) and COD) (1200-1760 and 2800-3230mgl(-1)), respectively. The treatments achieved typical organic load reductions of oils and greases, and total solids (up to 85%), as well as biochemical and chemical oxygen demands (between 62.0-78.8% and 74.6-79.5%, respectively). The research also found that the utilization of a column flotation achieved high efficiency of organic matter removal and its operation as a primary treatment showed no significant dependence of pollutant removal and air flow rate.

  8. Demonstration of the extrinsic coagulation pathway in teleostei: Identification of zebrafish coagulation factor VII

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, John; Templer, Michael; Gregory, Michael; Hanumanthaiah, Ravikumar; Troyer, Dean; Phan, Thao; Thankavel, Bharath; Jagadeeswaran, Pudur

    2001-01-01

    It is not known whether the mammalian mechanism of coagulation initiation is conserved in fish. Identification of factor VII is critical in providing evidence for such a mechanism. A cDNA was cloned from a zebrafish (teleost) library that predicted a protein with sequence similarity to human factor VII. Factor VII was shown to be present in zebrafish blood and liver by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Immunodepletion of factor VII from zebrafish plasma selectively inhibited thromboplastin-triggered thrombin generation. Heterologous expression of zebrafish factor VII demonstrated a secreted protein (50 kDa) that reconstituted thromboplastin-triggered thrombin generation in immunodepleted zebrafish plasma. These results suggest conservation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway between zebrafish and humans and add credence to the zebrafish as a model for mammalian hemostasis. The structure of zebrafish factor VIIa predicted by homology modeling was consistent with the overall three-dimensional structure of human factor VIIa. However, amino acid disparities were found in the epidermal growth factor-2/serine protease regions that are present in the human tissue factor–factor VIIa contact surface, suggesting a structural basis for the species specificity of this interaction. In addition, zebrafish factor VII demonstrates that the Gla-EGF-EGF-SP domain structure, which is common to coagulation factors VII, IX, X, and protein C, was present before the radiation of the teleosts from the tetrapods. Identification of zebrafish factor VII significantly narrows the evolutionary window for development of the vertebrate coagulation cascade and provides insight into the structural basis for species specificity in the tissue factor–factor VIIa interaction. PMID:11459993

  9. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D [Albuquerque, NM; Stewart, Thomas A [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  10. Management of coagulation abnormalities in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Potze, Wilma; Porte, Robert J; Lisman, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is characterized by changes in all phases of hemostasis. These hemostatic alterations were long considered to predispose patients with liver disease towards a bleeding tendency, as they are associated with prolonged conventional coagulation tests. However, these patients may also suffer from thrombotic complications, and we now know that the hemostatic system in patient with liver disease is, in fact, in a rebalanced state. In this review we discuss the concept of rebalanced hemostasis and its implications for clinical management of patients with liver disease. For instance, there is no evidence that the use of prophylactic blood product transfusion prior to invasive procedures reduces bleeding risk. Clinicians should also be aware of the possibility of thrombosis occurring in patients with a liver disease, and regular thrombosis prophylaxis should not be withheld in these patients.

  11. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  12. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  13. Coagulation fibrinolysis in sickle-cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P. A.; Breeze, G. R.; Mann, J. R.; Stuart, J.

    1974-01-01

    A study of fibrinolytic activity in sickle-cell patients during asymptomatic periods has shown a normal fibrinolytic response to exercise and local heat to the arm. During vasoocclusive crises there was no significant decrease in fibrinolytic activity. These results contrast with earlier reports of decreased fibrinolysis during crisis and a suggestion that fibrinolytic activators might be of value in preventing vasoocclusive episodes. Patients in painful crisis showed a significant rise in fibrinogen concentration and fall in platelet count. The former may contribute to localized vascular sludging by increasing whole-blood viscosity, while the latter probably results from local trapping of platelets in areas of sickling or from subsequent splenic sequestration of damaged platelets. There was no evidence of disseminated, as opposed to localized, intravascular coagulation during crisis. PMID:4412492

  14. [Effect of xuebijing oral effervescent tablet on endotoxin induced fever and disseminated intravascular coagulation rabbit model].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Gao, Ying-Jie; Tian, Xue-Chuan; Jin, Ya-Hong; Liu, Fang-Zhou; Cui, Xiao-Lan

    2013-08-01

    In order to discover the mechanism of Xuebijing oral effervescent tablet (XBJOET) to treat infectious diseases, the effect of XBJOET on endotoxin induced rabbit fever and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) was investigated. Auricle microcirculation in rabbit was detected by laser speckle blood perfusion imager system; coagulation function was measured by coagulation analyzer, fibrinolytic system was quantified by Elisa assay and micro thrombosis in tissues was observed with HE staining under light microscope. The results demonstrated that the body temperature of rabbit decreased significantly at 1-3 h after administration with 4.8, 2.4 and 1.2 g x kg(-1) XBJOET to endotoxin induced DIC rabbit model, the auricle microcirculation blood flow in model group (54.45 +/- 14.53) PU was lower than that in control group (77.18 +/- 12.32) PU. The auricle microcirculation blood flow increased markedly and there was significant difference between model group and 1.2 g x kg(-1) XBJOET group. There was significant difference between model group and control group in the content of PAI1 and FIB. The PAI1 levels in model and control groups were (30.48 +/- 2.46) ng x mL(-1) and (20.93 +/- 3.25) ng x mL(-1), respectively. The FIB levels in model and control group were (3.34 +/- 1.09) g x L(-1) and (4.84 +/- 1.10) g x L(-1), respectively. The content of PAI1 in rabbit plasma decreased notably, there were significant differences between model group and 4.8, 2.4 g x kg(-1) XBJOET groups. On the contrary the content of FIB increased. XBJOET possessed pharmacological activities of curing infectious fever and DIC, the mechanism of which is related to amelioration of microcirculation disturbance, inhibition of fibrinolytic system activation and coagulation and micro thrombosis elimination.

  15. Local Recurrence After Hepatic Radiofrequency Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Stefaan; Ni, Yicheng; Jamart, Jacques; Ruers, Theo; Marchal, Guy; Michel, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that influence local recurrence after radiofrequency coagulation of liver tumors. Summary Background Data: Local recurrence rate varies widely between 2% and 60%. Apart from tumor size as an important risk factor for local recurrence, little is known about the impact of other factors. Methods: An exhaustive literature search was carried out for the period from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2004. Only series with a minimal follow-up of 6 months and/or mean follow-up of 12 months were included. Univariate and multivariate meta-analyses were carried out. Results: Ninety-five independent series were included, allowing the analysis of the local recurrence rate of 5224 treated liver tumors. In a univariate analysis, tumor-dependent factors with significantly less local recurrences were: smaller size, neuroendocrine metastases, nonsubcapsular location, and location away from large vessels. Physician-dependent favorable factors were: surgical (open or laparoscopic) approach, vascular occlusion, general anesthesia, a 1-cm intentional margin, and a greater physician experience. In a multivariate analysis, significantly less local recurrences were observed for small size (P < 0.001) and a surgical (versus percutaneous) approach (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiofrequency coagulation by laparoscopy or laparotomy results in superior local control, independent of tumor size. The percutaneous route should mainly be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate a laparoscopy or laparotomy. The short-term benefits of less invasiveness for the percutaneous route do not outweigh the longer-term higher risk of local recurrence. PMID:16041205

  16. Field-theory methods in coagulation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, A. A.

    2011-08-15

    Coagulating systems are systems of chaotically moving particles that collide and coalesce, producing daughter particles of mass equal to the sum of the masses involved in the respective collision event. The present article puts forth basic ideas underlying the application of methods of quantum-field theory to the theory of coagulating systems. Instead of the generally accepted treatment based on the use of a standard kinetic equation that describes the time evolution of concentrations of particles consisting of a preset number of identical objects (monomers in the following), one introduces the probability W(Q, t) to find the system in some state Q at an instant t for a specific rate of transitions between various states. Each state Q is characterized by a set of occupation numbers Q = (n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, ..., n{sub g}, ...), where n{sub g} is the total number of particles containing precisely g monomers. Thereupon, one introduces the generating functional {Psi} for the probability W(Q, t). The time evolution of {Psi} is described by an equation that is similar to the Schroedinger equation for a one-dimensional Bose field. This equation is solved exactly for transition rates proportional to the product of the masses of colliding particles. It is shown that, within a finite time interval, which is independent of the total mass of the entire system, a giant particle of mass about the mass of the entire system may appear in this system. The particle in question is unobservable in the thermodynamic limit, and this explains the well-known paradox of mass-concentration nonconservation in classical kinetic theory. The theory described in the present article is successfully applied in studying the time evolution of random graphs.

  17. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-06-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects.

  18. A short contemporary history of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic intravascular activation of coagulation, leading to a widespread deposition of fibrin in the circulation. There is ample experimental and pathological evidence that the fibrin deposition contributes to multiple organ failure. The massive and ongoing activation of coagulation may result in depletion of platelets and coagulation factors, which may cause bleeding (consumption coagulopathy). The syndrome of DIC is well known in the medical literature for centuries, although a more precise description of the underlying mechanisms had to await the 20th century. Initial ideas on a role of the contact activation system as the primary trigger for the systemic activation of coagulation as well as a presumed hyperfibrinolytic response in DIC have been found to be misconceptions. Experimental and clinical evidence now indicate that the initiation of coagulation in DIC is caused by tissue factor expression, which in combination with downregulated physiological anticoagulant pathways and impaired fibrinolysis leads to widespread fibrin deposition. In addition, an extensive bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammation may further contribute to the pathogenesis of DIC.

  19. Argon laser photo-coagulation complications in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pavljasević, Suzana; Pranjić, Nurka; Sarajlić, Dzevdet

    2004-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a disease based on vascular genesis that begins as microangiopathy and develops into macroangioapthy preceded by fibroproliferation changes. According to histo- pathological changes, diabetic retinopathy is divided into nonproliferative, pre-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Possibilities and needs for photo-coagulation in the earlier and later changes in retina reduce the meaning of conservative treatment. Laser photo-coagulation with therapeutical may cause unwanted and damaging effects, as well. Complications diagnosed in diabetic retinopathy, such as cataract, secondary glaucoma, central retinal vein thrombosis, haemophthalmus, are much more frequent in patients with laser photo-coagulation treatment.

  20. Changes in the human blood coagulating system during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatova, L. M.; Anashkin, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the coagulating system of the blood were studied in six subjects during prolonged hypokinesia. Thrombogenic properties of the blood rose in all cases on the 8th day. These changes are explained by stress reaction due to unusual conditions for a healthy person. Changes in the blood coagulating system in the group subjected to physical exercise and without it ran a practically parallel course. Apparently physical exercise is insufficient to prevent such changes that appear in the coagulating system of the blood during prolonged hypokinesia.

  1. Implementation of a microcontroller-based semi-automatic coagulator.

    PubMed

    Chan, K; Kirumira, A; Elkateeb, A

    2001-01-01

    The coagulator is an instrument used in hospitals to detect clot formation as a function of time. Generally, these coagulators are very expensive and therefore not affordable by a doctors' office and small clinics. The objective of this project is to design and implement a low cost semi-automatic coagulator (SAC) prototype. The SAC is capable of assaying up to 12 samples and can perform the following tests: prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and PT/APTT combination. The prototype has been tested successfully.

  2. Influence of Enteromorpha polysaccharides on variation of coagulation behavior, flocs properties and membrane fouling in coagulation-ultrafiltration process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Sun, Shenglei; Song, Wuchang; Jia, Ruibao

    2015-03-21

    Enteromorpha polysaccharides (Ep) were used as a new coagulant aid together with polyaluminum chloride (PACl) in coagulation-ultrafiltration process to purify Yellow River water. The evolution of flocs size, growth rate, strength, recoverability and fractal structure due to Ep addition were systematically studied in this paper. On this basis, membrane fouling caused by the coagulation effluents of PACl and Ep were also investigated. Results indicated that Ep addition lead to 20% increase in coagulation performance, and meanwhile generate flocs with bigger sizes, faster growth rates and higher recovery abilities. Additionally, the flocs formed by PACl presented more compact structure with a larger D(f) value, while much looser flocs were obtained when Ep was added. Results of ultrafiltration experiments implied that with Ep addition, membrane fouling could be significantly reduced due to large size and loosely structures of flocs in coagulation effluents. Considering both the coagulation efficiency and ultrafiltration membrane performance, 0.2 mg/L Ep was determined as the optimal dosage in coagulation-ultrafiltration process in this study.

  3. Effect of copper(II) on natural organic matter removal during drinking water coagulation using aluminum-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guojing; Zhang, Xiangru; Talley, Jeffrey W

    2007-06-01

    Coagulation has been proposed as a best available technology for controlling natural organic matter (NOM) during drinking water treatment. The presence of heavy metals such as copper(II) in source water, which may form copper-NOM complexes and/or interact with a coagulant, may pose a potential challenge on the coagulation of NOM. In this work, the effect of copper(II) on NOM removal by coagulation using alum or PAX-18 (a commercial polymerized aluminum chloride from Kemiron Inc., Bartow, Florida) was examined. The results show that the presence of 1 to 10 mg/L of copper(H) in the simulated waters improved the total organic carbon (TOC) removal by up to 25% for alum coagulation and by up to 22% for PAX-18 coagulation. The increased NOM removal with the presence of copper(II) in the waters can most likely be ascribed to the formation copper-NOM complexes that may be more adsorbable on aluminum precipitates and to the formation of copper(II) co-precipitates that may also adsorb NOM. The presence of 1 to 5 mg/L of copper(I) in the waters containing 3 mg/L NOM as carbon was reduced below the maximum contaminant level goal (1.3 mg/L as copper) using either coagulant. The results suggest that the presence of copper(H) in source water may not adversely affect the NOM removal by coagulation. A good linear correlation was observed between the TOC removal efficiency and the log-total moles of the precipitated metals, which include the metal ion from a coagulant and the divalent metal ion(s) in source water.

  4. Removal of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by coagulation: effects of coagulants, typical ions, alkalinity and natural organic matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ye, Y Y; Qi, J; Li, F T; Tang, Y L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of removing titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from water by coagulation, as well as to find the optimal coagulant and experimental conditions for TiO2 NP removal, four types of coagulant were adopted: polyferric sulfate (PFS), ferric chloride (FeCl3), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), and alum (Al2(SO4)3). It was found that the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation was affected by ionic strength, alkalinity, as well as types and dosages of coagulants. PFS and FeCl3 achieved much higher removal efficiency of TiO2 NPs than PACl and Al2(SO4)3 did. For 30 mg/L TiO2 NPs, a dosage of 0.3 mM PFS (as Fe) achieved 84% removal after coagulation followed by 30 min settlement. Optimal ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl or 0.03 M CaCl2) is of vital importance for the performance of PFS. Na2SO4 is unfavorable for the performance of PFS. Optimal alkalinity (0.01-0.03 M NaHCO3) is necessary for FeCl3 to remove TiO2 NPs. Natural organic matter, as represented by humic acid (HA) up to 11 mg/L, reduces the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation. These findings indicate that coagulation is a good option for the removal of TiO2 NPs from water, and more attention should be paid to the effects of water quality when using coagulation to remove TiO2 NPs from aqueous matrices. This provides a possible solution to alleviate the potential hazard caused by TiO2 NPs.

  5. Influence of natural coagulants on isoflavones and antioxidant activity of tofu.

    PubMed

    Rekha, C R; Vijayalakshmi, G

    2010-08-01

    Tofu (instead of preparing using synthetic coagulant) was prepared using coagulants of plant origin (Citrus limonum, Garcinia indica, Tamarindus indica, Phyllanthus acidus and Passiflora edulis). Total crude protein and fat contents were highest in tofu prepared using G. indica and T. indica (72.5% dbw) compared to synthetic coagulant. Tofu prepared with natural coagulants had signifi cantly higher antioxidant activity compared to synthetic coagulant. Bioconversion of isoflavone glucosides (daidzin and genistin) into their corresponding bioactive aglycones (daidzein and genistein) was observed in tofu. The difference between glucosides and aglycones contents in soy milk was significant but there was not much difference in tofu coagulated with synthetic and natural coagulants.

  6. Impacts of epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine on coagulation performance and membrane fouling in coagulation/ultrafiltration combined process with different Al-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Ruihua; Sun, Shenglei; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-09-01

    Two kinds of aluminum-based coagulants and epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine (DAM-ECH) were used in the treatment of humic acid-kaolin simulated water by coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) hybrid process. Coagulation performance, floc characteristics, including floc size, compact degree, and strength were investigated in this study. Ultrafiltration experiments were conducted by a dead-end batch unit to implement the resistance analyses to explore the membrane fouling mechanisms. Results showed that DAM-ECH aid significantly increased the UV254 and DOC removal efficiencies and contributed to the formation of larger and stronger flocs with a looser structure. Aluminum chloride (Al) gave rise to better coagulation performance with DAM-ECH compared with poly aluminum chloride (PACl). The consequences of ultrafiltration experiments showed that DAM-ECH aid could reduce the membrane fouling mainly by decreasing the cake layer resistance. The flux reductions for PACl, Al/DAM-ECH (dosing both Al and DAM-ECH) and PACl/DAM-ECH (dosing both PACl and DAM-ECH) were 62%, 56% and 44%, respectively. Results of this study would be beneficial for the application of PACl/DAM-ECH and Al/DAM-ECH composite coagulants in water treatment processes.

  7. Electro-coagulation treatment of oily wastewater with sludge analysis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dhorgham Skban; Sakthipriya, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor to treat the oily effluent by electro-coagulation. The influence of operating parameters such as applied current, type of electrode and electrolysis time on electro-coagulation efficiency has been critically examined. The maximum percentage removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 94% under optimum experimental conditions of pH 6.7, current density 6 mA/cm², electrolysis time 40 min, and using mild steel as anode. The remaining sludge in the reactor was analyzed by energy disperse analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The analysis confirms that the oily pollutant was removed by electroflotation and adsorption of the oily particles of precipitate during the electro-coagulation process. Electro-coagulation can be used as an efficient treatment technique for oily wastewater.

  8. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  9. Screening for coagulation disorders in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke Ml; Leebeek, Frank Wg; de Maat, Moniek Pm; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik Wj

    2010-08-01

    The role of coagulation disorders in the pathogenesis of (recurrent) ischemic stroke is uncertain. Therefore, the clinical utility of screening patients with ischemic stroke for these conditions and the therapeutic implications of a detected coagulation disorder in a patient who experienced ischemic stroke are uncertain. We reviewed the currently available data on the relationship between various inherited and acquired coagulation abnormalities (factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, deficiencies of protein C, protein S and anti-thrombin, hyperhomocysteinemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and increased levels of fibrinogen) and ischemic stroke. Based on the existing evidence we discuss the usefulness of screening stroke patients for prothrombotic conditions and current recommendations regarding the optimal management of ischemic stroke patients in whom a coagulation disorder is found.

  10. Carbon dioxide pressure-induced coagulation of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Roland; Jessop, Philip G; Champagne, Pascale

    2015-12-28

    The move to a low-carbon economy has generated renewed interest in microalgae for the production of biofuels with the potential mutual benefit of wastewater treatment. However, harvesting has been identified as a limiting factor to the economic viability of this process. This paper explores the harvesting of microalgae using high-pressure gas without the addition of coagulants. Coagulation of microalgae under high-pressure gas was found to be an efficient method to separate algae from suspension. The critical coagulation pressures (CCPs) for H(2) and CO(2) were determined to be 6.1 and 6.2 MPa, respectively. The CO(2)-induced decrease in solution pH positively influenced coagulation rates, without appearing to affect the CCP. This approach could be beneficial for the economic removal of microalgae from solution for the production of both biofuels and biomedical compounds without the addition of non-environmentally friendly chemicals.

  11. Surgical Coagulator With Carbon Dioxide Laser For Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Wieslaw; Kazmirowski, Antoni; Korobowicz, Witold; Olborski, Zbigniew

    1987-10-01

    The technical data and parameters of the CO2 surgical laser for gynecology are given. Coagulator was designed and constructed in Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics Warsaw Technical University.

  12. Coagulation and flocculation study of iron ore fines

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.P.; Besra, L.; Ravi Prasad, A.

    1999-03-01

    A comparative study of the flocculation and coagulation response of an iron ore fines suspension has been carried out, and the extent of flocculation has been assessed by measurement of electrophoretic mobility, supernatant clarity, and settling rate. Of the several commercial flocculants and polyelectrolyte studied, the combination of medium molecular weight anionic flocculants Magnafloc 1011 and Rishfloc 258 (1:1), and coagulant aluminum nitrate was most effective in terms of enhancing settling rate and supernatant clarity.

  13. A new coagulation defect associated with a case of melanomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J D; O'Shea, M J

    1977-01-01

    A marked abnormality of the intrinsic coagulation system was observed in a patient with melanomatosis and frank melanuria. With successful treatment of the tumour there was a parallel improvement in the clotting abnormality. This defect was shown to be a deficiency of factor XI together with a previously unrecognised factor. This is distinct from either Fletcher or Fitzgerald factors and appears to act between factors XI and X in the coagulation sequence. PMID:874111

  14. PLASMA COAGULATION BY ORGANISMS OTHER THAN STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.

    PubMed

    BAYLISS, B G; HALL, E R

    1965-01-01

    Bayliss, Berenice G. (Washington State University, Pullman), and Elizabeth R. Hall. Plasma coagulation by organisms other than Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 89:101-105. 1965.-Approximately 200 organisms were investigated for their ability to clot human and rabbit plasma. Various anticoagulants were used in preparing the plasma: acid-citrate-dextrose, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, balanced oxalate, potassium and sodium oxalates, and heparin. Twelve organisms were found which coagulated citrated plasma in less than 8 hr: four strains of Streptococcus faecalis; two strains of S. faecalis var. zymogenes; three strains of S. faecalis var. liquefaciens; and one strain each of S. pyogenes, Escherichia coli, and Serratia marcescens. Six strains of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus were selected for use as controls. Experiments were performed to determine the mechanism by which these microorganisms coagulated citrated plasma. As this was the only plasma clotted, it was presumed that the citrate was utilized by the microorganisms, thereby releasing the calcium which was then made available so that normal physiological clotting could occur. To test this hypothesis, a chromatographic method was employed to determine the presence or absence of citrate. Coagulation tests, by use of increasing amounts of citrate, showed a linear relationship between the amount of citrate in the plasma and the coagulation time. It was demonstrated that the organisms must be actively metabolizing to clot citrated plasma. Proof for this was obtained by using a cell-free filtrate, to which thimerosal had been added to inhibit growth, instead of whole cultures for the coagulation test. Only the coagulase-positive staphylococci coagulated the citrated plasma under these conditions. From the results obtained, it was concluded that plasma coagulation by these organisms was by citrate utilization.

  15. The Continuous Coagulation-FragmentationEquations with Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurençot, Philippe; Mischler, Stéphane

    Existence of global weak solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equations with diffusion is investigated when the kinetic coefficients satisfy a detailed balance condition or the coagulation coefficient enjoys a monotonicity condition. Our approach relies on weak and strong compactness methods in L1 in the spirit of the DiPerna-Lions theory for the Boltzmann equation. Under the detailed balance condition the large-time behaviour is also studied.

  16. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  17. Effect of rivaroxaban on blood coagulation using the viscoelastic coagulation test ROTEM™.

    PubMed

    Casutt, M; Konrad, C; Schuepfer, G

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of the oral direct inhibitor of factor Xa rivaroxaban on blood coagulation measured by rotation thrombelastometry ROTEM™. Blood was obtained from 11 healthy male volunteers before and 2.5 h after oral administration of 10 mg rivaroxaban. In addition to standard coagulation tests clot formation was measured by ROTEM™ analyzing extrinsic (Extem) and intrinsic thrombelastometry (Intem). Significant differences to the baseline values were found in the Extem clotting time (Extem-CT, 58 ± 9 s and 87 ± 17 s, p < 0.01), Intem-CT (194 ± 26 s and 239 ± 43 s; p = 0.02), prothrombin time (PT, 86 ± 9% and 67 ± 7%; p < 0.01) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, 28 ± 1 s and 35 ± 2 s; p < 0.01). There was a low correlation between Extem-CT and PT as well as between Intem-CT and aPTT before and after rivaroxaban intake. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis determined aPTT to be the most appropriate parameter for the prediction of rivaroxaban-induced anticoagulation, Intem-CT and Extem-CT proved to be moderate tests and PT had no significance in the prediction of rivaroxaban-induced anticoagulation. Of utmost clinical importance was the fact that rivaroxaban treated patients could still show normal ROTEM™ values. Thus, ROTEM™ cannot be a suitable test method to exclude inhibition of blood coagulation by rivaroxaban.

  18. Coagulation-flocculation for lignin removal from wastewater - a review.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Arfa; Ahmed, Zaki; Shahbaz, Ali; Khan, Zahra; Javed, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Industrial discharge has tremendously increased inorganic pollutants in water bodies all over the world. Paper and pulp effluent is included in one of the most pollution generating discharges containing complex chemical compounds such as lignin. For clean and healthy water resources, the recovery of lignin from wastewater from the paper and pulp industry is of high importance. Available chemical and biological technologies for removal of lignin have certain drawbacks. Coagulation and flocculation is not only the economic but also the effective method for removal of lignin. The present review highlights available coagulants employed for removal of lignin from paper and pulp wastewater. Each coagulant is pH dependent and shows varied results with change in effluent characteristics. The hydrolysis products of aluminium-based coagulants, iron-based coagulants and copper sulphate have positive charges. These positive charges promote formation of flocs through charged neutralisation or sweep flocculation. In the case of titanium-based coagulants, hydrolysis product is negatively charged and mode is heterocoagulation. Ninety percent recovery of lignin is achieved by using a mixture of oxotitanium sulphate and aluminium sulphate and 80% with aluminium sulphate. Virtually complete recovery of lignin is observed with oxotitanium sulphate.

  19. Does whole blood coagulation analysis reflect developmental haemostasis?

    PubMed

    Ravn, Hanne Berg; Andreasen, Jo Bnding; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-07-27

    Developmental haemostasis has been well documented over the last 3 decades and age-dependent reference ranges have been reported for a number of plasmatic coagulation parameters. With the increasing use of whole blood point-of-care tests like rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and platelet function tests, an evaluation of age-dependent changes is warranted for these tests as well. We obtained blood samples from 149 children, aged 1 day to 5.9 years, and analysed conventional plasmatic coagulation tests, including activated partial prothrombin time, prothrombin time, and fibrinogen (functional). Whole blood samples were analysed using ROTEM to assess overall coagulation capacity and Multiplate analyzer to evaluate platelet aggregation. Age-dependent changes were analysed for all variables. We found age-dependent differences in all conventional coagulation tests (all P values < 0.05), but there was no sign of developmental changes in whole blood coagulation assessment when applying ROTEM, apart from clotting time in the EXTEM assay (P < 0.03). Despite marked differences in mean platelet aggregation between age groups, data did not reach statistical significance. Citrate-anticoagulated blood showed significantly reduced platelet aggregation compared with blood anticoagulated with heparin or hirudin (all P values < 0.003). We confirmed previous developmental changes in conventional plasmatic coagulation test. However, these age-dependent changes were not displayed in whole blood monitoring using ROTEM or Multiplate analyzer. Type of anticoagulant had a significant influence on platelet aggregation across all age groups.

  20. Treatment of paper and pulp mill effluent by coagulation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar; Majumdar, Bidyut; Choudhary, Rumi; Yadav, Deepak Kumar; Chand, Shri

    2010-04-01

    Pulp and paper mill effluent is highly polluting and is a subject of great environmental concern. In the present research we studied the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour from paper mill effluent, using the coagulation process. A batch coagulation study was conducted using various coagulants such as aluminium chloride (AlCl3), polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and copper sulphate (CuSO4 x 5H20). The initial pH of the effluent had a tremendous effect on the COD and colour removal. The PAC reduced COD by 83% and reduced colour by 92% at an optimum pH of 5.0 and a coagulant dose of 8 mL L(-1). With AlCl3, at an optimum pH of 4.0 and a coagulant dose of 5 g L(-1), 72% COD removal and 84% colour removal were observed. At an optimum pH of 6.0 and a mass loading of 5 g L(-1), 76% COD reduction and 78% colour reduction were obtained with copper sulphate. It was also observed that, after addition of coagulant, the pH of the effluent decreased. The decrease in the pH was highest with AlCl3, followed by PAC and then CuSO4 x 5H20.

  1. Autoantibodies to coagulation factors: from pathophysiology to diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Tedeschi, Alberto; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies may develop against coagulation factors altering their function or promoting their rapid clearance. In non-congenitally deficient patients, they are usually in association with autoimmune diseases, malignancies, pregnancy or advanced age. The possible development of coagulation factor autoantibodies should be considered when a patient presents with bleeding symptoms without any prior bleeding diathesis. The most common disorder associated with coagulation factor autoantibodies is acquired factor VIII deficiency, which is characterized by hemorrhages involving soft tissues, muscles and skin; hemarthroses are less frequent than in the inherited form. Acquired deficiencies of von Willebrand factor and factor XIII due to autoantibodies are emerging conditions. Autoantibodies to the other coagulation factors may be associated with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from minimal or no bleeding to life-threatening conditions. The diagnostic approach begins with global coagulation tests: prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). In case of prolonged times, mixing studies (typically using normal plasma in a 1:1 proportion) should be performed. Specific factor and inhibitor assays, assessment of lupus anticoagulant and eventually enzyme immunoassays for specific anti-factor antibodies complete the evaluation. A prompt diagnosis of specific coagulation factor inhibitors is mandatory for starting an appropriate treatment aimed at overcoming the deficient factor, in case of bleeding, and, if possible, at the suppression of the autoantibody's production.

  2. Coagulation-flocculation in leachate treatment using modified micro sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaldiri, Nur Hanani; Halim, Azhar Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Sanitary landfill leachate is considered as highly polluted wastewater, without any treatment, discharging into water system will cause underground water and surface water pollutions. This study was to investigate the treatability of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate via coagulation-flocculation using poly-aluminum chloride (PAC), cationic polymer, and modified micro sand. Leachate was collected from Pulau Burung Sanitary Landfill (PBSL) located in Penang, Malaysia. Coagulation-flocculation was performed by using jar test equipment and the effect of pH, dose of coagulant and dose of polymer toward removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and suspended solid (SS) were examined. Micro sand was also used in this study to compare settling time of coagulation-flocculation process. The optimum pH, dose of coagulant (PAC) and dose of polymer (cationic) achieved were 7.0, 1000 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively. The dose of micro sand used for the settling time process was 300 mg/L. Results showed that 52.66% removal of COD, 97.16% removal of SS and 96.44% removal of color were achieved under optimum condition. The settling times for the settling down of the sludge or particles that formed during coagulation-flocculation process were 1 min with modified sand, 20 min with raw micro sand and 45 min without micro sand.

  3. Disequilibrium of Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolytic System in Patients With Coronary Artery Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Lianfeng; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Thrombus formation and myocardial infarction are not uncommon in patients with coronary artery ectasia (CAE). In light of this, the present study aims to systemically evaluate the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in CAE patients. In this study, we enrolled 30 patients with CAE, 30 patients with coronary atherosclerosis disease (CAD), and 29 subjects with normal coronary arteries (control). The coagulation system was evaluated using a routine coagulation function test performed in the hospital laboratory before coronary angiography, and measurements included prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen time, and thrombin time. The evaluation of the fibrinolytic system included measurements of D-dimer, euglobulin lysis time, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, plasminogen, plasminogen activity assay, α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), α2 plasmin inhibitor (α2-PI), and α2-macroglobulin (α2-MG). Alpha1-AT, α2-PI, and α2-MG also inhibit activities of 3 neutrophil serine proteases, namely human neutrophil elastase (HNE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3); therefore, the plasma levels of these 3 proteinases were also evaluated. In CAE patients, the circulating coagulation system was normal. For the fibrinolytic system, a decrease of plasminogen activity was observed (P = 0.029) when compared with CAD patients, and the concentrations of α1-AT (both P < 0.001), α2-PI (P = 0.002 and P = 0.025), and α2-MG (P = 0.034 and P < 0.001) were significantly elevated when compared with CAD patients and normal controls. Moreover, the plasma levels of HNE (both P < 0.001) and CG (P = 0.027 and 0.016) in CAE patients were also significantly higher than those of the CAD and control groups. There was no difference in plasma PR3 concentration among these 3 groups. Disequilibrium of the coagulation/fibrinolytic system may contribute to thrombus formation and clinical coronary

  4. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  5. Inflammation and coagulation in urticaria and angioedema.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Asero, Riccardo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Lazzari, Riccardo; Marzano, Angelo V

    2012-09-01

    Urticaria is a skin disease characterised by short-lived surface swellings of the dermis (wheals) frequently accompanied by itching. It is classified as acute or chronic depending on whether the wheal recurrence occurs for less or more than six weeks. Acute urticaria is often due to a hypersensitivity reaction, whereas about 50% of the cases of chronic urticaria are regarded as autoimmune. Urticaria may occur alone or in association with a deeper swelling (angioedema) involving the subcutaneous and/or submucosal tissues, and last from hours to a few days. Angioedema can also develop alone, and may be idiopathic or be caused by allergies, inherited or acquired deficiencies of C1-inhibitor protein, or adverse drug reactions. An interplay between inflammation and coagulation has been proposed as a pathomechanism in urticaria and urticaria-associated angioedema (in which histamine and thrombin are involved), as well as in angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency, which involves various biological systems. An increase in the plasma markers of thrombin generation, fibrinolysis and inflammation has been documented during exacerbations of urticaria and angioedema, with the marker levels decreasing to normal during remission. However, the hypercoagulable state in chronic urticaria and angioedema has not been reported to be associated with any increased risk of thrombosis, although there have been a number of reports of cardiovascular events occurring during episodes of acute urticaria. These observations have provided the rationale for the clinical evaluation of anticoagulant and antifibrinolytic drugs, the efficacy of which has sometimes been demonstrated.

  6. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood.

  7. Planetesimal formation by sweep-up coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmark, Fredrik; Birnstiel, Til; Ormel, Chris W.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals is often accredited to collisional sticking of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. The exact process is however unknown, as collisions between larger aggregates tend to lead to fragmentation or bouncing rather than sticking. These growth barriers tend to halt the dust growth already at millimeters or centimeters in size, which is far below the kilometer-sizes that are needed for gravity to aid in the accretion. To study how far dust coagulation can proceed, we have developed a new collision model based on the latest laboratory experiments, and have used it together with a dust-size evolution code capable of resolving all grain interactions in the protoplanetary disk. We find that for the general dust population, bouncing and fragmenting collisions prevent the growth above millimeter-sizes. However, a small number of lucky particles can grow larger than the rest by only interacting at low, sticky velocities. As they grow, they become increasingly resilient to fragmentation caused by the small grains. In this way, two populations are formed: One which remains small due to the collisional barriers, and one that continues to grow by sweeping up the smaller grains around them.

  8. Moojenactivase, a novel pro-coagulant PIIId metalloprotease isolated from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, activates coagulation factors II and X and induces tissue factor up-regulation in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Costa, Tassia R; Laure, Helen J; Espíndola, Milena S; Frantz, Fabiani G; Sorgi, Carlos A; Cintra, Adélia C O; Arantes, Eliane C; Faccioli, Lucia H; Rosa, José C; Sampaio, Suely V

    2016-05-01

    Coagulopathies following snakebite are triggered by pro-coagulant venom toxins, in which metalloproteases play a major role in envenomation-induced coagulation disorders by acting on coagulation cascade, platelet function and fibrinolysis. Considering this relevance, here we describe the isolation and biochemical characterization of moojenactivase (MooA), a metalloprotease from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, and investigate its involvement in hemostasis in vitro. MooA is a glycoprotein of 85,746.22 Da, member of the PIIId group of snake venom metalloproteases, composed of three linked disulfide-bonded chains: an N-glycosylated heavy chain, and two light chains. The venom protease induced human plasma clotting in vitro by activating on both blood coagulation factors II (prothrombin) and X, which in turn generated α-thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. Additionally, MooA induced expression of tissue factor (TF) on the membrane surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which led these cells to adopt pro-coagulant characteristics. MooA was also shown to be involved with production of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1, suggesting an association between MooA pro-inflammatory stimulation of PBMC and TF up-regulation. We also observed aggregation of washed platelets when in presence of MooA; however, the protease had no effect on fibrinolysis. Our findings show that MooA is a novel hemostatically active metalloprotease, which may lead to the development of coagulopathies during B. moojeni envenomation. Moreover, the metalloprotease may contribute to the development of new diagnostic tools and pharmacological approaches applied to hemostatic disorders.

  9. High power visible diode laser for the treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Arne; Hagen, Clemens; Harlander, Maximilian; Nussbaumer, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    We present a high power visible diode laser enabling a low-cost treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation, including the two leading causes of blindness worldwide (diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration) as well as retinopathy of prematurely born children, intraocular tumors and retinal detachment. Laser coagulation requires the exposure of the eye to visible laser light and relies on the high absorption of the retina. The need for treatment is constantly increasing, due to the demographic trend, the increasing average life expectancy and medical care demand in developing countries. The World Health Organization reacts to this demand with global programs like the VISION 2020 "The right to sight" and the following Universal Eye Health within their Global Action Plan (2014-2019). One major point is to motivate companies and research institutes to make eye treatment cheaper and easily accessible. Therefore it becomes capital providing the ophthalmology market with cost competitive, simple and reliable technologies. Our laser is based on the direct second harmonic generation of the light emitted from a tapered laser diode and has already shown reliable optical performance. All components are produced in wafer scale processes and the resulting strong economy of scale results in a price competitive laser. In a broader perspective the technology behind our laser has a huge potential in non-medical applications like welding, cutting, marking and finally laser-illuminated projection.

  10. Coagulation of humic waters for diffused pollution control and the influence of coagulant type on DOC fractions removed.

    PubMed

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Leiviskä, Tiina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the suitability of organic coagulants for treatment of typically humic peat extraction runoff water by comparing their performance with that of ferric sulphate (FS). The influence of coagulant type on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions removed was analysed in detail using LC-OCD-OND (size exclusion liquid chromatography coupled with organic carbon and organic nitrogen detection) fractionation techniques. In general, lower coagulant dosage was needed under acidic (pH 4.5) than neutral (pH 6.5) conditions. Chitosan (Chit) and poly (diallyldimethyl) ammonium chloride (pDMAC) required significantly lower dosage (40-55%) than FS for acceptable purification, while a tannin-based coagulant (Tan2) required substantially higher dosage (55-75%) independent of water pH. FS demonstrated the best removal of DOC (<81%) and phosphorus (<93%) followed by pDMAC, while Chit and Tan2 achieved the highest removal of suspended solids (SS) (<58%), with flocs formed by Tan2 presenting the best settling properties. Higher molecular weight (MW) DOC fractions were more efficiently removed by all coagulants, with FS being the most efficient (biopolymers 69% and humic substances 91%), followed by Tan2. FS also displayed satisfactory removal of lower MW fractions (building blocks ∼46% and low MW neutrals 62%). Overall, FS was the best performing coagulant. Nevertheless, the organic polymers demonstrated satisfactory overall performance, achieving purification rates mostly inside the requirements set by Finnish environmental authorities.

  11. Characterization and coagulation of a polyaluminum chloride (PAC) coagulant with high Al13 content.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bao-Yu; Chu, Yong-Bao; Yue, Qin-Yan; Wang, Bing-Jian; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2005-07-01

    A polyaluminum chloride (PAC) coagulant was prepared from AlCl3 x 6H2O and Na2CO3. The Al13 species in PAC was separated and purified by the SO4(2-)/Ba2+ deposition-replacement method, and characterized by 27Al-NMR and XRD. From 27Al-NMR spectroscopy, it was found that PAC obtained after separation and purification contained more Al13 (PAC-Al13, for short) than original PAC before separation and purification. In XRD spectra, a strong Al13 signal appeared in the range of 2theta from 5 to 25 degrees. Jar tests were performed to test the coagulation efficiency of AlCl3, PAC and PAC-Al13 in treating synthetic or actual water samples. Compared with PAC and AlCl3, PAC-Al13 gives the best results for turbidity, humic acid and color removal, and achieves the highest charge-neutralizing ability. Under the study conditions, PAC-Al13 gave about 90% humic acid removal and almost 100% reactive blue dye removal when its dosages were 4.0 and 15 mg/L as Al, respectively. The Al13 species has a higher positive charge and is the most effective polymeric Al species in water and wastewater treatment.

  12. Dysfunction in the coagulation system and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, S; Amaral, O B; Mezzasalma, M A U; Panizzutti, R; Nardi, A E

    2016-01-01

    Although different hypotheses have been formulated to explain schizophrenia pathogenesis, the links between them are weak. The observation that five psychotic patients on chronic warfarin therapy for deep-vein thrombosis showed long-term remission of psychotic symptoms made us suspect that abnormalities in the coagulation pathway, specifically low tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity, could be one of the missing links. Our hypothesis is supported by a high prevalence of conditions affecting tPA activity in drug-naive schizophrenia, such as antiphospholipid antibodies, elevated cytokine levels, hyperinsulinemia and hyperhomocysteinemia. We recently screened a group of schizophrenia patients and controls for conditions affecting tPA activity. Free-protein S deficiency was highly prevalent among patients, but not found in controls. Free-protein S and functional protein C are natural anticoagulants that form complexes that inhibit tPA inhibitors. All participants had normal protein C levels, suggesting that protein S could have a role in schizophrenia, independent of protein C. Chronic patients and those studied during acute episodes had between three and six conditions affecting tPA and/or protein S activity, while patients in remission had up to two, which led us to postulate that multiple conditions affecting tPA and/or protein S activity could contribute to the full expression of schizophrenia phenotype. This paper describes the physiological roles of tPA and protein S, reviewing how their activity influences pathogenesis and comorbidity of schizophrenia. Next, it analyzes how activity of tPA and protein S is influenced by biochemical abnormalities found in schizophrenia. Last, it suggests future directions for research, such as studies on animal models and on therapeutic approaches for schizophrenia aiming at increasing tPA and protein S activity. PMID:26731441

  13. Instantaneous gelation in Smoluchowski's coagulation equation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Robin C.; Connaughton, Colm; Stein, Thorwald H. M.; Zaboronski, Oleg

    2011-07-01

    We study the solutions of the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with a regularization term which removes clusters from the system when their mass exceeds a specified cutoff size, M. We focus primarily on collision kernels which would exhibit an instantaneous gelation transition in the absence of any regularization. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for such kernels with monodisperse initial data, the regularized gelation time decreases as M increases, consistent with the expectation that the gelation time is zero in the unregularized system. This decrease appears to be a logarithmically slow function of M, indicating that instantaneously gelling kernels may still be justifiable as physical models despite the fact that they are highly singular in the absence of a cutoff. We also study the case when a source of monomers is introduced in the regularized system. In this case a stationary state is reached. We present a complete analytic description of this regularized stationary state for the model kernel, K(m1,m2)=max{m1,m2}ν, which gels instantaneously when M→∞ if ν>1. The stationary cluster size distribution decays as a stretched exponential for small cluster sizes and crosses over to a power law decay with exponent ν for large cluster sizes. The total particle density in the stationary state slowly vanishes as [(ν-1)logM]-1/2 when M→∞. The approach to the stationary state is nontrivial: Oscillations about the stationary state emerge from the interplay between the monomer injection and the cutoff, M, which decay very slowly when M is large. A quantitative analysis of these oscillations is provided for the addition model which describes the situation in which clusters can only grow by absorbing monomers.

  14. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p<0.001 for all variables except for PT; p=0.08). Elderly age (>50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Principles of dielectric blood coagulometry as a comprehensive coagulation test.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Brun, Marc-Aurèle; Machida, Kenzo; Nagasawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-06

    Dielectric blood coagulometry (DBCM) is intended to support hemostasis management by providing comprehensive information on blood coagulation from automated, time-dependent measurements of whole blood dielectric spectra. We discuss the relationship between the series of blood coagulation reactions, especially the aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes, and the dielectric response with the help of clot structure electron microscope observations. Dielectric response to the spontaneous coagulation after recalcification presented three distinct phases that correspond to (P1) rouleau formation before the onset of clotting, (P2) erythrocyte aggregation and reconstitution of aggregates accompanying early fibrin formation, and (P3) erythrocyte shape transformation and/or structure changes within aggregates after the stable fibrin network is formed and platelet contraction occurs. Disappearance of the second phase was observed upon addition of tissue factor and ellagic acid for activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively, which is attributable to accelerated thrombin generation. A series of control experiments revealed that the amplitude and/or quickness of dielectric response reflect platelet function, fibrin polymerization, fibrinolysis activity, and heparin activity. Therefore, DBCM sensitively measures blood coagulation via erythrocytes aggregation and shape changes and their impact on the dielectric permittivity, making possible the development of the battery of assays needed for comprehensive coagulation testing.

  16. Splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis. Role of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; Guillaumes, S; Blanco, I; Martínez de Hurtado, J; Esquius, J; Marruecos, L; Fontcuberta, J; Pérez, C; Farré, A; Lluís, F

    1992-08-01

    Splenic hematomas are infrequent complications of acute pancreatitis. In some cases, local factors that may play a role in the pathogenesis of the hematoma (thrombosis of the splenic artery or veins, intrasplenic pseudocysts, perisplenic adhesions, enzymatic digestion) are found. In the absence of local factors, the etiology of splenic hemorrhage remains unknown. We report two cases of splenic hematoma occurring during an acute necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis associated with renal failure that required renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis). In both cases, more than half of splenic parenchyma was affected by multiple infarctions. No local factors responsible for the splenic abnormalities were detected in either case. Thrombosis of the splenic arterial microcirculation and a coagulation disorder consistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation was detected in one patient. In the second patient, coagulation disorders secondary to either liver disease, pancreatitis and its septic complications, or extracorporeal circuit heparinization for renal replacement therapy were present. Coagulation disorders should be considered whenever a splenic hematoma is found in a patient with acute pancreatitis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may be the etiology of a splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis.

  17. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood coagulation and propagation of autowaves in flow.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Elena A; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Shnol, Emmanuil E

    2005-01-01

    This study analyses the effect of flow and boundary reactions on spatial propagation of waves of blood coagulation. A simple model of coagulation in plasma consisting of three differential reaction-diffusion equations was used for numerical simulations. The vessel was simulated as a two-dimensional channel of constant width, and the anticoagulant influence of thrombomodulin present on the undamaged vessel wall was taken into account. The results of the simulations showed that this inhibition could stop the coagulation process in the absence of flow in narrow channels. For the used mathematical model of coagulation this was the case if the width was below 0.2 mm. In wider vessels, the process could be stopped by the rapid blood flow. The required flow rate increased with the increase of the damage region size. For example, in a 0.5-mm wide channel with 1-mm long damage region, the propagation of coagulation may be terminated at the flow rate of more than 20 mm/min.

  19. A mini review of preoxidation to improve coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pengchao; Chen, Yiqun; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Jing; Wang, Zongping

    2016-07-01

    Preoxidation has attracted people's attention due to its effectiveness in enhancing coagulation. The mechanisms, drawbacks and applications in the improvement of coagulation were summarized in this work. Preoxidation can destroy the organic coating on the surface of particles to change the zeta potential, which is the vital reason for improving coagulation. Co-existing metallic ions, such as calcium, iron and manganese, play important roles in the improvement of coagulation due to the formation of metal-humate complexes or the in situ formed coagulant. However, preoxidation could degrade organic matter from high molecular weight to low molecular weight and damage cell membrane of algae, causing intracellular algal organic matter to release outside and producing hydrophilic functional groups to some extent, which has the potential to deteriorate the water quality. Additionally, disinfection byproduct formation is also affected significantly through changing the characteristics of the organic and inorganic precursors. Based on the recent publications, some future developments of preoxidation process were suggested in this study.

  20. Comparison of Moringa stenopetala seed extract as a clean coagulant with Alum and Moringa stenopetala-Alum hybrid coagulant to remove direct dye from Textile Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Arash; Gholibegloo, Elham; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Golchinpoor, Najmeh; Khazaei, Mohammad; Kamani, Hossein; Hosseini, Sara Sadat; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Moringa stenopetala seed extract was compared with alum and M. stenopetala-alum hybrid coagulant to remove Direct Red 23 azo dye from textile wastewater. The effects of parameters such as pH, coagulant dose, type of salt used for the extraction of coagulant and initial dye concentration on dye removal efficiency were investigated. Moreover, the existing functional groups on the structure of M. stenopetala coagulant (MSC) were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the morphology of sludge produced by MSC, alum, and hybrid coagulant was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Ninhydrin test was also used to determine the quantity of primary amines in the MSC and Moringa oleifera coagulant (MOC). According to the results, with increasing the coagulant dose and decreasing the initial dye concentration, dye removal efficiency has increased. The maximum dye removal of 98.5, 98.2, and 98.3 % were obtained by using 240, 120, and 80 mg/L MSC, alum and hybrid coagulant at pH 7, respectively. The results also showed MSC was much more effective than MOC for dye removal. The volume of sludge produced by MSC was one fourth and half of those produced by alum and hybrid coagulant, respectively. Based on the results, hybrid coagulant was the most efficient coagulant for direct dye removal from colored wastewater.

  1. Optical coherence tomography to investigate optical properties of blood during coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia; Fu, Feifei

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optical properties of human blood during the coagulation process under statics using optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT signal slope (OCTSS) and 1/e light penetration depth (d1/e) were obtained from the profiles of reflectance versus depth. Results showed that both OCTSS and d1/e were able to sensitively differentiate various stages of blood properties during coagulating. After 1 h clotting, OCTSS decreased by 47.0%, 15.0%, 13.7%, and 8.5% and d1/e increased by 34.7%, 29.4%, 24.3%, and 22.9% for the blood samples at HCT of 25%, 35%, 45%, and 55%, respectively. The slope of d1/e versus time (Sr, ×10-4 mm/s), associated with clot formation rate decreased from 6.0+/-0.3, 3.7+/-0.5 to 2.3+/-0.4 with the increasing of HCT from 35%, 45%, to 55%. The clotting time (tc) from the d1/e evolution curves was estimated to be 1969+/-92 s, 375+/-12 s, 455+/-11 s, and 865+/-47 s for the blood of 25%, 35%, 45%, and 55%. This study demonstrates that the parameters (tc and Sr) from the variations in d1/e had better sensitivity and smaller standard deviation. Furthermore, blood hematocrit affecting backscattering properties of blood during coagulation was capable of being discerned by OCT parameters. It is concluded that OCT is a potential technique to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  2. Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

  3. Optical coherence tomography to investigate optical properties of blood during coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia; Fu, Feifei

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optical properties of human blood during the coagulation process under statics using optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT signal slope (OCTSS) and 1∕e light penetration depth (d(1∕e)) were obtained from the profiles of reflectance versus depth. Results showed that both OCTSS and d(1∕e) were able to sensitively differentiate various stages of blood properties during coagulating. After 1 h clotting, OCTSS decreased by 47.0%, 15.0%, 13.7%, and 8.5% and d(1∕e) increased by 34.7%, 29.4%, 24.3%, and 22.9% for the blood samples at HCT of 25%, 35%, 45%, and 55%, respectively. The slope of d(1∕e) versus time (S(r), ×10(-4) mm∕s), associated with clot formation rate decreased from 6.0 ± 0.3, 3.7 ± 0.5 to 2.3 ± 0.4 with the increasing of HCT from 35%, 45%, to 55%. The clotting time (t(c)) from the d(1∕e) evolution curves was estimated to be 1969 ± 92 s, 375 ± 12 s, 455 ± 11 s, and 865 ± 47 s for the blood of 25%, 35%, 45%, and 55%. This study demonstrates that the parameters (t(c) and S(r)) from the variations in d(1∕e) had better sensitivity and smaller standard deviation. Furthermore, blood hematocrit affecting backscattering properties of blood during coagulation was capable of being discerned by OCT parameters. It is concluded that OCT is a potential technique to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  4. Comparison of coagulation pretreatment of produced water from natural gas well by polyaluminium chloride and polyferric sulphate coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun; Huang, Zejin; Rahaman, Md Hasibur; Li, Yue; Mei, Longyue; Ma, Hongpu; Hu, Xuebin; Xiao, Haiwen; Luo, Zhiyong; Wang, Kunping

    2016-08-19

    This study aimed to optimise coagulation pretreatment of the produced water (PW) collected from a natural gas field. Two coagulants, polyferric sulphate (PFS) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl), were applied separately for the organics, suspended solids (SS), and colour removal. Treatment performance at different coagulant dosages, initial pH values, stirring patterns, and the addition of cationic polyacrylamide (PAM) was investigated in jar tests. The optimal coagulation conditions were dosage of PACl 25 g/L or PFS 20 g/L with that of PAM 30 mg/L, initial pH of 11, and fast mixing of 1.5 min (for PACl) or 2 min (for PFS) at 250 rpm followed by slow mixing of 15 min at 50 rpm for both coagulants. PACl performed better than PFS to remove chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), SS, and colour, and achieved a removal efficiency of 90.1%, 89.4%, 99.0%, and 99.9%, respectively, under the optimal condition; while PFS efficiency was 86.1%, 86.1%, 99.0%, and 98.2%, respectively. However, oil removal was higher in PFS coagulation compared to PACl and showed 98.9% and 95.3%, respectively. Biodegradability, ratio of the biological oxygen demand (five-day) (BOD5)/COD, of the PW after pretreatment increased from 0.08 to 0.32 for PFS and 0.43 for PACl. Zeta potential (Z-potential) analysis at the optimum coagulant dosage of PACl and PFS suggests that charge neutralisation was the predominant mechanism during coagulation. Better efficiency was observed at higher pH. The addition of PAM and starring pattern had a minor influence on the removal performance of both coagulants. The results suggest that PACl or PFS can be applied for the pretreatment of PW, which can provide substantial removal of carbon, oil, and colour, a necessary first step for subsequent main treatment units such as chemical oxidation or biological treatment.

  5. Coagulation profile, gene expression and bioinformatics characterization of coagulation factor X of striped murrel Channa striatus.

    PubMed

    Arasu, Abirami; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-08-01

    A transcriptome wide analysis of the constructed cDNA library of snakehead murrel Channa striatus revealed a full length cDNA sequence of coagulation factor X. Sequence analysis of C. striatus coagulation factor X (CsFX) showed that the cDNA contained 1232 base pairs (bp) comprising 1209 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF region encodes 424 amino acids with a molecular mass of 59 kDa. The polypeptide contains γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) rich domain and two epidermal growth factor (EGF) like domains including EGF-CA domain and serine proteases trypsin signature profile. CsFX exhibited the maximum similarity with fish species such as Stegastes partitus (78%), Poecilia formosa (76%) and Cynoglossus semilaevis (74%). Phylogenetically, CsFX is clustered together with the fish group belonging to Actinopterygii. Secondary structure of factor X includes alpha helix 28.54%, extended strand 20.75%, beta turn 7.78% and random coil 42.92%. A predicted 3D model of CsFX revealed a short α-helix and a Ca(2+) (Gla domain) binding site in the coil. Four disulfide bridges were found in serine protease trypsin profile. Obviously, the highest gene expression (P < 0.05) was noticed in blood. Further, the changes in expression of CsFX was observed after inducing with bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) and fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) infections and other synthetic immune stimulants. Variation in blood clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT) and activated prothromboplastin time (APTT) was analyzed and compared between healthy and bacterial infected fishes. During infection, PT and APTT showed a declined clotting time due to the raised level of thrombocytes.

  6. How hemostatic agents interact with the coagulation cascade.

    PubMed

    Overbey, Douglas M; Jones, Edward L; Robinson, Thomas N

    2014-08-01

    Hemostasis is a critical component of the preservation of hemodynamic stability and operative visibility during surgery. Initially, hemostasis is achieved via the careful application of direct pressure to allow time for the coagulation cascade to create a fibrin and platelet plug. Other first-line methods of hemostasis in surgery include repair or ligation of the bleeding vessel with sutures, clips, or staples and coagulation of the bleeding site with a thermal energy-based device. When these methods are insufficient to provide adequate hemostasis, topical hemostatic agents can be used to augment the creation of a clot during surgery. A basic understanding of how and where these products interact with the coagulation cascade is essential to achieving optimal hemostasis outcomes.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with coagulation disorders].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Marcellán, F J; Mauri Cunill, A; Cabré Fabré, P; Argentino Gancedo Rodríguez, V; Güell Oliva, J A; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M

    1992-03-01

    During treatment of renal lithiasis with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) hemorrhagic events, especially renal hematoma, may present. A coagulation study is warranted in order to institute hemotherapy for blood factor deficiencies. We reviewed the records of 4,000 patients that had undergone ESWL. Of these, 17 (12 males, 5 females) presented coagulation disorders. The bleeding diatheses were due to platelet deficiency in 6 cases, plasma defects in 5, platelet and plasma disorders in 2, and capillary wall defects in 5 cases. The underlying cause was hepatosplenic disease in 12 cases, iatrogenic in 1, connectivopathy and corticoids in 2, and capillary purpura of unknown cause in 2 cases. Due to this protocol, no patient presented hemorrhage or hematoma from shock wave-induced lesions. These results show that a complete coagulation study must be performed in order to institute the necessary measures in patients with disorders of hemostasis due to the high risk of hematoma repeatedly reported in the literature.

  9. Effect of Coagulation of Nodes in an Evolving Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Wataru; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2012-04-01

    We propose a new type of stochastic network evolution model based on annihilation, creation, and coagulation of nodes, together with the preferential attachment rule. The system reaches a unique quasistatistically steady state in which the distribution of links follows a power law, lifetime of nodes follows an exponential distribution, and the mean number of links grows exponentially with time. The master equation of the model is solved analytically by applying Smoluchowski’s coagulation equation for aerosols. The results indicate that coagulation of nodes in complex networks and mean field analysis of aerosols are similar in both the growth dynamics with irreversible processes and in the steady state statistics. We confirm that the basic properties of the model are consistent with the empirical results of a business transaction network having about 1×106 firms.

  10. Multifrequency acoustics as a probe of mesoscopic blood coagulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Adarsh; Rajendran, Gokulnath; Ercole, Ari; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Coagulation is a complex enzymatic polymerisation cascade. Disordered coagulation is common in medicine and may be life-threatening yet clinical assays are typically bulky and/or provide an incomplete picture of clot mechanical evolution. We present the adaptation of an in-plane acoustic wave device: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation at multiple harmonics to determine the time-evolution of mesoscale mechanical properties of clot formation in vitro. This approach is sensitive to changes in surface and bulk clot structure in various models of induced coagulopathy. Furthermore, we are able to show that clot formation at surfaces has different kinetics and mechanical strength to that in the bulk, which may have implications for the design of bioprosthetic materials. The "Multifrequency acoustics" approach thus enables unique capability to portray biological processes concerning blood coagulation.

  11. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  12. Enhanced WWTP effluent organic matter removal in hybrid ozonation-coagulation (HOC) process catalyzed by Al-based coagulant.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Jin, Pengkang; Hou, Rui; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiaochang C

    2017-04-05

    A novel hybrid ozonation-coagulation (HOC) process was developed for application in wastewater reclamation. In this process, ozonation and coagulation occurred simultaneously within a single unit. Compared with the conventional pre-ozonation-coagulation process, the HOC process exhibited much better performance in removing dissolved organic matters. In particular, the maximal organic matters removal efficiency was obtained at the ozone dosage of 1mgO3/mg DOC at each pH value (pH 5, 7 and 9). In order to interpret the mechanism of the HOC process, ozone decomposition was monitored. The results indicated that ozone decomposed much faster in the HOC process. Moreover, by using the reagent of O3-resistant hydroxyl radical (OH) probe compound, para-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis, it was observed that the HOC process generated higher content of OH compared with pre-ozonation process. This indicates that the OH oxidation reaction as the key step can be catalyzed and enhanced by Al-based coagulants and their hydrolyzed products in this developed process. Thus, based on the catalytic effects of Al-based coagulants on ozonation, the HOC process provides a promising alternative to the conventional technology for wastewater reclamation in terms of higher efficiency.

  13. Properties and coagulation performance of coagulant poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Qin-yan; Wang, Bing-jian

    2006-01-01

    An efficient inorganic polymer coagulant, poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride (PAFSC), was developed using two approaches: (i) hydroxylation of the mixture of AlCl3, FeCl3 and fresh polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si molar ratios to obtain PAFSCc and (ii) hydroxylated poly-aluminum-iron-chloride (PAFC) combined with aged polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si ratios to produce PAFSCm. The properties of PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum silicate chloride (PASC) and polyferric silicate chloride (PAFC) were characterized by various experimental methods. The effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on the hydrolysis-polymerization process of Al (III) and Fe (III) in PAFSC solutions was examined by pH titration, and the effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on electrokinetic mobility of PAFSC was studied by Zeta potential measurement. The laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) for the coagulation of synthetic water samples, actual surface water and wastewater. The results show that interactions exist among aluminum species, ferric species and polysilicic acid, and the Al/Fe/Si molar ratio affects the Zeta potential of the hydrolyzate and the coagulating performance. PAFSC achieved a better water treatment result than PAC. At the same basicity (B) value and Al/Fe/Si ratio, PAFSCc has better coagulation performance than PAFSCm. PAFSC is a new type and high efficiency composite inorganic polymer coagulant.

  14. Characteristics of meso-particles formed in coagulation process causing irreversible membrane fouling in the coagulation-microfiltration water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Yamamura, H; Murata, N; Aoki, N; Yonekawa, H; Hafuka, A; Watanabe, Y

    2016-09-15

    In coagulation-membrane filtration water treatment processes, it is still difficult to determine the optimal coagulation condition to minimize irreversible membrane fouling. In microfiltration (MF), meso-particles (i.e., 20 nm-0.5 μm) are thought to play an important role in irreversible membrane fouling, especially their characteristics of particle number (PN) and zeta potential (ZP). In this study, a new nanoparticle tracker combined a high-output violet laser with a microscope was developed to identify the physicochemical characteristics of these microscopic and widely dispersed meso-particles. The effects of pH and coagulant dose on ZP and PN of micro-particles (i.e., >0.5 μm) and meso-particles were investigated, and then coagulation-MF tests were conducted. As the result, irreversible membrane fouling was best controlled for both types of membranes, while meso-particle ZP approached zero at around pH 5.5 for both types of natural water. Since PN was greatest under these conditions, ZP is more important in determining the extent of irreversible membrane fouling than PN. However, the acidic condition to neutralize meso-particles is not suitable for actual operation, as considering residual aluminum concentration, pipe corrosion, and chlorination efficiency. It is therefore necessary to investigate coagulants or other methods for the appropriate modification of meso-particle characteristics.

  15. Adaptive Force Sonorheometry for Assessment of Whole Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, F. William; Viola, Francesco; Hamer, Theresa C.; Ahmed, Eman M.; Crawford, Shawna B.; Haverstick, Doris M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Viscoelastic diagnostics that monitor the hemostatic function of whole blood (WB), such as thromboelastography, have been developed with demonstrated clinical utility. By measuring the cumulative effects of all components of hemostasis, viscoelastic diagnostics have circumvented many of the challenges associated with more common tests of blood coagulation. Methods: We describe a new technology, called sonorheometry, that adaptively applies acoustic radiation force to assess coagulation function in WB. The repeatability (precision) of coagulation parameters was assessed using citrated WB samples. A reference range of coagulation parameters, along with corresponding measurements from prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT), were obtained from WB samples of 20 healthy volunteers. In another study, sonorheometry monitored anticoagulation with heparin (0 – 5 IU/ml) and reversal from varied dosages of protamine (0 – 10 IU/ml) in heparinized WB (2 IU/ml). Results: Sonorheometry exhibited low CVs for parameters: clot initiation time (TC1), < 7%; clot stabilization time (TC2), < 6.5%; and clotting angle (θ), < 3.5%. Good correlation was observed between clotting times, TC1 and TC2, and PTT (r = 0.65 and 0.74 respectively; n=18). Linearity to heparin dosage was observed with average linearity r > 0.98 for all coagulation parameters. We observed maximum reversal of heparin anticoagulation at protamine to heparin ratios of 1.4:1 from TC1 (P=0.6) and 1.2:1 from θ (P=0.55). Conclusions: Sonorheometry is a non-contact method for precise assessment of WB coagulation. PMID:20096680

  16. Interpretation of coagulation test results under direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Mani, H

    2014-06-01

    Diagnostic of global coagulation parameters is part of the daily clinical routine practice in conservative as well in operative disciplines. The correct interpretation of in vitro test results in context to the ex vivo influence of anticoagulant drugs and the in vivo hemostatic system of the individual patient is dependent on the doctors clinical and laboratory experience. This article shortly reviews the laboratory interference of oral anticoagulants including the target-specific inhibitors dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban on coagulation parameters and discusses the potential of several methods for measuring the anticoagulant effect of the direct oral anticoagulants.

  17. Sonoclot(®)-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Henderson, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Thrombelastographic methods have been recently introduced to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in settings such as sickle cell disease, hemodialysis, mechanical circulatory support, and neuroinflammation. However, these inflammatory situations may have heme oxygenase-derived, coexistent carbon monoxide present, which also enhances coagulation as assessed by the same thrombelastographic variables that are affected by iron. This brief report presents a novel, Sonoclot-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation that is independent of carbon monoxide influence. Future investigation will be required to assess the sensitivity of this new method to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in clinical settings compared to results obtained with thrombelastographic techniques.

  18. Extremely refractory Kawasaki disease with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Kwon; Lee, Jae Hee; Park, Yeong Bong

    2017-03-07

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a rare complication of Kawasaki disease and appears in <0.1% of Kawasaki disease patients. We report a case of refractory Kawasaki disease complicated with disseminated intravascular coagulation and giant coronary aneurysm. A 5-month-old boy presented with Kawasaki disease with coagulopathy. Although the coagulopathy improved after fresh-frozen plasma and antithrombin-III administration, the fever persisted despite two rounds of intravenous immunoglobulin, along with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy and infliximab administration. Despite all efforts to treatment, the patient had giant coronary aneurysms and died suddenly.

  19. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights.

  20. Strongly differentiable solutions of the discrete coagulation-fragmentation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, A. C.; Smith, A. L.; Lamb, W.

    2010-08-01

    We examine an infinite system of ordinary differential equations that models the binary coagulation and multiple fragmentation of clusters. In contrast to previous investigations, our analysis does not involve finite-dimensional truncations of the system. Instead, we treat the problem as an infinite-dimensional differential equation, posed in an appropriate Banach space, and apply perturbation results from the theory of strongly continuous semigroups of operators. The existence and uniqueness of physically meaningful solutions are established for uniformly bounded coagulation rates but with no growth restrictions imposed on the fragmentation rates.

  1. Optical properties measurement of laser coagulated tissues with double integrating sphere and inverse Monte Carlo technique in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Nanjo, Takuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    In laser medicine, the accurate knowledge about the optical properties (absorption coefficient; μa, scattering coefficient; μs, anisotropy factor; g) of laser irradiated tissues is important for the prediction of light propagation in tissues, since the efficacy of laser treatment depends on the photon propagation within the irradiated tissues. Thus, it is likely that the optical properties of tissues at near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared wavelengths will be more important due to more biomedical applications of lasers will be developed. For improvement of the laser induced thermotherapy, the optical property change during laser treatment should be considered in the wide wavelength range. For estimation of the optical properties of the biological tissues, the optical properties measurement system with a double integrating sphere setup and an inverse Monte Carlo technique was developed. The optical properties of chicken muscle tissue were measured in the native state and after laser coagulation using the optical properties measurement system in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm. A CO2 laser was used for laser coagulation. After laser coagulation, the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue increased. And, the optical penetration depth decreased. For improvement of the treatment depth during laser coagulation, a quantitative procedure using the treated tissue optical properties for determination of the irradiation power density following light penetration decrease might be important in clinic.

  2. Ipomoea dasysperma seed gum: an effective natural coagulant for the decolorization of textile dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, Rashmi; Bhattacharya, Bani; Dixit, Awantika; Singh, Vandana

    2006-10-01

    An investigation of dye decolorization from synthetic dye solutions using the non-ionic, water-soluble, high molecular weight seed gums Ipomoea dasysperma and guar gum as coagulants was undertaken. The use of galactomannans derived from plants in this system presents a sustainable method of textile effluent treatment. These natural coagulants extracted from plants proved to be workable alternatives to conventional coagulants like polyaluminum chloride, as they are biodegradable, safe to human health, are cost effective when compared to imported chemicals and have a wider effective dosage range for flocculation of various colloidal suspensions. Coagulant dose and coagulation pH are important factors influencing the mechanism of coagulation. Also the type and chemical structure of the dye plays an important role in the coagulation process. The seed gums alone were found to be effective for decolorization of direct dye and in combination with PAC their coagulation efficiency was well extended even for reactive and acid dyes.

  3. The Coagulant Type Influence on Removal Efficiency of 5- and 6-Ring Pahs During Water Coagulation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacka, Anna; Włodarczyk-Makuła, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The article presents results on investigation of the removal efficiency of selected 5- and 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[j]fluoranthene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene) from water during coagulation and sedimentation process. Two pre-hydrolyzed aluminum coagulants: PAX XL 19H and FLOKOR 105V were chosen for research. Process was carried out at optimum process parameters: rapid-mixing - 3 min at the rotational speed of 200 rpm, slow mixing - 10 min at 30 rpm, sedimentation - 60 min. The removal effectiveness was dependant on coagulant type and its composition. Better results in the removal of 5-and 6-ring PAHs were obtained after application of FLOKOR 105V (lower aluminum content) than after using PAX XL 19H.

  4. Characterization and literature review of bowel perforation injuring using argon beam coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kelli S.; Merchel, Renée. A.; Taylor, Kenneth D.

    2015-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Argon Beam Coagulation (ABC®) technology is used in conjunction with the ConMed ABCFlex® Probe to provide non-contact hemostasis, coagulation, and tissue devitalization during endoscopic procedures. ABC provides a superficial tissue effect; however, there is a risk of bowel perforation. To better understand the settings that lead to perforation, this study reviews the literature and provides an ex vivo characterization of the ABCFlex Probe tissue effect at different settings when used at small distances. METHODS: Depth of thermal tissue effect was characterized to determine the effect of three parameters: power (W), distance from probe tip to tissue (mm) and application duration (s). 3 ABCFlex Probes were used to create 15 samples on ex vivo porcine small intestine for each combination of parameters. The depth of tissue effect for each sample was measured using a light microscope. RESULTS: Depth of tissue effect increases as power and application time increases. An increase of distance from the probe tip to the tissue results in a decrease in depth of tissue effect from a near contact to 1mm distance. Depth of tissue effect doesn't significantly change from 1mm to 3mm distance. CONCLUSION: ABCFlex Probe can be used to achieve hemostasis in endoscopic procedures. Increasing power and application time increases the depth of thermal effect while increasing distance from the probe time to the surface of the tissue decreases the depth of tissue effect.

  5. Nanoparticles in wastewater from a science-based industrial park - coagulation using polyaluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Chang, M R; Lee, D J; Lai, J Y

    2007-12-01

    The Hsinchu Science-based Industrial Park (HSIP) is the hi-tech manufacturing hub of Taiwan. Wastewater from the HSIP contains numerous nano-sized silicate particles whose size distributions peak at 2 and 90 nm. A 3-5 mg l(-1) as Al dose of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was used in the field to coagulate these particles, but the removal efficiency was low. Laboratory scale tests indicated that although PACl coagulation removed 52% of the turbidity and 48% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) from water, its effect on nano-particle removal was minimal. About 58% of the soluble COD was associated with colloidal Si particles. A light scattering test and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the nano-particles agglomerated in approximately linear aggregates of sizes 100-300 nm. Prolonged contact between residual PACl and the nano-particles generated large aggregates with sizes of up to 10 microm and a fractal dimension of 2.24-2.63. The results presented herein should be of interest in the processing of "high-tech" wastewater that contains nanosized silica particles.

  6. Group D prothrombin activators from snake venom are structural homologues of mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Veena S; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-01-01

    Procoagulant venoms of several Australian elapids contain proteinases that specifically activate prothrombin; among these, Group D activators are functionally similar to coagulation factor Xa (FXa). Structural information on this class of prothrombin activators will contribute significantly towards understanding the mechanism of FXa-mediated prothrombin activation. Here we present the purification of Group D prothrombin activators from three Australian snake venoms (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Notechis scutatus scutatus and Notechis ater niger) using a single-step method, and their N-terminal sequences. The N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain of hopsarin D (H. stephensi) revealed that a fully conserved Cys-7 was substituted with a Ser residue. We therefore determined the complete amino acid sequence of hopsarin D. Hopsarin D shows approximately 70% similarity with FXa and approximately 98% similarity with trocarin D, a Group D prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus. It possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains and a serine proteinase domain. All residues important for catalysis are conserved, as are most regions involved in interactions with factor Va and prothrombin. However, there are some structural differences. Unlike FXa, hopsarin D is glycosylated in both its chains: in light-chain residue 52 and heavy-chain residue 45. The glycosylation on the heavy chain is a large carbohydrate moiety adjacent to the active-site pocket. Overall, hopsarin D is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian coagulation FXa. PMID:12403650

  7. Red blood cell coagulation induced by low-temperature plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kenji; Ikehara, Sanae; Takei, Hikaru; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Ueda, Masashi; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Yamagishi, Masahiro; Kim, Jaeho; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2016-09-01

    Low-temperature plasma (LTP) treatment promotes blood clot formation by stimulation of the both platelet aggregation and coagulation factors. However, the appearance of a membrane-like structure in clots after the treatment is controversial. Based on our previous report that demonstrated characteristics of the form of coagulation of serum proteins induced by LTP treatment, we sought to determine whether treatment with two plasma instruments, namely BPC-HP1 and PN-110/120TPG, formed clots only from red blood cells (RBCs). LTP treatment with each device formed clots from whole blood, whereas LTP treatment with BPC-HP1 formed clots in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 2 × 10(9)/mL RBCs. Light microscopic analysis results showed that hemolysis formed clots consisting of materials with membrane-like structures from both whole blood and PBS-suspended RBCs. Moreover, electron microscopic analysis results showed a monotonous material with high electron density in the formed clots, presenting a membrane-like structure. Hemolysis disappeared with the decrease in the current through the targets contacting with the plasma flare and clot formation ceased. Taken together, our results and those of earlier studies present two types of blood clot formation, namely presence or absence of hemolysis capability depending on the current through the targets.

  8. Demonstration of the Coagulation and Diffusion of Homemade Slime Prepared under Acidic Conditions without Borate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isokawa, Naho; Fueda, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Korin; Kanno, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) precipitates in many kinds of aqueous salt solutions. While sodium sulfate, a coagulant for PVA fiber, precipitates PVA to yield a white rigid gel, coagulation of PVA with aluminum sulfate, a coagulant for water treatment, yields a slime-like viscoelastic fluid. One type of homemade slime is prepared under basic…

  9. Optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver tissue measured ex-vivo with diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez-Ullah; Atif, M.; Firdous, S.; Mehmood, M. S.; Hamza, M. Y.; Imran, M.; Hussain, G.; Ikram, M.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver at 720, 740, 770, 810, 825 and 840 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation. So, we were able to evaluate these optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients) with ex-vivo study using Kubelka Munk Model (KMM) from the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance with femtosecond pulsed laser in near IR region. These coefficients were significantly increased with coagulation. The penetration depths of the diffused light have been reported to a maximum value of 8.12 ± 0.36 mm in normal liver and 2.49 ± 0.17 mm in coagulated liver at 840 nm showing increasing behavior towards IR region. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to check the theoretical validation of measured optical properties of the tissue that showed a good match with our experimental results. We believe that these differences in optical properties will be helpful for the understanding arid optimal use of laser applications in medicine and differential diagnosis of tissues by using different optical methods. Especially for the investigation of biological tissue for photodynamic therapy (PDT), the knowledge of the specific optical properties and their thermo-induced changes is important.

  10. Acoustic determination of early stages of intravascular blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Uzlova, Svetlana G; Guria, Konstantin G; Guria, Georgy Th

    2008-10-13

    The blood coagulation system (BCS) is a complex biological system playing a principal role in the maintenance of haemostasis. Insufficient activity of the BCS may lead to bleeding and blood loss (e.g. in the case of haemophilia). On the other hand, excessive activity may cause intravascular blood coagulation, thromboses and embolization. Most of the methods currently used for BCS monitoring suffer from the major disadvantage of being invasive. The purpose of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasonic methods for non-invasive registration of the early stages of blood coagulation processes in intensive flows. With this purpose, a special experimental set-up was designed, facilitating the simultaneous detection of optical and acoustic signals during the clotting process. It was shown that (i) as microemboli appear in the flow during the early stage of blood coagulation, the intensity of the Doppler signal increases twofold, and (ii) microemboli formation in the early stages of blood clotting always reveals itself through an acoustic contrast. Both of these effects are well defined, so we hope that they may be used for non-invasive BCS monitoring in clinical practice.

  11. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  12. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  13. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  14. Membrane coagulation bioreactor (MCBR) for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia-Yu; Liang, Heng; Li, Xing; You, Shi-jie; Tian, Sen; Li, Gui-bai

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a novel submerged ultrafiltration (UF) membrane coagulation bioreactor (MCBR) process was evaluated for drinking water treatment at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) as short as 0.5h. The MCBR performed well not only in the elimination of particulates and microorganisms, but also in almost complete nitrification and phosphate removal. As compared to membrane bioreactor (MBR), MCBR achieved much higher removal efficiencies of organic matter in terms of total organic carbon (TOC), permanganate index (COD(Mn)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV absorbance at 254nm (UV(254)), as well as corresponding trihalomethanes formation potential (THMFP) and haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP), due to polyaluminium chloride (PACl) coagulation in the bioreactor. However, the reduction of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) by MCBR was only 8.2% and 10.1% higher than that by MBR, indicating that biodegradable organic matter (BOM) was mainly removed through biodegradation. On the other hand, the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) of MCBR developed much lower than that of MBR, which implies that coagulation in the bioreactor could mitigate membrane fouling. It was also identified that the removal of organic matter was accomplished through the combination of three unit effects: rejection by UF, biodegradation by microorganism and coagulation by PACl. During filtration operation, a fouling layer was formed on the membranes surface of both MCBR and MBR, which functioned as a second membrane for further separating organic matter.

  15. Defective thrombus formation in mice lacking coagulation factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Renné, Thomas; Pozgajová, Miroslava; Grüner, Sabine; Schuh, Kai; Pauer, Hans-Ulrich; Burfeind, Peter; Gailani, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    Blood coagulation is thought to be initiated by plasma protease factor VIIa in complex with the membrane protein tissue factor. In contrast, coagulation factor XII (FXII)–mediated fibrin formation is not believed to play an important role for coagulation in vivo. We used FXII-deficient mice to study the contributions of FXII to thrombus formation in vivo. Intravital fluorescence microscopy and blood flow measurements in three distinct arterial beds revealed a severe defect in the formation and stabilization of platelet-rich occlusive thrombi. Although FXII-deficient mice do not experience spontaneous or excessive injury-related bleeding, they are protected against collagen- and epinephrine-induced thromboembolism. Infusion of human FXII into FXII-null mice restored injury-induced thrombus formation. These unexpected findings change the long-standing concept that the FXII-induced intrinsic coagulation pathway is not important for clotting in vivo. The results establish FXII as essential for thrombus formation, and identify FXII as a novel target for antithrombotic therapy. PMID:16009717

  16. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  17. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.; McCabe, C.W.

    1985-02-08

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radiofrequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery. 4 figs.

  18. The Inflammatory Actions of Coagulant and Fibrinolytic Proteases in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aside from their role in hemostasis, coagulant and fibrinolytic proteases are important mediators of inflammation in diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. The blood circulating zymogens of these proteases enter damaged tissue as a consequence of vascular leak or rupture to become activated and contribute to extravascular coagulation or fibrinolysis. The coagulants, factor Xa (FXa), factor VIIa (FVIIa), tissue factor, and thrombin, also evoke cell-mediated actions on structural cells (e.g., fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) or inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages) via the proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Plasmin, the principle enzymatic mediator of fibrinolysis, also forms toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) activating fibrin degradation products (FDPs) and can release latent-matrix bound growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Furthermore, the proteases that convert plasminogen into plasmin (e.g., urokinase plasminogen activator) evoke plasmin-independent proinflammatory actions involving coreceptor activation. Selectively targeting the receptor-mediated actions of hemostatic proteases is a strategy that may be used to treat inflammatory disease without the bleeding complications of conventional anticoagulant therapies. The mechanisms by which proteases of the coagulant and fibrinolytic systems contribute to extravascular inflammation in disease will be considered in this review. PMID:25878399

  19. Application performance of a new coagulant in wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Yanzheng; Lu, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption characteristics of poly-Al-Zn-Fe (PAZF), a polymerized coagulant containing three kinds of metallic elements prepared from a galvanized-aluminum slag, was analyzed by UV-visible spectrophotometry during its polymerization process. Pollutant removal by PAZF in treating various wastewaters was investigated, in comparison with that of polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results showed that PAZF can be applied to different wastewaters and had excellent coagulation behavior due to its special internal composition. Various complicated substances having different absorption wavelengths and polymeric properties were produced during the PAZF polymerization process, and the structures of these complicated substances were adjusted continuously with the increasing of the polymerization time. PAZF posed better turbidity and organic matter (chemical oxygen demand, COD(Cr)) removal than PAC for different wastewaters, and the required dosage of PAZF was far lower than that of PAC when achieving the same coagulation performance. For pharmaceutical, sugar, dyeing, simulated pesticide and landscape wastewaters, PAZF gave higher removal of turbidity or COD(Cr) than PAC, by up to 79.5% (coagulant dose: 74 mg/L) or 16% (148 mg/L), 13.4% (111 mg/L) or 10% (185 mg/L), 26.5% (148 mg/L) or 8.1% (18.5 mg/L), 40% (18.5 mg/L) or 13.4% (111 mg/L), and 5% (70 mg/L) or 5% (70 mg/L), respectively.

  20. [Breakage and regrowth of flocs coagulation with polyaluminum chloride (PACl)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Guo; Luan, Zhao-Kun; Zhao, Ying; Cui, Jian-Hua; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Li, Yan-Zhong

    2007-02-01

    The conventional jar test and the monitoring technique of floc size in line were employed to investigate the breakage and regrowth of the flocs formed by PACl. It was found that the breakage and regrowth of flocs varied with coagulation zones. The flocs formed in stabilization zone were of high strength and difficult to break, and could regrow better after broken, with the recovery factor of up to 259%. The flocs formed in charge neutralization zone were of the lowest strength and prone to break, but could reform completely after broken. The flocs formed in restabilization and sweep coagulation zones were also of high strength and difficult to break, but significantly irreversible after broken. The recovery factor of the broken flocs in sweep coagulation zone was only 18.6%. The effects of remixing on the breakage and regrowth of flocs increased with remixing intensity. In sweep coagulation zone, the settling height and mean settling velocity of the interface between flocs blanket and water were lower for the broken and partly reforming flocs than for those unbroken; Moreover, in flocculation settling and zone settling zones, the instantaneous settling velocity of the interface at the same flocs concentration was also lower for the broken flocs than for those unbroken, but in compression settling zone, the instantaneous settling velocity was the same whether the flocs were broken or not.

  1. Mathematical models of blood coagulation and platelet adhesion: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Panteleev, M A; Ananyeva, N M; Ataullakhanov, F I; Saenko, E L

    2007-01-01

    At present, computer-assisted molecular modeling and virtual screening have become effective and widely-used tools for drug design. However, a prerequisite for design and synthesis of a therapeutic agent is determination of a correct target in the metabolic system, which should be either inhibited or stimulated. Solution of this extremely complicated problem can also be assisted by computational methods. This review discusses the use of mathematical models of blood coagulation and platelet-mediated primary hemostasis and thrombosis as cost-effective and time-saving tools in research, clinical practice, and development of new therapeutic agents and biomaterials. We focus on four aspects of their application: 1) efficient diagnostics, i.e. theoretical interpretation of diagnostic data, including sensitivity of various clotting assays to the changes in the coagulation system; 2) elucidation of mechanisms of coagulation disorders (e.g. hemophilias and thrombophilias); 3) exploration of mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents (e.g. recombinant activated factor VII) and planning rational therapeutic strategy; 4) development of biomaterials with non-thrombogenic properties in the design of artificial organs and implantable devices. Accumulation of experimental knowledge about the blood coagulation system and about platelets, combined with impressive increase of computational power, promises rapid development of this field.

  2. A plasma proteolysis pathway comprising blood coagulation proteases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Li, Yun; Bhattacharya, Arup; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2016-07-05

    Coagulation factors are essential for hemostasis. Here, we show that these factors also team up to degrade plasma proteins that are unrelated to hemostasis. Prolidase, SRC and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42) are used as probes. Each probe, upon entering the blood circulation, binds and activates factor XII (FXII), triggering the intrinsic and common coagulation cascades, which in turn activate factor VII, a component of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. Activated factor VII (FVIIa) rapidly degrades the circulating probes. Therefore, FXII and FVIIa serve as the sensor/initiator and executioner, respectively, for the proteolysis pathway. Moreover, activation of this pathway by one probe leads to the degradation of all three probes. Significant activation of this pathway follows tissue injury and may also occur in other disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, of which Aβ1-42 is a key driver. However, enoxaparin, a clinically used anticoagulant, inhibits the proteolysis pathway and elevates plasma levels of the probes. Enoxaparin may also mitigate potential impact of activators of the proteolysis pathway on coagulation. Our results suggest that the proteolysis pathway is important for maintaining low levels of various plasma proteins. Our finding that enoxaparin inhibits this pathway provides a means to control it. Inhibition of this pathway may facilitate the development of disease biomarkers and protein therapeutics, e.g., plasma Aβ1-42 as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease or recombinant human prolidase as an antitumor agent.

  3. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radio-frequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery.

  4. Synthetic polyphosphate inhibits endogenous coagulation and platelet aggregation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Wan, Mengjie; Liang, Ting; Peng, Minyuan; Chen, Fangping

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-derived polyphosphate has previously been indicated to induce coagulation. However, industrially synthesized polyphosphate has been found to have different effects from those of the platelet-derived form. The present study investigated whether synthetic sodium polyphosphate inhibits coagulation using routine coagulation tests and thromboelastography. Synthetic polyphosphate was found to inhibit adenosine diphosphate-, epinephrine-, arachidonic acid-, ristocetin-, thrombin-, oxytocin- and pituitrin-induced platelet aggregation. The effects of synthetic polyphosphate in clotting inhibition were revealed by the analysis of clotting factor activity and platelet aggregation tests. Synthetic polyphosphate may inhibit platelet aggregation by reducing platelet calcium levels, as indicated by the results of flow cytometric analysis and high-throughput fluorescent screening. Furthermore, analysis of thromboxane (TX)B2 by ELISA indicated that synthetic polyphosphate reduces platelet aggregation by inhibiting the TXA2 signaling pathway. In conclusion, synthetic polyphosphate inhibits clotting factor activity and endogenous coagulation by reducing the levels of calcium ions and TXA2 to curb platelet aggregation. PMID:28123708

  5. Nanofiltration based water reclamation from tannery effluent following coagulation pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, J; Mondal, D; Chakraborty, S; Sikder, J; Curcio, S; Arafat, H A

    2015-11-01

    Coagulation-nanofiltration based integrated treatment scheme was employed in the present study to maximize the removal of toxic Cr(VI) species from tannery effluents. The coagulation pretreatment step using aluminium sulphate hexadecahydrate (alum) was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). A nanofiltration unit was integrated with this coagulation pre-treatment unit and the resulting flux decline and permeate quality were investigated. Herein, the coagulation was conducted under response surface-optimized operating conditions. The hybrid process demonstrated high chromium(VI) removal efficiency over 98%. Besides, fouling of two of the tested nanofiltration membranes (NF1 and NF3) was relatively mitigated after feed pretreatment. Nanofiltration permeation fluxes as high as 80-100L/m(2)h were thereby obtained. The resulting permeate stream quality post nanofiltration (NF3) was found to be suitable for effective reuse in tanneries, keeping the Cr(VI) concentration (0.13mg/L), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (65mg/L), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) (142mg/L), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) (108mg/L), Total Solids (TS) (86mg/L) and conductivity levels (14mho/cm) in perspective. The process water reclaiming ability of nanofiltration was thereby substantiated and the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid system was thus affirmed.

  6. Clinical and prognostic significance of coagulation assays in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Serilmez, Murat; Keskin, Serkan; Sen, Fatma; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2013-03-01

    Activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis is frequently encountered among cancer patients. Such tumors are supposed to be associated with higher risk of invasion, metastases and eventually worse outcome. The aim of this study is to explore the prognostic value of blood coagulation tests for lung cancer patients. The study comprised 110 lung cancer patients. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, aPTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels and platelet counts were evaluated. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between D-Dimer levels and histological subtypes of NSCLC, pointing an elevated plasma D-dimer level in squamous cell cancer (p = 0.035). Patients with extensive stage SCLC exhibited evidently higher levels of D-Dimer, INR and PLT (p = 0.037, p = 0.042, p = 0.04, respectively). Prolongation of PT and INR had statistically significant adverse effect on survival (p = 0.05 and p = 0.014, respectively). Although prolonged aPTT and high levels of D-dimer was associated with worse survival, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.117, p = 0.104). Multivariate analysis revealed INR as the sole independent prognostic variable among coagulation parameters (p = 0.05). In conclusion, elevation of PT and INR are associated with decreased survival in lung cancer patients.

  7. Blood coagulation and the risk of atherothrombosis: a complex relationship.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Henri Mh; van der Voort, Danielle; Ten Cate, Hugo

    2004-12-01

    The principles of Virchov's triad appear to be operational in atherothrombosis or arterial thrombosis: local flow changes and particularly vacular wall damage are the main pathophysiological elements. Furthermore, alterations in arterial blood composition are also involved although the specific role and importance of blood coagulation is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review we provide support for the hypothesis that activated blood coagulation is an essential determinant of the risk of atherothrombotic complications. We distinguish two phases in atherosclerosis: In the first phase, atherosclerosis develops under influence of "classical" risk factors, i.e. both genetic and acquired forces. While fibrinogen/fibrin molecules participate in early plaque lesions, increased activity of systemic coagulation is of no major influence on the risk of arterial thrombosis, except in rare cases where a number of specific procoagulant forces collide. Despite the presence of tissue factor - factor VII complex it is unlikely that all fibrin in the atherosclerotic plaque is the direct result from local clotting activity. The dominant effect of coagulation in this phase is anticoagulant, i.e. thrombin enhances protein C activation through its binding to endothelial thrombomodulin.The second phase is characterized by advancing atherosclerosis, with greater impact of inflammation as indicated by an elevated level of plasma C-reactive protein, the result of increased production influenced by interleukin-6. Inflammation overwhelms protective anticoagulant forces, which in itself may have become less efficient due to down regulation of thrombomodulin and endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) expression. In this phase, the inflammatory drive leads to recurrent induction of tissue factor and assembly of catalytic complexes on aggregated cells and on microparticles, maintaining a certain level of thrombin production and fibrin formation. In advanced atherosclerosis systemic and

  8. Non-Equilibrium Iron Clusters Coagulation and Thermal Decomposition at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskii, A. Yu.; Zaslonko, I. S.

    The fast thermal decomposition of Fe(CO)5 (1000-8000 ppm) behind reflected shock waves was used as source of iron atoms. The growth and decomposition of iron clusters was observed using light absorption technique at λ = 632.8 nm. The iron cluster formation was studied behind incident shock waves (T = 1200 — 2000 K, p = 5 — 50 bar) and cluster decomposition behind reflected shock waves (T = 2600 — 3000 K, p = 10 — 100 bar). The temperature and pressure dependencies of observable rate constants for iron cluster growth and thermal decomposition has been obtained. The experimental data were treated using master equation solution for the cluster size distribution function. The light absorption in the system is shown to depend on the total atoms amount in the clusters with n* < n < n **, were n* ~ 3 — 5, n** ~ 104. When coagulation time is rather small that the concentration of clusters with n > n** is negligible and concentration of small clusters (n < n*) permanently decreases, light absorption increase. After that number of atoms enclosed into the clusters with n* < n < n** became decreasing and the total light-absorption cross section decreases. So, observations of the absorption gives us an important information about streams through the particle size axes, and observable rate constant kobs = dln(D)/dt is a good parameter for the description of the kinetic behavior at the broad variations of temperature and pressure for an iron cluster ensemble.

  9. Interstitial laser coagulation for localized destruction of solid tumors: overview of strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hillegersberg, Richard

    1997-06-01

    Interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) is a new method of producing localized tissue destruction, that may be used to eliminate soli tumors, such as liver metastases, pancreatic carcinomas, brain glioma and benign prostate hyperplasia. In ILC, Nd:YAG laser light is guided through flexible quartz fibers implanted directly into the tumor. Several experimental studies have shown the effectiveness of this therapy. Clinical application is feasible, however success in malignant tumors is limited by: (1) the restricted lesion size produced by a single optical fiber and (2) the lack of reliable on-line monitoring of the laser-induced effects. Research is therefore directed towards the development of multiple fiber application, guided by real time feedback of the laser-tissue interaction.

  10. Purification, characterization and application of dual coagulants containing chitosan and different Al species in coagulation and ultrafiltration process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyu; Zhao, Shuang; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Song, Wen; Feng, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different Al species and chitosan (CS) dosages on coagulation performance, floc characteristics (floc sizes, strength and regrowth ability and fractal dimension) and membrane resistance in a coagulation-ultrafiltration hybrid process. Results showed that different Al species combined with humic acid in diverse ways. Ala had better removal efficiency, as determined by UV254 and dissolved organic carbon, which could be further improved by the addition of CS. In addition, the optimal dosage of different Al species was determined to be 4.0mg/L with the CS concentration of 1.0mg/L, by orthogonal coagulation experiments. Combining Ala/Alb/Alc with CS resulted in larger flocs, higher recovery, and higher fractal dimension values corresponding to denser flocs; in particular, the floc size at the steady state stage was four times larger than that obtained with Al species coagulants alone. The results of ultrafiltration experiments indicated that the external fouling percentage was significantly higher than that of internal fouling, at around 85% and 15%, respectively. In addition, the total membrane resistance was significantly decreased due to CS addition.

  11. Enhanced Coagulation-Flocculation Performance of Iron-Based Coagulants: Effects of PO43- and SiO32- Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Houkai; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhao, Chuanliang; Liao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    PO43- and SiO32- are often used as modifier to improve stability and aggregating ability of the iron-base coagulants, however, there are few reports about their detailed comparison between the coagulation performance and mechanisms. In this study, three coagulants—polyferric phosphoric sulfate (PFPS), polysilicon ferric sulfate (PFSS), and polyferric sulfate (PFS) were synthesized; their structure and morphology were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Alkali titration and Ferron species analysis were employed to investigate the hydrolysis performance and species distribution. Jar test was conducted to measure their coagulation behaviors at different dosage, pH, and temperatures in which the flocs properties were measured. The results showed that a number of new compounds were formed due to the presence of PO43- and SiO32-. Moreover, PFPS and PFSS had similar level in Fea as well as Feb. Among them, PFPS produced more multi-core iron atoms polymer and content of Feb, and the formed flocs were larger and denser. It exhibited superior coagulation performance in terms of turbidity reduction, UV254 removal and residual ferric concentration. Jar test and floc breakage/regrowth experiments indicated other than charge neutrality, the dominated mechanism involved in PFSS was the adsorption between polysilicic acid and solution particle, while PFPS was sweeping, entrapment/adsorption resulting from larger polymer colloid of Fe-P chemistry bond. PMID:26339902

  12. [Freshly frozen preserved plasma for the treatment of intravascular coagulation in polytraumatized patients].

    PubMed

    Hehne, H J; Nyman, D; Burri, H; Wolff, G

    1976-05-15

    Coagulation disorders in hemorrhagic shock need not represent an isolated intravascular coagulation. They may also occur as a complex of local disseminated intravascular consumption, extravascular consumption, dilution, and reduced synthesis of coagulation factors. In the severely bleeding patient with hemorrhagic diathesis heparin is contraindicated because it does not normalize coagulability. Therefore, it fails to stop hemorrhage and shock remains untreatable. Fresh frozen plasma, however, has proved to be suitable as simultaneous substitution therapy of coagulopathy and of hypovolemic shock. 11 patients suffering from traumatic-hemorrhagic shock associated with intravascular coagulation and hemorrhagic diathesis were successfully treated with fresh frozen plasma, after conventional shock therapy had failed over a period of hours.

  13. Coagulation sensors based on magnetostrictive delay lines for biomedical and chemical engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliaritsi, E.; Zoumpoulakis, L.; Simitzis, J.; Vassiliou, P.; Hristoforou, E.

    2006-04-01

    Coagulation sensors based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique are presented in this paper. They are based on magnetostrictive ribbons and are used for measuring the coagulation, curing or solidification time of different liquids. Experimental results indicate that the presented sensing elements can determine the blood coagulation with remarkable repeatability, thus allowing their use as blood coagulation sensors. Additionally, results indicate that they can also measure curing time of resins, solidification of fluids and coagulation of chemical substances, therefore allowing their implementation in chemical engineering applications.

  14. Plasmin-induced procoagulant effects in the blood coagulation: a crucial role of coagulation factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Kenichi; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Shima, Midori

    2010-09-01

    Plasminogen activators provide effective treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, paradoxical elevation of thrombin activity associated with failure of clot lysis and recurrent thrombosis has been reported. Generation of thrombin in these circumstances appears to be owing to plasmin (Plm)-induced activation of factor (F) XII. Plm catalyzes proteolysis of several coagulant factors, but the roles of these factors on Plm-mediated procoagulant activity remain to be determined. Recently developed global coagulation assays were used in this investigation. Rotational thromboelastometry using whole blood, clot waveform analysis and thrombin generation tests using plasma, showed that Plm (> or =125 nmol/l) shortened the clotting times in similar dose-dependent manners. In particular, the thrombin generation test, which was unaffected by products of fibrinolysis, revealed the enhanced coagulation with an approximately two-fold increase of peak level of thrombin generation. Studies using alpha2-antiplasmin-deficient plasma revealed that much lower dose of Plm (> or =16 nmol/l) actually contributed to enhancing thrombin generation. The shortening of clotting time could be observed even in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor, supporting that Plm exerted the procoagulant activity independently of FXII. In addition, using specific coagulation-deficient plasmas, the clot waveform analysis showed that Plm did not shorten the clotting time in only FV-deficient or FVIII-deficient plasma in prothrombin time-based or activated partial thromboplastin time-based assay, respectively. Our results indicated that Plm did possess procoagulant activity in the blood coagulation, and this effect was likely attributed by multicoagulation factors, dependent on FV and/or FVIII.

  15. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes.

  16. Effect of carryover of clot activators on coagulation tests during phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Fukugawa, Yoko; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Takahiro; Tanouchi, Ayako; Sano, Junko; Miyawaki, Haruko; Kishino, Tomonori; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Yoshino, Hideaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of clot activators carried over from the serum tube on major coagulation tests during phlebotomy. First, blood specimens from 30 normal subjects were mixed with small amounts of fluid containing clot activators, and their effects on various coagulation tests were determined. Only the value of fibrin monomer complex displayed a remarkable change when thrombin-containing fluid was added to the blood specimens. Subsequently, 100 paired blood specimens (taken from 75 healthy volunteers and 25 patients taking warfarin) were collected in coagulation tubes before and after the serum tube using standard phlebotomy procedures. Various coagulation tests were performed to determine the effect of contamination of thrombin-containing blood on coagulation parameters. Differences between the 2 tubes were minimal but significant for some of the coagulation tests. Therefore, we conclude that the effect of clot activators in the serum tube on coagulation tests is minimal when standard phlebotomy procedures are used.

  17. New method for detection of blood coagulation using fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediay, Sergey G.; Kuznetzov, Alexsey V.

    1991-07-01

    The detection of blood coagulation is very important in therapeutics and surgery. It is necessary to determine the overall time taken for blood clotting, production rate of thrombin, presence or absence of blood coagulation factors, etc. In this paper a new method for detection of blood coagulation is presented. This method is based on the fiber-optic sensor and allows for the study of different ways of blood clotting (such as blood coagulation and platelets aggregation) separately, thus enhancing the precision of determination. The method for determining the blood coagulation presented possesses high precision in monitoring the process of coagulation. An elaborate mathematical model of the process of blood coagulation has been developed to help the computer handle obtained data.

  18. Comparative assessment of water treatment using polymeric and inorganic coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Innocent K. M.; Chidya, Russel C. G.; Saka, John D. K.; Biswick, Timothy T.

    2016-06-01

    Portable water plays a vital role in improving human life, particularly in controlling the spread of diseases. However, problems associated with lack of potable water are still common especially in developing countries including Malawi. Until now little information exists on the effectiveness of available commercial coagulants used by national water boards in Malawi. Therefore, this study was undertaken in Southern Region Water Board (SRWB) to investigate the efficiency of polymeric coagulants (sufdfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s) in turbidity reduction comparative with inorganic coagulant (aluminium sulphate) at Zomba, Liwonde, Mangochi, Chikwawa and Mulanje Treatment plants. The jar test method was used to determine the effectiveness of the water coagulants. The results revealed that sudfloc 3850 was most effective in reducing turbidity at Mangochi (99.4 ± 0.06%) and Liwonde (97.2 ± 0.04%) using 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dose. The Zomba, Mulanje and Chikwawa plants gave 19.56 ± 0.03%, 29.23 ± 0.02% and 9.43 ± 0.02% total reductions respectively. Algaefloc 19s afforded the highest turbidity reduction at Liwonde and Mangochi plants (98.66 ± 0.06 and 97.48 ± 0.05% at a dose of 0.4 and 0.6 mg L-1 respectively), while Chikwawa provided the lowest (9.52 ± 0.01%). At the Zomba and Mulanje plants 20.5 ± 0.03% and 28.4 ± 0.04% reductions were obtained respectively. The inorganic flocculant, alum provided a 99.0 ± 0.05% and 98.6 ± 0.04% reduction at a dose of 4.0 mg L-1 and 6.0 mg L-1 at Zomba and Liwonde plants respectively. The lowest reductions in turbidity were achieved at Chikwawa (7.50 ± 0.01%), Mangochi (12.97 ± 0.02%) and Mulanje (25.00 ± 0.02). The best and optimum pH ranges for polymeric and inorganic coagulants were 7.20-7.80 and 7.35 to 7.57 respectively. The results further revealed that sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s achieved faster formation of heavy flocs than alum. At 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dosage sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s required ten times

  19. Peculiarities of coagulation action of IR lasers (1-3 um) radiation on cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Yuri D.; Boiko, Ernest V.; Volkov, Venjamin V.; Danilichev, Vladimir F.; Ganin, Dmitry V.; Gatzu, Andrey F.; Smirnov, Nicolay N.; Lazo, Victor V.; Tkachuk, Alexandra M.

    1996-04-01

    Antiviral, antibacterial, antitumoral effects of laser coagulation are now of great importance in clinical ophthalmology for different corneal diseases treatment. One can note, that nowadays solid-state free-mode pulsed near-and-mid-infrared lasers with the 1.3 - 3.0 micrometers wavelengths may become widespreadly accepted in this field of ophthalmosurgery. The corneal tissue absorption coefficients for these wavelengths are lying from some parts to several thousand cm-1. Thus, by proper selection of laser wavelength, possibility is appeared to coagulate precisely the seat of pathological alterations without damaging of more deeper, non changed corneal tissue. In our work the comparative experimental study results of rabbit cornea coagulation after exposure with using of different IR lasers (with 1.32; 1.54; 1.96; 2.09 and 2.84 micrometers wavelengths) are presented. Pulse duration was about 10-3 s. The subthreshold, threshold and superthreshold energy levels were studied. Threshold energies were registered if slightly noticed coagulative changes appeared in exposed volume of corneal tissue. The cornea response resulting from laser radiation exposure was evaluated by clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy, light microscopy, fluorescent staining and biochemistry. For all wavelengths initial damage was found within the cornea layers. Superthreshold injury revealed the same picture except that for 1.32 micrometers the threefold increase of the threshold energy caused additionally iris injury. The damages of the cornea were marked near the surface, stretched to more deeper layers, and damage zones were extended from the epithelium for 2.84 micrometers wavelength to whole cornea thickness for 1.32 and 1.54 micrometers wavelengths and have intermediate position for 1.96 and 2.09 micrometers wavelengths, depending on the corneal absorption coefficient. Quantitative results of threshold energy levels were calculated by probit-analysis. The radiant exposure (HD50

  20. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  1. Nucleation and particle coagulation experiments in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the conditions under which carbon, aluminum oxide, and silicon carbide smokes condense and of the morphology and crystal structure of the resulting grains are essential if the nature of the materials ejected into the interstellar medium and the nature of the grains which eventually became part of the proto solar nebular are to be understood. Little information is currently available on the vapor-solid phase transitions of refractory metals and solids. What little experimental data do exist are, however, not in agreement with currently accepted models of the nucleation process for more volatile materials. The major obstacle to performing such experiments in earth-based laboratories is the susceptibility of these systems to convection. Evaporation of refractory materials into a low-pressure environment with a carefully controlled temperature gradient will produce refractory smokes when the critical supersaturation of the system is exceeded. Measurement of the point at which nucleation occurs, via light scattering or extinction, can not only yield nucleation data but also, information on the chemical composition and crystal structure of the condensate. Experimental requirements are presented.

  2. Towards in vivo laser coagulation and concurrent optical coherence tomography through double-clad fiber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudette, Kathy; Lo, William; Villiger, Martin; Shishkov, Milen; Godbout, Nicolas; Bouma, Brett E.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    There is a strong clinical need for an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of delivering concurrent coagulation light enabling image-guided dynamic laser marking for targeted collection of biopsies, as opposed to a random sampling, to reduce false-negative findings. Here, we present a system based on double-clad fiber (DCF) capable of delivering pulsed laser light through the inner cladding while performing OCT through the core. A previously clinically validated commercial OCT system (NVisionVLE, Ninepoint Medical) was adapted to enable in vivo esophageal image-guided dynamic laser marking. An optimized DCF coupler was implemented into the system to couple both modalities into the DCF. A DCF-based rotary joint was used to couple light to the spinning DCF-based catheter for helical scanning. DCF-based OCT catheters, providing a beam waist diameter of 62μm at a working distance of 9.3mm, for use with a 17-mm diameter balloon sheath, were used for ex vivo imaging of a swine esophagus. Imaging results using the DCF-based clinical system show an image quality comparable with a conventional system with minimal crosstalk-induced artifacts. To further optimize DCF catheter optical design in order to achieve single-pulse marking, a Zemax model of the DCF output and its validation are presented.

  3. [The coagulation characteristics of human oxyhemoglobin in the presence of a mercury (II) ion in a neutral phosphate buffer].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L D; Myshkin, A E

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of human oxyhemoglobin coagulation in neutral phosphate buffer in the presence of mercury acetate at 20 degrees has been studied using turbidimetric methods. The addition of small amounts of concentrated Hg2+ solution leads to rapid local protein coagulation with subsequent dissolution of the formed coagulate. Coagulation can be inhibited by addition of Tris that binds to mercury ions. The pattern of oxyhemoglobin coagulation is determined by molar Hg2+/protein ration rather than by total Hg2+ concentration.

  4. The vulnerable blood. Coagulation and clot structure in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hess, K

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While arteriosclerotic lesions have long been recognized as the underlying cause more recent studies suggest that alterations of the blood are also critically involved. Following plaque rupture, adherence of platelets is followed by the formation of a cross-linked fibrin clot. Patients with diabetes exhibit a prothrombotic milieu consisting of hyper reactive platelets, a tight and rigid clot structure which is due to up-regulation of coagulation factors and prolongation of clot lysis. Metabolic alterations as well as inflammatory processes, which are up-regulated in diabetes, are thought to be the main underlying causes. More recently, the complement cascade has emerged as a potential new player in this context with several complement components directly influencing both platelet function and coagulation. This review provides an overview concerning the changes that lead to alterations of platelet function and clot structure in diabetes.

  5. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  6. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  7. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    DeVille, R.E.L.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2011-09-20

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangian trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.

  8. Coagulation changes following traumatic brain injury and shock.

    PubMed

    Sillesen, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In these studies, we have shown that coagulation and innate immunity pathways respond to trauma within minutes. Furthermore, the appearance of dysfunction of platelets as well as activation of the endothelium is rapidly manifested. Interestingly, many of these changes were attenuated by treatment with valproic acid (VPA). These most notably included coagulation and endothelial activation as well as platelet dysfunction. These results add to the growing body of evidence indicating a protective effect of VPA following trauma, and suggests that this may in part be mediated through an attenuation of the above-mentioned pathways. Furthermore, these results indicate that VPA treatment may be effective in other pathological settings such as coagulopathy following trauma or sepsis.

  9. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  10. Coagulation assessment by rotation thrombelastometry in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Huissoud, Cyril; Carrabin, Nicolas; Benchaib, Mehdi; Fontaine, Oriane; Levrat, Albrice; Massignon, Denis; Touzet, Sandrine; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Berland, Michel

    2009-04-01

    We analysed changes in coagulation during normal pregnancy with a novel point-of-care device based on thrombelastometry (ROTEM). We compared the results obtained with those of standard coagulation tests in 104 patients: 20 non-pregnant women (controls) and 84 women in the first (T1, n = 17), second (T2, n = 9) and third (T3, n = 58) trimesters of pregnancy. We measured the clotting time (CT), the maximum clot firmness (MCF), the early clot amplitude at 5 and 15 minutes (CA(5), CA(15)) and the clot lysis index (CLI(30)) with four tests containing specific reagents. (a) The INTEM test involving ellagic acid activated the intrinsic pathway and (b) the EXTEM test using tissue factor triggered the extrinsic pathway; (c) The FIBTEM test based on a platelet inhibitor (cytochalasin D) evaluated the contribution of fibrinogen to clot formation and (d) the APTEM test was similar to the EXTEM but was based on inhibition in vitro of fibrinolysis by aprotinin. CT and CLI(30) were not significantly modified during pregnancy whereas MCF, CA(5) and CA(15) (INTEM, EXTEM, FIBTEM) increased significantly between the second and third trimesters (e.g. median [interquartile range]: MCF-FIBTEM, 13 [11-16] mm vs. 19 [17-23] mm, respectively, in controls and T3, p < 0.001). EXTEM values were not significantly different from those measured with APTEM. There were significant correlations between the results obtained with ROTEM and those from standard coagulation tests. ROTEM analysis showed a marked increase in coagulability during normal pregnancy. ROTEM values may serve as the basis for future studies in pregnant women.

  11. Development of the selective coagulation process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  12. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  13. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Torsten G.; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit. PMID:25309880

  14. Coagulation Changes During Graded Orhostatic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Cvirn, Gerhard; Schlagenhauf, Aaxel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Roessler, Andreas; Jantscher, Andreas; Waha, James Elvis; Wolf, Sabine; Vrecko, Karoline; Juergens, Guenther; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    Background: Orthostatic stress has been introduced as a novel paradigm for activating the coagulation system. We examined whether graded orthostatic stress (using head up tilt, HUT + lower body negative pressure, LBNP) until presyncope leads to anti / pro-coagulatory changes and how rapidly they return to baseline during recovery. Methodology: Eight male subjects were enrolled in this study. Presyncopal runs were carried out using HUT + LBNP. At minute zero, the tilt table was brought from 0° (supine) to 70 ° head-up position for 4 min, after which pressure in the LBNP chamber was reduced to -15, -30, and -45 mm Hg every 4 min. At presyncope, the subjects were returned to supine position. Coagulatory responses and plasma mass density (for volume changes) were measured before, during and 20 min after the orthostatic stress. Whole blood coagulation was examined by means of thrombelastometry. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was examined by using impedance aggregometry. Thrombin generation parameters, prothrombin levels, and markers of endothelial activation were measured in plasma samples. Results: At presyncope, plasma volume was 20 % below the initial supine value. Blood cell counts, prothrombin levels, thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) levels increased during the protocol, commensurate with hemoconcentration. The markers of endothelial activation (tissue factor, TF, tissue plasminogen activator, t-PA) and the markers of thrombin generation (Prothrombin fragments 1 and 2, F1+2, and thrombin-antithrombin complex, TAT) increased significantly. During recovery, all the coagulation parameters returned to initial supine values except F1 +2 and TAT. Conclusion: Head-up tilt/LBNP leads to activation of the coagulation system. Some of the markers of thrombin formation are still at higher than supine levels during recovery.

  15. Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Moss, Jonathan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients who undergo surgery appear to use dietary supplements significantly more frequently than the general population. Because they contain pharmacologically active compounds, dietary supplements may affect coagulation and platelet function during the perioperative period through direct effects, pharmacodynamic interactions, and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, in this regard, limited studies have been conducted that address the pharmacological interactions of dietary supplements. To avoid possible bleeding risks during surgery, information of potential complications of dietary supplements during perioperative management is important for physicians. Methods Through a systematic database search of all available years, articles were identified in this review if they included dietary supplements and coagulation/platelet function, while special attention was paid to studies published after 1990. Results Safety concerns are reported in commercially available dietary supplements. Effects of the most commonly used natural products on blood coagulation and platelet function are systematically reviewed, including 11 herbal medicines (echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and valerian) and 4 other dietary supplements (coenzyme Q10, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, fish oil, and vitamins). Bleeding risks of garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and fish oil are reported. Cardiovascular instability was observed with ephedra, ginseng, and kava. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between dietary supplements and drugs used in the perioperative period are discussed. Conclusions To prevent potential problems associated with the use of dietary supplements, physicians should be familiar with the perioperative effects of commonly used dietary supplements. Since the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation and platelet function are difficult to

  16. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenschilling, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  17. Blood coagulation activation and fibrinolysis during a downhill marathon run.

    PubMed

    Sumann, Günther; Fries, Dietmar; Griesmacher, Andrea; Falkensammer, Gerda; Klingler, Anton; Koller, Arnold; Streif, Werner; Greie, Sven; Schobersberger, Beatrix; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Prolonged physical exercise is associated with multiple changes in blood hemostasis. Eccentric muscle activation induces microtrauma of skeletal muscles, inducing an inflammatory response. Since there is a link between inflammation and coagulation we speculated that downhill running strongly activates the coagulation system. Thirteen volunteers participated in the Tyrolean Speed Marathon (42,195 m downhill race, 795 m vertical distance). Venous blood was collected 3 days (T1) and 3 h (T2) before the run, within 30 min after finishing (T3) and 1 day thereafter (T4). We measured the following key parameters: creatine kinase, myoglobin, thrombin-antithrombin complex, prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, D-dimer, plasmin-alpha(2)-antiplasmin complexes, tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen, plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 antigen and thrombelastography with ROTEM [intrinsic pathway (InTEM) clotting time, clot formation time, maximum clot firmness, alpha angle]. Thrombin generation was evaluated by the Thrombin Dynamic Test and the Technothrombin TGA test. Creatine kinase and myoglobin were elevated at T3 and further increased at T4. Thrombin-antithrombin complex, prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, D-dimer, plasmin-alpha(2)-antiplasmin complexes, tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 antigen were significantly increased at T3. ROTEM analysis exhibited a shortening of InTEM clotting time and clot formation time after the marathon, and an increase in InTEM maximum clot firmness and alpha angle. Changes in TGA were indicative for thrombin generation after the marathon. We demonstrated that a downhill marathon induces an activation of coagulation, as measured by specific parameters for coagulation, ROTEM and thrombin generation assays. These changes were paralleled by an activation of fibrinolysis indicating a preserved hemostatic balance.

  18. Effect of microparticulated whey proteins on milk coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; Varotto, A; De Marchi, M

    2014-11-01

    The enhancement of milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the reuse of whey produced by the dairy industry are of great interest to improve the efficiency of the cheese-making process. Native whey proteins (WP) can be aggregated and denatured to obtain colloidal microparticulated WP (MWP). The objective of this study was to assess the effect of MWP on MCP; namely, rennet coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time, and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition. Six concentrations of MWP (vol/vol; 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0%) were added to 3 bulk milk samples (collected and analyzed during 3 d), and a sample without MWP was used as control. Within each day of analysis, 6 replicates of MCP for each treatment were obtained, changing the position of the treatment in the rack. For control samples, 2 replicates per day were performed. In addition to MCP, WP fractions were measured on each treatment during the 3 d of analysis. Milk coagulation properties were measured on 144 samples by using a Formagraph (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark). Increasing the amount of MWP added to milk led to a longer RCT. In particular, significant differences were found between RCT of the control samples (13.5 min) and RCT of samples with 3.0% (14.6 min) or more MWP. A similar trend was observed for curd-firming time, which was shortest in the control samples and longest in samples with 9.0% MWP (21.4 min). No significant differences were detected for curd firmness at 30 min across concentrations of MWP. Adjustments in cheese processing should be made when recycling MWP, in particular during the coagulation process, by prolonging the time of rennet activity before cutting the curd.

  19. Two distinct forms of Factor VIII coagulant protein in human plasma. Cleavage by thrombin, and differences in coagulant activity and association with von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E

    1984-01-01

    We have characterized Factor VIII coagulant protein, present in normal human plasma, that reacts with a specific human 125I-labeled anti-human VIII:C antigen Fab antibody fragment. Two major Factor VIII coagulant antigen populations were present. The first, approximately 85% of the total antigen, was bound to von Willebrand factor and when tested in a standard one-stage assay had Factor VIII coagulant activity. The second antigenic population, eluting near fibrinogen when plasma was gel filtered, was not bound to von Willebrand protein, did not have Factor VIII coagulant activity unless activated, but did block anti-VIII:C Fab neutralization of clotting activity. The two antigenic populations were separable by cryoprecipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis. Although the two antigenic populations differed in their Factor VIII coagulant activity and in their binding to von Willebrand factor, the principal member of both populations is of mol wt 2.4 X 10(5). Both antigens, when proteolyzed by thrombin, were quickly converted to a 1 X 10(5)-mol wt form in association with the appearance of VIII:C activity. The 1 X 10(5)-mol wt antigen was further slowly degraded to an 8 X 10(4)-mol wt form while Factor VIII coagulant activity declined. These results demonstrate the presence of an inactive Factor VIII coagulant protein in plasma, not associated with von Willebrand factor, that can react with thrombin to yield Factor VIII coagulant activity. Images PMID:6421875

  20. Effect of second coagulant addition on coagulation efficiency, floc properties and residual Al for humic acid treatment by Al13 polymer and polyaluminum chloride (PACl).

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiying; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Ren, Haijing

    2012-05-15

    Influence of second dose on coagulation efficiency, floc re-growth, fractal structure and residual Al of the effluent in humic acid (HA) coagulation with Al(13) polymer ([Al(13)O(4)(OH)(24)(H(2)O)(12)](7+)) and PACl were comparatively investigated in this study. Effects of breakage shear on the floc properties generated in the coagulation with and without additional dose were also investigated. The results indicated that additional dose during breakage could essentially improve the HA removal efficiency and floc re-growth in both Al(13) and PACl coagulations. Second doses of Al(13) at 0.5 and 1.0mg/L resulted in better turbidity and UV(254) removal as well as floc re-growth rather than higher additional dose of 1.5 and 2.0mg/L; while in PACl coagulation, more efficient HA removal and better floc re-growth were obtained at higher additional doses (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mg/L). Small additional Al(13) could apparently increase the D(f) of re-formed flocs while the additional PACl displayed inconspicuous effect on floc D(f). The additional coagulant dose could alleviate the further decrease of re-grown floc size with increased breakage shear for both coagulants. The residual Al analysis implied that two-stage addition contributed to lower residual Al in effluent than one-time addition mode with the same total coagulant concentration.

  1. Slaughterhouse wastewater treatment by combined chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos; Farzadkia, Mehdi; Ownagh, Kamal Aldin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Slaughterhouse wastewater contains various and high amounts of organic matter (e.g., proteins, blood, fat and lard). In order to produce an effluent suitable for stream discharge, chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation techniques have been particularly explored at the laboratory pilot scale for organic compounds removal from slaughterhouse effluent. The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of treating cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater by combined chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation process to achieve the required standards. The influence of the operating variables such as coagulant dose, electrical potential and reaction time on the removal efficiencies of major pollutants was determined. The rate of removal of pollutants linearly increased with increasing doses of PACl and applied voltage. COD and BOD(5) removal of more than 99% was obtained by adding 100 mg/L PACl and applied voltage 40 V. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of chemical and electrochemical techniques for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters. Consequently, combined processes are inferred to be superior to electrocoagulation alone for the removal of both organic and inorganic compounds from cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater.

  2. Hereditary blood coagulation disorders: management and dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moreno, G; Cutando-Soriano, A; Arana, C; Scully, C

    2005-11-01

    Patients with hereditary hemostatic disorders, characterized by a tendency to bleeding or thrombosis, constitute a serious challenge in the dental practice. Advances in the medical diagnosis of hemostatic disorders have exposed dental professionals to new patients not amenable to the application of the management protocols associated with other, more well-known, disorders. It is the aim of this paper to review the evidence, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest management regimens for patients with hereditary hemostatic disorders. An extensive review has been made (PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, etc.) of literature pertaining to hereditary disorders affecting blood coagulation factors and how they affect the practice of dentistry. Several aspects relating to the care of such patients must be recognized and taken into consideration when dental treatment is planned. Replacement of deficient coagulation factors ensures that safe dental treatment will be carried out. However, the half-life of such coagulation factors requires that dental treatment be specifically planned and adapted to the type of pathology involved.

  3. Colon and pancreas tumors enhance coagulation: role of hemeoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Nfonsam, Valentine N; Matika, Ryan W; Ong, Evan S; Jie, Tun; Warneke, James A; Steinbrenner, Evangelina B

    2014-07-01

    Colon and pancreatic cancer are associated with significant thrombophilia. Colon and pancreas tumor cells have an increase in hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) activity, the endogenous enzyme responsible for carbon monoxide production. Given that carbon monoxide enhances plasmatic coagulation, we determined if patients undergoing resection of colon and pancreatic tumors had an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide and plasmatic hypercoagulability. Patients with colon (n = 17) and pancreatic (n = 10) tumors were studied. Carbon monoxide was determined by the measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). A thrombelastographic method to assess plasma coagulation kinetics and formation of carboxyhemefibrinogen (COHF) was utilized. Nonsmoking patients with colon and pancreatic tumors had abnormally increased COHb concentrations of 1.4 ± 0.9 and 1.9 ± 0.7%, respectively, indicative of HO-1 upregulation. Coagulation analyses comparing both tumor groups demonstrated no significant differences in any parameter; thus the data were combined for the tumor groups for comparison with 95% confidence interval values obtained from normal individuals (n = 30) plasma. Seventy percent of tumor patients had a velocity of clot formation greater than the 95% confidence interval value of normal individuals, with 53% of this hypercoagulable group also having COHF formation. Further, 67% of tumor patients had clot strength that exceeded the normal 95% confidence interval value, and 56% of this subgroup had COHF formation. Finally, 63% of all tumor patients had COHF formation. Future investigation of HO-1-derived carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of colon and pancreatic tumor-related thrombophilia is warranted.

  4. Breaking boundaries—coagulation and fibrinolysis at the neurovascular interface

    PubMed Central

    Bardehle, Sophia; Rafalski, Victoria A.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Blood proteins at the neurovascular unit (NVU) are emerging as important molecular determinants of communication between the brain and the immune system. Over the past two decades, roles for the plasminogen activation (PA)/plasmin system in fibrinolysis have been extended from peripheral dissolution of blood clots to the regulation of central nervous system (CNS) functions in physiology and disease. In this review, we discuss how fibrin and its proteolytic degradation affect neuroinflammatory, degenerative and repair processes. In particular, we focus on novel functions of fibrin—the final product of the coagulation cascade and the main substrate of plasmin—in the activation of immune responses and trafficking of immune cells into the brain. We also comment on the suitability of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems as potential biomarkers and drug targets in diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and stroke. Studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as major molecular pathways that regulate cellular functions at the NVU has the potential to lead to the development of novel strategies for the detection and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:26441525

  5. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation: factors V and X

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Vincenzo; Lettino, Maddalena

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries and antithrombotic treatment is nowadays widely used. Drugs able to reduce coagulation activation are the treatment of choice for a number of arterial and/or venous thromboembolic conditions. Some of the drugs currently used for this purpose, such as heparins (UFH or LMWH) and VKA, have limitations consisting of a narrow therapeutic window and an unpredictable response with the need of laboratory monitoring in order to assess their efficacy and safety. These drawbacks have stimulated an active research aimed to develop new drugs able to act on single factors involved in the coagulation network, with predictable response. Intense experimental and clinical work on new drugs has focused on synthetic agents, which could preferably be administered orally and at fixed doses. The most advanced clinical development with new anticoagulants has been achieved for those inhibiting FXa and some of them, like fondaparinux, are already currently used in clinical practice. Other agents, such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, otamixaban and edoxaban are under development and have already been studied or are currently under investigation in large scale phase III clinical trials for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndromes. Some of them have proved to be more effective than conventional therapy. Data on some agents inhibiting FVa are still preliminary and some of these drugs have so far been considered only in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to sepsis. PMID:21545479

  6. Kinetic Modeling of Oxidative Coagulation for Arsenic Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Wook; Kramer, Timothy A.

    2004-03-31

    A model of oxidative coagulation consisting of Fenton's reagent (Fe(II)/H2O2 at pH 7.0) was established. The optimum condition was found when the mole ratio of As(III):H2O2:Fe(II)=1:15:20. In this optimum condition, all of Fe(II) was converted to HFO (am-Fe(OH)3) and precipitated to be used as the oxidized arsenic(V) adsorbent and particle coagulant. Two sorption models consisting of a surface complexation model and a kinetic model were developed and coupled. Using the coupled sorption model, the kinetics of HFO surface charge/potential during As(V) sorption was calculated. Further, during arsenic sorption, the colloid stability kinetics resulting from the perikinetic coagulation mechanism was calculated by considering interparticle forces. Colloid surface potential was decreased from 60 mv to 12 mv in proportion to the amount of arsenic adsorbed onto HFO and this surface potential directly affected the colloid stability (collision efficiency).

  7. Slaughterhouse Wastewater Treatment by Combined Chemical Coagulation and Electrocoagulation Process

    PubMed Central

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos; Farzadkia, Mehdi; Ownagh, Kamal Aldin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Slaughterhouse wastewater contains various and high amounts of organic matter (e.g., proteins, blood, fat and lard). In order to produce an effluent suitable for stream discharge, chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation techniques have been particularly explored at the laboratory pilot scale for organic compounds removal from slaughterhouse effluent. The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of treating cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater by combined chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation process to achieve the required standards. The influence of the operating variables such as coagulant dose, electrical potential and reaction time on the removal efficiencies of major pollutants was determined. The rate of removal of pollutants linearly increased with increasing doses of PACl and applied voltage. COD and BOD5 removal of more than 99% was obtained by adding 100 mg/L PACl and applied voltage 40 V. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of chemical and electrochemical techniques for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters. Consequently, combined processes are inferred to be superior to electrocoagulation alone for the removal of both organic and inorganic compounds from cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater. PMID:22768233

  8. COAGULATION PARAMETERS IN THE AMERICAN FLAMINGO (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER).

    PubMed

    Gardhouse, Sara; Eshar, David; Beaufrère, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    American flamingos ( Phoenicopterus ruber ) are commonly kept in zoologic collections. When presented to veterinarians in states of health and illness, evaluation of selected coagulation parameters can aid in assessment of various coagulopathies, as well as other disease processes such as septicemia, vasculitis, and hepatic disease. Sixteen American flamingos (eight males, eight females) were presented for annual health evaluations. A blood sample was collected from the medial metatarsal vein, and prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, and fibrin degradation products (FDPs) were evaluated using an automated hemostasis analyzer. Results were reported as median and range (minimum-maximum): PT = 72.7 (39 to >100 sec), APTT = 97.5 (6.1 to >200 sec), fibrinogen = 184 (138-364 mg/dl), and FDPs = <5 (<5 to >20 μg/ml). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of coagulation parameters in American flamingos. Knowledge of coagulation parameters will allow for better clinical assessment and management of American flamingos.

  9. Trombocytopenia: one of the markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Hugo

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complication of a variety of severe underlying diseases and a contributing factor in multi-organ failure and death. DIC is diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings (organ failure, bleeding) and laboratory abnormalities. The laboratory data include (repeated) measurements of platelet count and global clotting tests, to which more specific and sensitive tests for activated coagulation are added. The focus of this paper is on thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 103/microl) as a marker in DIC. First, in patients with suspected DIC it is imperative to consider alternative causes of thrombocytopenia,such as related to heparin use (heparin induced thrombocytopenia II) or thrombocytopenic purpura. Second, the observation of thrombocytopenia in relation to DIC should be interpreted as a marker of advanced or overt DIC and not as an early indicator. According to recommended guidelines measurements of platelet counts should always be coupled to a panel of coagulation markers and not be used as single marker of DIC (or other syndromes). In general, thrombocytopenia should not trigger platelet transfusions except in patients with severe bleeding complications.

  10. Coagulation for removal of humic materials from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, S.; Benefield, L.; Jenkins, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of powdered activated carbon and alum-polyelectrolyte coagulation was evaluated to determine its effectiveness in reducing the color-causing organics in a highly colored synthetic groundwater. These organics have been shown to be the precursors for trihalomethane formation in chlorinated drinking waters. Using a series of jar tests, an optimum pH range for hydroxylated aromatics removal using alum-polyelectrolyte coagulation was found to occur near a pH of 5.0. For this pH a relationship between initial hydroxylated aromatics concentration per mg/L alum added and residual hydroxylated aromatics concentration was developd. A ratio value of less than 0.05 was found to be required to reduce the hydroxylated aromatics concentration below 1 mg/L. The use of powdered activated carbon as a modification to the conventional coagulation process was found to be ineffective for this synthetic groundwater. Less than a 5% reduction in hydroxylated aromatics was realized at a powdered activated carbon dosage of 300 mg/L.

  11. Crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation: the lessons of sepsis.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel

    2012-09-01

    Sepsis results in the concurrent activation of inflammatory and procoagulant pathways. Bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines trigger the coagulation system primarily via induction of tissue factor. During sepsis, activation of coagulation is accompanied by impaired function of major anticoagulant mechanisms, including antithrombin, the protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease activated receptors (PARs) form the molecular connection between coagulation and inflammation, and especially PAR1 seems to play an eminent role in sepsis pathogenesis. Activated protein C (APC) can cleave PAR1 when associated with either the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or CD11b/CD18, resulting in broad cytoprotective effects mediated by sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P1). In contrast, activation of PAR1 by high dose thrombin results in barrier disruptive effects in endothelial cells via an S1P3 dependent mechanism. Recombinant APC protects against mortality in experimental endotoxemia and sepsis by effects that can be mediated by either EPCR - PAR1 dependent (endothelial cells, dendritic cells) or CD11b/CD18 - PAR1 dependent (macrophages) mechanisms. These protective APC effects do not rely on the anticoagulant properties of this protein. APC mutants that lack anticoagulant properties but retain the capacity to activate PAR1 are promising new drugs for sepsis treatment.

  12. Coagulation on biomaterials in flowing blood: some theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D; Sefton, M V; Baldwin, S A

    1997-12-01

    Are truly inert biomaterials feasible? Recent mathematical models of coagulation which are reviewed here suggest that such materials are impossible. This conclusion, which is certainly consistent with our collective experimental evidence, arises from the calculation that conversion of Factor XI to XIa never drops to zero even at the highest flow rates and with virtually no Factor XIIa bound to a surface. Residual amounts of XIa are still formed which can in principle kick-off the coagulation cascade. Furthermore, if the flow rates and corresponding mass transfer coefficients are low and in spite of these near-vanishing levels of the initiating coagulants, the surprising result is that substantial amounts of thrombin are produced. On the contrary, under slightly higher flow conditions, there can be more substantial levels of initiating coagulants, yet paradoxically thrombin production is near zero. This article presents a theoretical understanding of the events which take place during the interaction of biomaterials with flowing blood. We follow these events from the time of first contact to the final production of thrombin. The effect of flow and surface activity on the contact phase reactions is examined in detail and the two are found to be intertwined. The common pathway is also examined and here the main feature is the existence of three flow dependent regions which produce either high or very low levels of thrombin, as well as multiple thrombin steady states. In a final analysis we link the two segments of the cascade and consider the events which result. In addition, we note that multiple steady states arise only in the presence of two (thrombin) feedback loops. Single loops or the bare cascade will produce only single steady states. With some imagination one can attribute to the feedback loops the role of providing the cascade with a mechanism to produce high thrombin levels in case of acute need (e.g. bleeding) or to allow levels to subside to 'stand

  13. Stability, sterility, coagulation, and immunologic studies of salmon coagulation proteins with potential use for mammalian wound healing and cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Laidmäe, Ivo; McCormick, Margaret E; Herod, Julia L; Pastore, Jennifer J; Salum, Tiit; Sawyer, Evelyn S; Janmey, Paul A; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-12-01

    Fibrin sealants made by polymerization of fibrinogen activated by the protease thrombin have many applications in hemostasis and wound healing. In treatments of acute injury or surgical wounds, concentrated fibrin preparations mimic the initial matrix that normally prevents bleeding and acts as a scaffold for cells that initiate tissue repair. However risks of infectious disease, immunogenic reaction, and the high cost of purified human or other mammalian blood proteins limit widespread use of these materials. Purified coagulation proteins from Atlantic salmon represent a potentially safer, equally effective, and less costly alternative in part because of the low ambient temperature of these farmed animals and the absence of endogenous agents known to be infectious in mammalian hosts. This study reports rheologic measurements of lyophilized salmon fibrinogen and thrombin that demonstrate stability to prolonged storage and gamma irradiation sufficient to reduce viral loads by over five orders of magnitude. Coagulation and immunologic studies in rats and rabbits treated intraperitoneally with salmon fibrin show no deleterious effects on coagulation profiles and no cross reactivity with host fibrinogen or thrombin. The results support the potential of salmon fibrin as an alternative to mammalian proteins in clinical applications.

  14. Interference in coagulation testing: focus on spurious hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2013-04-01

    The chance that errors might jeopardize the quality of testing is inherently present throughout the total testing process, especially in the preanalytical phase. In the coagulation laboratory, as well as in other areas of diagnostic testing, spurious hemolysis, icteria, and lipemia in test samples represent by far the leading diagnostic challenges. Interference in hemostasis testing due to spurious hemolysis is attributed to both analytical and biologic elements, namely high absorbance of cell-free hemoglobin at wavelengths used by optical instrumentation and release of both cytoplasmatic and plasma membrane molecules (e.g., tissue factor, proteases, phospholipids, and ADP) that can spuriously activate blood coagulation and platelets. The interference attributable to hyperbilirubinemia is mostly due to spectral overlap, whereas that of hypertriglyceridemia mainly reflects elements of light scatter and volume displacement as well as direct interference of lipid particles with hemostasis. In practical terms, spurious hemolysis reflects a more generalized process of endothelial and blood cell damage, so that test results on spuriously hemolyzed specimens should be systematically suppressed. The bias attributable to hyperbilirubinemia is less significant using modern coagulometers equipped with dedicated wavelengths (i.e., with readings at 650 nm or above), so that test results in samples with a bilirubin concentration up to 20 mg/dL can still be analytically reliable. The interference observed in lipemic samples is most evident with readings using wavelengths lower than 500 nm and can hence be prevented with readings at 650 nm or above, and/or using higher dilutions of the test sample, or can be abated in high hypertriglyceridemic specimens (i.e., > 1,000 mg/dL) using high speed microcentrifugation or lipid extraction with organic solvents such as fluorine-chlorinated hydrocarbon, or lipid-clearing agents such as LipoClear (StatSpin Inc., Norwood, MA) and n-hexane.

  15. Effects of magnetic ion-exchange resin addition during coagulation on floc properties and membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yang Hun; Kweon, Ji Hyang; Jeong, Young Mi; Kwon, Soonbuhm; Kim, Hyung-Soo

    2010-03-01

    The application of magnetic ion-exchange resin (MIEX) during chemical coagulation was investigated for the removal of organic matters responsible for fouling in membrane processes. Two different coagulants were used-polyaluminium chloride (PAC1) and polyaluminum chloride silicate (PACS). The MIEX addition during coagulation with both PAC1 and PACS considerably enhanced removal of dissolved organic carbon. Coagulation with MIEX treatment substantially removed all portions of natural organic matter (NOM), while the MIEX treatment alone effectively removed the hydrophobic and transphilic portions of NOM. The enhanced NOM removal by PAC1 coagulation with the addition of MIEX had positive effects on membrane flux at moderate transmembrane pressure conditions. However, the almost identical flux patterns were reported in the experiments of coagulation with PACS and PACS with MIEX addition. The results of the specific cake resistances indicated that the MIEX addition substantially decreased the resistances. The larger size distributions of PAC1 with MIEX corresponded well with the flux improvement.

  16. Using microfluidics to understand the effect of spatial distribution of tissue factor on blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Kastrup, Christian J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-01-01

    Initiation of blood coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a robust, highly regulated process. Both the spatial distribution of TF and the geometry of the vasculature may play important roles in regulating coagulation. As this review describes, microfluidic systems provide a unique opportunity for investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics of blood coagulation in vitro. Microfluidic systems with surfaces of phospholipid bilayers patterned with TF have been used to demonstrate experimentally the threshold responses of initiation of coagulation to the size and shape of surfaces presenting TF. These systems have also been used to demonstrate experimentally that propagation of coagulation is regulated by the shear rate of blood flow in microcapillaries and microchannels. By understanding these and other aspects of the spatial dynamics that regulate blood coagulation, many new methods for treating clotting disorders, such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) and sepsis, could arise.

  17. Spatial localization of bacteria controls coagulation of human blood by 'quorum acting'.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Christian J; Boedicker, James Q; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Moayeri, Mahtab; Bian, Yao; Pompano, Rebecca R; Kline, Timothy R; Sylvestre, Patricia; Shen, Feng; Leppla, Stephen H; Tang, Wei-Jen; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-12-01

    Blood coagulation often accompanies bacterial infections and sepsis and is generally accepted as a consequence of immune responses. Though many bacterial species can directly activate individual coagulation factors, they have not been shown to directly initiate the coagulation cascade that precedes clot formation. Here we demonstrated, using microfluidics and surface patterning, that the spatial localization of bacteria substantially affects coagulation of human and mouse blood and plasma. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, the anthrax-causing pathogen, directly initiated coagulation of blood in minutes when bacterial cells were clustered. Coagulation of human blood by B. anthracis required secreted zinc metalloprotease InhA1, which activated prothrombin and factor X directly (not via factor XII or tissue factor pathways). We refer to this mechanism as 'quorum acting' to distinguish it from quorum sensing--it does not require a change in gene expression, it can be rapid and it can be independent of bacterium-to-bacterium communication.

  18. Blood coagulation profiling in patients using optical thromboelastography (OTEG) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Markandey M.; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Impaired blood coagulation is often associated with increased postoperative mortality and morbidity in cardiovascular patients. The capability for blood coagulation profiling rapidly at the bedside will enable the timely detection of coagulation defects and open the opportunity for tailoring therapy to correct specific coagulation deficits Optical Thromboelastography (OTEG), is an optical approach to quantify blood coagulation status within minutes using a few drops of whole blood. The goal of the current study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of OTEG for rapid coagulation profiling in patients. In OTEG, temporal laser speckle intensity fluctuations from a drop of clotting blood are measured using a CMOS camera. To quantify coagulation status, the speckle intensity autocorrelation function is measured, the mean square displacement of scattering particles is extracted, and viscoelastic modulus (G), during coagulation is measured via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation. By quantifying time-resolved changes in G, the coagulation parameters, reaction time (R), clot progression time (K), clot progression rate (Angle), and maximum clot strength (MA) are derived. In this study, the above coagulation parameters were measured using OTEG in 269 patients and compared with standard mechanical Thromboelastography (TEG). Our results showed a strong correlation between OTEG and TEG measurements for all parameters: R-time (R=0.80, p<0.001), clotting time (R=0.78, p<0.001), Angle (R=0.58, p<0.001), and MA (R=0.60, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the unique capability of OTEG for rapid quantification of blood coagulation status to potentially improve clinical capability for identifying impaired coagulation in cardiovascular patients at the point of care.

  19. Method of removing arsenic and other anionic contaminants from contaminated water using enhanced coagulation

    DOEpatents

    Teter, David M.; Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.; Khandaker, Nadim R.

    2006-11-21

    An improved water decontamination process comprising contacting water containing anionic contaminants with an enhanced coagulant to form an enhanced floc, which more efficiently binds anionic species (e.g., arsenate, arsenite, chromate, fluoride, selenate, and borate, and combinations thereof) predominantly through the formation of surface complexes. The enhanced coagulant comprises a trivalent metal cation coagulant (e.g., ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate) mixed with a divalent metal cation modifier (e.g., copper sulfate or zinc sulfate).

  20. Evaluation of a coagulation/flocculation-lamellar clarifier and filtration-UV-chlorination reactor for removing emerging contaminants at full-scale wastewater treatment plants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Víctor; Salvadó, Victòria

    2013-03-15

    The presence and elimination of 25 emerging contaminants in two full-scale Spanish wastewater treatment plants was studied. The tertiary treatment systems consisted of coagulation, flocculation lamellar settlement and filtration (pulsed-bed sand filters) units, and disinfection was carried out by medium pressure UV light lamps and chlorination. Diclofenac and carbamazepine were found to be the emerging contaminants with the highest concentrations in secondary effluents. Photodegradable emerging contaminants (e.g. ketoprofen, triclosan and diclofenac) were removed by filtration-UV light radiation-chlorination whereas most hydrophobic compounds (e.g. galaxolide and tonalide) were eliminated by coagulation-flocculation followed by lamellar clarification, a unit in which a seasonal trend was observed. Overall mass removal efficiency was about 60%. 1-(8-Chlorocarbazolyl) acetic acid, an intermediate product of the photodegradation of diclofenac, was detected after filtration-UV-chlorination, but not after coagulation-flocculation and lamellar clarification. This study demonstrated potential for general applicability of two established tertiary treatment systems to eliminate emerging contaminants.

  1. Development of a User-Friendly App for Testing Blood Coagulation Status in Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Vegt, Johannes; Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation time is an important factor to consider for postoperative and cardiac disorder patients who have been prescribed anticoagulant coagulant medications. The coagulation process is also known to be perturbed in some individuals with psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. This chapter describes a patient self-management system for a functional assessment of blood coagulation activity, determining the appropriate anticoagulant dosages using a test strip device and the Coagu app. The app can also be used as a patient reminder of treatment times and to monitor treatment and effects over time.

  2. Coagulant Recovery from Water Treatment Residuals: A Review of Applicable Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, J.; Jarvis, P.; Judd, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional water treatment consumes large quantities of coagulant and produces even greater volumes of sludge. Coagulant recovery (CR) presents an opportunity to reduce both the sludge quantities and the costs they incur, by regenerating and purifying coagulant before reuse. Recovery and purification must satisfy stringent potable regulations for harmful contaminants, while remaining competitive with commercial coagulants. These challenges have restricted uptake and lead research towards lower-gain, lower-risk alternatives. This review documents the context in which CR must be considered, before comparing the relative efficacies and bottlenecks of potential technologies, expediting identification of the major knowledge gaps and future research requirements. PMID:26064036

  3. Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water by enhanced coagulation with ferric ions and coarse calcite.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Lopez-Valdivieso, A; Hernandez-Campos, D J; Peng, C; Monroy-Fernandez, M G; Razo-Soto, I

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water in a mine drainage system has been studied through an enhanced coagulation process with ferric ions and coarse calcite (38-74 microm) in this work. The experimental results have shown that arsenic-borne coagulates produced by coagulation with ferric ions alone were very fine, so micro-filtration (membrane as filter medium) was needed to remove the coagulates from water. In the presence of coarse calcite, small arsenic-borne coagulates coated on coarse calcite surfaces, leading the settling rate of the coagulates to considerably increase. The enhanced coagulation followed by conventional filtration (filter paper as filter medium) achieved a very high arsenic removal (over 99%) from high-arsenic water (5mg/l arsenic concentration), producing a cleaned water with the residual arsenic concentration of 13 microg/l. It has been found that the mechanism by which coarse calcite enhanced the coagulation of high-arsenic water might be due to attractive electrical double layer interaction between small arsenic-borne coagulates and calcite particles, which leads to non-existence of a potential energy barrier between the heterogeneous particles.

  4. Effect of the dosage ratio and the viscosity of PAC/PDMDAAC on coagulation performance and membrane fouling in a hybrid coagulation-ultrafiltration process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xue; Gao, Baoyu; Huang, Xin; Bu, Fan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Ruihua; Jin, Bo

    2017-04-01

    This study systematically determined the optimal dosage ratio and the viscosity (η) of co-coagulants, polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and poly dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDMDAAC), on coagulation performance and membrane fouling in a hybrid coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) process for natural organic matter (NOM) removal. Floc characteristics-including floc size, fractal dimension, strength and re-growth ability-were studied with respect to coagulant-dosing operations. Membrane fouling was evaluated in association with assessment of NOM removal performance by the hybrid process. The best coagulation performance was achieved when PAC and PDMDAAC were dosed with 1.0 mg/L and 0.1 mg/L, respectively. The addition of PDMDAAC could enhance the NOM removal efficiency, especially at low PAC dosages. Co-coagulants PAC/PDMDAAC (ηPDMDAAC = 2.18 dL/g) resulted in formation of the largest flocs with the smallest Df under all shear conditions, while the flocs formed by PAC/PDMDAAC (ηPDMDAAC = 1.86 dL/g) had higher recovery abilities. The results from ultrafiltration experiments indicated that coagulation using PAC/PDMDAAC with a viscosity range from 0.99 dL/g to 1.86 dL/g can significantly reduce membrane fouling, leading to increasing water fluxes from 0.1170 to 0.4906 in the ultrafiltration process.

  5. Lighting: Green Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  6. Ocular hazards of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The eye is protected against bright light by the natural aversion response to viewing bright light sources. The aversion response normally protects the eye against injury from viewing bright light sources such as the sun, arc lamps and welding arcs, since this aversion limits the duration of exposure to a fraction of a second (about 0.25 s). The principal retinal hazard resulting from viewing bright light sources is photoretinitis, e.g., solar retinitis with an accompanying scotoma which results from staring at the sun. Solar retinitis was once referred to as 'eclipse blindness' and associated 'retinal burn'. Only in recent years has it become clear that photoretinitis results from a photochemical injury mechanism following exposure of the retina to shorter wavelengths in the visible spectrum, i.e., violet and blue light. Prior to conclusive animal experiments at that time, it was thought to be a thermal injury mechanism. However, it has been shown conclusively that an intense exposure to short-wavelength light (hereafter referred to as 'blue light') can cause retinal injury. The product of the dose-rate and the exposure duration always must result in the same exposure dose (in joules-per-square centimeter at the retina) to produce a threshold injury. Blue-light retinal injury (photoretinitis) can result from viewing either an extremely bright light for a short time, or a less bright light for longer exposure periods. This characteristic of photochemical injury mechanisms is termed reciprocity and helps to distinguish these effects from thermal burns, where heat conduction requires a very intense exposure within seconds to cause a retinal coagulation otherwise, surrounding tissue conducts the heat away from the retinal image. Injury thresholds for acute injury in experimental animals for both corneal and retinal effects have been corroborated for the human eye from accident data. Occupational safety limits for exposure to UVR and bright light are based upon this

  7. The effects of chemical coagulants on the decolorization of dyes by electrocoagulation using response surface methodology (RSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Erick B.; Hung, Yung-Tse; Mulamba, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of electrocoagulation (ECF) coupled with an addition of chemical coagulant to decolorize textile dye. Tests were conducted using Box Behnken methodology to vary six parameters: dye type, weight, coagulant type, dose, initial pH and current density. The combination of electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation was able to decolorize dye up to 99.42 % in 30 min of treatment time which is remarkably shorter in comparison with using conventional chemical coagulation. High color removal was found to be contingent upon the dye type and current density, along with the interactions between the current density and the coagulant dose. The addition of chemical coagulants did enhanced treatment efficiency.

  8. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  9. [Clinical diagnosis of thrombosis and blood coagulation tests].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K

    1998-03-01

    Blood coagulation tests are useful to diagnose some thrombotic diseases. Particularly, these tests are valuable for the diagnosis of familiar thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). For the diagnosis of thrombophilia, determinations of both biological activity and antigen level of antithrombin III, protein C and protein S are important for initial screening. Since activated protein C (APC) resistance is extremely rare in Japanese, APC resistant test that based on APTT, is unnecessary to include as one of the screening tests. Detection of activity and antigen level of either plasminogen or fibrinogen is recommended to screen the plasminogen deficiency or dysfibrinogenemia. Determination of lupus anticoagulant is needed for the diagnosis of APS. At this time, the dilute phospholipid APTT (dAPTT) or the dilute Russell viper venom time (dRVVT) may be useful as a screening test for LA because procedure of these tests are basically simple to perform in Japanese laboratory. In the next step, cross mixing test of dAPTT (or APTT) should be perform to make a diagnose of LA more solid. Final confirm tests can be conveniently carried out with kit of either STACLOT or LA-CONFIRM. Platelet count and FDP (or FDP D dimer) assay are two essential tests for the diagnosis of DIC. Criteria of diagnosis for DIC recommended by Blood Coagulation Research Group of Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare is not unnecessarily appropriate for practical use. TAT and PIC can be a good laboratory tests for early detection of hypercoagulable state in patients with DIC.

  10. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Design Crossover trial. Setting Main meeting room of Leiden University’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. Participants 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were markers, or “fear factors” of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. Results All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Conclusion Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. PMID:26673787

  11. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Surgery for Facial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Yusa, Kazuyuki; Kitabatake, Kenichirou; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A case of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) presenting after surgery for facial trauma associated with multiple facial bone fractures is described. With regard to the oral and maxillofacial region, DIC has been described in the literature following head trauma, infection, and metastatic disease. Until now, only 5 reports have described DIC after surgery for facial injury. DIC secondary to facial injury is thus rare. The patient in this case was young and had no medical history. Preoperative hemorrhage or postoperative septicemia may thus induce DIC. PMID:27313913

  12. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  13. Pharmacogenomics of Anti-platelet and Anti-coagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Perry, Christina G.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a major component of vascular disease, especially myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Current anti-thrombotic therapies such as warfarin and clopidogrel are effective in inhibiting cardiovascular events; however, there is great inter-individual variability in response to these medications. In recent years, it has been recognized that genetic factors play a significant role in drug response, and, subsequently, common variants in genes responsible for metabolism and drug action have been identified. These discoveries along with the new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies on the horizon hold promise for more effective individualized anti-coagulation and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:23797323

  14. Numerical simulations of a reduced model for blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Jevgenija; Fasano, Antonio; Sequeira, Adélia

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional numerical resolution of a complex mathematical model for the blood coagulation process is presented. The model was illustrated in Fasano et al. (Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 51:1-14, 2012), Pavlova et al. (Theor Biol 380:367-379, 2015). It incorporates the action of the biochemical and cellular components of blood as well as the effects of the flow. The model is characterized by a reduction in the biochemical network and considers the impact of the blood slip at the vessel wall. Numerical results showing the capacity of the model to predict different perturbations in the hemostatic system are discussed.

  15. Local Anesthesia During Interstitial Laser Coagulation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, Kalish R

    2005-01-01

    With the emergence of minimally invasive therapies for the management of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as the reality of a changing medical economic environment, there is a need for a reliable local anesthesia protocol. The protocol described here for prostate anesthetic block is a safe, economical, and effective way to perform interstitial laser coagulation and other minor endoscopic urologic procedures in the office setting. Most patients experience little discomfort and recover quickly, with prompt return to normal activities. Urologists should be aware of and comfortable with these techniques. PMID:16985900

  16. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  17. Does Bicarbonate Correct Coagulation Function Impaired by Acidosis in Swine?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    L bicarbonate to a pH of 7.4 (A-Bi, n 6). Blood samples were taken at base - line, 15 minutes after acidosis induction, and 15 minutes after...Behring, Deerfield, IL). Plasma fibrinogen concentra- tion was determined by BCS Coagulation System based on fibrinogen functional activities in the...0.05). Hct decreased from 31 1% to 28 1% in A-LR and from 29 1% to 25 1% in A-Bi (p 0.05). Arterial base excess (BE) dropped from 7.1 0.7

  18. Microfiltration of different surface waters with/without coagulation: clear correlations between membrane fouling and hydrophilic biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Katsuki; Tanaka, Ken; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2014-02-01

    Although low-pressure membranes (microfiltration (MF) or ultrafiltration (UF)) have become viable options for drinking water treatment, problems caused by membrane fouling must still be addressed. The objective of this study was to compare five different surface waters and to identify a relevant index of water quality that can be used for prediction of the fouling potential of the water. Bench-scale filtration tests were carried out with commercially available hollow-fiber MF membranes. Fairly long-term (a few days) filtrations in the constant-flow mode were carried out with automatic backwash. Membrane fouling in this study was shown to be irreversible as a result of the periodic backwash carried out throughout of the operation. Easily accessible indexes of water quality including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance, Ca concentration and turbidity could not explain the degree of fouling encountered in the filtration tests. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) could provide information on the presence of protein-like substances in water, and peaks for protein showed some correlation with the membrane fouling. Biopolymer (characterized by high molecular weights and insensitivity to UV light absorption) concentrations in the five waters determined by liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) exhibited an excellent correlation with the fouling rates. Coagulation with polyaluminum chloride could mitigate membrane fouling in all cases. The extent of fouling seen with coagulated waters was also correlated with biopolymer concentrations. The relationship between biopolymer concentrations and the fouling rates established for the raw waters could also be applied to the coagulated waters. These results suggested that the contribution of biopolymers to membrane fouling in the present study was significant, an observation that was supported by the analysis of foulants extracted at the termination of each test. Biopolymer concentrations

  19. [Algae-removal effect of AS/PDM composite coagulants to winter Taihu Lake raw water].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Cheng; Zhu, Ling-Ling

    2009-04-15

    The series of stable AS/PDM composite coagulants prepared by polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDM) and aluminium sulphate (AS) were used to research the algae-removal effect to winter Taihu Lake raw water. The effects of dosage of composite coagulants, composite mass ratios (20:1-5:1) of AS and PDM, intrinsic viscosity values (0.55-3.99 dL/g) of PDM on algae-removal rates were studied through coagulation and algae-removal experiments. The feasibility of using composite coagulants to substitute prechlorination process was analysed. The results show that when residual turbidity of 2 NTU to water after coagulation and sediment is required by water plant, the dosage (based on Al2O3) of AS, AS/PDM (0.55/20:1-3.99/5:1) composite coagulants are 4.24 mg/L, 3.96-1.87 mg/L, and the algae-removal rates are 83.00%, 87.52%-90.93% respectively. When dosage to raw water are 4.24 mg/L, the algae-removal rates of AS, AS/PDM (0.55/20:1-3.99/5:1) composite coagulants are 83.00%, 88.29%-97.66%, and the residual turbidities are 2.00 NTU, 1.76-0.43 NTU respectively. When dosage to chlorine-added water are 4.50 mg/L, the treatment effect of AS/PDM (1.53/10:1) composite coagulant to raw water is better than that of AS to chlorine-added water, and the treatment effect of AS/PDM (3.99/5:1) composite coagulant to raw water is better than that of AS, AS/PDM (0.55/20:1) and AS/PDM (1.53/10:1) composite coagulants to chlorine-added water. So using AS/PDM composite coagulants can enhance evidently the treatment effect of AS to winter Taihu Lake raw water. Compared with using AS solely, the dosage of AS in composite coagulants are saved when the residual turbidities are required in same level, and the treatment effect of AS is enhanced when the dosage of AS in composite coagulants are same as that of using AS solely. Moreover, using composite coagulants can replace the part chlorine-added function on increasing coagulation and algae-removal in prechlorination process and profitably increases

  20. Validity of the statistical coagulation equation and runaway growth of protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Nakazawa, K.

    1994-02-01

    The coagulation equation has been widely used to describe various kinds of accretion processes. Owing to its statistical property, however, the coagulation equation has a serious defect in some cases, i.e., sometimes the total mass of a system is not conserved. The aim of the present study is to find the necessary and sufficient conditions under which the ordinary coagulation equation is valid physically. On the basis of the stochastic viewpoint, H. Tanaka and K. Nakazawa (1993) derived the stochastic coagulation equation which describes exactly the accretion process. They also obtained analytic solutions to the stochastic coagulation equation for three kinds of the bilinear coalescence rates (i.e., Aij = 1, i + j, and i x j). By comparing these analytical solutions with those to the ordinary coagulation equation, we examine the conditions under which the ordinary coagulation equation is valid. The results are summarized as follows: (1) In the cases of Aij = 1 and i + j, the coagulation equation remains valid before bodies grow to the mass comparable to the total mass, N. (2) In the case of Aij = i x j, the coagulation equation is valid until the stage in which bodies with mass comparable to or larger than N2/3 appear. Additionally, we calculate the time-variation of the masses of the largest two bodies in a system using the solutions to the stochastic coagulation equation. As a result, we can combine the above conditions (1) and (2) by a single statement: the ordinary coagulation equation is valid before the stages where the runaway growth starts. This conclusion is probably useful not only for cases of these limited coalescence rates but also for more general cases.

  1. The application of novel coagulant reagent (polyaluminium silicate chloride) for the post-treatment of landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Tzoupanos, N D; Zouboulis, A I; Zhao, Y-C

    2008-10-01

    Relatively "old" (stabilized) landfill leachates are a special category of wastewaters, which are difficult to treat further, mainly due to their bio-refractory organic content (humic substances). In this study, coagulation-flocculation was examined as post-treatment method for the biologically pre-treated stabilized leachates. The purpose was to examine the coagulation performance of alternative coagulant agents, i.e. the composite coagulant polyaluminium silicate chloride. Composite coagulants with different Al to Si molar ratio and different preparation methods were tested. Their efficiency was evaluated by monitoring from turbidity and phosphate content, other parameters strongly correlated with the presence of organic matter, such as UV absorbance at 254nm, COD and colour. The results suggest that the silica-based coagulants exhibit better coagulation performance, than the relevant conventional coagulant (alum) or simple pre-polymerized coagulants (PACl). Polyaluminium silicate chloride has greater tolerance against pH variation than alum or PACl, whereas this novel coagulant works better at pH values between 7 and 9. Coagulation-flocculation has proved to be an efficient post-treatment method for the biologically pre-treated leachates, promoting the removal of the refractory humic substances, while the treatment efficiency of coagulation can be improved by the application of the new coagulant agent.

  2. [Coagulation and adsorption on treating the Yellow River and the impact on chlorine decay during chlorination process].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao; Gao, Bao-yu; Liu, Bin; Xu, Chun-hua; Yue, Qin-yan

    2010-05-01

    Two types of inorganic polymer coagulants, polyferric chloride (PFC) and polyaluminum chloride (PAC), were chosen to treat the Yellow River water. Different dosages were investigated in order to investigate the turbidity, UV24, DOC and permanganate index removal efficiency and their coagulation mechanisms based on the Zeta potentials. The natural organic matter removal by the combination of coagulation and adsorption with powder activated carbon were analyzed based on different coagulant and adsorbent dosages and dosing orders. The effects of combination of coagulation and adsorption on the residual chlorine decay were analyzed. The results showed that the two coagulants had high turbidity removal efficiency ( > 90%). The UV254, DOC, permanganate index removal efficiency were 29.2%, 26.1% and 27.9% respectively for PAC coagulation and were 32.3%, 23.3% and 32.9% respectively for PFC. Electric neutralization played an important role in the PAC coagulation process while both adsorption bridging and electric neutralization performed when PFC was used. The removal percentage of organic matter increased with the increase coagulant and adsorbent. The adsorption after coagulation process gave the better UV254 and DOC removal efficiency than the coagulation after adsorption. The UV254 and DOC removal efficiency were 95.2% and 99.9% for PAC coagulation after adsorption and were 90.1% and 99.9% for PFC coagulation first. But adding powder activated carbon can improve floc settlement performance and maintained persistent disinfection effect.

  3. Interference of iron as a coagulant on MIB removal by powdered activated carbon adsorption for low turbidity waters.

    PubMed

    Seckler, Ferreira Filho Sidney; Margarida, Marchetto; Rosemeire, Alves Laganaro

    2013-08-01

    Powered activated carbon (PAC) is widely used in water treatment plants to minimize odors in drinking water. This study investigated the removal of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) by PAC adsorption, combined with coagulation using iron as a coagulant. The adsorption and coagulation process were studied through different case scenarios of jar tests. The analysis evaluated the effect of PAC dosing in the liquid phase immediately before or after the coagulant addition. Ferric sulphate was used as the coagulant with dosages from 10 to 30 mg/L, and PAC dosages varied from 10 to 40 mg/L. The highest MIB removal efficiency (about 70%) was achieved without the coagulant addition and with the highest PAC dosage (40 mg/L). Lower MIB removal efficiencies were observed in the presence of coagulant, showing a clear interference of the iron precipitate or coagulant in the adsorption process. The degree of interference of the coagulation process in the MIB removal was proportional to the ratio of ferric hydroxide mass to the PAC mass. For both cases of PAC dosing, upstream and downstream of the coagulant injection point, the MIB removal efficiency was similar. However, MIB removal efficiency was 15% lower when compared with experiments without the coagulant application. This interference in the MIB adsorption occurs potentially because the coagulant coats the surface of the carbon and interferes with the MIB coming in contact with the carbon's surface and pores. This constraint requires an increase of the PAC dosage to provide the same efficiency observed without coagulation.

  4. Abnormal factor VIII coagulant antigen in patients with renal dysfunction and in those with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E; Schmitt, G W; Hamburger, R H; Bauer, K A; Troll, J H; Janson, P; Deykin, D

    1985-01-01

    Factor VIII antigen (VIII:CAg) exhibits molecular weight heterogeneity in normal plasma. We have compared the relative quantities of VIII:CAg forms present in normal individuals (n = 22) with VIII:CAg forms in renal dysfunction patients (n = 19) and in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC; n = 7). In normal plasma, the predominant VIII: CAg form, detectable by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was of molecular weight 2.4 X 10(5), with minor forms ranging from 8 X 10(4) to 2.6 X 10(5) D. A high proportion of VIII:CAg in renal dysfunction patients, in contrast, was of 1 X 10(5) mol wt. The patients' high 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII: CAg level correlated with increased concentrations of serum creatinine, F1+2 (a polypeptide released upon prothrombin activation), and with von Willebrand factor. Despite the high proportion of the 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII:CAg form, which suggests VIII:CAg proteolysis, the ratio of Factor VIII coagulant activity to total VIII:CAg concentration was normal in renal dysfunction patients. These results could be simulated in vitro by thrombin treatment of normal plasma, which yielded similar VIII:CAg gel patterns and Factor VIII coagulant activity to antigen ratios. DIC patients with high F1+2 levels but no evidence of renal dysfunction had an VIII:CAg gel pattern distinct from renal dysfunction patients. DIC patients had elevated concentrations of both the 1 X 10(5) and 8 X 10(4) mol wt VIII:CAg forms. We conclude that an increase in a particular VIII:CAg form correlates with the severity of renal dysfunction. The antigen abnormality may be the result of VIII:CAg proteolysis by a thrombinlike enzyme and/or prolonged retention of proteolyzed VIII:CAg fragments. Images PMID:3932466

  5. Improved virus removal by high-basicity polyaluminum coagulants compared to commercially available aluminum-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Oshiba, A; Marubayashi, T; Sato, S

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of basicity, sulfate content, and aluminum hydrolyte species on the ability of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) coagulants to remove F-specific RNA bacteriophages from river water at a pH range of 6-8. An increase in PACl basicity from 1.5 to 2.1 and the absence of sulfate led to a reduction of the amount of monomeric aluminum species (i.e., an increase of the total amount of polymeric aluminum and colloidal aluminum species) in the PACl, to an increase in the colloid charge density of the PACl, or to both and, as a result, to high virus removal efficiency. The efficiency of virus removal at around pH 8 observed with PACl-2.1c, a nonsulfated high-basicity PACl (basicity 2.1-2.2) with a high colloidal aluminum content, was larger than that observed with PACl-2.1b, a nonsulfated high-basicity PACl (basicity 2.1-2.2) with a high polymeric aluminum content. In contrast, although extremely high basicity PACls (e.g., PACl-2.7ns, basicity 2.7) effectively removed turbidity and UV260-absorbing natural organic matter and resulted in a very low residual aluminum concentration, the virus removal ratio with PACl-2.7ns was smaller than the ratio with PACl-2.1c at around pH 8, possibly as a result of a reduction of the colloid charge density of the PACl as the basicity was increased from 2.1 to 2.7. Liquid (27)Al NMR analysis revealed that PACl-2.1c contained Al30 species, which was not the case for PACl-2.1b or PACl-2.7ns. This result suggests that Al30 species probably played a major role in virus removal during the coagulation process. In summary, PACl-2.1c, which has high colloidal aluminum content, contains Al30 species, and has a high colloid charge density, removed viruses more efficiently (>4 log10 for infectious viruses) than the other aluminum-based coagulants-including commercially available PACls (basicity 1.5-1.8), alum, and PACl-2.7ns-over the entire tested pH (6-8) and coagulant dosage (0.54-5.4 mg-Al/L) ranges.

  6. Coagulation behavior and floc properties of compound bioflocculant-polyaluminum chloride dual-coagulants and polymeric aluminum in low temperature surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Sun, Shenglei; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2015-04-01

    This study was intended to compare coagulation behavior and floc properties of two dual-coagulants polyaluminum chloride-compound bioflocculant (PAC-CBF) (PAC dose first) and compound bioflocculant-polyaluminum chloride (CBF-PAC) (CBF dose first) with those of PAC alone in low temperature drinking water treatment. Results showed that dual-coagulants could improve DOC removal efficiency from 30% up to 34%. Moreover, CBF contributed to the increase of floc size and growth rate, especially those of PAC-CBF were almost twice bigger than those of PAC. However, dual-coagulants formed looser and weaker flocs with lower breakage factors in which fractal dimension of PAC-CBF flocs was low which indicates a looser floc structure. The floc recovery ability was in the following order: PAC-CBF>PAC alone>CBF-PAC. The flocculation mechanism of PAC was charge neutralization and enmeshment, meanwhile the negatively charged CBF added absorption and bridging effect.

  7. Advances in the treatment of inherited coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A

    2013-09-01

    Inherited coagulation disorders constitute a broad spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies that include X-linked factor (F)VIII or FIX deficiency that causes haemophilia, and autosomal recessive disorders producing heterogeneous deficiencies in fibrinogen (FI), prothrombin (FII), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV+FVIII. Significant advances in treatments for patients with congenital haemophilia A (FVIII deficiency) and B (FIX deficiency) over the last two decades have resulted from improvements in the production, availability and patient access to factor replacement products. Translation of advances in biotechnology, namely recombinant protein technology, targeted protein modifications to improve function and potentially reduce immunogenicity, and advanced formulations to optimize bioavailability and sustain activity offer promisingly new treatments for haemophilia as well as recessively inherited bleeding disorders in patients who otherwise have few therapeutic options. Though a theoretical risk remains for blood-borne viral infections with pooled plasma-derived products, this concern has diminished with breakthroughs in purification and viral inactivation methods. Development of inhibitory antibodies is still the most daunting problem for patients with inherited bleeding disorders, complicating treatment approaches to control and prevent bleeding, and posing risks for allergic and anaphylactic reactions in susceptible patients. The objectives of this review are to (i) highlight emerging advances in hemostatic therapies that are bioengineered to improve pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability, sustain functional activity, and possibly eliminate immunogenicity of recombinant factor proteins; and (ii) present an overview of key clinical trials of novel factor products currently in the development pipeline.

  8. Reduced-order models of the coagulation cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kirk B.; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models of flow-mediated thrombogenesis have generally included the transport and reaction of dozens of biochemical species involved in the coagulation cascade. Researchers have shown, however, that thrombin generation curves can be accurately reproduced by a significantly smaller system of reactions. These reduced-order models are based on the system of ordinary differential equations representative of a well-mixed system, however, not the system of advection-diffusion-reaction equations required to model the flow-mediated case. Additionally, they focus solely on reproducing the thrombin generation curve, although accurate representation of certain intermediate species may be required to model additional aspects of clot formation, e.g. interactions with activated and non-activated platelets. In this work, we develop a method to reduce the order of a coagulation model through optimization techniques. The results of this reduced-order model are then compared to those of the full system in several representative cardiovascular flows. This work was supported by NSF grant 1354541, the NSF GRFP, and NIH grant HL108272.

  9. Postoperative bleeding in a patient with normal screening coagulation tests.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Eva; Anvari, Reza; D'cunha, Nicholas; Thaxton, Lauren; Malik, Asim; Nugent, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A 54-year-old man was brought to the emergency room after a head-on collision. He had multiple fractures in his lower extremities and required immediate surgery. After surgery, the patient had a persistent drop in hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets despite red blood cell transfusions. Laboratory studies included normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, normal plasminogen functional activity, negative antiplatelet antibodies, normal platelet functional analysis and negative disseminated intravascular coagulation screen. Factor XIII antigen levels were 25% of predicted, and the diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency was made. The patient was treated with cryoprecipitate, and the bleeding stopped. Patients with factor XIII deficiency have either a rare congenital or acquired coagulation disorder. Both presentations have normal standard laboratory clotting tests, and the diagnosis requires an assay measuring factor XIII activity or antigen levels. The usual treatment includes cryoprecipitate, fresh-frozen plasma or recombinant factor XIII. This deficiency should be considered in patients with unexplained spontaneous, traumatic or postoperative bleeding.

  10. Challenges in Radiofrequency Pasteurization of Shell Eggs: Coagulation Rings.

    PubMed

    Lau, Soon Kiat; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Jones, David; Negahban, Mehrdad; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2016-10-01

    A total of 50 different configurations of simple radiofrequency (RF) heating at 27.12 MHz of a shell egg were simulated using a finite element model with the purpose of pasteurizing the egg. Temperature-dependent thermal and dielectric properties of the yolk, albumen, and shell were measured, fitted, and introduced into the model. A regression equation that relates the top electrode voltage to the gap between the electrodes and vertical position of the egg was developed. Simulation and experimental results had good agreement in terms of temperature deviation (root mean squared error ranged from 0.35 °C to 0.48 °C) and both results demonstrated the development of a "coagulation ring" around the air cell. The focused heating near the air cell of the egg prevented pasteurization of the egg due to its impact on quality (coagulation). Analysis of the electric field patterns offered a perspective on how nonuniform RF heating could occur in heterogeneous food products. The results can be used to guide development of RF heating for heterogeneous food products and further development of RF pasteurization of eggs.

  11. Control of coagulation: a gift of Canadian agriculture.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Vivian

    2006-12-01

    Vitamin K, heparin and their antagonists remain the basis of coagulation therapies today, more than half a century after their discovery. Failure of blood clotting in chicks that were fed a fat-depleted diet was observed by William McFarlane, William Graham Jr. and Frederick Richardson of the Ontario Agricultural College; it led to the search that yielded vitamin K. Investigation of hemorrhagic disease in cattle by Francis Schofield of the Ontario Veterinary College found an anti-thrombin substance in spoiled clover which was later characterized as dicoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist, and led to the development of warfarin. In Toronto, a systematic approach lead by Charles Best resulted in the world's first plentiful supply of purified heparin. Clinical usefulness of heparin in thrombosis, embolism, cardiovascular surgery, dialysis and transplantation was demonstrated first by Gordon Murray and Louis Jaques. The roles and the careers of Canadian coagulation research pioneers are briefly presented in this review, which shows how clinical medicine benefited by the systematic development of agricultural science in Guelph, Ontario.

  12. Characterization of water treatment sludge and its reuse as coagulant.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tarique; Ahmad, Kafeel; Ahad, Abdul; Alam, Mehtab

    2016-11-01

    Coagulation-flocculation process results in the generation of large volume of waste or residue, known as water treatment sludge (WTS), in the purification of surface water for potable supplies. Sustainable management of the inevitable waste requires careful attention from the plant operators and sludge managers. In this study, WTS produced with the optimum alum dose of 30 ml/L at the laboratory scale has been treated with sulphuric acid to bring forth a product known as sludge reagent product (SRP). The performance of SRP is evaluated for its efficiency in removing the colloidal suspensions from the Yamuna river water over wide pH range of 2-13. 1% sludge acidified with sulphuric acid of normality 2.5 at the rate of 0.05 ml/ml sludge has been observed as the optimum condition for preparing SRP from WTS. The percentage turbidity removal is greater at higher pH value and increases with increasing the dosage of SRP. The optimum SRP dosage of 8 ml/L in the pH range of 6-8 performed well in removing the colloidal suspension and other impurities from the Yamuna water. The quality of treated water met the prescribed standards for most of the quality parameters. Thus, SRP has the potential to substitute the conventional coagulants partially or completely in the water treatment process, depending on the quality needed at the users end.

  13. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed.

  14. Lutein recovery from Chlorella sp. ESP-6 with coagulants.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Rhesa Pramudita; Chang, Yin-Ru; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-07-01

    Production of algal lutein included cell cultivation, biomass harvesting, cell wall disruption, and subsequent purification if needed. This work cultivated Chlorella sp. ESP-6 cells in photobioreactor to a biomass content of 1.1 gl(-1) and then the freezing-grinding, ultrasonic treatment (20 and 42kHz) and microwave treatment were used to disrupt the cell walls for recover intracellular lutein. The grinding recovered more lutein than ultrasound or microwave pretreatment. Single coagulation using >30 mgl(-1) chitosan or dual-conditioning using 10 mg l(-1) polyaluminum chloride and 10 mgl(-1) chitosan effectively enhance sedimentation and membrane filtration efficiency of algal suspensions. However, the presence of coagulants lowers the lutein yield from algal biomass in the subsequent 20 kHz ultrasound treatment and purification process. Simulation results revealed affine adsorption of lutein onto chitosan molecules via hydroxyl-amine interaction. The possible drawback by pre-treatment stage should be considered together with the subsequent recovery stage in whole process assessment.

  15. The syndrome of pneumococcemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation and asplenia.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, M E; MacKenzie, C R

    1979-01-01

    A 58-year-old man who survived an episode of fulminant pneumococcal septicemia with disseminated intravascular coagulation had undergone splenectomy 23 years previously. In the literature there are 25 reported cases of fulminant septicemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with asplenia in adults (excluding cases in which corticosteroid or immunosuppressive therapy was given). The pneumococcus was responsible for all of these cases as well. The mortality in this series was more than 90%, and death occurred within 24 hours of presentation at hospital in almost 70% of the fatal cases and was associated with high-density bacteremia and adrenal hemorrhage. Gram-staining of the buffy coat of the peripheral blood or the exudate from purpuric skin lesions was carried out in only 6 of the 26 cases but yielded positive results in all but 1. It is concluded that a diagnosis of septicemia in asplenic adults can be established within a short time of presentation on the basis of statistical probability and the results of Gram-staining of the peripheral blood and exudate from the skin lesions. Prevention appears to be the cornerstone of management because of the variable interval from splenectomy to the onset of the syndrome and the high mortality. Images FIG. 1 PMID:38002

  16. International biological standards for coagulation factors and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Anthony R

    2007-04-01

    The use of international biological standards during the last 30 years has proved extremely successful in promoting global harmonization of estimates between laboratories and methods. Experience has led to the identification of physical criteria essential for standards to be suitable for long-term use. High precision of liquid filling coupled with low residual moisture and oxygen and the use of sealed glass ampoules have been found consistent with homogeneous and stable International Standards (ISs). Most plasma coagulation factors and inhibitors are calibrated in International Units (IU), which are defined as the amount of analyte in 1 mL of normal pooled plasma. Adoption of the IU has provided clarity in the definition of normal and abnormal states and has facilitated dose calculation for replacement therapy. The assay of like-versus-like materials (e.g., concentrate versus concentrate) has been found to improve interlaboratory agreement and there are now both plasma and concentrate ISs available for many coagulation factors and inhibitors. Studies into the assay of recombinant factor VIII have indicated that additional measures, such as modifications to assay methodology, are necessary to reduce interlaboratory variability. This experience may prove valuable in the future, when we have to deal increasingly with the challenges to standardization associated with the products of bioengineering.

  17. Are we giving enough coagulation factors during major trauma resuscitation?

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony M-H; Karmakar, Manoj K; Dion, Peter W

    2005-09-01

    Hemorrhage is a major cause of trauma deaths. Coagulopathy exacerbates hemorrhage and is commonly seen during major trauma resuscitation, suggesting that current practice of coagulation factor transfusion is inadequate. Reversal of coagulopathy involves normalization of body temperature, elimination of the causes of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and transfusion with fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate. Transfusion should be guided by clinical factors and laboratory results. However, in major trauma, clinical signs may be obscured and various factors conspire to make it difficult to provide the best transfusion therapy. Existing empiric transfusion strategies for, and prevailing teachings on, FFP transfusion appear to be based on old studies involving elective patients transfused with whole blood and may not be applicable to trauma patients in the era of transfusion with packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Perpetuation of such concepts is in part responsible for the common finding of refractory coagulopathy in major trauma patients today. In this review, we argue that coagulopathy can best be avoided or reversed when severe trauma victims are transfused with at least the equivalent of whole blood in a timely fashion.

  18. [Numerical calculation of coagulation kinetics incorporating fractal theory].

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng-kang; Jing, Min-na; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2008-08-01

    Based on the Smoluchowski equation, a kinetic model was formulated by introducing the fractal dimension. In the kinetic model, fractal dimension at different time is calculated by considering of the void and primary particles contained in the flocs. Using the kinetic model, the coagulation kinetics was calculated by the method of finite difference. The calculation results showed that the characteristics of the structure and collision efficiency play an important role in particle size distribution. The higher of the fractal dimension and the collision efficiency, the broader of the particle size distribution will be obtained, which indicated the flocs with large size were formed. The results also revealed a tendency of decrease in the fractal dimension with the increase of floc size, which is resulted from the unproportionate growth between the floc size and the number of the primary particles contained in the flocs. The validity of the calculation was proved by a series of experiments using aluminum sulfate as coagulant for the flocculation of humic substances.

  19. First assembly times and equilibration in stochastic coagulation-fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D’Orsogna, Maria R.; Lei, Qi; Chou, Tom

    2015-07-07

    We develop a fully stochastic theory for coagulation and fragmentation (CF) in a finite system with a maximum cluster size constraint. The process is modeled using a high-dimensional master equation for the probabilities of cluster configurations. For certain realizations of total mass and maximum cluster sizes, we find exact analytical results for the expected equilibrium cluster distributions. If coagulation is fast relative to fragmentation and if the total system mass is indivisible by the mass of the largest allowed cluster, we find a mean cluster-size distribution that is strikingly broader than that predicted by the corresponding mass-action equations. Combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size under which equilibration is accelerated, eluding late-stage coarsening, are also delineated. Finally, we compute the mean time it takes particles to first assemble into a maximum-sized cluster. Through careful state-space enumeration, the scaling of mean assembly times is derived for all combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size. We find that CF accelerates assembly relative to monomer kinetic only in special cases. All of our results hold in the infinite system limit and can be only derived from a high-dimensional discrete stochastic model, highlighting how classical mass-action models of self-assembly can fail.

  20. Biosynthesis of bifunctional iron oxyhydrosulfate by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans and their application to coagulation and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Song, Zibo; Jie, Shiqi; Zhu, Jianyu; Zhu, Yaowu; Liu, Xinxing

    2016-02-01

    Coagulation and adsorption are important environmental technologies, which were widely applied in water treatment. In this study, a type of villous iron oxyhydrosulfate with low crystallinity, high content iron, sulfate and hydroxyl was synthesized by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which possessed coagulation and heavy metal adsorption ability simultaneously. The results showed that the Cu(II) adsorption capacity increased within a small range over the pH range of 3.0-5.0 but increased evidently over the range of 6.0-8.0. The maximal Cu(II) adsorption capacity of sample Af and Gf reached 50.97 and 46.08mg/g respectively. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) adsorption was 6.0, and the maximal adsorption capacity reached 51.32 and 59.57mg/g. The Langmuir isotherm can better describe the adsorption behavior of Cr(VI). Coagulation performance of the iron oxyhydrosulfate (Sh) has been significantly enhanced by polysilicic acid (PSA), which was mainly determined by PSA/Sh ratio, pH and coagulant dosage. Coagulation efficiency maintained approximately at 98% when the PSA/Sh ratio ranged from 0.4/0.1 to 1.0/0.1. Polysilicic acid worked efficiently in wide pH range extending, from 2 to 3.5. Coagulation performance improved significantly with the increasing of the coagulant dosage at lower dosage range, while, at higher dosage range, the improvement was not evident even with more coagulant addition.

  1. A new inorganic-organic composite coagulant, consisting of polyferric sulphate (PFS) and polyacrylamide (PAA).

    PubMed

    Moussas, P A; Zouboulis, A I

    2009-08-01

    Currently, research is focused on the synthesis of new composite coagulants, which are constituted of both inorganic and organic materials. In this paper, the development of relevant reagents was investigated, by combining the inorganic pre-polymerised iron-based coagulant Polyferric Sulphate (PFS) with an organic, non-ionic polymer (Polyacrylamide, PAA) under different PAA/Fe (mg/l) and OH/Fe molar ratios. Moreover, the new reagents were characterised in terms of typical properties, stability and morphological analysis (XRD, FTIR, SEM). Their coagulation performance, when treating low or high turbid kaolin-humic acid suspensions, was also investigated, whereas the applied coagulation mechanisms were discussed by using the Photometric Dispersion Analysis (PDA) analysis. The results show that the new coagulation reagents present improved properties, including increased effective polymer species concentration, and they exhibit very good stability. The respective tests using PDA confirmed that the predominant coagulation mechanism of PFS-PAA is the bridge formation mechanism. Coagulation experiments in low or high turbid kaolin-humic acid suspensions reveal that the novel composite reagent PFS-PAA exhibits better coagulation performance, when compared with simple PFS, in terms of zeta-potential reduction, turbidity and organic matter removal and residual iron concentration.

  2. Brownian coagulation laws in a system with a variable disperse phase concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutugin, A. G.

    Simple expressions are proposed for estimating coagulation in systems with dilution. The expressions are then applied to the problem of the dilution of a smoke jet due to Lagrange diffusion. An analysis of the results obtained indicates that no significant coagulation can occur even in the case of mesoscale transport of smoke aerosols.

  3. Removal of direct dyes by coagulation: the performance of preformed polymeric aluminum species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baoyou; Li, Guohong; Wang, Dongsheng; Feng, Chenghong; Tang, Hongxiao

    2007-05-08

    Removal of three direct dyes (Direct Black 19, Direct Red 28, and Direct Blue 86) by coagulation with three different Al based coagulants was investigated. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the coagulation features of polymeric aluminum coagulants in treatment of dye-polluted waters and the emphasis was placed on the roles of preformed Al species, particularly Al(13). The performance of Al(13) in coagulation of dyes was observed through jar tests by comparing traditional Al salt, polyaluminum chloride (PACl), and purified Al(13). The results showed that under most cases Al(13) had significantly higher efficiency in removal of direct dyes than traditional Al salt and commercial PACl with the exception of Direct Red 28 removal under high pH range. The coagulation of direct dyes could be greatly affected by pH. Reducing pH was favorable for preformed Al species in a broad pH range. For traditional Al coagulant, efficient dye removal only occurred in a relatively narrow pH range of near 6.0. The outstanding coagulation behavior of Al(13) could be ascribed to its high charge neutralization ability, relative stability and potential self-assembly tendency.

  4. Evaluation of Al30 polynuclear species in polyaluminum solutions as coagulant for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoyang; Fan, Bin; Peng, Xianjia; Zhang, Zhongguo; Fan, Jinghua; Luan, Zhaokun

    2006-08-01

    Polyaluminum coagulant with a content of 76.8% of Al30 (PACAl30) was prepared. Its coagulation behaviors were compared with high Al13 content polyaluminum coagulant (PACAl13) and AlCl3. The species stability was studied using Al-Ferron method and 27Al NMR. The coagulation performances were investigated by studying the rate of flocs development, the turbidity removal efficiency and charge neutralization capacity under fixed pH conditions and uncontrolled pH conditions. The effect of pH on coagulation was also studied. The results show that PACAl30 are stable for using as coagulant. PACAl30 causes less pH depression than PACAl13. The charge neutralization capacity of PACAl30 is slightly lower than that of PACAl13 at pH6.8 and higher at pH 6.5. PACAl30 achieves the most effective turbidity removal in these three coagulants. And it acts effectively within a much broader dosage range and a wider pH range when compared with PACAl13. PACAl30 achieves the highest turbidity removal due to its strong flocs formation capacity. The results verify that Al30 is another highly active coagulation/flocculation species for turbidity removal.

  5. Selective vascular coagulation of rabbit colon using a flashlamp-excited dye laser operating at 577 nanometers

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, N.S.; Tan, O.T.; Bronstein, B.R.; Farinelli, W.A.; Richter, J.M.; Parrish, J.A.; Anderson, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that brief pulses of selectively absorbed optical radiation can be used to confine thermal injury to pigmented targets within tissues. We performed studies in rabbits to assess the usefulness of this technique for selectively coagulating the colonic vasculature. By measuring the optical absorbance of rabbit colon with a spectrophotometer, it was determined that hemoglobin exhibits strong absorption relative to the rabbit colon at a wavelength of 577 nm. Because light must be absorbed to affect tissue, it was hypothesized that laser pulses of this wavelength would selectively damage blood vessels. This hypothesis was tested by examining the effect of 300-microseconds-long 577-nm laser pulses on rabbit colon in vivo. For delivered radiant exposures between 4 and 8 J/cm2, selective coagulation of the colonic vasculature could be produced without damage to the surrounding colon. At greater radiant exposures, vessel hemorrhage was occasionally noted but no transmural thermal injury was produced with delivered radiant exposures as high as 22 J/cm2. This technique may form the basis of a safe and simple treatment of vascular lesions of the colon such as angiodysplasia.

  6. Simultaneous removal of multiple pesticides from water: effect of organically modified clays as coagulant aid and adsorbent in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Shabeer, T P Ahammed; Saha, Ajoy; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Manjaiah, K M; Varghese, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water sources with agrochemical residues became a major concern in the twenty-first century. Coagulation-flocculation is the most widely used water-treatment process, but the efficiency to remove pesticides and other organic pollutants are limited compared to adsorption process. Thus, simultaneous action of adsorption on normal bentonite or organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M) and octadecylamine + amino-propyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] followed by coagulation-flocculation by alum and poly aluminium chloride has been evaluated for removal of 10 different pesticides, namely atrazine, lindane, metribuzin, aldrin, chlorpyriphos, pendimethalin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, p,p'-DDT, cypermethrin and two of its metabolites, endosulphan sulphate and p,p'-DDE, from water. The coagulation without integration of adsorption was less effective (removal % varies from 12 to 49) than the adsorption-coagulation integrated system (removal % varies from 71 to 100). Further, coagulation integrated with adsorption was more effective when organically modified montmorillonite was used as adsorbent compared to normal bentonite. The removal efficiency of organic clay depends upon the concentration of pesticides, doses of clay minerals, and efficiency was more for ODAAPS-M as compared to ODA-M. The combination of ODAAPS-M-clay with coagulants was also used efficiently for the removal of pesticides from natural and fortified natural water collected and the results exhibit the usefulness of this remediation technique for application in water decontamination and in treatment of industrial and agricultural waste waters.

  7. [Modern coagulation management reduces the transfusion rate of allogenic blood products].

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    Evaluating the patient's individual bleeding history with a standardized questionnaire, using "point-of-care" - methods for coagulation analyses and providing autologous transfusion techniques are preconditions of a modern coagulation management. Therapy of coagulopathic patients should be based on structured hemotherapy algorithms. Surgical haemostasis and the maintenance of the basic conditions for haemostasis are elementary requirements for an effective therapy. In cases of diffuse bleeding, early antifibrinolytic therapy should be considered. Coagulation factor deficiencies should be corrected "goal-directed" using coagulation factor concentrates. Transfusion of fresh frozen plasma is only indicated in the clinical setting of massive transfusions. DDAVP and transfusion of platelet concentrates are options to optimize primary haemostasis. In cases of on-going bleeding, recombinant activated coagulation factor VII represents an option for "ultima-ratio" therapy.

  8. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases.

  9. Dust coagulation. [in interstellar medium observed in stellar envelopes and planetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, D.

    1993-01-01

    The microphysics of coagulation between two, colliding, smooth, spherical grains in the elastic limit is investigated, and the criteria for sticking as a function of particle sizes, collision velocities, elastic properties, and binding energy are calculated. Critical relative velocities for coagulation were evaluated as a function of grain sizes for solicate, icy, and carbonaceous grains. It is concluded that efficient coagulation requires coverage of grain cores by an icy grain mantle. In this case, coagulation leads to only a doubling of the mass of a large grain within a dense core lifetime. It is concluded that coagulation can have a dramatic effect on the visible and, particularly, the UV portion of the extinction curve in dense clouds and on their IR spectrum.

  10. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  11. Enhanced coagulation in a typical North-China water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; You, Shijie; Qu, Jiuhui; Tang, Hongxiao

    2006-11-01

    The characteristics of typical source waters in northern China and their enhanced coagulation features were studied in this paper. Through bench scale tests, a composite coagulant (HPAC) was selected for this kind of high alkalinity and pH water. It can be 30% more efficient in organic matter (OM) removal than the traditional coagulants (AlCl(3), FeCl(3)), and polyaluminum chloride (PACl), especially more efficient in removing high SUVA, hydrophobic and high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). It is found that some DOM with low SUVA has precedence over that with high SUVA to be removed at conventional dosages in some seasons, and that the priority of DOM removal is in the same sequence for all the coagulants. DOM with high SUVA is not always more easily removed. When applying HPAC as coagulant, flotation process can remove hydrophobic OM more efficiently than sedimentation process in pilot scale tests.

  12. Development of a magnetic coagulant based on Moringa oleifera seed extract for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tássia R T; Silva, Marcela F; Nishi, Leticia; Vieira, Angélica M S; Klein, Márcia R F; Andrade, Murilo B; Vieira, Marcelo F; Bergamasco, Rosângela

    2016-04-01

    In this work, to evaluate the effectiveness of the coagulation/flocculation using a natural coagulant, using Moringa oleifera Lam functionalized with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, producing flakes that are attracted by an external magnetic field, thereby allowing a fast settling and separation of the clarified liquid, is proposed. The removal efficiency of the parameters, apparent color, turbidity, and compounds with UV254nm absorption, was evaluated. The magnetic functionalized M. oleifera Lam coagulant could effectively remove 90 % of turbidity, 85 % of apparent color, and 50 % for the compounds with absorption at UV254nm, in surface waters under the influence of an external magnetic field within 30 min. It was found that the coagulation/flocculation treatment using magnetic functionalized M. oleifera Lam coagulant was able to reduce the values of the physico-chemical parameters evaluated with reduced settling time.

  13. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu; Fan, Jianren; Hu, Yacai

    2011-02-28

    This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation process. The results indicate a superposition of coagulation and sedimentation effect of small nano-particles. Moreover, it is stable of nanofluids with the volume fraction of particles below the limit of "resolution" of the fluids. In addition, the effect of ζ potentials is against the formation of coagulation and positive to the stability of nanofluids.

  14. [Condition setting for the measurement of blood coagulation factor XIII activity using a fully automated blood coagulation analyzer, COAGTRON-350].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nobuko; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanabe, Kumiko; Jyona, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-12-01

    The automated laboratory analyzer COAGTRON-350 (Trinity Biotech) is used for routine and specific coagulation testing for the detection of fibrin formation utilizing either mechanical principles (ball method) or photo-optical principles, chromogenic kinetic enzyme analysis, and immune-turbidimetric detection systems in one benchtop unit. In this study, we demonstrated and established a parameter for the measurement of factor XIII (FXIII) activity using Berichrom FXIII reagent and the COAGTRON-350 analyzer. The usual protocol used for this reagent, based on the handling method, was slightly modified for this device. The analysis showed that fundamental study for the measurement of FXIII activity under our condition setting was favorable in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and correlation with another assays. Since FXIII is the key enzyme that plays important roles in hemostasis by stabilizing fibrin formation, the measurement of FXIII is essential for the diagnosis of bleeding disorders. Therefore, FXIII activity assessment as well as a routine coagulation testing can be conducted simultaneously with one instrument, which is useful in coagulopathy assessment.

  15. Electronic data management for the Hemochron Jr. Signature coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Searles, Bruce; Nasrallah, Fadi; Graham, Susan; Tozer, Michelle

    2002-09-01

    Point-of-care testing (POC, POCT) laboratory devices are being introduced into operating suites and critical care units in ever increasing numbers. The small, portable devices have gained in popularity because of their ease of use and the rapid availability of test results. POCT is an integral part of extracorporeal technology (ECT). A challenge associated with the growth of POC technology is related to management of the data generated by these devices. In the field of ECT, storing, retrieving, analyzing, viewing and charting quality control (QC) and patient test data generated with POC coagulation instruments is essential. We evaluated a premarket version of data management software developed for the Hemochron Jr. Signature coagulation analyzer, a PC-based software capable of fulfilling our objective. A database comprised of greater than 50 plasma and electronic QC results and greater than 140 patient sample results for ACT, PT, and aPTT tests was transferred from a Hemochron Jr. Signature device to two different PCs, each equipped with Hemochron ReportMaker software supplied by the manufacturer. Data files were transferred directly from the coagulation test unit to the PCs via an RS-232 cable. A variety of charts, reports, and file listings were created from the datasets using the software menus. Transfer of the complete database required less than 5 min. The relative speed and simplicity of the data interface promotes frequent charting of QC data, permitting real-time monitoring and early identification of data trends or values requiring intervention. If a subset of QC data is found to be incomplete, altered, or unacceptable, all patient samples tested during that period can be promptly identified. The software also includes data query tools useful for sorting and selecting specific subsets of patient and QC data. Electronic data management can facilitate compliance with quality control requirements and assist clinicians and laboratory personnel in the

  16. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  17. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  18. [Kidney donor with severe disseminated intravascular coagulation: transplantation however successful].

    PubMed

    Keeris, Lodewijk M; Bergmans, Dennis C J J; van der Sande, Frank M; Wind, Tineke J; van Suylen, Robert Jan; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2009-01-01

    A 41-year-old male, with no previous medical history, was admitted to our intensive care unit with severe isolated neurotrauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of E1-M1-V1, mid-dilated unreactive pupils and severe abnormalities on the brain CT-scan. A severe syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and non-oliguric renal insufficiency developed. Following clinical and neurophysiological examination the patient was declared brain-dead, and the family gave permission for organ donation. The left kidney was transplanted and functioned well immediately. However, in view of the DIC and renal function disorders the right kidney was not considered usable for transplantation elsewhere. Pathological examination revealed many fibrin thrombi in the glomerular capillaries and acute tubular necrosis. This case supports the view that thrombotic microangiopathy in kidneys of patients with DIS, even with renal function impairment, is not an a priori reason for excluding donation.

  19. Model-based advanced process control of coagulation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C W; Shariff, R; Stanley, S J; Smith, D W; Zhang, Q; Saumer, E D

    2002-01-01

    The drinking water treatment industry has seen a recent increase in the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for process modelling and offline process control tools and applications. While conceptual frameworks for integrating the ANN technology into the real-time control of complex treatment processes have been proposed, actual working systems have yet to be developed. This paper presents development and application of an ANN model-based advanced process control system for the coagulation process at a pilot-scale water treatment facility in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The system was successfully used to maintain a user-defined set point for effluent quality, by automatically varying operating conditions in response to changes in influent water quality. This new technology has the potential to realize significant operational cost saving for utilities when applied in full-scale applications.

  20. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  1. Treatment of copper wastewater using optimal current electrochemical-coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungtae; Cui, Fenghao; Yoon, Hyunsik; Kim, Moonil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an automatic current controlling electrochemical-coagulation (EC) process was developed by testing laboratory-scale and pilot-scale reactors for removing copper (Cu) from printed circuit board (PCB) industrial wastewater with an economic use of energy. During tests of the laboratory-scale reactor, the influences of electrode material, electrode gap, current density, hydraulic retention time (HRT), wastewater pH and conductivity on removal performance were explored. The relational expression between conductivity and current density that optimizes Cu removal based on conductivity changes was established and applied to the optimal current EC process. During tests of the pilot-scale reactor, Cu removal from PCB industrial wastewater was investigated by applying an automatic current controlling system for the EC process. More than 90% of the Cu was removed when applying optimal current control for the EC process in both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale experiments, which demonstrated significant energy savings.

  2. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2017-04-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  3. Analysis of ultrasonic techniques for monitoring milk coagulation during cheesemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budelli, E.; Pérez, N.; Lema, P.; Negreira, C.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental determination of time of flight and attenuation has been proposed in the literature as alternatives to monitoring the evolution of milk coagulation during cheese manufacturing. However, only laboratory scale procedures have been described. In this work, the use of ultrasonic time of flight and attenuation to determine cutting time and its feasibility to be applied at industrial scale were analyzed. Limitations to implement these techniques at industrial scale are shown experimentally. The main limitation of the use of time of flight is its strong dependence with temperature. Attenuation monitoring is affected by a thin layer of milk skin covering the transducer, which modifies the signal in a non-repetitive way. The results of this work can be used to develop alternative ultrasonic systems suitable for application in the dairy industry.

  4. Hazardous particle binder, coagulant and re-aerosolization inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula; Zalk, David; Hoffman, D. Mark

    2011-04-12

    A copolymer and water/ethanol solvent solution capable of binding with airborne contaminants or potential airborne contaminants, such as biological weapon agents or toxic particulates, coagulating as the solvent evaporates, and adhering the contaminants to a surface so as to inhibit the re-suspension of such contaminants. The solution uses a water or ethanol/water mixture for the solvent, and a copolymer having one of several functional group sets so as to have physical and chemical characteristics of high adhesion, low viscosity, low surface tension, negative electrostatic charge, substantially neutral pH, and a low pKa. Use of the copolymer solution prevents re-aerosolization and transport of unwanted, reactive species thus increasing health and safety for personnel charged with decontamination of contaminated buildings and areas.

  5. Hazardous particle binder, coagulant and re-aerosolization inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula; Zalk, David; Hoffman, D. Mark

    2012-07-10

    A copolymer and water/ethanol solvent solution capable of binding with airborne contaminants or potential airborne contaminants, such as biological weapon agents or toxic particulates, coagulating as the solvent evaporates, and adhering the contaminants to a surface so as to inhibit the re-suspension of such contaminants. The solution uses a water or ethanol/water mixture for the solvent, and a copolymer having one of several functional group sets so as to have physical and chemical characteristics of high adhesion, low viscosity, low surface tension, negative electrostatic charge, substantially neutral pH, and a low pKa. Use of the copolymer solution prevents re-aerosolization and transport of unwanted, reactive species thus increasing health and safety for personnel charged with decontamination of contaminated buildings and areas.

  6. Effect of coagulant/flocculants on bioproducts from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Renil J; Ellis, Joshua T; Sathish, Ashik; Rahman, Asif; Miller, Charles D; Sims, Ronald C

    2013-12-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of sustainable energy, nutritional supplements and specialized chemicals necessitates a thorough evaluation of the methods of harvesting microalgae with regards to the bioproduct(s) desired. This research assessed the effect of coagulation, flocculation, and centrifugation on the wet lipid extraction procedure, which fractionated microalgae into hydrolyzed biomass for fermentation into acetone, butanol, and ethanol, an aqueous phase as growth media for genetically engineered Escherichia coli, and a lipid fraction for the production of biodiesel. Biomass harvested by cationic starches, alum, and centrifugation produced 30, 19, and 22.5mg/g of dry wt. algae of total combined acetone, butanol, and ethanol, respectively. Higher biodiesel production was also observed for the cationic starches (9.6 mg/g of dry wt. algae) than alum (0.6 mg/g of dry wt. algae) harvested biomass. The results suggested significant effect of the harvesting methods on the yields of bioproducts.

  7. Evaluation of modified clay coagulant for sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Pearce, Pete

    2004-07-01

    The use of modified clays as coagulants for sewage treatment was investigated in this study. The raw clays were montmorillonites K10 and KSF, and were modified by polymeric Al or Fe and/or Al/Fe mixing polymeric species. The comparative performance of modified clays and aluminium sulphate and ferric sulphate were evaluated in terms of the removal of turbidity, suspended solids, UV(254)-abs, colour, and total and soluble CODs. The results demonstrated that after being modified with mixing polymeric Al/Fe species, two montmorillonite clays possess greater properties to remove the particles (as suspended solids) and organic pollutants (as COD and UV(254)-abs) from the sewage and to enhance the particle settling rate significantly.

  8. Is viscoelastic coagulation monitoring with ROTEM or TEG validated?

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Asmis, Lars M.; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent years have seen increasing worldwide interest in the use of viscoelastic coagulation monitoring tests, performed using devices such as ROTEM and TEG. The use of such tests to guide haemostatic therapy may help reduce transfusion of allogeneic blood products in bleeding patients and is supported in European guidelines for managing trauma and severe perioperative bleeding. In addition, viscoelastic tests form the basis of numerous published treatment algorithms. However, some publications have stated that viscoelastic tests are not validated. A specific definition of the term validation is lacking and regulatory requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have been fulfilled by ROTEM and TEG assays. Viscoelastic tests have been used in pivotal clinical trials, and they are approved for use in most of the world’s countries. Provided that locally approved indications are adhered to, the regulatory framework for clinicians to use viscoelastic tests in routine clinical practice is in place. PMID:27354213

  9. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2016-10-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  10. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-01-01

    Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors. PMID:18062812

  11. Optimisation of chemical purification conditions for direct application of solid metal salt coagulants: treatment of peatland-derived diffuse runoff.

    PubMed

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Saukkoriipi, Jaakko; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    The drainage of peatland areas for peat extraction, agriculture or bioenergy requires affordable, simple and reliable treatment methods that can purify waters rich in particulates and dissolved organic carbon. This work focused on the optimisation of chemical purification process for the direct dosage of solid metal salt coagulants. It investigated process requirements of solid coagulants and the influence of water quality, temperature and process parameters on their performance. This is the first attempt to provide information on specific process requirements of solid coagulants. Three solid inorganic coagulants were evaluated: aluminium sulphate, ferric sulphate and ferric aluminium sulphate. Pre-dissolved aluminium and ferric sulphate were also tested with the objective of identifying the effects of in-line coagulant dissolution on purification performance. It was determined that the pre-dissolution of the coagulants had a significant effect on coagulant performance and process requirements. Highest purification levels achieved by solid coagulants, even at 30% higher dosages, were generally lower (5%-30%) than those achieved by pre-dissolved coagulants. Furthermore, the mixing requirements of coagulants pre-dissolved prior to addition differed substantially from those of solid coagulants. The pH of the water samples being purified had a major influence on coagulant dosage and purification efficiency. Ferric sulphate (70 mg/L) was found to be the best performing solid coagulant achieving the following load removals: suspended solids (59%-88%), total organic carbon (56%-62%), total phosphorus (87%-90%), phosphate phosphorus (85%-92%) and total nitrogen (33%-44%). The results show that the use of solid coagulants is a viable option for the treatment of peatland-derived runoff water if solid coagulant-specific process requirements, such as mixing and settling time, are considered.

  12. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-05-20

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  13. [Ferguson hemorrhoidectomy, modified by using the Ligasure radiofrequency coagulator].

    PubMed

    Carditello, Antonio; Stilo, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of results of modified Ferguson hemorrhoidectomy, with use of the Ligasure radiofrequency coagulator, compared to the Milligan-Morgan and Longo techniques. From January 1988 to December 2005, 3011 patients underwent Ferguson hemorrhoidectomy (1849 F, 1162 M; age range: 18 to 84 years). One thousand three hundred patients had previously been treated by medical therapy with poor results and in 225 patients (7.5%) the indication was recurrence after previous surgical treatment. All patients underwent a closed Ferguson hemorrhoidectomy (combined with anoplasty in 28 cases of post-hemorrhoidal stenosis). Eighty percent of patients were operated on with loco-regional assisted anaesthesia, and the remainder with narcosis (cases of recurrence). During the last two years we performed hemorrhoidal excision in 116 patients (4%) with the Ligasure radiofrequency coagulator, followed by continuous suturing with Vicryl 4/0. There was no intraoperative mortality. Mean operation time was 25 minutes. Postoperative complications were hemorrhage in 6 patients (0.2%) and acute urinary retention in 9 patients (0.3%). No important complications were observed in any of the patients treated with Ligasure. The hospital stay was 24 hours for 2852 patients, and 36-86 hours in the other 5%. Seventy-two percent of patients (2160) had moderate postoperative pain, while 14% (420) had severe postoperative pain necessitating repeated administration of analgesics. The 115 patients undergoing Ferguson haemorrhoidectomy plus Ligasure were discharged within 24 hours of surgery. No cases of major domiciliary haemorrhage were observed. There were 13 cases of suture dehiscence (none in the Ferguson plus Ligasure group). Five patients presented suture infection, not requiring surgical drainage, but only medical treatment with local antibiotics. These results, obtained with the modified Ferguson technique, as compared to the classical and even the most innovative

  14. Cardiovascular and blood coagulative effects of pulmonary zinc exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Peter S.; Nyska, Abraham; Schladweiler, Mette C.; McGee, John K.; Wallenborn, J. Grace; Richards, Judy H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P. . E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov

    2006-02-15

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were instilled intratracheally with saline or zinc sulfate, 131 {mu}g/kg (2 {mu}mol/kg); the alterations were determined at 1, 4, 24, and 48 h postexposure. High-dose zinc enabled us to show changes in circulating levels of zinc above normal and induce significant pulmonary inflammation/injury such that cardiac impairments were likely. At 1-24 h postexposure, plasma levels of zinc increased to nearly 20% above the base line. Significant pulmonary inflammation and injury were determined by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histopathology in zinc-exposed rats at all time points. Starting at 4 h postexposure, pulmonary damage was accompanied by persistently increased gene expressions of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), but not thrombomodulin (TM). Cardiac tissues demonstrated similar temporal increases in expressions of TF, PAI-1, and TM mRNA following pulmonary instillation of zinc. In contrast to extensive pulmonary edema and inflammation, only mild, and focal acute, myocardial lesions developed in a few zinc-exposed rats; no histological evidence showed increased deposition of fibrin or disappearance of troponin. At 24 and 48 h postexposure to zinc, increases occurred in levels of systemic fibrinogen and the activated partial thromboplastin time. These data suggest that cardiovascular blood coagulation impairments are likely following pulmonary zinc exposure and associated pulmonary injury and inflammation.

  15. Polyphenoloxidase Silencing Affects Latex Coagulation in Taraxacum Species1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Daniela; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Richter, Carolin; Foucu, Florence; Twyman, Richard M.; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Fischer, Rainer; Muth, Jost; Prüfer, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Latex is the milky sap that is found in many different plants. It is produced by specialized cells known as laticifers and can comprise a mixture of proteins, carbohydrates, oils, secondary metabolites, and rubber that may help to prevent herbivory and protect wound sites against infection. The wound-induced browning of latex suggests that it contains one or more phenol-oxidizing enzymes. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the major latex proteins from two dandelion species, Taraxacum officinale and Taraxacum kok-saghyz, and enzymatic studies showing that polyphenoloxidase (PPO) is responsible for latex browning. Electrophoretic analysis and amino-terminal sequencing of the most abundant proteins in the aqueous latex fraction revealed the presence of three PPO-related proteins generated by the proteolytic cleavage of a single precursor (pre-PPO). The laticifer-specific pre-PPO protein contains a transit peptide that can target reporter proteins into chloroplasts when constitutively expressed in dandelion protoplasts, perhaps indicating the presence of structures similar to plastids in laticifers, which lack genuine chloroplasts. Silencing the PPO gene by constitutive RNA interference in transgenic plants reduced PPO activity compared with wild-type controls, allowing T. kok-saghyz RNA interference lines to expel four to five times more latex than controls. Latex fluidity analysis in silenced plants showed a strong correlation between residual PPO activity and the coagulation rate, indicating that laticifer-specific PPO plays a major role in latex coagulation and wound sealing in dandelions. In contrast, very little PPO activity is found in the latex of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, suggesting functional divergence of latex proteins during plant evolution. PMID:19605551

  16. Polyphenoloxidase silencing affects latex coagulation in Taraxacum species.

    PubMed

    Wahler, Daniela; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Richter, Carolin; Foucu, Florence; Twyman, Richard M; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Fischer, Rainer; Muth, Jost; Prüfer, Dirk

    2009-09-01

    Latex is the milky sap that is found in many different plants. It is produced by specialized cells known as laticifers and can comprise a mixture of proteins, carbohydrates, oils, secondary metabolites, and rubber that may help to prevent herbivory and protect wound sites against infection. The wound-induced browning of latex suggests that it contains one or more phenol-oxidizing enzymes. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the major latex proteins from two dandelion species, Taraxacum officinale and Taraxacum kok-saghyz, and enzymatic studies showing that polyphenoloxidase (PPO) is responsible for latex browning. Electrophoretic analysis and amino-terminal sequencing of the most abundant proteins in the aqueous latex fraction revealed the presence of three PPO-related proteins generated by the proteolytic cleavage of a single precursor (pre-PPO). The laticifer-specific pre-PPO protein contains a transit peptide that can target reporter proteins into chloroplasts when constitutively expressed in dandelion protoplasts, perhaps indicating the presence of structures similar to plastids in laticifers, which lack genuine chloroplasts. Silencing the PPO gene by constitutive RNA interference in transgenic plants reduced PPO activity compared with wild-type controls, allowing T. kok-saghyz RNA interference lines to expel four to five times more latex than controls. Latex fluidity analysis in silenced plants showed a strong correlation between residual PPO activity and the coagulation rate, indicating that laticifer-specific PPO plays a major role in latex coagulation and wound sealing in dandelions. In contrast, very little PPO activity is found in the latex of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, suggesting functional divergence of latex proteins during plant evolution.

  17. Reduced coagulation at high altitude identified by thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel S; Pate, Jim S; Vercueil, Andre; Doyle, Patrick W; Mythen, Michael G; Grocott, Mike P W

    2012-06-01

    The impact of hypoxaemia on blood coagulation remains unclear despite use of a variety of measures to address the issue. We report the first use of thromboelastography (TEG) at high altitude to describe the dynamics of clot formation in whole blood samples. Seventeen healthy volunteers ascended to 5,300 m following an identical ascent profile; TEG measurements at 4,250 m and 5,300 m were compared with those from sea level. Peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and haematocrit were also measured. Ascent resulted in a decline in SpO2 from 97.8 (± 1.2) % at sea level to 86.9 (± 3.3) % at 4,250 m and 79.5 (± 5.8) % at 5,300 m (p<0.001); haematocrit rose from 43.7 (± 2.8) % at sea level, to 46.7 (± 3.9) % and 52.6 (± 3.2) % at 4,250 m and 5,300 m, respectively (p<0.01). TEG reaction (R)-time and kinetic (K)-time were both increased at 5,300 m compared to sea level, 8.95 (± 1.37) minutes (min) to 11.69 (± 2.91) min (p=0.016) and 2.40 (± 0.66) min to 4.99 (± 1.67) min (p<0.001), respectively. Additionally the alpha (α)-angle was decreased from 57.7 (± 8.2) to 51.6 (± 6.4) (p<0.001). There was no change in maximum amplitude (MA) on ascent to altitude. These changes are consistent with an overall pattern of slowed coagulation at high altitude.

  18. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    We simulate collisional evolution of grains in dense turbulent molecular cloud cores (or Bok globules) in static equilibrium and free-fall collapse, assuming spherical symmetry. Relative velocities are due to thermal motions, differential settling, and turbulence, with the latter dominant for sonic turbulence with an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum. Realistic criteria are used to determine outcomes of collisions (coagulation vs. destruction) as functions of particle size and velocity. Results are presented for a variety of cloud parameters (radial density profile, turbulent velocity) and particle properties (density, impact strength). Results are sensitive to the assumed mechanical properties (density and impact strength) of grain aggregates. Particle growth is enhanced if aggregates have low density or fractal structures. On a timescale of a few Myr, an initial population of 0.1 micrometers grains may produce dense compact particles approximately 1 micrometer in size, or fluffy aggregates approximately 100 micrometers. For impact strengths less than or equal to 10(exp 6) ergs/g, a steady state is reached between coagulation of small grains and collisional disruption of larger aggregates. Formation of macroscopic aggregates requires high mechanical strengths and low aggregate densities. We assume sonic turbulence during collapse, with varied eddy size scales determining the dissipation rate or turbulence strength. The degree of collisional evolution during collapse is sensitive to the assumed small-scale structure (inner sc ale) of the turbulence. Weak turbulence results in few collisions and preserves the precollapse particle size distribution with little change. Strong turbulence tends to produce net destruction, rather than particle growth, during infall, unless inpact strengths are greater than 10(exp 6)ergs/g.

  19. Removal of antibiotic resistance genes from wastewater treatment plant effluent by coagulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-03-15

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), as emerging environmental contaminants, have become a threat to human health. Recent studies have demonstrated that the effluent from wastewater treatment plants is a significant point source of ARGs released into the environment. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of coagulation technology in the removal of ARGs from treated wastewater. Specifically, we measured the removal of five ARGs (two sulfonamide resistance genes, sulI and sulII, and three tetracycline resistance genes, tetO, tetW and tetQ) and the class 1 integron intI1 gene via the application of two coagulants: FeCl3 and polyferric chloride (PFC). Moreover, the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), NH3N and total phosphorus (TP) in the coagulation process was investigated. The coagulation process effectively removed ARGs from the effluent with 0.5-log to 3.1-log reductions. Significant removal correlations were observed between dissolved NH3N and DOC, intI1 and sulI, sulII and tetO, sulII and tetW, and tetO and tetW, implying that the co-removal of DOC, dissolved NH3N, the intI1 gene and different ARGs played an important role in ARG loss during coagulation with Fe-based coagulants. These results indicate that coagulation may play a promising role in ARG reduction in wastewater treatment plants.

  20. Use of combined coagulation-adsorption process as pretreatment of landfill leachate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Landfill leachate is an important pollution factor resulting from municipal landfill sites. Physical and chemical processes are the better option for pretreatment or full treatment of landfill leachate. This article presents a combination of pre-treatment method (coagulation and adsorption) for leachate collected from municipal solid waste open dumping site. Physico chemical characteristics of stabilized and fresh leachate were examined. Coagulation process was examined by using alum and ferric chloride. A low cost adsorbent, fly ash was used for adsorption studies. Coagulation studies were carried out for fresh and stabilized leachate. Adsorption studies have been conducted for alum pre-treated stabilized leachate. Effect of coagulant dose, adsorbent dose, pH and contact time were carried out. The effective optimum coagulant dosages were 0.6 g/L and 0.7 g/L for alum and ferric chloride respectively for stabilized leachate and incase of fresh leachate 0.8 g/L and 0.6 g/L for alum and ferric chloride respectively. For the alum pretreated stabilized leachate, the maximum COD removal is 28% using fly ash adsorbent with equilibrium time of 210 min and optimum dose of 6 g/L. Overall COD removal efficiency of 82% was obtained by coagulation using alum and adsorption using fly ash for stabilized leachate. The results obtained showed that combined coagulation and adsorption process can be used effectively for stabilized leachate treatment. PMID:23517661

  1. Simultaneous optimization of multiple performance characteristics in coagulation-flocculation process for Indian paper industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, R; Saseetharan, M K

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to optimize the coagulation-flocculation process in wastewater generated from the paper and pulp industry using a grey relational analysis (GRA)-based Taguchi method. Process parameters included types and doses of natural coagulants and coagulant aid, and pH. To track the efficiency of the treatment process, the following responses were chosen for optimization: chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS) and turbidity of wastewater, alone or in combination or all together. Analysis of variance showed that the type and dose of the coagulant aid were the most significant parameters, followed by pH and the dose of the coagulant; the type of coagulant used was found to be insignificant in the coagulation-flocculation process. Optimization of process parameters to achieve lower turbidity and greater removal of COD and TDS was verified in a separate confirmatory experiment, which showed improvements in COD and TDS removal and a decrease in turbidity of 8.2, 6.35 and 26.17%, respectively, with the application of the Taguchi method and GRA.

  2. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  3. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; ...

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequentmore » effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.« less

  4. The Organophosphate Paraoxon and Its Antidote Obidoxime Inhibit Thrombin Activity and Affect Coagulation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Golderman, Valery; Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Tamarin, Ilia; Rosman, Yossi; Shrot, Shai; Rosenberg, Nurit; Maggio, Nicola; Chapman, Joab; Eisenkraft, Arik

    Organophosphates (OPs) are potentially able to affect serine proteases by reacting with their active site. The potential effects of OPs on coagulation factors such as thrombin and on coagulation tests have been only partially characterized and potential interactions with OPs antidotes such as oximes and muscarinic blockers have not been addressed. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interactions between coagulation, thrombin, the OP paraoxon, and its antidotes obidoxime and atropine. The effects of these substances on thrombin activity were measured in a fluorescent substrate and on coagulation by standard tests. Both paraoxon and obidoxime but not atropine significantly inhibited thrombin activity, and prolonged prothrombin time, thrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. When paraoxon and obidoxime were combined, a significant synergistic effect was found on both thrombin activity and coagulation tests. In conclusion, paraoxon and obidoxime affect thrombin activity and consequently alter the function of the coagulation system. Similar interactions may be clinically relevant for coagulation pathways in the blood and possibly in the brain.

  5. Preparation and characterisation of new-polyaluminum chloride-chitosan composite coagulant.

    PubMed

    Ng, Mega; Liana, Ayu E; Liu, Sanly; Lim, May; Chow, Christopher W K; Wang, Dongsheng; Drikas, Mary; Amal, Rose

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the formulation of a novel polyaluminum chloride-chitosan composite coagulant that improves the coagulation process for natural organic matter (NOM) removal was investigated. The performance of the composite coagulant was tested using two water sources (synthetic and natural water) to develop a better understanding on the behaviour of the composite coagulant. Fourier Transform-Infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, ferron analysis and zeta potential studies were performed to characterise the composite coagulant. FT-IR analysis showed that there is an intermolecular interaction between Al species and chitosan molecules, while ferron analysis indicated that the distributions of Al(a), Al(b), and Al(c) in PACl-chitosan are different from those in PACl. At a low Al dosage (2.16 mg L⁻¹), a much higher removal of NOM from synthetic water, as evidenced from UV₂₅₄ and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) measurements, was achieved by the composite coagulants in comparison to that removed by PACl or PACl and chitosan added separately. For natural water from the Myponga Reservoir, both polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and PACl-chitosan composite coagulants demonstrated similar dissolved organic carbon (DOC) percentage removal, whereas PACl-chitosan gave a slight improvement in removing the UV₂₅₄ absorbing components of NOM.

  6. Purification and characterization of Al13 species in coagulant polyaluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Gao, Baoyu; Chu, Yongbao; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Nano-Al13 was separated and purified by four methods to investigate its characteristic, and was analyzed by Al-Ferron timed complexation spectrophotometer, 27Al-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coagulation efficiency of nano-Al13, polyaluminum chloride (PAC), and AlCl3 in synthetic water were also investigated by jar test. The dynamic process and aggregation state of kaolin suspensions coagulating with nano-Al13, PAC, and AICl3 were also investigated. The experimental results indicated that the efficiency of gel column chromatography method was the highest for separating PAC solution with low Al concentration. Ethanol and acetone method was simple and could separated PAC solution with different Al concentrations, while silicon alkylation white block column chromatography method could separate PAC solution only with low Al concentration. The SO4(2-)/Ba2+ displacement method could separate PAC solution with high Al concentration, but extra inorganic cation and anion could be introduced into the solution during the separation. The coagulation efficiency and dynamic experimental results showed that nano-Al13 with a high positive-charged species was the main species of electric neutralization in coagulation process, and it could reduce the turbidity and increase the effective particles collision rate efficiently in coagulation process. Its coagulation speed and the particle size of coagulant formed were of greatest value in this study.

  7. Disinfection byproduct precursor removal by enhanced coagulation and their distribution in chemical fractions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanmei; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Dongsheng; Yan, Mingquan; Bi, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    Raw water from the Songhua River was treated by four types of coagulants, ferric chloride (FeCI3), aluminum sulfate (AI2(SO4)3), polyaluminum chloride (PACI) and composite polyaluminum (HPAC), in order to remove dissolved organic matter (DOM). Considering the disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor treatability, DOM was divided into five chemical fractions based on resin adsorption. Trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) and haloacetic acid formation potential (HAAFP) were measured for each fraction. The results showed that hydrophobic acids (HoA), hydrophilic matter (HiM) and hydrophobic neutral (HoN) were the dominant fractions. Although both HoN and HoA were the main THM precursors, the contribution for THMFP changed after coagulation. Additionally, HoA and HiM were the main HAA precursors, while the contribution of HoN to HAAFP significantly increased after coagulation. HoM was more easily removed than HiM, no matter which coagulant was used, especially under enhanced coagulation conditions. DOC removal was highest for enhanced coagulation using FeCI3 while DBPFP was lowest using PACI. This could indicate that not all DOC fractions contained the precursors of DBPs. Reduction of THMFP and HAAFP by PACI under enhanced coagulation could reach 51% and 59% respectively.

  8. The Organophosphate Paraoxon and Its Antidote Obidoxime Inhibit Thrombin Activity and Affect Coagulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Golderman, Valery; Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Tamarin, Ilia; Rosman, Yossi; Shrot, Shai; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are potentially able to affect serine proteases by reacting with their active site. The potential effects of OPs on coagulation factors such as thrombin and on coagulation tests have been only partially characterized and potential interactions with OPs antidotes such as oximes and muscarinic blockers have not been addressed. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interactions between coagulation, thrombin, the OP paraoxon, and its antidotes obidoxime and atropine. The effects of these substances on thrombin activity were measured in a fluorescent substrate and on coagulation by standard tests. Both paraoxon and obidoxime but not atropine significantly inhibited thrombin activity, and prolonged prothrombin time, thrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. When paraoxon and obidoxime were combined, a significant synergistic effect was found on both thrombin activity and coagulation tests. In conclusion, paraoxon and obidoxime affect thrombin activity and consequently alter the function of the coagulation system. Similar interactions may be clinically relevant for coagulation pathways in the blood and possibly in the brain. PMID:27689805

  9. Influence of a constant and variable magnetic field on the coagulation of human blood in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degen, I. L.; Plaksenko, V. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of constant and varying magnetic fields on the coagulation of the blood was studied in experiments performed in vitro and vivo. In the in vitro tests it was found that a constant magnetic field with a strength of 100 or 200 oersteds influences the coagulation of the blood, retarding it in some cases and speeding up the coagulation time in others. In the in vivo studies, both retarding and accelerating effects were likewise observed with respect to the coagulation of the blood, but the nature of the change was a function of the background. A normalizing effect of the magnetic field on the coagulation of the blood was observed.

  10. A Novel Role for Pro-Coagulant Microvesicles in the Early Host Defense against Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Oehmcke, Sonja; Westman, Johannes; Malmström, Johan; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells with bacterial virulence factors results in the sequestration of pro-coagulant microvesicles (MVs). These particles explore their clotting activity via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathway of coagulation; however, their pathophysiological role in infectious diseases remains enigmatic. Here we describe that the interaction of pro-coagulant MVs with bacteria of the species Streptococcus pyogenes is part of the early immune response to the invading pathogen. As shown by negative staining electron microscopy and clotting assays, pro-coagulant MVs bind in the presence of plasma to the bacterial surface. Fibrinogen was identified as a linker that, through binding to the M1 protein of S. pyogenes, allows the opsonization of the bacteria by MVs. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a strong interaction between pro-coagulant MVs and fibrinogen with a KD value in the nanomolar range. When performing a mass-spectrometry-based strategy to determine the protein quantity, a significant up-regulation of the fibrinogen-binding integrins CD18 and CD11b on pro-coagulant MVs was recorded. Finally we show that plasma clots induced by pro-coagulant MVs are able to prevent bacterial dissemination and possess antimicrobial activity. These findings were confirmed by in vivo experiments, as local treatment with pro-coagulant MVs dampens bacterial spreading to other organs and improved survival in an invasive streptococcal mouse model of infection. Taken together, our data implicate that pro-coagulant MVs play an important role in the early response of the innate immune system in infectious diseases. PMID:23935504

  11. Coagulation of soil suspensions containing nonionic or anionic surfactants using chitosan, polyacrylamide, and polyaluminium chloride.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tania; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Lee, Dae S; Lee, Min W; Woo, Seung Han

    2009-06-01

    Effective coagulation and separation of particles in a soil-washed solution is required for a successful soil washing process. The effectiveness of chitosan (CS), a polycationic biodegradable polymer, as a coagulant was compared to polyacrylamide (PAA) and polyaluminium chloride (PAC) for the coagulation of a soil suspension (5 gL(-1)). The effect of surfactants in the coagulation process was investigated using Triton X-100 (TX-100), a nonionic surfactant, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant. CS (5 mgL(-1)) removed 86% and 63% of the suspended soil in the presence of TX-100 (5 gL(-1)) and SDS (5 gL(-1)), respectively, after 30 min at a pH of 6. The results prove that coagulation in the presence of TX-100 is more effective than with SDS. CS was found to be more efficient compared to PAA and PAC under all coagulation conditions. The optimum concentration of CS required for maximum coagulation of soil suspension was 5 mgL(-1). PAA and PAC could not achieve the same degree soil removal as CS even after increasing their concentrations up to 50 mgL(-1). Maximum levels of 50% and 60% soil removal were achieved using PAA (50 mgL(-1)) and PAC (50 mgL(-1)), respectively, after 30 min from a 5 gL(-1) suspension containing TX-100 (5 gL(-1)). The soil coagulation process was found to decrease with an increase in the pH of the suspension, and maximum coagulation was achieved with an acidic pH.

  12. Light Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Discusses multipurpose athletic-field lighting specifications to enhance lighting quality and reduce costs. Topics discussed include lamp choice, lighting spillover and glare prevention, luminary assemblies and poles, and the electrical dimming and switching systems. (GR)

  13. Light Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegel, Kurt W.

    1973-01-01

    Outdoor lighting is light pollution which handicaps certain astronomical programs. Protective measures must be adopted by the government to aid observational astronomy without sacrificing legitimate outdoor lighting needs. (PS)

  14. Feasibility study: protein denaturation and coagulation monitoring with speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Cheon, Gyeongwoo; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-12-01

    We performed the feasibility study using speckle variance optical coherence tomography (SvOCT) to monitor the thermally induced protein denaturation and coagulation process as a function of temperature and depth. SvOCT provided the depth-resolved image of protein denaturation and coagulation with microscale resolution. This study was conducted using egg white. During the heating process, as the temperature increased, increases in the speckle variance signal was observed as the egg white proteins coagulated. Additionally, by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient in specific areas, denaturized egg white conditions were successfully estimated. These results indicate that SvOCT could be used to monitor the denaturation process of various proteins.

  15. Ultrafiltration of sulfite liquors for separation of lignosulfonates removed from water by coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Yu.M.; Medvedev, M.I.; Tsapyuk, E.A.

    1986-04-10

    This paper attempts to select an ultrafilter retaining lignosulfonate (LS) fractions precipitated by coagulants and to study the relationships of their concentration and efficiency of removal from water by coagulants. The material studied - sulfite liquor from the Syas' pulp and paper combine - was fractionated with the use of ''Vladipor'' cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membranes of various pore sizes. Data on the efficiency of removal from water of LS fractions retained by membranes differing in pore size are presented. It is concluded that ecologically safe LS fractions (removed almost completely by the coagulant) can be obtained by ultrafiltration of technical liquor through UAM-500 membranes under 0.7 MPA pressure.

  16. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  17. Removal of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans by three coagulants in simulated coagulation processes for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Peng, Ping'an; Zhang, Sukun; Man, Ren; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2009-02-15

    Surface water from Guangzhou to which standard polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were added was treated by coagulation with ferric chloride (FC), polyaluminium chloride (PAC), and aluminium sulfate (AS) at optimum removal dosages for nature organic matter (NOM) to assess the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) removal efficiencies. PCDD/Fs in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and treated water (TW) after coagulation were analysed. Low residual levels of PCDD/Fs were found in treated water after coagulation: 0.8% for FC, 0.9% for PAC, and 3.1% for AS. The removal efficiency calculated using these results was >99% for FC and PAC and 97-98% for AS. Most PCDD/Fs congeners could be removed by the three coagulation processes; the removal efficiency of FC and PAC was similar, and slightly higher than that of AS. The results also demonstrate that coagulation with FC preferentially removed tetra- and penta-substituted PCDD/Fs from raw water.

  18. Determination of optimum polymeric coagulant in palm oil mill effluent coagulation using multiple-objective optimisation on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA).

    PubMed

    Tamrin, K F; Zahrim, A Y

    2016-12-24

    The main limitation of a conventional palm oil mill effluent (POME) ponding system lies in its inability to completely decolourise effluent. Decolourisation of effluent is aesthetically and environmentally crucial. However, determination of the optimum process parameters is becoming more complex with the increase of the number of coagulants and responses. The primary objective of this study is to determine the optimum polymeric coagulant in the coagulation-flocculation process of palm oil mill effluent by considering all output responses, namely lignin-tannin, low molecular mass coloured compounds (LMMCC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), pH and conductivity. Here, multiple-objective optimisation on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA) is employed to discretely measure multiple response characteristics of five different types of coagulants as a function of assessment value. The optimum coagulant is determined based on the highest assessment value and was identified as QF25610 (cationic polyacrylamide). On the other hand, the lowest assessment value was represented by AN1800 (anionic polyacrylamide). This study highlights the simplicity of MOORA approach in handling various input and output parameters, and it may be useful in other wastewater treatment processes as well.

  19. Comparison of epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine with other cationic organic polymers as coagulation aids of polyferric chloride in coagulation-ultrafiltration process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shenglei; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Ruihua; Song, Wen; Bu, Fan; Zhao, Shuang; Jia, Ruibao; Song, Wuchang

    2016-04-15

    Epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine (DAM-ECH) copolymer was acquired by polycondensation of hazardous reagents: epichlorohydrin (analytical reagent, A.R.) and dimethylamine (A.R.) with ethanediamine (A.R.) as cross-linker. Its coagulation and membrane performance as coagulation aid of polyferric chloride (PFC) was evaluated by comparing with other two cationic coagulation aids: poly dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride (PDMDAAC) and polyacrylamide (PAM) in humic acid-kaolin (HA-Kaolin) simulated water treatment. Firstly, optimum dosages of PFC&DAM-ECH, PFC&PDMDAAC and PFC&PAM were identified according to their coagulation performance. Then their impacts (under optimum dosages) on membrane fouling of regenerated cellulose (RC) ultra-membrane disc in coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) process were reviewed. Results revealed that small addition of DAM-ECH was the effective on turbidity and DOC removal polymer. Furthermore, in the following ultra-filtration process, external membrane fouling resistance was demonstrated to be the dominant portion of the total membrane fouling resistance under all circumstances. Meanwhile, the internal membrane fouling resistance was determined by residual of micro-particles(1) that cannot be intercepted by cake layer or ultrafiltration membrane.

  20. 21 CFR 864.5425 - Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5425 Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 864.5425 - Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5425 Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies. (a) Identification....

  2. Coagulation-flocculation and ammoniacal stripping of leachates from municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Paz; Díaz, Arturo; Cortijo, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    The elimination of contamination in leachates from municipal solid waste landfill was studied by sedimentation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the removal efficiency of turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids (SS) and ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)). First, by coagulation with aluminium sulphate like inorganic coagulant, and secondly by flocculation with anionic polyacrylamides in quick succession. The use of polyacrylamides after coagulation with Al(3+) showed a lower SS removal and slow filtration. Turbidity removal efficacy was over 60% if Al(3+) concentration was 190 mg/L. COD elimination by flocculation was 10 to 20% regardless of adding polyacrylamides. Finally, ammoniacal stripping is made in order to reduce the ammoniacal nitrogen concentration in the supernatant liquid obtained after coagulation with Al(3+). The most influential variable in ammoniacal stripping was the agitation time.

  3. Platelets and coagulation in thrombus formation: aberrations in the Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Johanna P; Swieringa, Frauke; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2016-05-01

    Platelets play key roles in thrombosis and hemostasis by forming aggregates and providing a procoagulant surface, at which thrombin is generated and fibrin fibers are formed. Here we present an overview of the different mechanisms how platelets orchestrate coagulation processes in thrombus formation in thrombosis and hemostasis. Parts of these are via Ca(2+)-dependent activation responses, leading to phosphatidylserine exposure; swelling to form balloons with increased binding of coagulation factors; and calpain-mediated integrin αIIbβ3 cleavage and inactivation. Other mechanisms are secretion of (anti) coagulation factors, and αIIbβ3-mediated thrombus retraction, and clot retraction. In a thrombus, coagulation factors are found at both platelets and fibrin fibers. Many of the procoagulant platelet activities are altered in the Scott syndrome.

  4. Paper and board mill effluent treatment with the combined biological-coagulation-filtration pilot scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shabir, Ghulam; Hussain, Irshad; Khalid, Zafar M

    2008-10-01

    Pilot scale reactor based on combined biological-coagulation-filtration treatments was designed and evaluated for the treatment of effluent from a paper and board mill. Biological treatment by fed batch reactor (FBR) followed by coagulation and sand filtration (SF) resulted in a total COD and BOD reduction of 93% and 96.5%, respectively. A significant reduction in both COD (90%) and BOD (92%) was also observed by sequencing batch reactor (SBR) process followed by coagulation and filtration. Untreated effluent was found to be toxic, whereas the treated effluents by either of the above two processes were found to be non-toxic when exposed to the fish for 72h. The resultant effluent from FBR-coagulation-sand filtration system meets National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) of Pakistan and can be discharged into the environment without any risks.

  5. Analysis of the coagulation of human blood cells on diamond surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranauskas, V.; Fontana, M.; Guo, Zhao Jing; Ceragioli, H. J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and coagulation of human blood cells in contact with solid surfaces. Blood was extracted from the veins of healthy adult donors and the samples were used immediately after extraction, deposited either on borosilicate glass or diamond substrates. Some blood samples were anti-coagulated by adding heparin for single cell AFM imaging. No chemicals were used for attaching or immobilizing the cells. The diamond substrates were produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD diamond) using a hot-filament CVD system fed with ethanol highly diluted in hydrogen. AFM imaging of isolated cells (anti-coagulated by heparin) was only possible on the glass substrates due to the lack of adherence of the cells to the diamond surface. The coagulation results suggest that blood clotting on diamond produces a less rough surface than blood clotting on glass.

  6. EXTRINSIC COAGULATION BLOCKADE ATTENUATES LUNG INJURY AND PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE RELEASE AFTER INTRATRACHEAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a potentially powerful regulator of local inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that blockade of TF-factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex would decrease lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine release after tracheal instillation o...

  7. Potential toxicity concerns from chemical coagulation treatment of stormwater in the Tahoe basin, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Lopus, S E; Bachand, P A M; Heyvaert, A C; Werner, I; Teh, S J; Reuter, J E

    2009-10-01

    Coagulant dosing of stormwater runoff with polyaluminum chlorides (PACs) is used in numerous waterbodies to improve water clarity, but the potential risks of PACs to aquatic organisms in Lake Tahoe, California are not fully understood. To assess these risks, the USEPA 3-species toxicity test and a non-standard fish test using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were used to determine the toxicity of PAC-treated and non-treated stormwater samples to aquatic species. Stormwater samples were collected from three sites representing runoff from different urbanized areas in May 2004; samples received coagulant dosing using three different coagulants (JC1720, PAX-XL9, Sumalchlor50) at levels optimized with jar testing. Raw stormwaters were toxic to algae and fathead minnows (mortality). Treatment with coagulants increased toxicity to zooplankton (reproduction) and had no consistent effects on the other toxicity metrics.

  8. REMOVAL OF BERYLLIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CHEMICAL COAGULATION AND LIME SOFTENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. ar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride and lime softening performed ...

  9. [Coagulation therapy in multiple trauma without point-of-care testing].

    PubMed

    Lier, H; Hinkelbein, J

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of blood coagulation with thrombelastometry (ROTEM™) and thrombelastography (TEG™) and analysis of thrombocyte function by a Multiplate™ assay is possible in only a few hospitals in Germany. Recently, the grade of recommendation (GoR) for point-of-care (POC) testing in official guidelines was increased and is now classified as GoR 1C. If a POC-based option is not available alternatives must be used. Besides blood products (RBC, FFP, TC), coagulation factor concentrates are used to treat trauma-induced coagulopathy. The benefits of therapy with factor concentrates are fewer immunological and infection side effects as well as faster effects after administration of specific coagulation factors. A good outcome in patients with multiple trauma is only possible by an adequate transfusion regime and administration of coagulation factors.

  10. Pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using Moringa oleifera seeds as natural coagulant.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subhash; Othman, Zalina; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2007-06-25

    Moringa oleifera seeds, an environmental friendly and natural coagulant are reported for the pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME). In coagulation-flocculation process, the M. oleifera seeds after oil extraction (MOAE) are an effective coagulant with the removal of 95% suspended solids and 52.2% reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The combination of MOAE with flocculant (NALCO 7751), the suspended solids removal increased to 99.3% and COD reduction was 52.5%. The coagulation-flocculation process at the temperature of 30 degrees C resulted in better suspended solids removal and COD reduction compared to the temperature of 40, 55 and 70 degrees C. The MOAE combined with flocculant (NALCO 7751) reduced the sludge volume index (SVI) to 210mL/g with higher recovery of dry mass of sludge (87.25%) and water (50.3%).

  11. Review of Coagulation Technology for Removal of Arsenic: Case of Chile

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation technology has been used since 1970 in northern Chile for removing arsenic from drinking-water. This experience suggests that coagulation is an effective technology for the removal of arsenic. It is currently possible to reduce arsenic from 400 μg/L to 10 μg/L at a rate of 500 L/sec, assuming pH, oxidizing and coagulation agents are strictly controlled. The Chilean experience with the removal of arsenic demonstrates that the water matrix dictates the selection of the arsenic-removal process. This paper presents a summary of the process, concepts, and operational considerations for the use of coagulation technology for removal of arsenic in Chile. PMID:17366767

  12. Aberrant coagulation causes a hyper-inflammatory response in severe influenza pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infects the respiratory tract in humans and causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide each year. Aggressive inflammation, known as a cytokine storm, is thought to cause most of the damage in the lungs during IAV infection. Dysfunctional coagulation is a common complication in pathogenic influenza, manifested by lung endothelial activation, vascular leak, disseminated intravascular coagulation and pulmonary microembolism. Importantly, emerging evidence shows that an uncontrolled coagulation system, including both the cellular (endothelial cells and platelets) and protein (coagulation factors, anticoagulants and fibrinolysis proteases) components, contributes to the pathogenesis of influenza by augmenting viral replication and immune pathogenesis. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of the dysfunctional coagulatory response in the pathogenesis of IAV. PMID:27041635

  13. Characteristic of a novel composite inorganic polymer coagulant-PFAC prepared by hydrochloric pickle liquor.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wei; Qiu, Huiqin; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Yanjing; Yang, Kailiang; Liu, Zhongzhe; Ding, Guoji

    2009-02-15

    A composite inorganic polymer coagulant, polyferric aluminum chloride (PFAC) was prepared by using hydrochloric pickle liquor and calcium aluminate as main materials. The optimum conditions for preparing PFAC with the hydrochloric pickle liquor and the calcium aluminate were studied. The coagulation performance of PFAC was investigated by studying the turbidity, COD, total phosphate (TP) and NH(3)-N removal efficiency in municipal sewage treatment. Results indicated that the effective composition, basicity (simplified as B, B=[OH]/(3[Fe(T)+Al(T)])x100%), coagulation performance and stability of PFAC were affected by calcium aluminate dosage, reaction time, reaction temperature and stabilizing agents. The COD and turbidity removal efficiency of PFAC was better than that of PFS and FeCl(3), and the TP and NH(3)-N removal efficiency of PFAC was much better than that of PFS, FeCl(3) and PAC. PFAC not only possessed a good coagulation performance, but also had good stability when stored.

  14. Combination of coagulation and catalytic wet oxidation for the treatment of pulp and paper mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Verenich; Laari, A; Nissen, M; Kallas, J

    2001-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is a well established process for purification of concentrated municipal and industrial wastewaters. Many attempts have been made to modify the WO process or to create a suitable combination of processes. This work was undertaken to investigate wet oxidation integrated with coagulation, i.e. to treat the sludge remaining after coagulation with a WO process. The possibility of regeneration of the used coagulant was also considered. Two waters from paper mills were used: TMP (thermomechanical pulp) circulation water and membrane concentrate. About 50% of the COD in the original water can be removed by coagulation using Fe2(SO4)3. The results from the wet oxidation experiments show the positive effect of iron in the chemical sludge as a catalyst. The efficiency of the WO process was enhanced almost by 100%. The remaining dissolved organic matter can be easily removed biologically.

  15. Tissue factor as an initiator of coagulation and inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Patients with severe infections almost invariably exhibit evidence of activation of the coagulation system. The lungs are amongst the most frequently affected organs during severe infection and sepsis. The abundant presence of intravascular and extravascular fibrin appears to be a specific hallmark of acute lung injury after sepsis. Tissue factor (TF) is regarded to be the primary initiator of coagulation in severe infection. Effective blockade of the TF pathway, either by recombinant TF pathway inhibitor or by anti-TF antibodies in experimental sepsis, attenuates lung injury and partially prevents pulmonary dysfunction. In addition, inhibition of the activity of TF prevents local activation of coagulation in models of pneumonia. The TF pathway can influence inflammatory signaling by activation of protease activated receptor-1 and -2. This review presents the most recent data on the crosstalk between TF-mediated coagulation and inflammation, with a specific emphasis on these processes in the lung.

  16. Evaluation of geotextile filtration applying coagulant and flocculant amendments for aquaculture biosolids dewatering and phosphorus removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wastes contained in the microscreen backwash discharged from intensive recirculating aquaculture systems were removed and dewatered in simple geotextile bag filters. Three chemical coagulation aids, (aluminum sulfate (alum), ferric chloride, and calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime)), were tested in com...

  17. Lighting Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Frank D.

    1975-01-01

    With the energy crisis has come an awareness of wasteful consumption practices. One area where research is being done is in lighting conservation. Information in this article is concerned with finding more effective and efficient lighting designs which include daylight utilization, task-oriented lighting, and lighting controls. (MA)

  18. Choline or CDP-choline attenuates coagulation abnormalities and prevents the development of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in dogs during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeki; Ozarda, Yesim; Cansev, Mehmet; Eralp, Oya; Kocaturk, Meric; Ulus, Ismail H

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis/endotoxemia causes platelet dysfunctions, abnormalities in coagulation and hemostatic mechanisms leading to organ dysfunctions and mortality. Choline prevents organ injury and improves survival during endotoxemia. The main objective of the present study was to determine the effects of choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Dogs were treated intravenously (i.v.) with saline, choline (20 mg/kg), or CDP-choline (70 mg/kg) three times with 4-h intervals starting 5 min before i.v. injection of endotoxin (1 mg/kg). Platelet counts and functions, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, coagulation factors, D-dimer and antithrombin (AT) were measured before and at 0.5-96 h after endotoxin. Circulating platelet, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were decreased, whereas PT and aPTT were prolonged and serum D-dimer levels were elevated after endotoxin. Endotoxin-induced reductions in platelet counts and functions, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were attenuated or blocked by choline or CDP-choline. Choline or CDP-choline blocked endotoxin-induced prolongation in PT and aPTT and enhancement in D-dimer. Elevated DIC scores were attenuated by choline and blocked by CDP-choline. Choline administration increased serum choline concentrations and caused bradycardia. Choline also increased choline and acetylcholine contents of circulating mononuclear cells and inhibited radioligand binding to their cholinergic receptors. These data show that choline administration, as choline chloride or CDP-choline, restores the abnormalities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary hemostasis and prevents the development of DIC during experimental endotoxemia in dogs probably by increasing both neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic activity.

  19. Coagulation of charged microparticles in neutral gas and charge-induced gel transitions.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G E; Konopka, U

    2002-11-04

    Coagulation of charged particles was studied using the mean-field Smoluchowski equation. The coagulation equation was generalized for the case of a conserved system of charged particles. It was shown that runaway cluster growth (gelation) solutions exist if the charge-dipole (induced) interaction of clusters is included. When clusters are in thermal equilibrium with the ambient gas, the charge-dipole interaction dramatically enhances the aggregation process and considerably increases the likelihood of a gelation transition.

  20. Genetic Factors Influencing Coagulation Factor XIII B-Subunit Contribute to Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, Matthew; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bevan, Stephen; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sudlow, Cathie; Williams, Frances M.K.; Markus, Hugh S.; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Abnormal coagulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, but how this association is mediated and whether it differs between ischemic stroke subtypes is unknown. We determined the shared genetic risk between 14 coagulation factors and ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Methods— Using genome-wide association study results for 14 coagulation factors from the population-based TwinsUK sample (N≈2000 for each factor), meta-analysis results from the METASTROKE consortium ischemic stroke genome-wide association study (12 389 cases, 62 004 controls), and genotype data for 9520 individuals from the WTCCC2 ischemic stroke study (3548 cases, 5972 controls—the largest METASTROKE subsample), we explored shared genetic risk for coagulation and stroke. We performed three analyses: (1) a test for excess concordance (or discordance) in single nucleotide polymorphism effect direction across coagulation and stroke, (2) an estimation of the joint effect of multiple coagulation-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke, and (3) an evaluation of common genetic risk between coagulation and stroke. Results— One coagulation factor, factor XIII subunit B (FXIIIB), showed consistent effects in the concordance analysis, the estimation of polygenic risk, and the validation with genotype data, with associations specific to the cardioembolic stroke subtype. Effect directions for FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly discordant with cardioembolic disease (smallest P=5.7×10−04); the joint effect of FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly predictive of ischemic stroke (smallest P=1.8×10−04) and the cardioembolic subtype (smallest P=1.7×10−04). We found substantial negative genetic covariation between FXIIIB and ischemic stroke (rG=−0.71, P=0.01) and the cardioembolic subtype (rG=−0.80, P=0.03). Conclusions— Genetic markers associated with low FXIIIB levels

  1. Fibrinogen Availability and Coagulation Function After Hemorrhage and Resuscitation in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), are per- formed in plasma, and, therefore, can- not reflect the interaction of platelet and fibrinogen. Activated ...requires a valid and comprehensive as- sessment of coagulation function. Nor- mal coagulation assays, such as pro- thrombin time (PT) and activated ...the initiation of thrombin generation by the activation of FVIIa/TF complex and FXa, the propagation of thrombin generation from the production of

  2. Influence of micellar calcium and phosphorus on rennet coagulation properties of cows milk.

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Massimo; Franceschi, Piero; Formaggioni, Paolo; Sandri, Sandro; Mariani, Primo; Summer, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The main requirement for milk processed in most cheese typologies is its rennet coagulation ability. Despite the increasing number of studies, the causes for abnormal coagulation of milk are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to ascertain relationships between milk characteristics and its rennet coagulation ability, focusing on the influence of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P). Ca and P are essential constituents of the micelles. Micellar P can be present as part of colloidal calcium phosphate (inorganic-P) or covalently bound to caseins as phosphate groups (casein-P). Eighty one herd milk samples (SCC<400 000 cell/ml) were classified as Optimal (8), Suboptimal (39) Poor (29) and Non-coagulating milk (5), according to their rennet coagulation parameters as assessed by lactodynamographic test. Samples were analysed for their chemical composition (basic composition, protein fractions, minerals and salt equilibria), physicochemical parameters (pH and titratable acidity) and rheological properties. Optimal milk was characterised by the highest contents of major constituents, protein fractions and minerals, lowest content of chloride and highest values of titratable acidity. Non-coagulating milk was characterised by the highest values of pH and the lowest of titratable acidity. At micellar level, Optimal milk showed the highest values of colloidal Ca, casein-P and colloidal Mg (g/100 g casein), while Non-coagulating milk showed the lowest values. Interestingly, there was no statistical difference regarding the content of colloidal inorganic-P (g/100 g casein) between Optimal and Non-coagulating milks. Overall, high mineralisation of the micelle (expressed as g inorganic-P/100 g casein) positively affect its rennetability. However, excessive mineralisation could lead to a reduction of the phosphate groups (g casein-P/100 g casein) available for curd formation.

  3. Laser and light therapy for facial warts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Maranda, E L; Lim, V M; Nguyen, A H; Nouri, K

    2016-10-01

    Facial verruca plana, or flat warts, are benign skin papillomas caused by human papillomavirus infections. A large portion of cases are refractory to treatment and can cause psychosocial distress in patients. Laser and light modalities offer an alternative therapeutic approach that has not been extensively explored. We systematically reviewed PubMed for studies describing treatment of facial verruca plana using lasers, photodynamic therapy and infrared coagulation. Final inclusion and review of eighteen studies suggests laser and light therapies to have considerable potential in the treatment of this recalcitrant condition. In particular, yttrium aluminium garnet lasers, infrared coagulation and photodynamic therapies have been reported to demonstrate efficacy. Further studies with larger power are required to determine which method should be established as the alternative treatment of choice for recalcitrant facial verrucae.

  4. Physical properties and biocompatibility of cellulose/soy protein isolate membranes coagulated from acetic aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Feg; Liu, Yong-Ming; Chang, Peter R; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yun

    2008-01-01

    A series of cellulose/soy protein isolate (SPI) membranes was prepared from cellulose and SPI solution by casting and coagulation from 5 wt% acetic acid and 5 wt% sulphuric acid aqueous solution, respectively. The structure and properties of the membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing. The effects of SPI content (W(SPI)) and the coagulants on the structure and properties of the membranes were investigated. The membranes exhibited porous structure. The pore size in the surfaces and cross-sections of the membranes increased with an increase of W(SPI) regardless of the coagulants. The membranes containing 10 wt% W(SPI) showed higher tensile strength and elongation at break than other membranes. The membranes with the same W(SPI) coagulated from acetic acid solution exhibited higher values of tensile strength, elongation at break and pore size in the surfaces and cross-sections than those corresponding membranes coagulated from sulphuric acid. The biocompatibility of the acetic acid-coagulated membranes was preliminarily evaluated by cell culture and in vivo implantation experiments. The results revealed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304) grew well on this biomaterial. In comparison with the pure cellulose membrane, because of the incorporation of SPI and the resultant alteration of microstructure, the SPI-modified membranes showed an improved in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability in the implantation experiments. These cellulose/SPI membranes warrant further explorations in biomedical fields.

  5. Untangling the complexity of blood coagulation network: use of computational modelling in pharmacology and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Shibeko, Alexey M; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-05-01

    Blood coagulation is a complex biochemical network that plays critical roles in haemostasis (a physiological process that stops bleeding on injury) and thrombosis (pathological vessel occlusion). Both up- and down-regulation of coagulation remain a major challenge for modern medicine, with the ultimate goal to correct haemostasis without causing thrombosis and vice versa. Mathematical/computational modelling is potentially an important tool for understanding blood coagulation disorders and their treatment. It can save a huge amount of time and resources, and provide a valuable alternative or supplement when clinical studies are limited, or not ethical, or technically impossible. This article reviews contemporary state of the art in the modelling of blood coagulation for practical purposes: to reveal the molecular basis of a disease, to understand mechanisms of drug action, to predict pharmacodynamics and drug-drug interactions, to suggest potential drug targets or to improve quality of diagnostics. Different model types and designs used for this are discussed. Functional mechanisms of procoagulant bypassing agents and investigations of coagulation inhibitors were the two particularly popular applications of computational modelling that gave non-trivial results. Yet, like any other tool, modelling has its limitations, mainly determined by insufficient knowledge of the system, uncertainty and unreliability of complex models. We show how to some extent this can be overcome and discuss what can be expected from the mathematical modelling of coagulation in not-so-far future.

  6. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  7. Advanced treatment of coking wastewater by coagulation and zero-valent iron processes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peng; Zhao, Hua-zhang; Wang, Chao; Ni, Jin-ren

    2007-08-17

    Advanced treatment of coking wastewater was investigated experimentally with coagulation and zero-valent iron (ZVI) processes. Particular attention was paid to the effect of dosage and pH on the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the two processes. The results showed that ZVI was more effective than coagulation for advanced treatment of coking wastewater. The jar tests revealed that maximal COD removal efficiency of 27.5-31.8% could be achieved under the optimal condition of coagulation, i.e. 400mg/L of Fe(2)(SO(4))3 as coagulant at pH 3.0-5.0. On the other hand, the COD removal efficiency could be up to 43.6% under the idealized condition of ZVI upon 10 g/L active carbon and 30 g/L iron being dosed at pH 4.0. The mechanisms for COD removal in ZVI were dominated by coagulation, precipitation and oxidation-reduction. ZVI would also enhance the biodegradability of effluent by increasing BOD5/COD from 0.07 to 0.53. Moreover, some ester compounds could be produced in the reaction. Although ZVI was found more efficient than coagulation in eliminating low molecular weight (<2000 Da) compounds in the wastewater, there were still a few residual contaminants which could hardly be eliminated by either of the process.

  8. Pretreatment of wastewater: optimal coagulant selection using Partial Order Scaling Analysis (POSA).

    PubMed

    Tzfati, Eran; Sein, Maya; Rubinov, Angelika; Raveh, Adi; Bick, Amos

    2011-06-15

    Jar-test is a well-known tool for chemical selection for physical-chemical wastewater treatment. Jar test results show the treatment efficiency in terms of suspended matter and organic matter removal. However, in spite of having all these results, coagulant selection is not an easy task because one coagulant can remove efficiently the suspended solids but at the same time increase the conductivity. This makes the final selection of coagulants very dependent on the relative importance assigned to each measured parameter. In this paper, the use of Partial Order Scaling Analysis (POSA) and multi-criteria decision analysis is proposed to help the selection of the coagulant and its concentration in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Therefore, starting from the parameters fixed by the jar-test results, these techniques will allow to weight these parameters, according to the judgments of wastewater experts, and to establish priorities among coagulants. An evaluation of two commonly used coagulation/flocculation aids (Alum and Ferric Chloride) was conducted and based on jar tests and POSA model, Ferric Chloride (100 ppm) was the best choice. The results obtained show that POSA and multi-criteria techniques are useful tools to select the optimal chemicals for the physical-technical treatment.

  9. Preparation and characterization of novel polytitanium tetrachloride coagulant for water purification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Phuntsho, S; Gao, B Y; Huang, X; Qi, Q B; Yue, Q Y; Wang, Y; Kim, J-H; Shon, H K

    2013-11-19

    Polymeric metal coagulants are increasingly being used to improve coagulation efficiency, yet the research on the development of titanium and particularly polytitanium salts remains limited. This study is the first attempt in the synthesis, characterization, and application of polytitanium salts as coagulants. Polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC) solutions with different basicity values B (OH/Ti molar ratio) were prepared using a slow alkaline titration method. Jar tests were conducted to assess coagulation performance using both synthetic and real raw water samples, and the floc characteristics were monitored online using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) was utilized to identify various Ti species, with the results providing strong evidence of the presence of various hydrolyzed Ti species in the titanium aqueous phase. Compared to titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4), higher or comparable turbidity and organic matter removal efficiency could be achieved by PTC with improved floc characteristics in terms of size, growth rate, and structure. Besides, the water pH after PTC coagulation was significantly improved toward neutral pH. This study indicates that PTC is an effective and promising coagulant for water purification. Besides, the PTC flocculated sludge was able to recycle and produce functional TiO2 photocatalyst.

  10. Effect of low dosage of coagulant on the ultrafiltration membrane performance in feedwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baiwen; Yu, Wenzheng; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-03-15

    One of the critical issues for the widely application of ultrafiltration (UF) in water treatment is membrane fouling owning to the dissolved organic matter. The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of various particle sizes caused by low dosages of coagulant with dissolved organic matter on the UF membrane performance. Aluminum chloride was added to the synthetic water with the hydrophobic humic acid (HA), the hydrophilic bovine serum albumin (BSA) - a protein- and their 1:1 (mass ratio) mixture. The results showed that there was a critical dose of Al that could cause dramatic flux reduction by blocking the membrane pores after coagulating with HA/BSA. For HA or BSA, the critical dose of Al was relatively lower at pH 6.0 than that at pH 8.0. After coagulation, the flux decline caused by HA was slightly varied as a function of pH while that caused by BSA was greatly affected by pH. The flux decline caused by the 1:1 (mass ratio) HA/BSA mixture after coagulation was similar to that caused by HA after coagulation because BSA could be encapsulated by HA. In addition, the peak value of the molecular weight (MW) distribution of HA coagulated with Al was changed more drastically compared to that of BSA after filtration.

  11. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  12. Coagulation of methylated arsenic from drinking water: Influence of methyl substitution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengzhi; Chen, Qingxin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-08-15

    Methylated arsenic can be found in virtually all earth surface environments. So far, however, little information has been collected regarding their removal by coagulation. In this study, the removal of monomethylarsenate (MMA) and dimethylarsenate (DMA) from drinking water by coagulation was investigated from the viewpoint of methyl substitution. Results indicated that FeCl3 was more efficient than AlCl3 and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) in methylated As removal. For the initial arsenic concentration of 200 μg/L, an FeCl3 dosage of 0.2 mmol Fe/L was sufficient to attain about 95% removal of MMA, while a dosage of 0.6 mmol Fe/L achieved about 57% removal of DMA. Arsenic removal efficiency was negatively correlated with the degree of methyl substitution. With the increase in methyl group number, the quantity of negatively charged arsenic species decreased and molecular size increased, leading to the decrease of methylated As removal by coagulation. Adsorption on preformed hydroxide flocs was the major mechanism during coagulation. Both FTIR and XPS results indicated that the As−O group of As might substitute the O−H group of Fe/Al hydroxide to form a Fe/Al−O−As complex. Furthermore, the use of traditional oxidants and coagulation aids exhibited limited help for improving coagulation removal of DMA.

  13. pH modeling for maximum dissolved organic matter removal by enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiankun; Wang, Dongsheng; van Leeuwen, John; Zhao, Yanmei; Xing, Linan; Chow, Christopher W K

    2012-01-01

    Correlations between raw water characteristics and pH after enhanced coagulation to maximize dissolved organic matter (DOM) removal using four typical coagulants (FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and high performance polyaluminum chloride (HPAC)) without pH control were investigated. These correlations were analyzed on the basis of the raw water quality and the chemical and physical fractionations of DOM of thirteen Chinese source waters over three seasons. It was found that the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants was influenced by the content of removable DOM (i.e. hydrophobic and higher apparent molecular weight (AMW) DOM), the alkalinity and the initial pH of raw water. A set of feed-forward semi-empirical models relating the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants with the raw water characteristics were developed and optimized based on correlation analysis. The established models were preliminarily validated for prediction purposes, and it was found that the deviation between the predicted data and actual data was low. This result demonstrated the potential for the application of these models in practical operation of drinking water treatment plants.

  14. The reproductive tract of the male spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) and coagulation studies with other species.

    PubMed

    Peitz, B; Foreman, D; Schmitt, M

    1979-09-01

    The testes of the spiny mice showed asymmetry, the left being significantly heavier than the right (P = 0.025). Histological studies indicated that spermatozoa were first present in the testes of animals 35--45 days of age but the maturation of the accessory glands, especially the lateral prostates and coagulating glands, occurred later. The highest fructose concentration in the adult was in the lateral prostates (126.97 +/- 22.23 mg fructose/100 g, n = 5) and coagulating glands (99.38 +/- 17.65 mg fructose/100 g gland weight, n = 5). Coagulation tests of mixtures of extracts of seminal vesicles and coagulating glands from spiny mice and rats indicated that the vesiculase of the spiny mouse was active on rat substrates and vice versa. Cross-reactions of extracts of house mouse (Mus musculus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus), and guinea-pig (Cavia porcellus) seminal vesicles (substrate) and coagulating glands (vesiculase) with those of rats and spiny mice showed that although the substrates of rat and spiny mouse were readily coagulated by vesiculase from all the other species, rat and spiny mouse vesiculase were not equally active on substrates of the other species.

  15. Monitoring and treatment of coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. an international survey on current practices.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, A; Depetris, N; Kaimakamis, E; Berardino, M; Stella, M

    2016-09-30

    The magnitude of coagulation abnormalities, and the definition and treatment of coagulopathy in burn patients are inadequately understood and continue to be discussed in the literature. We aimed to analyse physicians' views on monitoring and treating coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. A total of 350 questionnaires were distributed electronically to burn ICU physicians. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Responses were analysed electronically and comparisons were made according to the region of the ICU or the specialty of the physician. Of the 350 questionnaires distributed, 55 (15.7%) were returned. The majority of burn specialists consider sepsis-induced coagulopathy to be the most frequent coagulopathy in burn patients, and 74.5% declare that they do not use any specific definition/scoring system in their department to detect coagulopathy. The majority of specialists (70.8%) use standard coagulation tests. The most frequent indications for plasma transfusion are massive bleeding (32.8%) and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation syndrome treatment (20%). The main specific factors reported in our study are cryoprecipitate (23.2%) and fibrinogen concentrate (18.9%). 21.1% of respondents state that they do not use any specific coagulation factor substitution in burn patients. Specific coagulation factor substitution is not a routine practice. The low response rate precludes the generalization of our results.

  16. Metals in air pollution particles decrease whole-blood coagulation time.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rahul G; Soukup, Joleen M; Ghio, Andrew J

    2010-07-01

    The mechanism underlying procoagulative effects of air pollution particle exposure is not known. The authors tested the postulate that (1) the water-soluble components of an air pollution particle could affect whole-blood coagulation time and (2) metals included in this fraction were responsible for this effect. Exposure to the water-soluble fraction of particulate matter (PM), at doses as low as 50 ng/ml original particle, significantly diminished the whole-blood coagulation time. Inclusion of deferoxamine prolonged coagulation time following the exposures to the water-soluble fraction, whereas equivalent doses of ferroxamine had no effect. Except for nickel, all metal sulfates shortened the whole-blood coagulation time. Iron and zinc were two metals with the greatest capacity to reduce the coagulation time, with an effect observed at 10 ng/ml. Finally, in contrast to the anticoagulants citrate and EDTA, their iron complexes were found to be procoagulative. The authors conclude that metals in the water-soluble fraction of air pollution particles decrease whole-blood coagulation time. These metals can potentially contribute to procoagulative effects observed following human exposures to air pollution particles.

  17. Clarification of municipal sewage with ferric chloride: the nature of coagulant species.

    PubMed

    El Samrani, A G; Lartiges, B S; Montargès-Pelletier, E; Kazpard, V; Barrès, O; Ghanbaja, J

    2004-02-01

    The nature of coagulant species formed in the system ferric chloride/municipal sewage was explored with Transmission Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (TEM-EDXS) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption spectroscopy. Jar-test data combined with chemical analysis of supernatant (dissolved organic carbon, iron, and phosphorus) and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of freeze-dried sediment, provided a detailed description of sewage clarification. The results showed that the nature of coagulant species evolves with Fe concentration. Up to the optimum turbidity removal, mainly iron dimers linked with one phosphate anion are detected. At higher dosages, polymers of hydrolyzed Fe appear even though PO(4) still participates in the formation of coagulant species. TEM observation of freeze-dried sediments corroborates such an evolution of Fe speciation. EDXS analyses reveal that minute amounts of sulfur, silicon, aluminum, and calcium, are associated with the coagulant species. Even though the coagulant species change with Fe concentration, the destabilization mechanism, inferred from electrophoretic mobility of aggregates and the evolution of floc size under cyclic changes of stirring conditions, is equivalent with a charge neutralization of sewage colloids in the whole range of coagulant concentration.

  18. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging. PMID:26568136

  19. Preparation of organic tofu using organic compatible magnesium chloride incorporated with polysaccharide coagulants.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Chen, Fusheng; Yang, Bao; Lai, Shaojuan; Yang, Hongshun; Liu, Kunlun; Bu, Guanhao; Fu, Caili; Deng, Yun

    2015-01-15

    Organic tofu using organic compatible coagulants of magnesium chloride and three polysaccharides including carrageenan, guar gum and gum Arabic were generated. For MgCl2 coagulated tofu, carrageenan significantly increased the hardness from 969.5 g to 1210.5 g whereas guar gum (0.6g) decreased the hardness to 505.5 g. Interestingly, gypsum and guar gum (0.6g) increased the yield of tofu significantly. These organic compatible coagulants didn't affect most of 7S and 11S protein subunits. Importantly, the overall-acceptability of organic tofu prepared with MgCl2 combined with guar gum or gypsum was almost the same as conventional tofu made with gymsum while having more beany-flavour. Among these organic coagulants, tofu made from 0.6g guar gum and MgCl2 mixture was the most similar to that coagulated by conventional gypsum. Thus this mixture is promising as coagulant for making organic tofu.

  20. TREATMENT OF LANDFILL LEACHATE BY COUPLING COAGULATION-FLOCCULATION OR OZONATION TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION.

    PubMed

    Oloibiri, Violet; Ufomba, Innocent; Chys, Michael; Audenaert, Wim; Demeestere, Kristof; Van Hulle, Stijn W H

    2015-01-01

    A major concern for landfilling facilities is the treatment of their leachate. To optimize organic matter removal from this leachate, the combination of two or more techniques is preferred in order to meet stringent effluent standards. In our study, coagulation-flocculation and ozonation are compared as pre- treatment steps for stabilized landfill leachate prior to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The efficiency of the pre treatment techniques is evaluated using COD and UVA254 measurements. For coagulation- flocculation, different chemicals are compared and optimal dosages are determined. After this, iron (III) chloride is selected for subsequent adsorption studies due to its high percentage of COD and UVA254 removal and good sludge settle-ability. Our finding show that ozonation as a single treatment is effective in reducing COD in landfill leachate by 66% compared to coagulation flocculation (33%). Meanwhile, coagulation performs better in UVA254 reduction than ozonation. Subsequent GAC adsorption of ozonated effluent, coagulated effluent and untreated leachate resulted in 77%, 53% and 8% total COD removal respectively (after 6 bed volumes). The effect of the pre-treatment techniques on GAC adsorption properties is evaluated experimentally and mathematically using Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. Mathematical modelling of the experimental GAC adsorption data shows that ozonation increases the adsorption capacity and break through time with a factor of 2.5 compared to coagulation-flocculation.

  1. Characterization of cake layer structure on the microfiltration membrane permeability by iron pre-coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Pan, Siru; Luo, Dongping

    2013-02-01

    A cake layer is formed by coagulation aggregates under certain transmembrane pressure in the coagulation-microfiltration (MF) process. The characteristics of humic acid aggregates coagulated by different iron-based coagulants, such as charge, size, fractal dimension and compressibility, have an effect on the cake layer structure. At the optimum iron dose of 0.6 to 0.8 mmol/L for ferric chloride (FC) and polymer ferric sulfate (PFS) pre-coagulation, at the point of charge neutralization for near zero zeta potential, the aggregate particles produced possess the greatest size and highest fractal dimension, which contributes to the cake layer being most loose with high porosity and low compressibility. Thus the membrane filterability is better. At a low or high iron dose of FC and PFS, a high negative or positive zeta potential with high charge repulsion results in so many small aggregate particles and low fractal dimension that the cake layer is compact with low porosity and high compressibility. Therefore the membrane fouling is accelerated and MF permeability becomes worse. The variation of cake layer structure as measured by scanning electric microscopy corresponds with the fact that the smaller the coagulation flocs size and fractal dimension are, the lower the porosity and the tighter the cake layer conformation. This also explains the MF membrane flux variation visually and accurately.

  2. Treatment of textile dye wastewaters using ferrous sulphate in a chemical coagulation/flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luís M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation/flocculation treatment using FeSO4 x 7H2O as a coagulant is evaluated in this work for the removal of organic compounds and colour from synthetic effluents simulating the cotton, acrylic and polyester dyeing wastewaters. The coagulant dose, temperature, pH, stirring speed and stirring time that maximized the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour for each effluent are determined for the coagulation process. The effect of the stirring speed, stirring time and the dose of flocculant (Magnafloc 155 or Superfloc C-573) on the flocculation stage is also evaluated for effluents pretreated by coagulation at the optimal conditions previously determined. The obtained results showed that the optimal operating conditions are different for each effluent, and the process (coagulation/flocculation) as a whole was efficient in terms of colour removal (-91% for cotton, -94% for acrylic effluents; polyester effluent is practically colourless). However, the DOC removal observed is not significant (33% for polyester, -45% for cotton and -28% for acrylic effluents). On the other hand, the remaining dissolved iron content is appropriate for further integrating the treatment with an iron-catalysed Fenton process, thus reducing the consumption of chemicals in the overall treatment.

  3. Platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps collaborate to promote intravascular coagulation during sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Davis, Rachelle P; Kim, Seok-Joo; Tse, Mandy; Esmon, Charles T; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Jenne, Craig N

    2017-03-09

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs; webs of DNA coated in antimicrobial proteins) are released into the vasculature during sepsis where they contribute to host defense, but also cause tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Various components of NETs have also been implicated as activators of coagulation. Using multicolor confocal intravital microscopy in mouse models of sepsis, we observed profound platelet aggregation, thrombin activation, and fibrin clot formation within (and downstream of) NETs in vivo. NETs were critical for the development of sepsis-induced intravascular coagulation regardless of the inciting bacterial stimulus (gram-negative, gram-positive, or bacterial products). Removal of NETs via DNase infusion, or in peptidylarginine deiminase-4-deficient mice (which have impaired NET production), resulted in significantly lower quantities of intravascular thrombin activity, reduced platelet aggregation, and improved microvascular perfusion. NET-induced intravascular coagulation was dependent on a collaborative interaction between histone H4 in NETs, platelets, and the release of inorganic polyphosphate. Real-time perfusion imaging revealed markedly improved microvascular perfusion in response to the blockade of NET-induced coagulation, which correlated with reduced markers of systemic intravascular coagulation and end-organ damage in septic mice. Together, these data demonstrate, for the first time in an in vivo model of infection, a dynamic NET-platelet-thrombin axis that promotes intravascular coagulation and microvascular dysfunction in sepsis.

  4. Coagulation profile in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vad, Henrik; Pedersen, Søren; Hornbech, Kåre; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Licht, Peter B.; Nybo, Mads; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the impact of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin (LMWH) on the coagulation system in patients undergoing minimal invasive lung cancer surgery is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LMWH on the coagulation system in patients undergoing Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) lobectomy for primary lung cancer. Methods Sixty-three patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer undergoing VATS lobectomy were randomized to either subcutaneous injection with dalteparin (Fragmin®) 5000 IE once daily or no intervention. Coagulation was assessed pre-, peri-, and the first two days postoperatively by standard coagulation blood test, thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) and thrombin generation. Results Patients undergoing potential curative surgery for lung cancer were not hypercoagulable preoperatively. There was no statistically significant difference in the majority of the assessed coagulation parameters after LMWH, except that the no intervention group had a higher peak thrombin and a shorter INTEM clotting time on the first postoperative day and a lower fibrinogen level on the second postoperative day. A lower level of fibrin d-dimer in the LMWH group was found on the 1. and 2.postoperative day, although not statistical significant. No differences were found between the two groups in the amount of bleeding or number of thromboembolic events. Conclusions Use of LMWH administered once daily as thromboprophylaxis did not alter the coagulation profile per se. As the present study primarily evaluated biochemical endpoints, further studies using clinical endpoints are needed in regards of an optimized thromboprophylaxis approach. PMID:28199364

  5. Impacts of coagulation pretreatment on MF filtration and a comparative study of different membrane module types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Feng; Seung-Hyun, Kim; Jong-Sup, Yun; Seong-Yong, Moon

    2006-10-01

    Changes in the regulatory requirements and the forthcoming Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Products (D/DBP) Rule will require that drinking water treatment facilities be operated to achieve maximum removals of particles and disinfectant tolerant microorganisms as well as natural organic matter (NOM). For drinking water production, the use of membrane filtration processes such as microfiltration and ultrafiltration (MF/UF) alone to satisfy the turbidity, particle and microorganism removal a requirement of the surface water treatment regulation (SWTR) is not enough. MF/UF treatment processes can achieve only nominal (10 percent) removal of disinfection by-products (DBP) precursors (James, et al., 1995). On the other hand, too fast fouling can make the filtration processes more difficult to carry on. To solve these problems, many authors have been interested in installing coagulation pretreatment before membrane filtration to improve membrane performance. However, previous studies reported conflicting results. Some supported the effectiveness of coagulation pretreatment, while others contended that coagulation aggravated membrane performance. This research aims to identify the effects of coagulation pretreatment on membrane filtration through a pilot study using PVDF membrane in combination with analyzing the rationale of coagulation. Another objective of this research was to evaluate the different impacts on membrane performance of using different membrane modules (the submerged module and pressured module). The results showed that coagulation pretreatment greatly improved the membrane performance, extending the filtration time as well as reducing the permeated organic level, and that the submerged module is much more efficient than the pressured module.

  6. [Combined use of active chlorine and coagulants for drinking water purification and disinfection].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Zholdakova, Z I; Poliakova, E E; Kir'ianova, L F; Miasnikov, I N; Tul'skaia, E A; Artemova, T Z; Ivanova, L V; Dmitrieva, R A; Doskina, T V

    2004-01-01

    The authors made an experimental study of the efficiency of water purification procedures based on the combined use of active chlorine and coagulants and hygienically evaluated the procedures. The study included the evaluation of water disinfection with various coagulants and active chlorine; the investigation of the processes of production of deleterious organic chlorine compounds; the assessment of the quality of water after its treatment. The coagulants representing aluminum polyoxychloride: RAX-10 (AQUA-AURATE 10) and RAX-18 (AQUA-AURATE 18), and aluminum sulfate, technically pure grade were tested. The treatment of river water with the coagulants RAX-10 and RAX-18, followed by precipitation, filtration, and chlorination under laboratory conditions, was shown to result in water disinfection to the levels complying with the requirements described in SanPiN 2.1.4.1074-01. RAX-18 showed the best disinfecting activity against total and heat-tolerant coliform bacteria, but also to the highly chlorine-resistant microrganisms--the spores of sulfite-reducing Clostridia, phages, and viruses. Since the coagulants have an increased sorptive capacity relative to humus and other organic substances, substitution of primary chlorination for coagulant treatment may induce a reduction in the risk of formation of oncogenically and mutagenically hazardous chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  7. [Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process]. [Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, known as Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy since 1986 (Contracts DE-AC22-86PC91221 and DE-AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear flocculation, polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. Often, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. When the coal is superficially oxidized, a small dosage of reagents may be used to promote coagulation. During the last quarter, work was completed on the collection of the surface force and hydrophobicity data required for the estimation of the parameters in the hydrophobic interaction energy function. The estimation of these parameters will be completed in May, and the development of the extended DLVO equation for coal should be completed by the end of the next quarter. In Task 3, the mixing/coagulation characteristics of in-line mixers have been established and work with the ultrasonic horn has begun. The study of the recovery of coagula by column flotation will be completed in early May, and work on the remaining sub-tasks of Advanced Separation Methods has been accelerated in an effort to complete this task on schedule.

  8. Evaluation of milk compositional variables on coagulation properties using partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Bland, Julie H; Grandison, Alistair S; Fagan, Colette C

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of numerous milk compositional factors on milk coagulation properties using Partial Least Squares (PLS). Milk from herds of Jersey and Holstein-Friesian cattle was collected across the year and blended (n=55), to maximise variation in composition and coagulation. The milk was analysed for casein, protein, fat, titratable acidity, lactose, Ca2+, urea content, micelles size, fat globule size, somatic cell count and pH. Milk coagulation properties were defined as coagulation time, curd firmness and curd firmness rate measured by a controlled strain rheometer. The models derived from PLS had higher predictive power than previous models demonstrating the value of measuring more milk components. In addition to the well-established relationships with casein and protein levels, CMS and fat globule size were found to have as strong impact on all of the three models. The study also found a positive impact of fat on milk coagulation properties and a strong relationship between lactose and curd firmness, and urea and curd firmness rate, all of which warrant further investigation due to current lack of knowledge of the underlying mechanism. These findings demonstrate the importance of using a wider range of milk compositional variables for the prediction of the milk coagulation properties, and hence as indicators of milk suitability for cheese making.

  9. Real-Time Electrical Impedimetric Monitoring of Blood Coagulation Process under Temperature and Hematocrit Variations Conducted in a Microfluidic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kin Fong; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation is an extremely complicated and dynamic physiological process. Monitoring of blood coagulation is essential to predict the risk of hemorrhage and thrombosis during cardiac surgical procedures. In this study, a high throughput microfluidic chip has been developed for the investigation of the blood coagulation process under temperature and hematocrit variations. Electrical impedance of the whole blood was continuously recorded by on-chip electrodes in contact with the blood sample during coagulation. Analysis of the impedance change of the blood was conducted to investigate the characteristics of blood coagulation process and the starting time of blood coagulation was defined. The study of blood coagulation time under temperature and hematocrit variations was shown a good agreement with results in the previous clinical reports. The electrical impedance measurement for the definition of blood coagulation process provides a fast and easy measurement technique. The microfluidic chip was shown to be a sensitive and promising device for monitoring blood coagulation process even in a variety of conditions. It is found valuable for the development of point-of-care coagulation testing devices that utilizes whole blood sample in microliter quantity. PMID:24116099

  10. Vitamin K: the coagulation vitamin that became omnipotent.

    PubMed

    Cranenburg, Ellen C M; Schurgers, Leon J; Vermeer, Cees

    2007-07-01

    Vitamin K, discovered in the 1930s, functions as cofactor for the posttranslational carboxylation of glutamate residues. Gammacarboxy glutamic acid (Gla)-residues were first identified in prothrombin and coagulation factors in the 1970s; subsequently, extra-hepatic Gla proteins were described, including osteocalcin and matrix Gla protein (MGP). Impairment of the function of osteocalcin and MGP due to incomplete carboxylation results in an increased risk for developing osteoporosis and vascular calcification, respectively, and is an unexpected side effect of treatment with oral anticoagulants. It is conceivable that other side effects, possible involving growth-arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) protein will be identified in forthcoming years. In healthy individuals, substantial fractions of osteocalcin and MGP circulate as incompletely carboxylated species, indicating that the majority of these individuals is subclinically vitamin K-deficient. Potential new application areas for vitamin K are therefore its use in dietary supplements and functional foods for healthy individuals to prevent bone and vascular disease, as well as for patients on oral anticoagulant treatment to offer them protection against coumarin-induced side effects and to reduce diet-induced fluctuations in their INR values.

  11. Modeling the kinetics of carbon coagulation in explosives detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, F. H.; Viecelli, J. A.; Glosli, J. N.

    1998-05-01

    A typical insensitive high explosive such as LX-17 has a large carbon content. The detonation behavior of these explosives is affected by a slow coagulation of carbon atoms by diffusion and their possible transformation from one chemical bonding type to another. We have used the Brenner bond order potential to compute the melting line of diamond at high pressure and high temperature by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, with the goal to refine the potential for the study of the kinetics of the graphite diamond transition. The slow diffusion-controlled kinetics of carbon clusters has been examined by including a time-dependent surface correction to the Gibbs free energy of these clusters in the nonequilibrium CHEQ code. We also propose a new explosive burn model which incorporates a partial release of the heat of detonation in a fast reaction zone, followed by a diffusion-limited release of the remaining energy. Hydrodynamic applications of the new burn model to LX-17 show that computed expansion and compression results both agree closely with experimental data.

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  13. Seawater Immersion Aggravates Burn Injury Causing Severe Blood Coagulation Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Mao, Qingxiang; Ma, Yongda; Wang, Li; Chen, Xian; Hu, Yi; Ge, Hengjiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelial function in a canine model of burn injury combined with seawater immersion. The model of burn injury was established. The dogs were randomly divided into four groups including dogs with burn injury (B group), or burn injury combined with seawater immersion (BI group), or only immersion in seawater (I group), or control animals with no injury or immersion (C group). The circulating endothelial cell (CEC) count and coagulation-fibrinolysis parameters were measured. The CEC count in B group increased at 4 h, 7 h, and 10 h after injury and then reduced, whereas it continuously increased to a greater extent in BI group (P < 0.05). The von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and the ratio of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-K-PGF1α ) in BI group had a marked increase after injury, and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the BI group decreased. Microscope observations revealed thrombus formation in lungs of the animals in BI group, but not in C, I, or B groups. Burn injury causes endothelial dysfunction, and seawater immersion lastingly aggravates this injury, leading to a higher risk of developing thrombosis.

  14. Hepatocyte tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Bradley P.; Kopec, Anna K.; Joshi, Nikita; Cline, Holly; Brown, Juliette A.; Bishop, Stephanie C.; Kassel, Karen M.; Rockwell, Cheryl; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we characterized tissue factor (TF) expression in mouse hepatocytes (HPCs) and evaluated its role in mouse models of HPC transplantation and acetaminophen (APAP) overdose. TF expression was significantly reduced in isolated HPCs and liver homogenates from TFflox/flox/albumin-Cre mice (HPCΔTF mice) compared with TFflox/flox mice (control mice). Isolated mouse HPCs expressed low levels of TF that clotted factor VII-deficient human plasma. In addition, HPC TF initiated factor Xa generation without exogenous factor VIIa, and TF activity was increased dramatically after cell lysis. Treatment of HPCs with an inhibitory TF antibody or a cell-impermeable lysine-conjugating reagent prior to lysis substantially reduced TF activity, suggesting that TF was mainly present on the cell surface. Thrombin generation was dramatically reduced in APAP-treated HPCΔTF mice compared with APAP-treated control mice. In addition, thrombin generation was dependent on donor HPC TF expression in a model of HPC transplantation. These results suggest that mouse HPCs constitutively express cell surface TF that mediates activation of coagulation during hepatocellular injury. PMID:23305736

  15. Does tramadol affect coagulation status of patients with malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Bilir, Ayten; Akay, Meltem Olga; Ceyhan, Dilek; Andıc, Neslihan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the direct effects of tramadol on the coagulation status of women with gynecologic malignancies in vitro. Materials and Methods: Citrated whole-blood samples from 21 patients with gynecologic tumors were spiked ex vivo with 2 or 6 μl/ml tramadol. Thrombelastography (TEG) analysis was performed using ROTEM® to assess clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT) and maximum clot formation (MCF). Results: In the INTEM assay, CT (P < 0.05) and CFT (P < 0.01) were significantly prolonged with tramadol at a 6 μl/ml concentration compared with baseline. There were no significant differences in MCF values between the baseline and the tramadol-treated samples (P > 0.05). Blood medicated with tramadol (6 μl/ml) clotted slowly (increased CT and CFT). Conclusion: The changes observed by TEG demonstrated that tramadol impairs hemostasis in a concentration-dependent manner in the whole blood of women with gynecologic malignancies in vitro. PMID:25097280

  16. Optoacoustic temperature determination and automatic coagulation control in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Luft, Susanne; Baade, Alex; Bever, Marco; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Retinal laser photocoagulation is an established treatment method for many retinal diseases like macula edema or diabetic retinopathy. The selection of the laser parameters is so far based on post treatment evaluation of the lesion size and strength. Due to local pigment variations in the fundus and individual transmission the same laser parameters often lead to an overtreatment. Optoacoustic allows a non invasive monitoring of the retinal temperature increase during retinal laser irradiation by measuring the temperature dependent pressure amplitudes, which are induced by short probe laser pulses. A 75 ns/ 523 nm Nd:YLF was used as a probe laser at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and a cw / 532 nm treatment laser for heating. A contact lens was modified with a ring-shaped ultrasonic transducer to detect the pressure waves at the cornea. Temperatures were collected for irradiations leading to soft or invisible lesions. Based on this data the threshold for denaturation was found. By analyzing the initial temperature increase, the further temperature development during irradiation could be predicted. An algorithm was found to calculate the irradiation time, which is needed for a soft lesion formation, from the temperature curve. By this it was possible to provide a real-time dosimetry by automatically switching off the treatment laser after the calculated irradiation time. Automatically controlled coagulations appear softer and more uniformly.

  17. Smoluchowski coagulation models of sea ice thickness distribution dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlovitch, D.; Illner, R.; Monahan, A.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential decrease with thickness. This tail characterizes the range of ice thickness produced by mechanical redistribution of ice through the process of ridging, rafting, and shearing. We investigate how well the thickness distribution can be simulated by representing mechanical redistribution as a generalized stacking process. Such processes are naturally described by a well-studied class of models known as Smoluchowski Coagulation Models (SCMs), which describe the dynamics of a population of fixed-mass "particles" which combine in pairs to form a "particle" with the combined mass of the constituent pair at a rate which depends on the mass of the interacting particles. Like observed sea ice thickness distributions, the mass distribution of the populations generated by SCMs has an exponential or quasi-exponential form. We use SCMs to model sea ice, identifying mass-increasing particle combinations with thickness-increasing ice redistribution processes. Our model couples an SCM component with a thermodynamic component and generates qualitatively accurate thickness distributions with a variety of rate kernels. Our results suggest that the exponential tail of the sea ice thickness distribution arises from the nature of the ridging process, rather than specific physical properties of sea ice or the spatial arrangement of floes, and that the relative strengths of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes are key in accurately simulating the rate at which the sea ice thickness tail drops off with thickness.

  18. Smoluchowski Coagulation Models Of Sea Ice Thickness Distribution Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlovitch, D.; Illner, R.; Monahan, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential decrease with thickness. This tail characterises the range of ice thickness produced by mechanical redistribution of ice through the process of ridging, rafting, and shearing. It is possible to simulate thickness distribution dynamics by representing mechanical redistribution as a generalized stacking process. Stacking processes may be described by a class of models known as Smoluchowski Coagulation models, which originated in Statistical Mechanics and describe the dynamics of a population of fixed-mass "particles" which combine in pairs to form a "particle" with the combined mass of the constituent pair at a rate which depends on the mass of the interacting particles. We use SCMs to model sea ice, identifying mass-increasing particle combinations with thickness-increasing ice redistribution processes. Our model couples an SCM component with a thermodynamic component and generates qualitatively accurate thickness distributions. The model behaviour suggests that the exponential tail of the sea ice thickness distribution arises from the nature of the ridging process, rather than specific physical properties of sea ice or the spatial arrangement of floes, and that the relative strengths of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes are key in accurately simulating the rate at which the sea ice thickness tail drops off with thickness.

  19. Latex Surface and Bulk Coagulation Induced by Solvent Vapors.

    PubMed

    Braga; da Silva Md; Cardoso; Galembeck

    2000-08-01

    Latex exposure to solvent vapors leads to highly specific changes in latex stability as well as on the morphologies of the particle association products, depending on the latex and solvent used. Examples of solvent vapor-induced aggregation are given: surface films are obtained on two PS latexes; in one case, the film surface is mirror-reflective and very flat, as evidenced by AFM. Another PS latex coagulates under exposure to acetone vapors, and the morphologies of the coagula are highly sensitive to the exposure conditions. This latex yields a highly porous foam-like structure, in which particles are strongly coalesced but form percolating patches around the pores. The same latex but under other conditions produces a coagulum of large numbers of aggregated particles with a raspberry-like morphology. Density centrifugation experiments show that the effect of solvents on different latex fractions is not uniform, and some fractions show larger density changes than others, thus evidencing a variability in their swelling ability. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Coagulation parameters of ABO group-specific cryosupernatant.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, G S; Hoffman, S M; Williams, E C

    1998-04-01

    Patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura that is refractory to conventional fresh frozen plasma (FFP) exchange therapy are sometimes switched to cryosupernatant as the replacement fluid, although its hemostatic properties are not well defined. We performed several key coagulation assays on three pools of four units from each of three ABO groups of cryosupernatant and FFP. Fibrinogen, factor VIII activity, and von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag) levels were all significantly lower in cryosupernatant compared with FFP, although at levels usually not considered clinically significant. We confirmed that group O FFP contained significantly less factor VIII activity and vWF:Ag compared with groups AB and B. In contrast to FFP, group AB cryosupernatant contained lower levels of fibrinogen, factor V activity, factor VIII activity, and vWF:Ag than groups O or B. Group AB cryosupernatant, with the lowest levels of vWF:Ag and universal ABO compatibility, may be the product of choice for refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  1. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  2. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  3. Electro-coagulation-flotation process for algae removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Jixian; Tian, Jiayu; Ma, Fang; Tu, Gang; Du, Maoan

    2010-05-15

    Algae in surface water have been a long-term issue all over the world, due to their adverse influence on drinking water treatment process as well as drinking water quality. The algae removal by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) technology was investigated in this paper. The results indicated that aluminum was an excellent electrode material for algae removal as compared with iron. The optimal parameters determined were: current density=1 mA/cm(2), pH=4-7, water temperature=18-36 degrees C, algae density=0.55 x 10(9)-1.55 x 10(9) cells/L. Under the optimal conditions, 100% of algae removal was achieved with the energy consumption as low as 0.4 kWh/m(3). The ECF performed well in acid and neutral conditions. At low initial pH of 4-7, the cell density of algae was effectively removed in the ECF, mainly through the charge neutralization mechanism; while the algae removal worsened when the pH increased (7-10), and the main mechanism shifted to sweeping flocculation and enmeshment. The mechanisms for algae removal at different pH were also confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Furthermore, initial cell density and water temperature could also influence the algae removal. Overall, the results indicated that the ECF technology was effective for algae removal, from both the technical and economical points of view.

  4. Potentially prothrombotic abnormalities of coagulation in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, J; Leach, M; Greaves, M; Malia, R; Davies-Jones, G A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) may be caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral angiograms may, however, be normal in patients with BIH that are associated with conditions with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. This raises the possibility that unrecognised non-occlusive venous thrombus might impede CSF drainage. This study therefore examined the strength of the association between risk factors for thrombosis and BIH. METHODS: The incidence of prothrombotic abnormalities among a mixed prospectively and retrospectively investigated cohort of 38 patients with BIH, was compared with healthy obese subjects, and patients with other neurological diseases. Prothrombotic abnormalities investigated included anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, antithrombin III, proteins C and S, plasma fibrinogen, kaolin cephalin clotting time, prothrombin time, and full blood counts. RESULTS: Evidence for the presence of an antiphospholipid antibody was found in 32% of cases. Cases of familial deficiency of antithrombin III, thrombocytosis, and polycythaemia were also noted. Additionally, an increased concentration of plasma fibrinogen was found in 26%. A coagulation abnormality was more often detectable in those subjects with normal or low body mass index and in those tested within six months of onset. CONCLUSION: There is a thrombotic pathogenesis in some cases of BIH. Images PMID:9069476

  5. Inflammatory response to trauma: Implications for coagulation and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Albert; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this review Recent studies have changed our understanding of the timing and interactions of the inflammatory processes and coagulation cascade following severe trauma. This review highlights this information and correlates its impact on the current clinical approach for fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy for trauma patients. Recent findings Severe trauma is associated with a failure of multiple biologic emergency response systems that includes imbalanced inflammatory response, acute coagulopathy of trauma (ACOT), and endovascular glycocalyx degradation with microcirculatory compromise. These abnormalities are all inter-linked and related. Recent observations show that after severe trauma: 1) pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses are concomitant, not sequential and 2) resolution of the inflammatory response is an active process, not a passive one. Understanding these interrelated processes is considered extremely important for the development of future therapies for severe trauma in humans. Summary Traumatic injuries continue to be a significant cause of mortality worldwide. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of end-organ failure, and modulation of the inflammatory response has important clinical implications regarding fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy. PMID:24419158

  6. Measurement of size distributions of a coagulating aerosol. [Calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.G.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements have been performed for the determination of the size distribution of a coagulating ultrafine aerosol over a time interval of up to about 30 min. The aerosol was contained in a balloon with an initial volume of 60 l subject to a temperature inversion for the purpose of quenching the free convection and thereby diminishing the aerosol loss to the balloon wall. The aerosol size distribution was measured with the TSI electrostatic aerosol classifier hooked up to a TSI aerosol electrometer. The initial aerosol had an average diameter of about 12 nm. Measurements were taken by computer at a rate of 1 measurement cycle every 3 s; 1 cycle consists of a measurement of time, and burst measurements of electrometer current, classifier rod voltage, 3 flow rates, and 5 temperatures, followed by the calculation of averages and standard deviations, and storage of the results in a data string. The TSI instruments have been modified to permit the automatic computer reading of the parameters mentioned above. A multiplexer has been built to allow the multiplet data to be measured by a single system voltmeter. Channel switching in the multiplexer can be done either automatically by using the ''delay'' signal emitted by the system voltmeter every time it makes a reading or by software control through the 16-bit parallel interface of the computer.

  7. Light Visor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal Affective Disorder is a form of depression brought on by reduced light. For some people, this can lead to clinical depression. NASA has conducted research in light therapy and employs it to help astronauts adjust internal rhythms during orbital flight. Dr. George Brainard, a medical researcher and NASA consultant, has developed a portable light therapy device, which is commercially available. The Light Visor allows continuous light therapy and can be powered by either batteries or electricity. Dr. Brainard continues to research various aspects of light therapy.

  8. Light Motives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filler, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The new energy consciousness has led to a thorough reevaluation of how artificial lighting can be used wisely, while other researchers have explored the potential of daylighting as an alternative interior light source. (Author/MLF)

  9. Light Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ultra Sales, Inc.'s fluorescent lighting fixture gets a boost in reflectivity through installation of Lightdriver, a thin tough thermoplastic film plated with aluminum, capable of reflecting 95 percent of visible light striking it. Lightdriver increases brightness without adding bulbs, and allows energy savings by removing some bulbs because the mirrorlike surface cuts light loss generally occasioned by conventional low reflectivity white painted surface above the bulbs in many fluorescent fixtures. Forty-five percent reduction in lighting electricity is attainable.

  10. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  11. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  12. Hi-tech of the prostate: interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Keiditsch, Ernst; Rothenberger, Karl-Heinz; Schneede, Peter; Frank, Klaus H.

    1992-06-01

    We report on the new technique of interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate (ILCP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Basic experiments by use of a Nd:YAG laser in combination with a newly designed fiber tip homogeneously distributing the laser irradiation have been performed in potato, muscle, liver, and surgically removed human BPH-tissue to determine the volume of coagulation. The coagulation zone surrounding the probe was well defined and homogeneous. The size was dependent on laser power and irradiation time. Carbonization was never present except in darker tissues irradiated with high energy. Volume and time resolved measurements correlated well with the size of coagulation. 10 W and 5 minutes, for example, resulted in a coagulation zone of 17 X 15 mm. Comparable results have been seen in in-vivo experiments in surgically exposed canine prostates. Specimen for macroscopic and microscopic examination were taken immediately after treatment and after 5 and 35 days. The well demarked coagulation necrosis of the early stage resulted in cystic degeneration and fibrosis in the later stages. This was combined with shrinkage and reduction in volume. The urothelium of the urethra, the external sphincter and the rectum showed no damage. Until now, 15 patients suffering from obstructive symptoms due to BPH have been treated with interstitial laser coagulation. The probes were inserted from the perineum into the center of each lateral lobe of the prostate by transrectal ultrasound guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic control. Dependent on the size of the prostate irradiation, time was 5 to 10 minutes per lobe at a power setting of 5 to 10 W.

  13. Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. This study builds upon previously reported ex vivo tissue studies by exploring acute and short-term chronic in vivo canine studies. Isolation of the canine vas was achieved using a conventional vas ring clamp method. No perforation of the scrotal skin was necessary to occlude the vas. Laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface in a total of 8 dogs (n = 16 vasa) for a treatment time of 60 s. Burst pressure measurements were conducted at Days 0 and 21 (n = 8 vasa each day) to quantify the strength of vas closure. The vas was successfully thermally occluded in 15/16 (94%) procedures with 14/15 (93%) vas recording burst pressures above ejaculation pressure. One vas was not present, and another vas recorded a bursting pressure below ejaculation pressure. The coagulated vas bursting pressure averaged 283 +/- 34 mm Hg at Day 0 and 260 +/- 77 mm Hg at Day 21, significantly higher than reported vas ejaculation pressures of 136 +/- 29 mm Hg. Minor scrotal skin burns were observed during the recovery period. Noninvasive thermal occlusion of the vas is feasible in an in vivo canine model. Elimination of minor skin burns and longer term chronic in vivo canine studies are needed to confirm azospermia after vas occlusion without recanalization.

  14. Laser probes for noninvasive coagulation of subsurface tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chia-Chun; Permpongkosol, Sompol; Varkarakis, Ioannis M.; Lima, Guilherme; Franco, Nicholas; Hayman, Michael H.; Nicol, Theresa; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2006-02-01

    Previous ex vivo tissue studies utilizing deep laser heating combined with contact cooling of the tissue surface produced noninvasive thermal destruction of subsurface tissue structures in skin and liver samples. This study describes the design and preliminary in vivo testing of two integrated laser/cooling probes for simultaneous Nd:YAG laser irradiation and sapphire contact cooling of liver and skin tissues in an in vivo, acute porcine model for potential use in laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. Nd:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 1.06 μm, power of 20 W, 7.5-mm-diameter spot, 500-ms pulse length, and repetition rate of 0.625 Hz, was delivered to the tissue with a total irradiation time of 16 s. The tissue surface was continuously cooled with a sapphire plate maintained at -5 °C, and with pre- and post-ablation cooling times measuring 120 s and 30 s, resulting in a total operation time of 166 s per a lesion. Thermal lesions were created in liver and skin at a 1-mm depth below the tissue surface and with a 3-4 mm diameter. The laser parameters and lesion dimensions were comparable to previous ex vivo tissue studies. Preliminary in vivo animal studies demonstrate noninvasive creation of subsurface thermal lesions in tissue using Nd:YAG laser irradiation in conjunction with sapphire contact cooling. Chronic wound healing studies will be necessary to optimize the laser and cooling parameters. Potential clinical applications include endoscopic laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence and thermal coagulation of early stage bladder tumors.

  15. SCHOOL LIGHTING

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1965

    SEVERAL ARTICLES ON SCHOOL LIGHTING ARE CONTAINED IN THIS JOURNAL. THE TITLES AND AUTHORS INCLUDED ARE AS FOLLOWS--(1) "TODAY'S CONCEPTS IN SCHOOL LIGHTING" BY CHARLES D. GIBSON, (2) "CHALLENGE OF TOMMORROW'S LIGHTING" BY S.K. GUTH AND E.H. WITTE, (3) "PEEK PREVIEW OF THE WINDOWLESS SCHOOL" BY JAMES J. MORISSEAU, (4) "MAINTENANCE BEGINS BEFORE…

  16. New lab-made coagulant based on Schinopsis balansae tannin extract: synthesis optimization and preliminary tests on refractory water pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Martín, J.; Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Coco-Rivero, B.

    2014-09-01

    Quebracho colorado tannin extract was used as a coagulant raw material for water and wastewater treatment. The chemical synthesis follows a Mannich reaction mechanism and provides a fully working coagulant that can remove several pollutants from water. This paper addresses the optimization of such synthesis and confirms the feasibility of the coagulant by testing it in a preliminary screening for the elimination of dyes and detergents. The optimum combination of reagents was 6.81 g of diethanolamine (DEA) and 2.78 g of formaldehyde (F) per g of tannin extract. So obtained coagulant was succesfully tested on the removal of 9 dyes and 8 detergents.

  17. Optimizing the coagulation process in a drinking water treatment plant -- comparison between traditional and statistical experimental design jar tests.

    PubMed

    Zainal-Abideen, M; Aris, A; Yusof, F; Abdul-Majid, Z; Selamat, A; Omar, S I

    2012-01-01

    In this study of coagulation operation, a comparison was made between the optimum jar test values for pH, coagulant and coagulant aid obtained from traditional methods (an adjusted one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method) and with central composite design (the standard design of response surface methodology (RSM)). Alum (coagulant) and polymer (coagulant aid) were used to treat a water source with very low pH and high aluminium concentration at Sri-Gading water treatment plant (WTP) Malaysia. The optimum conditions for these factors were chosen when the final turbidity, pH after coagulation and residual aluminium were within 0-5 NTU, 6.5-7.5 and 0-0.20 mg/l respectively. Traditional and RSM jar tests were conducted to find their respective optimum coagulation conditions. It was observed that the optimum dose for alum obtained through the traditional method was 12 mg/l, while the value for polymer was set constant at 0.020 mg/l. Through RSM optimization, the optimum dose for alum was 7 mg/l and for polymer was 0.004 mg/l. Optimum pH for the coagulation operation obtained through traditional methods and RSM was 7.6. The final turbidity, pH after coagulation and residual aluminium recorded were all within acceptable limits. The RSM method was demonstrated to be an appropriate approach for the optimization and was validated by a further test.

  18. Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Research on food growth for long duration spacecraft has resulted in a light source for growing plants indoors known as Qbeam, a solid state light source consisting of a control unit and lamp. The light source, manufactured by Quantum Devices, Inc., is not very hot, although it generates high intensity radiation. When Ron Ignatius, an industrial partner of WCSAR, realized that terrestrial plant research lighting was not energy efficient enough for space use, he and WCSAR began to experiment with light emitting diodes. A line of LED products was developed, and QDI was formed to market the technology. An LED-based cancer treatment device is currently under development.

  19. Superior coagulation of graphene oxides on nanoscale layered double hydroxides and layered double oxides.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yidong; Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Zhongshan; Yao, Wen; Ai, Yuejie; Liu, Yunhai; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Alharbi, Njud S; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-12-01

    With the development and application of graphene oxides (GO), the potential toxicity and environmental behavior of GO has become one of the most forefront environmental problems. Herein, a novel nanoscale layered double hydroxides (glycerinum-modified nanocrystallined Mg/Al layered double hydroxides, LDH-Gl), layered double oxides (calcined LDH-Gl, LDO-Gl) and metallic oxide (TiO2) were synthesized and applied as superior coagulants for the efficient removal of GO from aqueous solutions. Coagulation of GO as a function of coagulant contents, pH, ionic strength, GO contents, temperature and co-existing ions were studied and compared, and the results showed that the maximum coagulation capacities of GO were LDO-Gl (448.3 mg g(-1)) > TiO2 (365.7 mg g(-1)) > LDH-Gl (339.1 mg g(-1)) at pH 5.5, which were significantly higher than those of bentonite, Al2O3, CaCl2 or other natural materials due to their stronger reaction active and interfacial effect. The presence of SO3(2-) and HCO3(-) inhibited the coagulation of GO on LDH-Gl and LDO-Gl significantly, while other cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ni(2+), Al(3+)) or anion (Cl(-)) had slightly effect on GO coagulation. The interaction mechanism of GO coagulation on LDO-Gl and TiO2 might due to the electrostatic interactions and strong surface complexation, while the main driving force of GO coagulation on LDH-Gl might be attributed to electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond, which were further evidenced by TEM, SEM, FT-IR and XRD analysis. The results of natural environmental simulation showed that LDO-Gl, TiO2 or other kinds of natural metallic oxides could be superior coagulants for the efficient elimination of GO or other toxic nanomaterials from aqueous solutions in real environmental pollution cleanup.

  20. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part I: benefits of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology is proven to provide certain benefits in drug delivery by improving solubility, increasing uptake to target sites and changing pharmacokinetics profiles of traditional drugs. Since properties of many materials change tremendously at the nanoscale levels, nanotechnology is also being explored in various industrial applications. As such, nanoparticles are rapidly entering various areas of industry, biology and medicine. The benefits of using nanotechnology for industrial and biomedical applications are often tempered by concerns about the safety of these new materials. One such area of concern includes their effect on the immune system. While nanoparticle interactions with various constituents of the immune system have been reviewed before, little attention was given to nanoparticle effects on the blood coagulation system. Nanoparticle interface with the blood coagulation system may lead to either benefits to the host or adverse reactions. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of nanoparticle interactions with plasma coagulation factors, platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes. Part I is focused on desirable interactions between nanoparticles and the coagulation system, and discusses benefits of using nanotechnology to intervene in coagulation disorders. Undesirable interactions posing safety concerns are covered in part II, which will be published in the June issue of Nanomedicine.

  1. CpaA a novel protease from Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates deregulates blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Law, Robert; Warren, Sarah; Samis, John A; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that displays high antibiotic resistance. It causes a variety of infections including pneumonias and sepsis which may result in disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this work, we identify and characterize a novel secreted, zinc-dependent, metallo-endopeptidase CpaA (coagulation targeting metallo-endopeptidase of Acinetobacter baumannii) which deregulates human blood coagulation in vitro and thus is likely to contribute to A. baumannii virulence. Three quarters of the clinical isolates tested (n = 16) had the cpaA gene; however, it was absent from two type strains, A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and A. baumannii ATCC 19606. The CpaA protein was purified from one clinical isolate and was able to cleave purified factor (F) V and fibrinogen and reduce the coagulation activity of FV in human plasma. CpaA-treated plasma showed reduced clotting activity in contact pathway-activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assays, but increased clotting activity in tissue factor pathway prothrombin time (PT) assays. A significant portion of clinically relevant A. baumannii isolates secrete a protease which targets and deregulates the coagulation system.

  2. Coagulation Biomarkers in Healthy Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Galit H; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Marini, Robert P; Vanderburg, Charles R; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fox, James G

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are a common model for the study of human biology and disease. To manage coagulopathies in these animals and to study their clotting changes, the ability to measure coagulation biomarkers is necessary. Currently, few options for coagulation testing in NHP are commercially available. In this study, assays for 4 coagulation biomarkers—D-dimer, antithrombin III, protein C, and soluble P-selectin—were developed and optimized for rhesus macaques. Whole blood was collected from 28 healthy Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (11 male; 17 female) ranging in age from 5 to 20 y. Coagulation biomarkers were measured by using bead-based sandwich ELISA technology. The ranges (mean ± 90% confidence interval) for these biomarkers were: antithrombin III, 124.2 to 133.4 μg/mL; protein C, 3.2 to 3.6 μg/mL; D-dimer, 110.3 to 161.3 ng/mL; soluble P-selectin, 0.12 to 0.14 ng/106 platelets. These reference values did not differ significantly according to sex or age. These new assays for coagulation biomarkers in rhesus macaques will facilitate the evaluation of in vivo hemostasis. PMID:27177557

  3. Identification of the blood coagulation factor interacting sequences in staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Hida, Shigeaki

    2017-03-25

    Staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs) are a family of exoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus. We have shown that SSL10 binds to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and inhibits blood coagulation induced by recalcification of citrated plasma. SSL10 was revealed to bind to coagulation factors via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. In this study we attempted to identify the responsible sequence of SSL10 for the interaction with coagulation factors. We prepared a series of domain swap mutants between SSL10 and its paralog SSL7 that does not interact with coagulation factors, and examined their binding activity to immobilized prothrombin using ELISA-like binding assay. The domain swap mutants that contained SSL10β1-β3 ((23)MEMKN ISALK HGKNN LRFKF RGIKI QVL(60)) bound to immobilized prothrombin, and mutants that contained SSL10β10-β12 ((174)SFYNL DLRSK LKFKY MGEVI ESKQI KDIEV NLK(207)) also retained the binding activity. On the other hand, mutants that lacked these two regions did not bind to prothrombin. These sequences, each alone, bound to prothrombin as 33 amino acid length polypeptides. These results suggest that SSL10 has two responsible sequences for the binding to prothrombin. These prothrombin-binding peptides would contribute to the development of new anticoagulants.

  4. Coagulation Biomarkers in Healthy Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Marini, Robert P; Vanderburg, Charles R; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fox, James G

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are a common model for the study of human biology and disease. To manage coagulopathies in these animals and to study their clotting changes, the ability to measure coagulation biomarkers is necessary. Currently, few options for coagulation testing in NHP are commercially available. In this study, assays for 4 coagulation biomarkers-D-dimer, antithrombin III, protein C, and soluble P-selectin-were developed and optimized for rhesus macaques. Whole blood was collected from 28 healthy Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (11 male; 17 female) ranging in age from 5 to 20 y. Coagulation biomarkers were measured by using bead-based sandwich ELISA technology. The ranges (mean ± 90% confidence interval) for these biomarkers were: antithrombin III, 124.2 to 133.4 μg/mL; protein C, 3.2 to 3.6 μg/mL; D-dimer, 110.3 to 161.3 ng/mL; soluble P-selectin, 0.12 to 0.14 ng/10(6) platelets. These reference values did not differ significantly according to sex or age. These new assays for coagulation biomarkers in rhesus macaques will facilitate the evaluation of in vivo hemostasis.

  5. Removal of arsenic and iron removal from drinking water using coagulation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC), biological aerated filter (BAF), alum coagulation and Moringa oleifera coagulation were investigated to remove iron and arsenic contaminants from drinking water. At an initial dose of 5 mg/L, the removal efficiency for arsenic and iron was 63% and 58% respectively using alum, and 47% and 41% respectively using Moringa oleifera. The removal of both contaminants increased with the increase in coagulant dose and decrease in pH. Biological processes were more effective in removing these contaminants than coagulation. Compared to BAF, BAC gave greater removal of both arsenic and iron, removing 85% and 74%, respectively. Longer contact time for both processes could reduce the greater concentration of arsenic and iron contaminants. The addition of coagulation (at 5 mg/L dosage) and a biological process (with 15 or 60 min contact time) could significantly increase removal efficiency, and the maximum removal was observed for the combination of alum and BAC treatment (60 min contact time), with 100% and 98.56% for arsenic and iron respectively. The reduction efficiency of arsenic and iron reduced with the increase in the concentration of dissolved organics in the feedwater due to the adsorption competition between organic molecules and heavy metals.

  6. Coagulation-flocculation mechanisms in wastewater treatment plants through zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    López-Maldonado, E A; Oropeza-Guzman, M T; Jurado-Baizaval, J L; Ochoa-Terán, A

    2014-08-30

    Based on the polyelectrolyte-contaminant physical and chemical interactions at the molecular level, this article analyzed and discussed the coagulation-flocculation and chemical precipitation processes in order to improve their efficiency. Bench experiments indicate that water pH, polyelectrolyte (PE) dosing strategy and cationic polyelectrolyte addition are key parameters for the stability of metal-PE complexes. The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed based on zeta potential (ζ) measurement as the criteria to define the electrostatic interaction between pollutants and coagulant-flocculant agents. Polyelectrolyte and wastewater dispersions are exposed to an electrophoretic effect to determine ζ. Finally, zeta potential values are compared at pH 9, suggesting the optimum coagulant dose at 162mg/L polydadmac and 67mg/L of flocculant, since a complete removal of TSS and turbidity is achieved. Based on the concentration of heavy metals (0.931mg/L Sn, 0.7mg/L Fe and 0.63mg/L Pb), treated water met the Mexican maximum permissible limits. In addition, the treated water has 45mg O2/L chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45mg C/L total organic carbon (TOC). The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed taking into account both: zeta potential (ζ)-pH measurement and chemical affinity, as the criteria to define the electrostatic and chemical interaction between pollutants and polyelectrolytes.

  7. Utilization of plant-based natural coagulants as future alternatives towards sustainable water clarification.

    PubMed

    Choy, Sook Yan; Prasad, Krishna Murthy Nagendra; Wu, Ta Yeong; Raghunandan, Mavinakere Eshwaraiah; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2014-11-01

    Rapid industrial developments coupled with surging population growth have complicated issues dealing with water scarcity as the quest for clean and sanitized water intensifies globally. Existing fresh water supplies could be contaminated with organic, inorganic and biological matters that have potential harm to the society. Turbidity in general is a measure of water cloudiness induced by such colloidal and suspended matters and is also one of the major criteria in raw water monitoring to meet the stipulated water quality guidelines. Turbidity reduction is often accomplished using chemical coagulants such as alum. The use of alum is widely associated with potential development of health issues and generation of voluminous sludge. Natural coagulants that are available in abundance can certainly be considered in addressing the drawbacks associated with the use of chemical coagulants. Twenty one types of plant-based natural coagulants categorized as fruit waste and others are identified and presented collectively with their research summary in this review. The barriers and prospects of commercialization of natural coagulants in near future are also discussed.

  8. Biodegradability enhancement of purified terephthalic acid wastewater by coagulation-flocculation process as pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Manikavasagam; Dafale, Nishant; Pathe, Pradyumna; Nandy, Tapas

    2008-06-15

    In this work, the coagulation-flocculation process was used as pretreatment for purified terephthalic acid (PTA) wastewater with the objective of improving its overall biodegradability. PTA production generates wastewaters with toxicants p-xylene [1,4-dimethyl-benzene (C8H10)], a major raw material used in the production process, along with some of the intermediates, viz., p-toluic acid, benzoic acid, 4-carboxybenzaldehyde, phthalic acid and terephthalic acid. These compounds affect the bio-oxidation process of wastewater treatment; hence removal of these constituents is necessary, prior to conventional aerobic treatment. This paper addresses the application of coagulation-flocculation process using chemical coagulants, viz., aluminium sulphate (alum), polyaluminium chloride (PAC), ferrous sulphate and ferric chloride in combination with anionic polyelectrolyte. Polyaluminium chloride (PAC) in conjunction with lime and polyelectrolyte removed about 63.1% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45.2% biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) from PTA wastewater. Coagulation-flocculation process coupled with aerobic bio-oxidation treatment of PTA wastewater achieved, COD & BOD removals of 97.4% and 99.4%, respectively. The biodegradability enhancement evaluated in terms of the BOD5/COD ratio, increased from 0.45 to 0.67 at the optimum conditions. The results obtained from these studies indicate that the coagulation-flocculation process could be a suitable pretreatment method in reducing toxicity of PTA wastewater whilst enhancing biodegradability for aerobic biological treatment scheme.

  9. Coagulation factor V(A2440G) causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lisa M; Tran, Sinh; Livaja, Ruzica; Bensend, Tracy A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2013-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers' plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder-associated F5(A2440G) leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation.

  10. Coagulation factor VA2440G causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lisa M.; Tran, Sinh; Livaja, Ruzica; Bensend, Tracy A.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers’ plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder–associated F5A2440G leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation. PMID:23979162

  11. Improving primary treatment of urban wastewater with lime-induced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Marani, Dario; Ramadori, Roberto; Braguglia, Camilla Maria

    2004-01-01

    The enhancement of primary treatment efficiency through the coagulation process may yield several advantages, including lower aeration energy in the subsequent biological unit and higher recovery of biogas from sludge digestion. In this work sewage coagulation with lime was studied at pilot plant level, using degritted sewage from the city of Rome. The work aimed at optimising the operating conditions (coagulant dosage or treatment pH, and mixing conditions in the coagulation and flocculation tanks), in order to maximise the efficiency of suspended Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal and to minimise sludge production. Lime dosage optimisation resulted in an optimal treatment pH of 9. Lime addition up to pH 9 may increase COD removal rate in the primary treatment from typical 30-35% of plain sedimentation up to 55-70%. Within the velocity gradients experimented in this work (314-795 s(-1) for the coagulation tank and 13-46 s(-1) for the flocculation tank), mixing conditions did not significantly affect the lime-enhanced process, which seems to be controlled by slow lime dissolution. Sludge produced in the lime-enhanced process settled and compacted easily, inducing an average 36% decrease in sludge volume with respect to plain settling. However excess sludge was produced, which was not accounted for by the amount of suspended solids removed. This is probably due to incomplete dissolution of lime, which may be partially incorporated in the sludge.

  12. Floc morphology and cyclic shearing recovery: comparison of alum and polyaluminum chloride coagulants.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Kevin; Carlson, Kenneth; Gregory, Dean

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the floc formation and re-aggregation potential for alum, polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and a blend of these coagulants. Bench-scale testing included floc morphology characterization for well-developed floc, post-shear floc, and non-settleable (filter influent) floc. Different applications of coagulants were observed to produce non-settleable floc that was morphologically different. The alum treatment had a decrease in average floc size from coagulated to non-settleable conditions, whereas the PACl and PACl/alum treatments resulted in similar sized floc between these processes. Zeta potential distribution measurements showed that the alum treatment resulted in a negative shift from coagulated to non-settleable conditions whereas the PACl and PACl/alum treatments had no significant shift. A photometric dispersion analyzer (PDA) was employed to compare the differences between coagulant treatments with respect to shear induced aggregate breakup and recovery. The PDA allowed a dynamic monitoring of initial floc aggregation and measured the degree of recovery from cyclic shearing. The degree of recovery from shearing was greatest for the PACl/alum treatment likely as a result of increased collision efficiency due to more effective charge neutralization.

  13. Prehospital coagulation monitoring of resuscitation with point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    A variety of point-of-care monitors for the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood gas with electrolytes, and lactate can be used also in the prehospital setting for optimizing and individualizing trauma resuscitation. Point-of-care coagulation testing with activated prothrombin test, prothrombin test, and activated coagulation/clotting time tests is available for prehospital use. Although robust, battery driven, and easy to handle, many devices lack documentation for use in prehospital care. Some of the devices correspond poorly to corresponding laboratory analyses in acute trauma coagulopathy and at lower hematocrits. In trauma, viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography can rapidly detect acute trauma coagulopathy and give an overall dynamic picture of the hemostatic system and the interaction between its different components: coagulation activation, fibrin polymerization, fibrin platelet interactions within the clot, and fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry is shock resistant and has the potential to be used outside the hospital setting to guide individualized coagulation factor and blood component therapies. Sonoclot and Rheorox are two small viscoelastic instruments with one-channel options, but with less documentation. The point-of-care market for coagulation tests is quickly expanding, and new devices are introduced all the time. Still they should be better adopted to prehospital conditions, small, robust, battery charged, and rapid and use small sample volumes and whole blood.

  14. UV/persulfate preoxidation to improve coagulation efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqun; Xie, Pengchao; Wang, Zongping; Shang, Ran; Wang, Songlin

    2017-01-15

    The performance of UV-activated persulfate (UV/PS) technology as preoxidation process to enhance Microcystis aeruginosa removal by subsequent coagulation-sedimentation was firstly evaluated. The results demonstrate that UV/PS preoxidation could successfully promote coagulation of algae cells through the effective neutralization of zeta potential, which was caused by the changes of cell morphology, size distribution and surface properties after simultaneous UV irradiation and formed reactive species (i.e. SO4(-) and HO) oxidation. Since excessive oxidation would cause cell rupture along with the release of organics, which could deteriorate coagulation efficiency, optimal PS dose (60mg/L) and UV dose (375mJ/cm(2)) were proposed to exist in this study. The concentrations of extracellular algal organic matter (AOM) sharply increased by 48.2% during the preoxidation period, while gradually decreased in the following coagulation and sedimentation. Most of the concerned disinfection by-products (DBPs) monotonically decreased or followed fluctuant reduction with increasing PS doses, whereas the trichloromethane, trichloroacetic acid and dichloroacetonitrile persistently increased, which was inferred to be related to the variation of AOM. This study suggests that UV/PS might be a potential pretreatment process to assist coagulation on the removal of algae.

  15. Hemolymph coagulation and phenoloxidase activity in Uca tangeri induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Salawu, Musa O; Oloyede, Hussein O B; Oladiji, Temidayo A; Yakubu, Musa T; Amuzat, Aliyu O

    2016-05-01

    Uca tangeri is a marine fiddler crab found commonly in the West African coast and is often exposed to Gram-negative pathogens upon injury. The aim of this study was to document the patterns of endotoxin-induced protein coagulation and phenoloxidase (PO) activity in hemolymph fractions of Uca tangeri. Hemolymph from live crabs was obtained by carapace puncture, pooled. and then separated into plasma, hemocyte Lysate (HL), hemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS) and hemocyte lysate debris (HLD). The effect of Escherichia coli (O1111:B4) endotoxin and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) on protein coagulation in the presence/absence of endotoxin and the endotoxin dose-dependence of coagulation and PO activity were each studied in the plasma, HL, HLS and HLD. The results showed Ca(2+) was required to induce coagulation, and was endotoxin concentration-dependent in the plasma. PO activity was highest in the HLS but PO specific activity was highest in HLD. PO activity remained relatively constant with increased LPS concentration in the range studied 0-10 EU/ml. From the data we conclude that endotoxin-induced protein coagulation occurs in the plasma alone and might be mediated by trans-glutaminases, while PO activity is localized inside hemocytes and cell membranes in Uca tangeri.

  16. Clinical utility of biomarkers of endothelial activation and coagulation for prognosis in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan M; Mwilu, Regina; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: HIV infection is associated with vascular dysfunction and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Our objective was to review the evidence regarding the clinical utility of endothelial activation and coagulation biomarkers for the prognosis of HIV-infected patients. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase for publications using the keywords “HIV” or “HIV infection” and “endothelium” or “coagulation”. We reviewed reference lists and hand-searched for additional relevant articles. All clinical studies that enrolled non-pregnant, HIV-infected adults, measured biomarkers reflecting endothelial activation or coagulation, and prospectively evaluated their associations with vascular dysfunction or clinical outcomes were included. Results: Seventeen studies were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 11 investigated endothelial activation biomarkers and 12 investigated coagulation biomarkers. Biomarkers and outcomes varied widely across studies. Overall, published studies support an association between P-selectin and venous thromboembolism in HIV-infected patients, an association between tissue-type plasminogen activator and death, and associations between D-dimer and several clinical outcomes, including venous thromboembolism, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Conclusions: Several studies have demonstrated associations between biomarkers of endothelial activation and coagulation and clinically important outcomes in HIV-1 infection. Additional large-scale prospective investigations to determine the utility of endothelial activation and coagulation biomarkers for risk stratification and prediction of adverse outcomes are clearly warranted. PMID:23732995

  17. Effect of high pressures on the enzymatic activity of commercial milk protein coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Krystyna; Reps, Arnold; Jankowska, Agnieszka

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of high pressures in the range of 100-1000 MPa/15 min, applied in 100 MPa increments, on the coagulating and proteolytic activity of commercial coagulants produced with genetic engineering methods: Maxiren, Chymogen, Chymax and of a natural rennin preparation, Hala. The coagulating activity of Hala preparation differed compared with the other preparations, due to greater resistance to high pressures, especially in the range of 500-600 MPa. The preparations produced with genetic engineering methods lost their capability for milk protein coagulation by 500 MPa. Pressurization at 200 MPa contributed to their reduced capability for casein macroproteolysis. In contrast, an increase in Chymax, Chymogen, Maxiren and Hala preparations' hydrolytic capability for the macroproteolysis of isoelectric casein was observed upon pressure treatment at 100 and 400 MPa and for microproteolysis after pressure treatment at 200 MPa. Storage (48 h/5°C) of the pressurized preparations had an insignificant effect on their coagulating and proteolytic activities.

  18. Comparison of the level of residual coagulant activity in different cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nidhi; Fox, Patrick F; McSweeney, Paul L H

    2009-08-01

    The coagulant retained in cheese curd is a major contributor to proteolysis during ripening. The objective of this study was to quantify residual coagulant in 9 cheese varieties by measuring its activity on a synthetic heptapeptide (Pro-Thr-Glu-Phe-[NO2-Phe]-Arg-Leu) assayed using reversed-phase HPLC. The level of residual coagulant activity was highest in Camembert cheese, probably due to its low pH at whey drainage and the high moisture content of the cheese, followed in order by Feta=Port du Salut=Cheddar>Gouda>Emmental=Parmigiano Reggiano=low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella=Mozzarella di Bufala Campana. The high cooking temperature (50-54 degrees C) used during the manufacture of Emmental and Parmigiano Reggiano cheeses and the cooking and stretching step in hot water during the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese may be the reasons for the lowest residual coagulant activity in these cheeses. The level of residual coagulant activity was higher in Feta cheese made from milk concentrated by ultrafiltration than in conventional Feta.

  19. Allometric scaling and prediction of concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans from animals.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2013-09-01

    Allometric scaling is a useful tool in early drug development and can be used for the prediction of human pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters from animal PK parameters. The main objective of this work was to predict concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans in a multi-compartment system using animal PK parameters. The prediction of concentration-time profiles in humans in a multi-compartment system was based on the predicted values of clearance and volumes of distribution (V(c), V(ss) and V(β)) from animals. Five coagulation factors from the literature were chosen that were described by two-compartment model in both humans and animals. Clearance and volumes of distribution from animals were allometrically scaled to humans and then were used to predict concentration-time profiles in humans. The predicted concentration-time profile for a given coagulation factor was accurate for most of the time points. Percent prediction error range varied across coagulation factors. The prediction error >50% was observed either at 1 or a maximum of two time points for a given drug. The study indicated that the allometric scaling can be useful in the prediction of concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans from animals and may be helpful in designing a first-in-human study.

  20. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8) does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade. PMID:27279976

  1. Genetic parameters of coagulation properties, milk yield, quality, and acidity estimated using coagulating and noncoagulating milk information in Brown Swiss and Holstein-Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Penasa, M; De Marchi, M; Gallo, L; Bittante, G; Carnier, P

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate heritabilities of rennet coagulation time (RCT) and curd firmness (a(30)) and their genetic correlations with test-day milk yield, composition (fat, protein, and casein content), somatic cell score, and acidity (pH and titratable acidity) using coagulating and noncoagulating (NC) milk information. Data were from 1,025 Holstein-Friesian (HF) and 1,234 Brown Swiss (BS) cows, which were progeny of 54 HF and 58 BS artificial insemination sires, respectively. Milk coagulation properties (MCP) of each cow were measured once using a computerized renneting meter and samples not exhibiting coagulation within 31 min after rennet addition were classified as NC milk. For NC samples, RCT was unobserved. Multivariate analyses, using Bayesian methodology, were performed to estimate the genetic relationships of RCT or a(30) with the other traits and statistical inference was based on the marginal posterior distributions of parameters of concern. For analyses involving RCT, a right-censored Gaussian linear model was used and records of NC milk samples, being censored records, were included as unknown parameters in the model implementing a data augmentation procedure. Rennet coagulation time was more heritable [heritability (h(2))=0.240 and h(2)=0.210 for HF and BS, respectively] than a(30) (h(2)=0.148 and h(2)=0.168 for HF and BS, respectively). Milk coagulation properties were more heritable than a single test-day milk yield (h(2)=0.103 and h(2)=0.097 for HF and BS, respectively) and less heritable than milk composition traits whose heritability ranged from 0.275 to 0.275, with the only exception of fat content of BS milk (h(2)=0.108). A negative genetic correlation, lower than -0.85, was estimated between RCT and a(30) for both breeds. Genetic relationships of MCP with yield and composition were low or moderate and favorable. The genetic correlation of somatic cell score with RCT in BS cows was large and positive and even more positive were

  2. Rifampicin-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; He, Jian-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by daily rifampicin therapy is rare, especially the patient is absent of malignancy, severe infection, and prior exposure to rifampicin. Patient concerns: We report a case of DIC induced by daily rifampicin treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. A 22-year-old, previously healthy man received an anti-tuberculosis therapy consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide on the daily dose recommended by the World Health Organization tuberculosis guidelines after a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Two weeks later, he was transferred to the West China Hospital with nasal hemorrhage for 1 week, hematochezia, hematuria, and petechiae for 5 days. Diagnoses: Laboratory data and symptoms on admission indicated DIC. Interventions: The anti-tuberculosis drugs were discontinued after admission and he was initiated with targeted treatment for DIC, omeprazole and polyene hosphatidylcholine infusion, as well as nutrition supportive treatment. Five days after admission, ethambutol, moxifloxacin, and amikacin were added to the patient without further active hemorrhage. Eight days after admission, the platelet count had risen gradually. Isoniazid was administered on 24 days after admission, while his liver function tests and platelet counts returned to normal. No recurrence of DIC occurred. The diagnosis of rifampicin-induced DIC was confirmed. Outcomes: The patient recovered and left hospital with isoniazid, ethambutol, levofloxacin, and streptomycin after 4 weeks of hospitalization. There was no recurrence of DIC or hemorrhage during the 8 months of follow-up. The literature review revealed that there were 10 other cases of rifampicin-induced DIC. Only 4 cases received rifampicin on a daily basis for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment and the others were on intermittent dosing schedule for pulmonary tuberculosis or leprosy treatment. Lessons: As a rare adverse effect, DIC induced by

  3. Synergistic effect of biological activated carbon and enhanced coagulation in secondary wastewater effluent treatment.

    PubMed

    Aryal, A; Sathasivan, A; Vigneswaran, S

    2012-01-01

    The use of secondary wastewater effluent (SWWE) is an essential strategy for making better use of limited water resources. However, a wide range of organic compounds eventually renders them unsuitable for recycling. In water treatment processes, biologically activated carbon (BAC) is adopted after physicochemical treatment. However, the effectiveness of such combination for SWWE remains poorly understood. This study investigates the effectiveness of various combinations: BAC/enhanced coagulation (EC) or EC/BAC, especially in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal. The results showed that distinct advantage could be obtained by adopting BAC/EC combination rather than EC/BAC, as microbes in BAC not only remove non-coagulable compounds but also synergize the removal efficiency by releasing some coagulable humic substances.

  4. Endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Umano, Yasukazu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masaya; Shono, Yoshiharu; Oku, Yoshimasa; Tanishima, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Takeshi; Tabuse, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We experienced three cases of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled gastrointestinal anastomosis, and established endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy (EMCT) with a cylinder-type electrode. We were able to treat postoperative hemorrhage over the entire circumference of stapled anastomosis successfully. Two patients had undergone a lower third thoracic esophagogastrectomy through a left thoraco-abdominal approach for gastric cancer in the cardia, while the other case had undergone Billroth I gastrectomy. They each had fresh bleeding from the stapled anastomosis after the operation. Emergency endoscopic examination was immediately performed. Endoscopy revealed bleeding on the suture line. We performed hemostasis endoscopically with microwave coagulation therapy safely. They were discharged from the hospital without complications such as leakage and stenosis. Since EMCT with the cylinder-type electrode can coagulate shallowly and widely, it is very effective for hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

  5. Effects of compound bioflocculant on coagulation performance and floc properties for dye removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Bo, Xiaowen; Zhao, Yanxia; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Sun, Shenglei; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2014-08-01

    A series of jar tests was conducted to investigate the coagulation performance of using compound bioflocculant (CBF) as a coagulant aid with aluminum sulfate (AS) and polyaluminum chloride (PAC) in synthetic dyeing wastewater treatment. Floc size, growth, breakage, re-growth and sedimentation natural were investigated by PDA2000. The results showed that the corresponding dual-coagulants of AS and PAC enhanced the color removal efficiency, especially at low aluminum dosage. Results also indicated that the floc generated by aluminum salts and CBF had larger size and higher growth rate. In addition, for both AS and PAC the floc recoverability was improved by addition of CBF. The adsorption and bridging effect of CBF performed a positive role in dye wastewater treatment.

  6. Modification of coagulation and Fenton oxidation processes for cost-effective leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, H C; Cho, S H; Ko, S O

    2001-01-01

    Physicochemical processes have been used to remove nonbiodegradable organic compounds in leachate generated from sanitary landfills. In this study, a coagulation process combined with Fenton oxidation was evaluated for the removal of refractory organics in leachate. Recycling of sludge generated from Fenton oxidation to a coagulation process was attempted to reduce operation cost and to improve organic removal rate. The addition mode of Fenton reagent was also modified to obtain a better organic removal rate and more cost-effective operation. With Fenton sludge recycling, 9% higher COD removal was obtained, and the sludge to be disposed could be reduced up to 50%. Also, the coagulant could be reduced by 50%. For Fenton oxidation process, stepwise addition of reagents gave a 5% higher COD removal, and a 25% reduction in chemical consumption.

  7. Two cases of burns caused by misuse of coagulation unit and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rolly, G

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of severe burns with monitoring apparatus are described. In a female patient of 45 years, a severe third degree burn occurred by misuse of coagulation apparatus (inversion of the poles of an older Bovie apparatus), in the presence of a non-floating ECG monitoring device. A high intensity current was established from the coagulation unit, via the earth plate under the buttocks, to the indifferent electrode placed on the chest, where burns occurred. In an 8 month female baby, having laparotomy for a neuroblastoma, a third degree burn of 5 cm diameter occurred with a non-floating ECG monitor. A twin-wired disposable earth plate was placed just beneath the indifferent ECG electrode on the leg. A burning current was established between the Bovie coagulation unit and the monitor.

  8. A review on palm oil mill biogas plant wastewater treatment using coagulation-ozonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Z. D.; Joseph, C. G.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) generated from the palm oil industry is highly polluted and requires urgent attention for treatment due to its high organic content. Biogas plant containing anaerobic digester is capable to treat the high organic content of the POME while generating valuable biogas at the same time. This green energy from POME is environmental-friendly but the wastewater produced is still highly polluted and blackish in colour. Therefore a novel concept of combining coagulation with ozonation treatment is proposed to treat pollution of this nature. Several parameters should be taken under consideration in order to ensure the effectiveness of the hybrid treatment including ozone dosage, ozone contact time, pH of the water or wastewater, coagulant dosage, and mixing and settling time. This review paper will elucidate the importance of hybrid coagulation-ozonation treatment in producing a clear treated wastewater which is known as the main challenge in palm oil industry

  9. Reduction of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of dye effluent using Fenton-coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2014-06-15

    Dye wastewater exhibits significant ecotoxicity even though its physico-chemical parameters meet the discharge standards. In this work, the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of dye effluent were tested, and the Fenton-coagulation process was carried out to detoxify this dye effluent. The acute toxicity was evaluated according to the mortality rate of zebrafish, and genotoxicity was evaluated by micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. Removal of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was also investigated. The results indicated that the dye effluent showed strong acute toxicity and genotoxicity to zebrafish. After 4h of treatment by Fenton-coagulation process, the dye effluent exhibited no significant acute toxicity and genotoxicity to zebrafish. In addition, its COD was less than 50mg/L, which met the discharge standard. It demonstrates that Fenton-coagulation process can comprehensively reduce the acute toxicity and genotoxicity as well as the COD of the dye effluent.

  10. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin

    2012-10-01

    We are presenting so-called Wave-guided Optical Waveguides (WOWs) fabricated by two-photon polymerization and capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. By integrating optical waveguides into the structures we have created freestanding waveguides which can be positioned anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation. In a broader context, this research shows that optically trapped micro-fabricated structures can potentially help bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the sub-wavelength domain.

  11. Emergency Lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A lighting system originally developed for NASA's Apollo and Skylab manned spacecraft resulted in a industrial spinoff and creation of a whole new company to produce and market the product line. The company is UDEC Corp., Waltham, Mass. UDEC's "Multi-Mode" electronic lighting systems are designed for plant emergency and supplemental use, such as night lighting, "always-on" stairwell lights and illuminated exit signs. Their advantages stem from the qualities demanded for spacecraft installation: extremely high fight output with very low energy drain, compactness, light weight, and high reliability. The Multi-Mode system includes long-life fluorescent lamps operated by electronic circuitry, a sealed battery that needs no maintenance for 10 years, and a solid-state battery charger. A typical emergency installation consists of a master module with battery and an eight watt lamp, together with four remote "Satellight" modules powered by the master's battery. As a night lighting system for maintenance or I security, UDEC fixtures can bypass the battery and 1 operate on normal current at a fraction of the energy 1 demand of conventional night lighting. Industrial customers have realized savings of better than ninety percent with UDEC night lights. UDEC started as a basement industry in 1972 but the company has already sold more than 1,000 lighting systems to building operators.

  12. Coagulation changes during lower body negative pressure and blood loss in humans.

    PubMed

    van Helmond, Noud; Johnson, Blair D; Curry, Timothy B; Cap, Andrew P; Convertino, Victor A; Joyner, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that markers of coagulation activation are greater during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) than those obtained during blood loss (BL). We assessed coagulation using both standard clinical tests and thrombelastography (TEG) in 12 men who performed a LBNP and BL protocol in a randomized order. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, -15, -30, and -45 mmHg of suction. BL included 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of blood removal (up to 1,000 ml total). Arterial blood draws were performed at baseline and after the last stage of each protocol. We found that LBNP to -45 mmHg is a greater central hypovolemic stimulus versus BL; therefore, the coagulation markers were plotted against central venous pressure (CVP) to obtain stimulus-response relationships using the linear regression line slopes for both protocols. Paired t-tests were used to determine whether the slopes of these regression lines fell on similar trajectories for each protocol. Mean regression line slopes for coagulation markers versus CVP fell on similar trajectories during both protocols, except for TEG α° angle (-0.42 ± 0.96 during LBNP vs. -2.41 ± 1.13°/mmHg during BL; P < 0.05). During both LBNP and BL, coagulation was accelerated as evidenced by shortened R-times (LBNP, 9.9 ± 2.4 to 6.2 ± 1.1; BL, 8.7 ± 1.3 to 6.4 ± 0.4 min; both P < 0.05). Our results indicate that LBNP models the general changes in coagulation markers observed during BL.

  13. Performance optimization of coagulation/flocculation in the treatment of wastewater from a polyvinyl chloride plant.

    PubMed

    Almubaddal, F; Alrumaihi, K; Ajbar, A

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents results of an experimental study of coagulation/flocculation process of wastewater generated from a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plant. The wastewater contains fine chlorine-based solid materials (i.e. latex). Experiments were carried out using a model wastewater which is chemically identical to the actual plant but is more consistent. Inorganic ions (Al2(SO4)3, FeCl3 and CaCl2) and a water soluble commercial polyelectrolyte (PE) were added to the wastewater sample. Coagulation efficiency was determined by measuring both the turbidity of the supernatants and the relative settlement of the flocs in the jar test. It was found that aluminum and ferric ions were more efficient than calcium ions as coagulants. The addition of polyelectrolyte was found to improve substantially the coagulation/flocculation process. It was found that the (Al2(SO4)3) combined with the polyelectrolyte at certain pH and agitation speed gave the best results compared to calcium chloride or ferric chloride when combined with the same concentration of polyelectrolyte. Only 0.0375g of a solution of (0.5% Al2(SO4)3) was required to coagulate the model wastewater. Ferric chloride (2.5% FeCl3) combined with the polyelectrolyte, on the other hand, required 0.1g while the optimum turbidity is almost the same. As for calcium chloride (2.5% CaCl2) it was found to be the least effective. The coagulation/flocculation process was found to be dependent on both pH and the agitation speed.

  14. Evaluation of reusing alum sludge for the coagulation of industrial wastewater containing mixed anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jangkorn, Siriprapha; Kuhakaew, Sinchai; Theantanoo, Suwapee; Klinla-or, Harit; Sriwiriyarat, Tongchai

    2011-01-01

    A coagulation-flocculation process is typically employed to treat the industrial wastewater generated by the consumer products industry manufacturing detergents, soaps, and others. The expenditure of chemicals including coagulants and chemicals for pH adjustment is costly for treating this wastewater. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing the aluminum sulfate (alum) sludge as a coagulant or as a coagulation aid so that the fresh alum dosage can be minimized or the removal efficiency can be enhanced. The experiments were conducted in a jar-test apparatus simulating the coagulation-flocculation process for simultaneous removals of organic matters, anionic surfactants, suspended solids, and turbidity. At the optimum initial pH value of 10 and the fresh alum concentration of 400 mg/L, the total suspended solids (TSS), total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), total anionic surfactants, and turbidity removal efficiencies were 71.5%, 76.4%, 95.4%, and 98.2%, respectively. The addition of alum sludge as a coagulant alone without any fresh alum addition could significantly remove the turbidity, TCOD, and anionic surfactants. The TSS was left in the supernatants after the settling period, but would subsequently be removed by adding the fresh alum. The TSS, TCOD, and turbidity removal efficiencies were also enhanced when both the alum sludge and the fresh alum were employed. The TCOD removal efficiency over 80% has been accomplished, which has never fulfilled by using the fresh alum alone. It is concluded that the alum sludge could be reused for the treatment of industrial wastewater generated by the consumer products industry.

  15. [Coagulation characteristics of different Al species on humic acid removal from water].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Pan-Yue; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gao, Ying; Xiao, Hui-Huang; Zhou, Fan

    2008-07-01

    Polyaluminum chloride PAC-Al13 with high Al13 content and PAC-Al30 with high Al30 content were prepared. Coagulation behaviors of PAC-Al30, PAC-Al13 and AlCl3 for humic acid removal from water were compared by jar-test. The floc growth, the charge neutralization capacity, the effect of pH and coagulant dosage on coagulation efficiency were investigated, and the residual aluminium in the purified water was considered. The results show that the order of the floc formation capacity is PAC-Al30 > PAC-Al13 > AlCl3. PAC-Al30 and PAC-Al13 have a broader effective pH range of 5.0-8.0, compared with AlCl3. The difference of charge neutralization capacity between PAC-Al30 and PAC-Al13 is not significant, but PAC-Al30 performs a more effective coagulation at low coagulant dosages because of its stronger adsorption and bridging, and PAC-Al30 has a broader effective dosage range of 0.08-0.64 mmol/L, compared with AlCl3 and PAC-Al13. The humic acid removal reaches 98.5% at a pH of 7.0 and a PAC-Al30 dosage of 0.16 mmol/L for the sample water with a humic acid content of 10 mg/L; and the residual aluminum in the purified water is 0.066 mg/L. The results verify that Al30 is another highly efficient coagulation/flocculation species for humic acid removal.

  16. Significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of 'normal' activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Eui-Hoon; Ma, Youngeun; Park, In-Ae; Kim, Seon-Woo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a widely used coagulation screening test in routine laboratories. The aPTT level in the control population varies and is reflected by the reference interval. However, there have been no studies to investigate the coagulation status determining the variability of the aPTT. The aim of this study was to investigate the coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in the population. The study participants were reference individuals with prothrombin time and aPTT within reference intervals. The aPTT was determined using STA-PTT Automate (Diagnostica Stago, Asnieres, France; local reference interval, 29.1-41.9 s). Those with aPTT within the marginal ranges of reference interval were selected for factor assays. We defined the lower marginal group as the lowest 10 percentile of reference interval (29.1-30.9 s) and the upper marginal group as the highest 10 percentile (38.0-41.9 s). Activities of factor II, V, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were determined in both groups. The lower marginal and upper marginal groups consisted of 220 and 209 individuals, respectively. All coagulation factors were significantly higher in the lower marginal than in the upper marginal group (P = 0.0127 for factor II and P < 0.0001 for the others). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed factor XII and VIII were two strongest contributors determining the aPTT level, whereas factor XI was not significantly different between the groups (P = 0.095). This study firstly demonstrated significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in reference individuals. The results suggested the possibility of disease association or phenotypic contribution of variable coagulation activities in the population.

  17. Impact of organic polyelectrolytes on coagulation of source-separated black water.

    PubMed

    Kozminykh, Pavlo; Heistad, Arve; Ratnaweera, Harsha C; Todt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Household wastewater is originated from common people's activities and has a potential harmful impact on the environment if discharged directly without proper treatment. Toilet wastewater or black water (BW) contains urine, faeces, toilet paper and flushing water and it contains the majority of pollutants obtained from a single household. In this study, the focus was on BW treatment using chemical methods. The main goal of current research was to define the possibility and applicability of conventional coagulants and flocculants in direct chemical treatment of vacuum-collected BW to remove particles, organic matter and phosphorous. After the definition of dosing ranges, based on the equivalent doses in conventional municipal and industrial wastewater treatment data, aluminium and iron coagulants, organic polyelectrolytes (polymers with anionic, neutral and cationic charge with different molecular weights) and their various combinations were tested using the well-known jar-test laboratory method to study aggregation and solid-liquid separation processes in raw BW. The most important process parameter during the coagulation was pH level, dependent on the type and doses of metal salts. Some side processes were found to occur while using iron-based coagulants. Dosing of either single coagulants or single polymers did not give satisfactory results, while a combination of aluminium salts and cationic polymers showed high removal rates in total suspended solids, total chemical oxygen demand and ortho-phosphates, reaching 97.8%, 92% and 98.6%, respectively, with the optimal doses of chemicals. Cationic polymers with the lowest molecular weight and highest charge density were the most efficient in combination with aluminium coagulants.

  18. Minimizing residual aluminum concentration in treated water by tailoring properties of polyaluminum coagulants.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masaoki; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Kenta; Ishikawa, Tairyo B; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2013-04-15

    Aluminum coagulants are widely used in water treatment plants to remove turbidity and dissolved substances. However, because high aluminum concentrations in treated water are associated with increased turbidity and because aluminum exerts undeniable human health effects, its concentration should be controlled in water treatment plants, especially in plants that use aluminum coagulants. In this study, the effect of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) coagulant characteristics on dissolved residual aluminum concentrations after coagulation and filtration was investigated. The dissolved residual aluminum concentrations at a given coagulation pH differed among the PACls tested. Very-high-basicity PACl yielded low dissolved residual aluminum concentrations and higher natural organic matter (NOM) removal. The low residual aluminum concentrations were related to the low content of monomeric aluminum (Ala) in the PACl. Polymeric (Alb)/colloidal (Alc) ratio in PACl did not greatly influence residual aluminum concentration. The presence of sulfate in PACl contributed to lower residual aluminum concentration only when coagulation was performed at around pH 6.5 or lower. At a wide pH range (6.5-8.5), residual aluminum concentrations <0.02 mg/L were attained by tailoring PACl properties (Ala percentage ≤0.5%, basicity ≥85%). The dissolved residual aluminum concentrations did not increase with increasing the dosage of high-basicity PACl, but did increase with increasing the dosage of normal-basicity PACl. We inferred that increasing the basicity of PACl afforded lower dissolved residual aluminum concentrations partly because the high-basicity PACls could have a small percentage of Ala, which tends to form soluble aluminum-NOM complexes with molecular weights of 100 kDa-0.45 μm.

  19. [Removal of DON in micro-polluted raw water by coagulation and adsorption using activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Yu, Guo-Zhong; Gu, Li; Zhao, Cheng-Mei; Li, Qing-Fei; Zhai, Hui-Min

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen as a precursor of new type nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water attracted gradually the attention of scholars all over the world. In order to explore the mechanism of DON removal in micro-polluted raw water by coagulation and adsorption, water quality parameters, such as DON, DOC, NH4(+) -N, UV254, pH and dissolved oxygen, were determined in raw water and the molecular weight distribution of the DON and DOC was investigated. The variations in DON, DOC and UV254 in the coagulation and adsorption tests were investigated, and the changes of DON in raw water were characterized using three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that DON, DOC and UV254 were 1.28 mg x L(-1), 8.56 mg x L(-1), 0.16 cm(-1), and DOC/DON and SUVA were 6.69 mg x mg(-1), 1.87 m(-1) x (mg x L(-1))(-1) in raw water, respectively. The molecular weight distribution of the DON in raw water showed a bimodal distribution. The small molecular weight (< 6 000) fractions accounted for a high proportion of 68% and the large (> 20 000) fractions accounted for about 22%. The removal of DON, DOC and UV254 was about 20%, 26% and 70%, respectively, in the coagulation test and the dosage of coagulant was 10 mg x L(-1). The removal of DON, DOC and UV254 was about 60%, 35% and 100%, respectively, in the adsorption test and the dosage of activated carbon was 1.0 g. In the combination of coagulation and adsorption, the removal of DON and DOC reached approximately 82% and 64%, respectively. 3DEEM revealed that the variation of DON in the coagulation and adsorption tests depended intimately on tryptophan protein-like substances, aromatic protein-like substances and fulvic acid-like substances.

  20. Coagulation Activation in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Is Associated with Cerebral Small Vessel Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Raffaella; De Bon, Emiliano; Bertomoro, Antonella; Casonato, Alessandra; Pontara, Elena; Omenetto, Elisabetta; Saggiorato, Graziella; Steffan, Agostino; Damian, Tamara; Cella, Giuseppe; Teso, Simone; Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Basso, Giuseppe; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Sainati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic complications in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) arise since infancy, but the role of the coagulation system in children has been poorly explored. To determine its role in the development of clinical complications in childhood we measured coagulation and endothelial parameters in children with SCD at steady state. Methods Markers of thrombin generation, fibrin dissolution and endothelial activation were evaluated in 38 children with SS-Sβ°, 6 with SC disease and 50 age and blood group matched controls. Coagulation variables were correlated with markers of hemolysis and inflammation, with the presence of cerebral and lung vasculopathy and with the frequency of clinical complications. Results SS-Sβ° patients presented higher levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and collagen binding activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), D-dimer, p-selectin, prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) and lower ADAMTS-13:activity/VWF:Ag (p<0.05) compared to controls and SC patients. In SS-Sβ° patients coagulation variables correlated positively with markers of inflammation, hemolysis, and negatively with HbF (p<0.05). Patients with cerebral silent infarcts showed significant decrease in t-PA:Ag and ADAMTS-13 Antigen and a tendency toward higher D-dimer, F1+2, TAT compared to patients without them. D-dimer was associated with a six fold increased risk of cerebral silent infarcts. No correlation was found between coagulation activation and large vessel vasculopathy or other clinical events except for decreased t-PA:Ag in patients with tricuspid Rigurgitant Velocity >2.5m/sec. Conclusions SS-Sβ° disease is associated with extensive activation of the coagulation system at steady state since young age. ADAMTS-13 and t-PA:Ag are involved in the development of cerebral silent infarcts. PMID:24205317