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Sample records for light curve patterns

  1. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  2. Light on curved backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, D.; Nelson, S.; Nowakowski, M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the motion of light on different spacetime manifolds by calculating the deflection angle, lensing properties and by probing into the possibility of bound states. The metrics in which we examine the light motion include, among other items, a general relativistic dark matter metric, a dirty black hole, and a worm hole metric, the last two inspired by noncommutative geometry. The lensing in a holographic screen metric is discussed in detail. We study also the bending of light around naked singularities like, e.g., the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric and include other cases. A generic property of light behavior in these exotic metrics is pointed out. For the standard metric like the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter cases, we improve the accuracy of the lensing results for the weak and strong regimes.

  3. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  4. Light curves of faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Pavel; Borovička, Jiří

    2001-11-01

    The results of the light curves analysis of 234 meteors observed and recorded within the double-station image intensifier observations at the Ondřejov observatory are presented. Double-station observations allow to compute the meteor trajectory in the solar system and in the atmosphere as well as to determinate the absolute magnitude of meteor and its mass. Light curves and heights data of all major meteor showers - Lyrids, η-Aquarids, Perseids, Orionids, Leonids, Geminids as well as many sporadic meteors - were analysed. The differences between individual showers were found, e.g. Perseids appear to be more compact than Leonids. There is also difference between 1998 and 1999 Leonids. This suggests different composition or structure of parent bodies. Our data show that the beginning heights of Perseids, Orionids and Leonids are weakly dependent on meteor mass, although the dust-ball theory assumes they should be mass independent.

  5. DELightcurveSimulation: Light curve simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Samuel D.

    2016-02-01

    DELightcurveSimulation simulates light curves with any given power spectral density and any probability density function, following the algorithm described in Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013). The simulated products have exactly the same variability and statistical properties as the observed light curves. The code is a Python implementation of the Mathematica code provided by Emmanoulopoulos et al.

  6. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  7. Modeling Type IIn Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter; Fryer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present near-by Type IIn supernovae observed with Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Based on the diversity of optical light curve properties, this Type II subclass is commonly referred to as heterogeneous. At the time of discovery, our IIn sample is ~ 2 magnitudes brighter at ultraviolet wavelengths than at optical wavelengths, and ultraviolet brightness decays faster than the optical brightness. We use a semi-analytical supernova (SN) model to better understand our IIn observations, and focus on matching specific observed light curves features, i.e peak luminosity and decay rate. The SN models are used to study the effects of initial SN conditions on early light curves, and to show the extent of the "uniqueness" problem in SN light curves. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from members of the Swift UVOT team, the NASA astrophysics archival data analysis program, and the NASA Swift guest investigator program.

  8. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  9. Electron differaction patterns with curved Kikuchi lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, R. K.; Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2007-09-01

    Curved Kikuchi lines have been observed in electron diffraction patterns obtained for silicon by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the curvature of Kikuchi lines is related to the shift of point reflections from their normal positions. The formation of curved Kikuchi lines stems from the local structural defects in the crystals under study.

  10. A synthetic light curve solution of the OAO-2 ultraviolet light curves of u Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    OAO 2 ultraviolet photometry of the eclipsing binary u Her is reported and interpreted. The light curve of u Her is found to be intrinsically variable, the variable light curve is rectified, and the adjusted light and color curves are plotted. A simultaneous solution to three adjusted OAO 2 light curves (at respective wavelengths of 3320, 1910, and 1550 A) is obtained by using the Roche model. The results indicate that the system is semidetached if the gravity darkening of the secondary is not significantly larger than expected. It is suggested that the primary is responsible for the variable light curve, that the monochromatic albedo of the secondary is very low at short wavelengths, and that the depth of primary eclipse is strongly dependent on the primary's limb darkening.

  11. NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni; Protopapas, Pavlos

    2012-09-01

    Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

  12. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  13. Modeling and Fitting Exoplanet Transit Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical model along with an original fitting routine for the analysis of transiting extra-solar planet light curves. Our light curve model is unique in several ways from other available transit models, such as the analytic eclipse formulae of Mandel & Agol (2002) and Giménez (2006), the modified Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP) model implemented in Southworth’s JKTEBOP code (Popper & Etzel 1981; Southworth et al. 2004), or the transit model developed as a part of the EXOFAST fitting suite (Eastman et al. in prep.). Our model employs Keplerian orbital dynamics about the system’s center of mass to properly account for stellar wobble and orbital eccentricity, uses a unique analytic solution derived from Kepler’s Second Law to calculate the projected distance between the centers of the star and planet, and calculates the effect of limb darkening using a simple technique that is different from the commonly used eclipse formulae. We have also devised a unique Monte Carlo style optimization routine for fitting the light curve model to observed transits. We demonstrate that, while the effect of stellar wobble on transit light curves is generally small, it becomes significant as the planet to stellar mass ratio increases and the semi-major axes of the orbits decrease. We also illustrate the appreciable effects of orbital ellipticity on the light curve and the necessity of accounting for its impacts for accurate modeling. We show that our simple limb darkening calculations are as accurate as the analytic equations of Mandel & Agol (2002). Although our Monte Carlo fitting algorithm is not as mathematically rigorous as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithms most often used to determine exoplanetary system parameters, we show that it is straightforward and returns reliable results. Finally, we show that analyses performed with our model and optimization routine compare favorably with exoplanet characterizations published by groups such as the

  14. Stability of patterns on thin curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nampoothiri, Sankaran

    2016-08-01

    We consider reaction-diffusion equations on a thin curved surface and obtain a set of effective reaction-diffusion (R-D) equations to O(ε^{2}), where ε is the surface thickness. We observe that the R-D systems on these curved surfaces can have space-dependent reaction kinetics. Further, we use linear stability analysis to study the Schnakenberg model on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The dependence of the steady state on the thickness is determined for both cases, and we find that a change in the thickness can stabilize the unstable modes, and vice versa. The combined effect of thickness and curvature can play an important role in the rearrangement of spatial patterns on thin curved surfaces. PMID:27627331

  15. Stability of patterns on thin curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nampoothiri, Sankaran

    2016-08-01

    We consider reaction-diffusion equations on a thin curved surface and obtain a set of effective reaction-diffusion (R-D) equations to O (ɛ2) , where ɛ is the surface thickness. We observe that the R-D systems on these curved surfaces can have space-dependent reaction kinetics. Further, we use linear stability analysis to study the Schnakenberg model on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The dependence of the steady state on the thickness is determined for both cases, and we find that a change in the thickness can stabilize the unstable modes, and vice versa. The combined effect of thickness and curvature can play an important role in the rearrangement of spatial patterns on thin curved surfaces.

  16. Modeling Light Curves for Improved Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraway, Julian; Mahabal, Ashish; Sun, Jiayang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi; Zhang, Lingsong

    2016-02-01

    Many synoptic surveys are observing large parts of the sky multiple times. The resulting lightcurves provide a wonderful window to the dynamic nature of the universe. However, there are many significant challenges in analyzing these light curves. These include heterogeneity of the data, irregularly sampled data, missing data, censored data, known but variable measurement errors, and most importantly, the need to classify in astronomical objects in real time using these imperfect light curves. We describe a modeling-based approach using Gaussian process regression for generating critical measures representing features for the classification of such lightcurves. We demonstrate that our approach performs better by comparing it with past methods. Finally, we provide future directions for use in sky-surveys that are getting even bigger by the day.

  17. SS433 Trek 2: light curve analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.; Obana, Y.; Okugami, M.

    The authors have calculated theoretical light curves of SS433 during eclipse and precession, using a model in which SS433 consists of a geometrically thick torus around a compact star and a companion star filling the Roche lobe. The favorite combination is that the mass ratio is about 2 (a compact star is a black hole) and the surface temperature of the companion is around 17000K.

  18. Atlas of Secular Light Curves of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrin, Ignacio

    2007-12-01

    We have completed work on the secular light curves of 30 periodic and non-periodic comets. The objectives and approach of this project has been explained in Ferrin (Icarus, 178, 493-516, 2005). Each comet requires 2 plots. The time plot shows the reduced (to Δ = 1 AU) magnitude of the comet as a function of time, thus displaying the brightness history of the object. The log plot is a reflected double log plot. The reflection takes place at R=1 AU, to allow the determination of the absolute magnitude by extrapolation. 22 photometric parameters are measured from the plots, most of them new. The plots have been collected in a document that constitutes "The Atlas". We have defined a photometric age, P-AGE, that attempts to measure the age of a comet based on its activity. P-AGE has been scaled to human ages to help in its interpretation. We find that comets Hale-Bopp and 29P/SW 1, are baby comets (P-AGE < 3 comet years), while 107P, 162P and 169P are methuselah comets (P-AGE > 100 cy). The secular light curve of 9P/Tempel 1 exhibits sublimation due to H2O and due to CO. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimento to be visited by the Rossetta spacecraft in 2014 exhibits a photometric anomaly. Comet 65P/Gunn exhibits a lag in maximum brightness of LAG = + 254 days after perihelion. We suggest that the pole is pointing to the sun at that time. The secular light curves will be presented and a preliminary interpretation will be advanced. The secular light curves present complexity beyond current understanding. The observations described in this work were carried out at the National Observatory of Venezuela (ONV), managed by the Center for Research in Astronomy (CIDA), for the Ministry of Science and Technology (MinCyT).

  19. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  20. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  1. X-Ray Nova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris; Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-04-01

    We describe recent work in which we revisit the database of historical X-Ray nova (XRN) light curves compiled by Chen, Shrader & Livio (1997, ApJ 491, 312), augmented by subsequent events recorded by RXTE, in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the outburst phenomenon. Previously, we demonstrated that, given the occurrence of an instability in the mass transfer rate from the secondary, a model based on viscous diffusion of matter through the disk (Wood et al, 2001, astro-ph/0108189) we could reproduce a large number of fast-rise exponential decay (FRED) type XRN light curves. We augment this effort by considering deviations from the FRED form, such as plateaus and power-law decay forms are also considered within this framework. More complex structures are, in a number of instances, successfully modeled as a superposition of mass- injection, diffusive propagation events. In addition, for a large number of cases, we perform a joint analysis of optical light curve data. In particular, we will attempt to characterize empirical characteristics such as possible tie lags, and relative decay time scales, and then interpret such effects withing the context of diffusive propagation in the disk.

  2. Ultraviolet light curves of V535 Arae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    1991-01-01

    The light curve of V535 Ara is determined from observations of this long-period W UMa binary in the UV, and its gravity darkening is estimated. The UV colors and spectral type correspond to (B - V)0 = 0.24, or A8V, and imply that the star should have very little residual convection in its envelope. It is concluded that the gravity darkening is large, as in a radiative star, unless it is modified by circulation in the common envelope, or unless all stars this warm are convective. Four solutions are obtained to a combination of optical and UV light curves, two for high radiative gravity darkening, and two for low convective gravity darkening. The light curves were fitted equally well in all four cases, while in all but the one with low-gravity darkening and a hot inner face there was a rather large global temperature difference between the two stars. It is suggested that the W UMa binaries are found only at spectral types later than about A8 because their outer envelopes must be convective to transfer luminosity.

  3. Creating A Light Curve Using Gathered Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Joseph; Stolarz, S. A.; DePorto, R. W.; Shake, W. J.; Piper, M.; Linder, T. R.; Holmes, R.; Conwell, J.

    2012-01-01

    Our group of students with the support of educators and astronomers carried out a program to do astrometric and photometric analysis on the asteroid 2000 SO1 with the objective of obtaining a more in depth analysis of this asteroid and publishing light curve data describing the period of the asteroid. We chose our target asteroid using the minor planet center database, choosing an object that would have an acceptable Right Ascension, Declination, magnitude, and air mass for the ARO (Astronomical Research Observatory)-30 inch telescope operated by the SKYNET program. Our journey began with using Astrometrica for the IASC/WISE Program to identify and find new asteroids in the sky and add data to the Minor Planet Center Database. We then used MPO (Minor Planet Observatory) Canopus to form a light curve and conduct a fourier analysis on an example asteroid to familiarize ourselves with the program and used the program again to conduct fourier analysis on asteroid 2000 SO1. The educational goal in mind was to (a) learn the process of collecting and analyzing data using Astrometrica, MPO Canopus, the Minor Planet Center, and SKYNET and (b) create a poster to display the steps used in the process of surveying taken images and the production of a light curve. We collected 300 images a night, while discarding all the corrupted images, until we had enough data to accurately represent the object.Our work was successful due to resources from; Eastern Illinois University's Physics Department, the Astronomical Research Observatory, the University of Chicago's Yerkes Observatory, the SKYNET network, NASA's IASC/WISE (International Astronomical Search Collaboration/ Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer), NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) and Lincoln-Way North High School.

  4. SPECTRA AND LIGHT CURVES OF FAILED SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Dahl, Jon A.; Fontes, Christopher J. E-mail: dahl@lanl.go

    2009-12-10

    Astronomers have proposed a number of mechanisms to produce supernova explosions. Although many of these mechanisms are now not considered primary engines behind supernovae (SNe), they do produce transients that will be observed by upcoming ground-based surveys and NASA satellites. Here, we present the first radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the spectra and light curves from three of these 'failed' SNe: SNe with considerable fallback, accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs, and energetic helium flashes (also known as type Ia SNe).

  5. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  6. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  7. ENERGY SOURCES AND LIGHT CURVES OF MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Takami, Hajime E-mail: takami@post.kek.jp

    2015-04-01

    A macronova (kilonova) was discovered with a short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B, which is widely believed to be powered by the radioactivity of r-process elements synthesized in the ejecta of a neutron star (NS)–binary merger. As an alternative, we propose that macronovae are energized by the central engine, i.e., a black hole or NS, and the injected energy is emitted after the adiabatic expansion of ejecta. This engine model is motivated by extended emission of short GRBs. In order to compare the theoretical models with observations, we develop analytical formulae for the light curves of macronovae. The engine model allows a wider parameter range, especially smaller ejecta mass, and a better fit to observations than the r-process model. Future observations of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves should distinguish energy sources and constrain the activity of the central engine and the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  8. SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES POWERED BY FALLBACK ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; Kasen, Daniel

    2013-07-20

    Some fraction of the material ejected in a core collapse supernova explosion may remain bound to the compact remnant, and eventually turn around and fall back. We show that the late time ({approx}>days) power potentially associated with the accretion of this 'fallback' material could significantly affect the optical light curve, in some cases producing super-luminous or otherwise peculiar supernovae. We use spherically symmetric hydrodynamical models to estimate the accretion rate at late times for a range of progenitor masses and radii and explosion energies. The accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star or black hole decreases as M-dot {proportional_to}t{sup -5/3} at late times, but its normalization can be significantly enhanced at low explosion energies, in very massive stars, or if a strong reverse shock wave forms at the helium/hydrogen interface in the progenitor. If the resulting super-Eddington accretion drives an outflow which thermalizes in the outgoing ejecta, the supernova debris will be re-energized at a time when photons can diffuse out efficiently. The resulting light curves are different and more diverse than previous fallback supernova models which ignored the input of accretion power and produced short-lived, dim transients. The possible outcomes when fallback accretion power is significant include super-luminous ({approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) Type II events of both short and long durations, as well as luminous Type I events from compact stars that may have experienced significant mass loss. Accretion power may unbind the remaining infalling material, causing a sudden decrease in the brightness of some long duration Type II events. This scenario may be relevant for explaining some of the recently discovered classes of peculiar and rare supernovae.

  9. THE WISE LIGHT CURVES OF POLARS

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Ryan K. E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humboldt.edu

    2015-08-15

    We have extracted the WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) single-exposure data for a sample of 72 polars, which are highly magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). We combine these data with both published and unpublished optical and infrared data to explore the origins of the large amplitude variations seen in these systems. In nearly every case, we find evidence for cyclotron emission in the WISE bandpasses. We find that the derived magnetic field strengths for some polars are either too high, or cyclotron emission from lower field components, located spatially coincident to the main accreting poles, must be occurring. We have also estimated field strengths for a number of polars where no such values exist. In addition, contrary to expectations, we find that emission from the fundamental cyclotron harmonic (n = 1) appears to be nearly always present when the magnetic field is of the appropriate strength that it falls within a WISE bandpass. We find that the light curves for RBS 490, an ultrashort-period (46 minutes) CV, suggest that it is a polar. Modeling its spectrum indicates that its donor star is much hotter than expected. Nearly all of the detected polars show 11.5 μm (“W3 band”) excesses. The general lack of variability seen in the W3 bandpass light curves for higher-field polars demonstrates that these excesses are probably not due to cyclotron emission. There is circumstantial evidence that these excesses can be attributed to bremsstrahlung emission from their accretion streams. Reduction of the Spitzer 24 μm image of V1500 Cyg shows that it appears to be located at the center of a small nebula.

  10. Do the Kepler AGN light curves need reprocessing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Williams, Joshua; Carini, Michael T.

    2015-10-01

    We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST data base with a reprocessed light curve constructed from raw pixel data. We use the first-order structure function, SF(δt), to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD (power spectral density) of Kasliwal et al. On short time-scales, we find a steeper log PSD slope (γ = 2.90 to within 10 per cent) for the reprocessed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST (γ = 2.65 to within 10 per cent) - both inconsistent with a damped random walk (DRW) which requires γ = 2. The log PSD slope inferred for the reprocessed light curve is consistent with previous results that study the same reprocessed light curve. The turnover time-scale is almost identical for both light curves (27.1 and 27.5 d for the reprocessed and MAST data base light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Reprocessing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusions reached by Kasliwal et al. - not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.

  11. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  12. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  13. Gamma-Ray Light Curves from Pulsar Magnetospheres with Finite Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has provided an unprecedented database for pulsar emission studies that includes gamma-ray light curves for over 100 pulsars. Modeling these light curves can reveal and constrain the geometry of the particle accelerator, as well as the pulsar magnetic field structure. We have constructed 3D magnetosphere models with finite conductivity, that bridge the extreme vacuum and force-free solutions used in previous light curves modeling. We are investigating the shapes of pulsar gamma-ray light curves using these dissipative solutions with two different approaches: (l) assuming geometric emission patterns of the slot gap and outer gap, and (2) using the parallel electric field provided by the resistive models to compute the trajectories and . emission of the radiating particles. The light curves using geometric emission patterns show a systematic increase in gamma-ray peak phase with increasing conductivity, introducing a new diagnostic of these solutions. The light curves using the model electric fields are very sensitive to the conductivity but do not resemble the observed Fermi light curves, suggesting that some screening of the parallel electric field, by pair cascades not included in the models, is necessary

  14. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  15. Bolometric and UV light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Brown, Peter J.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Frey, Lucille H.

    2014-06-01

    The Swift UV-Optical Telescope (UVOT) has been observing core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) of all subtypes in the UV and optical since 2005. Here we present 50 CCSNe observed with the Swift UVOT, analyzing their UV properties and behavior. Where we have multiple UV detections in all three UV filters (λ {sub c} = 1928-2600 Å), we generate early time bolometric light curves, analyze the properties of these light curves and the UV contribution to them, and derive empirical corrections for the UV-flux contribution to optical-IR based bolometric light curves.

  16. New Developments in Eclipsing Binary Light Curve Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Stagg, C. R.

    1994-03-01

    The light curve modeling of binary stars has continued to evolve since its founding by Henry Norris Russell (see Russell and Merrill 1952 and citations therein) nearly a century ago, accelerated in the 1950s by Kopal's introduction of Roche geometry into models and by the development of synthetic light curve computer code in the 1970's. Improved physics and the use of more kinds of observational input are providing another round of important advances that promise to enlarge our knowledge of both binary stars and ensembles containing them. Here we discuss the newer horizons of light curve modeling and the steps being taken toward them.

  17. QUEST1 VARIABILITY SURVEY. III. LIGHT CURVE CATALOG UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Rengstorf, A. W.; Thompson, D. L.; Mufson, S. L.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Adams, B.; Baltay, C.; Gebhard, M.; Andrews, P.; Coppi, P.; Emmet, W.; Vivas, A. K.; Abad, C.; Bongiovanni, A.; Briceno, C.; Bruzual, G.; Prugna, F. Della; Hernandez, J.; Bailyn, C.; Ferrin, I.; Fuenmayor, F.

    2009-03-15

    This paper reports an update to the QUEST1 (QUasar Equatorial Survey Team, Phase 1) Variability Survey (QVS) light curve catalog, which links QVS instrumental magnitude light curves to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) objects and photometry. In the time since the original QVS catalog release, the overlap between publicly available SDSS data and QVS data has increased by 8% in sky coverage and 16,728 in number of matched objects. The astrometric matching and the treatment of SDSS masks have been refined for the updated catalog. We report on these improvements and present multiple bandpass light curves, global variability information, and matched SDSS photometry for 214,941 QUEST1 objects.

  18. Using Kepler Light Curves for Astronomy Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Jennifer; Rivers, S.; Eleby, J.; Gould, A.; Komatsu, T.

    2014-01-01

    We will present our efforts related to Education and Public Outreach activities using Kepler Light Curves. We are currently developing interactive web based activities to introduce the public to the general topic of Stellar Variability and Intrinsic Variable Stars in particular using the high quality light curves of over a dozen Kepler targets. Along with the public website, we are exploring areas to develop teacher guides to use Kepler Light Curves in the middle and high school classrooms. These efforts are supported through a NASA EPSCoR grant "South Carolina Joint Venture Program" via a subaward to SC State University.

  19. CATALOG OF 93 NOVA LIGHT CURVES: CLASSIFICATION AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Strope, Richard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Henden, Arne A.

    2010-07-15

    We present a catalog of 93 very-well-observed nova light curves. The light curves were constructed from 229,796 individual measured magnitudes, with the median coverage extending to 8.0 mag below peak and 26% of the light curves following the eruption all the way to quiescence. Our time-binned light curves are presented in figures and as complete tabulations. We also calculate and tabulate many properties about the light curves, including peak magnitudes and dates, times to decline by 2, 3, 6, and 9 mag from maximum, the time until the brightness returns to quiescence, the quiescent magnitude, power-law indices of the decline rates throughout the eruption, the break times in this decline, plus many more properties specific to each nova class. We present a classification system for nova light curves based on the shape and the time to decline by 3 mag from the peak (t{sub 3}). The designations are 'S' for smooth light curves (38% of the novae), 'P' for plateaus (21%), 'D' for dust dips (18%), 'C' for cusp-shaped secondary maxima (1%), 'O' for quasi-sinusoidal oscillations superposed on an otherwise smooth decline (4%), 'F' for flat-topped light curves (2%), and 'J' for jitters or flares superposed on the decline (16%). Our classification consists of this single letter followed by the t{sub 3} value in parentheses; so, for example, V1500 Cyg is S(4), GK Per is O(13), DQ Her is D(100), and U Sco is P(3).

  20. EVEREST: Pixel Level Decorrelation of K2 Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luger, Rodrigo; Agol, Eric; Kruse, Ethan; Barnes, Rory; Becker, Andrew; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Deming, Drake

    2016-10-01

    We present EPIC Variability Extraction and Removal for Exoplanet Science Targets (EVEREST), an open-source pipeline for removing instrumental noise from K2 light curves. EVEREST employs a variant of pixel level decorrelation to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft’s pointing error and a Gaussian process to capture astrophysical variability. We apply EVEREST to all K2 targets in campaigns 0–7, yielding light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission for stars brighter than {K}p≈ 13, and within a factor of two of the Kepler precision for fainter targets. We perform cross-validation and transit injection and recovery tests to validate the pipeline, and compare our light curves to the other de-trended light curves available for download at the MAST High Level Science Products archive. We find that EVEREST achieves the highest average precision of any of these pipelines for unsaturated K2 stars. The improved precision of these light curves will aid in exoplanet detection and characterization, investigations of stellar variability, asteroseismology, and other photometric studies. The EVEREST pipeline can also easily be applied to future surveys, such as the TESS mission, to correct for instrumental systematics and enable the detection of low signal-to-noise transiting exoplanets. The EVEREST light curves and the source code used to generate them are freely available online.

  1. Interpretation of OAO-2 ultraviolet light curves of beta Doradus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, J. L.; Lillie, C. F.; Hill, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Middle-ultraviolet light curves of beta Doradus, obtained by OAO-2, are presented along with other evidence indicating that the small additional bumps observed on the rising branches of these curves have their origin in shock-wave phenomena in the upper atmosphere of this classical Cepheid. A simple piston-driven spherical hydrodynamic model of the atmosphere is developed to explain the bumps, and the calculations are compared with observations. The model is found to be consistent with the shapes of the light curves as well as with measurements of the H-alpha radial velocities.

  2. Closed Paths of Light Trapped in a Closed Fermat Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry; Naiman, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    Geometric constructions have previously been shown that can be interpreted as rays of light trapped either in polygons or in conics, by successive reflections. The same question, trapping light in closed Fermat curves, is addressed here. Numerical methods are used to study the behaviour of the reflection points of a triangle when the degree of the…

  3. The hidden X-ray breaks in afterglow light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Starling, R. L. C.

    2008-05-22

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared to the BeppoSAX, or pre-Swift era. Specifically, relatively few breaks, consistent with jet breaks, are observed in the X-ray light curves of these bursts. If these breaks are truly missing, it has serious consequences for the interpretation of GRB jet collimation and energy requirements, and the use of GRBs as standard candles.Here we address the issue of X-ray breaks which are possibly 'hidden' and hence the light curves are misinterpreted as being single power-laws. We show how a number of precedents, including GRB 990510 and GRB 060206, exist for such hidden breaks and how, even with the well sampled light curves of the Swift era, these breaks may be left misidentified. We do so by synthesising X-ray light curves and finding general trends via Monte Carlo analysis. Furthermore, in light of these simulations, we discuss how to best identify achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves via multi-wavelength analysis.

  4. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-11-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 μm and 0.6 mag at 4.5 μm. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 μm) and W2 (4.6 μm) from the Wide-feld Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010–2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude ∼0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude ∼0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune’s atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune’s atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 μm filters.

  5. The Chaotic Light Curves of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    We present model light curves for accreting Black Hole Candidates (BHC) based on a recently developed model of these sources. According to this model, the observed light curves and aperiodic variability of BHC are due to a series of soft photon injections at random (Poisson) intervals and the stochastic nature of the Comptonization process in converting these soft photons to the observed high energy radiation. The additional assumption of our model is that the Comptonization process takes place in an extended but non-uniform hot plasma corona surrounding the compact object. We compute the corresponding Power Spectral Densities (PSD), autocorrelation functions, time skewness of the light curves and time lags between the light curves of the sources at different photon energies and compare our results to observation. Our model reproduces the observed light curves well, in that it provides good fits to their overall morphology (as manifest by the autocorrelation and time skewness) and also to their PSDs and time lags, by producing most of the variability power at time scales 2 a few seconds, while at the same time allowing for shots of a few msec in duration, in accordance with observation. We suggest that refinement of this type of model along with spectral and phase lag information can be used to probe the structure of this class of high energy sources.

  6. Spatial Reasoning Training Through Light Curves Of Model Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nakroshis, Paul A.; Rudnick, Benjamin T.; Brautigam, Maxwell J.; Nelson, Tyler W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that spatial reasoning skills, long known to be crucial to math and science success, are teachable. Even short stints of training can improve spatial reasoning skills among students who lack them (Sorby et al., 2006). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their spatial reasoning skill (Hill et al., 2010). We have designed a hands on asteroid rotation lab that provides practice in spatial reasoning tasks while building the student’s understanding of photometry. For our tool, we mount a model asteroid, with any shape of our choosing, on a slowly rotating motor shaft, whose speed is controlled by the experimenter. To mimic an asteroid light curve, we place the model asteroid in a dark box, shine a movable light source upon our asteroid, and record the light reflected onto a moveable camera. Students may then observe changes in the light curve that result from varying a) the speed of rotation, b) the model asteroid’s orientation with respect to the motor axis, c) the model asteroid’s shape or albedo, and d) the phase angle. After practicing with our tool, students are asked to pair new objects to their corresponding light curves. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students must imagine how light scattering off of a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a ccd sensor plane, and then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. Through the use of our model asteroid, the student develops confidence in spatial reasoning skills.

  7. Vaporization of comet nuclei - Light curves and life times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. J.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of vaporization from the nucleus of a comet are examined and it is shown that a latitude dependence of vaporization can explain the asymmetries in cometary light curves. An attempt is made to explain the observed variation in molecular production rates with heliocentric distance when employing CO2 and clathrate hydrate ice as cometary nuclei substances. The energy balance equation and the vapor pressure equations of water and CO2 are used in calculating the vaporization from a surface. Calculations were carried out from both dry-ice and water-ice nuclei, using a variety of different effective visual albedos, but primarily for a thermal infrared of 0 (emission). Attention is given to cometary lifetimes and light curves and it was determined that the asymmetry in light curves occurs (occasionally) as a 'seasonal' effect due to a variation in the angle between the comet's rotation axis and the sun-comet line.

  8. CONSTRAINING PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE GEOMETRY WITH {gamma}-RAY LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Watters, Kyle P. E-mail: kwatters@stanford.ed

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for quantitatively comparing {gamma}-ray pulsar light curves with magnetosphere beaming models. With the Fermi LAT providing many pulsar discoveries and high-quality pulsar light curves for the brighter objects, such a comparison allows greatly improved constraints on the emission zone geometry and the magnetospheric physics. Here we apply the method to Fermi LAT light curves of a set of bright pulsars known since EGRET or before. We test three approximate models for the magnetosphere structure and two popular schemes for the location of the emission zone, the two pole caustic model and the outer gap (OG) model. We find that OG models and relatively physical B fields approximating force-free dipole magnetospheres are preferred at high statistical significance. An application to the full LAT pulsar sample will allow us to follow the emission zone's evolution with pulsar spindown.

  9. On classical meteor light curves and utilitarian model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.; Hargrove, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a series of classical meteor light curve profiles based upon a set of simplified analytic atmospheric models. The model atmospheres specifically express the density variation as a power law in atmospheric height, and are derived under a variety of assumptions relating to the atmospheric temperature profile and the variation of the acceleration due to gravity. We find that the light curve profiles show only small differences with respect to any variation in the temperature profile and the geometry imposed upon the atmospheres.

  10. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  11. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  12. First light curve and period study of LO Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.; Müyesseroğlu, Z.

    2005-01-01

    New BV light curves and times of minimum light for the short period W UMa system LO And were analyzed to derive the preliminary physical parameters of the system. The light curves were obtained at Ankara University Observatory during 5 nights in 2003. A new ephemeris is determined for the times of primary minimum. The analysis of the light curves is made using the Wilson-Devinney 2003 code. The present solution reveals that LO And has a photometric mass ratio q = 0.371 and is an A-type contact binary. The period of the system is still increasing, which can be attributed to light-time effect and mass transfer between the components. With the assumption of coplanar orbit of the third body the revealed mass is M3 = 0.21M. If the period change dP/dt = 0.0212 sec/yr is caused only by the mass transfer between components (from the lighter component to the heavier) the calculated mass transfer rate is dm/dt = 1.682 10-7M/yr. The absolute radii and masses estimated for the components, based on our photometric solution and the absolute parameters of the systems which have nearly same period are R1 = 1.30R, R2 = 0.85R, M1 = 1.31M, M2 = 0.49M respectively for the primary and secondary components.

  13. Light curve and period study of V Trianguli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.; Müyesseroğlu, Z.; Özdemir, T.

    2006-08-01

    New BVR light curves and times of minimum light for the short period β Lyrae system V Tri were analyzed to derive the physical parameters of the system. The light curves were obtained at Ankara University Observatory and at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory during 5 nights in 2001 and 2002. A new ephemeris is determined for the times of primary minimum. The analysis of the light curves is made using the Wilson-Devinney 2003 code. The present solution reveals that V Tri is a near-contact system with a mass ratio near 0.5. The absolute radii and masses estimated for the components, based on our photometric solution, are R1=1.94 Rsun, R2=1.44 Rsun, M1=2.68 Msun, M2=1.36 Msun, respectively, for the primary and secondary components. The period variation of the system can be attributed to the light-time effect. With the assumption of a coplanar orbit of the third body its revealed mass is m3=0.17 Msun.

  14. Orbital Signatures from Observed Light Curves of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalam, A.; Mohan, P.

    2014-09-01

    Variability in active galactic nuclei is observed in UV to X-ray emission based light curves. This could be attributed to orbital signatures of the plasma that constitutes the accretion flow on the putative disk or in the developing jet close to the inner region of the central black hole. We discuss some theoretical models based on this view. These models include general relativistic effects such as light bending, aberration effects, gravitational and Doppler redshifts. The novel aspects relate to the treatment of helical flow in cylindrical and conical geometries in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole that leads to amplitude and frequency modulations of simulated light curves as well as the inclusion of beaming effects in these idealized geometries. We then present a suite of time series analysis techniques applicable to data with varied properties which can extract detailed information from them for their use in theoretical models.

  15. EARLY SUPERNOVAE LIGHT CURVES FOLLOWING THE SHOCK BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Nakar, Ehud; Sari, Re'em

    2010-12-10

    The first light from a supernova (SN) emerges once the SN shock breaks out of the stellar surface. The first light, typically a UV or X-ray flash, is followed by a broken power-law decay of the luminosity generated by radiation that leaks out of the expanding gas sphere. Motivated by recent detection of emission from very early stages of several SNe, we revisit the theory of shock breakout and the following emission, paying special attention to the photon-gas coupling and deviations from thermal equilibrium. We derive simple analytic light curves of SNe from various progenitors at early times. We find that for more compact progenitors, white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet stars (WRs), and possibly more energetic blue-supergiant explosions, the observed radiation is out of thermal equilibrium at the breakout, during the planar phase (i.e., before the expanding gas doubles its radius), and during the early spherical phase. Therefore, during these phases we predict significantly higher temperatures than previous analysis that assumed equilibrium. When thermal equilibrium prevails, we find the location of the thermalization depth and its temporal evolution. Our results are useful for interpretation of early SN light curves. Some examples are (1) red supergiant SNe have an early bright peak in optical and UV flux, less than an hour after breakout. It is followed by a minimum at the end of the planar phase (about 10 hr), before it peaks again once the temperature drops to the observed frequency range. In contrast, WRs show only the latter peak in optical and UV. (2) Bright X-ray flares are expected from all core-collapse SNe types. (3) The light curve and spectrum of the initial breakout pulse hold information on the explosion geometry and progenitor wind opacity. Its spectrum in more compact progenitors shows a (nonthermal) power law and its light curve may reveal both the breakout diffusion time and the progenitor radius.

  16. Inferring asymmetric limb cloudiness on exoplanets from transit light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Paris, P.; Gratier, P.; Bordé, P.; Leconte, J.; Selsis, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Clouds have been shown to be present in many exoplanetary atmospheres. Cloud formation modeling predicts considerable inhomogeneities of cloud cover, consistent with optical phase curve observations. However, optical phase curves cannot resolve some existing degeneracies between cloud location and cloud optical properties. Aims: We present a conceptually simple technique for detecting inhomogeneous cloud cover on exoplanets. Such an inhomogeneous cloud cover produces an asymmetric primary transit of the planet in front of the host star. Asymmetric transits produce characteristic residuals that are different from standard symmetric models. Furthermore, bisector spans can be used to determine asymmetries in the transit light curve. Methods: We apply a model of asymmetric transits to the light curves of HAT-P-7b, Kepler-7b, and HD 209458b and search for possible cloud signatures. The nearly uninterrupted Kepler photometry is particularly well suited for this method since it allows for a very high time resolution. Results: We do not find any statistically sound cloud signature in the data of the considered planets. For HAT-P-7b, a tentative detection of an asymmetric cloud cover is found, consistent with analysis of the optical phase curve. Based on Bayesian probability arguments, a symmetric model with an offset in the transit ephemeris is still the most viable model. This work demonstrates that for suitable targets, namely low-gravity planets around bright stars, the method can be used to constrain cloud cover characteristics and is thus a helpful additional tool for the study of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  17. A Study on the Light Curves of GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Qiong; Mao, Zhu; Yang, Pi-bo

    2009-01-01

    It is generally believed that the complexity and variability of the light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are caused by the internal shocks, which would occur when a rapid shell catches up a slower one and collides with it. The electrons in the shock layer are heated by the shocks and radiate via the mechanisms of synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering. Based on relativistic kinematics, a relation between the photon number of the emission from the rapidly moving shock layer and the number of the photons received by an observer is derived. Then, employing the angular spreading of the internal shock emission, the curve equation and profile of a single pulse are obtained, and the shape is typically in the shape of a fast rise and exponential decline. Furthermore, by using the model of the successive collisions of multiple shells under the condition of reasonable parameters, the observed light curves are fitted with a rather good effect. Therefore, by this means, more different types of light curves of GRBs can be explained.

  18. Cosmological Parameters from Type IA Supernova Multicolor Light Curve Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, A. G.; Press, W. H.; Kirshner, R. P.

    1995-12-01

    We present an empirical method that uses blue, visual, red, and infrared multicolor light curve shapes (MLCS) to estimate the luminosity, distance, and total line-of-sight absorption of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's). This method is first applied to a ``training set'' of eight SN Ia light curves with independent distance estimates to derive the correlation between the LCS and the luminosity. We employ a linear estimation algorithm of the type developed by Rybicki and Press. Some of the results are similar to those obtained by Hamuy et al. with the advantage that MLCS measures interstellar extinction and produces quantitative error estimates for the distance. The light curves for 20 SN Ia's (10 of which are from the CTIO/Calan Search) are used to determine the MLCS distances of these supernovae. The Hubble diagram constructed using these LCS distances has a remarkably small dispersion of sigma_ {B,V,R}=0.15 mag. We use the light curves of SN 1972E and SN 1981B and the Cepheid distance to NGC 5253 and NGC 4536 to derive 66 +/- 6 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) for the Hubble constant. We then measure the Local Group motion relative to these SN Ia's by analyzing the distribution on the sky of velocity residuals from a pure Hubble flow. The solution is consistent with the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background as determined by the COBE measurement of the dipole temperature anisotropy, and also with many plausible bulk flows expected to accompany observed density variations. It is inconsistent with the velocity observed by Lauer and Postman. We also find that the properties of dust in distant galaxies hosting SN Ia's are consistent with those of Galactic dust as measured by the interstellar extinction curve.

  19. Enhancements of Bayesian Blocks; Application to Large Light Curve Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian Blocks are optimal piecewise linear representations (step function fits) of light-curves. The simple algorithm implementing this idea, using dynamic programming, has been extended to include more data modes and fitness metrics, multivariate analysis, and data on the circle (Studies in Astronomical Time Series Analysis. VI. Bayesian Block Representations, Scargle, Norris, Jackson and Chiang 2013, ApJ, 764, 167), as well as new results on background subtraction and refinement of the procedure for precise timing of transient events in sparse data. Example demonstrations will include exploratory analysis of the Kepler light curve archive in a search for "star-tickling" signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. (The Cepheid Galactic Internet, Learned, Kudritzki, Pakvasa1, and Zee, 2008, arXiv: 0809.0339; Walkowicz et al., in progress).

  20. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  1. The first light curve analysis of eclipsing binary NR Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli, F.; Hasanzadeh, A.; Poro, A.

    2015-05-01

    New observations of the eclipsing binary system NR Cam were carried out using a CCD in B, V, and R filters and new times of light minimum and new ephemeris were obtained. The B, V, and R light curves were analyzed using both the Binary Maker 3.0 and PHOEBE 0.31 programs to determine some geometrical and physical parameters of the system. These results show that NR Cam is an overcontact binary and that both components are Main Sequence stars. The O'Connell effect on NR Cam was studied and some variations in spot parameters were obtained over the different years.

  2. Optical and EUV light curves of dwarf nova outbursts

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Mattei, J A; Bateson, F M

    2000-11-15

    We combine AAVSO and VSS/RASNZ optical and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer EUV light curves of dwarf novae in outburst to place constraints on the nature of dwarf nova outbursts. From the observed optical-EUV time delays of {approx} 0.75-1.5 days, we show that the propagation velocity of the dwarf nova instability heating wave is {approx} 3 km s{sup -1}.

  3. CALCULATING TIME LAGS FROM UNEVENLY SAMPLED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    Timing techniques are powerful tools to study dynamical astrophysical phenomena. In the X-ray band, they offer the potential of probing accretion physics down to the event horizon. Recent work has used frequency- and energy-dependent time lags as tools for studying relativistic reverberation around the black holes in several Seyfert galaxies. This was achieved due to the evenly sampled light curves obtained using XMM-Newton. Continuously sampled data are, however, not always available and standard Fourier techniques are not applicable. Here, building on the work of Miller et al., we discuss and use a maximum likelihood method to obtain frequency-dependent lags that takes into account light curve gaps. Instead of calculating the lag directly, the method estimates the most likely lag values at a particular frequency given two observed light curves. We use Monte Carlo simulations to assess the method's applicability and use it to obtain lag-energy spectra from Suzaku data for two objects, NGC 4151 and MCG-5-23-16, that had previously shown signatures of iron K reverberation. The lags obtained are consistent with those calculated using standard methods using XMM-Newton data.

  4. A degeneracy in DRW modelling of AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-07-01

    Individual light curves of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are nowadays successfully modelled with the damped random walk (DRW) stochastic process, characterized by the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal, with the power β = 1. By Monte Carlo simulation means, we generate mock AGN light curves described by non-DRW stochastic processes (0.5 ≤ β ≤ 1.5 and β ≠ 1) and show they can be successfully and well modelled as a single DRW process, obtaining comparable goodness of fits. A good DRW fit, in fact, may not mean that DRW is the true underlying process leading to variability and it cannot be used as a proof for it. When comparing the input (non-DRW) and measured (DRW) process parameters, the recovered time-scale (amplitude) increases (decreases) with the increasing input β. In practice, this means that the recovered DRW parameters may lead to biased (or even non-existing) correlations of the variability and physical parameters of AGNs if the true AGN variability is caused by non-DRW stochastic processes. The proper way of identifying the processes leading to variability are model-independent structure functions and/or power spectral densities and then using such information on the covariance matrix of the signal in light-curve modelling.

  5. Signals of exomoons in averaged light curves of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. E.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, L. L.; Szatmáry, K.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of transiting exoplanets sparked a significant interest in discovering their moons. Most of the methods in the literature utilize timing analysis of the raw light curves. Here we propose a new approach for the direct detection of a moon in the transit light curves via the so-called scatter peak. The essence of the method is the evaluation of the local scatter in the folded light curves of many transits. We test the ability of this method with different simulations: Kepler 'short cadence', Kepler 'long cadence', ground-based millimagnitude photometry with 3-min cadence and the expected data quality of the ESA planned planetary transits and oscillations of stars (PLATO) mission. The method requires ≈100 transit observations, therefore, applicable for moons of 10-20 d period planets, assuming 3-5 year long observing campaigns with space observatories. The success rate for finding a 1REarth moon around an 1RJupiter exoplanet turned out to be quite promising even for the simulated ground-based observations, while the detection limit of the expected PLATO data is around 0.4REarth. We give practical suggestions for observations and data reduction to improve the chance of such a detection: (i) transit observations must include out-of-transit phases before and after a transit, spanning at least the same duration as the transit itself, and (ii) any trend filtering must be done in such a way that the preceding and following out-of-transit phases remain unaffected.

  6. New Horizons approach photometry of Pluto and Charon: light curves and Solar phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, A. M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Verbiscer, A.; Howett, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    While the most captivating images of Pluto and Charon were shot by NASA's New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, the spacecraft also imaged Pluto with its LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") during its Annual Checkouts and Approach Phases, with campaigns in July 2013, July 2014, January 2015, March 2015, April 2015, May 2015 and June 2015. All but the first campaign provided full coverage of Pluto's 6.4 day rotation. Even though many of these images were taken when surface features on Pluto and Charon were unresolved, these data provide a unique opportunity to study Pluto over a timescale of several months. Earth-based data from an entire apparition must be combined to create a single light curve, as Pluto is never otherwise continuously available for observing due to daylight, weather and scheduling. From the spacecraft, Pluto's sub-observer latitude remained constant to within 0.05 degrees of 43.15 degrees, comparable to a week's worth of change as seen from Earth near opposition. During the July 2013 to June 2015 period, Pluto's solar phase curve increased from 11 degrees to 15 degrees, a small range, but large compared to Earth's 2 degree limit. The slope of the solar phase curve hints at properties such as surface roughness. Using PSF photometry that takes into account the ever-increasing sizes of Pluto and Charon as seen from New Horizons, as well as surface features discovered at closest approach, we present rotational light curves and solar phase curves of Pluto and Charon. We will connect these observations to previous measurements of the system from Earth.

  7. Neutral versus charged defect patterns in curved crystals.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the complex spectrum of topological defects in ground states of curved crystals is a long-standing problem with wide implications, from the mathematical Thomson problem to diverse physical realizations, including fullerenes and particle-coated droplets. While the excess number of "topologically charged" fivefold disclinations in a closed, spherical crystal is fixed, here we study the elementary transition from defect-free, flat crystals to curved crystals possessing an excess of "charged" disclinations in their bulk. Specifically, we consider the impact of topologically neutral patterns of defects-in the form of multidislocation chains or "scars" stable for small lattice spacing-on the transition from neutral to charged ground-state patterns of a crystalline cap bound to a spherical surface. Based on the asymptotic theory of caps in continuum limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we derive the morphological phase diagram of ground-state defect patterns, spanned by surface coverage of the sphere and forces at the cap edge. For the singular limit of zero edge forces, we find that scars reduce (by half) the threshold surface coverage for excess disclinations. Even more significant, scars flatten the geometric dependence of excess disinclination number on Gaussian curvature, leading to a transition between stable "charged" and "neutral" patterns that is, instead, critically sensitive to the compressive vs tensile nature of boundary forces on the cap. PMID:27575209

  8. Neutral versus charged defect patterns in curved crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the complex spectrum of topological defects in ground states of curved crystals is a long-standing problem with wide implications, from the mathematical Thomson problem to diverse physical realizations, including fullerenes and particle-coated droplets. While the excess number of "topologically charged" fivefold disclinations in a closed, spherical crystal is fixed, here we study the elementary transition from defect-free, flat crystals to curved crystals possessing an excess of "charged" disclinations in their bulk. Specifically, we consider the impact of topologically neutral patterns of defects—in the form of multidislocation chains or "scars" stable for small lattice spacing—on the transition from neutral to charged ground-state patterns of a crystalline cap bound to a spherical surface. Based on the asymptotic theory of caps in continuum limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we derive the morphological phase diagram of ground-state defect patterns, spanned by surface coverage of the sphere and forces at the cap edge. For the singular limit of zero edge forces, we find that scars reduce (by half) the threshold surface coverage for excess disclinations. Even more significant, scars flatten the geometric dependence of excess disinclination number on Gaussian curvature, leading to a transition between stable "charged" and "neutral" patterns that is, instead, critically sensitive to the compressive vs tensile nature of boundary forces on the cap.

  9. Observations of fuors. I. Light curve of V 1057 Cyg

    SciTech Connect

    Ibragimov, M.A.; Shevchenko, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The photographic magnitudes m/sub pg/, m/sub pv/, m/sub pr/ of the fuor V 1057 Cyg obtained during the period July 1968-August 1970 and photoelectric UBVRI' observations during the period July 1078-December 1985 are given. At the time of the rise and the light maximum of V 1057 Cyg, 26 estimates were obtained of m/sub pg/, 20 of m/sub pv/, and three of m/sub pr/. The color index upper limit V - I < 3.5 was obtained in the pre-outburst epoch. Analysis of the B, V, R light curves obtained from 300 observation nights reveals a periodic component in the small-scale light curve with a period of about 12 days and an amplitude of about 0.1 V. There has been a further slowing down in the rate of decrease of the brightness: from 1982 through 1986 the brightness of V 1057 Cyg did not decrease by more than O.2 V, whereas during the preceding four years the decrease in the brightness was ..delta..V > 0.4.

  10. Light curves from supernova shock breakout through an extended wind

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Balberg, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some supernovae may be the result of an explosion into an optically thick circumstellar material, the product of pre-explosion mass loss (wind) by the progenitor star. This scenario has been studied previously both analytically and numerically. However, many previous studies base their analysis on the diffusion approximation for radiation transfer, which is inappropriate in the optically thin outer layers of the wind. Here we study the deviations from diffusion and calculate light curves more accurately using a Monte Carlo approach to photon transfer. We distinguish between 'compact' winds, for which the diffusion approximation is appropriate, and 'extended' winds, which require a more delicate treatment of the radiation. We show that this effect is more significant than that of the light-travel time difference to a distant observer, which has a secondary influence on the light curves of extended-wind systems. We also comment on the applicability of the widely used flux-limited diffusion approximation in this context: we find that it generally does not reproduce the Monte Carlo results. The flux-limited diffusion approximation leads to results that are not only quantitatively but also qualitatively wrong in the extended-wind regime.

  11. Light-Curve Survey of Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Melita, M.; Ortiz, J. L.; Licandro, J.; Williams, I. P.; Jones, D.

    2008-09-01

    Trojan asteroids are an interesting population of minor bodies due to their dynamical characteristics, their physical properties and that they are relatively isolated located at the snow-line The main hypotheses about the origin of the Jupiter Trojans assumed that they formed either during the final stages of the planetary formation (Marzari & Scholl 1998), or during the epoch of planetary migration (Morbidelli et al. 2005), in any case more than 3.8 Gy. ago. The dynamical configuration kept the Trojans isolated from the asteroid Main Belt throughout the history of the Solar System. In spite of eventual interactions with other populations of minor bodies like the Hildas, the Jupiter family comets, and the Centaurs, their collisional evolution has been dictated mostly by the intrapopulation collisions (Marzari et al. 1996, 1997). Therefore, the Jupiter Trojans may be considered primordial bodies, whose dynamical and physical properties can provide important clues about the environment of planetary formation. The available sample of Jupiter Trojans light-curves is small and mainly restricted to the largest objects. According to the MPC-website (updated last in March 2006), the present sample of rotation periods and light-curve-amplitudes of the Jupiter Trojan asteroids is composed by 25 objects with some information about their periods and by 10 of them with only an amplitude estimation. A survey of contact binary Trojan asteroids has been done by Mann et al. 2007, where they have recorded more than 100 amplitudes from sparse-sampled light-curves and very-wellresolved rotational periods. More than 2000 Trojan asteroids have been discovered up to date, so, there is an urgent need to enlarge the sample of intrinsic rotation periods and accurate light-curve amplitudes and to extend it to smaller sizes. Results and Discusions We requested 26 nights of observation in the second semester of 2007, to begin with the survey. They were scheduled for the following instruments

  12. Marginalizing Instrument Systematics in HST WFC3 Transit Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Sing, D. K.; Evans, T.; Deming, D.; Mandell, A.

    2016-03-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) infrared observations at 1.1-1.7 μm probe primarily the H2O absorption band at 1.4 μm, and have provided low-resolution transmission spectra for a wide range of exoplanets. We present the application of marginalization based on Gibson to analyze exoplanet transit light curves obtained from HST WFC3 to better determine important transit parameters such as Rp/R*, which are important for accurate detections of H2O. We approximate the evidence, often referred to as the marginal likelihood, for a grid of systematic models using the Akaike Information Criterion. We then calculate the evidence-based weight assigned to each systematic model and use the information from all tested models to calculate the final marginalized transit parameters for both the band-integrated and spectroscopic light curves to construct the transmission spectrum. We find that a majority of the highest weight models contain a correction for a linear trend in time as well as corrections related to HST orbital phase. We additionally test the dependence on the shift in spectral wavelength position over the course of the observations and find that spectroscopic wavelength shifts {δ }λ (λ ) best describe the associated systematic in the spectroscopic light curves for most targets while fast scan rate observations of bright targets require an additional level of processing to produce a robust transmission spectrum. The use of marginalization allows for transparent interpretation and understanding of the instrument and the impact of each systematic evaluated statistically for each data set, expanding the ability to make true and comprehensive comparisons between exoplanet atmospheres.

  13. Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of White Dwarf Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, N.; Zelechoski, S.; Feldman, H.; Peterson, C.; Schweitzer, J.

    2001-12-01

    We use nonlinear time series analysis methods to examine the light intensity curves of white dwarf PG1351+489 obtained by the Whole Earth Telescope (WET). Though these methods were originally introduced to study chaotic systems, when a clear signature of determinism is found for the process generating an observable and it couples the active degrees of freedom of the system, then the notion of phase space provides a framework for exploring the system dynamics of nonlinear systems in general. With a pronounced single frequency, its harmonics and other frequencies of lower amplitude on a broadband background, the PG1351 light curve lends itself to the use of time delay coordinates. Our phase space reconstruction yields a triangular, toroidal three-dimensional shape. This differs from earlier results of a circular toroidal representation. We find a morphological similarity to a magnetic dynamo model developed for fast rotators that yields a union of both results: the circular phase space structure for the ascending portion of the cycle, and the triangular structure for the declining portion. The rise and fall of the dynamo cycle yield both different phase space representations and different correlation dimensions. Since PG1351 is known to have no significant fields, these results may stimulate the observation of light curves of known magnetic white dwarfs for comparison. Using other data obtained by the WET, we compare the phase space reconstruction of DB white dwarf PG1351 with that of GD 358 which has a more complex power spectrum. We also compare these results with those for PG1159. There is some general similarity between the results of the phase space reconstruction for the DB white dwarfs. As expected, the difference between the results for the DB white dwarfs and PG1159 is great.

  14. Transit Light Curves with Finite Integration Time: Fisher Information Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/~eprice.

  15. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  16. Variability in GRB light curves: Introducing Orthogonal Matching Pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Husne; Bégué, Damien; Ryde, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Constraining the variability of GRBs is important as it is one of the few keys to estimate many unknown parameters, such as the emission radius, the Lorentz factor, the size of the progenitor. In this work, we introduced the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) method to study GRB light curves and to compute the minimum time variability of GRBs. Commonly used in medical sciences, this method reconstructs a signal by choosing among predefined functional shapes. We will discuss the implementation of the code, and compare its performances with those of other dedicated methods (Haar wavelet analysis, peak finding algorithm and step wise filter correlation).

  17. Light curve solutions of the ultrashort-period Kepler binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Dimitrov, D.

    2015-02-01

    We carried out light curve solutions of the ultrashort-period binaries with MS components observed by $Kepler$. All six targets turned out almost in thermal contact with contact or slightly overcontact configurations. Two of them, KID 4921906 and KID 6309193, are not eclipsing but reveal ellipsoidal and spot variability. One of the components of KID 8108785 exhibits inherent, quasi-sinusoidal, small-amplitude variability. KID 12055255 turned out a very rare case of ultrashort-period overcontact binary consisting of two M dwarfs. Our modeling indicated that the variability of KID 9532219 is due to eclipses but not to $\\delta$ Sct pulsations as it was previously supposed.

  18. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  19. Ultraviolet light curves of U Geminorum and VW Hydri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. C.; Panek, R. J.; Holm, A. V.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet light curves were obtained for the quiescent dwarf novae U Gem and VW Hyi. The amplitude of the hump associated with the accretion hot spot is much smaller in the UV than in the visible. This implies that the bright spot temperature is roughly 12000 K if it is optically thick. The flux distribution of U Gem in quiescence cannot be fitted by model spectra of steady state, viscous accretion disks. The absolute luminosity, the flux distribution, and the far UV spectrum suggest that the primary star is visible in the far UV. The optical UV flux distribution of VW Hyi can be matched roughly by the model accretion disks.

  20. WASP-14 b: transit timing analysis of 19 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Marka, C.; Fernández, M.; Güver, T.; Göğüş, E.; Nowak, G.; Vaňko, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Mugrauer, M.; Trepl, L.; Gelszinnis, J.

    2015-08-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light-curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis, we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years (2007-2013) allowed us to refine the transit ephemeris. We derived an orbital period 1.2 s longer and 10 times more precise than the one given in the discovery paper. We found no significant periodic signal in the timing-residuals and, hence, no evidence for TTV in the system.

  1. SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF TIMESCALE METRICS FOR APERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Cody, Ann Marie

    2015-01-10

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  2. Completing the Census of NGC 2264 Light Curve Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Cody, Ann Marie; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Carpenter, John; Soderblom, David; Ciardi, David; Vrba, Fred; Holtzman, Jon; Covey, Kevin; Barrado, David; Bouvier, Jerome; Hartmann, Lee; Gutermuth, Rob; Song, Inseok; Alencar, Sylvia; Carey, Sean

    2012-12-01

    We propose to obtain 80 epochs of Spitzer imaging photometry over a 20 day time period for a sample of 15 young stellar objects (YSOs) in NGC2264. These targets were selected based on the December 2011 Spitzer and CoRoT observations obtained of NGC2264 as part of the Spitzer Exploration Science program YSOVAR2: Mapping YSO Inner Disk Structure in NGC2264. Our GO9 program is designed to obtain multi-band photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy for a carefully chosen set of YSOs whose 2011 data were incomplete. In particular, ten of these stars have light curve variability which appears to be dominated by stochastically variable mass accretion rates from the disk to the star. Our Cycle 8 observations are the first to be able to clearly identify and characterize this type of photometric variability in classical T Tauri stars. The GO9 observations will increase the number of well-characterized members of this class by 40% and extend the membership into the substellar mass regime. The other five target stars are additional YSOs with rare light curve morphologies and incomplete data from 2011, including a PMS eclipsing binary whose components are likely to both be substellar.

  3. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  4. A Review of Correlated Noise in Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, J.; Blecic, J.; Hardy, R. A.; Hardin, M.

    2013-10-01

    A number of the occultation light curves of exoplanets exhibit time-correlated residuals (a.k.a. correlated or red noise) in their model fits. The correlated noise might arise from inaccurate models or unaccounted astrophysical or telescope systematics. A correct assessment of the correlated noise is important to determine true signal-to-noise ratios of a planet's physical parameters. Yet, there are no in-depth statistical studies in the literature for some of the techniques currently used (RMS-vs-bin size plot, prayer beads, and wavelet-based modeling). We subjected these correlated-noise assessment techniques to basic tests on synthetic data sets to characterize their features and limitations. Initial results indicate, for example, that, sometimes the RMS-vs-bin size plots present artifacts when the bin size is similar to the observation duration. Further, the prayer beads doesn't correctly increase the uncertainties to compensate for the lack of accuracy if there is correlated noise. We have applied these techniques to several Spitzer secondary-eclipse hot-Jupiter light curves and discuss their implications. This work was supported in part by NASA planetary atmospheres grant NNX13AF38G and Astrophysics Data Analysis Program NNX12AI69G.

  5. A Review of Correlated Noise in Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, J.; Hardin, M. R.; Blecic, J.; Hardy, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of the occultation light curves of exoplanets exhibit time-correlated residuals (a.k.a. correlated or red noise) in their model fits. The correlated noise might arise from inaccurate models or unaccounted astrophysical or telescope systematics. A correct assessment of the correlated noise is important to determine true signal-to-noise ratios of a planet's physical parameters. Yet, there are no in-depth statistical studies in the literature for some of the techniques currently used (time averaging, residual permutation, and wavelet-based likelihood fitting). We subjected these correlated-noise assessment techniques to basic tests on synthetic data sets to characterize their features and limitations. Initial results indicate, for example, that, sometimes the time-averaging method shows artifacts when the bin size is similar to the observation duration. Further, we found that the residual-permutation method doesn't correctly increase the uncertainties to compensate for the lack of accuracy if there is correlated noise. We have applied these techniques to several Spitzer secondary-eclipse hot-Jupiter light curves and discuss their implications. This work was supported in part by NASA planetary atmospheres grant NNX13AF38G and Astrophysics Data Analysis Program NNX12AI69G.

  6. Simulated Performance of Timescale Metrics for Aperiodic Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  7. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  8. Testing the recovery of stellar rotation signals from Kepler light curves using a blind hare-and-hounds exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Llama, J.; Ceillier, T.; Chagas, M. L. das; Davenport, J. R. A.; García, R. A.; Hay, K. L.; Lanza, A. F.; McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Nielsen, M. B.; Reinhold, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of a blind exercise to test the recoverability of stellar rotation and differential rotation in Kepler light curves. The simulated light curves lasted 1000 d and included activity cycles, Sun-like butterfly patterns, differential rotation and spot evolution. The range of rotation periods, activity levels and spot lifetime were chosen to be representative of the Kepler data of solar-like stars. Of the 1000 simulated light curves, 770 were injected into actual quiescent Kepler light curves to simulate Kepler noise. The test also included five 1000-d segments of the Sun's total irradiance variations at different points in the Sun's activity cycle. Five teams took part in the blind exercise, plus two teams who participated after the content of the light curves had been released. The methods used included Lomb-Scargle periodograms and variants thereof, autocorrelation function and wavelet-based analyses, plus spot modelling to search for differential rotation. The results show that the `overall' period is well recovered for stars exhibiting low and moderate activity levels. Most teams reported values within 10 per cent of the true value in 70 per cent of the cases. There was, however, little correlation between the reported and simulated values of the differential rotation shear, suggesting that differential rotation studies based on full-disc light curves alone need to be treated with caution, at least for solar-type stars. The simulated light curves and associated parameters are available online for the community to test their own methods.

  9. Hilbert-Curve Fractal Antenna With Radiation- Pattern Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.; Zaman, Afroz

    2007-01-01

    A printed, folded, Hilbert-curve fractal microwave antenna has been designed and built to offer advantages of compactness and low mass, relative to other antennas designed for the same operating frequencies. The primary feature of the antenna is that it offers the advantage of radiation-pattern diversity without need for electrical or mechanical switching: it can radiate simultaneously in an end-fire pattern at a frequency of 2.3 GHz (which is in the S-band) and in a broadside pattern at a frequency of 16.8 GHz (which is in the Ku-band). This radiation-pattern diversity could be utilized, for example, in applications in which there were requirements for both S-band ground-to-ground communications and Ku-band ground-to-aircraft or ground-to-spacecraft communications. The lack of switching mechanisms or circuitry makes this antenna more reliable, easier, and less expensive to fabricate than it otherwise would be.

  10. Atlas of Light Curves of Faint Mira-Type Stars. Statistical Relations Between the Characteristics of Smoothed Phase Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkina, L. S.; Andronov, I. L.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a set of the photometric parameters which could be useful for the classiffication of the pulsating Mira-type stars and related objects and determination of the EAGB and TPAGB stages of the stellar evolution. To solve this problem, the light curves of faint Mira- type stars and of the semi-regular variable V411 Sct were approximated using the program FDCN, which computes a trigonometric polynomial of a statistically optimal degree (I.L.Andronov, 1994, 2003). The at las of statistically optimal fits of the phase curves of 34 long-period is presented, based on digitized data from the scanned "Atlas" by P. Maffei and G.Tosti (http://astro.fisica.unipg.it/atlasmaffei/main.htm). Some statistical relations between the parameters of the trigonometrical polynomial approximation of the phase curve are analyzed. for an additional criterion of detailed classiffication of long-perodic variables, we used various parameters, e.g. "period", "amplitude", "asymmetry", "slope of the ascending branch", "characteristic time of brightening by 1m": Discussion of the results is presented.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V346 Cen multiwavelength light curves (Mayer+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, P.; Harmanec, P.; Wolf, M.; Nemravova, J.; Prsa, A.; Fremat, Y.; Zejda, M.; Liska, J.; Jurysek, J.; Honkova, K.; Masek, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present photographic light curves from O'Connell (1939, Publications of the Riverview College Observatory, 2, 5), uvby light curves from Gimenez et al. (1986A&AS...66...45G), BVR light curves from 0.6 m reflector with a CCD camera, Mt. John, New Zealand, green light curve from Sonnar 4/135mm telephoto lens with a CCD ATIK16IC camera, Sutherland, South Africa and BVRI light curves from 0.3m Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector with a CCD camera. (5 data files).

  12. Predicting neural network firing pattern from phase resetting curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel; Oprisan, Ana

    2007-04-01

    Autonomous neural networks called central pattern generators (CPG) are composed of endogenously bursting neurons and produce rhythmic activities, such as flying, swimming, walking, chewing, etc. Simplified CPGs for quadrupedal locomotion and swimming are modeled by a ring of neural oscillators such that the output of one oscillator constitutes the input for the subsequent neural oscillator. The phase response curve (PRC) theory discards the detailed conductance-based description of the component neurons of a network and reduces them to ``black boxes'' characterized by a transfer function, which tabulates the transient change in the intrinsic period of a neural oscillator subject to external stimuli. Based on open-loop PRC, we were able to successfully predict the phase-locked period and relative phase between neurons in a half-center network. We derived existence and stability criteria for heterogeneous ring neural networks that are in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  14. A Light Curve of Theta-1 Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. R.; Stutts, S. C.; Caton, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Theta-1 Orionis A (V1016 Ori), a member of the Trapezium, was only discovered to be an eclipsing binary system in 1974. The study of this system has been recently summarized by Strickland and Lloyd (The Observatory, 120, 2000, pp. 141-149). We are obtaining a complete light curve in VBRI using a CCD on the 18-inch telescope at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory. We have obtained new times of primary minimum and are searching for the undiscovered secondary eclipse as well. A status update on this project will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, through grant AST-9731062, and the Dunham Fund for Astrophysical Research. We would also like to thank the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory Library and acknowledge the use of the Simbad Astronomical Data Base. The instrumentation help provided by Lee Hawkins and Robert Miller is appreciated as well.

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF DOPPLER BOOSTING IN KEPLER LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.; Breton, Rene P.; Justham, Stephen; Rappaport, Saul A.; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Han, Zhanwen

    2010-05-20

    Among the initial results from Kepler were two striking light curves, for KOI 74 and KOI 81, in which the relative depths of the primary and secondary eclipses showed that the more compact, less luminous object was hotter than its stellar host. That result became particularly intriguing because a substellar mass had been derived for the secondary in KOI 74, which would make the high temperature challenging to explain; in KOI 81, the mass range for the companion was also reported to be consistent with a substellar object. We re-analyze the Kepler data and demonstrate that both companions are likely to be white dwarfs. We also find that the photometric data for KOI 74 show a modulation in brightness as the more luminous star orbits, due to Doppler boosting. The magnitude of the effect is sufficiently large that we can use it to infer a radial velocity amplitude accurate to 1 km s{sup -1}. As far as we are aware, this is the first time a radial-velocity curve has been measured photometrically. Combining our velocity amplitude with the inclination and primary mass derived from the eclipses and primary spectral type, we infer a secondary mass of 0.22 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}. We use our estimates to consider the likely evolutionary paths and mass-transfer episodes of these binary systems.

  16. The infrared light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III and its relationship to the visual light curve, C2, and water production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles S.; Hanner, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The near-IR light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III is analyzed and compared with C2 production, water production, and the visual light curve. This is the most complete IR light curve compiled to date for any comet. The scattering phase function at small sun-comet-earth angles is shown to affect the slope of near-IR light curve significantly. P/Halley's dust production, as inferred from the IR light curve showed an increased production rate near perihelion which appears to be correlated with the onset of significant jet activity. The near-IR light curve, visual light curve, C2, and water production rates displayed different heliocentric variations, suggesting that one parameter cannot be accurately estimated from another. This is particularly true of the early preperihelion visual light curve. A peak of 0.3-0.5 magnitude in the visual magnitude, representing the integrated brightness of the comet's visible coma, lagged the other parameters by about a day. The near-IR color, J-H, was less red during periods of strong dust activity.

  17. Video meteor light curve analysis of Orionids and Geminids and developing a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of shower meteors from the single station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grašić, L.; Milanović, N.; Pavlović, D.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of the shower meteors from single station video data. We found that even though the height of a meteor atmospheric trajectory obtained by using this method may have a large error, the absolute light curve shape is preserved. We used our method to calculate the F parameters of the Orionid and Geminid light curves. The light curves were obtained from the single station video data by the instrument with a limiting sensitivity of 3.5m. We found that for our sample of the light curves the zenith distance of meteor radiant does not affect the F parameter for either of the two showers. The value of F parameter of the Orionids obtained in this paper matches the values obtained by other authors, whilst for the Geminids it is significantly different.

  18. Advances in the interpretation and analysis of lunar occultation light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Glindemann, A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The introduction of fast 2D detectors and the use of very large telescopes have significantly advanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the lunar occultation technique. Recent routine observations at the ESO Very Large Telescope have yielded hundreds of events with results, especially in the area of binary stars, which are often beyond the capabilities of any other techniques. Aims: With the increase in the quality and in the number of the events, subtle features in the light curve patterns have occasionally been detected which challenge the standard analytical definition of the lunar occultation phenomenon as diffraction from an infinite straight edge. We investigate the possible causes for the observed peculiarities. Methods: We have evaluated the available statistics of distortions in occultation light curves observed at the ESO VLT, and compared it to data from other facilities. We have developed an alternative approach to model and interpret lunar occultation light curves, based on 2D diffraction integrals describing the light curves in the presence of an arbitrary lunar limb profile. We distinguish between large limb irregularities requiring the Fresnel diffraction formalism, and small irregularities described by Fraunhofer diffraction. We have used this to generate light curves representative of several limb geometries, and attempted to relate them to some of the peculiar data observed. Results: We conclude that the majority of the observed peculiarities is due to limb irregularities, which can give origin both to anomalies in the amplitude of the diffraction fringes and to varying limb slopes. We investigate also other possible effects, such as detector response and atmospheric perturbations, finding them negligible. We have developed methods and procedures that for the first time allow us to analyze data affected by limb irregularities, with large ones bending the fringe pattern along the shape of the irregularity, and small ones creating fringe

  19. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  20. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVES FROM PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERES WITH FINITE CONDUCTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-07-20

    We investigate the shapes of {gamma}-ray pulsar light curves using three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere models of finite conductivity. These models, covering the entire spectrum of solutions between vacuum and force-free magnetospheres, for the first time afford mapping the GeV emission of more realistic, dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. To this end we generate model light curves following two different approaches: (1) We employ the emission patterns of the slot and outer gap models in the field geometries of magnetospheres with different conductivity {sigma}. (2) We define realistic trajectories of radiating particles in magnetospheres of different {sigma} and compute their Lorentz factor under the influence of magnetospheric electric fields and curvature radiation-reaction; with these at hand we then calculate the emitted radiation intensity. The light curves resulting from these prescriptions are quite sensitive to the value of {sigma}, especially in the second approach. While still not self-consistent, these results are a step forward in understanding the physics of pulsar {gamma}-radiation.

  1. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  2. Low mass SN Ia and the late light curve

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Fryer, C.L.; Hand, K.P.

    1995-12-31

    The late bolometric light curves of type Ia supernovae, when measured accurately over several years, show an exponential decay with a 56d half-life over a drop in luminosity of 8 magnitudes (10 half-lives). The late-time light curve is thought to be governed by the decay of Co{sup 56}, whose 77d half-life must then be modified to account for the observed decay time. Two mechanisms, both relying upon the positron fraction of the Co{sup 56} decay, have been proposed to explain this modification. One explanation requires a large amount of emission at infra-red wavelengths where it would not be detected. The other explanation has proposed a progressive transparency or leakage of the high energy positrons (Colgate, Petschek and Kriese, 1980). For the positrons to leak out of the expanding nebula at the required rate necessary to produce the modified 56d exponential, the mass of the ejecta from a one foe (10{sup 51} erg in kinetic energy) explosion must be small, M{sub ejec} = 0.4M{sub {circle_dot}} with M{sub ejec} {proportional_to} KE{sup 0.5}. Thus, in this leakage explanation, any reasonable estimate of the total energy of the explosion requires that the ejected mass be very much less than the Chandrasekhar mass of 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}}. This is very difficult to explain with the ``canonical`` Chandrasekhar-mass thermonuclear explosion that disintegrates the original white dwarf star. This result leads us to pursue alternate mechanisms of type Ia supernovae. These mechanisms include sub-Chandrasekhar thermonuclear explosions and the accretion induced collapse of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs. We will summarize the advantages and disadvantages of both mechanisms with considerable detail spent on our new accretion induced collapse simulations. These mechanisms lead to lower Ni{sup 56} production and hence result in type Ia supernovae with luminosities decreased down to {approximately} 50% that predicted by the ``standard`` model.

  3. Supervised Detection of Anomalous Light Curves in Massive Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-01

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  4. Performance of Electroluminescent Flats for Precision Light Curve Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, Ryan L.; Oberst, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    We measure of the quality of flat field frames (flats) taken using an electroluminescent (EL) panel versus both dome and sky flats for purposes of calibrating visual CCD images. Classic dome and sky flats can both suffer from overall gradients and local irregularities. EL panel flats have recently grown in popularity as a third alternative, based partly on their potential to be free of such defects. We assess the flats based on their contributions to the RMS noise of long-duration light curves constructed via differential aperture photometry. The noise levels explored range from ~ 1 - few mmag, as needed for the ground-based detection of transiting planets. The target and reference stars are deliberately permitted to drift across the CCD in order to probe pixel-to-pixel variations. Both the filter and focus are varied during the tests - the former to probe color variation in the flats, and the latter because defocusing tends to average out pixel-to-pixel variations that the flats are intended to remove. All tests were performed at the Westminster College Observatory (WCO), which belongs to the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT)-North follow-up network.

  5. Rotating Type Ia SN progenitors: explosion and light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, I.; Piersanti, L.; Gagliardi, S.; Straniero, O.; Tornambe, A.; Bravo, E.

    2005-10-21

    High redshift SNe Ia have been recently used to calibrate the cosmological distance scale and to infer the existence of the dark energy. The reliability of such a method depends on the effective knowledge of the absolute brightness of this class of supernovae. This would require a complete understanding of the physics of SNeIa.Starting from an accreting rotating white dwarf, the only progenitor that we found to be able to grow till the Chandrasekhar mass and undergo a thermonuclear explosion, we simulate the explosion, deriving the nucleosynthesis and the light curve. We explore the final outcome in the framework of a 1D delayed detonation model, where the characteristic density for which the transition from deflagration to detonation takes place is a free parameter.Although preliminary, our results imply that rotating white dwarfs produce a range of explosive conditions, characterized by different ignition densities and total masses. Maximum luminosities of successfully explosive models differ up to 0.11 mag. In a few cases, the formation of a small highly neutronised remnant is found.

  6. Atmospheric trajectories and light curves of shower meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, P.; Borovička, J.; Spurný, P.; Betlem, H.; Evans, S.

    2004-12-01

    Double station data on 496 meteors belonging to several meteor showers were obtained within the program of the video meteor observations during years 1998-2001. Analyzed meteors cover a range of photometric masses from 10-7 to 10-4 kg with a corresponding range of maximum brightness from +4.7 to -2.1 absolute magnitude. Atmospheric trajectories of Perseid, Orionid and Leonid meteors are analysed. These typical cometary high velocity meteors are compared to Geminid meteors with probable asteroidal origin and Taurid meteors - another cometary shower with significantly lower entry velocity. The light curves of the studied meteors vary widely, but generally are nearly symmetrical with the point of maximum brightness located close the to middle of the luminous trajectory. Small differences between showers are reported. We found that the height data are in good agreement with the dust-ball model predictions. The only difference is the beginning height behaviour. The beginning heights of cometary meteors increase with increasing photometric mass. These meteoroids probably contain a volatile part which starts to ablate before we are able to detect the meteors. The Geminid meteors are a different case. They start to ablate suddenly and their beginning height is almost constant in the whole range of studied meteoroid masses. In this case we observe real beginnings of meteor ablation.

  7. Disk irradiation and light curves of x ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Wheeler, J. C.; Mineshige, S.

    1994-01-01

    We study the disk instability and the effect of irradiation on outbursts in the black hole X-ray nova system. In both the optical and soft X-rays, the light curves of several X-ray novae, A0620-00, GH 2000+25, Nova Muscae 1991 (GS 1124-68), and GRO J0422+32, show a main peak, a phase of exponential decline, a secondary maximum or reflare, and a final bump in the late decay followed by a rapid decline. Basic disk thermal limit cycle instabilities can account for the rapid rise and overall decline, but not the reflare and final bump. The rise time of the reflare, about 10 days, is too short to represent a viscous time, so this event is unlikely to be due to increased mass flow from the companion star. We explore the possibility that irradiation by X-rays produced in the inner disk can produce these secondary effects by enhancing the mass flow rate within the disk. Two plausible mechanisms of irradiation of the disk are considered: direct irradiation from the inner hot disk and reflected radiation from a corona or other structure above the disk. Both of these processes will be time dependent in the context of the disk instability model and result in more complex time-dependent behavior of the disk structure. We test both disk instability and mass transfer burst models for the secondary flares in the presence of irradiation.

  8. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE OF AN EXOZODIACAL DUST CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.

    2011-10-15

    Planets embedded within debris disks gravitationally perturb nearby dust and can create clumpy, azimuthally asymmetric circumstellar ring structures that rotate in lock with the planet. The Earth creates one such structure in the solar zodiacal dust cloud. In an edge-on system, the dust 'clumps' periodically pass in front of the star as the planet orbits, occulting and forward-scattering starlight. In this paper, we predict the shape and magnitude of the corresponding transit signal. To do so, we model the dust distributions of collisional, steady-state exozodiacal clouds perturbed by planetary companions. We examine disks with dusty ring structures formed by the planet's resonant trapping of in-spiraling dust for a range of planet masses and semi-major axes, dust properties, and disk masses. We synthesize edge-on images of these models and calculate the transit signatures of the resonant ring structures. The transit light curves created by dusty resonant ring structures typically exhibit two broad transit minima that lead and trail the planetary transit. We find that Jupiter-mass planets embedded within disks hundreds of times denser than our zodiacal cloud can create resonant ring structures with transit depths up to {approx}10{sup -4}, possibly detectable with Kepler. Resonant rings produced by planets more or less massive than Jupiter produce smaller transit depths. Observations of these transit signals may provide upper limits on the degree of asymmetry in exozodiacal clouds.

  9. Multi-band Emission Light Curves of Jupiter: Insights on Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Ge, Huazhi; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Sinclair, James; Fernandes, Joshua; Momary, Thomas W.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-10-01

    Many brown dwarfs exhibit significant infrared flux variability (e.g., Artigau et al. 2009, ApJ, 701, 1534; Radigan et al. 2012, ApJ, 750, 105), ranging from several to twenty percent of the brightness. Current hypotheses include temperature variations, cloud holes and patchiness, and cloud height and thickness variations (e.g., Apai et al. 2013, ApJ, 768, 121; Robinson and Marley 2014, ApJ, 785, 158; Zhang and Showman 2014, ApJ, 788, L6). Some brown dwarfs show phase shifts in the light curves among different wavelengths (e.g., Buenzli et al. 2012, ApJ, 760, L31; Yang et al. 2016, arXiv:1605.02708), indicating vertical variations of the cloud distribution. The current observational technique can barely detect the brightness changes on the surfaces of nearby brown dwarfs (Crossfield et al. 2014, Nature, 505, 654) let alone resolve detailed weather patterns that cause the flux variability. The infrared emission maps of Jupiter might shed light on this problem. Using COMICS at Subaru Telescope, VISIR at Very Large Telescope (VLT) and NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained infrared images of Jupiter over several nights at multiple wavelengths that are sensitive to several pressure levels from the stratosphere to the deep troposphere below the ammonia clouds. The rotational maps and emission light curves are constructed. The individual pixel brightness varies up to a hundred percent level and the variation of the full-disk brightness is around several percent. Both the shape and amplitude of the light curves are significantly distinct at different wavelengths. Variation of light curves at different epochs and phase shift among different wavelengths are observed. We will present principle component analysis to identify dominant emission features such as stable vortices, cloud holes and eddies in the belts and zones and strong emissions in the aurora region. A radiative transfer model is used to simulate those features to get a more quantitative

  10. The Regulus occultation light curve and the real atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Wasserman, L.

    1974-01-01

    An inversion of the light curve observed during the July 7, 1959, occultation of Regulus by Venus leads to the conclusion that the light curve cannot be reconciled with models of the Venus atmosphere based on spacecraft observations. The event occurred in daylight and, under the subsequently difficult observation conditions, it seems likely that the Regulus occultation light curve is marred by a systematic errors in spite of the competence of the observers involved.

  11. Bioconvective patterns, synchrony, and survival. [in light-limited growth model of motile algae culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    With and without bioconvective pattern formation, a theoretical model predicts growth in light-limited cultures of motile algae. At the critical density for pattern formation, the resulting doubly exponential population curves show an inflection. Such growth corresponds quantitatively to experiments in mechanically unstirred cultures. This attaches survival value to synchronized pattern formation.

  12. Unsupervised Clustering of Type II Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities come online, the astronomical community will be provided with extremely large data sets of well-sampled light curves (LCs) of transients. This motivates systematic studies of the LCs of supernovae (SNe) of all types, including the early rising phase. We performed unsupervised k-means clustering on a sample of 59 R-band SN II LCs and find that the rise to peak plays an important role in classifying LCs. Our sample can be divided into three classes: slowly rising (II-S), fast rise/slow decline (II-FS), and fast rise/fast decline (II-FF). We also identify three outliers based on the algorithm. The II-FF and II-FS classes are disjoint in their decline rates, while the II-S class is intermediate and “bridges the gap.” This may explain recent conflicting results regarding II-P/II-L populations. The II-FS class is also significantly less luminous than the other two classes. Performing clustering on the first two principal component analysis components gives equivalent results to using the full LC morphologies. This indicates that Type II LCs could possibly be reduced to two parameters. We present several important caveats to the technique, and find that the division into these classes is not fully robust. Moreover, these classes have some overlap, and are defined in the R band only. It is currently unclear if they represent distinct physical classes, and more data is needed to study these issues. However, we show that the outliers are actually composed of slowly evolving SN IIb, demonstrating the potential of such methods. The slowly evolving SNe IIb may arise from single massive progenitors.

  13. RADIOACTIVELY POWERED RISING LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-11-10

    The rising luminosity of the recent, nearby supernova 2011fe shows a quadratic dependence with time during the first Almost-Equal-To 0.5-4 days. In addition, studies of the composite light curves formed from stacking together many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have found similar power-law indices for the rise, but may also show some dispersion that may indicate diversity. I explore what range of power-law rises are possible due to the presence of radioactive material near the surface of the exploding white dwarf (WD). I summarize what constraints such a model places on the structure of the progenitor and the distribution and velocity of ejecta. My main conclusion is that for the inferred explosion time for SN 2011fe, its rise requires an increasing mass fraction X {sub 56} Almost-Equal-To (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} of {sup 56}Ni distributed between a depth of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} and 0.3 M {sub Sun} below the WD's surface. Radioactive elements this shallow are not found in simulations of a single C/O detonation. Scenarios that may produce this material include helium-shell burning during a double-detonation ignition, a gravitationally confined detonation, and a subset of deflagration to detonation transition models. In general, the power-law rise can differ from quadratic depending on the details of the velocity, density, and radioactive deposition gradients in a given event. Therefore, comparisons of this work with observed bolometric rises of SNe Ia would place strong constraints on the properties of the shallow outer layers, providing important clues for identifying the elusive progenitors of SNe Ia.

  14. Properties of GRB light curves from magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Granot, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflows, driving their extremely luminous prompt γ-ray emission is still uncertain. The leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the expected prompt-GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with Lorentz factors Γ'≳ a few in the jet's bulk frame. We consider such motions of the emitting material in two antiparallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting magnetic-field lines) within an ultrarelativistic (with Γ ≫ 1) thin spherical reconnection layer. The emission's relativistic beaming in the jet's frame greatly affects the light curves. For emission at radii R0 < R < R0 + ΔR (with Γ = const), the observed pulse width is ΔT ˜ (R0/2cΓ2) max (1/Γ', ΔR/R0), i.e. up to ˜Γ' times shorter than for isotropic emission in the jet's frame. We consider two possible magnetic reconnection modes: a quasi-steady state with continuous plasma flow into and out of the reconnection layer, and sporadic reconnection in relativistic turbulence that produces relativistic plasmoids. Both of these modes can account for many observed prompt-GRB properties: variability, pulse asymmetry, the very rapid declines at their end and pulse evolutions that are either hard to soft (for Γ' ≲ 2) or intensity tracking (for Γ' > 2). However, the relativistic turbulence mode is more likely to be relevant for the prompt sub-MeV emission and can naturally account also for the peak luminosity - peak frequency correlation.

  15. Constraining Type Ia supernovae progenitor parameters via light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Benjamin

    I study thermonuclear explosions of White Dwarf (WD) stars, or so-called Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Higher precision is needed to determine the nature of the dark energy and to accomplish this we turn to secondary parameters of LC variation. I have devised a general scheme and developed a code to analyze large sets of LC data for these secondary parameter variations which is based on a combination of theoretical model template fitting and Principal Component Analysis. Novel methods for finding statistical trends in sparsely-sampled and non-coincidental light curve data are explored and utilized. In practice, data sets for different supernovae are inhomogeneous in time, time coverage and accuracy, but I have developed a method to remap these inhomogeneous data sets of large numbers of individual objects to a homogeneous data set centered in time and magnitude space from which we can obtain the external, primary, and secondary LC parameters of individual objects. The set of external parameters of a given SN include the time of its maximum light in various bands, its distance modulus, the extinction along the light path, and redshift corrections (K-corrections) due to cosmic expansion. I investigate the intrinsic primary parameter variation of SNe Ia via template fitting, and then probe the secondary LC variations using monochromatic differential analysis in the UBV bands. We use photometry from 25 SNe Ia which were recently and precisely observed by the Carnegie Supernova Project to analyze the presence of theoretical model-based differential LC signatures of Main-Sequence mass variation of the progenitor stars when they formed, central density variation of the WD at the time of the explosion, and metallicity Z variation in the progenitors. The light curves in the V band are found to provide the highest accuracy in determining the distance modulus, K-corrections, extinction, main-sequence mass and central density

  16. THE BEHAVIOR OF NOVAE LIGHT CURVES BEFORE ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Collazzi, Andrew C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Xiao Limin; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kroll, Peter; Loechel, Klaus; Henden, Arne A.

    2009-12-15

    In 1975, E. R. Robinson conducted the hallmark study of the behavior of classical nova light curves before eruption, and this work has now become part of the standard knowledge of novae. He made three points: 5 out of 11 novae showed pre-eruption rises in the years before eruption, one nova (V446 Her) showed drastic changes in the variability across eruptions, and all but one of the novae (excepting BT Mon) have the same quiescent magnitudes before and after the outburst. This work has not been tested since it came out. We have now tested these results by going back to the original archival photographic plates and measuring large numbers of pre-eruption magnitudes for many novae using comparison stars on a modern magnitude scale. We find in particular that four out of five claimed pre-eruption rises are due to simple mistakes in the old literature, that V446 Her has the same amplitude of variations across its 1960 eruption, and that BT Mon has essentially unchanged brightness across its 1939 eruption. Out of 22 nova eruptions, we find two confirmed cases of significant pre-eruption rises (for V533 Her and V1500 Cyg), while T CrB has a deep pre-eruption dip. These events are a challenge to theorists. We find no significant cases of changes in variability across 27 nova eruptions beyond what is expected due to the usual fluctuations seen in novae away from eruptions. For 30 classical novae plus 19 eruptions from 6 recurrent novae, we find that the average change in magnitude from before the eruption to long after the eruption is 0.0 mag. However, we do find five novae (V723 Cas, V1500 Cyg, V1974 Cyg, V4633 Sgr, and RW UMi) that have significantly large changes, in that the post-eruption quiescent brightness level is over ten times brighter than the pre-eruption level. These large post-eruption brightenings are another challenge to theorists.

  17. Application of Geodetic VLBI Data to Obtaining Long-Term Light Curves for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kijima, Masachika

    2010-01-01

    The long-term light curve is important to research on binary black holes and disk instability in AGNs. The light curves have been drawn mainly using single dish data provided by the University of Michigan Radio Observatory and the Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Hence, thus far, we have to research on limited sources. I attempt to draw light curves using VLBI data for those sources that have not been monitored by any observatories with single dish. I developed software, analyzed all geodetic VLBI data available at the IVS Data Centers, and drew the light curves at 8 GHz. In this report, I show the tentative results for two AGNs. I compared two light curves of 4C39.25, which were drawn based on single dish data and on VLBI data. I confirmed that the two light curves were consistent. Furthermore, I succeeded in drawing the light curve of 0454-234 with VLBI data, which has not been monitored by any observatory with single dish. In this report, I suggest that the geodetic VLBI archive data is useful to obtain the long-term light curves at radio bands for astrophysics.

  18. appaloosa: Python-based flare finding code for Kepler light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-08-01

    The appaloosa suite automates flare-finding in every Kepler light curves. It builds quiescent light curve models that include long- and short-cadence data through iterative de-trending and includes completeness estimates via artificial flare injection and recovery tests.

  19. Generalized Fermat's principle and action for light rays in a curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-09-01

    We start with formulation of the generalized Fermat’s principle for light propagation in a curved spacetime. We apply Pontryagin’s minimum principle of the optimal control theory and obtain an effective Hamiltonian for null geodesics in a curved spacetime. We explicitly demonstrate that dynamical equations for this Hamiltonian correctly reproduce null geodesic equations. Other forms of the action for light rays in a curved spacetime are also discussed.

  20. A Novel GUI Based Interactive Work Flow Application for Exploratory and Batch Processing of Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, E.; Dave, R.; Protopapas, P.

    2008-08-01

    Current methodologies for extracting desired data from light curves involves a complicated process that is often not portable to other projects or other disciplines. To create a more generic environment to easily filter, correct, and clean light-curve data from a myriad of sources; we have developed an XML based work-flow application which allows for a standard, yet scalable and flexible way to handle light curve processing. Wrapped in a Python powered interactive GUI, this application offers astronomers an environment to easily experiment with various light curve filtering techniques. Once a favorable filtering process is discovered, the sequence of filters can be stored, reused, and then applied in batch to large set of raw light curves.

  1. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  2. Light Curves and Analyses of the Eclipsing Binaries EG Cas and EP Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Sanders, S. J.; McClain, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    New precision V & Rc light curves of the eclipsing binaries EG Cas and EP Cas have been obtained using the 41-cm telescope at the Eastern University Observatory equipped with an SBIG ST-10XME CCD. EG Cas (P = 0.6115 days, Vmax = 12.9) has no published light curves and only a few dozen (mostly visual) timings of minimum light. The system is being observed throughout the fall of 2009 and the current light curves distinctly show that the system is a totally eclipsing overcontact binary. The light curves are also significantly asymmetric (strong O'Connell effect) indicating the presence of large, cool starspots, most likely on both stars. Preliminary analysis indicates that the binary is an A-type (the larger, more massive star is the hotter component), has a mass ratio of 0.32, very large temperature difference between the stars greater than 1600 K, and a fillout of 0.26. The modern timings of minimum light combined with those in the literature indicate that the binary's period is decreasing. The large temperature difference coupled to a significant fillout factor seems contradictory, and further data acquisition and analysis will hopefully resolve this seeming enigma. EP Cas (P = 0.8134 days, Vmax = 11.2) is a partially eclipsing detached system with a relatively deep primary eclipse of 1.0 mag in Rc. No published light curves exist for this system although many timings of minimum light have been published. The O-C curve indicates that the period for the binary has remained relatively constant since observations were first published in 1936. Preliminary light curve models indicate a partially eclipsing system consisting of detached but tidally distorted stars. The complete light curve analyses as well as a period study of all published times of minimum light will be presented for both systems.

  3. 'Self-absorbed' GeV light curves of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Woźniak, P.

    2014-06-10

    We investigate the effect that the absorption of high-energy (above 100 MeV) photons produced in gamma-ray burst afterglow shocks has on the light curves and spectra of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) afterglows. Afterglows produced by the interaction of a relativistic outflow with a wind-like medium peak when the blast wave deceleration sets in, and the afterglow spectrum could be hardening before that peak, as the optical thickness to pair formation is decreasing. In contrast, in afterglows produced in the interaction with a homogeneous medium, the optical thickness to pair formation should increase and yield a light curve peak when it reaches unity, followed by a fast light curve decay, accompanied by spectral softening. If energy is injected in the blast wave, then the accelerated increase of the optical thickness yields a convex afterglow light curve. Other features, such as a double-peak light curve or a broad hump, can arise from the evolution of the optical thickness to photon-photon absorption. Fast decays and convex light curves are seen in a few LAT afterglows, but the expected spectral softening is rarely seen in (and difficult to measure with) LAT observations. Furthermore, for the effects of photon-photon attenuation to shape the high-energy afterglow light curve without attenuating it too much, the ejecta initial Lorentz factor must be in a relatively narrow range (50-200), which reduces the chance of observing those effects.

  4. Neptune's Dynamic Atmosphere from Kepler K2 Observations: Implications for Brown Dwarf Light Curve Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amy A.; Rowe, Jason F.; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gizis, John E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-02-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune's zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune's clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features.

  5. Comparison of 1998 and 1999 Leonid Light Curve Morphology and Meteoroid Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Ian S.; Beech, Martin; Taylor, Michael J.; Jenniskens, Peter; Hawkes, Robert L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Photometric low-light level video observations of 1999 Leonid storm meteors have been obtained from airborne platforms during the Leonid multi-instrument aircraft campaign (Leonid MAC). The 1999 Leonid light curves tend to be skewed towards the end point of the trajectory, while the 1998 Leonid light curves were not. The variation in the light curves from 1998 and 1999 can be explained as an overall reduction in the mass distribution index, alpha from approximately 1.95 in 1998 to approximately 1.75 in 1999. We have interpreted this behavior as being either indicative of a gradual loss of the "glue" that keeps the grains together, or the fact that the meteoroids sampled in 1998 had a different morphological structure to those sampled in 1999. The early fragmentation of a dustball meteoroid results in a light curve that peaks sooner than that predicted by classical single body ablation theory.

  6. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  7. Analysis of the U-B-V photoelectric light curves of the eclipsing binary GT CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, C.; Bonifazi, A.; Milano, L.

    1984-03-01

    The authors analyse the UBV light curves of GT Cep with different methods of solution. Some difficulties arise from the peculiar morphology of the light curves. The authors discuss the set of results and finally adopt the solution they derived by the Wilson and Devinney direct method. The system results to be a semi-detached one and this fact partly justifies the observed peculiarities. Given their results, the authors question the physical reliability of different models representing the light curves of eclipsing binaries.

  8. Dust in Intermediate Polars: Light Curves from the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Kunegunda E.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present Spitzer 4.5 μm light curves of two intermediate polars (IPs)-DQ Her and EX Hya-obtained with Cycle 6 observations. Our initial evaluation of the light curves of DQ Her and EX Hya shows that these two IPs exhibit similar behavior as that seen in non-magnetic systems (specifically WZ Sge). The binary eclipses seen in the Spitzer light curves of DQ Her and EX Hya are about three times longer than their optical counterparts, indicating that a reservoir of dust extends beyond the outer edge of the optically visible accretion disk.

  9. Light waves guided by a single curved metallic surface.

    PubMed

    Krammer, H

    1978-01-15

    Propagation of TE-waves along a single curved metallic surface with radius of curvature much larger than wavelength is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Approximate analytic expressions for the field configuration yield that power concentrates in a small region near the metal. The attenuation constant per unit angle of bend (radian) is given by the real part of the inverse of the refractive index, independent of the radius of curvature and of the mode number. In agreement with theory experiments with 10-microm radiation showed that low loss guiding can be realized.

  10. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  11. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  12. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-29

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:27176542

  13. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-29

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  14. Multicolor Light Curve Simulations of Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Shock Breakout to 56Co Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Blinnikov, Sergey; Suzuki, Tomoharu

    2016-04-01

    The properties of the first generation of stars and their supernova (SN) explosions remain unknown due to the lack of actual observations. Recently, many transient surveys have been conducted and the feasibility of detecting supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars is growing. In this paper, we study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse SN models (25-100 {M}⊙ ) to determine the indicators for the detection and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models that explain the observed abundance patterns of metal-poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using the multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code stella. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with non-zero-metallicity models and several observed SNe. We have found that the shock breakout characteristics, the evolution of the photosphere’s velocity, the luminosity, and the duration and color evolution of the plateau, that is, all of the SN phases from shock breakout to 56Co decay, are helpful for estimating the parameters of the SN progenitor: the mass, the radius, the explosion energy, and the metallicity. We conclude that the multicolor light curves could potentially be used to identify first-generation SNe in current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, James Webb Space Telescope). They are also suitable for identifying low-metallicity SNe in the nearby universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).

  15. Light curves for bump Cepheids computed with a dynamically zoned pulsation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T. F.; Castor, J. I.; Davis, C. G.

    1980-05-01

    The dynamically zoned pulsation code developed by Castor, Davis, and Davison was used to recalculate the Goddard model and to calculate three other Cepheid models with the same period (9.8 days). This family of models shows how the bumps and other features of the light and velocity curves change as the mass is varied at constant period. The use of a code that is capable of producing reliable light curves demonstrates that the light and velocity curves for 9.8 day Cepheid models with standard homogeneous compositions do not show bumps like those that are observed unless the mass is significantly lower than the 'evolutionary mass.' The light and velocity curves for the Goddard model presented here are similar to those computed independently by Fischel, Sparks, and Karp. They should be useful as standards for future investigators.

  16. Light curves for bump Cepheids computed with a dynamically zoned pulsation code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T. F.; Castor, J. I.; Davis, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamically zoned pulsation code developed by Castor, Davis, and Davison was used to recalculate the Goddard model and to calculate three other Cepheid models with the same period (9.8 days). This family of models shows how the bumps and other features of the light and velocity curves change as the mass is varied at constant period. The use of a code that is capable of producing reliable light curves demonstrates that the light and velocity curves for 9.8 day Cepheid models with standard homogeneous compositions do not show bumps like those that are observed unless the mass is significantly lower than the 'evolutionary mass.' The light and velocity curves for the Goddard model presented here are similar to those computed independently by Fischel, Sparks, and Karp. They should be useful as standards for future investigators.

  17. Light and Velocity Curves and Absolute Parameters of Several Overcontact Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenxian; Hrivnak, B. J.; Greene, R.

    2006-09-01

    We are continuing to observe and analyze the light and velocity curves of overcontact binary star systems to determine their physical parameters: mass, radius, and luminosity. We will present the results of several new studies, including W UMa itself.

  18. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  19. Light curve morphology analysis of contact binaries observed with the Kepler satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, Bartłomiej; Zoła, Stanisław

    2014-09-01

    Light-curve morphology analysis of contact binaries provides model-independent insight into the short-term evolution of the system activity. Light-curve morphology applied to the Kepler data of contact binaries reveals directly the migration spot connection to the light curve's intrinsic rapid changes. Since the flat-bottom secondary minima cannot be studied in the way Tran et al. (2013) or Conroy et al. (2014) did, we measure the actual light-curve minimum, instead of the presumed mid-eclipse time. This, combined with the study of the minimum depth, allowed us to uncover the direction of the spot migration for particular binaries. At the same time, the O'Connell effect evolution and the maxima separation confronted with modeling based on the Wilson-Devinney code agree with polar dark spots. The combined results of this new approach offer constraints on the star spots size, temperature and latitude at high precision.

  20. Using Type IA supernova light curve shapes to measure the Hubble constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam G.; Press, William H.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    We present an empirical method that uses visual band light curve shapes (LCSs) to estimate the luminosity of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia's). This method is first applied to a 'training set' of eight SN Ia light curves with independent distance estimates to derive the correlation between the LCS and the luminosity. We employ a linear estimation algorithm of the type developed by Rybicki and Press. The result is similar to that obtained by Hamuy et al. with the advantage that LCS produces quantitative error estimates for the distance. We then examine the light curves for 13 SN Ia's to determine the LCS distances of these supernovae. The Hubble diagram constructed using these LCS distances has a remarkably small dispersion of sigmaV = 0.21 mag. We use the light curve of SN 1972E and the Cepheid distance to NGC 5253 to derive 67 +/- 7 km/s/Mpc for the Hubble constant.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: DD Mon BV light curves (Qian+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Liu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Gu, S.; Huang, Z.

    1997-04-01

    New BV light curves of the short-period eclipsing binary system DD Mon have been obtained. Light-curve variability is seen in both B and V bands as compared with the light curves obtained in 1986 by Yamasaki et al. (1990AJ.....99.1218Y). The light curves are analyzed by using Wilson-Devinney's synthetic light-curve program, and the present photometric solution reveals that DD Mon is a near-contact binary with the secondary component filling the Roche lobe. Combined with Yamasaki et al.'s (1990AJ.....99.1218Y) spectroscopic results, absolute quantities of DD Mon are derived: mass of the primary M1=1.05+/-0.08M⊙, mass of the secondary M2=0.47+/-0.04M⊙, radius of the primary R1=1.36+/-0.04R⊙, radius of the secondary R2=1.03+/-0.03R⊙. These results show that the components of DD Mon have evolved away from the ZAMS and through a mass-transfer process to the present semi-detached state. The variation in shape of the light curve may be caused by the evolution of the system and the activity of dark spots. (2 data files).

  2. Reconstruct light curves from unevenly sampled variability data with artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Jie; Cao, Xinwu

    2014-07-01

    Light curves are usually constructed from discrete observational data by interpolation. In most cases, the observation data is temporally uneven, and therefore the light curve is usually derived by the interpolation of the binned data with the spline function, which is intended for reducing the "high sample noise" (i.e., the variability in the timescales comparable with the bin width). Such a practice of course reduces the time resolution of the light curve. It is known that function approximation is one of the most important applications of the artificial neural networks (ANN). In this work, for the first time we tentatively use the ANN to construct light curves from unevenly sampled variability data. To demonstrate the advantages of ANN for signal reconstruction over commonly used cubic spline function scheme, two sets of simulated periodic functions are used with random noises of varying magnitudes, one single frequency based and one multiple (two) frequency based. These signal reconstruction tests show that the ANN is clearly superior to the cubic spline scheme. As a case study, we use the uneven long-term multi-band monitoring data of BL lacertae to derive the light curves with ANN. It is found that the light curves derived with ANN have higher time resolution than those with the cubic spline function adopted in previous works. We recommend using ANN for the signal reconstruction in astrophysical data analysis as well as that of in other fields.

  3. Optical design and optimization of planar curved LED end-lit light bar.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jyh-Cheng; Chen, Zhi-Yao; Kao, Bang-De

    2014-10-10

    This study investigates the optical design of planar curved LED end-lit light bars using v cuts as light-diverting structures. The application of LEDs in automotive lighting has become popular, especially in signal lamps and daytime running lamps. Most designs adopt a direct back light using arrays of LEDs with diffusive coupling optics, which often causes problems such as low uniformity, glaring, and excessive LEDs. Edge-lit LED light guides in automotive applications share a similar principle with the light-guide plates in back-light models of LCD but with much more complicated geometry. However, related literature on the optical design of nonrectangular light-guide plates is very limited. This study addresses the design of planar curved LED end-lit light bars and the optimization scheme for illuminance uniformity. V cuts are used as the optical coupling features, and the lead angles of the v cuts are varied to achieve optimum axial luminous intensity. This study presents a solution to reduce the illuminance difference between the inner and the outer portions of curved light bars by introducing gradual taper v cuts across the curved section. A line graph with preselected anchor points is proposed to define the size distribution of evenly spaced v cuts along the light bar. A fuzzy optimization scheme is then applied to iterate the anchor size to achieve illuminance uniformity. The designs of a planar curve light bar with a rectangular cross section and a light-guide ring with a circular cross section are presented to illustrate the design scheme.

  4. Light curves, Spherical and Bond albedos of Jupiter, Saturn, and exoplanets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, U.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate how the light curve and stellar light reflection of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering, which was observed on Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical scattering phase function to Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.64 μm and Saturn at 0.64 and 0.44 μm and to Cassini spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.938 μm atmospheric window, 0.889 μm CH4 absorption band, and 0.258 μm UV filter. Using scattering ray-tracing model of a planet by Dyudina et al. (2005)*, the images of the planets with different scattering properties are simulated to calculate the reflected luminosity as it varies with scattering phase to produce full-orbit light curves. We compare the light curve shapes and total reflection integrated in all directions (spherical albedos) for Jupiter and Saturn with the ones for planets with Lambertian and semi-infinite Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. Saturn-like and especially Jupiter-like atmosphere produces light curves that are several times fainter at half-phase than does a Lambertian planet, given the same brightness at transit. The spherical albedo (and hence the wavelengh-integrated Bond albedo) is lower than for a Lambertian planet. Corresponding absorption of the stellar light and planet's heating rate would be higher than estimated for Lambertian planets, especially for bright planets. In extreme case of Jupiter-like scattering at 0.64 μm Lambertian assumption can overestimate spherical albedo by a factor of ˜1.5. We will discuss how the light curves and absorption for planets covered by atmospheres would differ from the light curves of rocky planet without atmosphere. * Dyudina, U. A., et al., Phase Light Curves for Extrasolar Jupiters and Saturns. ApJ, 618, 973-986, 2005

  5. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Luke; Verbiscer, Anne; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-05-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet’s phase. These observations cover broadbands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrowbands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 150-21 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.

  6. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet's phase. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59–0.72 and 0.39–0.5 μm, and narrow bands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24–0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. This work is published: Dyudina, U.,et al., 2016: ApJ, 822, 76, http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.04415.

  7. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Luke; Verbiscer, Anne; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-05-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet’s phase. These observations cover broadbands at 0.59–0.72 and 0.39–0.5 μm, and narrowbands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24–0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 150-21 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.

  8. CSI 2264: Characterizing Young Stars in NGC 2264 with Stochastically Varying Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Rebull, Luisa; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Turner, Neal J.; Carpenter, John; Carey, Sean; Terebey, Susan; Morales-Calderón, María; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; McGinnis, Pauline; Sousa, Alana; Bouvier, Jerome; Venuti, Laura; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore; Song, Inseok; Gutermuth, Rob; Barrado, David; Vrba, Frederick J.; Covey, Kevin; Herbst, William; Gillen, Edward; Medeiros Guimarães, Marcelo; Bouy, Herve; Favata, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves and other supporting data for 17 classical T Tauri stars in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves exemplify the “stochastic” light curve class as defined in 2014 by Cody et al. The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability within this light curve class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. Where we have appropriate spectral data, we show that the veiling variability in these stars is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical light curve morphology. The veiling variability is also well-correlated with the strength of the He i 6678 Å emission line, predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst light curve morphology also have variable mass accretion. The stochastic and accretion burst light curves can both be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic light curve class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Members of the stochastic light curve class have only moderate mass accretion rates. Their Hα profiles usually have blueshifted absorption features, probably originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the light curves suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion. Based on data from the Spitzer and CoRoT missions, as well as the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) MegaCam CCD, and the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal Chile, under program 088.C-0239. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with particpiation of ESA’s RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain

  9. WTF- and A- Stars: Spectroscopic Analysis of Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grae Short, Miona; Soderblom, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of Kepler data in 2012 found that in a sample of about 2000 A- and F- stars, 1% of them seemed to exhibit white light flares. However, such stars are not thought to have the convective envelopes needed to produce the magnetic dynamos that yield flares. We use the same Kepler data but examine the flaring stars more comprehensively by analyzing the pixel data in order to predict whether this flare-like behavior may be caused by smaller, less luminous M dwarfs exhibiting genuine flares in the line of sight of the A- and F-stars. The implications of finding verifiable flare activity in a subset of these stars would be enough to incite further investigation of the physical processes that allow this to take place. Yet, if that were not the case, this project would further be able to demonstrate the steps necessary to correct for false-positives in finding flares in A- and F- stars.

  10. Binning is sinning: morphological light-curve distortions due to finite integration time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.

    2010-11-01

    We explore how finite integration times or equivalently temporal binning induces morphological distortions to the transit light curve. These distortions, if uncorrected for, lead to the retrieval of erroneous system parameters and may even lead to some planetary candidates being rejected as ostensibly unphysical. We provide analytic expressions for estimating the disturbance to the various light-curve parameters as a function of the integration time. These effects are particularly crucial in light of the long-cadence photometry often used for discovering new exoplanets by, for example, Convection Rotation and Planetary Transits (CoRoT) and the Kepler Missions (8.5 and 30min). One of the dominant effects of long integration times is a systematic underestimation of the light-curve-derived stellar density, which has significant ramifications for transit surveys. We present a discussion of numerical integration techniques to compensate for the effects and produce expressions to quickly estimate the errors of such methods, as a function of integration time and numerical resolution. This allows for an economic choice of resolution before attempting fits of long-cadence light-curves. We provide a comparison of the short- and long-cadence light curves of TrES-2b and show that the retrieved transit parameters are consistent using the techniques discussed here.

  11. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  12. Are the variability properties of the Kepler AGN light curves consistent with a damped random walk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-08-01

    We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the damped random walk (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multiquarter Kepler AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. Kepler observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid (11.6-28.6 min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of 1 part in 105 over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into five broad categories. We measure the first-order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law power spectral density (PSD) characterized by a short-time-scale power-law index γ and turnover time-scale τ. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and observe variability on short time-scales (˜2 h). The turnover time-scale τ ranges from ˜10-135 d. Interesting structure function features include pronounced dips on rest-frame time-scales ranging from 10-100 d and varying slopes on different time-scales. The range of observed short-time-scale PSD slopes and the presence of dip and varying slope features suggests that the DRW model may not be appropriate for all AGN. We conclude that AGN variability is a complex phenomenon that requires a more sophisticated statistical treatment.

  13. A search for chaotic behavior in the light curves of three long-period variables

    SciTech Connect

    Cannizzo, J.K.; Goodings, D.A.; Mattei, J.A. American Association of Variable Star Observers, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-07-01

    The results are presented of a study of the light curves of the long-period variables Omicron Ceti (Mira), R Leonis, and V Bootis. In searching for evidence of deterministic chaos, the technique of Grassberger and Procaccia (1983) in which the dimension of an attractor can in principle be inferred from a long time series of physical measurements of a system. Autocorrelation functions and power spectra are also computed. The variations seen in the optical light are basically periodic, with P about 332 days (Mira), 313 days (R Leo), and 259 days (V Boo). The power spectra exhibit maxima at frequencies corresponding to these times, and harmonics are observed up to order three or four. The variations in the light curves can be modeled by adding two components, one periodic and one random. A good simulation of the light curves is obtained if the amplitude of the random variations is about one-half that of the periodic amplitude. 22 refs.

  14. THE DISCOVERY OF ELLIPSOIDAL VARIATIONS IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF HAT-P-7

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Jenkins, Jon; Rowe, Jason F.; Koch, David; Borucki, William J.

    2010-04-20

    We present an analysis of the early Kepler observations of the previously discovered transiting planet HAT-P-7b. The light curve shows the transit of the star, the occultation of the planet, and the orbit phase-dependent light from the planet. In addition, phase-dependent light from the star is present, known as 'ellipsoidal variations'. The very nearby planet (only four stellar radii away) gravitationally distorts the star and results in a flux modulation twice per orbit. The ellipsoidal variations can confuse interpretation of the planetary phase curve if not self-consistently included in the modeling. We fit the light curve using the Roche potential approximation and derive improved planet and orbit parameters.

  15. Gamma-ray pulsar light curves as probes of magnetospheric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    > The large number of -ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the -ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modelling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  16. Time Curves: Folding Time to Visualize Patterns of Temporal Evolution in Data.

    PubMed

    Bach, Benjamin; Shi, Conglei; Heulot, Nicolas; Madhyastha, Tara; Grabowski, Tom; Dragicevic, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We introduce time curves as a general approach for visualizing patterns of evolution in temporal data. Examples of such patterns include slow and regular progressions, large sudden changes, and reversals to previous states. These patterns can be of interest in a range of domains, such as collaborative document editing, dynamic network analysis, and video analysis. Time curves employ the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. We illustrate how time curves can visually reveal informative patterns in a range of different datasets.

  17. Timescale stretch parameterization of Type Ia supernova B-band light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goobar, A.; Hook, I.; Irwin, M.; Kim, M.; Knop, R.A.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.; York, T.

    2001-04-01

    R-band intensity measurements along the light curve of Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Cosmology Project (SCP) are fitted in brightness to templates allowing a free parameter the time-axis width factor w identically equal to s times (1+z). The data points are then individually aligned in the time-axis, normalized and K-corrected back to the rest frame, after which the nearly 1300 normalized intensity measurements are found to lie on a well-determined common rest-frame B-band curve which we call the ''composite curve.'' The same procedure is applied to 18 low-redshift Calan/Tololo SNe with Z < 0.11; these nearly 300 B-band photometry points are found to lie on the composite curve equally well. The SCP search technique produces several measurements before maximum light for each supernova. We demonstrate that the linear stretch factor, s, which parameterizes the light-curve timescale appears independent of z, and applies equally well to the declining and rising parts of the light curve. In fact, the B band template that best fits this composite curve fits the individual supernova photometry data when stretched by a factor s with chi 2/DoF {approx} 1, thus as well as any parameterization can, given the current data sets. The measurement of the data of explosion, however, is model dependent and not tightly constrained by the current data. We also demonstrate the 1 + z light-cure time-axis broadening expected from cosmological expansion. This argues strongly against alternative explanations, such as tired light, for the redshift of distant objects.

  18. A FOURIER OPTICS METHOD FOR CALCULATING STELLAR OCCULTATION LIGHT CURVES BY OBJECTS WITH THIN ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-15

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  19. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. III. Classification of Kepler Eclipsing Binary Light Curves with Locally Linear Embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, Gal; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of "detachedness" of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  20. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, Gal; Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu

    2012-05-15

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  1. The light-curve reconstruction method for measuring the time delay of gravitational lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Bernhard; Schneider, Peter

    1996-09-01

    We propose a new technique for measuring the time delay of radio-loud gravitational lens systems, which does not rely on the excessive use of interferometric observations. Instead, the method is based on single-dish flux density monitoring of the total light curve of the (unresolved) lens system, combined with additional interferometric measurements of the flux density ratio at a few epochs during that monitoring period. The basic idea of the method is to reconstruct the individual image light curves from the observed total light curve by assuming a range of potential values for the time delay and the magnification ratio of the images. It is then possible to single out the correct reconstruction, and therefore determine the time delay, by checking the consistency of the reconstructed individual light curves with the additional interferometric observations. We performed extensive numerical simulations of synthetic light curves to investigate the dependence of the performance of this method on various parameters which are involved in the problem. Probably the most promising candidates for applying the method (and also for determining the Hubble constant) are lens systems consisting of multiply imaged compact sources and an Einstein ring, such as B 0218+357 from which some of the parameters used for our simulations were adopted.

  2. Light Curve Solutions of Eclipsing Binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Rao, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present model light curves for nine eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These systems are detached binaries with nearly circular orbits, and were pseudorandomly selected from three of 21 LMC regions in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) survey. We make use of light curves, orbital periods, and binary classification as reported in Wyrzykowski et al. (2003). We present light curve solutions created with the software PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs (PHOEBE, Prsa & Zwitter 2005). Each solution has the best-fit mass ratio q, system inclination i, component temperatures T1 and T2, and modified Kopal potentials Ω1 and Ω2. PHOEBE employs a Nelder & Mead's Simplex fitting method that adjusts all the input parameters to find the best fit to the light curve. Many of the light curves have significant scatter, which can lead to multiple degenerate best-fit solutions, and we discuss what can be done in the future to refine our results, derive global stellar parameters, and place these nine systems in a larger context. We acknowledge the support of the International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program, which is sponsored by the NSF and administered by NSO/GONG.

  3. Light Curves and Analyses of the Eclipsing Overcontact Binaries V1033 Her and V1044 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Sanders, S. J.; Wiley, T. B.; Plumberg, C. J.; Grau, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    New precision V & Rc light curves of the eclipsing binaries V1033 Her and V1044 Her have been obtained using the 41-cm telescope at the Eastern University Observatory equipped with an SBIG ST-10XME CCD. V1033 Her (GSC 2066:1210, P = 0.2981 days, m = 11.2) has only one published unfiltered light curve (Blattler and Diethelm 2001a) with significant scatter in the data. The system was observed on seven nights from 15 Jun - 26 Jul 2006, accumulating approximately 800 observations in both V and Rc. The light curves show distinctly that the system is totally eclipsing and preliminary analysis indicates that that binary is W-type (the larger, more massive star is the cooler component), has a mass ratio of 0.30, small temperature difference between the stars of 300 K, and a fillout of 0.20. V1044 Her (GSC 3073:837, P = 0.2406 days, m = 12.5) is a partially eclipsing overcontact system of very short period and relatively deep eclipses of 0.6 mag in Rc. The previously published unfiltered light curve given by Blattler and Diethelm (2001b) had too much scatter for reliable analysis. V1044 Her was observed on eleven nights from 5 Jun - 10 Jul 2005, accumulating more than 800 observations in both V and Rc. Preliminary light curve models indicate a W-type system with a small temperature difference between the stars of 200 K, inclination greater than 80 degrees and an indication of the presence of starspots. The complete light curve analyses as well as a period study of all published times of minimum light will be presented for both systems.

  4. Simultaneous Modelling of the Complete SN1993J Expansion and Radio Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Marcaide, J. M.; Alberdi, A.

    We report on our modelling of all the available VLBI data and radio light curves of supernova SN1993J. We have used the most complete expansion curve of a supernova ever, which spans more than a decade at several frequencies. For the data modelling, we have developed a new software capable of simulating the evolution of the radio emission of a supernova. We find that for explaining both the radio light curves and the expansion curve simultaneously, a radial structure of the magnetic field inside the radiating region and opacity effects from the ejected material have to be considered, together with a constant pre-supernova mass-loss rate (contrary to some results found by other authors).

  5. Multi-filter Light Curves of 29 Very Short Period Candidate Contact Binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, C.; Koen, T.; Gray, R. O.

    2016-06-01

    Light curves of 26 probable contact binary stars are made available, from a list of candidates with the shortest periods known. This is supplemented by sets of light curves of three previously studied systems. Photometry was obtained in the Johnson UBV, Cousins RI system. All stars but one were observed in four wavebands, either UBV RC or {BV}{({RI})}C, depending on brightness. Tentative spectral classifications are given for 23 of the stars. Effective temperatures are derived from infrared and optical photometric indices, and from spectral types. These are generally in good agreement. The multicolor photometry, spectral typing, and estimated effective temperatures can be used to model these systems in detail. A preliminary study, based on Fourier coefficients of the light curves, suggests that all the systems are indeed eclipsing stars, with all but a handful probably in contact configurations.

  6. ROTATIONAL PROPERTIES OF JUPITER TROJANS. I. LIGHT CURVES OF 80 OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, Stefano; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carsenty, Uri; Hahn, Gerhard; Di Martino, Mario; Carbognani, Albino; Schober, Hans-Josef; Lahulla, Felix; Delbo, Marco; Lagerkvist, Claes-Ingvar

    2011-05-15

    We present the results of a Jupiter Trojans' light curve survey aimed at characterizing the rotational properties of Trojans in the approximate size range 60-150 km. The survey, which was designed to provide reliable and unbiased estimates of rotation periods and amplitudes, resulted in light curves for a total of 80 objects, 56 of which represent the first determinations published to date and nine of which supersede previously published erroneous values. Our results more than double the size of the existing database of rotational properties of Jovian Trojans in the selected size range. The analysis of the distributions of the rotation periods and light curve amplitudes is the subject of companion papers.

  7. An Internet Database of Ultraviolet Continuum Light Curves for Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jay P.; Jackson, Brian; Deo, Rajesh P.; Farrington, Chris; Das, Varendra; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2006-04-01

    Using the Multimission Archive at STScI (MAST), we have extracted spectra and determined continuum light curves for 175 Seyfert galaxies that have been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. To obtain the light curves as a function of Julian Date, we used fixed bins in the object's rest frame and measured small regions (between 30 and 60 Å) of each spectrum's continuum flux in the range 1150 to 3200 Å. We provide access to the UV light curves and other basic information about the observations in tabular and graphical form via the Internet at http://www.chara.gsu.edu/PEGA/IUE.

  8. The Kepler Light Curve of V344 LYR: Constraining the Thermal-Viscous Limit Cycle Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Still, M. D.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present time dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 90 d light curve of the short period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long term light curves. The data encompass a super outburst, preceded by three normal (i.e., short) outbursts and followed by two normal outbursts. The main decay of the super outburst is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate approx.12 d/mag, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. We show that the standard limit cycle model can account for the light curve, without the need for either the thermal-tidal instability or enhanced mass transfer.

  9. An efficient method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources. This method has the general advantage that all microimages contributing to the light curve are found. While a source moves along a straight line, all micro images are located either on the primary image track or on the secondary image tracks (loops). The primary image track extends from - infinity to + infinity and is made of many sequents which are continuously connected. All the secondary image tracks (loops) begin and end on the lensing point masses. The method can be applied to any microlensing situation with point masses in the deflector plane, even for the overcritical case and surface densities close to the critical. Furthermore, we present general rules to evaluate the light curve for a straight track arbitrary placed in the caustic network of a sample of many point masses.

  10. Light Curve Simulation Using Spacecraft CAD Models and Empirical Material Spectral BRDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willison, A.; Bedard, D.

    This paper presents a Matlab-based light curve simulation software package that uses computer-aided design (CAD) models of spacecraft and the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) of their homogenous surface materials. It represents the overall optical reflectance of objects as a sBRDF, a spectrometric quantity, obtainable during an optical ground truth experiment. The broadband bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the basis of a broadband light curve, is produced by integrating the sBRDF over the optical wavelength range. Colour-filtered BRDFs, the basis of colour-filtered light curves, are produced by first multiplying the sBRDF by colour filters, and integrating the products. The software package's validity is established through comparison of simulated reflectance spectra and broadband light curves with those measured of the CanX-1 Engineering Model (EM) nanosatellite, collected during an optical ground truth experiment. It is currently being extended to simulate light curves of spacecraft in Earth orbit, using spacecraft Two-Line-Element (TLE) sets, yaw/pitch/roll angles, and observer coordinates. Measured light curves of the NEOSSat spacecraft will be used to validate simulated quantities. The sBRDF was chosen to represent material reflectance as it is spectrometric and a function of illumination and observation geometry. Homogeneous material sBRDFs were obtained using a goniospectrometer for a range of illumination and observation geometries, collected in a controlled environment. The materials analyzed include aluminum alloy, two types of triple-junction photovoltaic (TJPV) cell, white paint, and multi-layer insulation (MLI). Interpolation and extrapolation methods were used to determine the sBRDF for all possible illumination and observation geometries not measured in the laboratory, resulting in empirical look-up tables. These look-up tables are referenced when calculating the overall sBRDF of objects, where

  11. Light Curves and Spectra from a Thermonuclear Explosion of a White Dwarf Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. Here, we utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1 {M}⊙ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. We discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.

  12. Rapidly rotating lenses: repeating features in the light curves of short-period binary microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew T.; Kerins, Eamonn; Mao, Shude

    2011-11-01

    Microlensing is most sensitive to binary lenses with relatively large orbital separations, and as such, typical binary microlensing events show little or no orbital motion during the event. However, despite the strength of binary microlensing features falling off rapidly as the lens separation decreases, we show that it is possible to detect repeating features in the light curve of binary microlenses that complete several orbits during the microlensing event. We investigate the light-curve features of such rapidly rotating lens (RRL) events. We derive analytical limits on the range of parameters where these effects are detectable, and confirm these numerically. Using a population synthesis Galactic model, we estimate the RRL event rate for a ground-based and a space-based microlensing survey to be 0.32fb and 7.8fb events per year, respectively, assuming year-round monitoring, where fb is the binary fraction. We detail how RRL event parameters can be quickly estimated from their light curves, and suggest a method to model RRL events using timing measurements of light-curve features. Modelling RRL light curves will yield the lens orbital period and possibly measurements of all orbital elements, including the inclination and eccentricity. Measurement of the period from the light curve allows a mass-distance relation to be defined, which when combined with a measurement of microlens parallax or finite-source effects can yield a mass measurement to a twofold degeneracy. With sub-per cent accuracy photometry, it is possible to detect planetary companions, but the likelihood of this is very small.

  13. Light Curves and Spectra from a Thermonuclear Explosion of a White Dwarf Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. Here, we utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1 {M}ȯ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. We discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.

  14. Light Curve Analyses of the Short Period, Totally Eclipsing Binaries V449 & V463 And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okimoto, Jensen; Schwartz, W. H.; Sanders, S. J.; Bradstreet, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    As part of our ongoing research on short period eclipsing binaries which do not have published precision light curves and/or analyses, we placed V449 & V463 And on our observing schedule for the fall of 2013. V449 And (GSC 3281-2158; Mis V1190) was reported by Kazarovet (2005) to be a short period (0.33853 day) overcontact system ranging from V = 12.2 - 12.9 mag. We have obtained more than 1300 total observations in V and Rc. Preliminary light curve analysis reveals a W-type overcontact system with the primary eclipse being total and a temperature difference between the stars of ~300 K. The light curves themselves are fairly symmetrical (not typical for these types of systems) except for a more rapid rise in the ascending branch after secondary eclipse than symmetry would predict. This seems quite peculiar, as most W-UMa light curves exhibit asymmetries primarily between maxima (the O’Connell effect). Detailed modeling including hot and/or cool spots will be presented, as well as a period study based upon the limited timings available. V463 And (GSC 2764-1417; NSV 14514) was discovered by Khruslov and reported in IBVS 5699 (2006) to be a short period (0.406095 day) system ranging from V = 12.15 - 13.05 mag. Our thoroughly covered V and Rc light curves show that the secondary eclipse is total. Subsequent analysis indicates the system is most likely a near-contact binary with a temperature difference of ~1200 K between the components. The light curves also demonstrate very significant asymmetries, especially near secondary eclipse. The O’Connell effect is 0.08 mag in Rc between the two maxima and the first maxima is significantly asymmetrically shaped. Modeling results including spot analysis and a period study will be presented in this poster.

  15. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, E.

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types and material type and orientation can mask an object's true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre's ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 360 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  16. Bolometric light curves and explosion parameters of 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Bersier, D.; James, P. A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fraser, M.; Pian, E.

    2016-03-01

    Literature data are collated for 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SE SNe; i.e. SNe IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-BL) that have good light-curve coverage in more than one optical band. Using bolometric corrections derived in previous work, the bolometric light curve of each SN is recovered and template bolometric light curves provided. Peak light distributions and decay rates are investigated; SNe subtypes are not cleanly distinguished in this parameter space, although some grouping of types does occur and there is a suggestion of a Phillips-like relation for most SNe Ic-BL. The bolometric light curves are modelled with a simple analytical prescription and compared to results from more detailed modelling. Distributions of the explosion parameters show the extreme nature of SNe Ic-BL in terms of their 56Ni mass and the kinetic energy, however ejected masses are similar to other subtypes. SNe Ib and Ic have very similar distributions of explosion parameters, indicating a similarity in progenitors. SNe IIb are the most homogeneous subtype and have the lowest average values for 56Ni mass, ejected mass, and kinetic energy. Ejecta masses for each subtype and SE SNe as a whole are inconsistent with those expected from very massive stars. The majority of the ejecta mass distribution is well described by more moderately massive progenitors in binaries, indicating these are the dominant progenitor channel for SE SNe.

  17. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Heather M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Barker, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types; material type and orientation can mask an object s true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon, Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre s ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 180 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  18. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  19. Reconstruction of the Structure of Accretion Disks in Dwarf Novae from the Multi-Band Light Curves of Early Superhumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ohshima, Tomohito; Maehara, Hiroyuki

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new method to reconstruct the structure of accretion disks in dwarf novae using multi-band light curves of early superhumps. Our model assumes that early superhumps are caused by the rotation effect of non-axisymmetrically flaring disks. We have developed a Bayesian model for this reconstruction, in which a smoother disk-structure tends to have a higher prior probability. We analyzed simultaneous optical and near-infrared photometric data of early superhumps of the dwarf nova, V455 And using this technique. The reconstructed disk has two flaring parts in the outermost region of the disk. These parts are responsible for the primary and secondary maxima of the light curves. The height-to-radius ratio is h/r 0.20-0.25 in the outermost region. In addition to the outermost flaring structures, flaring arm-like patterns can be seen in an inner region of the reconstructed disk. The overall profile of the reconstructed disk is reminiscent of the disk structure that is deformed by the tidal effect. However, an inner arm-like pattern, which is responsible for the secondary minimum in the light curve, cannot be reproduced only by the tidal effect. It implies the presence of another mechanism that deforms the disk structure. Alternatively, the temperature distribution of the disk could be non-axisymmetric. We demonstrate that the disk structure with weaker arm-like patterns is optimal in the model including the irradiation effect. However, the strongly irradiated disk gives quite blue colors, which may conflict with the observation. Our results suggest that the amplitude of early superhumps depends mainly on the height of the outermost flaring regions of the disk. We predict that early superhumps can be detected with an amplitude of > 0.02 mag in about 90% of WZ Sge stars.

  20. Analysis of HAT-P-2b Warm Spitzer Full Orbit Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole; Knuston, H.; Showman, A. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Cowan, N. B.; Deming, D.; Desert, J.; Langton, J.; Laughlin, G.; Mighell, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer warm mission has already greatly expanded the field of exoplanet characterization with over 3000 hours of time dedicated to exoplanet observations. Observations of eclipsing systems with Spitzer are at the heart of these advances, as they allow us to move beyond simple mass and period estimates to determine planetary radius, dayside emission, and emission variations as a function of orbital phase. The eclipsing system HAT-P-2 is of special interest because the massive Jovian sized planet in this system is on a highly eccentric orbit (e=0.5171). Because HAT-P-2b's orbit is eccentric, the planet is subject to time variable heating and probable non-synchronous rotation. Circulation patterns that we expect to develop in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere will likely vary with both planetary local time and orbital phase. Here we present an analysis of a full orbit light curve from the HAT-P-2 system obtained during the most recent cycle of the Spitzer warm mission and discuss the constraints it imposes on the atmospheric circulation of HAT-P-2b. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  1. An 80 day X-ray light curve of 3C 371

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Wood, K. S.; Yentis, D. J.; Meekins, J. F.; Smathers, H. W.; Byram, E. T.; Chubb, T. A.; Friedman, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Large Area Sky Survey (LASS) experiment on HEAO 1 that monitored the N galaxy/BL Lacertae object 3C 371 from August 19 to November 7, 1977 is discussed, noting that statistically significant threefold or larger intensity variations were observed in the flux range 0.5-20 keV. It is found that the degree of variability depends on the time of observation, with the source sometimes appearing constant and sometimes changing on time scales of 1 to 2 weeks. Also observed was an X-ray flare that lasted approximately 25 days. The total 80-day X-ray light curve is seen as suggesting either a superposition of X-ray flares or a variable injection rate that changes on weekly time scales. The observed X-ray flux is found to be consistent with that expected by extrapolating the nonthermal optical spectrum, suggesting that the optical to X-ray flux could be synchrotron radiation, provided that it is possible to account for the patterns of variability seen at optical and X-ray wavelengths and to dispose of inverse Compton difficulties.

  2. THE EFFECT OF A TIME-VARYING ACCRETION DISK SIZE ON QUASAR MICROLENSING LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-08-01

    Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting six seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculation in order to correctly model the strong correlations between the structure of the microlensing magnification patterns and the magnitude of the effect. We also comment briefly on the effect of this phenomenon for the stability of time-delay estimates.

  3. A Method for the Rapid Generation of Nonsequential Light-Response Curves of Chlorophyll Fluorescence1

    PubMed Central

    Serôdio, João; Ezequiel, João; Frommlet, Jörg; Laviale, Martin; Lavaud, Johann

    2013-01-01

    Light-response curves (LCs) of chlorophyll fluorescence are widely used in plant physiology. Most commonly, LCs are generated sequentially, exposing the same sample to a sequence of distinct actinic light intensities. These measurements are not independent, as the response to each new light level is affected by the light exposure history experienced during previous steps of the LC, an issue particularly relevant in the case of the popular rapid light curves. In this work, we demonstrate the proof of concept of a new method for the rapid generation of LCs from nonsequential, temporally independent fluorescence measurements. The method is based on the combined use of sample illumination with digitally controlled, spatially separated beams of actinic light and a fluorescence imaging system. It allows the generation of a whole LC, including a large number of actinic light steps and adequate replication, within the time required for a single measurement (and therefore named “single-pulse light curve”). This method is illustrated for the generation of LCs of photosystem II quantum yield, relative electron transport rate, and nonphotochemical quenching on intact plant leaves exhibiting distinct light responses. This approach makes it also possible to easily characterize the integrated dynamic light response of a sample by combining the measurement of LCs (actinic light intensity is varied while measuring time is fixed) with induction/relaxation kinetics (actinic light intensity is fixed and the response is followed over time), describing both how the response to light varies with time and how the response kinetics varies with light intensity. PMID:24067245

  4. LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Wesson, Roger; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days {approx}300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate {sup 56}Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }) from the bolometric light curve of each of days {approx}150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm{sup -3}) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium ({approx}1 cm{sup -3}). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The {sup 56}Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0

  5. The Varying Light Curve and Timings of the Ultrashort-period Contact Binary KIC 9532219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    KIC 9532219 is a W UMa-type eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 0.1981549 days that is below the short-period limit (˜0.22 days) of the period distribution for contact binaries. The Kepler light curve of the system exhibits striking changes in both eclipse depths and light maxima. Applying third-body and spot effects, the light-curve synthesis indicates that the eclipsing pair is currently in a marginal contact stage with a mass ratio of q = 1.20, an orbital inclination of i = 66.°0, a temperature difference of T1-T2 = 172 K, and a third light of l3 = 75.9%. To understand the light variations with time, we divided up the light curve into 312 segments and analyzed them separately. The results reveal that variation of eclipse depth is primarily caused by changing amounts of contamination due to the nearby star KIC 9532228 between the Kepler Quarters and that the variable O’Connell effect originates from the starspot activity on the less massive primary component. Based on our light-curve timings, a period study of KIC 9532219 indicates that the orbital period has varied as a combination of a downward parabola and a light-travel-time (LTT) effect due to a third body, which has a period of 1196 days and a minimum mass of 0.0892 M⊙ in an orbit of eccentricity 0.150. The parabolic variation could be a small part of a second LTT orbit due to a fourth component in a wider orbit, instead of either mass transfer or angular momentum loss.

  6. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter M.; Tucker, Bradley E.; Rest, Armin; Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Kasen, Daniel; Villar, Victoria; KEGS

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae. Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5±0.4 and 13.3±0.4 rest-frame days respectively. We find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280±20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490±20 R⊙) but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0±0.3 ×1051 erg.The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict possibly due to the supernova shockwave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass loss rate of 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve.No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a type II-P supernova.

  7. Characterizing the V-band Light-curves of Hydrogen-rich Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Olivares E., Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Schulze, Steve; Antezana, Roberto; Bolt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Contreras, Carlos; de Jaeger, Thomas; Folatelli, Gastón; Förster, Francisco; Freedman, Wendy L.; González, Luis; Hsiao, Eric; Krzemiński, Wojtek; Krisciunas, Kevin; Maza, José; McCarthy, Patrick; Morrell, Nidia I.; Persson, Sven E.; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the "plateau" phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the "plateau" stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply "SN II" with an "s 2" value giving the decline rate during the "plateau" phase, indicating its morphological type. Based on observations obtained with the du-Pont and Swope telescopes at LCO, and the Steward Observatory's CTIO60, SO90 and CTIO36 telescopes.

  8. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos; Olivares E, Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric; Schulze, Steve; Bolt, Luis; Folatelli, Gastón; Freedman, Wendy L.; Krzemiński, Wojtek; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  9. Ultraviolet light curves of beta Lyrae: Comparison of OAO A-2, IUE, and Voyager Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji; Mccluskey, George E.; Silvis, Jeffery M. S.; Polidan, Ronald S.; Mccluskey, Carolina P. S.; Eaton, Joel A.

    1994-01-01

    The six-band ultraviolet light curves of beta Lyrae obtained with the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) A-2 in 1970 exhibited a very unusual behavior. The secondary minimum deepened at shorter wavelength, indicating that one was not observing light variations caused primarily by the eclipses of two stars having a roughly Planckian energy distribution. It was then suggested that the light variations were caused by a viewing angle effect of an optically thick, ellipsoidal circumbinary gas cloud. Since 1978 beta Lyrae has been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. We have constructed ultraviolet light curves from the IUE archival data for comparison with the OAO A-2 results. We find that they are in substantial agreement with each other. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer was also used to observe this binary during a period covered by IUE observations. The Voyager results agree with those of the two other satellite observatories at wavelengths longer than about 1350 A. However, in the wavelength region shorter than the Lyman-alpha line at 1216 A, the light curves at 1085 and 965 A show virtually no light variation except an apparent flaring near phase 0.7, which is also in evidence at longer wavelengths. We suggest that the optically thick circumbinary gas cloud, which envelops the two stars completely, assumes a roughly spherical shape when observed at these shorter wavelengths.

  10. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  11. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  12. Exploring the Potential Diversity of Early Type Ia Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2016-07-01

    During the first several days after explosion, Type Ia supernova light curves probe the outer layers of the exploding star, and therefore provide important clues for identifying their progenitors. We investigate how both the shallow 56Ni distribution and the presence of circumstellar material shape these early light curves. This is performed using a series of numerical experiments with parameterized properties for systematic exploration. Although not all of the considered models may be realized in nature (and indeed there are arguments why some of them should not occur), the spirit of this work is to provide a broader exploration of the diversity of possibilities. We find that shallower 56Ni leads to steeper, bluer light curves. Differences in the shape of the rise can introduce errors in estimating the explosion time, and thus impact efforts to infer upper limits on the progenitor or companion radius from a lack of observed shock cooling emission. Circumstellar material can lead to significant luminosity during the first few days, but its presence can be difficult to identify depending on the degree of nickel mixing. In some cases, the hot emission of circumstellar material may even lead to a signature similar to an interaction with a companion, and thus in the future additional diagnostics should be gathered for properly assessing early light curves.

  13. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF V344 Lyrae: CONSTRAINING THE THERMAL-VISCOUS LIMIT CYCLE INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P. E-mail: Martin.D.Still@nasa.go

    2010-12-20

    We present time-dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 270 d light curve of the short-period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long-term light curves. The data encompass two superoutbursts and 17 normal (i.e., short) outbursts. The main decay of the superoutbursts is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate {approx}12 d mag{sup -1}, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. Our modeling using the basic accretion disk limit cycle can produce the main features of the V344 Lyr light curve, including the peak outburst brightness. Nevertheless, there are obvious deficiencies in our model light curves. (1) The rise times we calculate, both for the normal and superoutbursts, are too fast. (2) The superoutbursts are too short. (3) The shoulders on the rise to superoutburst have more structure than the shoulders in the observed superoutbursts and are too slow, comprising about a third to half of the total viscous plateau, rather than the {approx}10% observed. However, one of the {alpha}{sub cold} {r_reversible} {alpha}{sub hot} interpolation schemes we investigate (one that is physically motivated) does yield longer superoutbursts with suitably short, less structured shoulders.

  14. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S. K.; Burrows, D. N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments. These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadx activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission: from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve. This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f greater than or approx. equal to 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  15. An Information Theoretic Algorithm for Finding Periodicities in Stellar Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijse, Pablo; Estevez, Pablo A.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Zegers, Pablo; Principe, José C.

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new information theoretic metric for finding periodicities in stellar light curves. Light curves are astronomical time series of brightness over time, and are characterized as being noisy and unevenly sampled. The proposed metric combines correntropy (generalized correlation) with a periodic kernel to measure similarity among samples separated by a given period. The new metric provides a periodogram, called Correntropy Kernelized Periodogram (CKP), whose peaks are associated with the fundamental frequencies present in the data. The CKP does not require any resampling, slotting or folding scheme as it is computed directly from the available samples. CKP is the main part of a fully-automated pipeline for periodic light curve discrimination to be used in astronomical survey databases. We show that the CKP method outperformed the slotted correntropy, and conventional methods used in astronomy for periodicity discrimination and period estimation tasks, using a set of light curves drawn from the MACHO survey. The proposed metric achieved 97.2% of true positives with 0% of false positives at the confidence level of 99% for the periodicity discrimination task; and 88% of hits with 11.6% of multiples and 0.4% of misses in the period estimation task.

  16. Variable Stars in the 3.6 Year DIRBE Near-Infrared Light Curve Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Price, S. D.; Smith, B. J.; Kuchar, T. A.; Mizuno, D. R.; Webb, J.

    2011-05-01

    The 3.6 year light curve archive created by Price et al. (2010) from the cryo+post-cryo Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) mission contains a wealth of variable star information at 1.25, 2.2, 3.5, and 4.9 microns. Of the 2700 objects in the archive, over 500 show strong variability and another 75 show potential variability. We have combined visible observations obtained during the DIRBE extended mission with the infrared archive to investigate wavelength-dependent phase lags between the visible and the near-IR maxima, extending the study of Smith et al. (2006) to those stars with periods longer than the 300 day cryo mission. Of those 518 stars exhibiting strong near-infrared variability, 200 have visible light curves in the American Association of Variable Star Observers database during the DIRBE mission. Because viewing geometry for both the visible observers and DIRBE mission limited the opportunities for observing the stars, the light curves were inspected to determine if the peaks were defined well enough to determine phase lags among the five wavebands. For those objects that have sufficient data, we investigate a number of methods to best estimate the peaks and thus find the phase lags, if any. We have also examined the differences in phase dependence on variable type, e.g. Miras, SRa's, SRb's, and carbon stars. The DIRBE light curve data are available to the community through the Vizier service at the Centre de Donnees Astronomique de Strasbourg.

  17. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES OF SUPERNOVAE WITH THE SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Nousek, John; Vanden Berk, Daniel; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Gehrels, Neil; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin

    2009-05-15

    We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous, while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light-curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high-redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground-based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high-redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Y Cyg light curves and time of minima (Harmanec+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanec, P.; Holmgren, D. E.; Wolf, M.; Bozic, H.; Guinan, E. F.; Kang, Y. W.; Mayer, P.; McCook, G. P.; Nemravova, J.; Yang, S.; Slechta, M.; Ruzdjak, D.; Sudar, D.; Svoboda, P.

    2014-01-01

    We obtained new series of UBV observations at three observatories separated in local time to obtain complete light curves of Y Cyg for its orbital period close to 3 days. This new photometry was reduced and carefully transformed to the standard UBV system using the HEC22 program. (2 data files).

  19. A New Package of Computer Codes for Analyzing Light Curves of Eclipsing Pre-Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustynski, V.-V.; Pustylnik, I. B.

    2005-04-01

    Using the new package of computer codes for analyzing light curves of the two eclipsing pre-cataclysmic binary systems (PCBs) UU Sge and V471 Lyr we find updated values of the physical parameters and discuss the evolutionary state of these PCBs.

  20. The Kepler Light Curve of V344 Lyrae: Constraining the Thermal-viscous Limit Cycle Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Still, M. D.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present time-dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 270 d light curve of the short-period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long-term light curves. The data encompass two superoutbursts and 17 normal (i.e., short) outbursts. The main decay of the superoutbursts is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate ~12 d mag-1, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. Our modeling using the basic accretion disk limit cycle can produce the main features of the V344 Lyr light curve, including the peak outburst brightness. Nevertheless, there are obvious deficiencies in our model light curves. (1) The rise times we calculate, both for the normal and superoutbursts, are too fast. (2) The superoutbursts are too short. (3) The shoulders on the rise to superoutburst have more structure than the shoulders in the observed superoutbursts and are too slow, comprising about a third to half of the total viscous plateau, rather than the ~10% observed. However, one of the αcold <--> αhot interpolation schemes we investigate (one that is physically motivated) does yield longer superoutbursts with suitably short, less structured shoulders.

  1. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. III. CLASSIFICATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Palaversa, Lovro; Eyer, Laurent; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ivezić, Željko; Loebman, Sarah; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Božić, Hrvoje; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesarić, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott; Srdoč, Gregor; and others

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ∼7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg{sup 2} of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ∼0.03 mag at r = 15 to ∼0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ∼200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ∼7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (β Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the

  2. Exploring the Variable Sky with LINEAR. III. Classification of Periodic Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaversa, Lovro; Ivezić, Željko; Eyer, Laurent; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesarić, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Božić, Hrvoje; Loebman, Sarah; Sesar, Branimir; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Stuart, J. Scott; Becker, Andrew C.; Srdoč, Gregor; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Oluseyi, Hakeem

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ~7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg2 of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ~0.03 mag at r = 15 to ~0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ~200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ~7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (β Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the median period

  3. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary. PMID:19400731

  4. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary.

  5. CSI 2264: characterizing accretion-burst dominated light curves for young stars in NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean; Baglin, Annie; Alencar, Silvia; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Carpenter, John; Findeisen, Krzysztof; Venuti, Laura; Bouvier, Jerome; Plavchan, Peter; Terebey, Susan; Morales-Calderón, María; Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore; Song, Inseok; Gutermuth, Rob; Hartmann, Lee; and others

    2014-04-01

    Based on more than four weeks of continuous high-cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high-quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects whose optical variability is dominated by short-duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief—several hours to one day—brightenings at optical and near-infrared wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range of 5%-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a 30 day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u – g versus g – r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Hα equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Hα emission profiles or profiles with blueshifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Among the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Hα equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.

  6. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  7. The Information Content in Analytic Spot Models of Broadband Precision Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  8. Search for light curve modulations among Kepler candidates. Three very low-mass transiting companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Ribas, A.; Barrado, D.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Light curve modulations in the sample of Kepler planet candidates allows the disentangling of the nature of the transiting object by photometrically measuring its mass. This is possible by detecting the effects of the gravitational pull of the companion (ellipsoidal modulations) and in some cases, the photometric imprints of the Doppler effect when observing in a broad band (Doppler beaming). Aims: We aim to photometrically unveil the nature of some transiting objects showing clear light curve modulations in the phase-folded Kepler light curve. Methods: We selected a subsample among the large crop of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) based on their chances to show detectable light curve modulations, i.e., close (a< 12 R⋆) and large (in terms of radius, according to their transit signal) candidates. We modeled their phase-folded light curves with consistent equations for the three effects, namely, reflection, ellipsoidal and beaming (known as REB modulations). Results: We provide detailed general equations for the fit of the REB modulations for the case of eccentric orbits. These equations are accurate to the photometric precisions achievable by current and forthcoming instruments and space missions. By using this mathematical apparatus, we find three close-in very low-mass companions (two of them in the brown dwarf mass domain) orbiting main-sequence stars (KOI-554, KOI-1074, and KOI-3728), and reject the planetary nature of the transiting objects (thus classifying them as false positives). In contrast, the detection of the REB modulations and transit/eclipse signal allows the measurement of their mass and radius that can provide important constraints for modeling their interiors since just a few cases of low-mass eclipsing binaries are known. Additionally, these new systems can help to constrain the similarities in the formation process of the more massive and close-in planets (hot Jupiters), brown dwarfs, and very low-mass companions.

  9. Physical Characteristics of Faint Meteors by Light Curve and High-resolution Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The physical structure of a meteoroid may be inferred from optical observations, particularly the light curve, of a meteor. For example: a classically shaped (late peaked) light curve is seen as evidence of a solid single body, whereas a symmetric light curve may indicate a dustball structure. High-resolution optical observations show how the meteoroid fragments: continuously, leaving a long wake, or discretely, leaving several distinct pieces. Calculating the orbit of the meteoroid using two station data then allows the object to be associated with asteroidal or cometary parent bodies. Optical observations thus provide simultaneous information on meteoroid structure, fragmentation mode, and origin.CAMO (the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory) has been continuously collecting faint (masses < 10-4 kg) two station optical meteors with image-intensified narrow field (with a resolution of up to 3 meters per pixel) and wide field (26 by 19 degrees) cameras since 2010. The narrow field, telescopic cameras allow the meteor fragmentation to be studied using a pair of mirrors to track the meteor. The wide-field cameras provide the light curve and trajectory solution.We present preliminary results from classifying light curves and high-resolution optical observations for 3000 faint meteors recorded since 2010. We find that most meteors (both asteroidal and cometary) show long trails, while meteors with short trails are the second most common morphology. It is expected that meteoroids that experience negligible fragmentation have the shortest trails, so our results imply that the majority of small meteoroids fragment during ablation. A surprising observation is that almost equal fractions of asteroidal and cometary meteors fragment (showing long trails), implying a similar structure for both types of meteoroids.

  10. SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE POWERED BY MAGNETARS: LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES AND HARD EMISSION LEAKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2015-01-20

    Recently, research performed by two groups has revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810, and CSS121015 but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semianalytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model with the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semianalytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg, and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma-ray and X-ray leakages are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high-quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required.

  11. A LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF CLASSICAL NOVAE: FREE-FREE EMISSION VERSUS PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp

    2015-01-10

    We analyzed light curves of seven relatively slower novae, PW Vul, V705 Cas, GQ Mus, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, based on an optically thick wind theory of nova outbursts. For fast novae, free-free emission dominates the spectrum in optical bands rather than photospheric emission, and nova optical light curves follow the universal decline law. Faster novae blow stronger winds with larger mass-loss rates. Because the brightness of free-free emission depends directly on the wind mass-loss rate, faster novae show brighter optical maxima. In slower novae, however, we must take into account photospheric emission because of their lower wind mass-loss rates. We calculated three model light curves of free-free emission, photospheric emission, and their sum for various white dwarf (WD) masses with various chemical compositions of their envelopes and fitted reasonably with observational data of optical, near-IR (NIR), and UV bands. From light curve fittings of the seven novae, we estimated their absolute magnitudes, distances, and WD masses. In PW Vul and V705 Cas, free-free emission still dominates the spectrum in the optical and NIR bands. In the very slow novae, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, photospheric emission dominates the spectrum rather than free-free emission, which makes a deviation from the universal decline law. We have confirmed that the absolute brightnesses of our model light curves are consistent with the distance moduli of four classical novae with known distances (GK Per, V603 Aql, RR Pic, and DQ Her). We also discussed the reason why the very slow novae are about ∼1 mag brighter than the proposed maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation.

  12. Mathematical modelling of the light response curve of photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tyystjärvi, Esa; Hakala, Marja; Sarvikas, Päivi

    2005-06-01

    The light response curves of the acceptor and donor side mechanisms of photoinhibition of Photosystem II were calculated, using Arabidopsis as a model organism. Acceptor-side photoinhibition was modelled as double reduction of QA, noting that non-photochemical quenching has the same effect on the quantum yield of QA double reduction in closed PSII centres as it has on the quantum yield of electron transport in open centres. The light response curve of acceptor-side photoinhibition in Arabidopsis shows very low efficiency under low intensity light and a relatively constant quantum yield above light saturation of photosynthesis. To calculate the light response curve of donor-side photoinhibition, we built a model describing the concentration of the oxidized primary donor P680 + during steady-state photosynthesis. The model is based on literature values of rate constants of electron transfer reactions of PSII, and it was fitted with fluorescence parameters measured in the steady state. The modelling analysis showed that the quantum yield of donor-side photoinhibition peaks under moderate light. The deviation of the acceptor and donor side mechanisms from the direct proportionality between photoinhibition and photon flux density suggests that these mechanisms cannot solely account for photoinhibition in vivo, but contribution of a reaction whose quantum yield is independent of light intensity is needed. Furthermore, a simple kinetic calculation suggests that the acceptor-side mechanism may not explain singlet oxygen production by photoinhibited leaves. The theoretical framework described here can be used to estimate the yields of different photoinhibition mechanisms under different wavelengths or light intensities.

  13. Human phase response curve to a 1 h pulse of bright white light

    PubMed Central

    St Hilaire, Melissa A; Gooley, Joshua J; Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    The phase resetting response of the human circadian pacemaker to light depends on the timing of exposure and is described by a phase response curve (PRC). The current study aimed to construct a PRC for a 1 h exposure to bright white light (∼8000 lux) and to compare this PRC to a <3 lux dim background light PRC. These data were also compared to a previously completed 6.7 h bright white light PRC and a <15 lux dim background light PRC constructed under similar conditions. Participants were randomized for exposure to 1 h of either bright white light (n= 18) or <3 lux dim background light (n= 18) scheduled at 1 of 18 circadian phases. Participants completed constant routine (CR) procedures in dim light (<3 lux) before and after the light exposure to assess circadian phase. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in timing of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) during pre- and post-stimulus CRs. Exposure to 1 h of bright white light induced a Type 1 PRC with a fitted peak-to-trough amplitude of 2.20 h. No discernible PRC was observed in the <3 lux dim background light PRC. The fitted peak-to-trough amplitude of the 1 h bright light PRC was ∼40% of that for the 6.7 h PRC despite representing only 15% of the light exposure duration, consistent with previous studies showing a non-linear duration–response function for the effects of light on circadian resetting. PMID:22547633

  14. Near-infrared light curves of Type Ia supernovae: studying properties of the second maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, S.; Leibundgut, B.; Spyromilio, J.; Maguire, K.

    2015-04-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been proposed to be much better distance indicators at near-infrared (NIR) compared to optical wavelengths - the effect of dust extinction is expected to be lower and it has been shown that SNe Ia behave more like `standard candles' at NIR wavelengths. To better understand the physical processes behind this increased uniformity, we have studied the Y, J and H-filter light curves of 91 SNe Ia from the literature. We show that the phases and luminosities of the first maximum in the NIR light curves are extremely uniform for our sample. The phase of the second maximum, the late-phase NIR luminosity and the optical light-curve shape are found to be strongly correlated, in particular more luminous SNe Ia reach the second maximum in the NIR filters at a later phase compared to fainter objects. We also find a strong correlation between the phase of the second maximum and the epoch at which the SN enters the Lira law phase in its optical colour curve (epochs ˜ 15 to 30 d after B-band maximum). The decline rate after the second maximum is very uniform in all NIR filters. We suggest that these observational parameters are linked to the nickel and iron mass in the explosion, providing evidence that the amount of nickel synthesized in the explosion is the dominating factor shaping the optical and NIR appearance of SNe Ia.

  15. Light curve solution and orbital period analysis of the contact binary V842 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selam, S. O.; Albayrak, B.; Şenavci, H. V.; Aksu, O.

    2005-10-01

    New photoelectric BV light curves were obtained for the neglected eclipsing binary V842 Her at the TÜB{İTAK National Observatory (TUG) and studied for the first time in detail to determine the orbital parameters and geometry of the system. The solutions obtained simultaneously for the new light curves and the radial velocity curves in the literature by using the Wilson-Devinney code reveal a typical W-type contact system. The light curves exhibit the so-called O'Connell effect which the level of the primary maxima being higher than that of the secondary ones in both pass-bands. The O'Connell effect in the light curves is explained in terms of a dark-spot located on the more massive component which makes the more massive larger component slightly cooler than the less massive smaller one. The O-C diagram constructed for all available times of minima of V842 Her exhibits a cyclic character superimposed on a quadratic variation. The quadratic character yields a orbital period increase with a rate of dP/dt=7.76×10-7 days yr-1 which can be attributed to the mass exchange/loss mechanism in the system. By assuming the presence of a gravitationally bound third body in the system, the analysis of the cyclic nature in the O-C diagram revealed a third body with mass of 0.4M\\sun orbiting around the eclipsing pair. The possibility of magnetic activity cycle effect as a cause for the observed cyclic variation in the O-C diagram was also discussed.

  16. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  17. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Vacuum and Force-Free Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan E.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profiles. We find that, compared to the profiles derived from symmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines, increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission, formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, with vacuum dipole fits being more favorable.

  18. Visible and Near-infrared Light Curves of SN 2009nr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Jonathan; Bryngelson, Ginger

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the behavior of SN 2009nr, an apparently normal type Ia supernova (SN Ia). A plot of this object's brightness over time is known as a light curve. Because of the uniformity of their light curves, SNe Ia are valuable markers for determining the expansion of the universe and other cosmological parameters. Understanding the properties of these supernovae is vital in order to build our confidence in their use as standard candles. A small, but increasing number of SN Ia late-time observations have been made in the near-infrared (NIR). Most exhibit a flattening of the NIR power even as the visible light declines at a steady rate. It is still unclear as to why they exhibit this behavior and how typical this is. In order to characterize the late behavior of SNe Ia, images of SN 2009nr were analyzed using the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). NIR (J, H, K) images were taken with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National-Observatory using the FLAMINGOS IR Imaging Spectrometer while visible (B, V, R, I) images used the Mosaic 1 imager. The supernova's apparent magnitude for each night of observation (by filter) was found by using reference stars. We present preliminary light curves of SN 2009nr and a comparison to another SN observed at similar epochs.

  19. Multiple color light curves and period changes investigation of the contact binary HV Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Qian, S.-B.

    2013-07-01

    New V, R and I light curves of the short period binary system, HV Aqr, are presented. Photometric solutions were derived using the Wilson-Devinney code. Our new determined light curves do not show O'Connell effect. The nearly symmetry and complete eclipses of the light curves of HV Aqr enable us to determine high-precision photometric parameters of the binary system. The new solutions suggest that HV Aqr is a low mass ratio (q=0.1455) deep contact binary with a contact degree of f=55.9%. Based on all available times of light minimum, we analyzed the long-term period changes of HV Aqr. A secular decrease rate of dP/dt=8.84(±0.18)×10-8 days yr-1 was determined. The continuous period decrease can be explained by the mass transfer from the primary component to the secondary and angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind. A conservative mass transfer rate of dM1/dt=1.81×10-8M⊙ yr-1 and angular momentum loss rate at dJ/dt=5.96×1045 g cm2 s-1 yr-1 were derived. As the orbital period decreases, the contact degree of HV Aqr will become deeper and finally it will evolve into a single rapid-rotation star.

  20. Tracing Analytic Ray Curves for Light and Sound Propagation in Non-Linear Media.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qi; Yeh, Hengchin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-11-01

    The physical world consists of spatially varying media, such as the atmosphere and the ocean, in which light and sound propagates along non-linear trajectories. This presents a challenge to existing ray-tracing based methods, which are widely adopted to simulate propagation due to their efficiency and flexibility, but assume linear rays. We present a novel algorithm that traces analytic ray curves computed from local media gradients, and utilizes the closed-form solutions of both the intersections of the ray curves with planar surfaces, and the travel distance. By constructing an adaptive unstructured mesh, our algorithm is able to model general media profiles that vary in three dimensions with complex boundaries consisting of terrains and other scene objects such as buildings. Our analytic ray curve tracer with the adaptive mesh improves the efficiency considerably over prior methods. We highlight the algorithm's application on simulation of visual and sound propagation in outdoor scenes.

  1. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  2. Extrasolar Storms: Pressure-dependent Changes in Light-curve Phase in Brown Dwarfs from Simultaneous HST and Spitzer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Karalidi, Theodora; Flateau, Davin; Showman, Adam P.; Metchev, Stanimir; Buenzli, Esther; Radigan, Jacqueline; Artigau, Étienne; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2016-07-01

    We present Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during eight different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 G141 grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrowband filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multiwavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 to 13 hr. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.

  3. The 3.5 micron light curves of long period variable stars. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared observations at an effective wavelength of 3.5 microns of a selected group of long period variable (LPV) stars are presented. Mira type and semiregular stars of M, S, and C spectral classifications were monitored throughout the full cycle of variability. Although the variable infrared radiation does not exactly repeat in intensity or time, the regularity is sufficient to produce mean 3.5 micron light curves. The 3.5 micron maximum radiation lags the visual maximum by about one-seventh of a cycle, while the minimum 3.5 micron intensity occurs nearly one-half cycle after infrared maximum. In some stars, there are inflections or humps on the ascending portion of the 3.5 micron light curve which may also be seen in the visual variations.

  4. Updated UBV Light-Curve and Period Analysis of Eclipsing Binary HS Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Zeynep; Değirmenci, Ömer Lütfi

    2006-08-01

    UBV light-curves of the eclipsing binary HS Herculis, obtained in 2002 2003 observational seasons, were analysed with Wilson-Devinney computer code. New absolute dimensions of the system were calculated using the results of the light-curve analysis. Period variation of the system was also investigated. Several new times of minima have been secured for this problematic system. An apsidal motion with a period of 80.7 years was confirmed and a third body in a pretty eccentric orbit (e 3 = 0.90 ± 0.08) with a period of 85.4 years was found. The corresponding internal structure constants of the binary system, log k 2, and the mass of the third body were derived.

  5. Updated UBV Light-Curve and Period Analysis of Eclipsing Binary HS Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Zeynep; Değirmenci, Ömer Lütfi

    2006-08-01

    UBV light-curves of the eclipsing binary HS Herculis, which obtained in 2002--2003 observational seasons, were analysed with Wilson-Devinney computer code. New absolute dimensions of the system were calculated using the results of the light-curve analysis. Period variation of the system also investigated. Several new times of minima have been secured for this problematic system. An apsidal motion with the period of 80.7 years was confirmed and a third body in an pretty eccentric orbit (e 3 = 0.90 ± 0.08) with a period of 85.4 years was found. The corresponding internal structure constants of the binary system, log k 2, and mass of third body were derived.

  6. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  7. Radiative Trasnfer Calculation Of Light Curves And Spectra For Type Ia Sne Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Soma; Baron, E.; Timmes, F.; Hauschildt, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the light curves and spectra from a suite of Type Ia supernovae models, ranging from standard single degenerate scenarios to double degenerate collisions. We use a fully relativistic and time dependent radiative transfer code PHOENIX for our calculations which is time dependent in both radiative transfer and rate equation. Simple hydrodynamic calculation is used to treat conservation of energy of the gas and the radiation together and also allow different time-scales for gas and radiation. Between two time steps for the calculation of the light curve, the correct distribution of total energy change among gas and radiation is obtained by iteratively solving for the radiative transfer equation and hence the new temperature in the new time step. In our work we explore systematic relationships between the mass of 56ni mass produced, the mass of silicon group elements produced, the white dwarf metallicity, and the mass of unburned material

  8. BINARY CANDIDATES IN THE JOVIAN TROJAN AND HILDA POPULATIONS FROM NEOWISE LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnett, S.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.

    2015-02-01

    Determining the binary fraction for a population of asteroids, particularly as a function of separation between the two components, helps describe the dynamical environment at the time the binaries formed, which in turn offers constraints on the dynamical evolution of the solar system. We searched the NEOWISE archival data set for close and contact binary Trojans and Hildas via their diagnostically large light curve amplitudes. We present 48 out of 554 Hilda and 34 out of 953 Trojan binary candidates in need of follow-up to confirm their large light curve amplitudes and subsequently constrain the binary orbit and component sizes. From these candidates, we calculate a preliminary estimate of the binary fraction without confirmation or debiasing of 14%-23% for Trojans larger than ∼12 km and 30%-51% for Hildas larger than ∼4 km. Once the binary candidates have been confirmed, it should be possible to infer the underlying, debiased binary fraction through estimation of survey biases.

  9. Study of a light curve of Beta Persei at 3428 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-Y.; Merrill, J. E.; Richardson, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Photometric light-curve data obtained during Copernicus satellite observations of Beta Persei in the Balmer continuum at 3428 A are analyzed and reduced. A small but significant fluctuation with a period of very nearly 0.069167 day in the photometric counts is tentatively attributed to a small perturbation in spacecraft attitude introduced each time the satellite passes from daylight into darkness. The light curve is intensity-rectified, phase-rectified, and solved on the assumption that the limb darkening follows the linear cosine law. The resulting distributions of luminosity among the three components of Beta Persei are plotted, and it is shown that the effective temperature of Algol B may be higher than 5000 K.

  10. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  11. Rapidly evolving light curves of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhli, P.; Hakala, P. J.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Hannikainen, D. C.; Schultz, J.

    2004-07-01

    A few Galactic Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXBs) have shown drastically evolving X-ray and/or optical orbital light curves. In two short-period LMXBs, MS 1603+2600 (= UW CrB, P[orb] = 111 min) and 4U 1916-053 (see e.g. Homer et al. 2001), the variations in the light curve morphology seem to be repeating in a periodic manner. We present first results of a photometric monitoring campaign of MS 1603+2600, showing evidence of a 5-day superorbital period in this yet unclassified source. The observations also unraveled optical flares, reminiscent of type I bursts, suggesting a neutron star primary.

  12. An elementary theory of eclipsing depths of the light curve and its application to Beta Lyrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-S.; Brown, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    An elementary theory of the ratio of depths of secondary and primary eclipses of a light curve has been proposed for studying the nature of component stars. It has been applied to light curves of Beta Lyrae in the visual, blue, and far-ultraviolet regions with the purpose of investigating the energy sources for the luminosity of the disk surrounding the secondary component and determining the dominant radiative process in the disk. No trace of the spectrum of primary radiation has been found in the disk. Therefore, it is suggested that LTE is the main radiative process in the disk, which radiates at a temperature of approximately 12,000 K in the portion that undergoes eclipse. A small source corresponding to 14,500 K has also been tentatively detected and may represent a hot spot caused by hydrodynamic flow of matter from the primary component to the disk.

  13. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF THE UNIQUE DA WHITE DWARF BOKS 53856

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: howell@noao.edu

    2011-08-15

    The faint (g = 16.9) hot white dwarf BOKS 53856 was observed by the Kepler Mission in short cadence mode during mid-2009. Analysis of these observations reveals a highly stable modulation with a period of 6.1375 hr and a 2.46% half-amplitude. The folded light curve has an unusual shape that is difficult to explain in terms of a binary system containing an unseen companion more luminous than an L0 brown dwarf. Optical spectra of BOKS 53856 show a T{sub eff} = 34,000 K, log g = 8.0 DA white dwarf. There are few, if any, known white dwarfs in this temperature range exhibiting photometric variations similar to those we describe. A magnetic spin-modulated white dwarf model can in principle explain the light curve, an interpretation supported by spectral observations of the H{alpha} line showing evidence of Zeeman splitting.

  14. REVISITING THE LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE RELATIVISTIC TURBULENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Da-Bin; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Sun, Mou-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    Rapid temporal variability has been widely observed in the light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One possible mechanism for such variability is related to the relativistic eddies in the jet. In this paper, we include the contribution of the inter-eddy medium together with the eddies to the gamma-ray emission. We show that the gamma-ray emission can either lead or lag behind the observed synchrotron emission, where the latter originates in the inter-eddy medium and provides most of the seed photons for producing gamma-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering. As a consequence, we argue that the lead/lag found in non-stationary short-lived light curves may not reveal the intrinsic lead/lag of different emission components. In addition, our results may explain the lead of gamma-ray emission with respect to optical emission observed in GRB 080319B.

  15. The Kepler Light Curves of KSwAGS AGN: A Unique Window into Accretion Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Krista Lynne; Mushotzky, Richard; Boyd, Padi; Edelson, Rick; Howell, Steve; Gelino, Dawn; Brown, Alex

    2016-08-01

    The Kepler-Swift Active Galaxies Survey (KSwAGS) discovered ~160 AGN in the Kepler and K2 fields. The optical Kepler and K2 light curves of these AGN are by far the most precise and evenly-sampled ever obtained. There are unique challenges involved in adapting Kepler/K2 data for use with AGN since the Kepler pipeline removes stochasticity; however, once mitigated, these data provide an unprecedented glimpse of the accretion disk's variability. We have also conducted follow-up spectral observations to determine black hole masses and accretion rates for the sample, which fill a wide parameter space (6.9 < Log MBH < 9.4, 0.003 < L/Ledd < 0.6). These, in tandem with the light curves, may be able to distinguish between different accretion models.

  16. Ultraviolet light curves of the dwarf novae U Geminorum and VW Hydri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The optical light curves of many dwarf novae show a prominent hump. This hump is attributed to a hot spot located where the gas stream from the cool secondary star strikes the accretion disk around the white dwarf primary. In the present investigation, the energy distribution of the hot spot is obtained from the amplitude of the hump in different wavelength regions. The color temperature of the hot spot is derived, and the temperature and optical thickness for thermal free-free emission models for the spot is discussed. The nature of the disk is studied by comparing its UV-optical energy distribution with computed accretion disk models. The ultraviolet light curves of two quiescent dwarf novae, U Gem and VW Hyi is derived by combining Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS) photometry from several different epochs.

  17. Microphase separation patterns in diblock copolymers on curved surfaces using a nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Darae; Kim, Junseok

    2015-11-01

    We investigate microphase separation patterns on curved surfaces in three-dimensional space by numerically solving a nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation for diblock copolymers. In our model, a curved surface is implicitly represented as the zero level set of a signed distance function. We employ a discrete narrow band grid that neighbors the curved surface. Using the closest point method, we apply a pseudo-Neumann boundary at the boundary of the computational domain. The boundary treatment allows us to replace the Laplace-Beltrami operator by the standard Laplacian operator. In particular, we can apply standard finite difference schemes in order to approximate the nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation in the discrete narrow band domain. We employ a type of unconditionally stable scheme, which was introduced by Eyre, and use the Jacobi iterative to solve the resulting implicit discrete system of equations. In addition, we use the minimum number of grid points for the discrete narrow band domain. Therefore, the algorithm is simple and fast. Numerous computational experiments are provided to study microphase separation patterns for diblock copolymers on curved surfaces in three-dimensional space. PMID:26577816

  18. BEER analysis of Kepler and CoRoT light curves. III. Spectroscopic confirmation of seventy new beaming binaries discovered in CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The BEER algorithm searches stellar light curves for the BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection photometric modulations that are caused by a short-period companion. These three effects are typically of very low amplitude and can mainly be detected in light curves from space-based photometers. Unlike eclipsing binaries, these effects are not limited to edge-on inclinations. Aims: Applying the algorithm to wide-field photometric surveys such as CoRoT and Kepler offers an opportunity to better understand the statistical properties of short-period binaries. It also widens the window for detecting intrinsically rare systems, such as short-period brown-dwarf and massive-planetary companions to main-sequence stars. Methods: Applying the search to the first five long-run center CoRoT fields, we identified 481 non-eclipsing candidates with periodic flux amplitudes of 0.5-87 mmag. Optimizing the Anglo-Australian-Telescope pointing coordinates and the AAOmega fiber-allocations with dedicated softwares, we acquired six spectra for 231 candidates and seven spectra for another 50 candidates in a seven-night campaign. Analysis of the red-arm AAOmega spectra, which covered the range of 8342-8842 Å, yielded a radial-velocity precision of ~1 km s-1. Spectra containing lines of more than one star were analyzed with the two-dimensional correlation algorithm TODCOR. Results: The measured radial velocities confirmed the binarity of seventy of the BEER candidates - 45 single-line binaries, 18 double-line binaries, and 7 diluted binaries. We show that red giants introduce a major source of false candidates and demonstrate a way to improve BEER's performance in extracting higher fidelity samples from future searches of CoRoT light curves. The periods of the confirmed binaries span a range of 0.3-10 days and show a rise in the number of binaries per ΔlogP toward longer periods. The estimated mass ratios of the double-line binaries and the mass ratios assigned to the single

  19. The light curve of a transient X-ray source. [the aeriel satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-V satellite monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on approximately 4 December 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of approximately 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable pre-flare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than approximately 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-V operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, and a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37th power ergs/sec.

  20. The light curve of CV Serpentis, the sometimes-eclipsing Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Liller, W.

    1975-01-01

    New photoelectric observations of the B-magnitude of CV Ser made in 1973 and 1974 show no clear evidence of an eclipse, but they establish night-to-night variability of several percent, a systematic brightness change of 0.035 mag during a portion of the single orbit observed in 1973, and irregular flaring in 1974. We made iris photometer measurements of Harvard patrol plates taken between 1905 June and 1953 July, and find no evidence of a very deep eclipse such as observed by Hjellming and Hiltner. We present several new light curves and discuss then in the light of the recent results of Cowley et al.

  1. Light curves and spectra from off-axis gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Nappo, F.

    2016-10-01

    If gamma-ray burst prompt emission originates at a typical radius, and if material producing the emission moves at relativistic speed, then the variability of the resulting light curve depends on the viewing angle. This is due to the fact that the pulse evolution time-scale is Doppler contracted, while the pulse separation is not. For off-axis viewing angles θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1, the pulse broadening significantly smears out the light-curve variability. This is largely independent of geometry and emission processes. To explore a specific case, we set up a simple model of a single pulse under the assumption that the pulse rise and decay are dominated by the shell curvature effect. We show that such a pulse observed off-axis is (i) broader, (ii) softer and (iii) displays a different hardness-intensity correlation with respect to the same pulse seen on-axis. For each of these effects, we provide an intuitive physical explanation. We then show how a synthetic light curve made by a superposition of pulses changes with increasing viewing angle. We find that a highly variable light curve (as seen on-axis) becomes smooth and apparently single-pulsed (when seen off-axis) because of pulse overlap. To test the relevance of this fact, we estimate the fraction of off-axis gamma-ray bursts detectable by Swift as a function of redshift, finding that a sizeable fraction (between 10 per cent and 80 per cent) of nearby (z < 0.1) bursts are observed with θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1. Based on these results, we argue that low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts are consistent with being ordinary bursts seen off-axis.

  2. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaj, Ján

    2012-04-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. The Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently, a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. ɛ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed a dark, inclined, disk of dust with a central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks: an internal optically thick disk and an external optically thin disk which absorbs and scatters radiation. Shallow mid-eclipse brightening may result from eclipses by nearly edge-on flared (dusty or gaseous) disks. Mid-eclipse brightening may also be due to strong forward scattering and optical properties of the dust which can have an important effect on the light-curves. There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and transiting extrasolar planets. The reflection effect which is briefly reviewed is one of them. The exact Roche shape and temperature distributions over the surface of all currently known transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. In some cases (HAT-P-32b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b), departures from the spherical shape can reach 7-15%.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V960 Mon light curves (Hackstein+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackstein, M.; Haas, M.; Kospal, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Chini, R.; Abraham, P.; Moor, A.; Pozo Nunez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Kaderhandt, L.; Fein, C.; Barr Dominguez, A.; Hodapp, K.-W.

    2015-10-01

    Photometric light curves for V960Mon (2MASS J06593158-0405277) from different telescopes at multiple wavelengths between September 2009 to June 2015. This comprises optical observations from Universitaetssternwarte Bochum (USB) in Chile as part of the Bochum Galatic Disk Survey (GDS, 2015AN....336..590H), Konkoly Observatory in Hungary, and the Remote Observatory Atacama Desert (ROAD) in Chile, as well as near-infrared data from USB. (1 data file).

  4. Ensemble Learning Method for Outlier Detection and its Application to Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Protopapas, Pavlos; Sim, Brandon; Chen, Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Outlier detection is necessary for automated data analysis, with specific applications spanning almost every domain from financial markets to epidemiology to fraud detection. We introduce a novel mixture of the experts outlier detection model, which uses a dynamically trained, weighted network of five distinct outlier detection methods. After dimensionality reduction, individual outlier detection methods score each data point for “outlierness” in this new feature space. Our model then uses dynamically trained parameters to weigh the scores of each method, allowing for a finalized outlier score. We find that the mixture of experts model performs, on average, better than any single expert model in identifying both artificially and manually picked outliers. This mixture model is applied to a data set of astronomical light curves, after dimensionality reduction via time series feature extraction. Our model was tested using three fields from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. We confirm that the outliers detected using this method belong to rare classes, like Novae, He-burning, and red giant stars; other outlier light curves identified have no available information associated with them. To elucidate their nature, we created a website containing the light-curve data and information about these objects. Users can attempt to classify the light curves, give conjectures about their identities, and sign up for follow up messages about the progress made on identifying these objects. This user submitted data can be used further train of our mixture of experts model. Our code is publicly available to all who are interested.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multi-band light curve of WASP-36 (Mancini+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Kemmer, J.; Southworth, J.; Bott, K.; Molliere, P.; Ciceri, S.; Chen, G.; Henning, T.

    2016-05-01

    17 light curves of five transits of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-36, observed between 2012 and 2015, are presented. Four of the transits were observed simultaneously in the SDSS griz passbands using the seven-beam GROND imager on the MPG 2.2-m telescope. A fifth was observed in Cousins R with the CAHA 1.23-m telescope. (2 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ji light curves of WTS-2 (Birkby+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, J. L.; Cappetta, M.; Cruz, P.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Ivanyuk, O.; Mustill, A. J.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Pinfield, D. J.; Sipocz, B.; Kovacs, G.; Saglia, R.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; Campbell, D.; Catalan, S.; Fossati, L.; Galvez-Ortiz, M.-C.; Kenworthy, M.; Lillo-Box, J.; Martin, E. L.; Mislis, D.; de Mooij, E. J. W.; Nefs, S. V.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Stoev, H.; Zendejas, J.; Del Burgo, C.; Barnes, J.; Goulding, N.; Haswell, C. A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Lodieu, N.; Murgas, F.; Palle, E.; Solano, E.; Steele, P.; Tata, R.

    2015-07-01

    The infrared light curves of the WTS were generated from time series photometry taken with the WFCAM imager mounted at the prime focus of UKIRT. In order to confirm the transit of WTS-2 b and to help constrain the transit model, on 2010 July 18 we obtained further time series photometry in the Sloan i band using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at Roque de Los Muchachos, La Palma. (2 data files).

  7. Connection between the rapidly varying and smooth components in the light curves of Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Gagen-Torn, V.A.

    1987-11-01

    It is shown that for some Seyfert galaxies whose light curves contain a fast (burst) component and a smooth component (components I and II) the amplitude of the flux variation of component I is proportional to the flux of component II. Since components I and II are also identical in their color characteristics, it is very probable that the variability is due to a single smoothly varying and fluctuating source.

  8. LFN, QPO and fractal dimension of X-ray light curves from black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvetov, Art; Grebenev, Sergey

    The origin of the low frequency noise (LFN) and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in X-ray flux of Galactic black hole binaries is still not recognized in spite of multiple studies and attempts to model this phenomenon. There are known correlations between the QPO frequency, X-ray power density, X-ray flux and spectral state of the system, but there is no model that can do these dependences understandable. For the low frequency (~1 Hz) QPO we still have no even an idea capable to explain their production and don't know even what part of an accretion disc is responsible for them. Here we attempted to measure the fractal dimension of X-ray light curves of several black hole X-ray binaries and to study its correlation with the frequency of quasi periodic oscillations observed in their X-ray light-curves. The fractal dimension is a measure of the space-filling capacity of the light curves' profile. To measure the fractal dimension we used R/S method, which is fast enough and has good reputation in financial analytic and materials sciences. We found that if no QPO were observed in X-ray flux from the particular source, the fractal dimension is equal to the unique value which is independent on the source, its luminosity or its spectral state. On the other hand if QPO were detected in the flux, the fractal dimension deviated from its usual value. Also, we found a clear correlation between the QPO frequency and the fractal dimension of the emission. The relationship between these two parameters is solid but nonlinear. We believe that the analysis of X-ray light curves of black hole binaries using the fractal dimension has a good scientific potential and may provide an addition information on the geometry of accretion flow and fundamental physical parameters of the system.

  9. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY SPECTRA AND LIGHT CURVES OF V1494 AQUILAE

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrbach, J. G.; Ness, J.-U.; Starrfield, S. E-mail: Jan-Uwe.Ness@asu.edu E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int

    2009-06-15

    We present six Chandra X-ray spectra and light curves obtained for the nova V1494 Aql (1999 No. 2) in outburst. The first three observations were taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) on days 134, 187, and 248 after outburst. The count rates were 1.00, 0.69, and 0.53 counts s{sup -1}, respectively. We found no significant periodicity in the ACIS light curves. The X-ray spectra show continuum emission and lines originating from N and O. We found acceptable spectral fits using isothermal APEC models with significantly increased elemental abundances of O and N for all observations. On day 248 after outburst a bright soft component appeared in addition to the fading emission lines. The Chandra observations on days 300, 304, and 727 were carried out with the High Resolution Camera/Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS). The spectra consist of continuum emission plus strong emission lines of O and N, implying a high abundance of these elements. On day 300, a flare occurred and periodic oscillations were detected in the light curves taken on days 300 and 304. This flare must have originated deep in the outflowing material since it was variable on short timescales. The spectra extracted immediately before and after the flare are remarkably similar, implying that the flare was an extremely isolated event. Our attempts to fit blackbody, cloudy, or APEC models to the LETGS spectra failed, owing to the difficulty in disentangling continuum and emission-line components. The spectrum extracted during the flare shows a significant increase in the strengths of many of the lines and the appearance of several previously undetected lines. In addition, some of the lines seen before and after the flare are not present during the flare. On day 727 only the count rate from the zeroth order could be derived, and the source was too faint for the extraction of a light curve or spectrum.

  10. X-Rays from the Explosion Site: Fifteen Years of Light Curves of SN 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.; Ray, Alak; Immler, Stefan; Pooley, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J in a nearby galaxy M81. This is the only supernova other than SN 1987A, which is so extensively followed in the X-ray bands. Here we report on SN 1993J observations with the Chandra in the year 2005 and 2008, and Swift observations in 2005, 2006 and 2008. We combined these observations with all available archival data of SN 1993J, which includes ROSAT, ASCA, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, observations from 1993 April to 2006 August. In this paper we report the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J, extending up to fifteen years, in the soft (0.3-2.4 keV), hard (2-8 keV) and combined (0.3-8 keV) bands. The hard and soft-band fluxes decline at different rates initially, but after about 5 years they both undergo a t(sup -1) decline. The soft X-rays, which are initially low, start dominating after a few hundred days. We interpret that most of the emission below 8 keV is coming from the reverse shock which is radiative initially for around first 1000-2000 days and then turn into adiabatic shock. Our hydrodynamic simulation also confirms the reverse shock origin of the observed light curves. We also compare the Ha line luminosity of SN 1993J with its X-ray light curve and note that the Ha line luminosity has a fairly high fraction of the X-ray emission, indicating presence of clumps in the emitting plasma.

  11. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nousek, J.A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S.K.; Burrows, D.N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.P.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Falcone, A.D.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Goad, M.; Godet, O.; Hurkett, C.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /NASA, Marshall /Leicester U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /NASA, Marshall /IASF, Palermo /Brera Observ. /Frascati /Milan Bicocca U. /NASA, Goddard

    2005-08-17

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments: (1) an initial very steep decay ({infinity} t{sup -a} with 3 {approx}< a{sub 1} {approx}< 5) , followed by (2) a very shallow decay (0.2 {approx}< a{sub 2} {approx}< 0.8), and finally (3) a somewhat steeper decay (1 {approx}< a{sub 3} {approx}< 1.5). These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times, 300 s {approx}< t{sub break,1} {approx}< 500 s and 10{sup 3} s {approx}< t{sub break,2} {approx}< 10{sup 4} s. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadic activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission, from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve (t{sub break,1}) takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay (a{sub 2}) likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve (t{sub break,2}). This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f {approx}> 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  12. Correlation of circumstellar SiO maser spot distribution with the stellar light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyadomari, M.; Imai, H.; Nagayama, T.; Oyama, T.; Matsumoto, N.; Nakashima, J.; Cho, S.-H.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the distributions of silicon monoxide (SiO) v = 2 and v = 3 J = 1 → 0 masers around long-period variables (LPVs) in VLBI observations using the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) combined with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We find some examples of correlation of a maser spot distribution with the stellar light curve, which may provide a clue to elucidating the pumping mechanism of circumstellar SiO masers.

  13. WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE RISING LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED SUPERNOVAE?

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2013-05-20

    The light curve of the explosion of a star with a radius {approx}< 10-100 R{sub Sun} is powered mostly by radioactive decay. Observationally, such events are dominated by hydrogen-deficient progenitors and classified as Type I supernovae (SNe I), i.e., white dwarf thermonuclear explosions (Type Ia), and core collapses of hydrogen-stripped massive stars (Type Ib/c). Current transient surveys are finding SNe I in increasing numbers and at earlier times, allowing their early emission to be studied in unprecedented detail. Motivated by these developments, we summarize the physics that produces their rising light curves and discuss ways in which observations can be utilized to study these exploding stars. The early radioactive-powered light curves probe the shallowest deposits of {sup 56}Ni. If the amount of {sup 56}Ni mixing in the outermost layers of the star can be deduced, then it places important constraints on the progenitor and properties of the explosive burning. In practice, we find that it is difficult to determine the level of mixing because it is hard to disentangle whether the explosion occurred recently and one is seeing radioactive heating near the surface or whether the explosion began in the past and the radioactive heating is deeper in the ejecta. In the latter case, there is a ''dark phase'' between the moment of explosion and the first observed light emitted once the shallowest layers of {sup 56}Ni are exposed. Because of this, simply extrapolating a light curve from radioactive heating back in time is not a reliable method for estimating the explosion time. The best solution is to directly identify the moment of explosion, either through observing shock breakout (in X-ray/UV) or the cooling of the shock-heated surface (in UV/optical), so that the depth being probed by the rising light curve is known. However, since this is typically not available, we identify and discuss a number of other diagnostics that are helpful for deciphering how recently an

  14. Distribution of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts across the Bragg Curve of Light and Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Lacy, S.; Gridley, D. S.; Rusek, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment consists of energetic particles of varying mass and energy, and understanding the :biological Bragg curve" is essential in optimizing shielding effectiveness against space radiation induced biological impacts. The "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Previously, we studied the induction of micronuclei (MN) across the Bragg curve of energetic Fe and Si ions, and observed no increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, was found higher at the Bragg peak location in comparison to the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Here, we report the induction of MN in normal human fibroblast cells across the Bragg curve of incident protons generated at Loma Linda University. Similar to Si and Fe ions, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells showed a clear spike as the protons reached the Bragg peak. Unlike the two heavy ions, however, the MN yield also increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak of heavy, but not light ions are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  15. Three Fundamental Periods in an 87 Year Light Curve of the Symbiotic Star MWC 560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2015-08-01

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  16. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: Evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  17. Follow-up/light-curves of transients from the Catalina Realtime Transient Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Ashish; Drake, Andrew; Djorgovski, S. G.; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-08-01

    We propose to obtain multicolor light curves of interesting optical transients (OTs) discovered in the Catalina Realtime Transient Survey (CRTS). CRTS discovers OTs by obtaining repeated unfiltered CCD images of the same part of the sky. We have so far found ~ 3300 OTs including SNe, CV, blazars, AGN and many rarer classes. While a monochromatic survey can detect transients, their physical classification, interpretation and prioritization for a further follow- up - and thus the net scientific returns from the survey - depend crucially on the light curve and color information. We would obtain such information for objects which defy an immediate classification, or where such information would provide useful astrophysical information on its own (e.g., SN light curves). The most interesting events may then be followed up spectroscopically. Discovery of the rare, unusual, or even previously unknown types of OTs is one of the key priorities. These measurements will help us sharpen strategies for the future OT follow-up work, as well as to develop and improve the novel machine learning tools for automated classification of OTs, an essential enabling technology for the present and future synoptic surveys, including the LSST. In order to maximize the scientific returns for the entire community, we will be making all data immediately public (as we have started doing for the 2011A term).

  18. THREE FUNDAMENTAL PERIODS IN AN 87 YEAR LIGHT CURVE OF THE SYMBIOTIC STAR MWC 560

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2015-08-15

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  19. The search for single exoplanet transits in the Kepler light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Hogg, David W.; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    The planet discoveries made using data from the Kepler mission have revolutionized the field of exoplanet statistics. Thousands of planets have been discovered with orbital periods ranging from hours to two years. Some of the most dynamically interesting planets (Jupiter analogs, for example) only show a single transit in the four-year baseline of the Kepler mission and, as a result, they have not yet been found. Upcoming transit surveys like K2, TESS, and PLATO all have shorter contiguous observation baselines. It is therefore crucial to develop robust techniques for the discovery of single transit events. We present a search procedure designed to find single transits using a supervised classification model. To search for a transit signal in a given month-long light curve from Kepler, we train a random forest classifier on tens of thousands of simulated transit signals injected into the light curve of the same star at other times. Using a different set of simulations, we tune the model to maximize the precision of the recovered signals---minimizing the false alarm rate. With this model, we classify each section of the test light curve into two categories: transit and no transit. We demonstrate that this model is robust to systematic false positives and present an automated catalog of convincing single transit candidates.

  20. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHAPE AND ROTATION TO EXPLAIN THE LIGHT CURVE OF NEREID

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbrock, Andrew J.; Alexander, S. G.; Harp, Thomas W.; Abel, N. P.

    2013-06-15

    The observed photometric variability of Nereid over both short and long time scales has been known for some time and has remained a mystery. Schaefer et al. have documented some twenty years worth of observations that reveal that Nereid's light curve shows both short period intranight variations and long term active and inactive episodes. In this work, we report on a set of computational simulations of both the orbital and rotational motion of Nereid in an effort to understand Nereid's behavior. We model Nereid as an ellipsoid that is subject to torques from other bodies, and we calculate both its orbital and rotational motion. In addition, we only consider the case where Nereid is uniformly reflecting with no albedo variations on its surface. Thus, any brightness variations are caused solely by Nereid's changing orientation. We find for reasonable geometries, orientation, and spin rates that we can reproduce some of the features, but not all, of the observed light curve for Nereid. In particular, we show how active and inactive episodes can arise; however, our calculated light curve differs from observations in other aspects.

  1. X-ray Light Curves and Accretion Disk Structure of EX Hydrae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

    2005-04-12

    We present X-ray light curves for the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Deep Survey photometer. We confirm earlier results on the shape and amplitude of the binary light curve and discuss a new feature: the phase of the minimum in the binary light curve, associated with absorption by the bulge on the accretion disk, increases with wavelength. We discuss several scenarios that could account for this trend and conclude that, most likely, the ionization state of the bulge gas is not constant, but rather decreases with binary phase. We also conclude that photoionization of the bulge by radiation originating from the white dwarf is not the main source of ionization, but that it is heated by shocks originating from the interaction between the in-flowing material from the companion and the accretion disk. The findings in this paper provide a strong test for accretion disk models in close binary systems.

  2. New limb-darkening coefficients for modeling binary star light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamme, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present monochromatic, passband-specific, and bolometric limb-darkening coefficients for a linear as well as nonlinear logarithmic and square root limb-darkening laws. These coefficients, including the bolometric ones, are needed when modeling binary star light curves with the latest version of the Wilson-Devinney light curve progam. We base our calculations on the most recent ATLAS stellar atmosphere models for solar chemical composition stars with a wide range of effective temperatures and surface gravitites. We examine how well various limb-darkening approximations represent the variation of the emerging specific intensity across a stellar surface as computed according to the model. For binary star light curve modeling purposes, we propose the use of a logarithmic or a square root law. We design our tables in such a manner that the relative quality of either law with respect to another can be easily compared. Since the computation of bolometric limb-darkening coefficients first requires monochromatic coefficients, we also offer tables of these coefficients (at 1221 wavelength values between 9.09 nm and 160 micrometer) and tables of passband-specific coefficients for commonly used photometric filters.

  3. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND OPTICAL VARIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Street, Rachel A.; Treu, Tommaso; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Stern, Daniel; Brown, Timothy M.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2009-11-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, as well as the well-studied active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broadband B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, the 2 m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring telescope, the Palomar 60 inch (1.5 m) telescope, and the 0.80 m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.

  4. The bolometric light curves and physical parameters of stripped-envelope supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Rubin, A.; Corsi, A.; Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Zheng, W.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.

    2016-05-01

    The optical and optical/near-infrared pseudo-bolometric light curves of 85 stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) are constructed using a consistent method and a standard cosmology. The light curves are analysed to derive temporal characteristics and peak luminosity Lp, enabling the construction of a luminosity function. Subsequently, the mass of 56Ni synthesized in the explosion, along with the ratio of ejecta mass to ejecta kinetic energy, are found. Analysis shows that host-galaxy extinction is an important factor in accurately determining luminosity values as it is significantly greater than Galactic extinction in most cases. It is found that broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL) and gamma-ray burst SNe are the most luminous subtypes with a combined median Lp, in erg s-1, of log(Lp) = 43.00 compared to 42.51 for SNe Ic, 42.50 for SNe Ib, and 42.36 for SNe IIb. It is also found that SNe Ic-BL synthesize approximately twice the amount of 56Ni compared with SNe Ic, Ib, and IIb, with median MNi = 0.34, 0.16, 0.14, and 0.11 M⊙, respectively. SNe Ic-BL, and to a lesser extent SNe Ic, typically rise from Lp/2 to Lp more quickly than SNe Ib/IIb; consequently, their light curves are not as broad.

  5. High-Quality Optical Light Curves of Supernovae with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modjaz, M.; Li, W. D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Treffers, R. R.

    2000-05-01

    We present some results from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS), which is being conducted with the 0.75-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) and achieved successful operation in mid-1998. Since the commissioning of KAIT in 1996, significant improvements have been made to the software and hardware (such as installation of an AP7 CCD camera). A list is given of the roughly 60 nearby (z < 0.1) supernovae (SNe) discovered with LOSS, together with their spectral types and other relevant properties. We present well-sampled multi-color light curves of a selection of SNe out of a pool of about 30 SNe monitored within the past 2 years. We emphasize the importance of light-curve analysis of Type Ia and Type II SNe, since the detailed study of nearby SNe is crucial to establishing SNe as cosmological distance indicators. We also discuss preliminary conclusions derived from the surprisingly high rate of peculiar Type Ia SNe and from comparisons of their light curves. Projects which attempt to use our data for statistical analysis and for studies of bulk flows are underway. KAIT and its associated science have been made possible with funding or donations from NSF, NASA, the Sylvia and Jim Katzman Foundation, Sun Microsystems Inc., the Hewlett-Packard Company, Photometrics Ltd., AutoScope Corporation, and the University of California.

  6. TESTING MICROVARIABILITY IN QUASAR DIFFERENTIAL LIGHT CURVES USING SEVERAL FIELD STARS

    SciTech Connect

    De Diego, José A.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás; Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; Cepa, Jordi

    2015-08-15

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  7. Orbital Period Variation and Morphological Light Curve Studies for the W UMa Binary BB Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Magdy A.; Awadalla, Nabil S.

    2011-06-01

    The photometric light curves of the W-type W UMa eclipsing contact binary system BB Pegasi have been found to be extremely asymmetric over all the observed 63 years in all wavelengths UBVR. The light curves have been characterized by occultation primary minima. So, the morphology of these light curves has been studied in view of these different asymmetric degrees. The system shows a distinct O'Connell effect as well as depth variation. A 22.96 years cycle, of dark spots group, has been determined for the system combined with about the same cycling for the depth variations (22.78 yr). Also, an analysis of the measurements of mid-eclipse times of BB Peg has been presented. The analysis indicates a period decrease of 5.62× 10-8 d/yr, which can be interpreted in terms of mass transfer of rate -4.38 × 10-8 M_⊙/yr, from the more to the less massive component. The O-C diagram shows a damping sine wave covering two different cycles of 17.0 yr and 12.87 yr with amplitudes equal to 0.0071 and 0.0013 day, respectively. These unequal durations show a non periodicity which may be explained as a result of magnetic activity cycling variations due to star spots. The obtained characteristics are consistent when applying Applegate's (1992) mechanism.

  8. Light Curves for Type II Cepheids in M3 and M5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabidoux, K.; Smith, H. A.; Wells, K.; Randall, J.; Hartley, D.; LaCluyze, A.; De Lee, N.; Ingber, M.; Ireland, M.; KInemuchi, K.; Pellegrini, E.; Purdum, L. E.; Pritzl, B. J.; Lustig, R.; Osborn, W.; Lacy, J.; Curtis, M.; Smolinski, J.

    2005-12-01

    Many of the longer period Cepheids within globular clusters do not have modern light curves in the standard B, V, and Cousins-I photometric bandpasses. As part of a larger program to secure B, V, and I band photometry for these type II Cepheids, we have obtained CCD images of the globular clusters M3 and M5. Data were obtained with the 60-cm telescope at Michigan State University and the 40-cm telescopes at Macalester College and Central Michigan University. Light curves are presented for several Cepheids in these clusters. V84 in M5 shows evidence of alternating high and low maxima, indicative of RV Tauri behavior, and may mark the dividing line between pulsations of the type II Cepheid and RV Tauri variety. Observations have also been obtained for type II Cepheids in the globular clusters M2, M10, M12, and M13. Light curves for these variables will be used to investigate the period-luminosity relation for globular cluster Cepheids and to study their pulsational properties. This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  9. IMAGING STARSPOT EVOLUTION ON KEPLER TARGET KIC 5110407 USING LIGHT-CURVE INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Monnier, John D.; Harmon, Robert O.; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin

    2013-04-10

    The Kepler target KIC 5110407, a K-type star, shows strong quasi-periodic light curve fluctuations likely arising from the formation and decay of spots on the stellar surface rotating with a period of 3.4693 days. Using an established light-curve inversion algorithm, we study the evolution of the surface features based on Kepler space telescope light curves over a period of two years (with a gap of .25 years). At virtually all epochs, we detect at least one large spot group on the surface causing a 1%-10% flux modulation in the Kepler passband. By identifying and tracking spot groups over a range of inferred latitudes, we measured the surface differential rotation to be much smaller than that found for the Sun. We also searched for a correlation between the 17 stellar flares that occurred during our observations and the orientation of the dominant surface spot at the time of each flare. No statistically significant correlation was found except perhaps for the very brightest flares, suggesting that most flares are associated with regions devoid of spots or spots too small to be clearly discerned using our reconstruction technique. While we may see hints of long-term changes in the spot characteristics and flare statistics within our current data set, a longer baseline of observation will be needed to detect the existence of a magnetic cycle in KIC 5110407.

  10. Testing Microvariability in Quasar Differential Light Curves Using Several Field Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego, José A.; Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás; Cepa, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  11. Light Curve Observations of Upper Stages in the Low Earth Orbit Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Lederer, S.; Cowardin, H.; Mulrooney, M.; Read, J.; Chun, F.; Dearborn, M.; Tippets, R.

    2012-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) is a potential means to remediate the orbital debris environment in low Earth orbit (LEO). Massive intact objects, including spent upper stages and retired payloads, with high collision probabilities have been suggested as potential targets for ADR. The challenges to remove such objects on a routine basis are truly monumental. A key piece of information needed for any ADR operations is the tumble motion of the targets. Rapid tumble motion (in excess of one degree per second) of a multiple-ton intact object could be a major problem for proximity and docking operations. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the general tumble motion of the potential ADR targets for future ADR planning. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has initiated an effort to identify the global tumble behavior of potential ADR targets in LEO. The activities include optical light curve observations, imaging radar data collection, and laboratory light curve simulations and modeling. This paper provides a preliminary summary of light curve data of more than 100 upper stages collected by two telescope facilities in Colorado and New Mexico between 2011 and 2012. Analyses of the data and implications for the tumble motions of the objects are also discussed in the paper.

  12. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  13. CSI 2264: Characterizing Accretion-burst Dominated Light Curves for Young Stars in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Baglin, Annie; Alencar, Silvia; Rebull, Luisa; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Venuti, Laura; Turner, Neal J.; Carpenter, John; Plavchan, Peter; Findeisen, Krzysztof; Carey, Sean; Terebey, Susan; Morales-Calderón, María; Bouvier, Jerome; Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore; Song, Inseok; Gutermuth, Rob; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara; Barrado, David; Vrba, Frederick J.; Covey, Kevin; Herbst, William; Furesz, Gabor; Aigrain, Suzanne; Favata, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Based on more than four weeks of continuous high-cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high-quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects whose optical variability is dominated by short-duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief—several hours to one day—brightenings at optical and near-infrared wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range of 5%-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a 30 day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u - g versus g - r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Hα equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Hα emission profiles or profiles with blueshifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Among the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Hα equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts. Based on data from the Spitzer and CoRoT missions, as well as the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) MegaCam CCD, and the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal Chile, under

  14. Structuring Light by Concentric-Ring Patterned Magnetic Metamaterial Cavities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jinwei; Gao, Jie; Luk, Ting S; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-08-12

    Ultracompact and tunable beam converters pose a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. Here we design and demonstrate concentric-ring patterned structures of magnetic metamaterial cavities capable of tailoring both polarization and phase of light by converting circularly polarized light into a vector beam with an orbital angular momentum. We experimentally illustrate the realization of both radially and azimuthally polarized vortex beams using such concentric-ring patterned magnetic metamaterials. These results contribute to the advanced complex light manipulation with optical metamaterials, making it one step closer to realizing the simultaneous control of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light on a chip.

  15. Supernova 1987A: neutrino-driven explosions in three dimensions and light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The well-observed and well-studied type IIP Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), produced by the explosion of a blue supergiant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is a touchstone for the evolution of massive stars, the simulation of neutrino-driven explosions, and the modeling of light curves and spectra. Aims: In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the dependence of explosion properties on the structure of different blue supergiant progenitors and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of SN 1987A. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics code Prometheus, using of four available presupernova models as initial data. At a stage of almost homologous expansion, the hydrodynamical and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the implicit, Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code Crab to follow the blast-wave evolution into the SN outburst. Results: All of our 3D neutrino-driven explosion models, with explosion energies compatible with SN 1987A, produce 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail. Two of our models (based on the same progenitor) yield maximum velocities of around 3000 km s-1 for the bulk of ejected 56Ni, consistent with observational data. In all of our models inward mixing of hydrogen during the 3D evolution leads to minimum velocities of hydrogen-rich matter below 100 km s-1, which is in good agreement with spectral observations. However, the explosion of only one of the considered progenitors reproduces the shape of the broad light curve maximum of SN 1987A fairly well. Conclusions: The considered presupernova models, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1987A, except for those

  16. OO Aquilae: a solar-type contact binary with intrinsic light curve changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Li; Wei, Jian-Yan; Yang, Yuan-Gui; Dai, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    New multi-color photometry of the solar-type contact binary OO Aql was obtained in 2012 and 2013, using the 60 cm telescope at Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. From two sets of light curves LC1 and LC2, photometric models were performed by using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. The overcontact factor of the binary system was determined to be f = 37.0(±0.5)%. The intrinsic variability of this binary occurs in light maxima and minima, which could result from a possible third component and magnetic activity of the late type components. Based on all available light minimum times, the orbital period may change in a complicated mode, i.e., sudden period jumps or continuous period variations. The period of OO Aql may possibly undergo a secular period decrease with a rate of dP/dt = -3.63(±0.30) × 10-8 d yr-1, superimposed by two possible cyclic variations in the O - C curve. The long-term period decrease may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one. The 21.5-yr oscillation may be attributed to cyclic magnetic activity, and the 69.3-yr one may result from the light-time effect of an unseen tertiary body.

  17. Searching for transits in the WTS with the difference imaging light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendejas Dominguez, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    The search for exo-planets is currently one of the most exiting and active topics in astronomy. Small and rocky planets are particularly the subject of intense research, since if they are suitably located from their host star, they may be warm and potentially habitable worlds. On the other hand, the discovery of giant planets in short-period orbits provides important constraints on models that describe planet formation and orbital migration theories. Several projects are dedicated to discover and characterize planets outside of our solar system. Among them, the Wide-Field Camera Transit Survey (WTS) is a pioneer program aimed to search for extra-solar planets, that stands out for its particular aims and methodology. The WTS has been in operation since August 2007 with observations from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, and represents the first survey that searches for transiting planets in the near-infrared wavelengths; hence the WTS is designed to discover planets around M-dwarfs. The survey was originally assigned about 200 nights, observing four fields that were selected seasonally (RA = 03, 07, 17 and 19h) during a year. The images from the survey are processed by a data reduction pipeline, which uses aperture photometry to construct the light curves. For the most complete field (19h-1145 epochs) in the survey, we produce an alternative set of light curves by using the method of difference imaging, which is a photometric technique that has shown important advantages when used in crowded fields. A quantitative comparison between the photometric precision achieved with both methods is carried out in this work. We remove systematic effects using the sysrem algorithm, scale the error bars on the light curves, and perform a comparison of the corrected light curves. The results show that the aperture photometry light curves provide slightly better precision for objects with J < 16. However, difference photometry light curves present a significant improvement for

  18. CCD Photometric Observations and Light Curve Synthesis of the Near-Contact Binary XZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Park, Jang-Ho; Lee, Jae Woo; Jeong, Jang-Hae

    2009-06-01

    Through the photometric observations of the near-contact binary, XZ CMi, new BV light curves were secured and seven times of minimum light were determined. An intensive period study with all published timings, including ours, confirms that the period of XZ CMi has varied in a cyclic period variation superposed on a secular period decrease over last 70 years. Assuming the cyclic change of period to occur by a light-time effect due to a third-body, the light-time orbit with a semi-amplitude of 0.0056d, a period of 29y and an eccentricity of 0.71 was calculated. The observed secular period decrease of -5.26× 10^{-11} d/P was interpreted as a result of simultaneous occurrence of both a period decrease of -8.20 × 10^{-11} d/P by angular momentum loss (AML) due to a magnetic braking stellar wind and a period increase of 2.94 × 10^{-11} d/P by a mass transfer from the less massive secondary to the primary components in the system. In this line the decreasi! ng rate of period due to AML is about 3 times larger than the increasing one by a mass transfer in their absolute values. The latter implies a mass transfer of dot M_{s}= 3.21 × 10^{-8} M_⊙ y^{-1} from the less massive secondary to the primary. The BV light curves with the latest Wilson-Devinney binary code were analyzed for two separate models of 8200K and 7000K as the photospheric temperature of the primary component. Both models confirm that XZ CMi is truly a near-contact binary with a less massive secondary completely filling Roche lobe and a primary inside the inner Roche lobe and there is a third-light corresponding to about 15-17% of the total system light. However, the third-light source can not be the same as the third-body suggested from the period study. At the present, however, we can not determine which one between two models is better fitted to the observations because of a negligible difference of sum (O-C)^2 between them. The diversity of mass ratios, with which previous investigators were in

  19. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330-390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  20. Modeling Type IIn Supernovae: Understanding How Shock Development Effects Light Curves Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie

    2016-06-01

    Type IIn supernovae are produced when massive stars experience dramatic mass loss phases caused by opacity edges or violent explosions. Violent mass ejections occur quite often just prior to the collapse of the star. If the final episode happens just before collapse, the outward ejecta is sufficiently dense to alter the supernova light-curve, both by absorbing the initial supernova light and producing emission when the supernova shock hits the ejecta. Initially, the ejecta is driven by shock progating through the interior of the star, and eventually expands through the circumstellar medium, forming a cold dense shell. As the shock wave approaches the shell, there is an increase in UV and optical radiation at the location of the shock breakout. We have developed a suite of simple semi-analytical models in order to understand the relationship between our observations and the properties of the expanding SN ejecta. When we compare Type IIn observations to a set of modeled SNe, we begin to see the influence of initial explosion conditions on early UV light curve properties such as peak luminosities and decay rate.The fast rise and decay corresponds to the models representing a photosphere moving through the envelope, while the modeled light curves with a slower rise and decay rate are powered by 56Ni decay. However, in both of these cases, models that matched the luminosity were unable to match the low radii from the blackbody models. The effect of shock heating as the supernova material blasts through the circumstellar material can drastically alter the temperature and position of the photosphere. The new set of models redefine the initial modeling conditions to incorporate an outer shell-like structure, and include late-time shock heating from shocks produced as the supernova ejecta travels through the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium.

  1. ellc: A fast, flexible light curve model for detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Very high quality light curves are now available for thousands of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems as a result of surveys for transiting exoplanets and other large-scale photometric surveys. Aims: I have developed a binary star model (ellc) that can be used to analyse the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems that is fast and accurate, and that can include the effects of star spots, Doppler boosting and light-travel time within binaries with eccentric orbits. Methods: The model represents the stars as triaxial ellipsoids. The apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The model can also be used to calculate the flux-weighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). The main features of the model have been tested by comparison to observed data and other light curve models. Results: The model is found to be accurate enough to analyse the very high quality photometry that is now available from space-spaced instruments, flexible enough to model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and fast enough to enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing. The software package is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A111

  2. ANALYTIC MODELS FOR ALBEDOS, PHASE CURVES, AND POLARIZATION OF REFLECTED LIGHT FROM EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-03-01

    New observational facilities are becoming increasingly capable of observing reflected light from transiting and directly imaged extrasolar planets. In this study, we provide an analytic framework to interpret observed phase curves, geometric albedos, and polarization of giant planet atmospheres. We compute the observables for non-conservative Rayleigh scattering in homogeneous semi-infinite atmospheres using both scalar and vector formalisms. In addition, we compute phase curves and albedos for Lambertian, isotropic, and anisotropic scattering phase functions. We provide analytic expressions for geometric albedos and spherical albedos as a function of the scattering albedo for Rayleigh scattering in semi-infinite atmospheres. Given an observed geometric albedo our prescriptions can be used to estimate the underlying scattering albedo of the atmosphere, which in turn is indicative of the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmosphere. We also study the dependence of polarization in Rayleigh scattering atmospheres on the orbital parameters of the planet-star system, particularly on the orbital inclination. We show how the orbital inclination of non-transiting exoplanets can be constrained from their observed polarization parameters. We consolidate the formalism, solution techniques, and results from analytic models available in the literature, often scattered in various sources, and present a systematic procedure to compute albedos, phase curves, and polarization of reflected light.

  3. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  4. Estimation of fatigue strain-life curves for austenitic stainless steels in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1998-02-12

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code design fatigue curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Unlike those of carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects on fatigue lives of SSs are more pronounced in low-dissolved-oxygen (low-DO) water than in high-DO water, This paper summarizes available fatigue strain vs. life data on the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, DO level, strain range, and strain rate on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs. Statistical models for estimating the fatigue lives of these steels in LWR environments have been updated with a larger data base. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve has been evaluated.

  5. Investigation of Structure in the Light Curves of a Sample of Newly Discovered Long Period Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; Eykholt, R.; Flurchick, K. M.; Kraus, A. L.; Tucker, R. A.; Walker, D. K.

    2015-09-01

    Long period variable stars exhibit hump structures, and possibly flares, in their light curves. While the existence of humps is not controversial, the presence of flaring activity is less clear. Mining of a sky survey database of new variable star discoveries (the first MOTESS-GNAT Variable Star Catalog (MG1-VSC)) has led to identification of 47 such stars for which there are sufficient data to explore the presence of anomalous light curve features. We find a number of hump structures, and see one possible flare, suggesting that they are rare events. We present light curves and measured parameters for these stars, and a population statistical analysis.

  6. Preliminary NIR Late Light Curve of the Type Ia Supernova SN2009nr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Jonathan; Bryngelson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are important in determining the expansion of the universe based on the uniformity of their light curves. It is essential to understand the behavior of these supernovae in order to strengthen our confidence in their use as standard candles. A small, but increasing number of SNe Ia have been observed later than the 200 day epoch in the near-infrared (NIR). Most of these exhibit a flattening of the NIR power, even as the visible light declines at a steady rate. It is unclear as to exactly what causes this behavior, and how typical it is. In order to characterize the late behavior of SNe Ia, images of the supernova SN2009nr were analyzed using the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). These images were taken with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National-Observatory using the FLAMINGOS IR Imaging Spectrometer. The supernova’s magnitude was normalized with respect to the magnitudes of known stars so that traits related to the supernova may be compared to others. We present preliminary NIR (J, H, K) light curves of the observed supernova and compare them to other SNe Ia observed at these epochs.

  7. A Simple Model for the Light Curve Generated by a Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Mordecai-Mark, Mac Low

    1995-01-01

    The impact of a typical Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment produced three light peaks as seen from Earth. The first peak is related to the entry of the fragment into the Jovian atmosphere. The second peak occurs when the exploding fireball rises above Jupiter's limb into direct view from Earth. The third peak, much the brightest, occurs when the ejecta plume falls back on the atmosphere. By contrast, Galileo, which had a direct view of the impacts, saw two peaks, one at entry, and one at plumefall. Here we present a simple, highly idealized model of a ballistic plume, which we then use to fit the observed light curve of the R impact as recorded at Mauna Kea and Mount Palomar. From the light curve we find that the nominal R fragment had diameter 450-500 m and mass approx. 2-3 x 10(exp 13) g. The uncertainty in the mass is probably about a factor of 3, with a smaller event more likely than a larger one.

  8. Newly Discovered AGN and their Multi-year Light Curves from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, R.; Mushotzky, R.

    2014-01-01

    Variability seen at the center of a galaxy is an easy and reliable way to identify AGN. The Kepler space mission provides the ability to find galaxies with very low amplitude variability over a wide range in time delays. We report on a 2 year project to monitor ~400 galaxies with Kepler and our reduction software to stabilize long term photometric trends. We will present light curves for several of our newly discovered AGN with variability measured from the 30 minute to ~2 year timescales. The optical variability that Kepler explores is probably related to accretion disk instabilities, variation in accretion rate or changes in the accretion disk's structure. We developed, in a white paper, a future Kepler project to monitor of order 10,000 galaxies. Statistical analysis of light curves from hundreds of AGN would reveal the physical character of gas, dust or stars falling into AGN or eclipsing the light source and allow better models to be developed of the inner accretion disks/tori. In addition, this project should also find a large number of supernovae and other exotic transient events such as stellar tidal disruption and eta Carinae or P-Cygni type outbursts.

  9. APSIDAL MOTION AND A LIGHT CURVE SOLUTION FOR 13 LMC ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarcik, L.

    2015-12-15

    New CCD observations for 13 eccentric eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54 m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. These systems were observed for their times of minimum and 56 new minima were obtained. These are needed for accurate determination of the apsidal motion. Besides that, in total 436 times of minimum were derived from the photometric databases OGLE and MACHO. The O – C diagrams of minimum timings for these B-type binaries were analyzed and the parameters of the apsidal motion were computed. The light curves of these systems were fitted using the program PHOEBE, giving the light curve parameters. We derived for the first time relatively short periods of the apsidal motion ranging from 21 to 107 years. The system OGLE-LMC-ECL-07902 was also analyzed using the spectra and radial velocities, resulting in masses of 6.8 and 4.4 M{sub ⊙} for the eclipsing components. For one system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20112), the third-body hypothesis was also used to describe the residuals after subtraction of the apsidal motion, resulting in a period of about 22 years. For several systems an additional third light was also detected, which makes these systems suspect for triplicity.

  10. Obtaining the curve “Phase shift vs gray level” of a spatial light modulator Holoeye LC2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Granados-Agustín, F. S.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the process to obtain the curve “Graylevel vs phase shift” of a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) HoloeyeLC2012 is described. This work arises from the need that exists for having a new optical surface testing method at INAOE's Optical Workshop. The SLM was placed in one arm of a Twyman-Green interferometer. The fringe shifts in the interference patterns were produced by displaying the different gray levels in the SLM. The gray level images displayed in the SLM were divided in two equal parts, the upper part was varying the different gray levels from 0 to 255 and the lower part stayed fixed with a gray level of 0 as reference. We show the different phase shifts and the experimental interferograms. From this analysis it was found out that a noticeable phase shift can be obtained from the 50 to the 190 gray levels.

  11. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  12. Kinematics of illumination patterns and light echoes from flashes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Flash-induced light echoes-the observation of light reflected from a burst-have been observed in astronomical settings for more than a century and have been observed in the laboratory recently. Because of the flight time of light, perceived light echoes are different from real light illumination patterns on a scattering plane, neglecting interreflections and non-opaque scattering effects. The shape and motion of real illumination patterns are studied from a spherical flash. Then, ellipsoids of constant time delay for a specifically chosen coordinate system are applied. Generally, perceived light echoes are elliptical annular rings and the center of a light echo will not start at the flash, which leads to light echoes moving angularly toward the flash instead of away from it, a phenomenon actually recorded by other groups. The brightness of perceived light echoes was studied, and maximum brightness occurred close to the flash's projective point on the scattering plane. Two specific examples are given and a magnification effect between perceived echoes and real illumination patterns is proposed. PMID:27607505

  13. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  14. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  15. Stellar granulation as the source of high-frequency flicker in Kepler light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Saar, Steven H.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2014-02-01

    A large fraction of cool, low-mass stars exhibit brightness fluctuations that arise from a combination of convective granulation, acoustic oscillations, magnetic activity, and stellar rotation. Much of the short-timescale variability takes the form of stochastic noise, whose presence may limit the progress of extrasolar planet detection and characterization. In order to lay the groundwork for extracting useful information from these quasi-random signals, we focus on the origin of the granulation-driven component of the variability. We apply existing theoretical scaling relations to predict the star-integrated variability amplitudes for 508 stars with photometric light curves measured by the Kepler mission. We also derive an empirical correction factor that aims to account for the suppression of convection in F-dwarf stars with magnetic activity and shallow convection zones. So that we can make predictions of specific observational quantities, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of granulation light curves using a Lorentzian power spectrum. These simulations allowed us to reproduce the so-called flicker floor (i.e., a lower bound in the relationship between the full light-curve range and power in short-timescale fluctuations) that was found in the Kepler data. The Monte Carlo model also enabled us to convert the modeled fluctuation variance into a flicker amplitude directly comparable with observations. When the magnetic suppression factor described above is applied, the model reproduces the observed correlation between stellar surface gravity and flicker amplitude. Observationally validated models like these provide new and complementary evidence for a possible impact of magnetic activity on the properties of near-surface convection.

  16. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  17. Magnetar-driven Shock Breakout and Double-peaked Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Metzger, Brian D.; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (∼ {10}14 cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths ({T}{{eff}} ≈ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar-driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magnetar heating. A distinct double-peaked light curve may therefore only be conspicuous if thermal heating from the magnetar is suppressed at early times. We describe how such a delay in heating may naturally result from inefficient dissipation and thermalization of the pulsar wind magnetic energy. Without such suppression, the breakout may only be noticeable as a small bump or kink in the early luminosity or color evolution, or as a small but abrupt rise in the photospheric velocity. A similar breakout signature may accompany other central engines in supernovae, such as a black hole accreting fallback material.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick AGN monitoring 2011: light curves (Barth+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. J.; Bennert, V. N.; Canalizo, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gates, E. L.; Greene, J. E.; Li, W.; Malkan, M. A.; Pancoast, A.; Sand, D. J.; Stern, D.; Treu, T.; Woo, J.-H.; Assef, R. J.; Bae, H.-J.; Brewer, B. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Cooper, M. C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Hiner, K. D.; Honig, S. F.; Hsiao, E.; Kandrashoff, M. T.; Lazarova, M. S.; Nierenberg, A. M.; Rex, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Tollerud, E. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    This project was allocated 69 nights at the Lick 3m Shane telescope, distributed between 2011 March 27 and June 13. Observations were conducted using the Kast double spectrograph (3440-5515Å on the blue side and 5410-8200Å on the red side). In order to extend our light curves for two AGNs, we also requested additional observations from other observers using the Kast spectrograph: Mrk 50 from 2011 January through March, and Zw 229-015 in June and July. For Zw 229-015, three additional observations were taken 20-23 days after the end of our main campaign. See section 3. (2 data files).

  19. Discriminating solar and antisolar differential rotation in high-precision light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Arlt, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Context. Surface differential rotation (DR) is one major ingredient of the magnetic field generation process in the Sun and likely in other stars. The term solar-like differential rotation describes the observation that solar equatorial regions rotate faster than polar ones. The opposite effect of polar regions rotating faster than equatorial ones (termed as antisolar DR) has only been observed in a few stars, although there is evidence from theoretical dynamo models. Aims: We present a new method of detecting the sign of DR (i.e., solar-like or antisolar DR) by analyzing long-term high-precision light curves with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Methods: We compute the Lomb-Scargle periodogram and identify a set of significant periods Pk, which we associate with active regions located at different latitudes on the stellar surface. If detectable, the first harmonics (P_k') of these periods were identified to compute their peak-height-ratios rk:= h(P'k)/h(Pk) . Spots rotating at lower latitudes generate less sine-shaped light curves, which requires additional power in the harmonics, and results in larger ratios rk. Comparing different ratios rk and the associated periods Pk yields information about the spot latitudes, and reveals the sign of DR. Results: We tested our method on different sets of synthetic light curves all exhibiting solar-like DR. The number of cases where our method detects antisolar DR is the false-positive rate of our method. Depending on the set of light curves, the noise level, the required minimum peak separation, and the presence or absence of spot evolution, our method fails to detect the correct sign in at most 20%. We applied our method to 50 Kepler G stars and found 21-34 stars with solar-like DR and 5-10 stars with antisolar DR, depending on the minimum peak separation. Conclusions: The method is able to determine the sign of DR in a statistical way with a low false-positive rate. Applying our method to real data might suggest that - within

  20. The light curve of SN 1987A revisited: constraining production masses of radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Timmes, F. X.; Magkotsios, Georgios

    2014-09-01

    We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, and {sup 60}Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Co, {sup 56}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, and {sup 60}Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M({sup 56}Ni) = (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 57}Ni) = (4.1 ± 1.8) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}. Our best fit {sup 44}Ti mass is M({sup 44}Ti) = (0.55 ± 0.17) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for {sup 55}Co and {sup 60}Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M({sup 55}Co) < 7.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 60}Co) < 1.7 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of {sup 57}Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [{sup 57}Ni/{sup 56}Ni] = 2.5 ± 1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.

  1. Infrared light curves of Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts H, Q1 and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shykula, J. T.; Kilkenny, D.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Laney, C. D.

    1995-02-01

    The plumes associated with Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragments H, Q1 and S impacting Jupiter have been observed in the infrared at 2.2 mum. Measurements were carried out in the standard K passband with a time resolution of 5 s. The results are plotted against time to provide a light curve for each of the impacts. A time evolution of the plume for each event is thus illustrated, yielding accurate information about the rise and fall of the plume, in addition to the timing of the peak. Our observations appear to support an explosive model for cometary ablation deep in the Jovian atmosphere.

  2. Effect of repeated insertions of curved sequences in DNA plasmids: a light-scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Stefano; Chirico, Giuseppe; Baldini, Giancarlo; Kapp, U.; Badaracco, G.

    1993-06-01

    The effect of the insertion of different amounts (from 0 to 6) of the curved sequence AluI in pUC18m plasmid (2686 base pairs, bp) is studied by dynamic light scattering. This sequence is a highly repeated 113 base pairs long sequence from Artemia Franciscana shrimp. A 30% compaction of the plasmids containing 2 and 6 adjacent AluI sequences compared to pUC8 plasmid (2717 bp) is observed. Furthermore the behavior of the translational diffusion coefficient Dt versus the number of adjacent AluI insertion is not monotonic.

  3. ellc: Light curve model for eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-03-01

    ellc analyzes the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems. The model represents stars as triaxial ellipsoids, and the apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The code can also calculate the fluxweighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). ellc can model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and can enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing.

  4. IMPROVED DARK ENERGY CONSTRAINTS FROM {approx}100 NEW CfA SUPERNOVA TYPE Ia LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin E-mail: kirshner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-08-01

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sup +0.066} {sub -0.068} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  5. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Challis, Peter; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-06

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sub -0.068}{sup +0.066} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {Delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  6. Collapsar Accretion and the Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Christopher C.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Couch, Sean M.; Kumar, Pawan

    2010-04-01

    We present axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of the long-term accretion of a rotating gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor star, a "collapsar," onto the central compact object, which we take to be a black hole. The simulations were carried out with the adaptive-mesh-refinement code FLASH in two spatial dimensions and with an explicit shear viscosity. The evolution of the central accretion rate exhibits phases reminiscent of the long GRB γ-ray and X-ray light curve, which lends support to the proposal by Kumar et al. that the luminosity is modulated by the central accretion rate. In the first "prompt" phase, the black hole acquires most of its final mass through supersonic quasiradial accretion occurring at a steady rate of ~0.2 M sun s-1. After a few tens of seconds, an accretion shock sweeps outward through the star. The formation and outward expansion of the accretion shock is accompanied with a sudden and rapid power-law decline in the central accretion rate \\dot{M}∝ t^{-2.8}, which resembles the L X vprop t -3 decline observed in the X-ray light curves. The collapsed, shock-heated stellar envelope settles into a thick, low-mass equatorial disk embedded within a massive, pressure-supported atmosphere. After a few hundred seconds, the inflow of low angular momentum material in the axial funnel reverses into an outflow from the thick disk. Meanwhile, the rapid decline of the accretion rate slows down, which is potentially suggestive of the "plateau" phase in the X-ray light curve. We complement our adiabatic simulations with an analytical model that takes into account the cooling by neutrino emission and estimate that the duration of the prompt phase can be ~20 s. The model suggests that the steep decline in GRB X-ray light curves is triggered by the circularization of the infalling stellar envelope at radii where the virial temperature is below 1010 K, such that neutrino cooling is inefficient and an outward expansion of the accretion shock becomes imminent

  7. Supernova Shock Breakout Light Curves and Spectra from CASTRO Multigroup Radiation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of supernova shock breakout with the new multigroup radiation transport version of the CASTRO simulation code. Shock breakout occurs when the outgoing shockwave of a supernova explosion reaches the surface of the progenitor star and produces a bright flash. The breakout flash's spectral temperature, duration, and luminosity carry information about the progenitor star that may otherwise be very difficult to recover. To aid in detection and understanding of this phenomenon, we present integrated light curves and spectra of breakouts from a range of progenitors and explosions, including very low energy supernovae and pair-instability supernovae.

  8. An analysis of long-term light curves of four novalike variables.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraicheva, Z.; Stanishev, V.; Spassovska, I.; Popov, V.

    The long-term light curves of the novalike systems TT Ari, KR Aur, AM Her and MV Lyr, were compiled and analysed in a search for solar-like cyclical behaviour. The frequency analysis shows long-term cyclical modulations of the brightness of the stars, which can be ascribed to changes of the radii of the late type secondaries of the order of ΔR/R ≅ 10-4 - 10-5. Periods of about 250 - 400 days are also suspected for all systems studied here.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curves for the eclipsing binary V1094 Tau (Maxted+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Hutcheon, R. J.; Torres, G.; Lacy, C. H. S.; Southworth, J.; Smalley, B.; Pavlovski, K.; Marschall, L. A.; Clausen, J. V.

    2015-04-01

    Photometric light curves of the detached eclipsing binary V1094 Tau in the Stroemgren u-,v-,b- and y-bands, and in the Johnson V-band. The curves in the Stroemgren bands were obtained with the Stroemgren Automatic Telescope (SAT) at ESO, La Silla. The curves in the V-band were obtained with the NFO telescope in New Mexico and with the URSA telescope at the University of Arkansas. (6 data files).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: An SX Phoenicis Variable light curve (Kim+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Jeon, J.-B.; Kim, S.-L.; Yushchenko, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    We present investigation of V=17mag star, which appears to be SX Phe type variable. Observations at 1.8 and 1.0 meter telescopes of Boyhunsan and Mount Lemon observatories permit us to improve the light elements and to investigate the power spectrum. We applied a Fourier decomposition to the data in order to determine the component frequencies of the synthetic light curve, and five components including a pair of closely separated components of f1=24.6539 and f2=24.8173 c/d were identified. We proposed that one of these two components corresponds to a non-radial oscillation mode. Other observed frequencies are the combinations of the first two. Metallicity of the star was estimated to be [Fe/H]<-2. We also found that one of the faint variable stars, No. 14, in the field is RRc type pulsator. (2 data files).

  11. Perception of light source distance from shading patterns.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Heiko H; Baier, Franziska; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Varying the distance of a light source from an object alters both the intensity and spatial distribution of surface shading patterns. We tested whether observers can use such cues to infer light source distance. Participants viewed stereoscopic renderings of rough objects with diffuse and glossy surfaces, which were illuminated by a point source at a range of distances. In one task, they adjusted the position of a small probe dot in three dimensions to report the apparent location of the light in the scene. In a second task, they adjusted the shading on one object (by moving an invisible light source) until it appeared to be illuminated from the same distance as another object. Participants' responses increased linearly with the true light source distance, suggesting that they have clear intuitions about how light source distance affects shading patterns for a variety of different surfaces. However, there were also systematic errors: Subjects overestimated light source distance in the probe adjustment task, and in both experiments, roughness and glossiness affected responses. We find the pattern of results is predicted surprisingly well by a simplistic model based only on the area of the image that exceeds a certain intensity threshold. Thus, although subjects can report light source distance, they may rely on simple--sometimes erroneous--heuristics to do so. PMID:26868887

  12. Perception of light source distance from shading patterns.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Heiko H; Baier, Franziska; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Varying the distance of a light source from an object alters both the intensity and spatial distribution of surface shading patterns. We tested whether observers can use such cues to infer light source distance. Participants viewed stereoscopic renderings of rough objects with diffuse and glossy surfaces, which were illuminated by a point source at a range of distances. In one task, they adjusted the position of a small probe dot in three dimensions to report the apparent location of the light in the scene. In a second task, they adjusted the shading on one object (by moving an invisible light source) until it appeared to be illuminated from the same distance as another object. Participants' responses increased linearly with the true light source distance, suggesting that they have clear intuitions about how light source distance affects shading patterns for a variety of different surfaces. However, there were also systematic errors: Subjects overestimated light source distance in the probe adjustment task, and in both experiments, roughness and glossiness affected responses. We find the pattern of results is predicted surprisingly well by a simplistic model based only on the area of the image that exceeds a certain intensity threshold. Thus, although subjects can report light source distance, they may rely on simple--sometimes erroneous--heuristics to do so.

  13. Understanding the light curves of the HST-1 knot in M87 with internal relativistic shock waves along its jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, Y.; López-Corona, O.; Mendoza, S.

    2016-10-01

    Knots or blobs observed in astrophysical jets are commonly interpreted as shock waves moving along them. Long-time observations of the HST-1 knot inside the jet of the galaxy M87 have produced detailed multiwavelength light curves. In this paper, we model these light curves using the semi-analytical approach developed by Mendoza et al. This model was developed to account for the light curves produced by working surfaces (blobs) moving along relativistic jets. These working surfaces are generated by periodic oscillations of the injected flow velocity and mass ejection rates at the base of the jet. Using genetic algorithms to fit the parameters of the model, we are able to explain the outbursts observed in the light curves of the HST-1 knot with an accuracy greater than a 2σ statistical confidence level.

  14. A UNIFORM SEARCH FOR SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF HOT JUPITERS IN KEPLER Q2 LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J. L.; Lopez-Morales, M.

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we present the results of searching the Kepler Q2 public data set for the secondary eclipses of 76 hot Jupiter planet candidates from the list of 1235 candidates published by Borucki et al. This search has been performed by modeling both the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curves and new light curves produced via our own photometric pipeline. We derive new stellar and planetary parameters for each system, while calculating robust errors for both. We find 16 systems with 1{sigma}-2{sigma}, 14 systems with 2{sigma}-3{sigma}, and 6 systems with >3{sigma} confidence level secondary eclipse detections in at least one light curve produced via the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve or our own pipeline; however, results can vary depending on the light curve modeled and whether eccentricity is allowed to vary or not. We estimate false alarm probabilities of 31%, 10%, and 6% for the 1{sigma}-2{sigma}, 2{sigma}-3{sigma}, and >3{sigma} confidence intervals, respectively. Comparing each secondary eclipse result to theoretical expectations, we find that the majority of detected planet candidates emit more light than expected owing to thermal blackbody emission in the optical Kepler bandpass, and present a trend of increasing excess emission with decreasing maximum effective planetary temperature. These results agree with previously published optical secondary eclipse data for other hot Jupiters. We explore modeling biases, significant planetary albedos, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium or other thermal emission, significant internal energy generation, and misidentification of brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, or stellar blends as possible causes of both the excess emission and its correlation with expected planetary temperature. Although we find that no single cause is able to explain all of the planet candidates, significant planetary albedos, with a general trend of increasing planetary albedos with decreasing atmospheric temperatures, are

  15. Recurrence plot analysis of nonstationary data: The understanding of curved patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, A.; Kantz, H.; Tiezzi, E.

    2005-08-01

    Recurrence plots of the calls of the Nomascus concolor (Western black crested gibbon) and Hylobates lar (White-handed gibbon) show characteristic circular, curved, and hyperbolic patterns superimposed to the main temporal scale of the signal. It is shown that these patterns are related to particular nonstationarities in the signal. Some of them can be reproduced by artificial signals like frequency modulated sinusoids and sinusoids with time divergent frequency. These modulations are too faint to be resolved by conventional time-frequency analysis with similar precision. Therefore, recurrence plots act as a magnifying glass for the detection of multiple temporal scales in slightly modulated signals. The detected phenomena in these acoustic signals can be explained in the biomechanical context by taking in account the role of the muscles controlling the vocal folds.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of CoRoT-29b (Palle+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Chen, G.; Alonso, R.; Nowak, G.; Deeg, H.; Cabrera, J.; Murgas, F.; Parviainen, H.; Nortmann, L.; Hoyer, S.; Prieto-Arranz, J.; Nespral, D.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Iro, N.

    2016-04-01

    2 transit light curves of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-29b obtained on the nights of 2014/7/31 and 2015/7/8 using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m GTC telescope. The light curves have been integrated over the bandpass of 515-915nm, where the wavelength range of 755-765 nm has been excluded due to presence of strong telluric O2 absorption. (2 data files).

  17. The effect of background galaxy contamination on the absolute magnitude and light curve speed class of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boisseau, John R.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1991-01-01

    Observational data are presented in support of the hypothesis that background galaxy contamination is present in the photometric data of Ia supernovae and that this effect can account for the observed dispersion in the light curve speeds of most of Ia supernovae. The implication is that the observed dispersion in beta is artificial and that most of Ia supernovae have nearly homogeneous light curves. The result supports the notion that Ia supernovae are good standard candles.

  18. Hydrodynamics associated to the X-ray light curve of A0620-00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, Y.; Mendoza, S.

    2015-12-01

    From 1975 to 1976, an outburst was detected in the light curve of the X-ray transient A0620-00 using the Ariel V and SAS-3 experiments. In this article we model the outburst with the hydrodynamical model proposed by Mendoza et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 395:1403, 2009). The physical model is constructed assuming basic mass and momentum conservation laws associated to the motion of the shock waves developed inside the expanding relativistic jet of the source. These internal shock waves are produced as a result of periodic variations of the injected mass and velocity of the flow at the base of the jet. The observations of this X-ray light curve present two clear bumps. The first one is modelled assuming periodic variations of the injected velocity at the base of the jet, while the second one can either be modelled by further velocity oscillations, or by a periodic variation of the mass injection rate at the base of the jet at a latter time. This latter model is statistically more significant for the observed data, than the former. The fitting of the data fixes different parameters of the model, such as the mean mass injection rate at the base of the jet and the oscillation frequency of the flow as measured on the rest frame of the central source.

  19. Period and light-curve study of the contact eclipsing binary V523 Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mahya; Abedi, Abbas; Riazi, Nematollah

    2016-04-01

    CCD photometry of the eclipsing W Uma binary system V523 Cas in U, B, V and RC filters was carried out during eight nights in 2012. The physical and geometrical parameters of this system are obtained. A possible pulsation period of one of the components is obtained by analyzing the residuals of the ephemeris light curve. Our observations contain 16 times of minimum light. We combined these with all available published times of minimum. By fitting a quadratic curve to the O-C values, a new ephemeris of the system is calculated. By attributing the period change to mass transfer, we find a mass transfer rate of 4 ×10-12 M⊙/yr. Also, Period (80.58 yr) and the minimum mass (0.3 M⊙) of a possible third body is estimated. In addition, the possible existence of a fourth body with a mass of order 0.15 M⊙ is discussed. These third and fourth bodies could be low-mass main-sequence stars (red dwarfs).

  20. Spitzer Light Curves of Dusty AGB Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Meixner, Margaret; Riebel, David; Vijh, Uma; Hora, Joe; Boyer, Martha; Cook, Kem; Groenewegen, Martin; Whitelock, Patricia; Ita, Yoshifusa; Feast, Michael; Kemper, Ciska; Marengo, Massimo; Otsuka, Masaaki; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2014-12-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) variable stars are, together with supernovae, the main sources of enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) in processed material, particularly carbon, nitrogen and heavy s-process elements. The dustiest, extreme AGB stars contribute the largest enrichment per star. We propose to measure the first light curves for 32 of the dustiest AGB variable stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the warm Spitzer mission's IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging for monthly imaging measurements. We know most are variable based on dual-epoch observations from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) surveys of the SMC and ground-based near-infrared observations, but we have not observed these dusty SMC stars at the mid-infrared wavelengths available to Spitzer. Only Spitzer will be able to measure the light curve of this key phase of the AGB: the dustiest and indeed final stage of the AGB. Without this information, our developing picture of AGB evolution is decidedly incomplete. The observations we propose will test the validity of AGB evolution models, and, thus, their predictions of the return of mass and nucleosynthetic products to the ISM. A value-added component to this study is that we will obtain variability information on other AGB stars that lie within the fields of view of our observations. This proposal continues the studies we have begun with our Cycle 9 program (pid 90219) and our Cycle 10 program (pid 10154).

  1. Light Curves of Symbiotic Stars in Massive Photometric Surveys I: D-Type Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromadzki, M.; Mikołajewska, J.; Whitelock, P.; Marang, F.

    2009-06-01

    ASAS, MACHO, OGLE and SAAO JHKL light curves of 13 stars, that have at some time been classified as D-type symbiotic stars, are analyzed. Most of the near-IR light curves that have been monitored over many years show long-term changes due to variable dust obscuration, in addition to the stellar pulsation. The distances to these objects are derived from the period-luminosity relation and estimates of the mass-loss rates made from the K_0-[12] color. We reclassify AS 245 as an S-type symbiotic star with a semi-regular cool component and a pulsation period of about one year. The periods of the large amplitude pulsations of SS73 38 (463 days), AS 210 (423 days) and H2-38 (395 days) are estimated for the first time, confirming that they are symbiotic Miras. A comparison of the symbiotic Miras with normal Miras of similar pulsation period shows that the symbiotic stars have on average higher values of K_0-[12]. This may indicate that they have higher mass-loss rates, or more likely that the dust which is being lost by the Mira is trapped within the binary system.

  2. The quiescent light curve and orbital period of GRO J0422+32.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, C.; Ilovaisky, S. A.

    1996-08-01

    CCD photometry of the black hole candidate GRO J0422+32 in quiescence, obtained at Haute-Provence from 1994 November to 1995 February, reveals a double-wave modulation at a period close to the value we found during outbursts and also close to one of the possible periods derived by Filippenko, Matheson and Ho (1995) from spectroscopic observations with the W. M. Keck 10-m telescope. A period of 0.212140+/-0.000003d (5.09136+/-0.00007h) fits all our photometric data from 1993 January to 1995 February and yields a minimum in our light curves at the inferior conjunction of the M star, as determined from the radial velocity data of Filippenko et al. (1995). The quiescent R_c_ band light curve exhibits a changing asymmetry of shape and a variable amplitude. On two consecutive nights the source was found constant to within +/-0.05mag, suggesting an upper limit on the ellipsoidal effect in this band.

  3. A Light Curve Probe of Stellar Surface Convection and Measure of Stellar Surface Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan; Basri, Gibor S.; Pepper, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that high quality light curves, such as those obtained by NASA's Kepler, K2, and the soon-to-be-launched TESS missions, may be used to measure stellar surface gravity via granulation-driven light curve "flicker." Here, we describe our updated and extended the relation, which is now calibrated against a more robust set of asteroseismically derived surface gravities and which we apply to over 28,000 Kepler stars. We discuss how we treat phenomena, such as exoplanet transits and shot noise, that adversely affect the measurement of flicker, and we explore the limitations of the technique. We suggest that flicker may be used to probe convection in stars with surface gravities as low as 1.5, and we show that, in concert with asteroseismically measured surface gravities, it might be used to examine differences in the convective properties of red giant, red clump, and secondary clump stars. Finally, we highlight further applications of flicker, such as astrodensity profiling or its use in studying other types of stars with convective outer layers.

  4. The spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Observations made by the Hard X-ray and Low Energy Gamma-Ray Experiment on board HEAO-1 of the spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts for which localized arrival directions will become available are presented. The burst of October 20, 1977 is found to exhibit a fluence of 0.000031 + or - 0.000005 erg/sq cm over the energy range 0.135-2.05 MeV and a duration of 38.7 sec, while that of November 10, 1977 is found to have a fluence of 0.000021 + or - 0.000008 erg/sq cm between 0.125 and 3 MeV over 2.8 sec. The light curves of both bursts exhibit time fluctuations down to the limiting time resolution of the detectors. The spectrum of the October burst can be fit by a power law of index -1.93 + or -0.16, which is harder than any other gamma-burst spectrum yet reported. The spectrum of the second burst is softer (index -2.4 + or - 0.7), and is consistent with the upper index in the double power law fit to the burst of April 27, 1972.

  5. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  6. EXTRACTING PERIODIC TRANSIT SIGNALS FROM NOISY LIGHT CURVES USING FOURIER SERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-07-01

    We present a simple and powerful method for extracting transit signals associated with a known transiting planet from noisy light curves. Assuming the orbital period of the planet is known and the signal is periodic, we illustrate that systematic noise can be removed in Fourier space at all frequencies by only using data within a fixed time frame with a width equal to an integer number of orbital periods. This results in a reconstruction of the full transit signal, which on average is unbiased despite no prior knowledge of either the noise or the transit signal itself being used in the analysis. The method therefore has clear advantages over standard phase folding, which normally requires external input such as nearby stars or noise models for removing systematic components. In addition, we can extract the full orbital transit signal (360°) simultaneously, and Kepler-like data can be analyzed in just a few seconds. We illustrate the performance of our method by applying it to a dataset composed of light curves from Kepler with a fake injected signal emulating a planet with rings. For extracting periodic transit signals, our presented method is in general the optimal and least biased estimator and could therefore lead the way toward the first detections of, e.g., planet rings and exo-trojan asteroids.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A TIGHT CORRELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH 'CANONICAL' LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michal; Willingale, Richard; Capozziello, Salvatore; Cardone, Vincenzo Fabrizio E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.p E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.i

    2010-10-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts z>8 are fascinating objects to study due to their still unexplained relativistic outburst mechanisms and their possible use to test cosmological models. Our analysis of 77 GRB afterglows with known redshifts revealed a physical subsample of long GRBs with the canonical plateau breaking to power-law light curves with a significant luminosity L*{sub X}-break time T*{sub a} correlation in the GRB rest frame. This subsample forms approximately the upper envelope of the studied distribution. We have also found a similar relation for a small sample of GRB afterglows that belong to the intermediate class between the short and the long ones. It proves that within the full sample of afterglows there exist physical subclasses revealed here by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. The afterglows with regular ('canonical') light curves obey not only the mentioned tight physical scaling, but-for a given T*{sub a}-the more regular progenitor explosions lead to preferentially brighter afterglows.

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Early Light Curves of Type IIP Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Piro, Anthony L.; Renzo, Mathieu; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-10-01

    The early rise of Type IIP supernovae (SN IIP) provides important information for constraining the properties of their progenitors. This can, in turn, be compared to pre-explosion imaging constraints and stellar models to develop a more complete picture of how massive stars evolve and end their lives. Using the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC), we model the first 40 days of SNe IIP to better understand what constraints can be derived from their early light curves. We use two sets of red supergiant (RSG) progenitor models with zero-age main sequence masses in the range between 9 {M}⊙ and 20 {M}⊙ . We find that the early properties of the light curve depend most sensitively on the radius of the progenitor, and thus provide a relation between the g-band rise time and the radius at the time of explosion. This relation will be useful for deriving constraints on progenitors from future observations, especially in cases where detailed modeling of the entire rise is not practical. When comparing to observed rise times, the radii we find are a factor of a few larger than previous semi-analytic derivations and are generally in better agreement with what is found with current stellar evolution calculations as well as direct observations of RSGs.

  9. The 1991-2012 light curve of the old nova HR Lyrae

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Shears, J.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W.; Henden, A. A. E-mail: bunburyobservatory@hotmail.com E-mail: Jeff.Robertson@atu.edu

    2014-05-01

    The 22 yr light curve of HR Lyr, acquired with a typical cadence of 2-6 days, is examined for periodic and quasi-periodic variations. No persistent periodicities are revealed. Rather, the light curve variations often take the form of nearly linear rises and falls having typical e-folding times of about 100 days. Occasional ∼0.6 mag outbursts are also seen, with properties similar to those of small outbursts found in some nova-like cataclysmic variables. When the photometry is formed into yearly averages, a decline of 0.012 ± 0.005 mag yr{sup –1} is apparent, consistent with the fading of irradiation-induced M-dot following the nova. The equivalent width of Hα is tabulated at three epochs over the interval 1986-2008 in order to compare with a recent result for DK Lac in which Hα was found to be fading 50 yr after the nova. However, our results for such a fading in HR Lyr are inconclusive.

  10. Seeing double: the frequency and detectability of double-peaked superluminous supernova light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of double-peaked light curves in some superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) offers an important new clue to their origins. We examine the published photometry of all Type Ic SLSNe, finding 14 objects with constraining data or limits around the time of explosion. Of these, eight (including the already identified SN 2006oz and LSQ14bdq) show plausible flux excess at the earliest epochs, which deviate by 2-9σ from polynomial fits to the rising light curves. Simple scaling of the LSQ14bdq data show that they are all consistent with a similar double-peaked structure. PS1-10pm provides multicolour UV data indicating a temperature of Tbb = 25000 ± 5000 K during the early `bump' phase. We find that a double-peak cannot be excluded in any of the other six objects, and that this behaviour may be ubiquitous. The homogeneity of the observed bumps is unexpected for interaction-powered models. Engine-powered models can explain the observations if all progenitors have extended radii or the central engine drives shock breakout emission several days after the supernova explosion.

  11. CLASSICAL NOVAE IN ANDROMEDA: LIGHT CURVES FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY AND GALEX

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yi; Lou Yuqing; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Neill, James D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Nugent, Peter E.; Law, Nicholas M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-06-20

    We present optical light curves of 29 novae in M31 during the 2009 and 2010 observing seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The dynamic and rapid cadences in PTF monitoring of M31, from one day to ten minutes, provide excellent temporal coverage of nova light curves, enabling us to record the photometric evolution of M31 novae in unprecedented detail. We also detect eight of these novae in the near-ultraviolet (UV) band with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Novae M31N 2009-10b and M31N 2010-11a show prominent UV emission peaking a few days prior to their optical maxima, possibly implying aspherical outbursts. Additionally, our blueshifted spectrum of the recent outburst of PT And (M31N 2010-12a) indicates that it is a recurrent nova in M31 and not a dwarf nova in the Milky Way as was previously assumed. Finally, we systematically searched for novae in all confirmed globular clusters (GCs) of M31 and found only M31N 2010-10f associated with Bol 126. The specific nova rate in the M31 GC system is thus about one per year, which is not enhanced relative to the rate outside the GC system.

  12. POST-FLARE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES EXPLAINED WITH THERMAL INSTABILITY OF LOOP PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Reale, F.; Landi, E.; Orlando, S.

    2012-02-10

    In the present work, we study the C8 flare that occurred on 2000 September 26 at 19:49 UT and observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation spectrometer from the beginning of the impulsive phase to well beyond the disappearance in the X-rays. The emission first decayed progressively through equilibrium states until the plasma reached 2-3 MK. Then, a series of cooler lines, i.e., Ca X, Ca VII, Ne VI, O IV, and Si III (formed in the temperature range log T = 4.3-6.3 under equilibrium conditions), are emitted at the same time and all evolve in a similar way. Here, we show that the simultaneous emission of lines with such a different formation temperature is due to thermal instability occurring in the flaring plasma as soon as it has cooled below {approx}2 MK. We can qualitatively reproduce the relative start time of the light curves of each line in the correct order with a simple (and standard) model of a single flaring loop. The agreement with the observed light curves is greatly improved, and a slower evolution of the line emission is predicted, if we assume that the model loop consists of an ensemble of subloops or strands heated at slightly different times. Our analysis can be useful for flare observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

  13. A Light Curve And Period Analysis Of AE Ursae Majoris, CY Aquarii, And DY Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Iverson, E. P.; Jolley, J. W.; Joner, L. A.; Swenson, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a light curve analysis of three high amplitude delta Scuti stars (HADs). Data for this presentation were all secured during spring and fall of 2007. Most of the observations were obtained using the facilities of the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. The variable stars we observed in this investigation include AE Ursae Majoris, CY Aquarii, and DY Pegasi. We present evidence for small period changes as well as an analysis of the light curve components for each of the variables. We compare the results obtained in the present investigation with prior studies of these same targets. This investigation is part of an initiative to provide a mentored learning environment at the West Mountain Observatory and to promote a variety of undergraduate research experiences. Tools developed in this investigation include the data reduction procedures that enable us to process the several thousand CCD frames that are secured each night as raw observations. We thank the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University for the continued support of mentored undergraduate research.

  14. Modeling the Light Curve of the Classical Nova v723 Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Ryan; Hamilton, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    On August 24th 1995, the classical nova v723 Cassiopeia (v723 Cas) experienced a sudden thermonuclear outburst, a process by which hydrogen-rich material is accreted onto the surface of a white dwarf and ignited. Observations of the binary system from the last decade suggest that v723 Cas is still emitting in the X-rays as a Super-Soft-Source (SSS). Consequently, it has been hypothesized that v723 Cas has evolved into a permanent SSS and thus has begun its approach to the Chandrasekhar limit. For this reason v723 Cas has been closely followed since its original eruption. Here we present photometric data over a span of seven years (2006 through 2013) taken with the 31” telescope at the National Undergraduate Research Observatory (NURO) in Flagstaff, Arizona. A photometric analysis of the data produced light curves in the optical bands. Modeling of the binary system was also performed using the eclipsing binary star simulator Nightfall for comparison with observations. The data analyzed here reveal an asymmetric light curve, the overall structure of which exhibits a subtle variation in magnitude from year to year.

  15. Contribution of Sun-like faculae to the light-curve modulation of young active dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondoin, P.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:The time variability of the broadband solar irradiance depends not only on the intrinsic evolution and visibility modulation of sunspots but also on that of faculae that become brighter near the limb during the solar rotation. Sun-like faculae around spots could also play a significant role in modulating the broadband visible flux of active dwarfs. It is the aim of the present study to test this hypothesis. Methods: I analyzed high accuracy light-curves of two active dwarfs obtained with the MOST satellite during several stellar rotation periods. The observed time series were fitted using a model that takes into account not only starspot contributions but also the areas of faculae in active regions and their bolometric contrast. Results: A low value of the mean ratio of faculae to cool spot areas in active regions provides the best description of ɛ Eri and κ Ceti light curves. Conclusions: Although not conclusive, this result suggests that the ratio of faculae to cool spot areas decreases in stars somewhat more active than the Sun. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  16. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  17. Type IIP supernova progenitor properties from Pan-STARRS1 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nathan; Soderberg, A. M.; Pan-STARRS1 CfA Supernova Group

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a comprehensive and uniform analysis of the light curves of more than 100 spectroscopically-confirmed Type II supernovae discovered by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. Our sample is drawn from more than 4 years of multi-band optical/NIR (grizy) imaging from the PS1 Medium-Deep Survey (MDS). We have developed and applied a Bayesian methodology for modeling the supernova light curves. This framework robustly models available data and produces constraints on the full, multiwavelength evolution of each object in the sample, even when observations are sparse or coverage is limited. We focus on the most common class of massive star explosion, Type IIP supernovae, with a typical redshift of z = 0.1 in our sample. Utilizing the deep imaging, high cadence (1-2 day), and long survey duration of the PS1 MDS, we test for variation in the rise time behavior, plateau duration, and temperature evolution of the supernovae. We discuss inferences on the distribution of progenitor star and explosion properties (mass, radius, and energy) permitted by these measurements, and their implications for our understanding of the death processes of massive stars in the local universe.

  18. Phase response curve to 1 h light pulses for the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerard A; Hudson, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    While much is known about the circadian systems of rodents, chronobiological studies of other mammalian groups have been limited. One of the most extensively studied nonrodent species, both in the laboratory and in the wild, is the European rabbit. The aim of this study was to extend knowledge of the rabbit circadian system by examining its phasic response to light. Twelve Dutch-Himalayan cross rabbits of both sexes were allowed to free-run in constant darkness and then administered 1 h light pulses (1000 lux) at multiple predetermined circadian times. Changes in the phase of the rabbits' circadian wheel-running rhythms were measured after each light pulse and used to construct a phase-response curve (PRC). The rabbits' PRC and free-running period (τ) conformed to the empirical regularities reported for other predominantly nocturnal animals, including rodents and predatory marsupials. The results of the study are thus consistent with reports that the rabbit is essentially a nocturnal animal and show that it can entrain to light/dark (LD) cycles via discrete phase shifts. Knowledge about the rabbit's circadian range of entrainment to LD cycles gained in this study will be useful for examining the putative circadian processes believed to underlie the unusual rhythm of very brief, once-daily nest visits by nursing rabbit mothers and other nursing lagomorphs. PMID:27305519

  19. Laser Beam Shaping For Lithography on Inclined and Curved Surfaces Using a liquid crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatabi, Javad R.; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Tamir, Dan; Pandey, Kumar

    2013-03-01

    An exposure tool for lithography on non-flat substrates that includes a real time photoresist thickness and surface topography monitor is under development at Texas State University. Exposure dose and focusing are corrected on curved parts of the sample using novel laser beam shaping techniques: two approaches using a Holoeye liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) are being investigated: (1) the implementation of multiple lenses with different focal lengths to split the beam into several parts and keeping each part in focus depending on sample topography; (2) the implementation of a tilted lens function resulting in a tilt of the image plane. Image quality is limited by quantization aberration, caused by the phase modulator's bit depth limitation, and pixelation aberration, caused by the modulator's pixel size. A statistical analysis on lenses with different focal lengths provides a detailed description of the mentioned aberrations. The image quality, i.e. resolution and contrast of both techniques, are determined from developed photoresist patterns on curved samples and compared to the theory.

  20. Design a light pattern of multiple concentric circles for LED fishing lamps using Fourier series and an energy mapping method.

    PubMed

    Shen, S C; Li, J S; Huang, M C

    2014-06-01

    Fourier series and an energy mapping method were used in this study to design a lens that produces a light pattern of multiple concentric circles (LPMCC) for a light-emitting diode (LED) fishing lamp. Fourier series were used to represent the light intensity distribution curve (LIDC) of the LPMCC light pattern. Energy mapping involves performing angular energy mapping based on the LIDCs of an LED light source and LPMCC to design a freeform lens. Type I and Type II LPMCC lenses were designed according to the phototaxis behavior of fish to create a LPMCC light pattern of interleaving light-dark zones that attracts fish shoals to stay in an area for a long period. The experimental results indicated that, in comparing the LIDCs of the Type I and II lenses with the respective simulation values, the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) value reached 96%. According to a 24-hour observation of the phototaxis of Poecilia reticulata to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed light pattern to attract fish, when a fish shoal was habituated to a light source that emitted constant illumination light, it gradually moved away from the intense light zone and hovered around the junction of the light and dark zones. In the future, the design used in this study can be applied to LED fishing lamps to replace traditional fishing lamps.

  1. Design a light pattern of multiple concentric circles for LED fishing lamps using Fourier series and an energy mapping method.

    PubMed

    Shen, S C; Li, J S; Huang, M C

    2014-06-01

    Fourier series and an energy mapping method were used in this study to design a lens that produces a light pattern of multiple concentric circles (LPMCC) for a light-emitting diode (LED) fishing lamp. Fourier series were used to represent the light intensity distribution curve (LIDC) of the LPMCC light pattern. Energy mapping involves performing angular energy mapping based on the LIDCs of an LED light source and LPMCC to design a freeform lens. Type I and Type II LPMCC lenses were designed according to the phototaxis behavior of fish to create a LPMCC light pattern of interleaving light-dark zones that attracts fish shoals to stay in an area for a long period. The experimental results indicated that, in comparing the LIDCs of the Type I and II lenses with the respective simulation values, the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) value reached 96%. According to a 24-hour observation of the phototaxis of Poecilia reticulata to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed light pattern to attract fish, when a fish shoal was habituated to a light source that emitted constant illumination light, it gradually moved away from the intense light zone and hovered around the junction of the light and dark zones. In the future, the design used in this study can be applied to LED fishing lamps to replace traditional fishing lamps. PMID:24921540

  2. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXVIII - Ultraviolet light curves for Alpha Lupi and BW Vulpeculae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Photometric data from the Wisconsin Experiment Package on OAO-2 have been used to construct light curves at three ultraviolet wavelengths for Alpha Lup and at seven wavelengths for BW Vul. Both stars are well-known variables of the Beta Cephei (Beta Canis Majoris) type. The light curves for Alpha Lup are in good agreement with the radial-velocity period. A temperature variation of 400-500 K is derived. The BW Vul light curves confirm recent ephemerides based on a secularly varying period and show a stillstand near light maximum at some wavelengths. Both stars exhibit increasing light amplitude at the shortest ultraviolet wavelengths. There is little evidence for cycle-to-cycle variations on a time scale of the order of 1 day.

  3. Variability in Proto-planetary Nebulae. I. Light Curve Studies of 12 Carbon-rich Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Maupin, Richard E.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.

    2010-02-01

    We have carried out long-term (14 years) V and R photometric monitoring of 12 carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae. The light and color curves display variability in all of them. The light curves are complex and suggest multiple periods, changing periods, and/or changing amplitudes, which are attributed to pulsation. A dominant period has been determined for each and found to be in the range of ~150 days for the coolest (G8) to 35-40 days for the warmest (F3). A clear, linear inverse relationship has been found in the sample between the pulsation period and the effective temperature and also an inverse relationship between the amplitude of light variation and the effective temperature. These are consistent with the expectation for a pulsating post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star evolving toward higher temperature at constant luminosity. The published spectral energy distributions and mid-infrared images show these objects to have cool (200 K), detached dust shells and published models imply that intensive mass loss ended 400-2000 years ago. The detection of periods as long as 150 days in these requires a revision in the published post-AGB evolution models that couple the pulsation period to the mass loss rate and that assume that intensive mass loss ended when the pulsation period had decreased to 100 days. This revision will have the effect of extending the timescale for the early phases of post-AGB evolution. It appears that real time evolution in the pulsation periods of individual objects may be detectable on the timescale of two or three decades.

  4. VARIABILITY IN PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULAE. I. LIGHT CURVE STUDIES OF 12 CARBON-RICH OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu Wenxian; Maupin, Richard E.; Spitzbart, Bradley D. E-mail: wen.lu@valpo.ed E-mail: bspitzbart@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-02-01

    We have carried out long-term (14 years) V and R photometric monitoring of 12 carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae. The light and color curves display variability in all of them. The light curves are complex and suggest multiple periods, changing periods, and/or changing amplitudes, which are attributed to pulsation. A dominant period has been determined for each and found to be in the range of approx150 days for the coolest (G8) to 35-40 days for the warmest (F3). A clear, linear inverse relationship has been found in the sample between the pulsation period and the effective temperature and also an inverse relationship between the amplitude of light variation and the effective temperature. These are consistent with the expectation for a pulsating post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star evolving toward higher temperature at constant luminosity. The published spectral energy distributions and mid-infrared images show these objects to have cool (200 K), detached dust shells and published models imply that intensive mass loss ended 400-2000 years ago. The detection of periods as long as 150 days in these requires a revision in the published post-AGB evolution models that couple the pulsation period to the mass loss rate and that assume that intensive mass loss ended when the pulsation period had decreased to 100 days. This revision will have the effect of extending the timescale for the early phases of post-AGB evolution. It appears that real time evolution in the pulsation periods of individual objects may be detectable on the timescale of two or three decades.

  5. UBVRI Light Curves of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 7469 During 1990-1998: Microvariability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. I.

    2000-02-01

    Observations of the nuclear region of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 obtained at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory with the 1.25 m telescope are presented. During 64 nights on nine observational runs between 1990 September 24 and 1998 October 22 in each spectral band of the Johnson UBVRI system, about 1500 measurements have been performed simultaneously through the round aperture 20" in diameter using differential photometry techniques. The estimated accuracy of each measurement is about 0.01 mag. During the observing period 1990-1996 the mean luminosity of the nucleus was almost constant; only overlapping brightness fluctuations were observed. The mean luminosity level has been raised in 1996 October. The peak amplitude (maximum flux/minimum flux) Fmax/Fmin=2.09 on the light curves was observed in the U band, while the minimum amplitude Fmax/Fmin=1.32 was in the I band for the entire observation period. Using structure function (SF) analysis, the following conclusions have been made: (1) Long-term variability is caused by the same processes in the optical, because the slope b of the SF is approximately equal for all wave bands, except for the I band the slope is appreciably distinguished from the others. This would be an indication of the presence of an independent IR energy source in NGC 7469. (2) Considering the same time interval (from 6 minutes to 2 hr) for intranight variability on SFs at different wave bands, one can conclude that flicker noise causes variations observed on the light curve at the UV region (U and B bands), while at the near-IR region the light curve is formed by mixed shot noise and flicker noise-the greater the wavelength, the more the contribution of shot noise processes. (3) On intranight light curves of the NGC 7469 there exist rapid flares with durations ~25 minutes at U band, ~55 minutes at B, V bands, and ~2 hr at R, I bands-a typical timescale of intranight variability increasing with the increasing wavelength. In order to examine the

  6. The Multi-color Light Curves of the W UMa type Contact Binary EP Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.-P.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, K.; He, J.-J.; Zhao, E.-G.; Zhou, X.

    2013-10-01

    New multi-color CCD photometric light curves of the eclipsing binary EP And were obtained over six nights in 2006, 2011, and 2012. Using the Wilson-Devinney code, we computed the photometric elements of this system. It was discovered that EP And is a W-type W UMa contact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 2.685 and a degree of contact factor f = 24.9%, rather than an A-type system. Combining 28 newly determined times of minimum light derived from 1999 to 2012 with others collected from the literature, a long-term increase (dP/dt = +5.22 × 10-8 days yr-1) with a sinusoidal variation (A = 0.0109 days T = 40.89 yr) in the orbital period was found. The orbital period secular increases may be interpreted as conservative mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one, and cyclic variations of the orbital period may be caused by the light-travel time effect through the presence of a third body. The evolutionary status and the age of the system are also discussed.

  7. THE MULTI-COLOR LIGHT CURVES OF THE W UMa TYPE CONTACT BINARY EP ANDROMEDAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, W.-P.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, K.; He, J.-J.; Zhao, E.-G.; Zhou, X.

    2013-10-01

    New multi-color CCD photometric light curves of the eclipsing binary EP And were obtained over six nights in 2006, 2011, and 2012. Using the Wilson-Devinney code, we computed the photometric elements of this system. It was discovered that EP And is a W-type W UMa contact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 2.685 and a degree of contact factor f = 24.9%, rather than an A-type system. Combining 28 newly determined times of minimum light derived from 1999 to 2012 with others collected from the literature, a long-term increase (dP/dt = +5.22 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}) with a sinusoidal variation (A = 0.0109 days; T = 40.89 yr) in the orbital period was found. The orbital period secular increases may be interpreted as conservative mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one, and cyclic variations of the orbital period may be caused by the light-travel time effect through the presence of a third body. The evolutionary status and the age of the system are also discussed.

  8. GLOBAL MAPPING OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS FROM SCATTERED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Fujii, Yuka

    2010-09-10

    Scattered lights from terrestrial exoplanets provide valuable information about their planetary surface. Applying the surface reconstruction method proposed by Fujii et al. to both diurnal and annual variations of scattered light, we develop a reconstruction method of land distribution with both longitudinal and latitudinal resolutions. We find that one can recover a global map of an idealized Earth-like planet on the following assumptions: (1) cloudlessness, (2) a face-on circular orbit, (3) known surface types and their reflectance spectra, (4) lack of atmospheric absorption, (5) known rotation rate, (6) a static map, and (7) the absence of a moon. Using the dependence of light curves on planetary obliquity, we also show that the obliquity can be measured by adopting the {chi}{sup 2} minimization or the extended information criterion. We demonstrate the feasibility of our methodology by applying it to a multi-band photometry of a cloudless model Earth with future space missions such as the occulting ozone observatory (O3). We conclude that future space missions can estimate both the surface distribution and the obliquity at least for cloudless Earth-like planets within 5 pc.

  9. Light curve solutions of the eccentric Kepler binaries KIC 4281895 and KIC 5115178 with tidally-induced humps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Vasileva, Doroteya

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents our light curve solutions of the Keplerdata of two eccentric, eclipsing binaries: KIC 4281895 and KIC 5115178. The derived orbital and stellar parameters reveal that their components are of G spectral type and undergo partial eclipses. We found tidally-induced light humps around the periastron phases of the two targets which are appearances of the recently discovered "heartbeat" phenomenon.

  10. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting; Duan, Xiaoxi

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  11. The EB factory project. I. A fast, neural-net-based, general purpose light curve classifier optimized for eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (∼60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  12. The EB Factory Project. I. A Fast, Neural-net-based, General Purpose Light Curve Classifier Optimized for Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (~60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  13. Atlas of the mean light curves of the Mira-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkina, L. S.; Andronov, I. L.

    For 62 Mira-type stars (best covered by the AAVSO observations published by Mattei (1979)) the mean curves have been fitted by trigonometric polynomials with an optimal number of harmonics (program by Andronov (1994)). The characteristics of the mean curve and of the individual harmonics are tabulated. The correlation analysis of the pairs of these mean characteristics is made. Among them: the amplitude r_j of the main wave (j = 1), trial (j-1)th harmonic in stellar magnitudes, phase phi_j of the maximum brightness of the trial wave, ratio r_j/r_1 of the amplitude of the amplitude of the harmonic to the amplitude of the main harmonic wave, shift phi_j-j phi_1 of the phase of the trial harmonic relatively to the main wave etc. have been calculated. Three diagrams have been considered: "period - (r_2/r_1)", "period - (phi_2 - phi_1)","(r_2 / r_1) - (phi_2 - phi_1)", where index "1" indicates a main wave. The majority of the stars exhibit negative shift of the phase of the first harmonic phi_2 with respect to the main wave phi_1. Maximal negative shifts of the phases are characteristic for the stars with values of the period P < 250^d and with P >= 400^d. Points with maximal positive phase shifts agree well with total picture for the negative ones. Twelve stars, which are characterized by symmetrical light curves (phi_2 - phi_1 = 0), form a homogeneous group according to their spectral types. This group corresponds to early spectral subclasses of type M (from M0 to M5). The more detailed analysis of the pairs of these and other mean characteristics allow to separate the Mira-type stars into the groups of homogeneous physical and evolutionary state. These groups are compared with that proposed by Mennessier (1985).

  14. Light-Curve Modelling Constraints on the Obliquities and Aspect Angles of the Young Fermi Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed gamma-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity alpha and of the line of sight angle zeta, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different gamma-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit gamma-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their gamma-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus gamma-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (alpha, zeta) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and gamma-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (alpha, gamma) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the gamma-ray only fit leads to underestimated alpha or zeta when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main alpha-zeta plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favored in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of a on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived gamma-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from

  15. Light curves for off-centre ignition models of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S. A.; Sauer, D. N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2007-06-01

    Motivated by recent models involving off-centre ignition of Type Ia supernova explosions, we undertake three-dimensional time-dependent radiation transport simulations to investigate the range of bolometric light-curve properties that could be observed from supernovae in which there is a lop-sided distribution of the products from nuclear burning. We consider both a grid of artificial toy models which illustrate the conceivable range of effects and a recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion model. We find that observationally significant viewing angle effects are likely to arise in such supernovae and that these may have important ramifications for the interpretation of the observed diversity of Type Ia supernova and the systematic uncertainties which relate to their use as standard candles in contemporary cosmology.

  16. PERIOD CHANGES AND FOUR-COLOR LIGHT CURVES OF ACTIVE CONTACT BINARY VW BOOTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Li, L.-J.

    2011-05-15

    The secured four-color light curves of VW Boo were analyzed with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. It is confirmed that VW Boo is a shallow W-type contact binary system with a degree of contact factor f = 10.8%({+-} 0.5%). Two dark spots were found on the massive cool component this time. They cause an unequal depth of the two maxima. A period investigation based on all available visual, photographic, CCD, and photoelectric data shows that the period of the system includes a long-term decrease (dP/dt = -1.454 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}) and an oscillation (A{sub 3} = 0.0059 days; T{sub 3} = 25.96 years). These may be caused by mass transfer, angular momentum loss, and cyclic magnetic activity.

  17. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF SN 1987A: THE SOFT X-RAY LIGHT CURVE REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Helder, E. A.; Broos, P. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Dewey, D.; Dwek, E.; McCray, R.; Park, S.; Racusin, J. L.; Zhekov, S. A.

    2013-02-10

    We report on the present stage of SN 1987A as observed by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We reanalyze published Chandra observations and add three more epochs of Chandra data to get a consistent picture of the evolution of the X-ray fluxes in several energy bands. We discuss the implications of several calibration issues for Chandra data. Using the most recent Chandra calibration files, we find that the 0.5-2.0 keV band fluxes of SN 1987A have increased by {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} per year since 2009. This is in contrast with our previous result that the 0.5-2.0 keV light curve showed a sudden flattening in 2009. Based on our new analysis, we conclude that the forward shock is still in full interaction with the equatorial ring.

  18. HZ Her/Her X-1: Study of the light curve dips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igna, Ciprian Dacian

    The HZ Her/Her X-1 X-ray binary exhibits rapid and variable X-ray absorption features. These were noticed soon after the discovery of its periodic flux variations, such as X-ray pulsations and eclipses, and were named light curve dips by Giacconi et al. 1973. Their properties were analyzed, debated and documented ever since. The largest existing set of detailed observations of Her X-1 are contained in the data archive of NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). From this entire light curve, several hundred new light curve dips were documented, based on X-ray Softness Ratio (SR), making this thesis the most extensive study of HZ Her/Her X-1's dips to date. The dips were classified into 12 different categories in order to study their statistical distribution, intensity, duration, symmetry and SR evolution. Some dips properties depend on Her X-1's 35-day X-ray cycle, which is caused by the precessing disk around the neutron star. The 35-day phase of dips was determined using Turn-On (TO) times calculated from the February 1996 - December 2009 RXTE/All Sky Monitor (ASM) light curve. 147 TOs were found by cross-correlation with X-ray cycle templates, and the 22 Burst and Transient Source Experiment TOs were confirmed. Thus this study also has the longest time period yet for the analysis of the 35-day X-ray cycle. The set of 147 TOs does not correlate with 0.2 or 0.7 orbital phases, disproving the reports over the past 30 years. The ASM-based 35-day cycle lengths range from 33.2 to 36.7 days, with an average of 34.7 +/- 0.2 days. The observed timing of dips is illustrated in the 35-day phase vs. orbital phase plot, and compared to models. The current large set of dips gives much better detail than that of Crosa & Boynton 1980. A model for dips is developed here, which takes dips to be caused by blockage of the line of sight to the neutron star by the site of the accretion stream - disk collision. An extensive investigation of the model

  19. The EROS-2 Light Curve Server (ELCS), a tool for stellar astrophysics and some associated results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, J. B.; Lesquoy, É.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Tisserand, P.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Milsztajn, A.

    2007-07-01

    Between July 1996 and March 2003 the EROS-2 (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) collaboration has conducted a large photometric survey mainly towards the Magellanic Clouds and the Galactic centre, in order to detect the baryonic dark matter in the Halo by microlensing effect. If it is now recognized that massive compact objects are not the major component of the Halo, tens of millions of light curves are now available for the stellar community. A specific server hosted by a CEA machine has been developped, in order to open a public access to these data. In its present configuration the so-called ELCS server contains more than 32 millions of Magellanic Clouds objects. The server is presented together with recent results of data mining in the EROS-2 database, including the detection of the first R Coronae Borealis stars in the SMC and a systematic search of double mode objects.

  20. Correlation Analysis of Optical and Radio Light Curves for a Large Sample of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Smith, A. G.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.

    1995-08-01

    The Rosemary Hill Observatory has accumulated internally consistent light curves extending over as much as 26 years for a large sample of active galactic nuclei. Forty-six of these optical records have been compared with similar radio records from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Algonquin Radio Observatory. For 18 objects, pairs of records were sufficiently long and unconfused to allow reliable application of the Discrete Correlation Function analysis; this group included 8 BL Lacertids, 8 quasars, and 2 Seyfert galaxies. Nine of the 18 sources showed positive radio-optical correlations, with the radio events lagging the optical by intervals ranging from 0 to 14 months. Consistent with the relativistic beaming model of the BL Lacertids, the group displaying correlations was dominated by this type of object.

  1. Evidence for Filamentary Jet Structure: The Light Curve of GRB 011211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsson, P.; Hjorth, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pedersen, K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Watson, D.; Jensen, B. L.; Gray, T.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the discovery of the optical afterglow of the X-ray rich, long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 011211, and the oscillatory behavior present in its optical and X-ray afterglow light curve. The time scale of the fluctuations, -1 hour, is much smaller than the time of the observations, -12 hours from the onset of the gamma-ray burst. The character and strength of the fluctuations visible in the optical data are unprecedented, and are inconsistent with causally connected variations in the emission of a symmetric, relativistic blast wave. Moreover, the differential time lag between the short-term variations in X-ray and optical energies suggests they do not arise from the same emitting region. Such variability may imply that local spherical symmetry is broken because the energy content across the jet-emitting surface is not uniform, indicating the detection of a small scale substructure within the jet itself.

  2. Finite source sizes and the information content of macho-type lens search light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Wickramasinghe, W. A. D. T.

    1994-01-01

    If the dark halo matter is primarily composed of Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs) toward the lower end of the possible detection range (less than 10(exp -3) solar mass) a fraction of the lens detection events should involve the lens crossing directly in front of the disk of the background star. Previously, Nemiroff has shown that each crossing would create an inflection point in the light curve of the MACHO event. Such inflection points would allow a measure of the time it took for the lens to cross the stellar disk. Given an independent estimate of the stellar radius by other methods, one could then obtain a more accurate estimate of the velocity of the lens. This velocity could then, in turn, be used to obtain a more accurate estimate of the mass range for the MACHO or disk star doing the lensing.

  3. The Active Contact Binary FU Draconis: Four Color Light Curves and Period Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Qian, Sheng-Bang; He, Jia-Jia; Liao, Wen-Ping; Zhu, Li-Ying; Zhao, Ergang

    2012-06-01

    Secured four color light curves of FU Dra were analyzed with the 2003 version of the Wilson and Devinney (WD) code. It was shown that FU Dra is still a W-type contact binary system, but might have a high fill-out factor (≥ = 26.7% ± 1.0%). A dark spot was introduced on the massive cool component. A period investigation based on all available data shows that the period of the system may include a long-term increase (dP/dt = 8.8±2.9 × 10-8 d yr-1) and an oscillation (semi-amplitude of 0.0024 d, P3 = 7.8 yr). The long-term period decrease may be caused by mass transfer, though the periodic oscillation may be rooted in cyclic magnetic activity.

  4. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g <= 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g <= 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ~0.1-0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  5. Light Curve Analysis for W UMa-Type Eclipsing Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Scott; Peach, N.; Olsen, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report results from summer 2006 in an ongoing study of eclipsing binary stars. Our investigations have focused on the measurement and interpretation of light curves for W UMa-type systems 44i Boötis and VW Cephei. These contact binaries have component stars of spectral type G, and revolve with periods of 6.43 and 6.67 hours. Dome automation and scripting capabilities introduced this summer have significantly reduced experimental uncertainties in our data. In support of previous findings we continue to observe an increase in the orbital period of 44i Boo at a rate of 10.4 µs/epoch or 14.2 ms/yr. Residuals computed after incorporating the increasing period suggest an underlying sinusoidal oscillation with a 61.5 year period and amplitude of 648 seconds. AAPT Member Thomas Olsen is sponsoring the lead presenter, SPS Member Scott Henderson, and the co-presenter, SPS Member Nick Peach.

  6. THE FIRST SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF TYPE Ibc SUPERNOVA MULTI-BAND LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, Maria R.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Cenko, S. Bradley; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Sand, David J.; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2011-11-10

    We present detailed optical photometry for 25 Type Ibc supernovae (SNe Ibc) within d Almost-Equal-To 150 Mpc obtained with the robotic Palomar 60 inch telescope in 2004-2007. This study represents the first uniform, systematic, and statistical sample of multi-band SNe Ibc light curves available to date. We correct the light curves for host galaxy extinction using a new technique based on the photometric color evolution, namely, we show that the (V - R) color of extinction-corrected SNe Ibc at {Delta}t Almost-Equal-To 10 days after V-band maximum is tightly distributed, ((V - R){sub V10}) = 0.26 {+-} 0.06 mag. Using this technique, we find that SNe Ibc typically suffer from significant host galaxy extinction, (E(B - V)) Almost-Equal-To 0.4 mag. A comparison of the extinction-corrected light curves for helium-rich (Type Ib) and helium-poor (Type Ic) SNe reveals that they are statistically indistinguishable, both in luminosity and decline rate. We report peak absolute magnitudes of (M{sub R}) = -17.9 {+-} 0.9 mag and (M{sub R}) = -18.3 {+-} 0.6 mag for SNe Ib and Ic, respectively. Focusing on the broad-lined (BL) SNe Ic, we find that they are more luminous than the normal SNe Ibc sample, (M{sub R}) = -19.0 {+-} 1.1 mag, with a probability of only 1.6% that they are drawn from the same population of explosions. By comparing the peak absolute magnitudes of SNe Ic-BL with those inferred for local engine-driven explosions (GRB-SN 1998bw, XRF-SN 2006aj, and SN 2009bb) we find a 25% probability that relativistic SNe are drawn from the overall SNe Ic-BL population. Finally, we fit analytic models to the light curves to derive typical {sup 56}Ni masses of M{sub Ni} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 and 0.5 M{sub Sun} for SNe Ibc and SNe Ic-BL, respectively. With reasonable assumptions for the photospheric velocities, we further extract kinetic energy and ejecta mass values of M{sub ej} Almost-Equal-To 2 M{sub Sun} and E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 51} erg for SNe Ibc, while for SNe Ic

  7. Light-curve modelling constraints on the obliquities and aspect angles of the young Fermi pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-03-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed γ-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity α and of the line of sight angle ζ, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different γ-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit γ-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their γ-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus γ-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (α,ζ) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and γ-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (α,ζ) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the γ-ray only fit leads to underestimated α or ζ when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main α-ζ plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favoured in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of α on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived γ-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from radio-quiet to radio-loud solutions. For all

  8. An information preserving method for producing full coverage CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Granado, J.; Garrido, R.; Suárez, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    Invalid flux measurements, caused mainly by the South Atlantic Anomaly crossing of the CoRoT satellite, introduce aliases in the periodogram and wrong amplitudes. It has been demonstrated that replacing such invalid data with a linear interpolation is not harmless. On the other side, using power spectrum estimators for unevenly sampled time series is not only less computationally efficient but it leads to difficulties in the interpretation of the results. Therefore, even when the gaps are rather small and the duty cycle is high enough the use of gap-filling methods is a gain in frequency analysis. However, the method must preserve the information contained in the time series. In this work we give a short description of an information preserving method (MIARMA) and show some results when applying it to CoRoT seismo light curves. The method is implemented as the second step of a pipeline for CoRoT data analysis.

  9. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of Four Ultrashort-Period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents light curve solutions of our observations of four new ultrashort-period eclipsing binaries with MS components. Two of them have periods almost at the upper limit (0.22 days) of the ultrashort-period binaries, while the periods of around 0.18 days of CSS J171508.5+350658 and CSS J214633.8+120016 are amongst the shortest known orbital periods. CSS J171410.0+445850, CSS J214633.8+120016 and CSS J224326.0+154532 are overcontact binaries with fillout factors around 0.25 while CSS J171508.5+350658 is a semidetached system. The two targets with shortest periods consist of M dwarfs.

  10. Spectral analysis of stellar light curves by means of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, R.; Ciaramella, A.; Milano, L.; Barone, F.; Longo, G.

    1999-06-01

    Periodicity analysis of unevenly collected data is a relevant issue in several scientific fields. In astrophysics, for example, we have to find the fundamental period of light or radial velocity curves which are unevenly sampled observations of stars. Classical spectral analysis methods are unsatisfactory to solve the problem. In this paper we present a neural network based estimator system which performs well the frequency extraction in unevenly sampled signals. It uses an unsupervised Hebbian nonlinear neural algorithm to extract, from the interpolated signal, the principal components which, in turn, are used by the MUSIC frequency estimator algorithm to extract the frequencies. The neural network is tolerant to noise and works well also with few points in the sequence. We benchmark the system on synthetic and real signals with the Periodogram and with the Cramer-Rao lower bound. This work was been partially supported by IIASS, by MURST 40\\% and by the Italian Space Agency.

  11. Chandra Observations of SN 1987A: The Soft X-Ray Light Curve Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, E. A.; Broos, P. S.; Dewey, D.; Dwek, E.; McCray, R.; Park, S.; Racusin, J. L.; Zhekov, S. A.; Burrows, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the present stage of SN 1987A as observed by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We reanalyze published Chandra observations and add three more epochs of Chandra data to get a consistent picture of the evolution of the X-ray fluxes in several energy bands. We discuss the implications of several calibration issues for Chandra data. Using the most recent Chandra calibration files, we find that the 0.5-2.0 keV band fluxes of SN 1987A have increased by approximately 6 x 10(exp-13) erg s(exp-1)cm(exp-2) per year since 2009. This is in contrast with our previous result that the 0.5-2.0 keV light curve showed a sudden flattening in 2009. Based on our new analysis, we conclude that the forward shock is still in full interaction with the equatorial ring.

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts from Magnetic Reconnection: Variability and Robustness of Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The dissipation mechanism that powers gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains uncertain almost half a century after their discovery. The two main competing mechanisms are the extensively studied internal shocks and the less studied magnetic reconnection. Here we consider GRB emission from magnetic reconnection accounting for the relativistic bulk motions that it produces in the jet's bulk rest frame. Far from the source the magnetic field is almost exactly normal to the radial direction, suggesting locally quasi-spherical thin reconnection layers between regions of oppositely directed magnetic field. We show that if the relativistic motions in the jet's frame are confined to such a quasi-spherical uniform layer, then the resulting GRB light curves are independent of their direction distribution within this layer. This renders previous results for a delta-function velocity-direction distribution applicable to a much more general class of reconnection models, which are suggested by numerical simulations. Such models that vary in their velocity-direction distribution differ mainly in the size of the bright region that contributes most of the observed flux at a given emission radius or observed time. The more sharply peaked this distribution, the smaller this bright region, and the stronger the light curve variability that may be induced by deviations from a uniform emission over the thin reconnection layer, which may be expected in a realistic GRB outflow. This is reflected both in the observed image at a given observed time and in the observer-frame emissivity map at a given emission radius, which are calculated here for three simple velocity-direction distributions.

  13. CfA4: LIGHT CURVES FOR 94 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Bakos, Gaspar; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R.; Caldwell, Nelson; Calkins, Mike; Falco, Emilio; Fernandez, Jose; Friedman, Andrew S.; Groner, Ted; Hartman, Joel; Rest, Armin; Cramer, Claire E.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Currie, Thayne; De Kleer, Kathy; Esquerdo, Gil; Everett, Mark; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present multi-band optical photometry of 94 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 0.0055-0.073, obtained between 2006 and 2011. There are a total of 5522 light-curve points. We show that our natural-system SN photometry has a precision of {approx}< 0.03 mag in BVr'i', {approx}< 0.06 mag in u', and {approx}< 0.07 mag in U for points brighter than 17.5 mag and estimate that it has a systematic uncertainty of 0.014, 0.010, 0.012, 0.014, 0.046, and 0.073 mag in BVr'i'u'U, respectively. Comparisons of our standard-system photometry with published SN Ia light curves and comparison stars reveal mean agreement across samples in the range of {approx}0.00-0.03 mag. We discuss the recent measurements of our telescope-plus-detector throughput by direct monochromatic illumination by Cramer et al. This technique measures the whole optical path through the telescope, auxiliary optics, filters, and detector under the same conditions used to make SN measurements. Extremely well characterized natural-system passbands (both in wavelength and over time) are crucial for the next generation of SN Ia photometry to reach the 0.01 mag accuracy level. The current sample of low-z SNe Ia is now sufficiently large to remove most of the statistical sampling error from the dark-energy error budget. But pursuing the dark-energy systematic errors by determining highly accurate detector passbands, combining optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectra, using the nearby sample to illuminate the population properties of SNe Ia, and measuring the local departures from the Hubble flow will benefit from larger, carefully measured nearby samples.

  14. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of < E/M> =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  15. Ground-based Light Curves Two Pluto Days Before the New Horizons Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, A. S.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Durst, R. F.; Seeger, C. H.; Levine, S. E.; Abe, F.; Suzuki, D.; Nagakane, M.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Person, M. J.; Zuluaga, C.; Kosiarek, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    We observed the occultation of a 12th magnitude star, one of the two brightest occultation stars ever in our dozen years of continual monitoring of Pluto's atmosphere through such studies, on 29 June 2015 UTC. At Canterbury University's Mt. John University Observatory on the south island of New Zealand, in clear sky, we used our POETS frame-transfer CCD at 10 Hz with GPS timing on the 1-m McLellan telescope as well as an infrared camera on an 0.6-m telescope and three-color photometry at a slower cadence on a second 0.6-m telescope. The light curves show a central flash, indicating that we were close to the center of the occultation path, and allowing us to explore Pluto's atmosphere lower than usual. The light curves show that Pluto's atmosphere remained robust. Observations from 0.5- and 0.4-m telescopes at the Auckland Observatory gave the first half of the occultation before clouds came in. We coordinated our observations with aircraft observations with NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and its High Speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO). Our ground-based and airborne stellar-occultation effort came only just over two weeks of Earth days and two Pluto days (based on Pluto's rotational period) before the flyby of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, meaning that the mission's exquisite snapshot of Pluto's atmosphere can be placed in the context of our series of ground-based occultation observations carried out on a regular basis since 2002 following a first Pluto occultation observed in 1988 from aloft. Our observations were supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNX12AJ29G to Williams College, NNX15AJ82G to Lowell Observatory, and NNX10AB27G to MIT, and by the National Research Foundation of South Africa. We thank Alan Gilmore, Pam Kilmartin, Robert Lucas, Paul Tristam, and Carolle Varughese for assistance at Mt. John.

  16. Light curve analysis of GSC 2750-0054 and GSC 03208-02644

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhateeb, M. M.; Nouh, M. I.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first photometric analysis for the newly discovered eclipsing binary systems of Algole-type GSC 2750-0054 and GSC 03208-02644. Our analysis was carried out by means of the most recent version of Wilson Devinney (WD) code, which applies the model atmosphere by (Kurucz, R., 1993. In: Milon, E. (Ed.), Light Curve Modeling of Eclipsing Binary Stars. Springer-Verlag, New York, p. 93) with a prescription in passband for the radiative treatment. The accepted light curve solutions reveal absolute physical parameters and the spectral classifications for the components are adopted. We derived the spectral types of the system GSC 2750-0054 as K3 and K7. The physical parameters of the system are M1 = 0.72 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.47 ± 0.02 M⊙, R1 = 0.81 ± 0.03 R⊙, R2 = 0.62 ± 0.03 R⊙, L1 = 0.27 ± 0.01 L⊙ and L2 = 0.1 ± 0.004 L⊙. For the system, GSC 03208 02644 the spectral types of the components are A5 and A8. The physical parameters are M1 = 1.86 ± 0.076 M⊙, M2 = 1.21 ± 0.049 M⊙, R1 = 1.84 ± 0.075 R⊙, R2 = 1.75 ± 0.072 R⊙, L1 = 13.58 ± 0.55 L⊙ and L2 = 9.94 ± 0.41 L⊙. Comparison with the evolutionary models as well as the empirical databases is presented.

  17. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL MODELS IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Narayan, Gautham; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-04-20

    We have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves spanning optical through near-infrared (NIR) data. A hierarchical framework coherently models multiple random and uncertain effects, including intrinsic supernova (SN) light curve covariances, dust extinction and reddening, and distances. An improved BAYESN Markov Chain Monte Carlo code computes probabilistic inferences for the hierarchical model by sampling the global probability density of parameters describing individual SNe and the population. We have applied this hierarchical model to optical and NIR data of 127 SNe Ia from PAIRITEL, CfA3, Carnegie Supernova Project, and the literature. We find an apparent population correlation between the host galaxy extinction A{sub V} and the ratio of total-to-selective dust absorption R{sub V} . For SNe with low dust extinction, A{sub V} {approx}< 0.4, we find R{sub V} {approx} 2.5-2.9, while at high extinctions, A{sub V} {approx}> 1, low values of R{sub V} < 2 are favored. The NIR luminosities are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction. They exhibit low correlation with optical peak luminosities, and thus provide independent information on distances. The combination of NIR and optical data constrains the dust extinction and improves the predictive precision of individual SN Ia distances by about 60%. Using cross-validation, we estimate an rms distance modulus prediction error of 0.11 mag for SNe with optical and NIR data versus 0.15 mag for SNe with optical data alone. Continued study of SNe Ia in the NIR is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  18. Collapsar Accretion, Shockwaves, and the Gamma-ray Burst X-ray Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Christopher C.; Milosavljevic, M.

    2010-03-01

    We present axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of the long-term accretion of a rotating gamma-ray burst progenitor star, a "collapsar,'' onto the central black hole. The simulations were carried out with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH in two spatial dimensions and with an explicit shear viscosity. The evolution of the central accretion rate exhibits phases reminiscent of the long GRB gamma-ray and X-ray light curve, which lends support to the proposal by Kumar et al. 2008 that the luminosity is modulated by the central accretion rate. In the first "prompt'' phase characterized by an approximately constant accretion rate, the black hole acquires most of its final mass through supersonic quasiradial accretion occurring at a steady rate of 2 Msun s-1. After a few tens of seconds, an accretion shock sweeps outward through the star. The formation and outward expansion of the accretion shock is accompanied with a sudden and rapid power-law decline in the central accretion rate Mdot t-2.8. The collapsed, shock-heated stellar envelope settles into a thick, low-mass equatorial disk embedded within a massive, pressure-supported atmosphere. After a few hundred seconds, the inflow of low-angular-momentum material in the axial funnel reverses into an outflow from the surface of the thick disk, and the decay of the accretion rate is slowed. While the duration of the "prompt'' phase depends on the resolution in our simulations, we provide an analytical model taking into account neutrino losses that estimates the duration to be 20 s. The model suggests that the steep decline in GRB X-ray light curves is triggered by the circularization of the infalling stellar envelope at radii where the virial temperature is below 1010 K, such that neutrino cooling shuts off. We also present results from 1D simulations of the accretion powered acceleration of the shockwave formed in collapsar models.

  19. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light Curve Shapes: MLCS2k2

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Saurabh; Riess, Adam G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present an updated version of the Multicolor Light Curve Shape method to measure distances to type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), incorporating new procedures for K-correction and extinction corrections. We also develop a simple model to disentangle intrinsic color variations and reddening by dust, and expand the method to incorporate U-band light curves and to more easily accommodate prior constraints on any of the model parameters. We apply this method to 133 nearby SN Ia, including 95 objects in the Hubble flow (cz {ge} 2500 km s{sup -1}), which give an intrinsic dispersion of less than 7% in distance. The Hubble flow sample, which is of critical importance to all cosmological uses of SN Ia, is the largest ever presented with homogeneous distances. We find the Hubble flow supernovae with H{sub 0}d{sub SN} {ge} 7400 km s{sup -1} yield an expansion rate that is 6.5 {+-} 1.8% lower than the rate determined from supernovae within that distance, and this can have a large effect on measurements of the dark energy equation of state with SN Ia. Peculiar velocities of SN Ia host galaxies in the rest frame of the Local Group are consistent with the dipole measured in the Cosmic Microwave Background. Direct fits of SN Ia that are significantly reddened by dust in their host galaxies suggest their mean extinction law may be described by R{sub V} {approx_equal} 2.7, but optical colors alone provide weak constraints on R{sub V}.

  20. Modeling Indications of Technology in Planetary Transit Light Curves-Dark-side Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Eric J.; Sallmen, Shauna M.; Leystra Greene, Diana

    2015-08-01

    We analyze potential effects of an extraterrestrial civilization’s use of orbiting mirrors to illuminate the dark side of a synchronously rotating planet on planetary transit light curves. Previous efforts to detect civilizations based on side effects of planetary-scale engineering have focused on structures affecting the host star output (e.g., Dyson spheres). However, younger civilizations are likely to be less advanced in their engineering efforts, yet still capable of sending small spacecraft into orbit. Since M dwarfs are the most common type of star in the solar neighborhood, it seems plausible that many of the nearest habitable planets orbit dim, low-mass M stars, and will be in synchronous rotation. Logically, a civilization evolving on such a planet may be inspired to illuminate their planet’s dark side by placing a single large mirror at the L2 Lagrangian point, or launching a fleet of small thin mirrors into planetary orbit. We briefly examine the requirements and engineering challenges of such a collection of orbiting mirrors, then explore their impact on transit light curves. We incorporate stellar limb darkening and model a simplistic mirror fleet’s effects for transits of Earth-like (R = 0.5 to 2 {R}{Earth}) planets which would be synchronously rotating for orbits within the habitable zone of their host star. Although such an installation is undetectable in Kepler data, the James Webb Space Telescope will provide the sensitivity necessary to detect a fleet of mirrors orbiting Earth-like habitable planets around nearby stars.

  1. The long-term light curve of the cataclysmic variable V794 Aquilae

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W. E-mail: skafka@aip.org

    2014-01-01

    The 1990-2012 light curve of the nova-like (NL) cataclysmic variable V794 Aql is studied in order to characterize and better understand the transitions to and from the faint state, and the variations within the bright state. Investigations of earlier portions of this data had concluded that the transitions to the low state were much slower than the rapid recovery, giving a sawtoothed appearance to the light curve. This behavior differs from that of most other VY Scl stars, which led to an interpretation of the large amplitude sawtooths as being due to an accretion disk (AD) instability. However, more recent photometry strongly suggests that the bright state itself has transitions of 1-1.5 mag, and that earlier studies had intermixed these bright state variations with the transitions to the low state. These newly recognized variations within the bright state sometimes appear as small outbursts (OBs) with typical amplitudes of 0.5-1.5 mag and spacings of ∼15-50 days. The rise times of the OBs are 2-3 times faster than the decline times. We argue that the V794 Aql bright state variations are due to AD behavior similar to that seen in dwarf novae, but with varying degrees of stability. Similar regular small OBs have also been reported in other NL CVs, which we compare with V794 Aql. The true deep low states in V794 Aql appear to be normal, having transition speeds and shapes very similar to the transitions in other VY Scl stars.

  2. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; et al

    2016-03-16

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, withmore » $$\\gt 5$$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1–3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2–20) × 1051 erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $$\\langle E/M\\rangle =0.85\\times {10}^{51}$$ erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ($${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}$$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. Lastly, this limits the possible power sources for such events.« less

  3. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Kasen, Daniel; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our

  4. Synthetic direct impact light curves of the ultracompact AM CVn binary systems V407 Vul and HM Cnc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    The interacting binary white dwarf (AM CVn) systems HM Cnc and V407 have orbital periods of 5.4 and 9.5 min, respectively. The two systems are characterized by an `on/off' behaviour in the X-ray light curve, and optical light curves that are nearly sinusoidal and which lead the X-ray light curves in phase by about 0.2 in both systems. Of the models that have been proposed to explain the observations, the one that seems to require the least fine-tuning is the direct impact model of Marsh & Steeghs. In this model, the white dwarf primary is large enough relative to the semimajor axis that the accretion stream impacts the surface of the primary white dwarf directly without forming an accretion disc. Marsh & Steeghs proposed that in this situation there could be a flow setup around the equator with a decreasing surface temperature, the further one measured from the impact point. In this study, we estimate the light curves that might result from such a temperature distribution, and find them to be reasonable approximations to the observations. One unexpected result is that two distinct X-ray spots must exist to match the shape of the X-ray light curves.

  5. A Multi-Year Light Curve of Scorpius X-1 Based on CGRO BATSE Spectroscopy Detector Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, B. J.; Harrison, T. E.; Mason, P. A.; Templeton, M.; Heikkila, C. W.; Buckley, T.; Galvan, E.; Silva, A.; Harmon, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-year light curve of the low mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, is constructed based on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Spectroscopy Detector (SD) data in the nominal energy range of 10-20 keV. A detailed discussion is given of the reduction process of the BATSE/SD data. Corrections to the SD measurements are made for off-axis pointings, spectral and bandpass changes, and differences in the eight SD sensitivities. The resulting 4.4 year Sco X-1 SD light curve is characterized in terms of the time scales over which various types of emission changes occur. This light curve is then compared with Sco X-1 light curves obtained by Axiel 5, the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LADs), and the RXTE all-sky monitor (ASM). Coincident temporal coverage by the BATSE/SD and RXTE/ASM allows a direct comparison of the behavior of Sco X-1 over a range of high energies to be made. These ASM light curves are then used to discuss model constraints on the Sco X-1 system.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: J0113+31 light + velocity curves (Gomez Maqueo Chew+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Morales, J. C.; Faedi, F.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Hebb, L.; Rodler, F.; Deshpande, R.; Mahadevan, S.; McCormac, J.; Barnes, R.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Skillen, I.; Collier, Cameron A.; Joner, M. D.; Laney, C. D.; Stephens, D. C.; Stassun, K. G.; Cargile, P. A.; Montanes-Rodriguez, P.

    2014-09-01

    We derive the fundamental properties of 1SWASP J011351.29+314909.7 (J0113+31), a metal-poor (-0.40+/-0.04dex), eclipsing binary in an eccentric orbit (~0.3) with an orbital period of 14.277d. Eclipsing M dwarfs that orbit solar-type stars (EBLMs), like J0113+31, have been identified from their light curves and follow-up spectroscopy in the course of the WASP transiting planet search. We present the analysis of the first binary of the EBLM sample for which masses, radii and temperatures of both components are derived. The primary component with a mass of 0.945+/-0.045M⊙ has a large radius (1.378+/-0.058R⊙) indicating that the system is quite old, ~9.5Gyr. The M-dwarf secondary mass of 0.186+/-0.010M⊙ and radius of 0.209+/-0.011R⊙ are fully consistent with stellar evolutionary models. However, from the near-infrared secondary eclipse light curve, the M dwarf is found to have an effective temperature of 3922+/-42K, which is ~600K hotter than predicted by theoretical models. We present the WASP light curve, the optical follow-up light curves, the near-infrared light curve of the secondary eclipse, and the radial velocity measurements of J0113+31. (6 data files).

  7. Characterizing mid-ultraviolet to optical light curves of nearby type IIn supernovae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    de la Rosa, Janie; Roming, Pete; Pritchard, Tyler; Fryer, Chris

    2016-03-21

    Here, we present early mid-ultraviolet and optical observations of Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) observed from 2007 to 2013. Our results focus on the properties of UV light curves: peak absolute magnitudes, temporal decay, and color evolution. During early times, this sample demonstrates that UV light decays faster than optical, and each event transitions from a predominantly UV-bright phase to an optically bright phase. In order to understand early UV behavior, we generate and analyze the sample's blackbody luminosity, temperature, and radius as the SN ejecta expand and cool. Since most of our observations were detected post maximum luminosity, wemore » introduce a method for estimating the date of peak magnitude. When our observations are compared based on filter, we find that even though these SNe IIn vary in peak magnitudes, there are similarities in UV decay rates. We use a simple semi-analytical SN model in order to understand the effects of the explosion environment on our UV observations. Understanding the UV characteristics of nearby SNe IIn during an early phase can provide valuable information about the environment surrounding these explosions, leading us to evaluating the diversity of observational properties in this subclass.« less

  8. Testing Dissipative Magnetosphere Model Light Curves and Spectra with Fermi Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2015-01-01

    We explore the emission properties of a dissipative pulsar magnetosphere model introduced by Kalapotharakos et al. comparing its high-energy light curves and spectra, due to curvature radiation, with data collected by the Fermi LAT. The magnetosphere structure is assumed to be near the force-free solution. The accelerating electric field, inside the light cylinder (LC), is assumed to be negligible, while outside the LC it rescales with a finite conductivity (sigma). In our approach we calculate the corresponding high-energy emission by integrating the trajectories of test particles that originate from the stellar surface, taking into account both the accelerating electric field components and the radiation reaction forces. First, we explore the parameter space assuming different value sets for the stellar magnetic field, stellar period, and conductivity. We show that the general properties of the model are in a good agreement with observed emission characteristics of young gamma-ray pulsars, including features of the phase-resolved spectra. Second, we find model parameters that fit each pulsar belonging to a group of eight bright pulsars that have a published phase-resolved spectrum. The sigma values that best describe each of the pulsars in this group show an increase with the spin-down rate (E? ) and a decrease with the pulsar age, expected if pair cascades are providing the magnetospheric conductivity. Finally, we explore the limits of our analysis and suggest future directions for improving such models.

  9. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF TIME SYMMETRY IN LIGHT CURVES: RECONSIDERING SCORPIUS X-1 OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, Alexander W.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles R.

    2009-08-20

    We present a new approach to the analysis of time symmetry in light curves, such as those in the X-ray at the center of the Scorpius X-1 occultation debate. Our method uses a new parameterization for such events (the bilogistic event profile) and provides a clear, physically relevant characterization of each event's key features. We also demonstrate a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to carry out this analysis, including a novel independence chain configuration for the estimation of each event's location in the light curve. These tools are applied to the Scorpius X-1 light curves presented in Chang et al., providing additional evidence based on the time series that the events detected thus far are most likely not occultations by trans-Neptunian objects.

  10. THE EFFECTS ON SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUT AND SWIFT LIGHT CURVES DUE TO THE MASS OF THE HYDROGEN-RICH ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Even, Wesley; Frey, Lucille H.; Fryer, Chris L.; Young, Patrick A.

    2015-06-01

    Mass loss remains one of the primary uncertainties in stellar evolution. In the most massive stars, mass loss dictates the circumstellar medium and can significantly alter the fate of the star. Mass loss is caused by a variety of wind mechanisms and also through binary interactions. Supernovae (SNe) are excellent probes of this mass loss, both the circumstellar material and the reduced mass of the hydrogen-rich envelope. In this paper, we focus on the effects of reducing the hydrogen-envelope mass on the SN light curve, studying both the shock breakout and peak light-curve emission for a wide variety of mass-loss scenarios. Even though the trends of this mass loss will be masked somewhat by variations caused by different progenitors, explosion energies, and circumstellar media, these trends have significant effects on the SN light curves that should be seen in SN surveys. We conclude with a comparison of our results to a few key observations.

  11. LONG-TERM TRANSIT TIMING MONITORING AND REFINED LIGHT CURVE PARAMETERS OF HAT-P-13b

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Pal, Andras; Zachary Gazak, J.

    2011-09-15

    We present 10 new transit light curves of the transiting hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b, obtained during two observational seasons by three different telescopes. When combined with 12 previously published light curves, we have a sample consisting of 22 transit light curves, spanning 1041 days across four observational seasons. We use this sample to examine the recently observed large-amplitude transit timing variations (TTVs) by Pal et al. and give refined system parameters. We find that the transit times are consistent with a linear ephemeris, with the exception of a single transit time, from UT 2009 November 5, for which the measured mid-transit time significantly deviates from our linear ephemeris. The nature of this deviation is not clear, and the rest of the data do not show any significant TTVs.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BAT6 sample optical and X-ray light curves (Melandri+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Rogantini, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Sbarufatti, B.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Nava, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-03-01

    We followed the classification scheme described in Margutti et al. (2013, Cat. J/MNRAS/428/729/) that divided the light curves in four main classes: class 0 for events decaying with simple power-law; class Ia (Ib) for a smooth broken power-law that goes from a shallower (steeper) to a steeper (shallower) decay; class IIa or IIb for events that display steep-shallow-steep (canonical) or shallow-steep-shallow decays respectively; and finally, class III for those events that show a late-time break in their light curves. (6 data files).

  13. THE INFRARED LIGHT CURVE OF SN 2011fe IN M101 AND THE DISTANCE TO M101

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, T.; Joyce, R. R.; Allen, L. E.; Saha, A.; Silva, D. R.; Binkert, W. S.; Butler, K.; Everett, M.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Adams, J. J.; Anderson, R. E.; Beck, T. L.; Bentz, M. C.; Bershady, M. A.; Eigenbrot, A.; Gallagher, J. S.; Camarata, M. A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Glikman, E.; Harbeck, D.; and others

    2012-07-20

    We present near-infrared light curves of supernova (SN) 2011fe in M101, including 34 epochs in H band starting 14 days before maximum brightness in the B band. The light curve data were obtained with the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera. When the data are calibrated using templates of other Type Ia SNe, we derive an apparent H-band magnitude at the epoch of B-band maximum of 10.85 {+-} 0.04. This implies a distance modulus for M101 that ranges from 28.86 to 29.17 mag, depending on which absolute calibration for Type Ia SNe is used.

  14. Patterning of nanostructured thin films by structured light illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Fort, E.; Lacharme, J.P.; Ricolleau, C.

    2005-10-03

    Light-induced reshaping of silver nanostructured films near the percolation threshold are investigated using a KrF excimer laser emitting at 248 nm. Depending on the laser intensity and the number of pulses, striking effects are observed for which the irregular particles melt and transform into spherical shaped particles. We show that the laser-induced modifications can be spatially designed by irradiating through masks and gratings taking advantage of their respective diffractive properties. This permits an easy and well controlled way to produce a variety of submicron patterning. The induced patterns accurately coincide with the intensity variations of the illumination field.

  15. Impact of morphological parameters onto simulated light scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupski, Krzysztof; Mroczka, Janusz; Riefler, Norbert; Oltmann, Hergen; Will, Stefan; Wriedt, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the impact of the variation of various parameters of fractal aggregates on simulated light scattering patterns. Static light scattering is commonly used to measure soot in a flame and such a study could help to improve experimental approaches. Aggregate models, used for our light scattering simulations, are based on real soot structures that can be found under laboratory conditions in a premixed ethane/air flame (McKenna-type burner, equivalence ratio ϕ=2.5). Our work was not focused on modeling and analysis of aggregates that are typically encountered in the atmosphere, therefore the results might be of limited interest to climate scientists. In our study, the variation of all parameters that enter into the standard fractal equation were investigated. Additionally effects when varying the overlap of primary particles, the incident wavelength and the complex refractive index are discussed. For numerical simulations two different codes were used, the T-Matrix (when particles are in point contact) and the DDScat program (which is capable of performing light scattering simulations by overlapping spheres). Comparisons between these two methods show very good agreement. The results demonstrate that the radius of gyration is responsible for the amount of light scattered towards the back direction while the total volume of an aggregate defines the shape of the light scattering patterns. Small changes of the fractal dimension can be neglected (provided that the fractal prefactor is accordingly modified in a suitable way). The overlap level, if the radius of gyration is kept constant, introduces barely visible changes to the light scattering diagrams which suggest that a simple aggregate model, composed of particles being in point contact, can be used instead of a structure in early sintering stage when overlap of primary particles is not so high.

  16. Unlocking the secrets of supernovae through their light curves, spectra & polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc; Li, Chendong

    2013-06-01

    Utilizing the radiative transfer code CMFGEN, we have undertaken time-dependent radiative transfer calculations that compute the light curve and spectra for Type Ia, Ib, Ic, and II supernovae (SNe) through the photospheric and nebular phases. The non-LTE calculations allow for a multitude of atomic processes (bound-bound, bound-free, free-free, collisional, charge exchange, and Penning ionization) and for non-thermal excitation and ionization from non-thermal electrons created by the degradation in energy of high-energy (˜1 MeV) gamma-rays. The proper inclusion of all these processes requires a vast amount of atomic data. Not all the atomic data is available, and the quality of the available atomic data varies considerably. We have confirmed the results of Utrobin and Chugai (2005) that time dependent terms must be included in the statistical equilibrium equations in order to model the Hα evolution of SN 1987A, shown that time dependent terms influence other spectral features, and shown that these conclusions also apply to the modeling of Type II SNe in general. The inclusion of non-thermal processes has allowed us to model Hα and He I emission in Type II SNe into the nebular phase, and to model the He I emission in Type Ib and Ic SNe. Our calculations show that the He deficiency in Ic SNe is unlikely to be real - instead, the absence of He I on SNe Ic spectra is more likely related to inefficient excitation of He Iions. Simply by varying the amount of mixing we are able to create spectra of Type Ib and Ic SNe using the SAME progenitor model. Based on a new grid of SNe Ib/c models, we confirm previous findings that the typically fast-rising narrow-peak fast-declining SNe Ib/c light curves imply ejecta masses ≲5M, favoring intermediate-mass massive stars in interacting binaries. We are successfully applying CMFGEN to model Type Ia SNe, and are currently exploring the role of mixing and non-thermal processes in these SNe. We highlight the differences between the

  17. Investigation of the energy dependence of the orbital light curve in LS 5039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Ji, L.; Chen, Y. P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kuulkers, E.; Collmar, W.; Liu, C. Z.

    2016-08-01

    LS 5039 is so far the best studied γ-ray binary system at multi-wavelength energies. A time resolved study of its spectral energy distribution (SED) shows that above 1 keV its power output is changing along its binary orbit as well as being a function of energy. To disentangle the energy dependence of the power output as a function of orbital phase, we investigated in detail the orbital light curves as derived with different telescopes at different energy bands. We analysed the data from all existing INTEGRAL/IBIS/ISGRI observations of the source and generated the most up-to-date orbital light curves at hard X-ray energies. In the γ-ray band, we carried out orbital phase-resolved analysis of Fermi-LAT data between 30 MeV and 10 GeV in 5 different energy bands. We found that, at ≲100 MeV and ≳1 TeV the peak of the γ-ray emission is near orbital phase 0.7, while between ˜100 MeV and ˜1 GeV it moves close to orbital phase 1.0 in an orbital anti-clockwise manner. This result suggests that the transition region in the SED at soft γ-rays (below a hundred MeV) is related to the orbital phase interval of 0.5-1.0 but not to the one of 0.0-0.5, when the compact object is "behind" its companion. Another interesting result is that between 3 and 20 GeV no orbital modulation is found, although Fermi-LAT significantly (˜18σ) detects LS 5039. This is consistent with the fact that at these energies, the contributions to the overall emission from the inferior conjunction phase region (INFC, orbital phase 0.45 to 0.9) and from the superior conjunction phase region (SUPC, orbital phase 0.9 to 0.45) are equal in strength. At TeV energies the power output is again dominant in the INFC region and the flux peak occurs at phase ˜0.7.

  18. Investigation of the energy dependence of the orbital light curve in LS 5039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Ji, L.; Chen, Y. P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kuulkers, E.; Collmar, W.; Liu, C. Z.

    2016-11-01

    LS 5039 is so far the best-studied γ-ray binary system at multiwavelength energies. A time-resolved study of its spectral energy distribution (SED) shows that above 1 keV its power output is changing along its binary orbit as well as being a function of energy. To disentangle the energy dependence of the power output as a function of orbital phase, we investigated in detail the orbital light curves as derived with different telescopes at different energy bands. We analysed the data from all existing International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL)/INTEGRAL on-board Imager/INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager observations of the source and generated the most up-to-date orbital light curves at hard X-ray energies. In the γ-ray band, we carried out orbital phase-resolved analysis of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data between 30 MeV and 10 GeV in five different energy bands. We found that, at ≲100 MeV and ≳1 TeV the peak of the γ-ray emission is near orbital phase 0.7, while between ˜100 MeV and ˜1 GeV it moves close to orbital phase 1.0 in an orbital anticlockwise manner. This result suggests that the transition region in the SED at soft γ-rays (below a hundred MeV) is related to the orbital phase interval of 0.5-1.0 but not to the one of 0.0-0.5, when the compact object is `behind' its companion. Another interesting result is that between 3 and 20 GeV no orbital modulation is found, although Fermi-LAT significantly (˜18σ) detects LS 5039. This is consistent with the fact that at these energies, the contributions to the overall emission from the inferior conjunction phase region (INFC, orbital phase 0.45-0.9) and from the superior conjunction phase region (orbital phase 0.9-0.45) are equal in strength. At TeV energies the power output is again dominant in the INFC region and the flux peak occurs at phase ˜0.7.

  19. MODELING THE LIGHT CURVE OF THE TRANSIENT SCP06F6

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Wheeler, J. Craig; Vinko, J. E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2009-10-20

    We consider simple models based on core collapse or pair-formation supernovae (SNe) to account for the light curve of the transient SCP06F6. A radioactive decay diffusion model provides estimates of the mass of the required radioactive nickel and the ejecta as functions of the unknown redshift. An opacity change such as by dust formation or a recombination front may account for the rapid decline from maximum. Within this class of model, the redshift must be less than z approx 1 or the nickel mass would exceed the total mass of the ejecta; the radiated energy would exceed the kinetic energy, and kinematic and photometric estimates of the radius would disagree. We particularly investigate two specific redshifts: z = 0.143, for which Gaensicke et al. have proposed that the unidentified broad absorption features in the spectrum of SCP06F6 are C{sub 2} Swan bands, and z = 0.57 based on a crude agreement with the Ca H and K and UV iron-peak absorption features that are characteristic of SNe of various types. For the lower redshift, we obtain a nickel mass of 0.3 M {sub sun} and an ejected envelope mass of approx 38 M {sub sun}, while for the latter case we find 4.8 M {sub sun} and 20 M {sub sun}, respectively, for fiducial parameters. The kinetic energy of the ejecta, while dependent on uncertain parameters, is generally large, approx10{sup 52} erg, throughout this range of redshift. The ejected masses and kinetic energies are smaller for a more tightly constrained model invoking envelope recombination. We also discuss the possibilities of circumstellar matter (CSM) shell diffusion and shock interaction models. In general, optically thick CSM diffusion models can fit the data with the underlying energy coming from an energetic buried SN. Models in which the CSM is of lower density so that the shock energy is both rapidly thermalized and radiated tend not to be self-consistent. We suggest that a model of SCP06F6 worth further exploration is one in which the redshift is

  20. A Theoretical Light-Curve Model for the 1999 Outburst of U Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Kato, Taichi; Matsumoto, Katsura

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical light curve for the 1999 outburst of U Scorpii is presented in order to obtain various physical parameters of the recurrent nova. Our U Sco model consists of a very massive white dwarf (WD) with an accretion disk and a lobe-filling, slightly evolved, main-sequence star (MS). The model includes a reflection effect by the companion and the accretion disk together with a shadowing effect on the companion by the accretion disk. The early visual light curve (with a linear phase of t~1-15 days after maximum) is well reproduced by a thermonuclear runaway model on a very massive WD close to the Chandrasekhar limit (MWD=1.37+/-0.01 Msolar), in which optically thick winds blowing from the WD play a key role in determining the nova duration. The ensuing plateau phase (t~15-30 days) is also reproduced by the combination of a slightly irradiated MS and a fully irradiated flaring-up disk with a radius ~1.4 times the Roche lobe size. The cooling phase (t~30-40 days) is consistent with a low-hydrogen content of X~0.05 of the envelope for the 1.37 Msolar WD. The best-fit parameters are the WD mass of MWD~1.37 Msolar, the companion mass of MMS~1.5 Msolar (0.8-2.0 Msolar is acceptable), the inclination angle of the orbit (i~80deg), and the flaring-up edge, the vertical height of which is ~0.30 times the accretion disk radius. The duration of the strong wind phase (t~0-17 days) is very consistent with the BeppoSAX supersoft X-ray detection at t~19-20 days because supersoft X-rays are self-absorbed by the massive wind. The envelope mass at the peak is estimated to be ~3×10-6 Msolar, which is indicates an average mass accretion rate of ~2.5×10-7 Msolar yr-1 during the quiescent phase between 1987 and 1999. These quantities are exactly the same as those predicted in a new progenitor model of Type Ia supernovae.

  1. Implications of the Early X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves of Swift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; Konigl, Arieh; Piran, Tsvi; /Hebrew U.

    2006-01-17

    According to current models, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced when the energy carried by a relativistic outflow is dissipated and converted into radiation. The efficiency of this process, {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, is one of the critical factors in any GRB model. The X-ray afterglow light curves of Swift GRBs show an early stage of flattish decay. This has been interpreted as reflecting energy injection. When combined with previous estimates, which have concluded that the kinetic energy of the late ({approx}> 10 hr) afterglow is comparable to the energy emitted in {gamma}-rays, this interpretation implies very high values of {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, corresponding to {approx}> 90% of the initial energy being converted into {gamma}-rays. Such a high efficiency is hard to reconcile with most models, including in particular the popular internal-shocks model. We re-analyze the derivation of the kinetic energy from the afterglow X-ray flux and re-examine the resulting estimates of the efficiency. We confirm that, if the flattish decay arises from energy injection and the pre-Swift broad-band estimates of the kinetic energy are correct, then {epsilon}{sub {gamma}} {approx}> 0.9. We discuss various issues related to this result, including an alternative interpretation of the light curve in terms of a two-component outflow model, which we apply to the X-ray observations of GRB 050315. We point out, however, that another interpretation of the flattish decay--a variable X-ray afterglow efficiency (e.g., due to a time dependence of afterglow shock microphysical parameters)--is possible. We also show that direct estimates of the kinetic energy from the late X-ray afterglow flux are sensitive to the assumed values of the shock microphysical parameters and suggest that broad-band afterglow fits might have underestimated the kinetic energy (e.g., by overestimating the fraction of electrons that are accelerated to relativistic energies). Either one of these possibilities implies a

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Occultation lights curves (Herald+ 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herald, Dave; Breit, Derek; Dunham, David; Frappa, Eric; Gault, Dave; George, Tony; Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Loader, Brian; Manek, Jan; Miyashita, Kazuhisa; Pavlov, Hristo; Preston, Steve; Soma, Mitsuru; Talbot, John; Timerson, Brad

    Lunar occultation light curves have been recorded since the mid-20th century using high-speed photomultipliers. Running at high cadence for high angular resolution, such recordings were usually made on large telescopes and limited to the brighter stars - and were not large in number. While a small number of video recordings of lunar and asteroidal occultations were made from about 1980, they became common from about the year 2000, when inexpensive low-light security cameras became available. As of 2016, almost all lunar and asteroidal occultation observations are recorded using video, with the video recording being measured using software packages such as Limovie [http://astro-limovie.info/limovie/limovie_en.html], and Tangra [http://www.hristopavlov.net/Tangra3/]. As a result, light curves are now routinely generated for almost all lunar and asteroidal occultation observations, especially those coordinated through the International Occultation Timing Association and related organisations around the world. This is resulting in large numbers of occultation light curves being obtained each year - albeit with some limitations on time resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. As of 2016, video recordings are mainly made using one or other of the two international video standards - NTSC, or PAL. Both NTSC and PAL use an interlaced video scan, whereby each frame of the video is comprised of two interlaced, time-sequential, fields. The frame rate of an NTSC system is 29.97 frames/sec (59.94 fields/sec), while that for PAL is 25 frames/sec ( 50 fields/sec). Consistent with broadcast television standards, the majority of video cameras used for recording occultations use 8-bit CCD's. However some video recordings are made using progressive scan, 12 to 16-bit digital video systems. For lunar occultations, the temporal resolution is governed by a combination of the frame (or field) rate of the video recording, and the rate of motion of the moon. The typical topocentric motion of

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Occultation lights curves (Herald+ 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herald, Dave; Breit, Derek; Dunham, David; Frappa, Eric; Gault, Dave; George, Tony; Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Loader, Brian; Manek, Jan; Miyashita, Kazuhisa; Pavlov, Hristo; Preston, Steve; Soma, Mitsuru; Talbot, John; Timerson, Brad

    Lunar occultation light curves have been recorded since the mid-20th century using high-speed photomultipliers. Running at high cadence for high angular resolution, such recordings were usually made on large telescopes and limited to the brighter stars - and were not large in number. While a small number of video recordings of lunar and asteroidal occultations were made from about 1980, they became common from about the year 2000, when inexpensive low-light security cameras became available. As of 2016, almost all lunar and asteroidal occultation observations are recorded using video, with the video recording being measured using software packages such as Limovie [http://astro-limovie.info/limovie/limovie_en.html], and Tangra [http://www.hristopavlov.net/Tangra3/]. As a result, light curves are now routinely generated for almost all lunar and asteroidal occultation observations, especially those coordinated through the International Occultation Timing Association and related organisations around the world. This is resulting in large numbers of occultation light curves being obtained each year - albeit with some limitations on time resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. As of 2016, video recordings are mainly made using one or other of the two international video standards - NTSC, or PAL. Both NTSC and PAL use an interlaced video scan, whereby each frame of the video is comprised of two interlaced, time-sequential, fields. The frame rate of an NTSC system is 29.97 frames/sec (59.94 fields/sec), while that for PAL is 25 frames/sec ( 50 fields/sec). Consistent with broadcast television standards, the majority of video cameras used for recording occultations use 8-bit CCD's. However some video recordings are made using progressive scan, 12 to 16-bit digital video systems. For lunar occultations, the temporal resolution is governed by a combination of the frame (or field) rate of the video recording, and the rate of motion of the moon. The typical topocentric motion of

  4. Optical Transients Powered by Magnetars: Dynamics, Light Curves, and Transition to the Nebular Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling-Jun; Wang, S. Q.; Dai, Z. G.; Xu, Dong; Han, Yan-Hui; Wu, X. F.; Wei, Jian-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Millisecond magnetars can be formed via several channels: core collapse of massive stars, accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs (WDs), double WD mergers, double neutron star (NS) mergers, and WD-NS mergers. Because the mass of ejecta from these channels could be quite different, their light curves are also expected to be diverse. We evaluate the dynamic evolution of optical transients powered by millisecond magnetars. We find that the magnetar with a short spin-down timescale converts its rotational energy mostly into the kinetic energy of the transient, while the energy of a magnetar with a long spin-down timescale goes into radiation of the transient. This leads us to speculate that hypernovae could be powered by magnetars with short spin-down timescales. At late times the optical transients will gradually evolve into a nebular phase because of the photospheric recession. We treat the photosphere and nebula separately because their radiation mechanisms are different. In some cases the ejecta could be light enough that the magnetar can accelerate it to a relativistic speed. It is well known that the peak luminosity of a supernova (SN) occurs when the luminosity is equal to the instantaneous energy input rate, as shown by Arnett. We show that photospheric recession and relativistic motion can modify this law. The photospheric recession always leads to a delay of the peak time {t}{pk} relative to the time {t}× at which the SN luminosity equals the instantaneous energy input rate. Relativistic motion, however, may change this result significantly.

  5. Weathering Patterns of Ignitable Liquids with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Thomas J; Allen, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    One can take advantage of the striking similarity of ignitable liquid vaporization (or weathering) patterns and the separation observed during distillation to predict the composition of residual compounds in fire debris. This is done with the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. Analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, Karl Fischer coulombic titrimetry, refractometry, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. We have applied this method on product streams such as finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this paper, we present results on a variety of ignitable liquids that are not commodity fuels, chosen from the Ignitable Liquids Reference Collection (ILRC). These measurements are assembled into a preliminary database. From this selection, we discuss the significance and forensic application of the temperature data grid and the composition explicit data channel of the ADC. PMID:26401423

  6. Pluto and Charon Color Light Curves from New Horizons on Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Howett, C. J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Reuter, D. C.; Buratti, B. J.; Buie, M. W.; Grundy, W. M.; Parker, A. H.; Zangari, A. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Jennings, D. E.; Linscott, I. R.; Parker, J. Wm.; Protopapa, S.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    On approach to the Pluto system, New Horizons’ Ralph Instrument’s Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) observed Pluto and Charon, spatially separated, between April 9 and June 23, 2015. In this period, Pluto and Charon were observed to transition from unresolved objects to resolved and their integrated disk intensities were measured in four MVIC filters: blue (400-550 nm), red (540-700 nm), near-infrared (780-975 nm), and methane (860-910 nm). The measurement suite sampled the bodies over all longitudes. We will present the color rotational light curves for Pluto and Charon and compare them to previous (Buie, M. et al. 2010 AJ 139, 1117; Buratti, B.J. et al 2015 ApJ 804, L6) and concurrent ground-based BVR monitoring. We will also compare these data to color images of the encounter hemisphere taken during New Horizons’ July 14, 2015 Pluto and Charon flyby, as this data set provides a unique bridge between Pluto & Charon as viewed as astronomical targets versus the complex worlds that early data from New Horizons has revealed them to be. This work was supported by NASA’s New Horizons project.

  7. Exoplanet Atmospheres: From Light-Curve Analyses to Radiative-Transfer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Foster, Andrew S.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-wavelength transit and secondary-eclipse light-curve observations are some of the most powerful techniques to probe the thermo-chemical properties of exoplanets. Although the small planet-to-star constrast ratios demand a meticulous data analysis, and the limited available spectral bands can further restrain constraints, a Bayesian approach can robustly reveal what constraints can we set, given the data.We review the main aspects considered during the analysis of Spitzer time-series data by our group with an aplication to WASP-8b and TrES-1. We discuss the applicability and limitations of the most commonly used correlated-noise estimators. We describe our open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. BART calculates the planetary emission or transmission spectrum by solving a 1D line-by-line radiative-transfer equation. The generated spectra are integrated over determined bandpasses for comparison to the data. Coupled to our Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MC3) statistical package, BART constrains the temperature profile and chemical abundances in the planet's atmosphere. We apply the BART retrieval code to the HD 209458b data set to estimate the planet's temperature profile and molecular abundances.This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  8. M DWARFS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STRIPE 82: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND FLARE RATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; Sesar, Branimir; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.

    2009-08-15

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search {approx}2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of H{alpha} in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with {delta}u {>=} 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr{sup -1} deg{sup -2} but can vary significantly with the line of sight.

  9. The Importance of 56Ni in Shaping the Light Curves of Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Poznanski, Dovi; Katz, Boaz

    2016-06-01

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of SNe II? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni as well as a combination of the envelope mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of SNe II from the literature, we find that a 56Ni contribution is often significant. In our sample, its contribution to the time-weighted integrated luminosity during the photospheric phase ranges between 8% and 72% with a typical value of 30%. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in SNe II are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline rate that is steeper by up to 1 mag/100 days. Nevertheless, we find that the cooling envelope emission, and not 56Ni contribution, is the main driver behind the observed range of decline rates. Furthermore, contrary to previous suggestions, our findings indicate that fast decline rates are not driven by lower envelope masses. We therefore suggest that the difference in observed decline rates is mainly a result of different density profiles of the progenitors.

  10. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/Lat GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-21

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new “Pass 8” data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between the Tc and the decay index, which makes the anti-correlation with brightness more clear. This results appears to be consistent with the External Shock model, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  11. Spectrashift Exoplanet Transit Search Project: 40,000 Light Curves and Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Thomas G.; Healy, David

    2009-05-01

    Spectrashift has recently branched out from its radial velocity work detecting exoplanets, and has now fully implemented an exoplanet transit search program. Junk Bond Observatory's 0.8 meter fully automated RC telescope has been engaged in this effort full-time since October of 2008. To date the search has examined more than 40,000 light curves. The Spectrashift strategy is to look at fewer but fainter stars putting this search into the magnitude range the majority of professional searches can not penetrate. Custom software was developed for the reduction pipeline to handle the volume of data. The software implements artificial intelligence algorithms to sort out the most likely candidates for human inspection at the end of the pipeline. To date the project has come up with several "triple hits" where a transit-like event has happened on three occasions. The Spectrashift team's ultimate goal is to include a network of non-professional telescopes around the world for 24 hour coverage of star fields. It is believed this is the first serious non-professional transit search effort.

  12. M Dwarfs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82: Photometric Light Curves and Flare Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-08-01

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search ~2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of Hα in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with Δu >= 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr-1 deg-2 but can vary significantly with the line of sight. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  13. TEMPORAL DECONVOLUTION STUDY OF LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; and others

    2012-01-10

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  14. IRTF/SPEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNUSUAL KEPLER LIGHT CURVE SYSTEM KIC 8462852

    SciTech Connect

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-20

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8–4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley and Greene’s emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ∼1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  15. SN 2009ip: CONSTRAINING THE LATEST EXPLOSION PROPERTIES BY ITS LATE-PHASE LIGHT CURVE

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2015-04-20

    We constrain the explosion and circumstellar properties at the 2012b event of SN 2009ip based on its recently reported late-phase bolometric light curve. The explosion energy and ejected mass at the 2012b event are estimated as 0.01 M{sub ⊙} and 2 × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. The circumstellar medium is assumed to have two components: an inner shell and an outer wind. The inner shell, which is likely created at the 2012a event, has a mass of 0.2 M{sub ⊙}. The outer wind is created by the wind mass loss before the 2012a mass ejection, and the progenitor is estimated to have had a mass-loss rate of about 0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} with a wind velocity of 550 km s{sup −1} before the 2012a event. The estimated explosion energy and ejected mass indicate that the 2012b event is not caused by a regular SN.

  16. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  17. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/LatGRBs - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-23

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new "Pass8" data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between Tc and the decay index, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  18. Absolute parameters of the eclipsing binary V821 Cas from UBVRI light curves and radial velocities†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakırlı, Ö.; Ibanoǧlu, C.; Bilir, S.; Sipahi, E.

    2009-05-01

    We present UBVRI photometric measurements and spectroscopic observations of the double-lined eclipsing binary V821Cas. The radial velocities were obtained by means of the cross-correlation technique. Simultaneous analyses of the multiband light curves and RVs give the absolute parameters for the stars as: and . An analysis of the O-C residuals yielded an apsidal motion in the binary at a rate of , corresponding to an apsidal period of U = 118 +/- 19yr. Subtracting the relativistic contribution, we find that logk2obs = -2.590 which is in agreement with the value predicted by theoretical models. Comparison with current stellar evolution models gives an age of 5.6 × 108yr for the system. Based on observations collected at Catania Astrophysical Observatory (Italy) and TÜBİTAK National Observatory (Antalya, Turkey). Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://www.blackwell-syngery.com/doi. ‡ E-mail: omur.cakirli@ege.edu.tr

  19. The Light-Curve and Rotation Rate of 'Active Asteroid' 313P/Gibbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, Dave Gerald

    2016-10-01

    The 'Active Asteroids' are a strange, yet newly discovered class of small bodies in the Solar System that have the orbital and dynamical properties of asteroids, but also the physical properties of comets (ejection of dust and volatile materials). Of the known ~25 Active Asteroids discovered thus far (Jewitt, Hseih, Argwal, 2015), only 4 have been known to be active on subsequent multiple occasions 238P/Read, 133P/Elst-Pizarro, 324P/La Sagra, (Jewitt et al. 2016) and 313P/Gibbs. In this work, we have determined the rotation rate and light-curve for Active Asteroid 313P/Gibbs using the Keck 10-m telescope to better understand the mechanisms and drivers of subsequent activity in this Solar System Small Body so that we may form a more complete picture of this population, better characterize them, and add to our inventory of Solar System small bodies to form a more complete model of the formation of the Solar System as well as what this may imply for future detection of activity in the Active Asteroid population.

  20. Temporal Deconvolution Study of Long and Short Gamma-Ray Burst Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  1. Early-time polarized optical light curve of GRB 131030A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, O. G.; Blinov, D.; Giannios, D.; Papadakis, I.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hovatta, T.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; Kylafis, N.; Kus, A.; Myserlis, I.; Modi, D.; Panopoulou, G.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T. J.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We report the polarized optical light curve of a gamma-ray burst afterglow obtained using the RoboPol instrument. Observations began 655 s after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB 131030A, and continued uninterrupted for 2 h. The afterglow displayed a low, constant fractional linear polarization of p = (2.1 ± 1.6) per cent throughout, which is similar to the interstellar polarization measured on nearby stars. The optical brightness decay is consistent with a forward-shock propagating in a medium of constant density, and the low polarization fraction indicates a disordered magnetic field in the shock front. This supports the idea that the magnetic field is amplified by plasma instabilities on the shock front. These plasma instabilities produce strong magnetic fields with random directions on scales much smaller than the total observable region of the shock, and the resulting randomly-oriented polarization vectors sum to produce a low net polarization over the total observable region of the shock.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVRIz light curves of 51 Type II supernovae (Galbany+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Maza, J.; de Jaeger, T.; Moraga, T.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Morrell, N. I.; Thomas-Osip, J.; Krzeminski, W.; Gonzalez, L.; Antezana, R.; Wishnjewski, M.; McCarthy, P.; Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Stritzinger, M.; Folatelli, G.; Anguita, C.; Galaz, G.; Green, E. M.; Impey, C.; Kim, Y.-C.; Kirhakos, S.; Malkan, M. A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Phillips, A. C.; Pizzella, A.; Prosser, C. F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Schommer, R. A.; Sherry, W.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wells, L. A.; Williger, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a sample of multi-band, visual-wavelength light curves of 51 type II supernovae (SNe II) observed from 1986 to 2003 in the course of four different surveys: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernovae Survey (CATS). Near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of this set of SNe II will be published in two companion papers. A list of the SNe II used in this study is presented in Table1. The first object in our list is SN 1986L and it is the only SN observed with photoelectric techniques (by M.M.P and S.K., using the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9m equipped with a photometer and B and V filters). The remaining SNe were observed using a variety of telescopes equipped with CCD detectors and UBV(RI)KCz filters (see Table5). The magnitudes for the photometric sequences of the 51 SNe II are listed in Table4. In every case, these sequences were derived from observations of Landolt standards (see Appendix D in Hamuy et al. 2001ApJ...558..615H for the definition of the z band and Stritzinger et al. 2002AJ....124.2100S for the description of the z-band standards). Table5 lists the resulting UBVRIz magnitudes for the 51 SNe. (3 data files).

  3. CfAIR2: Near-infrared Light Curves of 94 Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Marion, G. H.; Challis, Peter; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Modjaz, Maryam; Narayan, Gautham; Hicken, Malcolm; Foley, Ryan J.; Klein, Christopher R.; Starr, Dan L.; Morgan, Adam; Rest, Armin; Blake, Cullen H.; Miller, Adam A.; Falco, Emilio E.; Wyatt, William F.; Mink, Jessica; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2015-09-01

    CfAIR2 is a large, homogeneously reduced set of near-infrared (NIR) light curves (LCs) for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained with the 1.3 m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope. This data set includes 4637 measurements of 94 SNe Ia and 4 additional SNe Iax observed from 2005 to 2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. CfAIR2 includes {{JHK}}s photometric measurements for 88 normal and 6 spectroscopically peculiar SN Ia in the nearby universe, with a median redshift of z ˜ 0.021 for the normal SN Ia. CfAIR2 data span the range from -13 days to +127 days from B-band maximum. More than half of the LCs begin before the time of maximum, and the coverage typically contains ˜13-18 epochs of observation, depending on the filter. We present extensive tests that verify the fidelity of the CfAIR2 data pipeline, including comparison to the excellent data of the Carnegie Supernova Project. CfAIR2 contributes to a firm local anchor for SN cosmology studies in the NIR. Because SN Ia are more nearly standard candles in the NIR and are less vulnerable to the vexing problems of extinction by dust, CfAIR2 will help the SN cosmology community develop more precise and accurate extragalactic distance probes to improve our knowledge of cosmological parameters, including dark energy and its potential time variation.

  4. A New Relationship Between Soft X-Rays and EUV Flare Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares are the result of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona which converts magnetic energy into kinetic energy resulting in the rapid heating of solar plasma. As this plasma cools, it emits radiation at different EUV wavelengths when the dropping temperature passes a line’s temperature of formation. This results in a delay in the emissions from cooler EUV lines relative to hotter EUV lines. Therefore, characterizing how this hot plasma cools is important for understanding how the corresponding geo-effective extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance evolves in time. I present a simple new framework in which to study flare cooling by using a Lumped Element Thermal Model (LETM). LETM is frequently used in science and engineering to simplify a complex multi-dimensional thermal system by reducing it to a 0-D thermal circuit. For example, a structure that conducts heat out of a system is simplified with a resistive element and a structure that allows a system to store heat is simplified with a capacitive element. A major advantage of LETM is that the specific geometry of a system can be ignored, allowing for an intuitive analysis of the major thermal processes. I show that LETM is able to accurately reproduce the temporal evolution of cooler flare emission lines based on hotter emission line evolution. In particular, it can be used to predict the evolution of EUV flare light curves using the NOAA X-Ray Sensor (XRS).

  5. IRTF/SPeX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Light Curve System KIC8462852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8–4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene’s emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ∼1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  6. Historical light curve and the 2016 outburst of the symbiotic star StHalpha 169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, Ulisse; Graziani, Mauro; Jurdana-Sepic, Rajka

    2016-07-01

    Accurate BVRI optical photometry of StHa 169 has been collected during the period 2005-2016. It reveals two outbursts, in 2009 and 2016, both peaking at B=13.6. The mean brightness in quiescence was B=15.29. In response to the 2016 outburst, the integrated absolute flux of the emission lines increased by a factor of 7 for Balmer, 9 for HeI lines, and 4.5 for HeII 4686, the Balmer continuum turned into strong emission, and [NeV] 3526 and OVI Raman 6825 Ang emissions disappeared. We have reconstructed the 1897-1951 B-band light curve of StHa 169 from Harvard historical plates. On top of a slow decline from a large outburst, ending in 1916, several brightenings are visible. Two fast-evolving outbursts, separated by 510 days, occurred in 1934 and 1935, peaking at B=13.7. The brightness in quiescence was the same as we measured in 2005-2016.

  7. IRTF/SPeX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Light Curve System KIC8462852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8-4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene’s emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ˜1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  8. AN X-RAY AND OPTICAL LIGHT CURVE MODEL OF THE ECLIPSING SYMBIOTIC BINARY SMC3

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    2013-01-20

    Some binary evolution scenarios for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) include long-period binaries that evolve to symbiotic supersoft X-ray sources in their late stage of evolution. However, symbiotic stars with steady hydrogen burning on the white dwarf's (WD) surface are very rare, and the X-ray characteristics are not well known. SMC3 is one such rare example and a key object for understanding the evolution of symbiotic stars to SNe Ia. SMC3 is an eclipsing symbiotic binary, consisting of a massive WD and red giant (RG), with an orbital period of 4.5 years in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The long-term V light curve variations are reproduced as orbital variations in the irradiated RG, whose atmosphere fills its Roche lobe, thus supporting the idea that the RG supplies matter to the WD at rates high enough to maintain steady hydrogen burning on the WD. We also present an eclipse model in which an X-ray-emitting region around the WD is almost totally occulted by the RG swelling over the Roche lobe on the trailing side, although it is always partly obscured by a long spiral tail of neutral hydrogen surrounding the binary in the orbital plane.

  9. Surface Patterning of Ceramic Phosphor Plate for Light Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, An

    Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are expected to replace traditional lighting sources in the near future due to their energy-efficiency, optical design flexibility and good reliability over traditional lighting sources. III-V nitride blue LEDs with powdered phosphors have been used commercially to get white emission. However, due to scattering losses, thermal issues as well as the surface reactivity with common encapsulants, LEDs fabricated with powdered phosphors have limitations in achieving high luminous efficacy, high chromatic stability and good color-rendering properties. Solid, non-scattering phosphors could avoid many of these limitations, but issues of light extraction and coupling of excitation radiation to the phosphor require development to insure efficient operation. Photonic crystal structures fabricated into or on non-scattering phosphors can be used to address these challenges. In this thesis, a lift-off process with bilayer resist system is developed to create nanopatterns. A photonic crystal structure is fabricated by low cost molecular transfer lithography (MxL) with bi-layer resist system on non-scattering phosphor plate used for white emission to increase the extraction efficiency. In Chapter 1, some basic background concepts which appear frequently in this thesis are introduced. These concepts include the Stokes shift and backscattering phenomenon for powder phosphors as well as non-scattering phosphors. In Chapter 2, a non-scattering single crystal phosphor with a patterned surface is proposed to replace the powdered phosphors used for color converted LEDs. A non-scattering phosphor YAG:Ce ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) patterned with TiO2 photonic crystal structure is selected for convenience to demonstrate the concept. The physical origin of light extraction of the proposed structure is discussed. The simulation principles and results are discussed in this chapter to find the optimized photonic crystal structure for light extraction. In Chapter 3

  10. Photometric analysis of the contact binary star V842 Hercules on the basis of seasonal light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Özkardeş, B.

    2009-04-01

    We present new BVR light curves and photometric analysis of the contact binary star V842 Her. The light curves were obtained at the ÇOMU Observatory in the consecutive years 2003, 2004, 2005, and also 2007. We studied the variation of the orbital period of the system. The O- C diagram shows a quasi-sinusoidal form superimposed on a parabola. The parabolic variation, which indicates the secular increase of the orbital period of the system, was interpreted in terms of the combined effect of mass transfer between the components of the system and mass loss by a stellar wind from the system. The sinusoidal form of the orbital period variation was considered as an apparent change and interpreted in term of the light-time effect due to an unseen component in the system. We have also studied the nature of asymmetries and the intrinsic variability in the light curves of the system. The differences between light levels of both maxima (i.e. O'Connell effect) and minima are changing with time. These peculiar asymmetries were explained by a dark spot on the surface of the large and more massive component star. The present BVR light curves and radial velocity curves obtained by [Rucinski, S.M., Lu, W., 1999. AJ 118, 2451] were analysed by means of the Wilson-Devinney method supplemented with a Monte Carlo type algorithm. Absolute parameters of the system were also derived. They are m1 = 0.38 m⊙, m2 = 1.45 m⊙, R1 = 0.81 R⊙, R2 = 1.47 R⊙, M = 5m.08 and M = 4m.06.

  11. Selecting a linear mixed model for longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern model, and growth curve approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Rovine, Michael J; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2012-03-01

    With increasing popularity, growth curve modeling is more and more often considered as the 1st choice for analyzing longitudinal data. Although the growth curve approach is often a good choice, other modeling strategies may more directly answer questions of interest. It is common to see researchers fit growth curve models without considering alterative modeling strategies. In this article we compare 3 approaches for analyzing longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern models, and growth curve models. As all are members of the general linear mixed model family, they represent somewhat different assumptions about the way individuals change. These assumptions result in different patterns of covariation among the residuals around the fixed effects. In this article, we first indicate the kinds of data that are appropriately modeled by each and use real data examples to demonstrate possible problems associated with the blanket selection of the growth curve model. We then present a simulation that indicates the utility of Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion in the selection of a proper residual covariance structure. The results cast doubt on the popular practice of automatically using growth curve modeling for longitudinal data without comparing the fit of different models. Finally, we provide some practical advice for assessing mean changes in the presence of correlated data.

  12. High-precision 2MASS JHK{sub s} light curves and other data for RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450 + 001501: Strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models

    SciTech Connect

    Szabó, Róbert; Ivezić, Željko; Kiss, László L.; Kolláth, Zoltán; Jones, Lynne; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Sesar, Branimir; Cutri, Roc M.

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss an extensive data set for the non-Blazhko ab-type RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450+001501, including optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz light curves and spectroscopic data, LINEAR and Catalina Sky Survey unfiltered optical light curves, and infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer W1 and W2 light curves. Most notable is that light curves obtained by 2MASS include close to 9000 photometric measures collected over 3.3 yr and provide an exceedingly precise view of near-infrared variability. These data demonstrate that static atmosphere models are insufficient to explain multiband photometric light-curve behavior and present strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models for RR Lyrae stars. It is a challenge to modelers to produce theoretical light curves that can explain data presented here, which we make publicly available.

  13. The light curve shapes as a key to resolving the origin of long secondary periods in red giant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment light curves of red giant stars exhibiting long secondary periods (LSPs)—an enigmatic phenomenon commonly observed in stars on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. We show that the light curves of LSP stars are essentially identical to those of the spotted variables with one dark spot on their photospheres. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of a dusty cloud orbiting the red giant together with a low-mass companion in a close, circular orbit. We argue that the binary scenario is in agreement with most of the observational properties of LSP variables, including non-sinusoidal shapes of their radial velocity curves.

  14. Determination of the parameters of the eclipsing binary system V367 CYG by the light-curve synthesis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhina, E. A.; Menchenkova, E. V.

    1990-06-01

    Fresa's (1966) blue light curve of V367 Cyg is analyzed by the synthesis method in the framework of the Roche model and a model with a geometrically thick disk. The new spectroscopic mass ratio q = M2//M1 = 1.57 was used. The fundamental parameters and the absolute dimensions of the system were determined.

  15. Dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves encountering a density bump or void

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  16. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of Gamma-Ray Burst Blast Waves Encountering a Density Bump or Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  17. A CHANGE IN THE LIGHT CURVE OF KUIPER BELT CONTACT BINARY (139775) 2001 QG{sub 298}

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro

    2011-09-15

    New observations show that the light curve of Kuiper Belt contact binary (139775) 2001 QG{sub 298} has changed substantially since the first observations in 2003. The 2010 light curve has a peak-to-peak photometric range of {Delta}m{sub 2010} = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 mag, significantly lower than in 2003, {Delta}m{sub 2003} = 1.14 {+-} 0.04 mag. This change is most simply interpreted if 2001 QG{sub 298} has an obliquity near 90{sup 0}. The observed decrease in {Delta}m is caused by a change in viewing geometry, from equator-on in 2003 to nearly 16{sup 0} (the orbital angular distance covered by the object between the observations) off the equator in 2010. The 2003 and 2010 light curves have the same rotation period and appear in phase when shifted by an integer number of full rotations, also consistent with high obliquity. Based on the new 2010 light curve data, we find that 2001 QG{sub 298} has an obliquity of {epsilon} = 90{sup 0} {+-} 30{sup 0}. Current estimates of the intrinsic fraction of contact binaries in the Kuiper Belt are debiased assuming that these objects have randomly oriented spins. If, as 2001 QG2{sub 98}, Kuiper Belt Object contact binaries tend to have large obliquities, a larger correction is required. As a result, the abundance of contact binaries may be larger than previously believed.

  18. Against the Wind: Radio Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae Interacting with Low-density Circumstellar Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Chelsea E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasen, Daniel N.

    2016-06-01

    For decades a wide variety of observations spanning the radio through optical and on to the X-ray have attempted to uncover signs of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). The goal of these studies is to constrain the nature of the hypothesized SN Ia mass-donor companion. A continuous CSM is typically assumed when interpreting observations of interaction. However, while such models have been successfully applied to core-collapse SNe, the assumption of continuity may not be accurate for SNe Ia, because shells of CSM could be formed by pre-supernova eruptions (novae). In this work, we model the interaction of SNe with a spherical, low-density, finite-extent CSM and create a suite of synthetic radio synchrotron light curves. We find that CSM shells produce sharply peaked light curves. We also identify a fiducial set of models that obey a common evolution and can be used to generate radio light curves for an interaction with an arbitrary shell. The relations obeyed by the fiducial models can be used to deduce CSM properties from radio observations; we demonstrate this by applying them to the nondetections of SN 2011fe and SN 2014J. Finally, we explore a multiple shell CSM configuration and describe its more complicated dynamics and the resultant radio light curves.

  19. FIRST PRECISION LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF THE NEGLECTED EXTREME MASS RATIO SOLAR-TYPE BINARY HR BOOTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, Ronald G.; Benkendorf, Barry; Dignan, James B.; Robb, Russell; Kring, James; Faulkner, Danny R.

    2015-04-15

    HR Bootis is a neglected binary that is found to be a solar-type (G2V) extreme mass ratio binary (EMRB). It was discovered by Hanley and Shapley in 1940. Surprisingly, little has been published in the intervening years. In 1999 it was characterized by a 0.31587 day orbital period. Since that time it has been observed by various observers who have determined ∼20 timings of minimum light over the past ∼15,000 orbits. Our observations in 2012 represent the first precision curves in the BVR{sub c}I{sub c} Johnson–Cousins wavelength bands. The light curves have rather low amplitudes, averaging some 0.5 magnitudes, yet they exhibit total eclipses, which is typical of the rare group of solar-type EMRBs. An improved linear ephemeris was computed along with a quadratic ephemeris showing a decaying orbit, which indicates magnetic breaking may be occurring. The light curve solution reveals that HR Boo is a contact system with a somewhat low 21% Roche-lobe fill-out but a mass ratio of q = 4.09 (0.2444), which defines it as an EMRB. Two spots, both hot, were allowed to iterate to fit the light curve asymmetries. Their radii are 32° and 16°. Both are high-latitude polar spots indicative of strong magnetic activity. The shallow contact yet nearly equal component temperatures makes it an unusual addition to this group.

  20. Fringe Pattern of the PEP-II Synchrotron-Light Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    Synchrotron-light interferometry is used to measure the vertical beam sizes in the high-energy and low-energy rings (HER and LER) of the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. Light from a point in a dipole magnet is diffracted by two slits and then imaged onto a CCD camera. A curve fitting algorithm matches the measured interference fringes to a calculated pattern that includes the effect on the modulation depth of the fringes due to both the small but nonzero source size and the narrow bandpass of the optical filter. These formulas are derived here. Next, an additional focusing term from the primary mirror in the vacuum chamber is considered. The mirror needs extensive cooling due to the intense fan of synchrotron x-rays and is likely to have a slight stress-induced curvature, which must be considered to determine the true source size.

  1. Microlensing of sub-parsec massive binary black holes in lensed QSOs: Light curves and size-wavelength relation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Chang-Shuo; Lu, Youjun; Mao, Shude; Yu, Qingjuan; Wambsganss, Joachim E-mail: luyj@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    Sub-parsec binary massive black holes (BBHs) have long been thought to exist in many QSOs but remain observationally elusive. In this paper, we propose a novel method to probe sub-parsec BBHs through microlensing of lensed QSOs. If a QSO hosts a sub-parsec BBH in its center, it is expected that the BBH is surrounded by a circumbinary disk, each component of the BBH is surrounded by a small accretion disk, and a gap is opened by the secondary component in between the circumbinary disk and the two small disks. Assuming such a BBH structure, we generate mock microlensing light curves for some QSO systems that host BBHs with typical physical parameters. We show that microlensing light curves of a BBH QSO system at the infrared-optical-UV bands can be significantly different from those of corresponding QSO system with a single massive black hole (MBH), mainly because of the existence of the gap and the rotation of the BBH (and its associated small disks) around the center of mass. We estimate the half-light radii of the emission region at different wavelengths from mock light curves and find that the obtained half-light radius versus wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be much flatter than those of single MBH QSO systems at a wavelength range determined by the BBH parameters, such as the total mass, mass ratio, separation, accretion rates, etc. The difference is primarily due to the existence of the gap. Such unique features on the light curves and half-light radius-wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be used to select and probe sub-parsec BBHs in a large number of lensed QSOs to be discovered by current and future surveys, including the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, the Large Synoptic Survey telescope, and Euclid.

  2. Self-Esteem Trajectories among Ethnic Minority Adolescents: A Growth Curve Analysis of the Patterns and Predictors of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Melissa L.; Way, Niobe

    2005-01-01

    The current study presents a growth curve analysis of self-esteem among Black, Latino, and Asian American high school students. A series of hierarchical linear models were used to examine patterns and predictors of change in self-esteem over time. Results revealed an average increase in self-esteem with age. Although boys and girls experienced…

  3. Wavelet-based filter methods for the detection of small transiting planets: Application to Kepler and K2 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Paetzold, Martin; KEST

    2016-10-01

    The Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung (RIU-PF) has developed the software package EXOTRANS for the detection of transits of exoplanets in stellar light curves. This software package was in use during the CoRoT space mission (2006-2013). EXOTRANS was improved by different wavelet-based filter methods during the following years to separate stellar variation, orbital disturbances and instrumental effects from stellar light curves taken by space telescopes (Kepler, K2, TESS and PLATO). The VARLET filter separates faint transit signals from stellar variations without using a-priori information about the target star. VARLET considers variations by frequency, amplitude and shape simultaneously. VARLET is also able to extract most instrumental jumps and glitches. The PHALET filter separates periodic features independent of their shape and is used with the intention to separate diluting stellar binaries. It is also applied for the multi transit search. Stellar light curves of the K2 mission are constructed from the processing of target pixel files which corrects disturbances caused by the reduced pointing precision of the Kepler telescope after the failure of two gyroscopes. The combination of target pixel file processing with both filter techniques and the proven detection pipeline EXOTRANS lowers the detection limit, reduces false alarms and simplifies the detection of faint transits in light curves of the K2 mission. Using EXOTRANS many new candidates were detected in K2 light curves by using EXOTRANS which were successfully confirmed by ground-based follow-up observation of the KEST collaboration. New candidates and confirmed planets are presented.

  4. Perspective on Afterglows: Numerically Computed Views, Light Curves, and the Analysis of Homogeneous and Structured Jets with Lateral Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonson, Jay D.

    2003-08-01

    Herein I present numerical calculations of light curves of homogeneous and structured afterglows with various lateral expansion rates as seen from any vantage point. Such calculations allow for direct simulation of observable quantities for complex afterglows with arbitrary energy distributions and lateral expansion paradigms. A simple, causal model is suggested for lateral expansion of the jet as it evolves: namely, that the lateral expansion kinetic energy derives from the forward kinetic energy. As such, the homogeneous jet model shows that lateral expansion is important at all times in the afterglow evolution and that analytical scaling laws do a poor job at describing the afterglow decay before and after the break. In particular, I find that lateral expansion does not cause a break in the light curve as had been predicted. A primary purpose of this paper is to study structured afterglows, which do a good job of reproducing global relationships and correlations in the data and thus suggest the possibility of a universal afterglow model. Simulations of structured jets show a general trend in which jet breaks become more pronounced with increasing viewing angle with respect to the jet axis. In fact, under certain conditions a bump can occur in the light curve at the jet-break time. I derive scaling relations for this bump and suggest that it may be a source of some bumps in observed light curves such as that of GRB 000301C. A couple of lateral expansion models are tested over a range of efficiencies and viewing angles, and it is found that lateral expansion can, in some cases, substantially sharpen the jet break. I show flux surface contour maps and simulated images of the afterglows that give insight into how they evolve and determine their light curves.

  5. High-Quality Early-Time Light Curves of GRB 060206: Implications for Gamma-Ray Burst Environments and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Carter, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Bersier, D. F.; Gomboc, A.; Melandri, A.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.

    2006-09-01

    The 2 m robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT) reacted promptly to the high-redshift (z=4.048) gamma-ray burst GRB 060206. The afterglow was identified automatically, and the multicolor r'i'z' imaging program was triggered without human intervention. Combining our data with those obtained from later follow-ups provides a well-sampled optical light curve from 5 minutes to more than 2days after the gamma event. The light curve is highly structured, with at least three bumps evident in the first 75 minutes, including a major rebrightening (Δr'~-1.6 at t~3000 s), interpreted as late energy injection. At early time (t~440 s), we find evidence for fast (Δtrest<4 s<light curve in the rest frame at early times; the light-curve behavior of GRB 060206 should therefore not be considered peculiar. Finally, although the observed late-time steepening of the optical light curve resembles a jet break if taken in isolation, the lack of a corresponding change in the X-ray slope rules out a jet-break interpretation. Traditionally, GRB jet breaks have been inferred from optical data in the absence of simultaneous X-ray data. We therefore suggest that current estimates of the jet-opening angle distribution might be biased by events like GRB 060206. Consequently, the GRB explosion energy distribution and event rates may have to be revised.

  6. Periodicity Analysis of X-ray Light Curves of SS 433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Lu, X. L.; Zhao, Q. W.; Dong, D. Q.; Lao, B. Q.; Lu, Y.; Wei, Y. H.; Wu, X. C.; An, T.

    2016-03-01

    SS 433 is the only X-ray binary to date that was detected to have a pair of well-collimated jets, and its orbital period, super orbital period, and nutation period were all detected at the same time. The study on the periodic X-ray variabilities is helpful for understanding its dynamic process of the central engine and the correlation with other bands. In the present paper, two time series analysis techniques, Lomb-Scargle periodogram and weighted wavelet Z-transform, are employed to search for the periodicities from the Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope)(15--50 keV) and RXTE/ASM (Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/All-Sky Monitor)(1.5--3, 3--5 and 5--12 keV) light curves of SS 433, and the Monte Carlo simulation is performed. For the 15--50 keV energy band, five significant periodic signals are detected, which are P_1(˜6.29 d), P_2 (˜6.54 d), P_3 (˜13.08 d), P_4 (˜81.50 d), and P_5 (˜162.30 d). For the 3--5 and 5--12 keV energy bands, periodic signals P_3 (˜13 d) and P_5 (˜162 d) are detected in both energy bands. However, for the 1.5--3 keV energy band, no significant periodic signal is detected. P_5 has the strongest periodic signal in the power spectrum for all the energy bands of 3--5, 5--12, and 15--50 keV, and it is consistent with that obtained by previous study in optical band. Further, due to the existence of relativistic radio jets, the X-ray and optical band variability of P_5 (˜162 d) is probably related to the precession of the relativistic jets. High coherence between X-ray and optical light curves may also imply that the X-ray and optical emissions are of the same physical origin. P_3 shows a good agreement with the orbital period (˜13.07 d) first obtained by previous study, and P_2 and P_4 are the high frequency harmonic components of P_3 and P_5, respectively. P_1 is detected from the power spectrum of 15--50 keV energy band only, and it is consistent with the systematic nutation period. As the power of energy band decreases (from hard X-ray to

  7. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: start of activity and heliocentric light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubiana, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Bramich, D.; Boehnhardt, H.; Barrera, L.

    2012-09-01

    centre for much of this time (Fig. 1 - top). The 2007/8 data presented here was particularly difficult, and the comet will once again be badly placed for Earth based observations in 2014/5. We made use of the technique of Difference Image Analysis (as implemented in the DanDIA software, [5]), which is commonly used in variable star and exoplanet research, to remove background sources and extract images of the comet (Fig. 1 - bottom). We determined that the comet became active during the period November 2007 - March 2008, at a distance of 4.1-3.4 AU from the Sun. The comet will reach this distance, and probably become active again, in April- September 2014. To investigate the longer period activity cycle of the comet we compiled the heliocentric light curve of the comet, making use of images of 67P/C-G taken during the last three apparitions taken from the ESO archive. A preliminary light curve is shown in 2. This information will be used for planning observing campaigns, both from the ground and using OSIRIS on board Rosetta.

  8. The Mid-infrared Light Curve of Nearby Core-collapse Supernova SN 2011dh (PTF 11eon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, George; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Surace, Jason; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2013-11-01

    We present Spitzer observations at 3.6 and 4.5 μm of the supernova SN 2011dh (PTF 11eon) in M51 from 18 days to 625 days after explosion. The mid-infrared emission peaks at 24 days after explosion at a few ×107 L ⊙, and decays more slowly than the visible-light bolometric luminosity. The infrared color temperature cools for the first 90 days and then is constant. Simple numerical models of a thermal echo can qualitatively reproduce the early behavior. At late times, the mid-IR light curve cannot be explained by a simple thermal echo model, suggesting additional dust heating or line emission mechanisms. We also propose that thermal echoes can serve as effective probes to uncover supernovae in heavily obscured environments, and speculate that under the right conditions, integrating the early epoch of the mid-infrared light curve may constrain the total energy in the shock breakout flash.

  9. MODELING PHASE-ALIGNED GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J0034-0534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of 'altitude-limited' outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario ('low-altitude slot gap' (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere

  10. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray and Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T.; Harding, A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J00340534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of altitude-limited outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario (low-altitude slot gap (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and

  11. The Definitive X-Ray Light Curve of Swift J164449.3+573451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2016-02-01

    On 2011 March 28, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope triggered on an object that had no analog in over six years of Swift operations. Follow-up observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) found a new, bright X-ray source covering three orders of magnitude in flux over the first few days, that was much more persistent (and variable) than gamma-ray burst afterglows. Ground-based spectroscopy found a redshift of 0.35, implying extremely high luminosity, with integrated isotropic-equivalent energy output in the X-ray band alone exceeding 1053 erg in the first two weeks after discovery. Strong evidence for a collimated outflow or beamed emission was found. The observational properties of this object are unlike anything ever before observed. We interpret these unique properties as the result of emission from a relativistic jet produced in the aftermath of the tidal disruption of a main sequence star by a massive black hole (BH) in the center of the host galaxy. The source decayed slowly as the stellar remnants were accreted onto the BH, before abruptly shutting off. Here we present the definitive XRT team light curve for Swift J164449.3+573451 and discuss its implications. We show that the unabsorbed flux decayed roughly as a {t}-1.5 power law up to 2012 August 17. The steep turnoff of an order of magnitude in 24 hr seems to be consistent with the shutdown of the jet as the accretion disk transitioned from a thick disk to a thin disk. Swift continues to monitor this source in case the jet reactivates.

  12. Metallicity as a Source of Dispersion in the SNIa Bolometric Light Curve Luminosity-Width Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, E.; Domínguez, I.; Badenes, C.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.

    2010-03-01

    The recognition that the metallicity of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitors might bias their use for cosmological applications has led to an increasing interest in its role in shaping SNIa light curves. We explore the sensitivity of the synthesized mass of 56Ni, M(56Ni), to the progenitor metallicity starting from pre-main-sequence models with masses M 0 = 2-7 M sun and metallicities Z = 10-5-0.10. The interplay between convective mixing and carbon burning during the simmering phase eventually raises the neutron excess, η, and leads to a smaller 56Ni yield, but does not change substantially the dependence of M(56Ni) on Z. Uncertain attributes of the progenitor white dwarf, like the central density, have a minor effect on M(56Ni). Our main results are: (1) a sizeable amount of 56Ni is synthesized during incomplete Si-burning, which leads to a stronger dependence of M(56Ni) on Z than obtained by assuming that 56Ni is produced in material that burns fully to nuclear statistical equilibrium; (2) in one-dimensional delayed detonation simulations a composition dependence of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) density gives a nonlinear relationship between M(56Ni) and Z and predicts a luminosity larger than previously thought at low metallicities (however, the progenitor metallicity alone cannot explain the whole observational scatter of SNIa luminosities); and (3) an accurate measurement of the slope of the Hubble residuals versus metallicity for a large enough data set of SNIa might give clues to the physics of DDT in thermonuclear explosions.

  13. Study of GRB Light-curve Decay Indices in the Afterglow Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Roberta; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michał

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we study the distribution of temporal power-law decay indices, α, in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow phase, fitted for 176 GRBs (139 long GRBs, 12 short GRBs with extended emission, and 25 X-ray flashes) with known redshifts. These indices are compared with the temporal decay index, α W , derived with the light-curve fitting using the Willingale et al. model. This model fitting yields similar distributions of α W to the fitted α, but for individual bursts a difference can be significant. Analysis of (α, L a ) distribution, where L a is the characteristic luminosity at the end of the plateau, reveals only a weak correlation of these quantities. However, we discovered a significant regular trend when studying GRB α values along the Dainotti et al. correlation between L a and the end time of the plateau emission in the rest frame, {T}a* , hereafter LT correlation. We note a systematic variation of the α parameter distribution with luminosity for any selected {T}a* . We analyze this systematics with respect to the fitted LT correlation line, expecting that the presented trend may allow us to constrain the GRB physical models. We also attempted to use the derived correlation of α ({T}a) versus {L}a({T}a) to diminish the luminosity scatter related to the variations of α along the LT distribution, a step forward in the effort of standardizing GRBs. A proposed toy model accounting for this systematics applied to the analyzed GRB distribution results in a slight increase of the LT correlation coefficient.

  14. The Impact of Tides on Transiting Planet Structure and Evolution and Light Curve Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We examine two key consequences of tidal forces on the transiting planet observed and theoretical properties. First, based on consistent calculations coupling gravothermal evolution with complete tidal equations, we revisit the viability of the tidal heating hypothesis to explain the anomalously large radius of some transiting planets. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that calculations based on tidal models truncated at second order in eccentricity, as done in all previous studies, lead to severely erroneous tidal evolutions. Such truncated calculations yield characteristic timescales for dynamical evolution that can be wrong by orders of magnitude, leading accordingly to completely erroneous tidal energy dissipation rates during the planet's evolution. We demontrate that these results do not stem from uncertainties in the tidal quality factor, as often (erroneously) suggested, but from the exact calculations of the tidal equations. We show that, although tidal heating provides a substantial contribution to the planet's heat budget, this mechanism can not explain alone all the anomalously inflated planets. We examine alternative mechanisms to explain these puzzling properties. Furthermore, due to strong tidal forces, transiting planets exhibit a non-spherical shape. Such a departure from sphericity has a measurable impact on the observed transit depth and leads to a bias in the derivation of the transit radius from the light curve. As the tidally deformed planet projects its smallest cross section area during the transit, the measured effective radius is smaller than the one of the unperturbed genuine spherical planet. To correct this bias, we present analytical expressions that can easily be used to calculate the shape of observed planets (and Love number) and its impact on the transit lightcurve. These expressions enable us to convert the planet’s measured cross section into its real equilibrium radius, the one to be used when comparing

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V392 Car light curve (Debernardi+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardi, Y.; North, P.

    2001-06-01

    We present a detailed study of an eclipsing binary which had been classified Ap SrCrEu (Hartoog, 1976ApJ...205..807H) before being known as a binary. Radial velocities measured at the times of both quadratures allow us to obtain precise masses for both components, while the light curve yields the radii. The following ephemeris and fundamental parameters of the system were obtained: HJD=(2447999.7656+/-0.0041) +(3.174990+/-0.000001) E, e=0.00, i=81.9+/-0.1°, M1=1.90+/-0.02M⊙, M2=1.85+/-0.02M⊙, R1=1.63+/-0.03R⊙, R2=1.60+/-0.03R⊙, vsini1=27.6+/-3.5km/s, vsini2=23.6+/-3.6km/s. The projected rotational velocities were determined by fitting a synthetic spectrum convolved with a rotational profile to the observed spectrum. A comparison of the spectra of V392 Car and of the normal A star Cox 98, which has the same colour indices, shows that Sr is not overabundant and the metallicity of V392 Car is the same as that of the other cluster members. Therefore, V392 Car is a normal A2 star rather than an Ap star. The position of V392 Car in the HR diagram is entirely consistent with membership of the cluster NGC 2516. An independent estimate of the distance to this cluster was done using the parameters of the eclipsing system, and found to be in agreement with the Hipparcos one. A comparison of the parameters obtained from observations with predictions of internal structure models leads to a metallicity estimate [M/H]=0+/-0.10dex for NGC 2516. This estimate is completely independent of any spectroscopic or photometric method (except for the Teff determination) but relies on stellar structure models. (1 data file).

  16. ANALYTICAL LIGHT CURVE MODELS OF SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE: {chi}{sup 2}-MINIMIZATION OF PARAMETER FITS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Vinko, J.; Horvath, Z. L.; Nagy, A.

    2013-08-10

    We present fits of generalized semi-analytic supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs including {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and forward and reverse shock heating due to supernova ejecta-circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We apply our models to the observed LCs of the H-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSN-II) SN 2006gy, SN 2006tf, SN 2008am, SN 2008es, CSS100217, the H-poor SLSN-I SN 2005ap, SCP06F6, SN 2007bi, SN 2010gx, and SN 2010kd, as well as to the interacting SN 2008iy and PTF 09uj. Our goal is to determine the dominant mechanism that powers the LCs of these extraordinary events and the physical conditions involved in each case. We also present a comparison of our semi-analytical results with recent results from numerical radiation hydrodynamics calculations in the particular case of SN 2006gy in order to explore the strengths and weaknesses of our models. We find that CS shock heating produced by ejecta-CSM interaction provides a better fit to the LCs of most of the events we examine. We discuss the possibility that collision of supernova ejecta with hydrogen-deficient CSM accounts for some of the hydrogen-deficient SLSNe (SLSN-I) and may be a plausible explanation for the explosion mechanism of SN 2007bi, the pair-instability supernova candidate. We characterize and discuss issues of parameter degeneracy.

  17. METALLICITY AS A SOURCE OF DISPERSION IN THE SNIa BOLOMETRIC LIGHT CURVE LUMINOSITY-WIDTH RELATIONSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, E.; DomInguez, I.; Badenes, C.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O. E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2010-03-10

    The recognition that the metallicity of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitors might bias their use for cosmological applications has led to an increasing interest in its role in shaping SNIa light curves. We explore the sensitivity of the synthesized mass of {sup 56}Ni, M({sup 56}Ni), to the progenitor metallicity starting from pre-main-sequence models with masses M {sub 0} = 2-7 M {sub sun} and metallicities Z = 10{sup -5}-0.10. The interplay between convective mixing and carbon burning during the simmering phase eventually raises the neutron excess, {eta}, and leads to a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield, but does not change substantially the dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z. Uncertain attributes of the progenitor white dwarf, like the central density, have a minor effect on M({sup 56}Ni). Our main results are: (1) a sizeable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized during incomplete Si-burning, which leads to a stronger dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z than obtained by assuming that {sup 56}Ni is produced in material that burns fully to nuclear statistical equilibrium; (2) in one-dimensional delayed detonation simulations a composition dependence of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) density gives a nonlinear relationship between M({sup 56}Ni) and Z and predicts a luminosity larger than previously thought at low metallicities (however, the progenitor metallicity alone cannot explain the whole observational scatter of SNIa luminosities); and (3) an accurate measurement of the slope of the Hubble residuals versus metallicity for a large enough data set of SNIa might give clues to the physics of DDT in thermonuclear explosions.

  18. THE PECULIAR LIGHT CURVE OF THE SYMBIOTIC STAR AX PER OF THE LAST 125 YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the optical light curve (LC) of the last 125 years of the symbiotic star AX Per through some remarkable correlations that we discovered in its power spectrum (PS). The data were assembled from the literature and from the American Association of Variable Stars Observers database. A series of six major outbursts dominate the LC. They are presented in the PS as 13 harmonics of the fundamental frequency f {sub a} = 1/P {sub a} = 1/23,172 day{sup –1}. We refer to them as the ''red'' frequencies. Oscillations with the binary periodicity of the system P {sub b} = 1/f {sub b} = 681.48 days are also seen in the LC, with particularly large amplitudes during outbursts. The f {sub b} peak in the PS is accompanied by 13 other peaks on each side, which we refer to as the ''blue'' frequencies. A distinct structure in the frequency distribution of the blue peaks, as well as in their peak power, is best interpreted as reflecting beating of the 13 ''red'' frequencies with the binary one. We suggest, following others, that the major outbursts of the system result from events of intense mass loss from the giant star. Mass accretion onto the hot component, partially through the L1 point of the system, took place in the last 125 years at a rate that oscillated with the 13 first harmonics of the f {sub a} frequency. The binary orbit is slightly eccentric and periastron passages induced modulation of the L1 accretion at the binary frequency. Hence the f {sub b} oscillations in the brightness of the star of an amplitude that is modulated by the ''red'' frequencies of the system.

  19. Kepler light-curve analysis of the blazar W2R 1926+42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, Rumen; Strigachev, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We study the long term Kepler light curve of the blazar W2R 1926+42 (˜1.6 yr) which indicates a variety of variability properties during different intervals of observation. The normalized excess variance, Fvar ranges from 1.8 per cent in the quiescent phase and 43.3 per cent in the outburst phase. We find no significant deviation from linearity in the Fvar-flux relation. Time series analysis is conducted using the Fourier power spectrum and the wavelet analysis methods to study the power spectral density (PSD) shape, infer characteristic time-scales and statistically significant quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). A bending power law with an associated time-scale of T_B = 6.2^{+6.4}_{-3.1} hours is inferred in the PSD analysis. We obtain a black hole mass of M• = (1.5-5.9) × 107 M⊙ for the first time using Fvar and the bend time-scale for this source. From a mean outburst lifetime of days, we infer a distance from the jet base r ≤ 1.75 pc indicating that the outburst originates due to a shock. A possible QPO peaked at 9.1 d and lasting 3.4 cycles is inferred from the wavelet analysis. Assuming that the QPO is a true feature, r = (152-378)GM•/c2 and supported by the other timing analysis products such as a weighted mean PSD slope of -1.5 ± 0.2 from the PSD analysis, we argue that the observed variability and the weak and short duration QPO could be due to jet based processes including orbital features in a relativistic helical jet and others such as shocks and turbulence.

  20. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: SPECTROSCOPIC CAMPAIGN AND EMISSION-LINE LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Treu, Tommaso; Pancoast, Anna; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Woo, Jong-Hak; Assef, Roberto J.; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Brewer, Brendon J.; Cenko, S. Bradley; and others

    2015-04-15

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hβ line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad Hβ line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad Hβ width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region “breathes” on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad Hβ velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad Hβ velocity shifted by ∼250 km s{sup −1} over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  1. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-line Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E..; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pancoast, Anna; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hß line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad H beta line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad H beta width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region "breathes" on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad H beta velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad H beta velocity shifted by approximately 250 km s(exp -1) over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  2. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-line Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pancoast, Anna; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Assef, Roberto J.; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Brewer, Brendon J.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cooper, Michael C.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hiner, Kyle D.; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Hsiao, Eric; Kandrashoff, Michael T.; Lazarova, Mariana S.; Nierenberg, A. M.; Rex, Jacob; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.

    2015-04-01

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hβ line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad Hβ line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad Hβ width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region “breathes” on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad Hβ velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad Hβ velocity shifted by ˜250 km s-1 over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  3. Delayed detonation models for normal and subluminous type Ia sueprnovae: Absolute brightness, light curves, and molecule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, P.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We compute optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) using an elaborate treatment of the Local Thermodynamic Equilbrium (LTE) radiation transport, equation of state and ionization balance, expansion opacity including the cooling by CO, Co(+), and SiO, and a Monte Carlo gamma-ray deposition scheme. The models have an amount of Ni-56 in the range from approximately or equal to 0.1 solar mass up to 0.7 solar mass depending on the density at which the transition from a deflagration to a detonation occurs. Models with a large nickel production give light curves comparable to those of typical Type Ia supernovae. Subluminous supernovae can be explained by models with a low nickel production. Multiband light curves are presented in comparison with the normally bright event SN 1992bc and the subluminous events Sn 1991bg and SN 1992bo to establish the principle that the delayed detonation paradigm in Chandrasekhar mass models may give a common explosion mechanism accounting for both normal and subluminous SN Ia's. Secondary IR-maxima are formed in the models of normal SN Ia's as a photospheric effect if the photospheric radius continues to increase well after maximum light. Secondary maxima appear later and stronger in models with moderate expansion velocities and with radioactive material closer to the surface. Model light curves for subluminous SN Ia's tend to show only one 'late' IR-maximum. In some delayed detonation models shell-like envelopes form, which consist of unburned carbon and oxygen. The formation of molecules in these envelopes is addressed. If the model retains a C/O-envelope and is subluminous, strong vibration bands of CO may appear, typically several weeks past maximum light. CO should be very weak or absent in normal Sn Ia's.

  4. Comparing the precision 2009 and 2012 light curves of the precontact W UMa binary V1001 Cassiopeia

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, R. G.; Koenke, S. S.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A 2012 follow up to the analysis of 2009 observations is presented for the very short period (∼0.43 days) precontact W UMa binary (PCWB) V1001 Cassiopeia. Its short period, similar to the majority of W UMa binaries, and its distinct EA light curve make it a very rare and interesting system for continuing photometric investigation. Previous photometric VRI standard magnitudes give a K4 spectral type. Our solutions of light curves separated by some three years give approximately the same physical parameters. However, the spots have radically changed in temperature, area, and position. While only one dark spot was used to model the first curves, two hot spots are now needed. This affects the overall shape of the light curve, especially in the secondary eclipses in B and V. Additional eclipse timings now show that the orbital period is changing. We conclude that spots are very active on this solar-type dwarf system and that it may mimic its larger cousins, the RS CVn binaries. The conclusion is that analysis now needs to be directed at the continuous time evolution of PCWBs.

  5. EAS development curve at energy of 10(16) - 10(18) eV measured by optical Cerenkov light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, T.; Daigo, M.; Honda, M.; Kamata, K.; Kifune, T.; Mizumoto, Y.; Nagano, M.; Ohno, Y.; Tanahasni, G.

    1985-01-01

    The data of optical Cerenkov light from extensive air shower observed at the core distance more than 1 Km at Akeno are reexamined. Applying the new simulated results, the shower development curves for the individual events were constructed. For the showers of 10 to 17th power eV the average depth at the shower maximum is determined to be 660 + or - 40 gcm/2. The shower curve of average development is found to be well described by a Gaisser-Hillas shower development function with above shower maximum depth.

  6. ASTEROID LIGHT CURVES FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY SURVEY: ROTATION PERIODS AND PHASE FUNCTIONS FROM SPARSE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ip, Wing-Huen; Kinoshita, Daisuke; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Masci, Frank; Helou, George; Levitan, David; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    2015-09-15

    We fit 54,296 sparsely sampled asteroid light curves in the Palomar Transient Factory survey to a combined rotation plus phase-function model. Each light curve consists of 20 or more observations acquired in a single opposition. Using 805 asteroids in our sample that have reference periods in the literature, we find that the reliability of our fitted periods is a complicated function of the period, amplitude, apparent magnitude, and other light-curve attributes. Using the 805-asteroid ground-truth sample, we train an automated classifier to estimate (along with manual inspection) the validity of the remaining ∼53,000 fitted periods. By this method we find that 9033 of our light curves (of ∼8300 unique asteroids) have “reliable” periods. Subsequent consideration of asteroids with multiple light-curve fits indicates a 4% contamination in these “reliable” periods. For 3902 light curves with sufficient phase-angle coverage and either a reliable fit period or low amplitude, we examine the distribution of several phase-function parameters, none of which are bimodal though all correlate with the bond albedo and with visible-band colors. Comparing the theoretical maximal spin rate of a fluid body with our amplitude versus spin-rate distribution suggests that, if held together only by self-gravity, most asteroids are in general less dense than ∼2 g cm{sup −3}, while C types have a lower limit of between 1 and 2 g cm{sup −3}. These results are in agreement with previous density estimates. For 5–20 km diameters, S types rotate faster and have lower amplitudes than C types. If both populations share the same angular momentum, this may indicate the two types’ differing ability to deform under rotational stress. Lastly, we compare our absolute magnitudes (and apparent-magnitude residuals) to those of the Minor Planet Center’s nominal (G = 0.15, rotation-neglecting) model; our phase-function plus Fourier-series fitting reduces asteroid photometric rms

  7. Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; Surace, Jason; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ip, Wing-Huen; Kinoshita, Daisuke; Helou, George; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    2015-09-01

    We fit 54,296 sparsely sampled asteroid light curves in the Palomar Transient Factory survey to a combined rotation plus phase-function model. Each light curve consists of 20 or more observations acquired in a single opposition. Using 805 asteroids in our sample that have reference periods in the literature, we find that the reliability of our fitted periods is a complicated function of the period, amplitude, apparent magnitude, and other light-curve attributes. Using the 805-asteroid ground-truth sample, we train an automated classifier to estimate (along with manual inspection) the validity of the remaining ˜53,000 fitted periods. By this method we find that 9033 of our light curves (of ˜8300 unique asteroids) have “reliable” periods. Subsequent consideration of asteroids with multiple light-curve fits indicates a 4% contamination in these “reliable” periods. For 3902 light curves with sufficient phase-angle coverage and either a reliable fit period or low amplitude, we examine the distribution of several phase-function parameters, none of which are bimodal though all correlate with the bond albedo and with visible-band colors. Comparing the theoretical maximal spin rate of a fluid body with our amplitude versus spin-rate distribution suggests that, if held together only by self-gravity, most asteroids are in general less dense than ˜2 g cm-3, while C types have a lower limit of between 1 and 2 g cm-3. These results are in agreement with previous density estimates. For 5-20 km diameters, S types rotate faster and have lower amplitudes than C types. If both populations share the same angular momentum, this may indicate the two types’ differing ability to deform under rotational stress. Lastly, we compare our absolute magnitudes (and apparent-magnitude residuals) to those of the Minor Planet Center’s nominal (G = 0.15, rotation-neglecting) model; our phase-function plus Fourier-series fitting reduces asteroid photometric rms scatter by a factor of

  8. Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; Surace, Jason; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ip, Wing-Huen; Kinoshita, Daisuke; Helou, George; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    2015-09-01

    We fit 54,296 sparsely sampled asteroid light curves in the Palomar Transient Factory survey to a combined rotation plus phase-function model. Each light curve consists of 20 or more observations acquired in a single opposition. Using 805 asteroids in our sample that have reference periods in the literature, we find that the reliability of our fitted periods is a complicated function of the period, amplitude, apparent magnitude, and other light-curve attributes. Using the 805-asteroid ground-truth sample, we train an automated classifier to estimate (along with manual inspection) the validity of the remaining ∼53,000 fitted periods. By this method we find that 9033 of our light curves (of ∼8300 unique asteroids) have “reliable” periods. Subsequent consideration of asteroids with multiple light-curve fits indicates a 4% contamination in these “reliable” periods. For 3902 light curves with sufficient phase-angle coverage and either a reliable fit period or low amplitude, we examine the distribution of several phase-function parameters, none of which are bimodal though all correlate with the bond albedo and with visible-band colors. Comparing the theoretical maximal spin rate of a fluid body with our amplitude versus spin-rate distribution suggests that, if held together only by self-gravity, most asteroids are in general less dense than ∼2 g cm‑3, while C types have a lower limit of between 1 and 2 g cm‑3. These results are in agreement with previous density estimates. For 5–20 km diameters, S types rotate faster and have lower amplitudes than C types. If both populations share the same angular momentum, this may indicate the two types’ differing ability to deform under rotational stress. Lastly, we compare our absolute magnitudes (and apparent-magnitude residuals) to those of the Minor Planet Center’s nominal (G = 0.15, rotation-neglecting) model; our phase-function plus Fourier-series fitting reduces asteroid photometric rms scatter by a

  9. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakar, Ehud; Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-06-20

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  10. Supernovae with Two Peaks in the Optical Light Curve and the Signature of Progenitors with Low-mass Extended Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-06-01

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a "standard" density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  11. BEER Analysis of Kepler and CoRoT Light Curves. II. Evidence for Superrotation in the Phase Curves of Three Kepler Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  12. BEER ANALYSIS OF KEPLER AND CoRoT LIGHT CURVES. II. EVIDENCE FOR SUPERROTATION IN THE PHASE CURVES OF THREE KEPLER HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-10

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  13. Analysis of a Kepler Light Curve of the Novalike Cataclysmic Variable KIC 8751494

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Taichi; Maehara, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed a Kepler light curve of KIC 8751494, a recently recognized novalike cataclysmic variable in the Kepler field. We detected a stable periodicity of 0.114379(1) d, which we identified as being the binary's orbital period. The stronger photometric period at around 0.12245 d, which had been detected from a ground-based observation, was found to be variable, and we identified this period as the positive-superhump period. This superhump period showed short-term (10-20 d) strong variations in period most unexpectedly when the object entered a slightly faint state. The fractional superhump excess varied by as much large as ˜ 30%. The variation of the period very well traced the variation of the brightness of the system. The time-scale of this variation of superhump periods was too slow to be interpreted as a variation caused by a change of the disk radius due to thermal disk instability. We interpreted the cause of the period variation as a varying pressure effect on the period of positive superhumps. This finding suggests that the pressure effect, in at least novalike systems, plays a very important (up to ˜ 30% in the precession rate) role in producing the period of positive superhumps. We also described a possible detection of negative superhumps with a varying period of 0.1071-0.1081 d in the Q14 run of the Kepler data, and found that the variation of frequency of negative superhumps followed that of positive superhumps. The relation between the fractional superhump excesses of negative and positive superhumps can be understood if the angular frequency of positive superhumps is decreased by a pressure effect. We also found that the phase of the variation in the velocity of the emission lines reported in the earlier study is compatible with the SW Sex-type classification. Further, we introduced a new two-dimentional period analysis using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso), and showed superior advantages of this method.

  14. Spin-orbit angle of Kepler-13Ab from gravity-darkened transit light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kento

    2015-08-01

    A rotating star is fainter at its equator than its pole due to the reduction of the effective surface gravity, which is a phenomenon known as the gravity darkening. Analysis of the transit light curve deformed by this effect provides a unique opportunity to photometrically measure both components of the stellar obliquity ψ, the sky-projected spin-orbit angle λ and inclination of the stellar spin axis i*. We apply the method to Kepler-13A, a transiting hot Jupiter system found with the Kepler space telescope. Previously, Barnes et al. (2011) reported λ=24°± 4° and i* =45° ± 4° (assuming the host-star mass of 1.83M⊙) with the gravity-darkening method, while the Doppler tomography by Johnson et al. (2014) indicated λ = 58.6° ± 2.0°, in clear disagreement with the previous estimate. In this study, we find that the spin-orbit angle obtained from the gravity-darkening method is sensitive to the adopted limb-darkening profile of the host star. Indeed, the joint solution that satisfies the constraint λ = 58.6° ± 2.0° can be obtained if both of the two parameters in the quadratic limb-darkening law are fitted. The new solution indicates that the star is rather close to an equator-on configuration with i* = 81° ± 5° and ψ = 60° ± 2°, and the resulting stellar rotation period 24 ± 2 hr better agrees with the estimate by Szabo et al. (2012, 2014). We also report the temporal variation in the orbital inclination of Kepler-13Ab, d |cos iorb|/dt = (-7.0 ± 0.4) × 10-6 day-1, which further supports the spin-orbit precession scenario proposed by Szabo et al. (2012). By fitting the precession model to the time series of iorb, λ, and i⋆ obtained with the gravity-darkened model, we constrain the stellar quadrupole moment J2 = (6.1 ± 0.3) × 10-5 for our joint solution, which is several times smaller than J2 = (1.66 ± 0.08) × 10-4 obtained for the same solution as found by Barnes et al. (2011). The difference in the spin-orbit angle evolutions

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF THE {gamma} Cas-LIKE B1e STAR HD 110432

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Myron A.; Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo

    2012-08-10

    HD 110432 (BZ Cru; B1Ve) is the brightest member of a small group of '{gamma} Cas analogs' that emit copious hard X-ray flux, punctuated by ubiquitous 'flares'. To characterize the X-ray time history of this star, we made a series of six RXTE multi-visit observations in 2010 and an extended observation with the XMM-Newton in 2007. We analyzed these new light curves along with three older XMM-Newton observations from 2002 to 2003. Distributed over five months, the RXTE observations were designed to search for long X-ray modulations over a few months. These observations indeed suggest the presence of a long cycle with P Almost-Equal-To 226 days and an amplitude of a factor of two. We also used X-ray light curves constructed from XMM-Newton observations to characterize the lifetimes, strengths, and interflare intervals of 1615 flare-like events in the light curves. After accounting for false positive events, we infer the presence of 955 (2002-2003) and 386 (2007) events we identified as flares. Similarly, as a control we measured the same attributes for an additional group of 541 events in XMM-Newton light curves of {gamma} Cas, which, after a similar correction, yielded 517 flares. We found that the flare properties of HD 110432 are mostly similar to our control group. In both cases the distribution of flare strengths are best fit with log-linear relations. Both the slopes of these distributions and the flaring frequencies themselves exhibit modest fluctuations. We discovered that some flares in the hard X-ray band of HD 110432 were weak or unobserved in the soft band and vice versa. The light curves also occasionally show rapid curve drop-offs that are sustained for hours. We discuss the existence of the long cycle and these flare properties in the backdrop of two rival scenarios to produce hard X-rays, a magnetic star-disk interaction, and the accretion of blobs onto a secondary white dwarf.

  16. A Revised Gyro-Age for M 67 from Kepler/K2-Campaign-5 Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the photometric variability of stars in the M 67 field using Kepler/K2-Campaign-5 light curves. In our previous work, we limited the search area around M 67 to that of a recent ground-based study. In the present work, we expand the search area and apply a more rigorous period-finding algorithm to determine the rotation periods of 98 main sequence cluster members from the same data. In addition, we derive periods of 40 stars from the K2SC detrended light curves. We determine the mean period of single sun-like main sequence cluster members to be 29.6 ± 0.6 d. Assuming the periods correspond to stellar rotation, the corresponding mean gyro-age is 5.4 ± 0.2 Gyr.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of HAT-P-32b (Nortmann+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nortmann, L.; Palle, E.; Murgas, F.; Dreizler, S.; Iro, N.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2016-05-01

    We provide two transit light curves of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b obtained on the nights of 2012/09/15 and 2012/09/30 using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m GTC telescope. The data was obtained by using OSIRIS in broad slit spectroscopy mode and covering the wavelength region between 518nm-918nm. For the night of 2012/09/30 we further provide twenty narrowband light curves which were created by summing the flux over 20-nm-wide channels instead over the whole wavelength region. We provide several auxiliary parameters of the observations which we have used to correct the data from correlated noise. These auxiliary parameters are the position drift of the stars on the CCD detector in spatial and dispersion direction, air mass and seeing (FWHM). (23 data files).

  18. Light curve solutions of the eclipsing Kepler binaries KIC 5080652, KIC 5285607, KIC 9236858 and KIC 11975363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Atanasova, Teodora

    2016-11-01

    We carried out light curve solutions of four detached binaries with circular orbits, observed by Kepler. As a result their orbital inclinations, temperatures and relative stellar radii were determined. We estimated also their global parameters on the base of the obtained solutions and empirical relation "temperature, luminosity" for MS stars. The out-of-eclipse light curves of KIC 5080652, KIC 9236858 and KIC 11975363 reveal a trend the bigger amplitudes to correspond to single-waved shape while the two-waved shape to be inherent to the smaller amplitudes. This type of variability was attributed to gradually transition between state with two almost opposite cool spots and state with bigger in size polar spot. We detected also several microflares of KIC 11975363 with amplitudes of 0.002-0.003 mag.

  19. Radio emission of SN1993J: the complete picture. II. Simultaneous fit of expansion and radio light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Marcaide, J. M.; Alberdi, A.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2011-02-01

    We report on a simultaneous modelling of the expansion and radio light curves of the supernova SN1993J. We developed a simulation code capable of generating synthetic expansion and radio light curves of supernovae by taking into consideration the evolution of the expanding shock, magnetic fields, and relativistic electrons, as well as the finite sensitivity of the interferometric arrays used in the observations. Our software successfully fits all the available radio data of SN 1993J with a standard emission model for supernovae, which is extended with some physical considerations, such as an evolution in the opacity of the ejecta material, a radial decline in the magnetic fields within the radiating region, and a changing radial density profile for the circumstellar medium starting from day 3100 after the explosion.

  20. On the Discovery of Massive ZZ Ceti Variables and the Peculiar Light Curve of SDSS J1529

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curd, Brandon; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in three hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs with masses greater than one solar mass. We identified these white dwarfs through SDSS Data Release 7 spectroscopy. All three objects show monoperiodic oscillations with periods ranging from 203 s to 11 min. With follow-up observations of the confirmed ZZ Ceti stars, it should be possible to detect lower amplitude pulsation modes in order to conduct an in depth asteroseismological analysis and estimate the fraction of their core mass that is crystallized. We also present and discuss the peculiar light curve of J1529, which shows eclipse-like events every 38 min. We compare the light curve of J1529 to that of GD 394 which has similar characteristics (despite being four times hotter) which are thought to be caused by a metal-rich dark spot on the star's surface.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Marriner, John; Kessler, Richard; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Ben; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  2. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  3. Effects of forward and backward transitions in light intensities in tau-illuminance curves of the rat motor activity rhythm under constant dim light.

    PubMed

    Cambras, Trinitat; Díez-Noguera, Antoni

    2012-07-01

    Circadian rhythms are strongly influenced by light intensity, the effects of which may persist beyond the duration of light exposure (aftereffects). Here, the authors constructed period-illuminance curves for the motor activity circadian rhythm of male and female rats by recording the effects of a series of small upward and downward steps in light intensity (illuminance ranging between .01 lux of dim red light and 1 lux of white light) on their activity. In all cases, stepwise changes were made in five logarithmic steps (irradiance: dim red light: .692 µW/cm(2) and white light: .006, .016, .044, .12, and .315 µW/cm(2), corresponding, respectively, to .02, .05, .14, .13, and 1 lux measured at cage level), with changes in intensity every 2 wks. One group of rats (DLD) started in dim red light, moved up to 1 lux white light, and then back down to the original light intensity. Another group (LDL) started at 1 lux, moved down to .01 lux, and then back up to the original intensity. Motor activity data were recorded throughout the experiment and tau values, the percentage of variance explained by the rhythm, and the mean motor activity for each stage and group were calculated. The results show differences in the dynamics of tau values between the DLD and LDL groups and between males and females. In the LDL group, the tau values of both males and females were dependent on light intensity, and were similar for the forward and backward transitions. In other words, no aftereffects were found, and no differences were detected between males and females. In the DLD group, however, differences were found between males and females. Males had a tau value of 24 h 20 min under dim red light, 25 h 40 min under 1 lux, and 24 h 50 min on return to dim red light. It is noticeable that the tau values of the backward branch of the illuminance curve contradicted classical predictions, since at .38 and .14 lux the tau values were shorter than those found under the same intensities after

  4. DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURST BLAST WAVES WITH A LONG-LIVED REVERSE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang Bing; Hascoeet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert; Park, Il H.

    2012-12-20

    We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS causes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the ''mechanical model'' that correctly incorporates the energy conservation, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. Exploring a total of 20 different ejecta stratifications, we explain in detail how a stratified ejecta affects its blast wave dynamics and afterglow light curves. We show that, while the FS light curves are not sensitive to the ejecta stratifications, the RS light curves exhibit much richer features, including steep declines, plateaus, bumps, re-brightenings, and a variety of temporal decay indices. These distinctive RS features may be observable if the RS has higher values of the microphysics parameters than the FS. We discuss possible applications of our results in understanding the gamma-ray burst afterglow data.

  5. K2SC: flexible systematics correction and detrending of K2 light curves using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Parviainen, H.; Pope, B. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction), a PYTHON pipeline to model instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. K2SC uses Gaussian Process regression to model position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability simultaneously, enabling the user to remove both (e.g. for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). For periodic variables, K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution time-scale of the variability. We apply K2SC to publicly available K2 data from Campaigns 3-5 showing that we obtain photometric precision approaching that of the original Kepler mission. We compare our results to other publicly available K2 pipelines, showing that we obtain similar or better results, on average. We use transit injection and recovery tests to evaluate the impact of K2SC on planetary transit searches in K2 Pre-search Data Conditioning data, for planet-to-star radius ratios down to Rp/R* = 0.01 and periods up to P = 40 d, and show that K2SC significantly improves the ability to distinguish between true and false detections, particularly for small planets. K2SC can be run automatically on many light curves, or manually tailored for specific objects such as pulsating stars or large amplitude eclipsing binaries. It can be run on ASCII and FITS light-curve files, regardless of their origin. Both the code and the processed light curves are publicly available, and we provide instructions for downloading and using them. The methodology used by K2SC will be applicable to future transit search missions such as TESS and PLATO.

  6. Radioactivity and Thermalization in the Ejecta of Compact Object Mergers and Their Impact on Kilonova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel; Wu, Meng-Ru; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    One promising electromagnetic signature of compact object mergers are kilonovae: approximately isotropic radioactively powered transients that peak days to weeks post-merger. Key uncertainties in kilonova modeling include the emission profiles of the radioactive decay products—non-thermal β -particles, α -particles, fission fragments, and γ -rays—and the efficiency with which their kinetic energy is absorbed by the ejecta. The radioactive energy emitted, along with its thermalization efficiency, sets the luminosity budget and is therefore crucial for predicting kilonova light curves. We outline uncertainties in the radioactivity, describe the processes by which the decay products transfer energy to the ejecta, and calculate time-dependent thermalization efficiencies for each particle type. We determine the net thermalization efficiency and explore its dependence on r-process yields—in particular, the production of α -decaying translead nuclei—and on ejecta mass, velocity, and magnetic fields. We incorporate our results into detailed radiation transport simulations, and calculate updated kilonova light curve predictions. Thermalization effects reduce kilonova luminosities by a factor of roughly 2 at peak, and by an order of magnitude at later times (15 days or more after explosion). We present analytic fits to time-dependent thermalization efficiencies, which can be used to improve light curve models. We revisit the putative kilonova that accompanied gamma-ray burst 130603B, and estimate the mass ejected in that event. We find later time kilonova light curves can be significantly impacted by α -decay from translead isotopes; data at these times may therefore be diagnostic of ejecta abundances.

  7. STUDIES OF VARIABILITY IN PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULAE. II. LIGHT AND VELOCITY CURVE ANALYSES OF IRAS 22272+5435 AND 22223+4327

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Sperauskas, Julius; Zacs, Laimons; Van Winckel, Hans; Bohlender, David E-mail: wen.lu@valpo.edu E-mail: Hans.VanWinckel@ster.kuleuven.be E-mail: zacs@latnet.lv

    2013-04-01

    We have carried out a detailed observational study of the