Science.gov

Sample records for light curve patterns

  1. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  2. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  3. LCC: Light Curves Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio). Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

  4. Light on curved backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, D.; Nelson, S.; Nowakowski, M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the motion of light on different spacetime manifolds by calculating the deflection angle, lensing properties and by probing into the possibility of bound states. The metrics in which we examine the light motion include, among other items, a general relativistic dark matter metric, a dirty black hole, and a worm hole metric, the last two inspired by noncommutative geometry. The lensing in a holographic screen metric is discussed in detail. We study also the bending of light around naked singularities like, e.g., the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric and include other cases. A generic property of light behavior in these exotic metrics is pointed out. For the standard metric like the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter cases, we improve the accuracy of the lensing results for the weak and strong regimes.

  5. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  6. K2 Mission Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; morris, robert; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Caldwell, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    The K2 mission is now generating light curves for its ecliptic-field campaigns. Producing good photometry for K2 is more challenging than for Kepler’s prime mission because periodic thruster firings are used to compensate for the loss of two reaction wheels. These firings, referred to as "roll tweaks", result in spacecraft rotation along the barrel axis and high corresponding image motion. The resulting motion-dominated systematic errors are dramatically different than the focus-dominated systematic errors experienced during the prime mission. They also make it challenging to properly identify and remove flux from background objects present in the optimal apertures. We summarize these challenges and describe the resulting modifications to the Kepler pipeline for the processing of K2 data. The quality of the K2 mission light curves is characterized.

  7. Optimal strategies for adaptive curve lighting.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Michael; Schoettle, Brandon; Flannagan, Michael J; Minoda, Takako

    2005-01-01

    Conventional low beams headlamps do not provide sufficient illumination for nighttime visibility on curves. This analytical study evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of several curve-lighting strategies that involve moving one or both low beams by various amounts. Two curve radii were examined for both curve directions, using representative tungsten-halogen and high-intensity discharge low-beam patterns. The dependent variable was the maximum distance of 3-lux illumination (combined from both lamps) at a plane 0.25 m above the roadway for seven lateral positions. For short-radius, left and right curves, moving both lamps in parallel should substantially increase the visibility of objects in one's lane of travel, in several additional lanes of travel to the left and right, and off the road. Because of the lateral trade-offs of advantages and disadvantages for large-radius curves, additional research is needed to better understand the desirable approach for these types of curves. Moving both lamps in parallel into the curve is recommended for small-radius curves.

  8. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  9. Meteor light curves: the relevant parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, N.; Helled, Ravit; Polishook, D.; Almoznino, E.; David, N.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate a uniform sample of 113 light curves of meteors collected at the Wise Observatory in 2002 November during a campaign to observe the Leonid meteor shower. We use previously defined descriptors, such as the classical skewness parameter F and a recently defined pointedness variable P, along with a number of other measurable or derived quantities, in order to explore the parameter space in search of meaningful light curve descriptors. In comparison with previous publications, we make extensive use of statistical techniques to reveal links among the various parameters and to understand their relative importance. In particular, we show that meteors with long-duration trails rise slowly to their maximal brightness and also decay slowly from the peak, while showing milder flaring than other meteors. Early skewed meteors, with their peak brightness in the first half of the light curve, show a fast rise to the peak. We show that the duration of the luminous phase of the meteor is the most important variable differentiating among the 2002 meteor trails. The skewness parameter F, which is widely used in meteor light curve analyses, appears only as the second or third in order of importance in explaining the variance among the observed light curves, with the most important parameter being related to the duration of the meteor light-producing phase. We suggest that the pointedness parameter P could possibly be useful in describing differences among meteor showers, perhaps by being related to the different compositions of meteoroids, and also in comparing observations to model light curves. We compare the derived characteristics of the 2002 meteors with model predictions and conclude that more work is required to define a consistent set of measurable and derived light-curve parameters that would characterize the light production from meteors. We suggest that meteor observers should consider publishing more characterizing parameters from the light curves they

  10. Generating artificial light curves: revisited and updated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; McHardy, I. M.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    The production of artificial light curves with known statistical and variability properties is of great importance in astrophysics. Consolidating the confidence levels during cross-correlation studies, understanding the artefacts induced by sampling irregularities, establishing detection limits for future observatories are just some of the applications of simulated data sets. Currently, the widely used methodology of amplitude and phase randomization is able to produce artificial light curves which have a given underlying power spectral density (PSD) but which are strictly Gaussian distributed. This restriction is a significant limitation, since the majority of the light curves, e.g. active galactic nuclei, X-ray binaries, gamma-ray bursts, show strong deviations from Gaussianity exhibiting `burst-like' events in their light curves yielding long-tailed probability density functions (PDFs). In this study, we propose a simple method which is able to precisely reproduce light curves which match both the PSD and the PDF of either an observed light curve or a theoretical model. The PDF can be representative of either the parent distribution or the actual distribution of the observed data, depending on the study to be conducted for a given source. The final artificial light curves contain all of the statistical and variability properties of the observed source or theoretical model, i.e. the same PDF and PSD, respectively. Within the framework of Reproducible Research, the code and the illustrative example used in this paper are both made publicly available in the form of an interactive MATHEMATICA notebook.

  11. Modeling Type IIn Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter; Fryer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present near-by Type IIn supernovae observed with Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Based on the diversity of optical light curve properties, this Type II subclass is commonly referred to as heterogeneous. At the time of discovery, our IIn sample is ~ 2 magnitudes brighter at ultraviolet wavelengths than at optical wavelengths, and ultraviolet brightness decays faster than the optical brightness. We use a semi-analytical supernova (SN) model to better understand our IIn observations, and focus on matching specific observed light curves features, i.e peak luminosity and decay rate. The SN models are used to study the effects of initial SN conditions on early light curves, and to show the extent of the "uniqueness" problem in SN light curves. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from members of the Swift UVOT team, the NASA astrophysics archival data analysis program, and the NASA Swift guest investigator program.

  12. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  13. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  14. On the Light Curves of AM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smak, J.

    2017-03-01

    Light curves of AM CVn are analyzed by decomposing them into their Fourier components. The amplitudes of the fundamental mode and overtones of the three components: the superhumps, the negative superhumps and the orbital variations, are found to be variable. This implies that variations in the shape of the observed light curve of AM CVn are not only due to the interference between those components, but also due to the intrinsic variability within these components.

  15. Multiwavelength light curve parameters of Cepheid variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Marconi, Marcella; Rejkuba, Marina; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-09-01

    We present a comparative analysis of theoretical and observed light curves of Cepheid variables using Fourier decomposition. The theoretical light curves at multiple wavelengths are generated using stellar pulsation models for chemical compositions representative of Cepheids in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. The observed light curves at optical (VI), near-infrared (JHKs) and mid-infrared (3.6 & 4.5-μm) bands are compiled from the literature. We discuss the variation of light curve parameters as a function of period, wavelength and metallicity. Theoretical and observed Fourier amplitude parameters decrease with increase in wavelength while the phase parameters increase with wavelength. We find that theoretical amplitude parameters obtained using canonical mass-luminosity levels exhibit a greater offset with respect to observations when compared to non-canonical relations. We also discuss the impact of variation in convective efficiency on the light curve structure of Cepheid variables. The increase in mixing length parameter results in a zero-point offset in bolometric mean magnitudes and reduces the systematic large difference in theoretical amplitudes with respect to observations.

  16. Light curves of light rays passing through a wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Naoki; Harada, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing is a good probe into the topological structure of dark gravitating celestial objects. In this paper, we investigate the light curve of a light ray that passes through the throat of an Ellis wormhole, the simplest example of traversable wormholes. The method developed here is also applicable to other traversable wormholes. To study whether the light curve of a light ray that passes through a wormhole throat is distinguishable from that which does not, we also calculate light curves without the passage of a throat for an Ellis wormhole, a Schwarzschild black hole, and an ultrastatic wormhole with the spatial geometry identical to that of the Schwarzschild black hole in the following two cases: (i) "microlensing," where the source, lens, and observer are almost aligned in this order and the light ray starts at the source, refracts in the weak gravitational field of the lens with a small deflection angle, and reaches the observer; and (ii) "retrolensing," where the source, observer, and lens are almost aligned in this order, and the light ray starts at the source, refracts in the vicinity of the light sphere of the lens with a deflection angle very close to π , and reaches the observer. We find that the light curve of the light ray that passes through the throat of the Ellis wormhole is clearly distinguishable from that by the microlensing but not from that by the retrolensing. This is because the light curve of a light ray that passes by a light sphere of a lens with a large deflection angle has common characters, irrespective of the details of the lens object. This implies that the light curves of the light rays that pass through the throat of more general traversable wormholes are qualitatively the same as that of the Ellis wormhole.

  17. A PANOPLY OF CEPHEID LIGHT CURVE TEMPLATES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoachim, Peter; McCommas, Les P.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2009-06-15

    We have generated accurate V and I template light curves using a combination of Fourier decomposition and principal component analysis for a large sample of Cepheid light curves. Unlike previous studies, we include short-period Cepheids and stars pulsating in the first overtone mode in our analysis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations show that our templates can be used to precisely measure Cepheid magnitudes and periods, even in cases where there are few observational epochs. These templates are ideal for characterizing serendipitously discovered Cepheids and can be used in conjunction with surveys such as Pan-Starrs and LSST where the observational sampling may not be optimized for Cepheids.

  18. Cellinoid shape model for multiple light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-04-01

    Extended from the ellipsoid shape, cellinoid shape model consists of eight octants from eight different ellipsoids with the constraint that the adjacent octants have the same semi-axes in common. With the asymmetric shape, cellinoid shape model could be adopted in simulating the irregular shapes of asteroids. In this article, we attempt to apply cellinoid shape model to multiple light curves observed in various geometries and present some techniques to make the whole inverse process more efficient. Finally numerical experiments confirm that cellinoid shape model could derive the physical parameters of asteroids from both of synthetic and real light curves.

  19. A synthetic light curve solution of the OAO-2 ultraviolet light curves of u Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    OAO 2 ultraviolet photometry of the eclipsing binary u Her is reported and interpreted. The light curve of u Her is found to be intrinsically variable, the variable light curve is rectified, and the adjusted light and color curves are plotted. A simultaneous solution to three adjusted OAO 2 light curves (at respective wavelengths of 3320, 1910, and 1550 A) is obtained by using the Roche model. The results indicate that the system is semidetached if the gravity darkening of the secondary is not significantly larger than expected. It is suggested that the primary is responsible for the variable light curve, that the monochromatic albedo of the secondary is very low at short wavelengths, and that the depth of primary eclipse is strongly dependent on the primary's limb darkening.

  20. NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni; Protopapas, Pavlos

    2012-09-01

    Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

  1. More Unusual Light Curves from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    Twenty-three new objects have been added to the growing collection of stars observed to have unusual dips in their light curves. A recent study examines these stars and the potential causes of their strange behavior.An Influx of DataThe primary Kepler mission provided light curves for over 100,000 stars, and its continuation K2 is observing another 20,000 stars every three months. As we enter an era where these enormous photometric data sets become commonplace Gaia will obtain photometry for millions of stars, and LSST billions its crucial that we understand the different categories of variability observed in these stars.The authors find three different types of light curves among their 23 unusual stars. Scallop-shell curves (top) show many undulations; persistent flux-dip class curves (middle) have discrete triangularly shaped flux dips; transient, narrow dip class curves (bottom) have only one dip that is variable in depth. The authors speculate a common cause for the scallop-shell and persistent flux-dip stars, and a different cause for the transient flux-dip stars. [Stauffer et al. 2017]After filtering out the stars with planets, those in binary systems, those with circumstellar disks, and those with starspots, a number of oddities remain: a menagerie of stars with periodic variability that cant be accounted for in these categories. Some of these stars are now famous (for instance, Boyajians star); some are lesser known. But by continuing to build up this sample of stars with unusual light curves, we have a better chance of understanding the sources of variability.Building the MenagerieTo this end, a team of scientists led by John Stauffer (Spitzer Science Center at Caltech) has recently hunted for more additions to this sample in the K2 data set. In particular, they searched through the light curves from stars in the Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region a data set that makes up the largest collection of high-quality light curves for low-mass, pre

  2. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  3. Modeling and Fitting Exoplanet Transit Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical model along with an original fitting routine for the analysis of transiting extra-solar planet light curves. Our light curve model is unique in several ways from other available transit models, such as the analytic eclipse formulae of Mandel & Agol (2002) and Giménez (2006), the modified Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP) model implemented in Southworth’s JKTEBOP code (Popper & Etzel 1981; Southworth et al. 2004), or the transit model developed as a part of the EXOFAST fitting suite (Eastman et al. in prep.). Our model employs Keplerian orbital dynamics about the system’s center of mass to properly account for stellar wobble and orbital eccentricity, uses a unique analytic solution derived from Kepler’s Second Law to calculate the projected distance between the centers of the star and planet, and calculates the effect of limb darkening using a simple technique that is different from the commonly used eclipse formulae. We have also devised a unique Monte Carlo style optimization routine for fitting the light curve model to observed transits. We demonstrate that, while the effect of stellar wobble on transit light curves is generally small, it becomes significant as the planet to stellar mass ratio increases and the semi-major axes of the orbits decrease. We also illustrate the appreciable effects of orbital ellipticity on the light curve and the necessity of accounting for its impacts for accurate modeling. We show that our simple limb darkening calculations are as accurate as the analytic equations of Mandel & Agol (2002). Although our Monte Carlo fitting algorithm is not as mathematically rigorous as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithms most often used to determine exoplanetary system parameters, we show that it is straightforward and returns reliable results. Finally, we show that analyses performed with our model and optimization routine compare favorably with exoplanet characterizations published by groups such as the

  4. Radio light curves of V471 Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Skillman, David R.

    1993-01-01

    We have acquired light curves at a wavelength of 6 cm of the eclipsing binary V471 Tauri around the orbit, in order to determine the geometrical location of the radio emission in the binary. Each light curve shows a broad minimum near the time of optical eclipse, suggesting that the radio luminosity originates between the two stars. Other observations at X-ray, UV, and visual wavelengths are also supportive of the idea of a gas cloud more or less permanently located between the stars. This could be explained if the radio emission arises from the interaction of the magnetic fields of the secondary and the white dwarf near the line of centers.

  5. Modeling Light Curves for Improved Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraway, Julian; Mahabal, Ashish; Sun, Jiayang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi; Zhang, Lingsong

    2016-02-01

    Many synoptic surveys are observing large parts of the sky multiple times. The resulting lightcurves provide a wonderful window to the dynamic nature of the universe. However, there are many significant challenges in analyzing these light curves. These include heterogeneity of the data, irregularly sampled data, missing data, censored data, known but variable measurement errors, and most importantly, the need to classify in astronomical objects in real time using these imperfect light curves. We describe a modeling-based approach using Gaussian process regression for generating critical measures representing features for the classification of such lightcurves. We demonstrate that our approach performs better by comparing it with past methods. Finally, we provide future directions for use in sky-surveys that are getting even bigger by the day.

  6. Light curves of rotating, oscillating neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A technique has been developed for computing the light curve produced by a rotating, oscillating neutron star that emits radiation from circular polar cap regions, as are thought to exist in pulsars, X-ray binaries, and perhaps X-ray bursters. Several examples of light curves produced by single, low-order (l = 1, 2) oscillation modes are given. A Gaussian beaming function is used to simulate typical radio pulsar beam widths in order to investigate a neutron star oscillation model for subpulse drift in pulsars. X-ray bursts and X-ray pulsars have also been simulated to assess the possibility of detecting such oscillations in these sources with XTE and AXAF.

  7. Icarus: Stellar binary light curve synthesis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene

    2016-11-01

    Icarus is a stellar binary light curve synthesis tool that generates a star, given some basic binary parameters, by solving the gravitational potential equation, creating a discretized stellar grid, and populating the stellar grid with physical parameters, including temperature and surface gravity. Icarus also evaluates the outcoming flux from the star given an observer's point of view (i.e., orbital phase and orbital orientation).

  8. SS433 Trek 2: light curve analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.; Obana, Y.; Okugami, M.

    The authors have calculated theoretical light curves of SS433 during eclipse and precession, using a model in which SS433 consists of a geometrically thick torus around a compact star and a companion star filling the Roche lobe. The favorite combination is that the mass ratio is about 2 (a compact star is a black hole) and the surface temperature of the companion is around 17000K.

  9. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  10. SPOTTED STAR LIGHT CURVES WITH ENHANCED PRECISION

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.

    2012-09-15

    The nearly continuous timewise coverage of recent photometric surveys is free of the large gaps that compromise attempts to follow starspot growth and decay as well as motions, thereby giving incentive to improve computational precision for modeled spots. Due to the wide variety of star systems in the surveys, such improvement should apply to light/velocity curve models that accurately include all the main phenomena of close binaries and rotating single stars. The vector fractional area (VFA) algorithm that is introduced here represents surface elements by small sets of position vectors so as to allow accurate computation of circle-triangle overlap by spherical geometry. When computed by VFA, spots introduce essentially no noticeable scatter in light curves at the level of one part in 10,000. VFA has been put into the Wilson-Devinney light/velocity curve program and all logic and mathematics are given so as to facilitate entry into other such programs. Advantages of precise spot computation include improved statistics of spot motions and aging, reduced computation time (intrinsic precision relaxes needs for grid fineness), noise-free illustration of spot effects in figures, and help in guarding against false positives in exoplanet searches, where spots could approximately mimic transiting planets in unusual circumstances. A simple spot growth and decay template quantifies time profiles, and specifics of its utilization in differential corrections solutions are given. Computational strategies are discussed, the overall process is tested in simulations via solutions of synthetic light curve data, and essential simulation results are described. An efficient time smearing facility by Gaussian quadrature can deal with Kepler mission data that are in 30 minute time bins.

  11. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew Samuel

    2012-05-01

    This thesis presents the CfAIR2 data set, which includes over 4000 near-Infrared (NIR) JHK8-band measurements of 104 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) observed from 2005-2011 using PAIRITEL, the 1.3-m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. While the discovery of dark energy and most subsequent supernova cosmology has been performed using optical and Ultraviolet wavelength observations of SN Ia, a growing body of evidence suggests that NIR SN Ia observations will be crucial for future cosmological studies. Whereas SN Ia observed at optical wavelengths have been shown to be excellent standardizeable candles, using empirical correlations between luminosity, light curve shape, and color, the CfAIR2 data set strengthens the evidence that SN Ia at NIR wavelengths are essentially standard candles, even without correction for light-curve shape or for reddening. CfAIR2 was obtained as part of the CfA Supernova Program, an ongoing multi-wavelength follow-up effort at FLWO designed to observe high-quality, densely sampled light curves and spectra of hundreds of low-redshift SN Ia. CfAIR2 is the largest homogeneously observed and processed NIR data set of its kind to date, nearly tripling the number of individual JHK8-band observations and nearly doubling the set of SN Ia with published NIR light curves in the literature. Matched only by the recently published Carnegie Supernova Project sample, CfAIR2 complements the large and growing set of low-redshift optical and NIR SN Ia observations obtained by the CfA and other programs, making this data set a unique and particularly valuable local universe anchor for future supernova cosmology.

  12. Ultraviolet light curves of V535 Arae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    1991-01-01

    The light curve of V535 Ara is determined from observations of this long-period W UMa binary in the UV, and its gravity darkening is estimated. The UV colors and spectral type correspond to (B - V)0 = 0.24, or A8V, and imply that the star should have very little residual convection in its envelope. It is concluded that the gravity darkening is large, as in a radiative star, unless it is modified by circulation in the common envelope, or unless all stars this warm are convective. Four solutions are obtained to a combination of optical and UV light curves, two for high radiative gravity darkening, and two for low convective gravity darkening. The light curves were fitted equally well in all four cases, while in all but the one with low-gravity darkening and a hot inner face there was a rather large global temperature difference between the two stars. It is suggested that the W UMa binaries are found only at spectral types later than about A8 because their outer envelopes must be convective to transfer luminosity.

  13. Light Curves of Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. H.; Herbst, W.; Balonek, T. J.; Benson, P. J.; Chromey, F. R.; Ratcliff, S. J.

    1992-05-01

    VRI light curves of five Type Ia supernovae (1991B, 1991N, 1991T, 1991bg, and 1992G) have been obtained with CCDs attached to small telescopes at northeastern sites. The data have been carefully transformed to the standard system using images obtained with the 0.9m telescope at KPNO. The first three supernovae have faded sufficiently that we can carefully correct for the galactic background and, in particular, its effect on the determination of fade rates at late times. SN 1991bg clearly demonstrates that there can be gross differences among Type Ia's in the shape (and maximum brightness) of their light curves (Filippenko et al., preprint). We investigate whether a single "template" can be devised which fits the R and I light curve shapes of the other four supernovae in our sample, and the degree to which each fits the V template of Leibundgut (1988, Ph.D. thesis, U. of Basel). The distinctive secondary maximum seen in I (about 18 days after primary maximum; Balonek et al., preprint) should be useful for distinguishing peculiar Type Ia's like SN 1991bg, and for establishing the time of maximum brightness for supernovae that were discovered up to three weeks afterwards. We thank the W. M. Keck Foundation for their support of the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium. This project is an outgrowth of that support.

  14. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  15. Creating A Light Curve Using Gathered Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Joseph; Stolarz, S. A.; DePorto, R. W.; Shake, W. J.; Piper, M.; Linder, T. R.; Holmes, R.; Conwell, J.

    2012-01-01

    Our group of students with the support of educators and astronomers carried out a program to do astrometric and photometric analysis on the asteroid 2000 SO1 with the objective of obtaining a more in depth analysis of this asteroid and publishing light curve data describing the period of the asteroid. We chose our target asteroid using the minor planet center database, choosing an object that would have an acceptable Right Ascension, Declination, magnitude, and air mass for the ARO (Astronomical Research Observatory)-30 inch telescope operated by the SKYNET program. Our journey began with using Astrometrica for the IASC/WISE Program to identify and find new asteroids in the sky and add data to the Minor Planet Center Database. We then used MPO (Minor Planet Observatory) Canopus to form a light curve and conduct a fourier analysis on an example asteroid to familiarize ourselves with the program and used the program again to conduct fourier analysis on asteroid 2000 SO1. The educational goal in mind was to (a) learn the process of collecting and analyzing data using Astrometrica, MPO Canopus, the Minor Planet Center, and SKYNET and (b) create a poster to display the steps used in the process of surveying taken images and the production of a light curve. We collected 300 images a night, while discarding all the corrupted images, until we had enough data to accurately represent the object.Our work was successful due to resources from; Eastern Illinois University's Physics Department, the Astronomical Research Observatory, the University of Chicago's Yerkes Observatory, the SKYNET network, NASA's IASC/WISE (International Astronomical Search Collaboration/ Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer), NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) and Lincoln-Way North High School.

  16. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, R. P.; Wood-Vasey, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Mandel, K.; Challis, P.; Hicken, M.; Narayan, G.; Foley, R.; Rest, A.; Modjaz, M.; Starr, D.; Blondin, S.; Blake, C.; CfA Supernova Group; PAIRITEL Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    For my Astronomy Ph.D. thesis at Harvard University, I used the PAIRITEL 1.3m robotic telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona to observe Near-Infrared (NIR) JHKs band light curves of over 100 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) in nearby galaxies, compiling a data set that will more than quintuple the number of NIR SN Ia light curves in the literature. With this data, we confirm and strengthen the claim that SN Ia are more standard in NIR luminosity, less sensitive to dust extinction, and crucial to reducing systematic distance errors due to the degeneracy between intrinsic color variation and reddening of light by dust, arguably the most dominant systematic error in SN Ia cosmology. Uncertainty in our knowledge of the distributions of host galaxy dust properties is a major obstacle to obtaining consistent dark energy constraints with different SN Ia cosmological analysis methods. As such, I develop a color curve model using optical and NIR data to estimate the most probable amount of dust extinction and the properties of the host galaxy dust for each SN Ia. Continuing a comprehensive ground based optical and NIR program to observe low redshift SN Ia is one of the best ways to improve the precision and accuracy of SN Ia as standardizeable candles and cosmological distance indicators moving forward. Such data will critically inform the design of the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission, and indeed any future cosmology experiment designed to measure cosmic acceleration and dark energy with a sample of high redshift SN Ia. This work has been supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a NASA GSRP Fellowship.

  17. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  18. Thermonuclear supernova light curves: Progenitors and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.

    Thermonuclear Supernovae (TN SNe) are an extremely important tool in modern astronomy. In their role as cosmological distance probes, they have revealed the accelerated expansion of the universe and have begun to constrain the nature of the dark energy that may be driving that expansion. The next decade will see a succession of wide-field surveys producing thousands of TNSN detections each year. Traditional methods of SN analysis, rooted in time-intensive spectroscopic follow-up, will become completely impractical. To realize the potential of this coming tide of massive data sets, we will need to extract cosmographic parameters (redshift and luminosity distance) from SN photometry without any spectroscopic support. In this dissertation, I present the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method, an innovative new approach to the analysis of SN light curves. SOFT uses the framework of fuzzy set theory to perform direct comparisons of SN candidates against template light curves, simultaneously producing both classifications and cosmological parameter estimates. The SOFT method allows us to shed new light on two rich archival data sets. I revisit the IfA Deep Survey and HST GOODS to extract new and improved measurements of the TNSN rate from z=0.2 out to z=1.6. Our new analysis shows a steady increase in the TNSN rate out to z˜1, and adds support for a decrease in the rate at z=1.5. Comparing these rate measurements to theoretical models, I conclude that the progenitor scenario most favored by the collective observational data is a single degenerate model, regulated by a strong wind from the accreting white dwarf. Using a compilation of SN light curves from five recent surveys, I demonstrate that SOFT is able to derive useful constraints on cosmological models from a data set with no spectroscopic information at all. Looking ahead to the near future, I find that photometric analysis of data sets containing 2,000 SNe will be able to improve our constraints on

  19. The Transit Light Curve (TLC) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Winn, J. N.

    2006-09-01

    We present results from our recently initiated Transit Light Curve (TLC) Project, a program of long-term monitoring of transiting extrasolar planets. The principal scientific goals of this project are: (1) to refine the estimates of the physical and orbital properties of these planets, and (2) to search for variations in the transit times (Holman and Murray 2005, Agol et al. 2005) and light curve shapes that indicate the presence of additional, perturbing planets (Miralda-Escude 2002). To date, we have observed transits of nine of the ten known transiting planets. To observe the bright northern hemisphere targets, we are using the KeplerCam on the 1.2-m telescope at the F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, AZ. For the fainter and southern hemisphere OGLE planets, we are using the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope, and the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Magellan Instant Camera (MagIC) on the 6.5-m Magellan Clay telescope. In most cases, our photometry is accurate enough ( 1 mmag per minute of integration) that the resulting uncertainties in the planetary and stellar radii are dominated by the uncertainty in the assumed stellar mass, rather than by the statistical error. The noise in our KeplerCam photometry of XO-1b and TrES-1, in particular, is nearly Gaussian and time-averages down with the expected 1/sqrt(t) dependence all the way up to 30 minute time bins. This opens the possibility of detecting signals at the 0.1 mmag or even 0.01 mmag level, such as that produced by reflected light, by combining the results of many observations with small ground-based telescopes. Our transit timings for these systems are accurate to within 15 seconds.

  20. Bumpy light curves of interacting supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyholm, Anders

    2017-04-01

    A supernova (SN) is the explosive destruction of a star. Via a luminous outpouring of radiation, the SN can rival the brightness of its SN host galaxy for months or years. In the past decade, astronomical surveys regularly observing the sky to deep limiting magnitudes have revealed that core collapse SNe (the demises of massive stars) are sometimes preceded by eruptive episodes by the progenitor stars during the years before the eventual SN explosion. Such SNe tend to show strong signatures of interaction between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar medium (CSM) deposited by the star before the SN explosion, likely by mass-loss episodes like the ones we have started to observe regularly. The complex CSM resolved around certain giant stars in our own galaxy and the eruptions of giant stars like Eta Carinae in the 19th century can be seen in this context. As the SN ejecta of an interacting SN sweep up the CSM of the progenitor, radiation from this process offers observers opportunity to scan the late mass loss history of the progenitor. In this thesis, interacting SNe and eruptive mass loss of their progenitors is discussed. The SN iPTF13z (discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF) is presented. This transient was followed with optical photometry and spectroscopy during 1000 days and displayed a light curve with several conspicuous re-brigthenings ("bumps"), likely arising from SN ejecta interacting with denser regions in the CSM. Around 200 days before discovery, in archival data we found a clear precursor outburst lasting ∼50 days. A well-observed (but not necessarily well understood) event like SN 2009ip, which showed both precursor outbursts and a light curve bump, makes an interesting comparison object. The embedding of the (possible) SN in a CSM makes it hard to tell if a destructive SN explosion actually happened. In this respect, iPTF13z is compared to e.g. SN 2009ip but also to long-lived interacting SNe like SN 1988Z. Some suggestions

  1. ENERGY SOURCES AND LIGHT CURVES OF MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Takami, Hajime E-mail: takami@post.kek.jp

    2015-04-01

    A macronova (kilonova) was discovered with a short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B, which is widely believed to be powered by the radioactivity of r-process elements synthesized in the ejecta of a neutron star (NS)–binary merger. As an alternative, we propose that macronovae are energized by the central engine, i.e., a black hole or NS, and the injected energy is emitted after the adiabatic expansion of ejecta. This engine model is motivated by extended emission of short GRBs. In order to compare the theoretical models with observations, we develop analytical formulae for the light curves of macronovae. The engine model allows a wider parameter range, especially smaller ejecta mass, and a better fit to observations than the r-process model. Future observations of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves should distinguish energy sources and constrain the activity of the central engine and the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. Modeling Patterns of Activities using Activity Curves.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Pervasive computing offers an unprecedented opportunity to unobtrusively monitor behavior and use the large amount of collected data to perform analysis of activity-based behavioral patterns. In this paper, we introduce the notion of an activity curve, which represents an abstraction of an individual's normal daily routine based on automatically-recognized activities. We propose methods to detect changes in behavioral routines by comparing activity curves and use these changes to analyze the possibility of changes in cognitive or physical health. We demonstrate our model and evaluate our change detection approach using a longitudinal smart home sensor dataset collected from 18 smart homes with older adult residents. Finally, we demonstrate how big data-based pervasive analytics such as activity curve-based change detection can be used to perform functional health assessment. Our evaluation indicates that correlations do exist between behavior and health changes and that these changes can be automatically detected using smart homes, machine learning, and big data-based pervasive analytics.

  3. Modeling Patterns of Activities using Activity Curves

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Pervasive computing offers an unprecedented opportunity to unobtrusively monitor behavior and use the large amount of collected data to perform analysis of activity-based behavioral patterns. In this paper, we introduce the notion of an activity curve, which represents an abstraction of an individual’s normal daily routine based on automatically-recognized activities. We propose methods to detect changes in behavioral routines by comparing activity curves and use these changes to analyze the possibility of changes in cognitive or physical health. We demonstrate our model and evaluate our change detection approach using a longitudinal smart home sensor dataset collected from 18 smart homes with older adult residents. Finally, we demonstrate how big data-based pervasive analytics such as activity curve-based change detection can be used to perform functional health assessment. Our evaluation indicates that correlations do exist between behavior and health changes and that these changes can be automatically detected using smart homes, machine learning, and big data-based pervasive analytics. PMID:27346990

  4. THE WISE LIGHT CURVES OF POLARS

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Ryan K. E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humboldt.edu

    2015-08-15

    We have extracted the WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) single-exposure data for a sample of 72 polars, which are highly magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). We combine these data with both published and unpublished optical and infrared data to explore the origins of the large amplitude variations seen in these systems. In nearly every case, we find evidence for cyclotron emission in the WISE bandpasses. We find that the derived magnetic field strengths for some polars are either too high, or cyclotron emission from lower field components, located spatially coincident to the main accreting poles, must be occurring. We have also estimated field strengths for a number of polars where no such values exist. In addition, contrary to expectations, we find that emission from the fundamental cyclotron harmonic (n = 1) appears to be nearly always present when the magnetic field is of the appropriate strength that it falls within a WISE bandpass. We find that the light curves for RBS 490, an ultrashort-period (46 minutes) CV, suggest that it is a polar. Modeling its spectrum indicates that its donor star is much hotter than expected. Nearly all of the detected polars show 11.5 μm (“W3 band”) excesses. The general lack of variability seen in the W3 bandpass light curves for higher-field polars demonstrates that these excesses are probably not due to cyclotron emission. There is circumstantial evidence that these excesses can be attributed to bremsstrahlung emission from their accretion streams. Reduction of the Spitzer 24 μm image of V1500 Cyg shows that it appears to be located at the center of a small nebula.

  5. Pluto's light curve in 1933 1934

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Buie, Marc W.; Smith, Luke Timothy

    2008-10-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has complex photometric variations on all time scales; due to rotational modulations of dark markings across the surface, the changing orientation of the system as viewed from Earth, occultations and eclipses between Pluto and Charon, as well as the sublimation and condensation of frosts on the surface. The earliest useable light curve for Pluto is from 1953 to 1955 when Pluto was 35 AU from the Sun. Earlier data on Pluto has the potential to reveal properties of the surface at a greater heliocentric distance with nearly identical illumination and viewing geometry. We are reporting on a new accurate photographic light curve of Pluto for 1933-1934 when the heliocentric distance was 40 AU. We used 43 B-band and V-band images of Pluto on 32 plates taken on 15 nights from 19 March 1933 to 10 March 1934. Most of these plates were taken with the Mount Wilson 60″ and 100″ telescopes, but 7 of the plates (now at the Harvard College Observatory) were taken with the 12″ and 16″ Metcalf doublets at Oak Ridge. The plates were measured with an iris diaphragm photometer, which has an average one-sigma photometric error on these plates of 0.08 mag as measured by the repeatability of constant comparison stars. The modern B and V magnitudes for the comparison stars were measured with the Lowell Observatory Hall 1.1-m telescope. The magnitudes in the plate's photographic system were converted to the Johnson B- and V-system after correction with color terms, even though they are small in size. We find that the average B-band mean opposition magnitude of Pluto in 1933-1934 was 15.73±0.01, and we see a roughly sinusoidal modulation on the rotational period (6.38 days) with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.11±0.03 mag. With this, we show that Pluto darkened by 5% from 1933-1934 to 1953-1955. This darkening from 1933-1934 to 1953-1955 cannot be due to changing viewing geometry (as both epochs had identical sub-Earth latitudes), so our observations must

  6. Do the Kepler AGN light curves need reprocessing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Williams, Joshua; Carini, Michael T.

    2015-10-01

    We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST data base with a reprocessed light curve constructed from raw pixel data. We use the first-order structure function, SF(δt), to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD (power spectral density) of Kasliwal et al. On short time-scales, we find a steeper log PSD slope (γ = 2.90 to within 10 per cent) for the reprocessed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST (γ = 2.65 to within 10 per cent) - both inconsistent with a damped random walk (DRW) which requires γ = 2. The log PSD slope inferred for the reprocessed light curve is consistent with previous results that study the same reprocessed light curve. The turnover time-scale is almost identical for both light curves (27.1 and 27.5 d for the reprocessed and MAST data base light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Reprocessing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusions reached by Kasliwal et al. - not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.

  7. Towards dynamic light-curve catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, Bart; Groffen, Fabian

    2012-09-01

    Time-domain astronomy is becoming a fundamental aspect of the next generation of astronomical instruments. The timing properties will revolutionise the studies of all kinds of astronomical objects. Consequetially, the huge complex data volumes and high cadences of these facilities will force us to overhaul and extend current software solutions. LOFAR, laying the groundwork for this, will produce a continuously updated spectral light-curve catalogue of all detected sources, with real-time capabilities to cope with the growth of 50 - 100TB/yr, making it the largest dynamic astronomical catalogue. Automated pipelines use the column-store MonetDB as their key component. We exploit SciLens, a 300+ node, 4-tier locally distributed cluster focussed on massive I/O. Introduction of the new array-based query language, SciQL, simplifies data exploration and mining. I will demonstrate how MonetDB/SQL & SciQL on its SciLens platform manages the millions of lightcurves for LOFAR. Initial benchmark results confirm the linear scale-up performance over tens of TBs using tens of nodes.

  8. Light Curve Modeling of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi; Blinnikov, Sergei I.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-01-01

    Origins of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered by recent SN surveys are still not known well. One idea to explain the huge luminosity is the collision of dense CSM and SN ejecta. If SN ejecta is surrounded by dense CSM, the kinetic energy of SN ejecta is efficiently converted to radiation energy, making them very bright. To see how well this idea works quantitatively, we performed numerical simulations of collisions of SN ejecta and dense CSM by using one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA and obtained light curves (LCs) resulting from the collision. First, we show the results of our LC modeling of SLSN 2006gy. We find that physical parameters of dense CSM estimated by using the idea of shock breakout in dense CSM (e.g., Chevalier & Irwin 2011, Moriya & Tominaga 2012) can explain the LC properties of SN 2006gy well. The dense CSM's radius is about 1016 cm and its mass about 15 M ⊙. It should be ejected within a few decades before the explosion of the progenitor. We also discuss how LCs change with different CSM and SN ejecta properties and origins of the diversity of H-rich SLSNe. This can potentially be a probe to see diversities in mass-loss properties of the progenitors. Finally, we also discuss a possible signature of SN ejecta-CSM interaction which can be found in H-poor SLSN.

  9. Light curve analysis of southern eclipsing binary EM Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, C.; Bulut, I.; Bulut, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, ASAS light curve of the eclipsing binary EM Car (Sp = O8V, P = 3.4 days) has been analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney method. The light curve analyses have found that EM Car is a detached eclipsing binary system with small eccentric orbit

  10. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  11. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 microns and 0.6 mag at 4.5 microns. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 microns) and W2 (4.6 microns) from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010-2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude approximately 0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude approximately 0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune's atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune's atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 micron filters.

  12. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; hide

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 microns and 0.6 mag at 4.5 microns. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 microns) and W2 (4.6 microns) from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010-2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude approximately 0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude approximately 0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune's atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune's atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 micron filters.

  13. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  14. Gamma-Ray Light Curves from Pulsar Magnetospheres with Finite Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has provided an unprecedented database for pulsar emission studies that includes gamma-ray light curves for over 100 pulsars. Modeling these light curves can reveal and constrain the geometry of the particle accelerator, as well as the pulsar magnetic field structure. We have constructed 3D magnetosphere models with finite conductivity, that bridge the extreme vacuum and force-free solutions used in previous light curves modeling. We are investigating the shapes of pulsar gamma-ray light curves using these dissipative solutions with two different approaches: (l) assuming geometric emission patterns of the slot gap and outer gap, and (2) using the parallel electric field provided by the resistive models to compute the trajectories and . emission of the radiating particles. The light curves using geometric emission patterns show a systematic increase in gamma-ray peak phase with increasing conductivity, introducing a new diagnostic of these solutions. The light curves using the model electric fields are very sensitive to the conductivity but do not resemble the observed Fermi light curves, suggesting that some screening of the parallel electric field, by pair cascades not included in the models, is necessary

  15. QUEST1 VARIABILITY SURVEY. III. LIGHT CURVE CATALOG UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Rengstorf, A. W.; Thompson, D. L.; Mufson, S. L.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Adams, B.; Baltay, C.; Gebhard, M.; Andrews, P.; Coppi, P.; Emmet, W.; Vivas, A. K.; Abad, C.; Bongiovanni, A.; Briceno, C.; Bruzual, G.; Prugna, F. Della; Hernandez, J.; Bailyn, C.; Ferrin, I.; Fuenmayor, F.

    2009-03-15

    This paper reports an update to the QUEST1 (QUasar Equatorial Survey Team, Phase 1) Variability Survey (QVS) light curve catalog, which links QVS instrumental magnitude light curves to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) objects and photometry. In the time since the original QVS catalog release, the overlap between publicly available SDSS data and QVS data has increased by 8% in sky coverage and 16,728 in number of matched objects. The astrometric matching and the treatment of SDSS masks have been refined for the updated catalog. We report on these improvements and present multiple bandpass light curves, global variability information, and matched SDSS photometry for 214,941 QUEST1 objects.

  16. An analysis of the light curve of Pluto.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, A. A.; Fix, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The light curve of Pluto is analyzed in terms of a geometrical model consisting of bright and dark areas which are assumed to exhibit either a diffuse or a geometrical type of reflectivity. A Fourier analysis method is used to invert the observed light curve to obtain the longitudinal distribution of bright and dark areas for any combination of albedos selected for the two types of terrain. The analysis indicates that the light curve of Pluto can be readily understood in terms of a surface consisting of bright and dark areas. However, on the basis of the presently available photometric data, the existence or absence of limb-darkened material cannot be established.

  17. Bolometric and UV light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Brown, Peter J.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Frey, Lucille H.

    2014-06-01

    The Swift UV-Optical Telescope (UVOT) has been observing core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) of all subtypes in the UV and optical since 2005. Here we present 50 CCSNe observed with the Swift UVOT, analyzing their UV properties and behavior. Where we have multiple UV detections in all three UV filters (λ {sub c} = 1928-2600 Å), we generate early time bolometric light curves, analyze the properties of these light curves and the UV contribution to them, and derive empirical corrections for the UV-flux contribution to optical-IR based bolometric light curves.

  18. Using Kepler Light Curves for Astronomy Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Jennifer; Rivers, S.; Eleby, J.; Gould, A.; Komatsu, T.

    2014-01-01

    We will present our efforts related to Education and Public Outreach activities using Kepler Light Curves. We are currently developing interactive web based activities to introduce the public to the general topic of Stellar Variability and Intrinsic Variable Stars in particular using the high quality light curves of over a dozen Kepler targets. Along with the public website, we are exploring areas to develop teacher guides to use Kepler Light Curves in the middle and high school classrooms. These efforts are supported through a NASA EPSCoR grant "South Carolina Joint Venture Program" via a subaward to SC State University.

  19. New Developments in Eclipsing Binary Light Curve Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Stagg, C. R.

    1994-03-01

    The light curve modeling of binary stars has continued to evolve since its founding by Henry Norris Russell (see Russell and Merrill 1952 and citations therein) nearly a century ago, accelerated in the 1950s by Kopal's introduction of Roche geometry into models and by the development of synthetic light curve computer code in the 1970's. Improved physics and the use of more kinds of observational input are providing another round of important advances that promise to enlarge our knowledge of both binary stars and ensembles containing them. Here we discuss the newer horizons of light curve modeling and the steps being taken toward them.

  20. Light bullets in nonlinear periodically curved waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszewski, Michal; Garanovich, Ivan L.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2010-04-15

    We predict that stable mobile spatiotemporal solitons can exist in arrays of periodically curved optical waveguides. We find two-dimensional light bullets in planar arrays with harmonic waveguide bending and three-dimensional bullets in square lattices with helical waveguide bending using variational formalism. Stability of the light-bullet solutions is confirmed by the direct numerical simulations which show that the light bullets can freely move across the curved arrays. This mobility property is a distinguishing characteristic compared to previously considered discrete light bullets which were trapped to a specific lattice site. These results suggest new possibilities for flexible spatiotemporal manipulation of optical pulses in photonic lattices.

  1. Bolometric Light Curves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the bolometric light curves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, and 2009E), which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors like that of SN 1987A, using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe light curves using three different common techniques common from the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the light curves calculated by SuperBoL, along with previously published light curves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction light curves largely agree with previously published light curves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2≲ δ {L}{bol}/{L}{bol}≲ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ∼5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric light curves from observed sets of broadband light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  2. CATALOG OF 93 NOVA LIGHT CURVES: CLASSIFICATION AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Strope, Richard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Henden, Arne A.

    2010-07-15

    We present a catalog of 93 very-well-observed nova light curves. The light curves were constructed from 229,796 individual measured magnitudes, with the median coverage extending to 8.0 mag below peak and 26% of the light curves following the eruption all the way to quiescence. Our time-binned light curves are presented in figures and as complete tabulations. We also calculate and tabulate many properties about the light curves, including peak magnitudes and dates, times to decline by 2, 3, 6, and 9 mag from maximum, the time until the brightness returns to quiescence, the quiescent magnitude, power-law indices of the decline rates throughout the eruption, the break times in this decline, plus many more properties specific to each nova class. We present a classification system for nova light curves based on the shape and the time to decline by 3 mag from the peak (t{sub 3}). The designations are 'S' for smooth light curves (38% of the novae), 'P' for plateaus (21%), 'D' for dust dips (18%), 'C' for cusp-shaped secondary maxima (1%), 'O' for quasi-sinusoidal oscillations superposed on an otherwise smooth decline (4%), 'F' for flat-topped light curves (2%), and 'J' for jitters or flares superposed on the decline (16%). Our classification consists of this single letter followed by the t{sub 3} value in parentheses; so, for example, V1500 Cyg is S(4), GK Per is O(13), DQ Her is D(100), and U Sco is P(3).

  3. EVEREST: Pixel Level Decorrelation of K2 Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luger, Rodrigo; Agol, Eric; Kruse, Ethan; Barnes, Rory; Becker, Andrew; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Deming, Drake

    2016-10-01

    We present EPIC Variability Extraction and Removal for Exoplanet Science Targets (EVEREST), an open-source pipeline for removing instrumental noise from K2 light curves. EVEREST employs a variant of pixel level decorrelation to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft’s pointing error and a Gaussian process to capture astrophysical variability. We apply EVEREST to all K2 targets in campaigns 0-7, yielding light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission for stars brighter than {K}p≈ 13, and within a factor of two of the Kepler precision for fainter targets. We perform cross-validation and transit injection and recovery tests to validate the pipeline, and compare our light curves to the other de-trended light curves available for download at the MAST High Level Science Products archive. We find that EVEREST achieves the highest average precision of any of these pipelines for unsaturated K2 stars. The improved precision of these light curves will aid in exoplanet detection and characterization, investigations of stellar variability, asteroseismology, and other photometric studies. The EVEREST pipeline can also easily be applied to future surveys, such as the TESS mission, to correct for instrumental systematics and enable the detection of low signal-to-noise transiting exoplanets. The EVEREST light curves and the source code used to generate them are freely available online.

  4. Interpretation of OAO-2 ultraviolet light curves of beta Doradus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, J. L.; Lillie, C. F.; Hill, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Middle-ultraviolet light curves of beta Doradus, obtained by OAO-2, are presented along with other evidence indicating that the small additional bumps observed on the rising branches of these curves have their origin in shock-wave phenomena in the upper atmosphere of this classical Cepheid. A simple piston-driven spherical hydrodynamic model of the atmosphere is developed to explain the bumps, and the calculations are compared with observations. The model is found to be consistent with the shapes of the light curves as well as with measurements of the H-alpha radial velocities.

  5. Prelimary Photoelectric Light Curve for DHK29=SAO 70629

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Daniel H.; Gunn, Jerry B.; Lamb, Charles F.; Sullivan, Philip

    The newly discovered eclipsing binary star DHK 29 = SAO 70629 has been observed photoelectrically from October 1992 to October 1993. With the light curve coverage 75% complete, it is apparent that the initial 1.9-day period reported in IB VS 3815 is the half-period. Three times of primary minima have been determined. New light elements are given.

  6. Photometric Identification of Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae: Multicolor Light Curve Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Blinnikov, Sergey; Suzuki, Tomoharu

    We study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse supernova (SN) models (25-100 ȯ ) to determine the indicators for the detection and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models that explain the observed abundance patterns of metal-poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using the multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code STELLA. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with solar-metallicity models and observed SNe. We conclude that the multicolor light curves could be used to identify first-generation SNe in current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, James Webb Space Telescope). They are also suitable for identifying low-metallicity SNe in the nearby universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).

  7. CG Cygni - Solutions of 1979 and 1980 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowell, James R.; Wilson, John W.; Hall, Douglas S.; Peyman, Pamela E.

    1987-05-01

    Three new V light curves of CG Cyg, a short-period RS CVn binary, are presented. Fourier analysis showed the wave to be present still. The most striking feature of the light outside eclipse is the monotonic increase in the mean level by 15% since 1967. Solution of the rectified light curve yielded values of i = 81°.8, k = 1.00, and p0 = -0.44. These, combined with published spectroscopic elements, gave values of Rh = Rc = 0.80 R_sun;, Mh = Mc = 0.52 M_sun;, and a = 3.13 R_sun;.

  8. Spitzer Space Telescope Mid-IR Light Curves of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Marley, Mark S.; Gizis, John E.; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-11-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 μm and 0.6 mag at 4.5 μm. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 μm) and W2 (4.6 μm) from the Wide-feld Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010-2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler/K2 in the visible (amplitude ˜0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude ˜0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune’s atmosphere than for K2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune’s atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 μm filters.

  9. PERIOD VARIATION AND ASYMMETRY LIGHT CURVES OF XY URSAE MAJORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jinzhao

    2010-05-15

    New CCD photometric observations of the chromospherically active binary XY Ursae Majoris (XY UMa) were obtained every year since 2006. The light curves obtained in the late Spring of 2006 show obvious variations on a short timescale, while the light curves obtained in 2008 December do not. But both sets of light curves are markedly asymmetric, and were analyzed using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code with spot model. New absolute physical parameters are obtained. It is found that the total spotted area on the more massive component covers 7% of the photospheric surface in 2008 December. Fitting all available light minimum times including the newly obtained ones with a sinusoidal ephemeris and a four-part linear ephemeris reveals that the orbital period undergoes quasi-periodic oscillation rather than sinusoidal variations. Between the two mechanisms of magnetic activity and a third body around the eclipsing pair, the former one is more plausible.

  10. Optical light curves of FUor and FUor-like objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, Evgeni; Peneva, Stoyanka; Ibryamov, Sunay

    2017-06-01

    Using recent data from photometric monitoring and data from the photographic plate archives we aim to study, the long-term photometric behavior of FUors. The construction of the historical light curves of FUors could be very important for determining the beginning of the outburst, the time to reach the maximum light, the rate of increase and decrease in brightness, the pre-outburst variability of the star. Our CCD photometric observations were performed with the telescopes of the Rozhen (Bulgaria) and Skinakas (Crete, Greece) observatories. Most suitable for long-term photometric study are the plate archives of the big Schmidt telescopes, as the telescopes at Kiso Observatory, Asiago Observatory, Palomar Observatory and others. In comparing our results with light curves of the well-studied FUors, we conclude that every new FUor object shows different photometric behavior. Each known FUor has a different rate of increase and decrease in brightness and a different light curve shape.

  11. Model light curves of linear Type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, D.A.; Wheeler, J.C.; Harkness, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Light curves computed from hydrodynamic models of supernova are compared graphically with the average observed B and V-band light curves of linear Type II supernovae. Models are based on the following explosion scenarios: carbon deflagration within a C + O core near the Chandrasekhar mass, electron-capture-induced core collapse of an O-Ne-Mg core of the Chandrasekhar mass, and collapse of an Fe core in a massive star. A range of envelope mass, initial radius, and composition is investigated. Only a narrow range of values of these parameters are consistent with observations. Within this narrow range, most of the observed light curve properties can be obtained in part, but none of the models can reproduce the entire light curve shape and absolute magnitude over the full 200 day comparison period. The observed lack of a plateau phase is explained in terms of a combination of small envelope mass and envelope helium enhancement. The final cobalt tail phase of the light curve can be reproduced only if the mass of explosively synthesized radioactive Ni-56 is small. The results presented here, in conjunction with the observed homogeneity among individual members of the supernova subclass, argue favorably for the O-Ne-Mg core collapse mechanism as an explanation for linear Type II supernovae. The Crab Nebula may arisen from such an explosion. Carbon deflagrations may lead to brighter events like SN 1979C. 62 refs.

  12. Spatial Reasoning Training Through Light Curves Of Model Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nakroshis, Paul A.; Rudnick, Benjamin T.; Brautigam, Maxwell J.; Nelson, Tyler W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that spatial reasoning skills, long known to be crucial to math and science success, are teachable. Even short stints of training can improve spatial reasoning skills among students who lack them (Sorby et al., 2006). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their spatial reasoning skill (Hill et al., 2010). We have designed a hands on asteroid rotation lab that provides practice in spatial reasoning tasks while building the student’s understanding of photometry. For our tool, we mount a model asteroid, with any shape of our choosing, on a slowly rotating motor shaft, whose speed is controlled by the experimenter. To mimic an asteroid light curve, we place the model asteroid in a dark box, shine a movable light source upon our asteroid, and record the light reflected onto a moveable camera. Students may then observe changes in the light curve that result from varying a) the speed of rotation, b) the model asteroid’s orientation with respect to the motor axis, c) the model asteroid’s shape or albedo, and d) the phase angle. After practicing with our tool, students are asked to pair new objects to their corresponding light curves. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students must imagine how light scattering off of a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a ccd sensor plane, and then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. Through the use of our model asteroid, the student develops confidence in spatial reasoning skills.

  13. Vaporization of comet nuclei - Light curves and life times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. J.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of vaporization from the nucleus of a comet are examined and it is shown that a latitude dependence of vaporization can explain the asymmetries in cometary light curves. An attempt is made to explain the observed variation in molecular production rates with heliocentric distance when employing CO2 and clathrate hydrate ice as cometary nuclei substances. The energy balance equation and the vapor pressure equations of water and CO2 are used in calculating the vaporization from a surface. Calculations were carried out from both dry-ice and water-ice nuclei, using a variety of different effective visual albedos, but primarily for a thermal infrared of 0 (emission). Attention is given to cometary lifetimes and light curves and it was determined that the asymmetry in light curves occurs (occasionally) as a 'seasonal' effect due to a variation in the angle between the comet's rotation axis and the sun-comet line.

  14. A Crowd Sourced Light Curve for SN 2014G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    SN 2014G was initially classified as a Type IIn (CBET 3787) and was later revealed to be a Type II-L (ATEL 5935). In addition to having an interesting classification, it was also relatively bright, nearby (peak V ~ 14.3) and easy to observe with small to moderate sized telescope. We mounted a cooperative effort open to both professional and non-professional observers with the goal of producing a light curve that could accurately measure variations in brightness of 0.1 mag with a cadence of one every two days or better. Simply collecting measured magnitudes often results in a light curve with systematic offsets between independent contributors. To minimize that effect without burdening the volunteer observers with too many additional requirements, we collected calibrated images and processed them uniformly to produce the light curve.

  15. Establishing a CCD Light Curve For BW Vul (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowall, D.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) BW Vul is a pulsating variable star of the class BCEP. Review of the AID over the last 20 years reveals only scattered visual observations. Since 2011, a few CCD observations have been obtained with the BSMs, but not enough to obtain any knowledge of the light curve other than a mean color. Rapid cadence time series of BW Vul are currently underway using the AAVSOnet. The data generated should allow for modeling of the light curve and an updated ephemeris of Tmin values with O-C analysis.

  16. Adaptively Stretched Templates for Normal Type Ia Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Individual BVRI light-curve templates have been determined for 22 unusually well-observed literature Type Ia supernovae by the newly developed template builder AQUAA. This tool uses light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. In the B filter, to high accuracy 19 of these light curves may be represented by a single master template that is stretched adaptively along the time axis. The usual parameter describing average linear stretch is supplemented by two new nonlinear parameters that characterize transitions between regions of different time dilation. The distribution of these parameter values is related to the observed diversity of supernova rise times (Strovink, M., ApJ in press, astro-ph/07050726). Major portions of the VRI light curves, including the pre-maximum and peak regions, may be represented by corresponding master templates that similarly are stretched. When the dependence of absolute supernova luminosity on the limited number of stretch parameters is established, the use of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological distance indicators will be simplified and may be sharpened. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  18. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  19. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  20. Modeling magnetization curves in magnetic thin films with striped patterns.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M Di Pietro; Milano, J; Eddrief, M; Marangolo, M; Bustingorry, S

    2016-04-06

    In this work, we study magnetic thin films presenting magnetic stripe patterns. A fingerprint of such domains is a linear behavior of the in-plane magnetization curves below a given saturation field. We present free energy models for the in-plane magnetization curves which permit us to extract key geometrical information about the stripe patterns, such as the maximum canted angle of the magnetization and the domain wall width. As an example, we discuss in this work magnetization curves for Fe(1-x)Ga(x) magnetic films which present a stripe pattern with a period of 160 nm and we found a typical maximum canted angle of 85° and a domain wall width around 30 nm.

  1. Modeling magnetization curves in magnetic thin films with striped patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro Martínez, M.; Milano, J.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Bustingorry, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we study magnetic thin films presenting magnetic stripe patterns. A fingerprint of such domains is a linear behavior of the in-plane magnetization curves below a given saturation field. We present free energy models for the in-plane magnetization curves which permit us to extract key geometrical information about the stripe patterns, such as the maximum canted angle of the magnetization and the domain wall width. As an example, we discuss in this work magnetization curves for Fe1-x Ga x magnetic films which present a stripe pattern with a period of 160 nm and we found a typical maximum canted angle of {{85}{^\\circ}} and a domain wall width around 30 nm.

  2. Coherent States of Light Propagating in Curved Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, I. A.; Rosas, Alexandre; Furtado, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate classical and quantum properties of light propagating in curved spacetimes determined by the Robertson-Walker metric. As a special case we consider the classical de Sitter spacetime. Afterwards, based on a quadratic invariant and the dynamical invariant method, we solve the Schrödinger equation for this problem and write the corresponding wave functions in terms of solutions of the Milne-Pinney equation. In addition, we construct coherent states for the quantized light and employ them to study quantum properties of light in curved spacetimes. In particular, we show that the product of the quantum fluctuations of the coordinate and the momentum space does not attain its minimum value.

  3. EARLY SUPERNOVAE LIGHT CURVES FOLLOWING THE SHOCK BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Nakar, Ehud; Sari, Re'em

    2010-12-10

    The first light from a supernova (SN) emerges once the SN shock breaks out of the stellar surface. The first light, typically a UV or X-ray flash, is followed by a broken power-law decay of the luminosity generated by radiation that leaks out of the expanding gas sphere. Motivated by recent detection of emission from very early stages of several SNe, we revisit the theory of shock breakout and the following emission, paying special attention to the photon-gas coupling and deviations from thermal equilibrium. We derive simple analytic light curves of SNe from various progenitors at early times. We find that for more compact progenitors, white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet stars (WRs), and possibly more energetic blue-supergiant explosions, the observed radiation is out of thermal equilibrium at the breakout, during the planar phase (i.e., before the expanding gas doubles its radius), and during the early spherical phase. Therefore, during these phases we predict significantly higher temperatures than previous analysis that assumed equilibrium. When thermal equilibrium prevails, we find the location of the thermalization depth and its temporal evolution. Our results are useful for interpretation of early SN light curves. Some examples are (1) red supergiant SNe have an early bright peak in optical and UV flux, less than an hour after breakout. It is followed by a minimum at the end of the planar phase (about 10 hr), before it peaks again once the temperature drops to the observed frequency range. In contrast, WRs show only the latter peak in optical and UV. (2) Bright X-ray flares are expected from all core-collapse SNe types. (3) The light curve and spectrum of the initial breakout pulse hold information on the explosion geometry and progenitor wind opacity. Its spectrum in more compact progenitors shows a (nonthermal) power law and its light curve may reveal both the breakout diffusion time and the progenitor radius.

  4. Inferring asymmetric limb cloudiness on exoplanets from transit light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Paris, P.; Gratier, P.; Bordé, P.; Leconte, J.; Selsis, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Clouds have been shown to be present in many exoplanetary atmospheres. Cloud formation modeling predicts considerable inhomogeneities of cloud cover, consistent with optical phase curve observations. However, optical phase curves cannot resolve some existing degeneracies between cloud location and cloud optical properties. Aims: We present a conceptually simple technique for detecting inhomogeneous cloud cover on exoplanets. Such an inhomogeneous cloud cover produces an asymmetric primary transit of the planet in front of the host star. Asymmetric transits produce characteristic residuals that are different from standard symmetric models. Furthermore, bisector spans can be used to determine asymmetries in the transit light curve. Methods: We apply a model of asymmetric transits to the light curves of HAT-P-7b, Kepler-7b, and HD 209458b and search for possible cloud signatures. The nearly uninterrupted Kepler photometry is particularly well suited for this method since it allows for a very high time resolution. Results: We do not find any statistically sound cloud signature in the data of the considered planets. For HAT-P-7b, a tentative detection of an asymmetric cloud cover is found, consistent with analysis of the optical phase curve. Based on Bayesian probability arguments, a symmetric model with an offset in the transit ephemeris is still the most viable model. This work demonstrates that for suitable targets, namely low-gravity planets around bright stars, the method can be used to constrain cloud cover characteristics and is thus a helpful additional tool for the study of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  5. Exotrending: Fast and easy-to-use light curve detrending software for exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Oscar; Gandolfi, Davide

    2017-06-01

    The simple, straightforward Exotrending code detrends exoplanet transit light curves given a light curve (flux versus time) and good ephemeris (epoch of first transit and orbital period). The code has been tested with Kepler and K2 light curves and should work with any other light curve.

  6. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  7. Hidden Patterns of Light Revealed by Spitzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-07

    Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  8. Synthetic Light Curves for Born Again Events: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Rohrmann, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    The development of surveys which will be able to cover a large region of the sky several times per year will allow the massive detection of transient events taking place on timescales of years. In addition, the projected full digitalization of the Harvard plate collection will open a new window on the identification of slow transients taking place on timescales of centuries. In particular, these projects will allow the detection of stars undergoing slow eruptions as those expected during late helium flashes in the post-AGB evolution. In order to identify those transients which correspond with late helium flashes the development of synthetic light curves of those events is mandatory. In this connection we present preliminary results of a project aimed at computing grids of theoretical light curves of born again stars.

  9. Enhancements of Bayesian Blocks; Application to Large Light Curve Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian Blocks are optimal piecewise linear representations (step function fits) of light-curves. The simple algorithm implementing this idea, using dynamic programming, has been extended to include more data modes and fitness metrics, multivariate analysis, and data on the circle (Studies in Astronomical Time Series Analysis. VI. Bayesian Block Representations, Scargle, Norris, Jackson and Chiang 2013, ApJ, 764, 167), as well as new results on background subtraction and refinement of the procedure for precise timing of transient events in sparse data. Example demonstrations will include exploratory analysis of the Kepler light curve archive in a search for "star-tickling" signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. (The Cepheid Galactic Internet, Learned, Kudritzki, Pakvasa1, and Zee, 2008, arXiv: 0809.0339; Walkowicz et al., in progress).

  10. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  11. THE LOS ALAMOS SUPERNOVA LIGHT-CURVE PROJECT: COMPUTATIONAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Lucille H.; Even, Wesley; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Colgan, James

    2013-02-15

    We have entered the era of explosive transient astronomy, in which current and upcoming real-time surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the Palomar Transient Factory, and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System will detect supernovae in unprecedented numbers. Future telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope may discover supernovae from the earliest stars in the universe and reveal their masses. The observational signatures of these astrophysical transients are the key to unveiling their central engines, the environments in which they occur, and to what precision they will pinpoint cosmic acceleration and the nature of dark energy. We present a new method for modeling supernova light curves and spectra with the radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE coupled with detailed monochromatic opacities in the SPECTRUM code. We include a suite of tests that demonstrate how the improved physics and opacities are indispensable to modeling shock breakout and light curves when radiation and matter are tightly coupled.

  12. Focusing of light through turbid media by curve fitting optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changmei; Wu, Tengfei; Liu, Jietao; Li, Huijuan; Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jianqi

    2016-12-01

    The construction of wavefront phase plays a critical role in focusing light through turbid media. We introduce the curve fitting algorithm (CFA) into the feedback control procedure for wavefront optimization. Unlike the existing continuous sequential algorithm (CSA), the CFA locates the optimal phase by fitting a curve to the measured signals. Simulation results show that, similar to the genetic algorithm (GA), the proposed CFA technique is far less susceptible to the experimental noise than the CSA. Furthermore, only three measurements of feedback signals are enough for CFA to fit the optimal phase while obtaining a higher focal intensity than the CSA and the GA, dramatically shortening the optimization time by a factor of 3 compared with the CSA and the GA. The proposed CFA approach can be applied to enhance the focus intensity and boost the focusing speed in the fields of biological imaging, particle trapping, laser therapy, and so on, and might help to focus light through dynamic turbid media.

  13. PAIR INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE: LIGHT CURVES, SPECTRA, AND SHOCK BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.; Heger, Alexander

    2011-06-20

    For the initial mass range (140 M{sub sun} < M < 260 M{sub sun}) stars die in a thermonuclear runaway triggered by the pair-production instability. The supernovae they make can be remarkably energetic (up to {approx}10{sup 53} erg) and synthesize considerable amounts of radioactive isotopes. Here we model the evolution, explosion, and observational signatures of representative pair instability supernovae (PI SNe) spanning a range of initial masses and envelope structures. The predicted light curves last for hundreds of days and range in luminosity from very dim to extremely bright (L {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}). The most massive events are bright enough to be seen at high redshift, but the extended light curve duration ({approx}1 yr)-prolonged by cosmological time-dilation-may make it difficult to detect them as transients. A more promising approach may be to search for the brief and luminous outbreak occurring when the explosion shock wave first reaches the stellar surface. Using a multi-wavelength radiation-hydrodynamics code we calculate that, in the rest frame, the shock breakout transients of PI SNe reach luminosities of 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, peak at wavelengths {approx}30-170 A, and last for several hours. We discuss how observations of the light curves, spectra, and breakout emission can be used to constrain the mass, radius, and metallicity of the progenitor.

  14. CALCULATING TIME LAGS FROM UNEVENLY SAMPLED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    Timing techniques are powerful tools to study dynamical astrophysical phenomena. In the X-ray band, they offer the potential of probing accretion physics down to the event horizon. Recent work has used frequency- and energy-dependent time lags as tools for studying relativistic reverberation around the black holes in several Seyfert galaxies. This was achieved due to the evenly sampled light curves obtained using XMM-Newton. Continuously sampled data are, however, not always available and standard Fourier techniques are not applicable. Here, building on the work of Miller et al., we discuss and use a maximum likelihood method to obtain frequency-dependent lags that takes into account light curve gaps. Instead of calculating the lag directly, the method estimates the most likely lag values at a particular frequency given two observed light curves. We use Monte Carlo simulations to assess the method's applicability and use it to obtain lag-energy spectra from Suzaku data for two objects, NGC 4151 and MCG-5-23-16, that had previously shown signatures of iron K reverberation. The lags obtained are consistent with those calculated using standard methods using XMM-Newton data.

  15. Pre-nebular Light Curves of SNe I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David; Fryer, Christopher; Matheson, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    We compare analytic predictions of supernova light curves with recent high-quality data from SN2011fe (Ia), KSN2011b (Ia), and the Palomar Transient Factory and the La Silla-QUEST variability survey (LSQ) (Ia). Because of the steady, fast cadence of observations, KSN2011b provides unique new information on SNe Ia: the smoothness of the light curve, which is consistent with significant large-scale mixing during the explosion, possibly due to 3D effects (e.g., Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities), and provides support for a slowly varying leakage (mean opacity). For a more complex light curve (SN2008D, SN Ib), we separate the luminosity due to multiple causes and indicate the possibility of a radioactive plume. The early rise in luminosity is shown to be affected by the opacity (leakage rate) for thermal and non-thermal radiation. A general derivation of Arnett’s rule again shows that it depends upon all processes heating the plasma, not just radioactive ones, so that SNe Ia will differ from SNe Ibc if the latter have multiple heating processes.

  16. General Model for Light Curves of Chromospherically Active Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetsu, L.; Henry, G. W.; Lehtinen, J.

    2017-04-01

    The starspots on the surface of many chromospherically active binary stars concentrate on long-lived active longitudes separated by 180°. Shifts in activity between these two longitudes, the “flip-flop” events, have been observed in single stars like FK Comae and binary stars like σ Geminorum. Recently, interferometry has revealed that ellipticity may at least partly explain the flip-flop events in σ Geminorum. This idea was supported by the double-peaked shape of the long-term mean light curve of this star. Here we show that the long-term mean light curves of 14 chromospherically active binaries follow a general model that explains the connection between orbital motion, changes in starspot distribution, ellipticity, and flip-flop events. Surface differential rotation is probably weak in these stars, because the interference of two constant period waves may explain the observed light curve changes. These two constant periods are the active longitude period ({P}{act}) and the orbital period ({P}{orb}). We also show how to apply the same model to single stars, where only the value of P act is known. Finally, we present a tentative interference hypothesis about the origin of magnetic fields in all spectral types of stars. The CPS results are available electronically at the Vizier database.

  17. New Horizons approach photometry of Pluto and Charon: light curves and Solar phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, A. M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Verbiscer, A.; Howett, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    While the most captivating images of Pluto and Charon were shot by NASA's New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, the spacecraft also imaged Pluto with its LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") during its Annual Checkouts and Approach Phases, with campaigns in July 2013, July 2014, January 2015, March 2015, April 2015, May 2015 and June 2015. All but the first campaign provided full coverage of Pluto's 6.4 day rotation. Even though many of these images were taken when surface features on Pluto and Charon were unresolved, these data provide a unique opportunity to study Pluto over a timescale of several months. Earth-based data from an entire apparition must be combined to create a single light curve, as Pluto is never otherwise continuously available for observing due to daylight, weather and scheduling. From the spacecraft, Pluto's sub-observer latitude remained constant to within 0.05 degrees of 43.15 degrees, comparable to a week's worth of change as seen from Earth near opposition. During the July 2013 to June 2015 period, Pluto's solar phase curve increased from 11 degrees to 15 degrees, a small range, but large compared to Earth's 2 degree limit. The slope of the solar phase curve hints at properties such as surface roughness. Using PSF photometry that takes into account the ever-increasing sizes of Pluto and Charon as seen from New Horizons, as well as surface features discovered at closest approach, we present rotational light curves and solar phase curves of Pluto and Charon. We will connect these observations to previous measurements of the system from Earth.

  18. Multi-q pattern classification of polarization curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Ricardo; Bastos, Ivan N.; Neto, Francisco D. Moura; Lopes, Francisco J. P.; Gonçalves, Wesley N.; Bruno, Odemir M.

    2014-02-01

    Several experimental measurements are expressed in the form of one-dimensional profiles, for which there is a scarcity of methodologies able to classify the pertinence of a given result to a specific group. The polarization curves that evaluate the corrosion kinetics of electrodes in corrosive media are applications where the behavior is chiefly analyzed from profiles. Polarization curves are indeed a classic method to determine the global kinetics of metallic electrodes, but the strong nonlinearity from different metals and alloys can overlap and the discrimination becomes a challenging problem. Moreover, even finding a typical curve from replicated tests requires subjective judgment. In this paper, we used the so-called multi-q approach based on the Tsallis statistics in a classification engine to separate the multiple polarization curve profiles of two stainless steels. We collected 48 experimental polarization curves in an aqueous chloride medium of two stainless steel types, with different resistance against localized corrosion. Multi-q pattern analysis was then carried out on a wide potential range, from cathodic up to anodic regions. An excellent classification rate was obtained, at a success rate of 90%, 80%, and 83% for low (cathodic), high (anodic), and both potential ranges, respectively, using only 2% of the original profile data. These results show the potential of the proposed approach towards efficient, robust, systematic and automatic classification of highly nonlinear profile curves.

  19. UBVRIz Light Curves of 51 Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, Lluís; Hamuy, Mario; Phillips, Mark M.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; de Jaeger, Thomas; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Krisciunas, Kevin; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Krzeminski, Wojtek; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; Anguita, Claudio; Galaz, Gaspar; Green, Elisabeth M.; Impey, Chris; Kim, Yong-Cheol; Kirhakos, Sofia; Malkan, Mathew A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Prosser, Charles F.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Sherry, William; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wells, Lisa A.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986-2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  20. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; Krisciunas, Kevin; Krzeminski, Wojtek; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  1. New NIR light-curve templates for classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inno, L.; Matsunaga, N.; Romaniello, M.; Bono, G.; Monson, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Persson, E.; Buonanno, R.; Freedman, W.; Gieren, W.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Ita, Y.; Laney, C. D.; Lemasle, B.; Madore, B. F.; Nagayama, T.; Nakada, Y.; Nonino, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Primas, F.; Scowcroft, V.; Soszyński, I.; Tanabé, T.; Udalski, A.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present new near-infrared (NIR) light-curve templates for fundamental (FU, J, H, KS) and first overtone (FO, J) classical Cepheids. The new templates together with period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit (PW) relations provide Cepheid distances from single-epoch observations with a precision only limited by the intrinsic accuracy of the method adopted. Methods: The templates rely on a very large set of Galactic and Magellanic Cloud Cepheids (FU, ~600; FO, ~200) with well-sampled NIR (IRSF data set) and optical (V, I; OGLE data set) light-curves. To properly trace the change in the shape of the light-curve as a function of pulsation period, we split the sample of calibrating Cepheids into ten different period bins. The templates for the first time cover FO Cepheids and the short-period range of FU Cepheids (P ≤ 5 days). Moreover, the phase zero-point is anchored to the phase of the mean magnitude along the rising branch. The new approach has several advantages in sampling the light-curve of bump Cepheids when compared with the canonical phase of maximum light. We also provide new empirical estimates of the NIR-to-optical amplitude ratios for FU and FO Cepheids. We perform detailed analytical fits using seventh-order Fourier series and multi-Gaussian periodic functions. The latter are characterized by fewer free parameters (nine vs. fifteen). Results: The mean NIR magnitudes based on the new templates are up to 80% more accurate than single-epoch NIR measurements and up to 50% more accurate than the mean magnitudes based on previous NIR templates, with typical associated uncertainties ranging from 0.015 mag (J band) to 0.019 mag (KS band). Moreover, we find that errors on individual distance estimates for Small Magellanic Cloud Cepheids derived from NIR PW relations are essentially reduced to the intrinsic scatter of the adopted relations. Conclusions: Thus, the new templates are the ultimate tool for estimating precise Cepheid distances from NIR single

  2. Observations of fuors. I. Light curve of V 1057 Cyg

    SciTech Connect

    Ibragimov, M.A.; Shevchenko, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The photographic magnitudes m/sub pg/, m/sub pv/, m/sub pr/ of the fuor V 1057 Cyg obtained during the period July 1968-August 1970 and photoelectric UBVRI' observations during the period July 1078-December 1985 are given. At the time of the rise and the light maximum of V 1057 Cyg, 26 estimates were obtained of m/sub pg/, 20 of m/sub pv/, and three of m/sub pr/. The color index upper limit V - I < 3.5 was obtained in the pre-outburst epoch. Analysis of the B, V, R light curves obtained from 300 observation nights reveals a periodic component in the small-scale light curve with a period of about 12 days and an amplitude of about 0.1 V. There has been a further slowing down in the rate of decrease of the brightness: from 1982 through 1986 the brightness of V 1057 Cyg did not decrease by more than O.2 V, whereas during the preceding four years the decrease in the brightness was ..delta..V > 0.4.

  3. Light Curve and Orbital Period Analysis of VX Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, M.; Nelson, R. H.; Şenavcı, H. V.; İzci, D.; Özavcı, İ.; Gümüş, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we performed simultaneously light curve and radial velocity, and also period analyses of the eclipsing binary system VX Lac. Four color (BVRI) light curves of the system were analysed using the W-D code. The results imply that VX Lac is a classic Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.27, of which the less massive secondary component fills its Roche lobe. The orbital period behaviour of the system was analysed by assuming the light time effect (LITE) from a third body. The O-C analysis yielded a mass transfer rate of dM/dt=1.86×10-8M⊙yr-1 and the minimal mass of the third body to be M3=0.31M⊙. The residuals from mass transfer and the third body were also analysed because another cyclic variation is seen in O-C diagram. This periodic variation was examined under the hypotheses of stellar magnetic activity and fourth body.

  4. Light curves from supernova shock breakout through an extended wind

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Balberg, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some supernovae may be the result of an explosion into an optically thick circumstellar material, the product of pre-explosion mass loss (wind) by the progenitor star. This scenario has been studied previously both analytically and numerically. However, many previous studies base their analysis on the diffusion approximation for radiation transfer, which is inappropriate in the optically thin outer layers of the wind. Here we study the deviations from diffusion and calculate light curves more accurately using a Monte Carlo approach to photon transfer. We distinguish between 'compact' winds, for which the diffusion approximation is appropriate, and 'extended' winds, which require a more delicate treatment of the radiation. We show that this effect is more significant than that of the light-travel time difference to a distant observer, which has a secondary influence on the light curves of extended-wind systems. We also comment on the applicability of the widely used flux-limited diffusion approximation in this context: we find that it generally does not reproduce the Monte Carlo results. The flux-limited diffusion approximation leads to results that are not only quantitatively but also qualitatively wrong in the extended-wind regime.

  5. Light-Curve Survey of Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Melita, M.; Ortiz, J. L.; Licandro, J.; Williams, I. P.; Jones, D.

    2008-09-01

    Trojan asteroids are an interesting population of minor bodies due to their dynamical characteristics, their physical properties and that they are relatively isolated located at the snow-line The main hypotheses about the origin of the Jupiter Trojans assumed that they formed either during the final stages of the planetary formation (Marzari & Scholl 1998), or during the epoch of planetary migration (Morbidelli et al. 2005), in any case more than 3.8 Gy. ago. The dynamical configuration kept the Trojans isolated from the asteroid Main Belt throughout the history of the Solar System. In spite of eventual interactions with other populations of minor bodies like the Hildas, the Jupiter family comets, and the Centaurs, their collisional evolution has been dictated mostly by the intrapopulation collisions (Marzari et al. 1996, 1997). Therefore, the Jupiter Trojans may be considered primordial bodies, whose dynamical and physical properties can provide important clues about the environment of planetary formation. The available sample of Jupiter Trojans light-curves is small and mainly restricted to the largest objects. According to the MPC-website (updated last in March 2006), the present sample of rotation periods and light-curve-amplitudes of the Jupiter Trojan asteroids is composed by 25 objects with some information about their periods and by 10 of them with only an amplitude estimation. A survey of contact binary Trojan asteroids has been done by Mann et al. 2007, where they have recorded more than 100 amplitudes from sparse-sampled light-curves and very-wellresolved rotational periods. More than 2000 Trojan asteroids have been discovered up to date, so, there is an urgent need to enlarge the sample of intrinsic rotation periods and accurate light-curve amplitudes and to extend it to smaller sizes. Results and Discusions We requested 26 nights of observation in the second semester of 2007, to begin with the survey. They were scheduled for the following instruments

  6. SUPERLUMINOUS LIGHT CURVES FROM SUPERNOVAE EXPLODING IN A DENSE WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Balberg, Shmuel

    2012-10-01

    Observations from the last decade have indicated the existence of a general class of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), in which the peak luminosity exceeds 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Here we focus on a subclass of these events, where the light curve is also tens of days wide, so the total radiated energy is of order 10{sup 51} erg. If the origin of these SLSNe is a core-collapse-driven explosion of a massive star, then the mechanism that converts the explosion energy into radiation must be very efficient (much more than in typical core-collapse SNe, where this efficiency is of order 1%). We examine the scenario where the radiated luminosity is due to efficient conversion of kinetic energy of the ejected stellar envelope into radiation by interaction with an optically thick, pre-existing circumstellar material, presumably the product of a steady wind from the progenitor. We base the analysis on analytical derivations of various limits, and on a simple, numerically solved, hydrodynamic diffusion model, which allows us to explore the regime of interest, which does not correspond to the analytical limits. In our results, we identify the qualitative behavior of the observable light curves, and relate them to the parameters of the wind. We specifically show that a wide and superluminous supernova requires the mass of the relevant wind material to be comparable to that of the ejected material from the exploding progenitor. We find the wind parameters that explain the peak luminosity and width of the bolometric light curves of three particular SLSNe, namely, SN 2005ap, SN 2006gy, and SN 2010gx, and show that they are best fitted with a wind that extends to a radius of order 10{sup 15} cm. These results serve as an additional indication that at least some SLSNe may be powered by interaction of the ejected material with a steady wind of similar mass.

  7. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  8. Marginalizing Instrument Systematics in HST WFC3 Transit Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Sing, D.K.; Deming, D.; Mandell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) infrared observations at 1.1-1.7 microns probe primarily the H2O absorption band at 1.4 microns, and have provided low-resolution transmission spectra for a wide range of exoplanets. We present the application of marginalization based on Gibson to analyze exoplanet transit light curves obtained from HST WFC3 to better determine important transit parameters such as "ramp" probability (R (sub p)) divided by "ramp" total (R (sub asterisk)), which are important for accurate detections of H2O. We approximate the evidence, often referred to as the marginal likelihood, for a grid of systematic models using the Akaike Information Criterion. We then calculate the evidence-based weight assigned to each systematic model and use the information from all tested models to calculate the final marginalized transit parameters for both the band-integrated and spectroscopic light curves to construct the transmission spectrum. We find that a majority of the highest weight models contain a correction for a linear trend in time as well as corrections related to HST orbital phase. We additionally test the dependence on the shift in spectral wavelength position over the course of the observations and find that spectroscopic wavelength shifts delta (sub lambda) times lambda) best describe the associated systematic in the spectroscopic light curves for most targets while fast scan rate observations of bright targets require an additional level of processing to produce a robust transmission spectrum. The use of marginalization allows for transparent interpretation and understanding of the instrument and the impact of each systematic evaluated statistically for each data set, expanding the ability to make true and comprehensive comparisons between exoplanet atmospheres.

  9. Marginalizing Instrument Systematics in HST WFC3 Transit Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Sing, D.K.; Deming, D.; Mandell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) infrared observations at 1.1-1.7 microns probe primarily the H2O absorption band at 1.4 microns, and have provided low-resolution transmission spectra for a wide range of exoplanets. We present the application of marginalization based on Gibson to analyze exoplanet transit light curves obtained from HST WFC3 to better determine important transit parameters such as "ramp" probability (R (sub p)) divided by "ramp" total (R (sub asterisk)), which are important for accurate detections of H2O. We approximate the evidence, often referred to as the marginal likelihood, for a grid of systematic models using the Akaike Information Criterion. We then calculate the evidence-based weight assigned to each systematic model and use the information from all tested models to calculate the final marginalized transit parameters for both the band-integrated and spectroscopic light curves to construct the transmission spectrum. We find that a majority of the highest weight models contain a correction for a linear trend in time as well as corrections related to HST orbital phase. We additionally test the dependence on the shift in spectral wavelength position over the course of the observations and find that spectroscopic wavelength shifts delta (sub lambda) times lambda) best describe the associated systematic in the spectroscopic light curves for most targets while fast scan rate observations of bright targets require an additional level of processing to produce a robust transmission spectrum. The use of marginalization allows for transparent interpretation and understanding of the instrument and the impact of each systematic evaluated statistically for each data set, expanding the ability to make true and comprehensive comparisons between exoplanet atmospheres.

  10. Thermal Emission Light-Curves of Rapidly Rotating Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozitis, Ben; Emery, Joshua; Lowry, Stephen; Rozek, Agata; Wolters, Stephen; Snodgrass, Colin; Green, Simon

    2014-12-01

    We propose to use Spitzer/IRAC to obtain simultaneous 3 and 4 um light-curves of 23 rapidly rotating asteroids (rotation periods of less than 3 hrs) to determine thermal inertia and surface roughness spatial variations. These observations will probe asteroid geophysics and constrain the origin of their rapid rotation. Rapidly rotating asteroids are unusual bodies where their own self-gravity is balanced or exceeded by rotational centrifugal forces, and are thought to have acquired their fast rotation rates through the YORP effect - a radiative torque induced by exposure to sunlight. For each target asteroid, we will measure thermal flux in both IRAC bands for a full rotation. When combined with shapes and spin axes derived from our ground-based programme, and a thermophysical model, we will be able to identify any temperature variations resulting from thermal inertia and/or surface roughness variation, and be able to constrain theoretical predictions of YORP rotational acceleration. The thermal property variations will be compared against models of surface gravity in order to provide insights into the physical processes by which asteroids retain and lose surface material. 16 of our target asteroids are being observed at optical wavelengths in a European Southern Observatory (ESO) Large Programme (LP) awarded 82 nights to constrain rotation period changes induced by the YORP effect (PI Stephen Lowry; Program IDs 185.C-1033, 185.C-1034). Approximately 80 additional nights on a range of other facilities has also been awarded for this programme. The ESO LP will support the Spitzer programme by providing shape and spin axis information necessary to search for surface property variations in the thermal emission light-curves of these asteroids. Likewise, the Spitzer/IRAC thermal emission light-curves will allow us to derive the physical properties that drive the YORP effect on the ESO LP asteroids.

  11. Transit Light Curves with Finite Integration Time: Fisher Information Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/~eprice.

  12. Properties of SN Ia progenitors from light curves and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höflich, P.; Dragulin, P.; Mitchell, J.; Penney, B.; Sadler, B.; Diamond, T.; Gerardy, C.

    2013-04-01

    With recent advances in theory and observations, direct connections emerge between the progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) and the observed light curves and spectra. A direct link is important for our understanding of the supernovae physics, the diversity of SNe Ia and the use of SNe Ia for high-precision cosmology because the details of the explosion depends sensitively on the initial conditions and the explosion scenario(s) realized in nature. Do SNe Ia originate from SD- or DD systems, and do they lead to M Ch mass explosions or dynamical mergers? Does the statistical distribtion of SNe Ia depend on their environment which can be expected to change with redshift? In this contribution, we will exam from the theoretical point of view the tell-tails for this connection, their consistency with the observations, and future directions. In a first section, we present the physics of the explosion, light curves and spectral formation in a nutshell to help understanding the connection. For details of the progenitor evolution and explosion physics, we refer to reviews and the other contributions in this issue. Each of the topical sections starts with a brief general review followed by a more detailed discussion of specific results. Because the youth of the field, some bias is unavoidable towards results obtained within our collaborations (and FSU). The imprint of the metallicity, progenitor stars and properties such as the central density of the exploding WD are presented. IR spectroscopy, polarimetry and imaging of SNR remnants are discussed as a tool to test for the WD properties, magnetic fields and asymmetries. We discuss different classes of Type Ia supernovae, and their environment. Possible correlations between the spectroscopic and light curve properties of SN Ia are discussed. Finally, the overall emerging picture and future developments are discussed.

  13. Optical Light Curve and Cooling Break of GRB 050502A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, S. A.; Alatalo, K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C. W.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Blake, C. H.; Bloom, J. S.; Boettcher, M.; Falco, E. E.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Halpern, J. P.; Horns, D.; Joshi, M.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; McKay, T. A.; Mirabal, N.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Shields, J. C.; Skrutskie, M.; Smith, D. A.; Starr, D. L.; Swan, H. F.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wren, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present light curves of the afterglow of GRB 050502A, including very early data at t-tGRB<60 s. The light curve is composed of unfiltered ROTSE-IIIb optical observations from 44 s to 6 hr postburst, R-band MDM observations from 1.6 to 8.4 hr postburst, and PAIRITEL JHKs observations from 0.6 to 2.6 hr postburst. The optical light curve is fit by a broken power law, where tα steepens from α=-1.13+/-0.02 to -1.44+/-0.02 at ~5700 s. This steepening is consistent with the evolution expected for the passage of the cooling frequency νc through the optical band. Even in our earliest observation at 44 s postburst, there is no evidence that the optical flux is brighter than a backward extrapolation of the later power law would suggest. The observed decay indices and spectral index are consistent with either an ISM or a wind fireball model, but slightly favor the ISM interpretation. The expected spectral index in the ISM interpretation is consistent within 1 σ with the observed spectral index β=-0.8+/-0.1 the wind interpretation would imply a spectral index slightly (~2 σ) shallower than observed. A small amount of dust extinction at the source redshift could steepen an intrinsic spectrum sufficiently to account for the observed value of β. In this picture, the early optical decay, with the peak at or below 4.7×1014 Hz at 44 s, requires very small electron and magnetic energy partitions from the fireball.

  14. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  15. Low States of Polars from CRTS Optical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Joshua; Mason, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of light curves from the 10 year baseline for 98 polars observed using the Catalina Realtime Transit Survey (CRTS). In particular we investigate the stability of high and low luminosity states, for which these highly magnetic binaries are known. We identify several classes of behavior. Some polars have stable low states, (EF Eri, AR UMa, AM Her) in which they spend considerable time. About as many dip in brightness to low states followed by quick returns, (CE Gru, BM CrB). A few like FL Cet show 3 distinctive states.

  16. Variability in GRB light curves: Introducing Orthogonal Matching Pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Husne; Bégué, Damien; Ryde, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Constraining the variability of GRBs is important as it is one of the few keys to estimate many unknown parameters, such as the emission radius, the Lorentz factor, the size of the progenitor. In this work, we introduced the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) method to study GRB light curves and to compute the minimum time variability of GRBs. Commonly used in medical sciences, this method reconstructs a signal by choosing among predefined functional shapes. We will discuss the implementation of the code, and compare its performances with those of other dedicated methods (Haar wavelet analysis, peak finding algorithm and step wise filter correlation).

  17. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  18. Light curves and phase relations of the asteroid 55 Pandora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevchenko, V. G.; Kruglyj, Yu. N.; Lupishko, D. F.; Harris, A. W.; Chernova, G. P.

    1993-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of 55 Pandora were performed in Feb.-March 1989 (six nights) in the phase-angle range of 2.5-14 deg and in Sept.-Nov. 1991 (15 nights) in the range 0.5-16.3 deg. The mean amplitudes of the light curves in these oppositions were 0.22m and 0.10m, respectively. The data indicate that Pandora is a typical M-asteroid, and that the high albedo observed by the IRAS satellite does not correspond to reality.

  19. Neutral versus charged defect patterns in curved crystals.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the complex spectrum of topological defects in ground states of curved crystals is a long-standing problem with wide implications, from the mathematical Thomson problem to diverse physical realizations, including fullerenes and particle-coated droplets. While the excess number of "topologically charged" fivefold disclinations in a closed, spherical crystal is fixed, here we study the elementary transition from defect-free, flat crystals to curved crystals possessing an excess of "charged" disclinations in their bulk. Specifically, we consider the impact of topologically neutral patterns of defects-in the form of multidislocation chains or "scars" stable for small lattice spacing-on the transition from neutral to charged ground-state patterns of a crystalline cap bound to a spherical surface. Based on the asymptotic theory of caps in continuum limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we derive the morphological phase diagram of ground-state defect patterns, spanned by surface coverage of the sphere and forces at the cap edge. For the singular limit of zero edge forces, we find that scars reduce (by half) the threshold surface coverage for excess disclinations. Even more significant, scars flatten the geometric dependence of excess disinclination number on Gaussian curvature, leading to a transition between stable "charged" and "neutral" patterns that is, instead, critically sensitive to the compressive vs tensile nature of boundary forces on the cap.

  20. Neutral versus charged defect patterns in curved crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the complex spectrum of topological defects in ground states of curved crystals is a long-standing problem with wide implications, from the mathematical Thomson problem to diverse physical realizations, including fullerenes and particle-coated droplets. While the excess number of "topologically charged" fivefold disclinations in a closed, spherical crystal is fixed, here we study the elementary transition from defect-free, flat crystals to curved crystals possessing an excess of "charged" disclinations in their bulk. Specifically, we consider the impact of topologically neutral patterns of defects—in the form of multidislocation chains or "scars" stable for small lattice spacing—on the transition from neutral to charged ground-state patterns of a crystalline cap bound to a spherical surface. Based on the asymptotic theory of caps in continuum limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we derive the morphological phase diagram of ground-state defect patterns, spanned by surface coverage of the sphere and forces at the cap edge. For the singular limit of zero edge forces, we find that scars reduce (by half) the threshold surface coverage for excess disclinations. Even more significant, scars flatten the geometric dependence of excess disinclination number on Gaussian curvature, leading to a transition between stable "charged" and "neutral" patterns that is, instead, critically sensitive to the compressive vs tensile nature of boundary forces on the cap.

  1. Flare Characteristics from X-ray Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryciuk, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, B.; Mrozek, T.

    2017-06-01

    A new methodology is given to determine basic parameters of flares from their X-ray light curves. Algorithms are developed from the analysis of small X-ray flares occurring during the deep solar minimum of 2009, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24, observed by the Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) on the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon (CORONAS- Photon) spacecraft. One is a semi-automatic flare detection procedure that gives start, peak, and end times for single ("elementary") flare events under the assumption that the light curve is a simple convolution of a Gaussian and exponential decay functions. More complex flares with multiple peaks can generally be described by a sum of such elementary flares. Flare time profiles in the two energy ranges of SphinX (1.16 - 1.51 keV, 1.51 - 15 keV) are used to derive temperature and emission measure as a function of time during each flare. The result is a comprehensive catalogue - the SphinX Flare Catalogue - which contains 1600 flares or flare-like events and is made available for general use. The methods described here can be applied to observations made by Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and other broad-band spectrometers.

  2. WASP-14 b: transit timing analysis of 19 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Marka, C.; Fernández, M.; Güver, T.; Göğüş, E.; Nowak, G.; Vaňko, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Mugrauer, M.; Trepl, L.; Gelszinnis, J.

    2015-08-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light-curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis, we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years (2007-2013) allowed us to refine the transit ephemeris. We derived an orbital period 1.2 s longer and 10 times more precise than the one given in the discovery paper. We found no significant periodic signal in the timing-residuals and, hence, no evidence for TTV in the system.

  3. Spectral Lags Obtained by CCF of Smoothed Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaosheng; Chen, Li; Wang, Dehua

    2012-04-01

    We present a new technique to calculate the spectral lags of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Unlike previous processing methods, we first smooth the light curves of gamma-ray bursts in high- and low-energy bands using the "Loess" filter, then we directly define the spectral lags as such to maximize the cross-correlation function (CCF) between two smoothed light curves. This method is suitable for various shapes of CCF; it effectively avoids the errors caused by manual selections for the fitting function and fitting interval. Using the method, we have carefully measured the spectral lags of individual pulses contained in Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts and confirmed the anticorrelation between the spectral lag and the isotropic luminosity. The distribution of spectral lags can be well fitted by four Gaussian components, with the centroids at 0.03 s, 0.09 s, 0.15 s, and 0.21 s, respectively. We find that some spectral lags of the multipeak GRBs seem to evolve with time.

  4. Spectral Lags Obtained by CCF of Smoothed Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaosheng; Chen, Li; Wang, Dehua

    2012-04-01

    We present a new technique to calculate the spectral lags of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Unlike previous processing methods, we first smooth the light curves of gamma-ray bursts in high- and low-energy bands using the “Loess” filter, then we directly define the spectral lags as such to maximize the cross-correlation function (CCF) between two smoothed light curves. This method is suitable for various shapes of CCF; it effectively avoids the errors caused by manual selections for the fitting function and fitting interval. Using the method, we have carefully measured the spectral lags of individual pulses contained in Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts and confirmed the anticorrelation between the spectral lag and the isotropic luminosity. The distribution of spectral lags can be well fitted by four Gaussian components, with the centroids at 0.03 s, 0.09 s, 0.15 s, and 0.21 s, respectively. We find that some spectral lags of the multipeak GRBs seem to evolve with time.

  5. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  6. SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF TIMESCALE METRICS FOR APERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Cody, Ann Marie

    2015-01-10

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  7. Simulated Performance of Timescale Metrics for Aperiodic Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  8. A Semiautomatic Pipeline for Be Star Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rímulo, L. R.; Carciofi, A. C.; Rivinius, T.; Okazaki, A.

    2016-11-01

    Observational and theoretical studies from the last decade have shown that the Viscous Decretion Disk (VDD) scenario, in which turbulent viscosity is the physical mechanism responsible for the transport of material and angular momentum ejected from the star to the outer regions of the disk, is the only viable model for explaining the circumstellar disks of Be stars. In the α-disk approach applied to the VDD, the dimensionless parameter α is a measure of the turbulent viscosity. Recently, combining the time-dependent evolution of a VDD α-disk with non-LTE radiative transfer calculations, the first measurement of the α parameter was made, for the disk dissipation of the Be star ω CMa. It was found that α≍ 1 for that Be disk. The main motivation of this present work is the statistical determination of the α parameter. For this purpose, we present a pipeline that will allow the semiautomatic determination of the α parameter of several dozens of light curves of Be stars available from photometric surveys, In this contribution, we describe the pipeline, outlining the main staps required for the semiautomatic analysis of light curves

  9. Unifying Type II Supernova Light Curves with Dense Circumstellar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Piro, Anthony L.; Valenti, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    A longstanding problem in the study of supernovae (SNe) has been the relationship between the Type IIP and Type IIL subclasses. Whether they come from distinct progenitors or they are from similar stars with some property that smoothly transitions from one class to another has been the subject of much debate. Here, using one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic SN models, we show that the multi-band light curves of SNe IIL are well fit by ordinary red supergiants surrounded by dense circumstellar material (CSM). The inferred extent of this material, coupled with a typical wind velocity of ∼ 10{--}100 {km} {{{s}}}-1, suggests enhanced activity by these stars during the last ~months to ∼years of their lives, which may be connected with advanced stages of nuclear burning. Furthermore, we find that, even for more plateau-like SNe, dense CSM provides a better fit to the first ∼ 20 days of their light curves, indicating that the presence of such material may be more widespread than previously appreciated. Here we choose to model the CSM with a wind-like density profile, but it is unclear whether this just generally represents some other mass distribution, such as a recent mass ejection, thick disk, or even inflated envelope material. Better understanding the exact geometry and density distribution of this material will be an important question for future studies.

  10. A Review of Correlated Noise in Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, J.; Blecic, J.; Hardy, R. A.; Hardin, M.

    2013-10-01

    A number of the occultation light curves of exoplanets exhibit time-correlated residuals (a.k.a. correlated or red noise) in their model fits. The correlated noise might arise from inaccurate models or unaccounted astrophysical or telescope systematics. A correct assessment of the correlated noise is important to determine true signal-to-noise ratios of a planet's physical parameters. Yet, there are no in-depth statistical studies in the literature for some of the techniques currently used (RMS-vs-bin size plot, prayer beads, and wavelet-based modeling). We subjected these correlated-noise assessment techniques to basic tests on synthetic data sets to characterize their features and limitations. Initial results indicate, for example, that, sometimes the RMS-vs-bin size plots present artifacts when the bin size is similar to the observation duration. Further, the prayer beads doesn't correctly increase the uncertainties to compensate for the lack of accuracy if there is correlated noise. We have applied these techniques to several Spitzer secondary-eclipse hot-Jupiter light curves and discuss their implications. This work was supported in part by NASA planetary atmospheres grant NNX13AF38G and Astrophysics Data Analysis Program NNX12AI69G.

  11. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  12. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  13. On Correlated-noise Analyses Applied to Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lust, Nate B.; Blecic, Jasmina; Stemm, Madison

    2017-01-01

    Time-correlated noise is a significant source of uncertainty when modeling exoplanet light-curve data. A correct assessment of correlated noise is fundamental to determine the true statistical significance of our findings. Here, we review three of the most widely used correlated-noise estimators in the exoplanet field, the time-averaging, residual-permutation, and wavelet-likelihood methods. We argue that the residual-permutation method is unsound in estimating the uncertainty of parameter estimates. We thus recommend to refrain from this method altogether. We characterize the behavior of the time averaging’s rms-versus-bin-size curves at bin sizes similar to the total observation duration, which may lead to underestimated uncertainties. For the wavelet-likelihood method, we note errors in the published equations and provide a list of corrections. We further assess the performance of these techniques by injecting and retrieving eclipse signals into synthetic and real Spitzer light curves, analyzing the results in terms of the relative-accuracy and coverage-fraction statistics. Both the time-averaging and wavelet-likelihood methods significantly improve the estimate of the eclipse depth over a white-noise analysis (a Markov-chain Monte Carlo exploration assuming uncorrelated noise). However, the corrections are not perfect when retrieving the eclipse depth from Spitzer data sets, these methods covered the true (injected) depth within the 68% credible region in only ∼45%–65% of the trials. Lastly, we present our open-source model-fitting tool, Multi-Core Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MC3). This package uses Bayesian statistics to estimate the best-fitting values and the credible regions for the parameters for a (user-provided) model. MC3 is a Python/C code, available at https://github.com/pcubillos/MCcubed.

  14. Testing the recovery of stellar rotation signals from Kepler light curves using a blind hare-and-hounds exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Llama, J.; Ceillier, T.; Chagas, M. L. das; Davenport, J. R. A.; García, R. A.; Hay, K. L.; Lanza, A. F.; McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Nielsen, M. B.; Reinhold, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of a blind exercise to test the recoverability of stellar rotation and differential rotation in Kepler light curves. The simulated light curves lasted 1000 d and included activity cycles, Sun-like butterfly patterns, differential rotation and spot evolution. The range of rotation periods, activity levels and spot lifetime were chosen to be representative of the Kepler data of solar-like stars. Of the 1000 simulated light curves, 770 were injected into actual quiescent Kepler light curves to simulate Kepler noise. The test also included five 1000-d segments of the Sun's total irradiance variations at different points in the Sun's activity cycle. Five teams took part in the blind exercise, plus two teams who participated after the content of the light curves had been released. The methods used included Lomb-Scargle periodograms and variants thereof, autocorrelation function and wavelet-based analyses, plus spot modelling to search for differential rotation. The results show that the `overall' period is well recovered for stars exhibiting low and moderate activity levels. Most teams reported values within 10 per cent of the true value in 70 per cent of the cases. There was, however, little correlation between the reported and simulated values of the differential rotation shear, suggesting that differential rotation studies based on full-disc light curves alone need to be treated with caution, at least for solar-type stars. The simulated light curves and associated parameters are available online for the community to test their own methods.

  15. Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaviz, Pablo; De Marco, Orsola; Passy, Jean-Claude; Staff, Jan E.; Iaconi, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The common envelope (CE) binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The CE interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers, and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. CE simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based CE simulations to produce the light curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from CE hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in unigrid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is tested using the first 135 days of the CE simulation of Passy et al., where a 0.8 M ⊙ red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6 M ⊙ companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as CE interactions.

  16. Type IIb SN 2011fu: spectral and light curve evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Isern, J.; NTT-TNG Large Programme

    2013-05-01

    Type IIb supernovae (SNe) are a subclass of core-collapse supernovae that appear to be a hybrid between SNe characterized by the presence of H in their spectra (Type II) and Type Ib/c SNe (those that do not exhibit H features in their spectra but possibly HeI). We present some preliminary results of the photometric and spectroscopic analysis of type IIb supernova 2011fu. In principle, the characteristics of SN 2001fu are pretty similar to those of canonical type IIb SNe, but its Bessel UBVRI and Sloan uriz light curves (LCs) present an early peak resembling the unique case of the well studied type IIb SN 1993J (Richmond et al. 1994, AJ, 107, 1022).

  17. K2 High-cadence Light Curves of Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Garnavich, Peter M.; Tucker, Brad; Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Kasen, Daniel; Zenteno, Alfredo; Margheim, Steven J.; Smith, Chris; James, David

    2017-01-01

    I will give an overview of the Kepler Extra-Galactic Survey (KEGS), a program using Kepler to search for supernovae, active galactic nuclei, and other transients in galaxies. To date we have found 22 supernova, and with 2 more years (through 2018) planned, including the forward-facing C16/C17, we hope to discover 20 - 30 more SN. The 30-minute cadence of Kepler has reveales subtle features in the light-curves of these supernova not detectable with any other survey, including, shock break-out in a large number of SN, improving our understanding of supernova progenitors. We can also search in nearby galaxies for very fast and faint transients, filling in a previously unaccessible parameter space.

  18. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-12-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  19. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  20. High-order harmonics in light curves of Kepler planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Caden; Rein, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    The Kepler mission was launched in 2009 and has discovered thousands of planet candidates. In a recent paper, Esteves et al. found a periodic signal in the light curves of KOI-13 and HAT-P-7, with a frequency triple the orbital frequency of a transiting planet. We found similar harmonics in many systems with a high occurrence rate. At this time, the origins of the signal are not entirely certain. We look carefully at the possibility of errors being introduced through our data processing routines but conclude that the signal is real. The harmonics on multiples of the orbital frequency are a result of non-sinusoidal periodic signals. We speculate on their origin and generally caution that these harmonics could lead to wrong estimates of planet albedos, beaming mass estimates, and ellipsoidal variations.

  1. Detecting faint echoes in stellar-flare light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    1992-01-01

    Observational considerations are discussed for detecting echoes from flare-star photospheres and from stellar or planetary companions. Synthetic spectra are used to determine optimal conditions for the recovery of echoes in flare light curves. The most detectable echoes are expected to appear in broadband observations of the UV continuum. Short-lived flares are ideal for resolving echoes from the flare-star photosphere and may provide constraints for stellar-flare models. Strong outbursts may be used to detect stellar or planetary companions of a flare star. However, the possible planetary configurations that may be probed by this method are limited to Jupiter-size objects in tight orbits about the parent star.

  2. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  3. A Light Curve of Theta-1 Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. R.; Stutts, S. C.; Caton, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Theta-1 Orionis A (V1016 Ori), a member of the Trapezium, was only discovered to be an eclipsing binary system in 1974. The study of this system has been recently summarized by Strickland and Lloyd (The Observatory, 120, 2000, pp. 141-149). We are obtaining a complete light curve in VBRI using a CCD on the 18-inch telescope at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory. We have obtained new times of primary minimum and are searching for the undiscovered secondary eclipse as well. A status update on this project will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, through grant AST-9731062, and the Dunham Fund for Astrophysical Research. We would also like to thank the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory Library and acknowledge the use of the Simbad Astronomical Data Base. The instrumentation help provided by Lee Hawkins and Robert Miller is appreciated as well.

  4. Thermal evolution and light curves of young bare strange stars.

    PubMed

    Page, Dany; Usov, Vladimir V

    2002-09-23

    We study numerically the cooling of a young bare strange star and show that its thermal luminosity, mostly due to e(+)e(-) pair production from the quark surface, may be much higher than the Eddington limit. The mean energy of photons far from the strange star is approximately 10(2) keV or even more. This differs both qualitatively and quantitatively from the thermal emission from neutron stars and provides a definite observational signature for bare strange stars. It is shown that the energy gap of superconducting quark matter may be estimated from the light curves if it is in the range from approximately 0.5 MeV to a few MeV.

  5. OBSERVATIONS OF DOPPLER BOOSTING IN KEPLER LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.; Breton, Rene P.; Justham, Stephen; Rappaport, Saul A.; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Han, Zhanwen

    2010-05-20

    Among the initial results from Kepler were two striking light curves, for KOI 74 and KOI 81, in which the relative depths of the primary and secondary eclipses showed that the more compact, less luminous object was hotter than its stellar host. That result became particularly intriguing because a substellar mass had been derived for the secondary in KOI 74, which would make the high temperature challenging to explain; in KOI 81, the mass range for the companion was also reported to be consistent with a substellar object. We re-analyze the Kepler data and demonstrate that both companions are likely to be white dwarfs. We also find that the photometric data for KOI 74 show a modulation in brightness as the more luminous star orbits, due to Doppler boosting. The magnitude of the effect is sufficiently large that we can use it to infer a radial velocity amplitude accurate to 1 km s{sup -1}. As far as we are aware, this is the first time a radial-velocity curve has been measured photometrically. Combining our velocity amplitude with the inclination and primary mass derived from the eclipses and primary spectral type, we infer a secondary mass of 0.22 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}. We use our estimates to consider the likely evolutionary paths and mass-transfer episodes of these binary systems.

  6. Spontaneous Pattern Formation with Incoherent White Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Tal; Carmon, Tal; Buljan, Hrvoje; Segev, Mordechai

    2004-11-01

    We present the first experimental observation of modulation instability and spontaneous pattern formation with incoherent white light emitted from an incandescent light bulb. We show experimentally that modulation instability of white light propagating in a noninstantaneous self-focusing medium is a collective effect, where the entire temporal spectrum of the light beam becomes unstable at the same threshold value and collectively forms a pattern with a single periodicity. We experimentally demonstrate that the temporal spectrum of the evolving perturbation self-adjusts to match the collective pattern formation phenomenon.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V346 Cen multiwavelength light curves (Mayer+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, P.; Harmanec, P.; Wolf, M.; Nemravova, J.; Prsa, A.; Fremat, Y.; Zejda, M.; Liska, J.; Jurysek, J.; Honkova, K.; Masek, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present photographic light curves from O'Connell (1939, Publications of the Riverview College Observatory, 2, 5), uvby light curves from Gimenez et al. (1986A&AS...66...45G), BVR light curves from 0.6 m reflector with a CCD camera, Mt. John, New Zealand, green light curve from Sonnar 4/135mm telephoto lens with a CCD ATIK16IC camera, Sutherland, South Africa and BVRI light curves from 0.3m Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector with a CCD camera. (5 data files).

  8. Simulated Radio Images and Light Curves of Young Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Ball, L.

    2002-12-01

    We present calculations of the radio emission from supernovae based on high-resolution simulations of the hydrodynamics and radiation transfer, using simple energy density relations which link the properties of the radiating electrons and the magnetic field to the hydrodynamics. As a specific example we model the emission from SN1993J, which cannot be adequately fitted with the often-used analytic mini-shell model, and present a good fit to the radio evolution at a single frequency. Both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption are needed to fit the light curve at early times and a circumstellar density profile of ρ ~ r -1.7 provides the best fit to the later data. We discuss the use of high-resolution radio images of supernovae to distinguish between different absorption mechanisms and determine the origin of specific light curve features. Comparisons of VLBI images of SN1993J with synthetic model images suggest that internal free-free absorption completely obscures emission at 8.4 GHz passing through the center of the supernova for the first few tens of years after explosion. We predict that at 8.4 GHz the internal free-free absorption is currently declining, and that over the next ~ 40 years the surface brightness of the center of the source should increase relative to the bright ring of emission seen in VLBI images. Similar absorption in a nearby supernova would make the detection of a radio pulsar at 1 GHz impossible for ~ 150 years after explosion. VVD is supported by the US. Department of Energy under grant number B341495 to the ASCI Flash Center at the University of Chicago.

  9. Low mass SN IA and the late light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Hand, K. P.

    1995-01-01

    The late bolometric light curves of type Ia supernovae, when measured accurately over several years, show an exponential decay with a 56d half-life over a drop in luminosity of 8 magnitudes (10 half-lives). The late-time light curve is thought to be governed by the decay of Co56, whose 77d half-life must then be modified to account for the observed decay time. Two mechanisms, both relying upon the positron fraction of the Co56 decay, have been proposed to explain this modification. One explanation requires a large amount of emission at infra-red wavelengths where it would not be detected. The other explanation has proposed a progressive transparency or leakage of the high energy positrons (Colgate, Petschek and Kriese). For the positrons to leak out of the expanding nebula at the required rate necessary to produce the modified 56d exponential, the mass of the ejecta from a one foe (1051 erg in kinetic energy) explosion must be small, Mejec = 0.4M(circle dot) with Mejec (proportional to) KE0.5. Thus, in this leakage explanation, any reasonable estimate of the total energy of the explosion requires that the ejected mass be very much less than the Chandrasekhar mass of 1.4M(circle dot). This is very difficult to explain with the 'canonical' Chandrasekhar-mass thermonuclear explosion that disintegrates the original white dwarf star. This result leads us to pursue alternate mechanisms of type Ia supernovae. These mechanisms include sub-Chandrasekhar thermonuclear explosions and the accretion induced collapse of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs. We will summarize the advantages and disadvantages of both mechanisms with considerable detail spent on our new accretion induced collapse simulations. These mechanisms lead to lower Ni56 production and hence result in type Ia supernovae with luminosities decreased down to (approximately) 50% that predicted by the 'standard' model.

  10. The infrared light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III and its relationship to the visual light curve, C2, and water production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles S.; Hanner, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The near-IR light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III is analyzed and compared with C2 production, water production, and the visual light curve. This is the most complete IR light curve compiled to date for any comet. The scattering phase function at small sun-comet-earth angles is shown to affect the slope of near-IR light curve significantly. P/Halley's dust production, as inferred from the IR light curve showed an increased production rate near perihelion which appears to be correlated with the onset of significant jet activity. The near-IR light curve, visual light curve, C2, and water production rates displayed different heliocentric variations, suggesting that one parameter cannot be accurately estimated from another. This is particularly true of the early preperihelion visual light curve. A peak of 0.3-0.5 magnitude in the visual magnitude, representing the integrated brightness of the comet's visible coma, lagged the other parameters by about a day. The near-IR color, J-H, was less red during periods of strong dust activity.

  11. The infrared light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III and its relationship to the visual light curve, C2, and water production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles S.; Hanner, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The near-IR light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III is analyzed and compared with C2 production, water production, and the visual light curve. This is the most complete IR light curve compiled to date for any comet. The scattering phase function at small sun-comet-earth angles is shown to affect the slope of near-IR light curve significantly. P/Halley's dust production, as inferred from the IR light curve showed an increased production rate near perihelion which appears to be correlated with the onset of significant jet activity. The near-IR light curve, visual light curve, C2, and water production rates displayed different heliocentric variations, suggesting that one parameter cannot be accurately estimated from another. This is particularly true of the early preperihelion visual light curve. A peak of 0.3-0.5 magnitude in the visual magnitude, representing the integrated brightness of the comet's visible coma, lagged the other parameters by about a day. The near-IR color, J-H, was less red during periods of strong dust activity.

  12. Hilbert-Curve Fractal Antenna With Radiation- Pattern Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.; Zaman, Afroz

    2007-01-01

    A printed, folded, Hilbert-curve fractal microwave antenna has been designed and built to offer advantages of compactness and low mass, relative to other antennas designed for the same operating frequencies. The primary feature of the antenna is that it offers the advantage of radiation-pattern diversity without need for electrical or mechanical switching: it can radiate simultaneously in an end-fire pattern at a frequency of 2.3 GHz (which is in the S-band) and in a broadside pattern at a frequency of 16.8 GHz (which is in the Ku-band). This radiation-pattern diversity could be utilized, for example, in applications in which there were requirements for both S-band ground-to-ground communications and Ku-band ground-to-aircraft or ground-to-spacecraft communications. The lack of switching mechanisms or circuitry makes this antenna more reliable, easier, and less expensive to fabricate than it otherwise would be.

  13. Video meteor light curve analysis of Orionids and Geminids and developing a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of shower meteors from the single station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grašić, L.; Milanović, N.; Pavlović, D.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of the shower meteors from single station video data. We found that even though the height of a meteor atmospheric trajectory obtained by using this method may have a large error, the absolute light curve shape is preserved. We used our method to calculate the F parameters of the Orionid and Geminid light curves. The light curves were obtained from the single station video data by the instrument with a limiting sensitivity of 3.5m. We found that for our sample of the light curves the zenith distance of meteor radiant does not affect the F parameter for either of the two showers. The value of F parameter of the Orionids obtained in this paper matches the values obtained by other authors, whilst for the Geminids it is significantly different.

  14. Real Time Polarization Light Curves for Space Debris and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryjewski, J.; Hand, D.; Tyler, D.; Murali, S.; Roggemann, M.; Peterson, N.

    2010-09-01

    In recent years there as been a lot of interest in using the time history of re_ected solar light (light curves) from satellites and space debris as a means of determining shape and material composition. Most of these studies used time series analysis in an attempt to classify objects while some have used multi-spectral or spectroscopic approaches. One of the difficulties that most of these approaches had was the lack of high fidelity shape and material modeling. Here we present a high fidelity modeling approach that correctly describes the shape, material and dynamics of space objects. Furthermore, this model, in real time, correctly models reflection, emission, glint and polarization effects. We use this model to show how detection of polarization effects can help characterize both satellites and space debris. Polarization approaches have an advantage over spectroscopic or intensity based method because polarization is unaffected by the atmosphere. We present a comparison of polarization approaches for the analysis of space debris and satellites and discuss the advantages of being able to do these calculations in real time.

  15. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  16. Predicting neural network firing pattern from phase resetting curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel; Oprisan, Ana

    2007-04-01

    Autonomous neural networks called central pattern generators (CPG) are composed of endogenously bursting neurons and produce rhythmic activities, such as flying, swimming, walking, chewing, etc. Simplified CPGs for quadrupedal locomotion and swimming are modeled by a ring of neural oscillators such that the output of one oscillator constitutes the input for the subsequent neural oscillator. The phase response curve (PRC) theory discards the detailed conductance-based description of the component neurons of a network and reduces them to ``black boxes'' characterized by a transfer function, which tabulates the transient change in the intrinsic period of a neural oscillator subject to external stimuli. Based on open-loop PRC, we were able to successfully predict the phase-locked period and relative phase between neurons in a half-center network. We derived existence and stability criteria for heterogeneous ring neural networks that are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Low mass SN Ia and the late light curve

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Fryer, C.L.; Hand, K.P.

    1995-12-31

    The late bolometric light curves of type Ia supernovae, when measured accurately over several years, show an exponential decay with a 56d half-life over a drop in luminosity of 8 magnitudes (10 half-lives). The late-time light curve is thought to be governed by the decay of Co{sup 56}, whose 77d half-life must then be modified to account for the observed decay time. Two mechanisms, both relying upon the positron fraction of the Co{sup 56} decay, have been proposed to explain this modification. One explanation requires a large amount of emission at infra-red wavelengths where it would not be detected. The other explanation has proposed a progressive transparency or leakage of the high energy positrons (Colgate, Petschek and Kriese, 1980). For the positrons to leak out of the expanding nebula at the required rate necessary to produce the modified 56d exponential, the mass of the ejecta from a one foe (10{sup 51} erg in kinetic energy) explosion must be small, M{sub ejec} = 0.4M{sub {circle_dot}} with M{sub ejec} {proportional_to} KE{sup 0.5}. Thus, in this leakage explanation, any reasonable estimate of the total energy of the explosion requires that the ejected mass be very much less than the Chandrasekhar mass of 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}}. This is very difficult to explain with the ``canonical`` Chandrasekhar-mass thermonuclear explosion that disintegrates the original white dwarf star. This result leads us to pursue alternate mechanisms of type Ia supernovae. These mechanisms include sub-Chandrasekhar thermonuclear explosions and the accretion induced collapse of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs. We will summarize the advantages and disadvantages of both mechanisms with considerable detail spent on our new accretion induced collapse simulations. These mechanisms lead to lower Ni{sup 56} production and hence result in type Ia supernovae with luminosities decreased down to {approximately} 50% that predicted by the ``standard`` model.

  18. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  19. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters From Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam; Richards, J.; Bloom, J. S.; a larger Team

    2014-01-01

    We present a new machine-learning-based framework for the prediction of the fundamental stellar parameters, Teff, log g, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from repeated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ~9000 stellar variables (including ~3000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ~67k variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine-learning model that can determine Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random-forest-regression model uses SDSS color information and light-curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  20. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters from Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.

    We present a new machine learning based framework for the prediction of the fun- damental stellar parameters, Teff, logg, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from re- peated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ˜9,000 stellar variables (including ˜3,000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ˜67,000 variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine learning model that can determine Teff , log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random forest regression model uses SDSS color information and light curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  1. Supervised Detection of Anomalous Light Curves in Massive Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-01

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  2. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVES FROM PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERES WITH FINITE CONDUCTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-07-20

    We investigate the shapes of {gamma}-ray pulsar light curves using three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere models of finite conductivity. These models, covering the entire spectrum of solutions between vacuum and force-free magnetospheres, for the first time afford mapping the GeV emission of more realistic, dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. To this end we generate model light curves following two different approaches: (1) We employ the emission patterns of the slot and outer gap models in the field geometries of magnetospheres with different conductivity {sigma}. (2) We define realistic trajectories of radiating particles in magnetospheres of different {sigma} and compute their Lorentz factor under the influence of magnetospheric electric fields and curvature radiation-reaction; with these at hand we then calculate the emitted radiation intensity. The light curves resulting from these prescriptions are quite sensitive to the value of {sigma}, especially in the second approach. While still not self-consistent, these results are a step forward in understanding the physics of pulsar {gamma}-radiation.

  3. Design of reflector focusing light flux from LED into arbitrary 3D curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Mikhail A.; Borisova, Ksenya V.; Andreev, Evgeny S.; Kravchenko, Sergey V.

    2015-09-01

    The problem of focusing light flux into an arbitrary curve in 3D space arises in the design of different laser or illumination systems. Using a diaphragm with a curved hole is not efficient and does not work for any 3D pattern. In this study, we propose a numerical analytical approach for designing reflective surfaces that efficiently produces the prescribed intensity distribution on the arbitrary curve in 3D space. The method consists of two steps: computation of the eikonal function on the curve and reconstruction of the reflective surface using the precomputed eikonal function. In the first step, we use the iterative technique for obtaining the eikonal function in the set of points on the curve. After that, we compute the continuous eikonal function by interpolation of the obtained values of the eikonal in points and reconstruct the reflective surface using continuous eikonal distribution. As examples, the reflectors generating spiral lines on the inclined plane and illumination system module are computed and simulated. Simulation data show the high quality of the produced illuminance distributions.

  4. Disk irradiation and light curves of x ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Wheeler, J. C.; Mineshige, S.

    1994-01-01

    We study the disk instability and the effect of irradiation on outbursts in the black hole X-ray nova system. In both the optical and soft X-rays, the light curves of several X-ray novae, A0620-00, GH 2000+25, Nova Muscae 1991 (GS 1124-68), and GRO J0422+32, show a main peak, a phase of exponential decline, a secondary maximum or reflare, and a final bump in the late decay followed by a rapid decline. Basic disk thermal limit cycle instabilities can account for the rapid rise and overall decline, but not the reflare and final bump. The rise time of the reflare, about 10 days, is too short to represent a viscous time, so this event is unlikely to be due to increased mass flow from the companion star. We explore the possibility that irradiation by X-rays produced in the inner disk can produce these secondary effects by enhancing the mass flow rate within the disk. Two plausible mechanisms of irradiation of the disk are considered: direct irradiation from the inner hot disk and reflected radiation from a corona or other structure above the disk. Both of these processes will be time dependent in the context of the disk instability model and result in more complex time-dependent behavior of the disk structure. We test both disk instability and mass transfer burst models for the secondary flares in the presence of irradiation.

  5. Performance of Electroluminescent Flats for Precision Light Curve Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, Ryan L.; Oberst, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    We measure of the quality of flat field frames (flats) taken using an electroluminescent (EL) panel versus both dome and sky flats for purposes of calibrating visual CCD images. Classic dome and sky flats can both suffer from overall gradients and local irregularities. EL panel flats have recently grown in popularity as a third alternative, based partly on their potential to be free of such defects. We assess the flats based on their contributions to the RMS noise of long-duration light curves constructed via differential aperture photometry. The noise levels explored range from ~ 1 - few mmag, as needed for the ground-based detection of transiting planets. The target and reference stars are deliberately permitted to drift across the CCD in order to probe pixel-to-pixel variations. Both the filter and focus are varied during the tests - the former to probe color variation in the flats, and the latter because defocusing tends to average out pixel-to-pixel variations that the flats are intended to remove. All tests were performed at the Westminster College Observatory (WCO), which belongs to the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT)-North follow-up network.

  6. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE OF AN EXOZODIACAL DUST CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.

    2011-10-15

    Planets embedded within debris disks gravitationally perturb nearby dust and can create clumpy, azimuthally asymmetric circumstellar ring structures that rotate in lock with the planet. The Earth creates one such structure in the solar zodiacal dust cloud. In an edge-on system, the dust 'clumps' periodically pass in front of the star as the planet orbits, occulting and forward-scattering starlight. In this paper, we predict the shape and magnitude of the corresponding transit signal. To do so, we model the dust distributions of collisional, steady-state exozodiacal clouds perturbed by planetary companions. We examine disks with dusty ring structures formed by the planet's resonant trapping of in-spiraling dust for a range of planet masses and semi-major axes, dust properties, and disk masses. We synthesize edge-on images of these models and calculate the transit signatures of the resonant ring structures. The transit light curves created by dusty resonant ring structures typically exhibit two broad transit minima that lead and trail the planetary transit. We find that Jupiter-mass planets embedded within disks hundreds of times denser than our zodiacal cloud can create resonant ring structures with transit depths up to {approx}10{sup -4}, possibly detectable with Kepler. Resonant rings produced by planets more or less massive than Jupiter produce smaller transit depths. Observations of these transit signals may provide upper limits on the degree of asymmetry in exozodiacal clouds.

  7. The light curves of RR Lyrae field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, N. R.; Teays, T. J.

    1982-10-01

    Fourier decompositions have been made of the light curves of a large sample of RR Lyrae field stars. The coefficients have been tabulated. Following the scheme of an earlier investigation of classical Cepheids, certain combinations of the low-order coefficients - phi21, R21, and phi31 - are plotted against period. The Bailey-type c pulsators stand out from the type ab stars, particularly on the R21 plot which is found to be a more sensitive discriminator of Bailey type than is the traditionally employed amplitude-period diagram. The RR Lyrae plots of phi21, R21, and phi31 are compared with those previously obtained for classical Cepheids. It is noted that, while the Cepheid plots display a tightly defined progression with period, reflecting the influence of a modal resonance, in the RR Lyrae case there is much more scatter. However, some evidence is shown to exist for a Cepheid-like progression appearing among the longer period RR Lyrae pulsators and culminating in the unique small-amplitude variable XZ Ceti.

  8. CfA Nearby Supernova Ia Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicken, Malcolm; Berlind, P.; Blondin, S.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Esquerdo, G.; Everett, M.; Fernandez, J.; Jha, S.; Kirshner, R. P.; Latham, D.; Modjaz, M.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, M.

    2007-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are central in measuring the accelerated expansion of the Universe and the properties of the underlying dark energy. Nearby SN Ia are compared with distant ones to establish the history of cosmic expansion. In fact, current efforts in SN Ia cosmology are constrained by the limited number of well-observed nearby SN Ia. A significantly improved sample of nearby SN Ia, fully covering the space of Ia properties, is needed to maximize the utility of high-redshift SN Ia. Our ongoing project at the CfA has collected such a set of 170 SN Ia. We have used the FLWO 1.2m telescope. About half of our objects were observed in UBVRI with the 4Shooter camera and have an average of 10 epochs each while the other half was taken in UBVr'i' with the Keplercam instrument and have an average of 17 epochs each. We have now reduced this sample of over 25000 images and present calibrated light curves of these SN Ia along with an analysis of their properties. The CfA Supernova program is supported in part by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0606772 to Harvard University.

  9. Transient structure in the high-energy X-ray light curve of NP 0532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryckman, S. G.; Ricker, G. R.; Scheepmaker, A.; Ballintine, J. E.; Doty, J. P.; Downey, P. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the observation of pulsed fractions in the primary and secondary peaks, as well as in the interpulse region, of the high-energy X-ray light curve of NP 0532. A statistical analysis of light-curve data is performed, and a similar analysis is carried out using simulated data. It is concluded that a previously reported third peak in the light curve was transient in nature.

  10. Multi-band Emission Light Curves of Jupiter: Insights on Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Ge, Huazhi; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Sinclair, James; Fernandes, Joshua; Momary, Thomas W.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-10-01

    Many brown dwarfs exhibit significant infrared flux variability (e.g., Artigau et al. 2009, ApJ, 701, 1534; Radigan et al. 2012, ApJ, 750, 105), ranging from several to twenty percent of the brightness. Current hypotheses include temperature variations, cloud holes and patchiness, and cloud height and thickness variations (e.g., Apai et al. 2013, ApJ, 768, 121; Robinson and Marley 2014, ApJ, 785, 158; Zhang and Showman 2014, ApJ, 788, L6). Some brown dwarfs show phase shifts in the light curves among different wavelengths (e.g., Buenzli et al. 2012, ApJ, 760, L31; Yang et al. 2016, arXiv:1605.02708), indicating vertical variations of the cloud distribution. The current observational technique can barely detect the brightness changes on the surfaces of nearby brown dwarfs (Crossfield et al. 2014, Nature, 505, 654) let alone resolve detailed weather patterns that cause the flux variability. The infrared emission maps of Jupiter might shed light on this problem. Using COMICS at Subaru Telescope, VISIR at Very Large Telescope (VLT) and NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained infrared images of Jupiter over several nights at multiple wavelengths that are sensitive to several pressure levels from the stratosphere to the deep troposphere below the ammonia clouds. The rotational maps and emission light curves are constructed. The individual pixel brightness varies up to a hundred percent level and the variation of the full-disk brightness is around several percent. Both the shape and amplitude of the light curves are significantly distinct at different wavelengths. Variation of light curves at different epochs and phase shift among different wavelengths are observed. We will present principle component analysis to identify dominant emission features such as stable vortices, cloud holes and eddies in the belts and zones and strong emissions in the aurora region. A radiative transfer model is used to simulate those features to get a more quantitative

  11. Light curve of the optical counterpart of 2A0311-227

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G.; Hiltner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    Visual and blue light curves are presented for the optical counterpart of the X-ray source 2A0311-227. This system, which is the newest member of the AM Herculis class of binaries, has an orbital period of 81 minutes which also modulates the visual light curve. A Fourier analysis of the data has revealed the presence of a 6-minute oscillation, at least in the visual light curve. Whether or not it is also present in the blue light curve is unclear.

  12. RADIOACTIVELY POWERED RISING LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-11-10

    The rising luminosity of the recent, nearby supernova 2011fe shows a quadratic dependence with time during the first Almost-Equal-To 0.5-4 days. In addition, studies of the composite light curves formed from stacking together many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have found similar power-law indices for the rise, but may also show some dispersion that may indicate diversity. I explore what range of power-law rises are possible due to the presence of radioactive material near the surface of the exploding white dwarf (WD). I summarize what constraints such a model places on the structure of the progenitor and the distribution and velocity of ejecta. My main conclusion is that for the inferred explosion time for SN 2011fe, its rise requires an increasing mass fraction X {sub 56} Almost-Equal-To (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} of {sup 56}Ni distributed between a depth of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} and 0.3 M {sub Sun} below the WD's surface. Radioactive elements this shallow are not found in simulations of a single C/O detonation. Scenarios that may produce this material include helium-shell burning during a double-detonation ignition, a gravitationally confined detonation, and a subset of deflagration to detonation transition models. In general, the power-law rise can differ from quadratic depending on the details of the velocity, density, and radioactive deposition gradients in a given event. Therefore, comparisons of this work with observed bolometric rises of SNe Ia would place strong constraints on the properties of the shallow outer layers, providing important clues for identifying the elusive progenitors of SNe Ia.

  13. Variability in the light curve of tidal disruption events†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zu-Jia; Lin, Da-Bin; Xie, Ling-Hua; Liang, En-Wei

    The X-ray light curve of Sw~J1644+57 indicates this event would be due to a tidal disruption. The lightcurve shows large amplitude fluctuation. As proposed by Lyubarskii (1997), the aperiodic variability observed in the Galactic X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei is likely from the fluctuation of the viscous parameter in their disks. We explain the significant fluctuation of the late X-ray lightcurve (t>106 seconds) of Sw J1644+57 with this model. We assume the stochastic variations in the viscous parameter featuring as α(R,t) = α0 [1+β(R,t)], where the time-scale for varying β(R,t) is set as ten times of the dynamic time-scale for disk at the radius R (Janiuk & Misra 2012). Based on the simulation results of Lodato et al. (2009), we describe the fallback behavior of the tidal disruption as Ṁ fb ~ {[(t - t b )/t fb ]κ n + [(t - t b )/t fb ]5n/3}-1/n for t > t b and Ṁ fb=0 for other situations, where κ=10.0, n=0.5, t fb=103τ, and t b =102τ in which τ=2π(R f 3/GM BH)1/2 and R f =5r g is the pericentre distance. Figure 1 compare the power-density spectra (PDS) derived from the observed and our simulated lightcurves. It is found the our simulations are well consistent with the observations.

  14. Unsupervised Clustering of Type II Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities come online, the astronomical community will be provided with extremely large data sets of well-sampled light curves (LCs) of transients. This motivates systematic studies of the LCs of supernovae (SNe) of all types, including the early rising phase. We performed unsupervised k-means clustering on a sample of 59 R-band SN II LCs and find that the rise to peak plays an important role in classifying LCs. Our sample can be divided into three classes: slowly rising (II-S), fast rise/slow decline (II-FS), and fast rise/fast decline (II-FF). We also identify three outliers based on the algorithm. The II-FF and II-FS classes are disjoint in their decline rates, while the II-S class is intermediate and “bridges the gap.” This may explain recent conflicting results regarding II-P/II-L populations. The II-FS class is also significantly less luminous than the other two classes. Performing clustering on the first two principal component analysis components gives equivalent results to using the full LC morphologies. This indicates that Type II LCs could possibly be reduced to two parameters. We present several important caveats to the technique, and find that the division into these classes is not fully robust. Moreover, these classes have some overlap, and are defined in the R band only. It is currently unclear if they represent distinct physical classes, and more data is needed to study these issues. However, we show that the outliers are actually composed of slowly evolving SN IIb, demonstrating the potential of such methods. The slowly evolving SNe IIb may arise from single massive progenitors.

  15. Constraining Type Ia supernovae progenitor parameters via light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Benjamin

    I study thermonuclear explosions of White Dwarf (WD) stars, or so-called Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Higher precision is needed to determine the nature of the dark energy and to accomplish this we turn to secondary parameters of LC variation. I have devised a general scheme and developed a code to analyze large sets of LC data for these secondary parameter variations which is based on a combination of theoretical model template fitting and Principal Component Analysis. Novel methods for finding statistical trends in sparsely-sampled and non-coincidental light curve data are explored and utilized. In practice, data sets for different supernovae are inhomogeneous in time, time coverage and accuracy, but I have developed a method to remap these inhomogeneous data sets of large numbers of individual objects to a homogeneous data set centered in time and magnitude space from which we can obtain the external, primary, and secondary LC parameters of individual objects. The set of external parameters of a given SN include the time of its maximum light in various bands, its distance modulus, the extinction along the light path, and redshift corrections (K-corrections) due to cosmic expansion. I investigate the intrinsic primary parameter variation of SNe Ia via template fitting, and then probe the secondary LC variations using monochromatic differential analysis in the UBV bands. We use photometry from 25 SNe Ia which were recently and precisely observed by the Carnegie Supernova Project to analyze the presence of theoretical model-based differential LC signatures of Main-Sequence mass variation of the progenitor stars when they formed, central density variation of the WD at the time of the explosion, and metallicity Z variation in the progenitors. The light curves in the V band are found to provide the highest accuracy in determining the distance modulus, K-corrections, extinction, main-sequence mass and central density

  16. Light curves of the latest FUor: Indication of a close binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackstein, M.; Haas, M.; Kóspál, Á.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Chini, R.; Ábrahám, P.; Moór, A.; Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, Ch.; Kaderhandt, L.; Fein, Ch.; Barr Domínguez, A.; Hodapp, K.-W.

    2015-10-01

    We monitored the recent FUor 2MASS J06593158-0405277 (V960 Mon) since November 2009 at various observatories and multiple wavelengths. After the outburst by nearly 2.9 mag in r around September 2014 the brightness gently fades until April 2015 by nearly 1 mag in U and 0.5 mag in z. Thereafter the brightness at λ> 5000 Å was constant until June 2015 while the shortest wavelengths (U,B) indicate a new rise, similar to that seen for the FUor V2493 Cyg (HBC722). Our near-infrared (NIR) monitoring between December 2014 and April 2015 shows a smaller outburst amplitude (~2 mag) and a smaller (0.2-0.3 mag) post-outburst brightness decline. Optical and NIR color-magnitude diagrams indicate that the brightness decline is caused by growing extinction. The post-outburst light curves are modulated by an oscillating color-neutral pattern with a period of about 17 days and an amplitude declining from ~0.08 mag in October 2014 to ~0.04 mag in May 2015. The properties of the oscillating pattern lead us to suggest the presence of a close binary with eccentric orbit. The light curve Table is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/L12

  17. Bioconvective patterns, synchrony, and survival. [in light-limited growth model of motile algae culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    With and without bioconvective pattern formation, a theoretical model predicts growth in light-limited cultures of motile algae. At the critical density for pattern formation, the resulting doubly exponential population curves show an inflection. Such growth corresponds quantitatively to experiments in mechanically unstirred cultures. This attaches survival value to synchronized pattern formation.

  18. Bioconvective patterns, synchrony, and survival. [in light-limited growth model of motile algae culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    With and without bioconvective pattern formation, a theoretical model predicts growth in light-limited cultures of motile algae. At the critical density for pattern formation, the resulting doubly exponential population curves show an inflection. Such growth corresponds quantitatively to experiments in mechanically unstirred cultures. This attaches survival value to synchronized pattern formation.

  19. THE BEHAVIOR OF NOVAE LIGHT CURVES BEFORE ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Collazzi, Andrew C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Xiao Limin; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kroll, Peter; Loechel, Klaus; Henden, Arne A.

    2009-12-15

    In 1975, E. R. Robinson conducted the hallmark study of the behavior of classical nova light curves before eruption, and this work has now become part of the standard knowledge of novae. He made three points: 5 out of 11 novae showed pre-eruption rises in the years before eruption, one nova (V446 Her) showed drastic changes in the variability across eruptions, and all but one of the novae (excepting BT Mon) have the same quiescent magnitudes before and after the outburst. This work has not been tested since it came out. We have now tested these results by going back to the original archival photographic plates and measuring large numbers of pre-eruption magnitudes for many novae using comparison stars on a modern magnitude scale. We find in particular that four out of five claimed pre-eruption rises are due to simple mistakes in the old literature, that V446 Her has the same amplitude of variations across its 1960 eruption, and that BT Mon has essentially unchanged brightness across its 1939 eruption. Out of 22 nova eruptions, we find two confirmed cases of significant pre-eruption rises (for V533 Her and V1500 Cyg), while T CrB has a deep pre-eruption dip. These events are a challenge to theorists. We find no significant cases of changes in variability across 27 nova eruptions beyond what is expected due to the usual fluctuations seen in novae away from eruptions. For 30 classical novae plus 19 eruptions from 6 recurrent novae, we find that the average change in magnitude from before the eruption to long after the eruption is 0.0 mag. However, we do find five novae (V723 Cas, V1500 Cyg, V1974 Cyg, V4633 Sgr, and RW UMi) that have significantly large changes, in that the post-eruption quiescent brightness level is over ten times brighter than the pre-eruption level. These large post-eruption brightenings are another challenge to theorists.

  20. The Behavior of Novae Light Curves Before Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collazzi, Andrew C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Xiao, Limin; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kroll, Peter; Löchel, Klaus; Henden, Arne A.

    2009-12-01

    In 1975, E. R. Robinson conducted the hallmark study of the behavior of classical nova light curves before eruption, and this work has now become part of the standard knowledge of novae. He made three points: 5 out of 11 novae showed pre-eruption rises in the years before eruption, one nova (V446 Her) showed drastic changes in the variability across eruptions, and all but one of the novae (excepting BT Mon) have the same quiescent magnitudes before and after the outburst. This work has not been tested since it came out. We have now tested these results by going back to the original archival photographic plates and measuring large numbers of pre-eruption magnitudes for many novae using comparison stars on a modern magnitude scale. We find in particular that four out of five claimed pre-eruption rises are due to simple mistakes in the old literature, that V446 Her has the same amplitude of variations across its 1960 eruption, and that BT Mon has essentially unchanged brightness across its 1939 eruption. Out of 22 nova eruptions, we find two confirmed cases of significant pre-eruption rises (for V533 Her and V1500 Cyg), while T CrB has a deep pre-eruption dip. These events are a challenge to theorists. We find no significant cases of changes in variability across 27 nova eruptions beyond what is expected due to the usual fluctuations seen in novae away from eruptions. For 30 classical novae plus 19 eruptions from 6 recurrent novae, we find that the average change in magnitude from before the eruption to long after the eruption is 0.0 mag. However, we do find five novae (V723 Cas, V1500 Cyg, V1974 Cyg, V4633 Sgr, and RW UMi) that have significantly large changes, in that the post-eruption quiescent brightness level is over ten times brighter than the pre-eruption level. These large post-eruption brightenings are another challenge to theorists.

  1. Light-Induced Surface Patterning of Silica.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hong Suk; Lee, Seungwoo; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Hongkyung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-10-27

    Manipulating the size and shape of silica precursor patterns using simple far-field light irradiation and transforming such reconfigured structures into inorganic silica patterns by pyrolytic conversion are demonstrated. The key concept of our work is the use of an azobenzene incorporated silica precursor (herein, we refer to this material as azo-silane composite) as ink in a micromolding process. The moving direction of azo-silane composite is parallel to light polarization direction; in addition, the amount of azo-silane composite movement can be precisely determined by controlling light irradiation time. By exploiting this peculiar phenomenon, azo-silane composite patterns produced using the micromolding technique are arbitrarily manipulated to obtain various structural features including high-resolution size or sophisticated shape. The photoreconfigured patterns formed with azo-silane composites are then converted into pure silica patterns through pyrolytic conversion. The pyrolytic converted silica patterns are uniformly formed over a large area, ensuring crack-free formation and providing high structural fidelity. Therefore, this optical manipulation technique, in conjunction with the pyrolytic conversion process, opens a promising route to the design of silica patterns with finely tuned structural features in terms of size and shape. This platform for designing silica structures has significant value in various nanotechnology fields including micro/nanofluidic channel for lab-on-a-chip devices, transparent superhydrophobic surfaces, and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Application of Geodetic VLBI Data to Obtaining Long-Term Light Curves for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kijima, Masachika

    2010-01-01

    The long-term light curve is important to research on binary black holes and disk instability in AGNs. The light curves have been drawn mainly using single dish data provided by the University of Michigan Radio Observatory and the Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Hence, thus far, we have to research on limited sources. I attempt to draw light curves using VLBI data for those sources that have not been monitored by any observatories with single dish. I developed software, analyzed all geodetic VLBI data available at the IVS Data Centers, and drew the light curves at 8 GHz. In this report, I show the tentative results for two AGNs. I compared two light curves of 4C39.25, which were drawn based on single dish data and on VLBI data. I confirmed that the two light curves were consistent. Furthermore, I succeeded in drawing the light curve of 0454-234 with VLBI data, which has not been monitored by any observatory with single dish. In this report, I suggest that the geodetic VLBI archive data is useful to obtain the long-term light curves at radio bands for astrophysics.

  3. Diffraction calculation of occultation light curves in the presence of an isothermal atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Gierasch, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    From diffraction theory, light curves are calculated for stellar occultations by a planetary body with an isothermal atmosphere. The character of the resulting curves is determined by the scale height H, the Fresnel zone size l, the surface atmospheric refractivity, and the planetary radius. An exact general solution and two approximations are presented which are valid when H is much greater than l. The importance is assessed of accounting for diffraction effects of the limb when deducing atmospheric parameters from occultation light curves

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of WASP-48b (Murgas+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgas, F.; Palle, E.; Parviainen, H.; Chen, G.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Iro, N.

    2017-08-01

    We present the white light curve and the curves produced using bins of 25nm in width, and bins of 10nm in width of one full transit event of WASP-48b taken on July 17, 2014. We provide auxiliary parameters of the observations that were used to detrend the original light curves. These parameters are: airmass, FWHM of the spectral profile in spatial direction, and telescope rotator angle. (3 data files).

  5. The DOHA algorithm: a new recipe for cotrending large-scale transiting exoplanet survey light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mislis, D.; Pyrzas, S.; Alsubai, K. A.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vilchez, N. P. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present DOHA, a new algorithm for cotrending photometric light curves obtained by transiting exoplanet surveys. The algorithm employs a novel approach to the traditional 'differential photometry' technique, by selecting the most suitable comparison star for each target light curve, using a two-step correlation search. Extensive tests on real data reveal that DOHA corrects both intra-night variations and long-term systematics affecting the data. Statistical studies conducted on a sample of ∼9500 light curves from the Qatar Exoplanet Survey reveal that DOHA-corrected light curves show an rms improvement of a factor of ∼2, compared to the raw light curves. In addition, we show that the transit detection probability in our sample can increase considerably, even up to a factor of 7, after applying DOHA.

  6. Understanding how Supernova Light Curves are Affected by the Density Profiles of Extended Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühleisen, Marc; Piro, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The light curve of a supernova can provide important clues about the structure of the exploding progenitor. When extended material is present, shock cooling of this material can lead to a prominent early peak distinct from the main radioactive nickel peak, as seen in some Type IIb supernovae. We explore whether the density profile of the extended material plays a role in shaping these light curves. We perform a series of numerical supernova simulations with a range of extended mass configurations. We find that steeper density profiles for the extended material shrink the width and decrease the luminosity of the early peak of the light curve. We conclude that light curves with a distinct, early peak do not imply a particular structure, but rather may arise from several distinct mass configurations. This places limits on how much can be inferred about the progenitor's structure from its light curve.

  7. CSI 2264: CHARACTERIZING YOUNG STARS IN NGC 2264 WITH STOCHASTICALLY VARYING LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean; Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Carpenter, John; Turner, Neal J.; Terebey, Susan; Morales-Calderón, Maria; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; McGinnis, Pauline; Sousa, Alana; Bouvier, Jerome; Venuti, Laura; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore; Song, Inseok; Gutermuth, Rob; and others

    2016-03-15

    We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves and other supporting data for 17 classical T Tauri stars in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves exemplify the “stochastic” light curve class as defined in 2014 by Cody et al. The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability within this light curve class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. Where we have appropriate spectral data, we show that the veiling variability in these stars is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical light curve morphology. The veiling variability is also well-correlated with the strength of the He i 6678 Å emission line, predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst light curve morphology also have variable mass accretion. The stochastic and accretion burst light curves can both be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic light curve class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Members of the stochastic light curve class have only moderate mass accretion rates. Their Hα profiles usually have blueshifted absorption features, probably originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the light curves suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.

  8. Light-curve solutions for S Cancri and TT Hydrae with rapid rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamme, W.; Wilson, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Physical model light- and velocity-curve solutions for S Cancri and TT Hydrae are obtained, and analyses with incorporation of asynchronous rotation are carried out. A photometric rotation rate for the primary star of TT Hya is determined, and excellent agreement with results from spectral line profiles is found. Both separate light- and velocity-curve solutions and simultaneous light-velocity solutions are listed. The photometric rotation for S Cnc from existing light curves is indeterminate, but is compatible with line profile measures. Evidence for third light from the light curves of S Cnc is found. An explanation for the apparent conflict between the rotational states and mass-transfer activities of the two binaries is suggested.

  9. Comparison of BRDF-Predicted and Observed Light Curves of GEO Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-18

    Inc. Phan Dao AFRL /RV Richard Rast AFRL /RD Although the amount of light received by sensors on the ground from Resident Space Objects...Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) with predicted light curves from the Ashikhmin-Premoze BRDF and two additional popular illumination models...ground station location, observation time and BRDF. The predicted light curves were then compared with AFRL telescope data. The selected BRDFS

  10. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  11. Supernova 2013by: a Type IIL supernova with a IIP-like light-curve drop★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D.; Stritzinger, M.; Howell, D. A.; Arcavi, I.; McCully, C.; Childress, M. J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Contreras, C.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M.; Gromadzki, M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Marion, G. H.

    2015-04-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have a sharp light-curve decline similar to that seen in SNe IIP. This light-curve feature has rarely been observed in other SNe IIL due to their relative rarity and the intrinsic faintness of this particular phase of the light curve. We suggest that the presence of this drop could be used as a physical parameter to distinguish between subclasses of SNe II, rather than their light-curve decline rate shortly after peak. Close inspection of the spectra of SN 2013by indicate asymmetric line profiles and signatures of high-velocity hydrogen. Late (˜90 d after explosion) near-infrared spectra of SN 2013by exhibit oxygen lines, indicating significant mixing within the ejecta. From the late-time light curve, we estimate that 0.029 M⊙ of 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion. It is also shown that the V-band light-curve slope is responsible for part of the scatter in the luminosity (V magnitude 50 d after explosion) versus 56Ni relation. Our observations of SN 2013by and other SNe IIL through the onset of the nebular phase indicate that their progenitors are similar to those of SNe IIP.

  12. NEPTUNE'S DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE FROM KEPLER K2 OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BROWN DWARF LIGHT CURVE ANALYSES.

    PubMed

    Simon, Amy A; Rowe, Jason F; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B; Casewell, Sarah L; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gizis, John E; Lissauer, Jack J; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S; Wong, Michael H; Marley, Mark S

    2016-02-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune's zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune's clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features.

  13. 'Self-absorbed' GeV light curves of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Woźniak, P.

    2014-06-10

    We investigate the effect that the absorption of high-energy (above 100 MeV) photons produced in gamma-ray burst afterglow shocks has on the light curves and spectra of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) afterglows. Afterglows produced by the interaction of a relativistic outflow with a wind-like medium peak when the blast wave deceleration sets in, and the afterglow spectrum could be hardening before that peak, as the optical thickness to pair formation is decreasing. In contrast, in afterglows produced in the interaction with a homogeneous medium, the optical thickness to pair formation should increase and yield a light curve peak when it reaches unity, followed by a fast light curve decay, accompanied by spectral softening. If energy is injected in the blast wave, then the accelerated increase of the optical thickness yields a convex afterglow light curve. Other features, such as a double-peak light curve or a broad hump, can arise from the evolution of the optical thickness to photon-photon absorption. Fast decays and convex light curves are seen in a few LAT afterglows, but the expected spectral softening is rarely seen in (and difficult to measure with) LAT observations. Furthermore, for the effects of photon-photon attenuation to shape the high-energy afterglow light curve without attenuating it too much, the ejecta initial Lorentz factor must be in a relatively narrow range (50-200), which reduces the chance of observing those effects.

  14. Long-term Light Curve of Highly Variable Protostellar Star GM Cep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Limin; Kroll, Peter; Henden, Arne A.

    2010-04-01

    We present data from the archival plates at Harvard College Observatory and Sonneberg Observatory showing the field of the solar-type pre-main-sequence star GM Cep. A total of 186 magnitudes of GM Cep have been measured on these archival plates, with 176 in blue sensitivity, six in visible, and four in red. We combine our data with data from the literature and from the American Association of Variable Star Observers to depict the long-term light curves of GM Cep in both B and V wavelengths. The light curves span from 1895 until now, with two densely sampled regions (1935-1945 in the B band, and 2006 until now in the V band). The long-term light curves do not show any fast rise behavior as predicted by an accretion mechanism. Both the light curves and the magnitude histograms confirm the conclusion that the light curves are dominated by dips (possibly from extinction) superposed on some quiescence state, instead of outbursts caused by accretion flares. Our result excludes the possibility of GM Cep being a FUor, EXor, or McNeil's Nebula-type star. Several special cases of T Tauri stars were checked, but none of these light curves were compatible with that of GM Cep. The lack of periodicity in the light curve excludes the possibility of GM Cep being a KH 15D system.

  15. Type Ia Supernova Light-Curve Inference: Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis in the Near-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2009-10-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of the properties of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves in the near-infrared using recent data from Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope and the literature. We construct a hierarchical Bayesian framework, incorporating several uncertainties including photometric error, peculiar velocities, dust extinction, and intrinsic variations, for principled and coherent statistical inference. SN Ia light-curve inferences are drawn from the global posterior probability of parameters describing both individual supernovae and the population conditioned on the entire SN Ia NIR data set. The logical structure of the hierarchical model is represented by a directed acyclic graph. Fully Bayesian analysis of the model and data is enabled by an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm exploiting the conditional probabilistic structure using Gibbs sampling. We apply this framework to the JHKs SN Ia light-curve data. A new light-curve model captures the observed J-band light-curve shape variations. The marginal intrinsic variances in peak absolute magnitudes are σ(MJ ) = 0.17 ± 0.03, σ(MH ) = 0.11 ± 0.03, and σ(MKs ) = 0.19 ± 0.04. We describe the first quantitative evidence for correlations between the NIR absolute magnitudes and J-band light-curve shapes, and demonstrate their utility for distance estimation. The average residual in the Hubble diagram for the training set SNe at cz > 2000kms-1 is 0.10 mag. The new application of bootstrap cross-validation to SN Ia light-curve inference tests the sensitivity of the statistical model fit to the finite sample and estimates the prediction error at 0.15 mag. These results demonstrate that SN Ia NIR light curves are as effective as corrected optical light curves, and, because they are less vulnerable to dust absorption, they have great potential as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  16. Comparison of 1998 and 1999 Leonid Light Curve Morphology and Meteoroid Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Ian S.; Beech, Martin; Taylor, Michael J.; Jenniskens, Peter; Hawkes, Robert L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Photometric low-light level video observations of 1999 Leonid storm meteors have been obtained from airborne platforms during the Leonid multi-instrument aircraft campaign (Leonid MAC). The 1999 Leonid light curves tend to be skewed towards the end point of the trajectory, while the 1998 Leonid light curves were not. The variation in the light curves from 1998 and 1999 can be explained as an overall reduction in the mass distribution index, alpha from approximately 1.95 in 1998 to approximately 1.75 in 1999. We have interpreted this behavior as being either indicative of a gradual loss of the "glue" that keeps the grains together, or the fact that the meteoroids sampled in 1998 had a different morphological structure to those sampled in 1999. The early fragmentation of a dustball meteoroid results in a light curve that peaks sooner than that predicted by classical single body ablation theory.

  17. On the mean profiles of radio pulsars - II. Reconstruction of complex pulsar light curves and other new propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, H. L.; Beskin, V. S.; Philippov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    Our previous paper outlined the general aspects of the theory of radio light curve and polarization formation for pulsars. We predicted the one-to-one correspondence between the tilt of the linear polarization position angle of the the circular polarization. However, some of the radio pulsars indicate a clear deviation from that correlation. In this paper, we apply the theory of the radio wave propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere for the analysis of individual effects leading to these deviations. We show that within our theory the circular polarization of a given mode can switch its sign, without the need to introduce a new radiation mode or other effects. Moreover, we show that the generation of different emission modes on different altitudes can explain pulsars, that presumably have the X-O-X light-curve pattern, different from what we predict. General properties of radio emission within our propagation theory are also discussed. In particular, we calculate the intensity patterns for different radiation altitudes and present light curves for different observer viewing angles. In this context we also study the light curves and polarization profiles for pulsars with interpulses. Further, we explain the characteristic width of the position angle curves by introducing the concept of a wide emitting region. Another important feature of radio polarization profiles is the shift of the position angle from the centre, which in some cases demonstrates a weak dependence on the observation frequency. Here we demonstrate that propagation effects do not necessarily imply a significant frequency-dependent change of the position angle curve.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pleiades members with K2 light curves. III. (Stauffer+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, J.; Rebull, L.; Bouvier, J.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Pinsonneault, M.; Aigrain, S.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.; Ciardi, D.; Cody, A. M.; David, T.; Micela, G.; Soderblom, D.; Somers, G.; Stassun, K. G.; Valenti, J.; Vrba, F. J.

    2017-01-01

    Light curves for of order 1000 candidate Pleiades members were obtained during the K2 Field 4 campaign. This represents more than half of the known or suspected members of the cluster; most of the members lacking K2 light curves simply fell outside the K2 field of view, and therefore we believe that the sample of cluster members with light curves should be relatively unbiased. The observations and methods are discussed in detail in Paper I (Rebull et al., Cat. J/AJ/152/113). (1 data file).

  19. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  20. Construction of the light curves for solar flares in the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, A. V.; Konyaev, P. A.; Zhdanov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The results of an investigation of some factors affecting the construction of the light curves for solar flares in the Hα line are presented. It is determined that the type of the light curve depends on the method of measuring the intensity, the size of the measurement window, and the brightness fluctuations of the quiet chromosphere areas (the reference areas). The light curves constructed on the basis of the flare's peak intensity show a real picture of the flare development process. A method for the selection of the "reference areas" is suggested.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVRI light curves and RV curves of 65 UMa (Zasche+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Uhlar, R.; Slechta, M.; Wolf, M.; Harmanec, P.; Nemravova, J. A.; Korcakova, D.

    2012-04-01

    We perform a combined analysis of the light and radial velocity curves, as well as the period variation by studying the times of the minima and the interferometric orbit. A disentangling technique is used to perform the spectra decomposition. This combined approach allows us to study the long-term period changes in the system for the first time, identifying the period variation due to the motion on the visual orbit, in addition to some short-term modulation. (4 data files).

  2. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  3. The effects of chronotype, sleep schedule and light/dark pattern exposures on circadian phase.

    PubMed

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara; Rea, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Chronotype characterizes individual differences in sleep/wake rhythm timing, which can also impact light exposure patterns. The present study investigated whether early and late chronotypes respond differently to controlled advancing and delaying light exposure patterns while on a fixed, advanced sleep/wake schedule. In a mixed design, 23 participants (11 late chronotypes and 12 early chronotypes) completed a 2-week, advanced sleep/wake protocol twice, once with an advancing light exposure pattern and once with a delaying light exposure pattern. In the advancing light exposure pattern, the participants received short-wavelength light in the morning and short-wavelength-restricting orange-tinted glasses in the evening. In the delaying light exposure pattern, participants received short-wavelength-restricting orange-tinted glasses in the morning and short-wavelength light in the evening. Light/dark exposures were measured with the Daysimeter. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was also measured. Compared to the baseline week, DLMO was significantly delayed after the delaying light intervention and significantly advanced after the advancing light intervention in both groups. There was no significant difference in how the two chronotype groups responded to the light intervention. The present results demonstrate that circadian phase changes resulting from light interventions are consistent with those predicted by previously published phase response curves (PRCs) for both early and late chronotypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Light curves for bump Cepheids computed with a dynamically zoned pulsation code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T. F.; Castor, J. I.; Davis, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamically zoned pulsation code developed by Castor, Davis, and Davison was used to recalculate the Goddard model and to calculate three other Cepheid models with the same period (9.8 days). This family of models shows how the bumps and other features of the light and velocity curves change as the mass is varied at constant period. The use of a code that is capable of producing reliable light curves demonstrates that the light and velocity curves for 9.8 day Cepheid models with standard homogeneous compositions do not show bumps like those that are observed unless the mass is significantly lower than the 'evolutionary mass.' The light and velocity curves for the Goddard model presented here are similar to those computed independently by Fischel, Sparks, and Karp. They should be useful as standards for future investigators.

  5. II ZW 229.015: The most complete optical light curve of any AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Joshua; Carini, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    II ZW 229.015 is the brightest AGN in the Kepler field of view. It has been extensively monitored with both the Kepler spacecraft and ground based observatories since the beginning of the Kepler mission. The Kepler light curve is unmatched by any optical light curve ever obtained for an AGN. In this poster we present the Kepler and ground based light curve spanning the entire Kepler mission. Using the Kepler light curve, we have performed a time series analysis using the PSRESP methodology and determined a characteristic variability time scale and mass of the central supermassive black hole in II ZW 229.015. We compare this result to the previous mass estimates from variability and reverberation mapping studies of II ZW 229.015.

  6. Light curves for bump Cepheids computed with a dynamically zoned pulsation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T. F.; Castor, J. I.; Davis, C. G.

    1980-05-01

    The dynamically zoned pulsation code developed by Castor, Davis, and Davison was used to recalculate the Goddard model and to calculate three other Cepheid models with the same period (9.8 days). This family of models shows how the bumps and other features of the light and velocity curves change as the mass is varied at constant period. The use of a code that is capable of producing reliable light curves demonstrates that the light and velocity curves for 9.8 day Cepheid models with standard homogeneous compositions do not show bumps like those that are observed unless the mass is significantly lower than the 'evolutionary mass.' The light and velocity curves for the Goddard model presented here are similar to those computed independently by Fischel, Sparks, and Karp. They should be useful as standards for future investigators.

  7. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  8. Eclipsing binary stars with extreme light curve asymmetries mined from large astronomical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Athanasios; Kleftogiannis, Georgios; Christopoulou, Panagiota-Eleftheria

    2017-09-01

    The O'Connell effect is one of the most perplexing challenges in binary studies as it has not been convincingly explained. Furthermore, a simple method to obtain essential parameters for eclipsing binaries exhibiting this effect and to extract information describing the asymmetry in the light curve maxima is needed. We have developed an automated program that characterizes the morphology of light curves by depth of both minima, height of both maxima and curvature outside the eclipses.

  9. Optical design and optimization of planar curved LED end-lit light bar.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jyh-Cheng; Chen, Zhi-Yao; Kao, Bang-De

    2014-10-10

    This study investigates the optical design of planar curved LED end-lit light bars using v cuts as light-diverting structures. The application of LEDs in automotive lighting has become popular, especially in signal lamps and daytime running lamps. Most designs adopt a direct back light using arrays of LEDs with diffusive coupling optics, which often causes problems such as low uniformity, glaring, and excessive LEDs. Edge-lit LED light guides in automotive applications share a similar principle with the light-guide plates in back-light models of LCD but with much more complicated geometry. However, related literature on the optical design of nonrectangular light-guide plates is very limited. This study addresses the design of planar curved LED end-lit light bars and the optimization scheme for illuminance uniformity. V cuts are used as the optical coupling features, and the lead angles of the v cuts are varied to achieve optimum axial luminous intensity. This study presents a solution to reduce the illuminance difference between the inner and the outer portions of curved light bars by introducing gradual taper v cuts across the curved section. A line graph with preselected anchor points is proposed to define the size distribution of evenly spaced v cuts along the light bar. A fuzzy optimization scheme is then applied to iterate the anchor size to achieve illuminance uniformity. The designs of a planar curve light bar with a rectangular cross section and a light-guide ring with a circular cross section are presented to illustrate the design scheme.

  10. GERLUMPH Data Release 2: 2.5 Billion Simulated Microlensing Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Bate, N. F.; Croton, D.; Vohl, D.

    2015-04-01

    In the upcoming synoptic all-sky survey era of astronomy, thousands of new multiply imaged quasars are expected to be discovered and monitored regularly. Light curves from the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are further affected by superimposed variability due to microlensing. In order to disentangle the microlensing from the intrinsic variability of the light curves, the time delays between the multiple images have to be accurately measured. The resulting microlensing light curves can then be analyzed to reveal information about the background source, such as the size of the quasar accretion disk. In this paper we present the most extensive and coherent collection of simulated microlensing light curves; we have generated \\gt 2.5 billion light curves using the GERLUMPH high resolution microlensing magnification maps. Our simulations can be used to train algorithms to measure lensed quasar time delays, plan future monitoring campaigns, and study light curve properties throughout parameter space. Our data are openly available to the community and are complemented by online eResearch tools, located at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au.

  11. Accretion disc time lag distributions: applying CREAM to simulated AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, D. A.; Horne, Keith; Villforth, C.

    2016-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary in their brightness across all wavelengths. Moreover, longer wavelength ultraviolet-optical continuum light curves appear to be delayed with respect to shorter wavelength light curves. A simple way to model these delays is by assuming thermal reprocessing of a variable point source (a lamp post) by a blackbody accretion disc. We introduce a new method, CREAM (Continuum REprocessed AGN Markov Chain Monte Carlo), that models continuum variations using this lamp post model. The disc light curves lag the lamp post emission with a time delay distribution sensitive to the disc temperature-radius profile and inclination. We test CREAM's ability to recover both inclination and product of black hole mass and accretion rate {Mdot{M}}, and show that the code is also able to infer the shape of the driving light curve. CREAM is applied to synthetic light curves expected from 1000 s exposures of a 17th magnitude AGN with a 2-m telescope in Sloan g and i bands with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of 500-900 depending on the filter and lunar phase. We also test CREAM on poorer quality g and i light curves with SNR = 100. We find in the high-SNR case that CREAM can recover the accretion disc inclination to within an uncertainty of 5° and an {Mdot{M}} to within 0.04 dex.

  12. Light curves, Spherical and Bond albedos of Jupiter, Saturn, and exoplanets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, U.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate how the light curve and stellar light reflection of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering, which was observed on Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical scattering phase function to Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.64 μm and Saturn at 0.64 and 0.44 μm and to Cassini spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.938 μm atmospheric window, 0.889 μm CH4 absorption band, and 0.258 μm UV filter. Using scattering ray-tracing model of a planet by Dyudina et al. (2005)*, the images of the planets with different scattering properties are simulated to calculate the reflected luminosity as it varies with scattering phase to produce full-orbit light curves. We compare the light curve shapes and total reflection integrated in all directions (spherical albedos) for Jupiter and Saturn with the ones for planets with Lambertian and semi-infinite Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. Saturn-like and especially Jupiter-like atmosphere produces light curves that are several times fainter at half-phase than does a Lambertian planet, given the same brightness at transit. The spherical albedo (and hence the wavelengh-integrated Bond albedo) is lower than for a Lambertian planet. Corresponding absorption of the stellar light and planet's heating rate would be higher than estimated for Lambertian planets, especially for bright planets. In extreme case of Jupiter-like scattering at 0.64 μm Lambertian assumption can overestimate spherical albedo by a factor of ˜1.5. We will discuss how the light curves and absorption for planets covered by atmospheres would differ from the light curves of rocky planet without atmosphere. * Dyudina, U. A., et al., Phase Light Curves for Extrasolar Jupiters and Saturns. ApJ, 618, 973-986, 2005

  13. Vertical scanning white-light interference microscopy on curved microstructures.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Although white-light interferometers have become well-established tools for measuring smooth, rough, and microstructured surfaces, there are some limitations in certain applications, e.g., if tilted surface areas or small radii of curvature are to be measured. Since the correction of chromatic aberrations is not perfect over the total field of view or the total pupil plane, dispersion differences occur for different ray paths of the microscopic imaging system. The influence of these effects is discussed on the basis of the most commonly used Mirau interferometer, and the resulting systematic measuring errors are explained.

  14. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  15. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Luke; Verbiscer, Anne; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-05-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet’s phase. These observations cover broadbands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrowbands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 150-21 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.

  16. Analysis of late-time light curves of Type IIb, Ib and Ic supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Johnson, V.; Clocchiatti, A.

    2015-06-01

    The shape of the light-curve peak of radioactive-powered core-collapse `stripped-envelope' supernovae constrains the ejecta mass, nickel mass and kinetic energy by the brightness and diffusion time for a given opacity and observed expansion velocity. Late-time light curves give constraints on the ejecta mass and energy, given the gamma-ray opacity. Previous work has shown that the principal light-curve peaks for SN IIb with small amounts of hydrogen and for hydrogen/helium-deficient SN Ib/c are often rather similar near maximum light, suggesting similar ejecta masses and kinetic energies, but that late-time light curves show a wide dispersion, suggesting a dispersion in ejecta masses and kinetic energies. It was also shown that SN IIb and SN Ib/c can have very similar late-time light curves, but different ejecta velocities demanding significantly different ejecta masses and kinetic energies. We revisit these topics by collecting and analysing well-sampled single-band and quasi-bolometric light curves from the literature. We find that the late-time light curves of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae are heterogeneous. We also show that the observed properties, the photospheric velocity at peak, the rise time and the late decay time, can be used to determine the mean opacity appropriate to the peak. The opacity determined in this way is considerably smaller than common estimates. We discuss how the small effective opacity may result from recombination and asymmetries in the ejecta.

  17. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet's phase. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrow bands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. This work is published: Dyudina, U.,et al., 2016: ApJ, 822, 76, http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.04415.

  18. CSI 2264: Characterizing Young Stars in NGC 2264 with Stochastically Varying Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Rebull, Luisa; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Turner, Neal J.; Carpenter, John; Carey, Sean; Terebey, Susan; Morales-Calderón, María; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; McGinnis, Pauline; Sousa, Alana; Bouvier, Jerome; Venuti, Laura; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore; Song, Inseok; Gutermuth, Rob; Barrado, David; Vrba, Frederick J.; Covey, Kevin; Herbst, William; Gillen, Edward; Medeiros Guimarães, Marcelo; Bouy, Herve; Favata, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves and other supporting data for 17 classical T Tauri stars in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves exemplify the “stochastic” light curve class as defined in 2014 by Cody et al. The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability within this light curve class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. Where we have appropriate spectral data, we show that the veiling variability in these stars is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical light curve morphology. The veiling variability is also well-correlated with the strength of the He i 6678 Å emission line, predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst light curve morphology also have variable mass accretion. The stochastic and accretion burst light curves can both be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic light curve class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Members of the stochastic light curve class have only moderate mass accretion rates. Their Hα profiles usually have blueshifted absorption features, probably originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the light curves suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion. Based on data from the Spitzer and CoRoT missions, as well as the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) MegaCam CCD, and the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal Chile, under program 088.C-0239. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with particpiation of ESA’s RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain

  19. Water Maser Emission and the Visual Light Curve of R Draconis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmer, Samantha J.; Benson, Priscilla J.; Little-Marenin, Irene R.

    1991-10-01

    The water maser emmision of R Draconis was observed at 22 GHz at the Haystack Observatory approximately once each month from November 1988 to July 1990. There is a correlation between the variations of the maser emission and the AAVSO light curve; the peak of the maser activity follows the light activity by about 0.2 period.

  20. Are the variability properties of the Kepler AGN light curves consistent with a damped random walk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-08-01

    We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the damped random walk (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multiquarter Kepler AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. Kepler observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid (11.6-28.6 min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of 1 part in 105 over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into five broad categories. We measure the first-order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law power spectral density (PSD) characterized by a short-time-scale power-law index γ and turnover time-scale τ. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and observe variability on short time-scales (˜2 h). The turnover time-scale τ ranges from ˜10-135 d. Interesting structure function features include pronounced dips on rest-frame time-scales ranging from 10-100 d and varying slopes on different time-scales. The range of observed short-time-scale PSD slopes and the presence of dip and varying slope features suggests that the DRW model may not be appropriate for all AGN. We conclude that AGN variability is a complex phenomenon that requires a more sophisticated statistical treatment.

  1. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  2. Periodicity in some light curves of the solar analogue V352 Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajatkari, P.; Jetsu, L.; Cole, E.; Hackman, T.; Henry, G. W.; Joutsiniemi, S.-L.; Lehtinen, J.; Mäkelä, V.; Porceddu, S.; Ryynänen, K.; Solea, V.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We applied the Continuous Period Search (CPS) method to 14 yr of V-band photometry of the active G6.5 solar analog V352 CMa. Our aim was to show that CPS can successfully model the presence or absence of periodicity in low-amplitude light curves. Methods: CPS computes values for the mean brightness, photometric period, amplitude and minimum of selected datasets. We also applied the Power Spectrum Method (PSM) to these datasets and compared the performance of this frequently applied method to that of CPS. Results: We found an apparent 11.7 ± 0.5 yr cycle in the mean brightness. The mean of the individual photometric rotation periods is 7.24 ± 0.22 days. The lower limit for the differential rotation coefficient is |k| > 0.12, assuming that period changes in V352 CMa follow the solar pattern. The Kuiper method detected stable, active longitudes rotating with a period of 7.157 ± 0.002 days, from the epochs of light minimum, but these structures vanished after the year 2009. CPS performed better than the traditional PSM, because the latter assumes a sinusoidal model for the data even when this was not correct. The analysed photometry and numerical results of the analysis are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A84

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves as Probes of Magnetospheric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The large number of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the gamma-ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modeling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  4. THE DISCOVERY OF ELLIPSOIDAL VARIATIONS IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF HAT-P-7

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Jenkins, Jon; Rowe, Jason F.; Koch, David; Borucki, William J.

    2010-04-20

    We present an analysis of the early Kepler observations of the previously discovered transiting planet HAT-P-7b. The light curve shows the transit of the star, the occultation of the planet, and the orbit phase-dependent light from the planet. In addition, phase-dependent light from the star is present, known as 'ellipsoidal variations'. The very nearby planet (only four stellar radii away) gravitationally distorts the star and results in a flux modulation twice per orbit. The ellipsoidal variations can confuse interpretation of the planetary phase curve if not self-consistently included in the modeling. We fit the light curve using the Roche potential approximation and derive improved planet and orbit parameters.

  5. Disk-integrated reflection light curves of planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Munoz, A.

    2014-03-01

    The light scattered by a planet atmosphere contains valuable information on the planet's composition and aerosol content. Typically, the interpretation of that information requires elaborate radiative transport models accounting for the absorption and scattering processes undergone by the star photons on their passage through the atmosphere. I have been working on a particular family of algorithms based on Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) integration for solving the multiple-scattering problem in atmospheric media. BMC algorithms simulate statistically the photon trajectories in the reverse order that they actually occur, i.e. they trace the photons from the detector through the atmospheric medium and onwards to the illumination source following probability laws dictated by the medium's optical properties. BMC algorithms are versatile, as they can handle diverse viewing and illumination geometries, and can readily accommodate various physical phenomena. As will be shown, BMC algorithms are very well suited for the prediction of magnitudes integrated over a planet's disk (whether uniform or not). Disk-integrated magnitudes are relevant in the current context of exploration of extrasolar planets because spatial resolution of these objects will not be technologically feasible in the near future. I have been working on various predictions for the disk-integrated properties of planets that demonstrate the capacities of the BMC algorithm. These cases include the variability of the Earth's integrated signal caused by diurnal and seasonal changes in the surface reflectance and cloudiness, or by sporadic injection of large amounts of volcanic particles into the atmosphere. Since the implemented BMC algorithm includes a polarization mode, these examples also serve to illustrate the potential of polarimetry in the characterization of both Solar System and extrasolar planets. The work is complemented with the analysis of disk-integrated photometric observations of Earth and Venus

  6. Discovery of four periodic methanol masers and updated light curve for a further one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Wolak, P.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2015-04-01

    We report the discovery of 6.7 GHz methanol maser periodic flares in four massive star-forming regions and the updated light curve for the known periodic source G22.357+0.066. The observations were carried out with the Torun 32-m radio telescope between 2009 June and 2014 April. Flux density variations with period of 120 to 245 d were detected for some or all spectral features. A variability pattern with a fast rise and relatively slow fall on time-scale of 30-60 d dominated. A reverse pattern was observed for some features of G22.357+0.066, while sinusoidal-like variations were detected in G25.411+0.105. A weak burst lasting ˜520 d with the velocity drift of 0.24 km s-1 yr-1 occurred in G22.357+0.066. For three sources for which high-resolution maps are available, we found that the features with periodic behaviour are separated by more than 500 au from those without any periodicity. This suggests that the maser flares are not triggered by large-scale homogeneous variations in either the background seed photon flux or the luminosity of the exciting source and a mechanism which is able to produce local changes in the pumping conditions is required.

  7. Atlas of Light Curves and Photometric Monitoring of The Non-Resolved Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, N.; Shakun, L.; Korobeinikova, E.; Strakhova, S.; Melikiants, S.; Dragomiretsky, V.; Ryabov, A.

    2013-09-01

    Photometric monitoring is a tool for remote diagnostics of the satellite rotation around its center of mass. This information is important in many cases. For example, in case of abnormal mode of the satellite functioning. And also to take into account the orientation of non-spherical body (eg, space debris) in the numerical integration of its motion when it is expected to close approach with the another spacecraft. This paper presents the results of long-term (since 1980) photometric monitoring of both operational satellites, and large bodies of space debris in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The light curves of the non-resolved cosmic objects (CO), which are recorded prior to 2004, were obtained using electrophotometer (PMT with multialkaline cathode) in the visible wavelength range without using a filter. The light curves, which are recorded after 2004, were obtained using a TV CCD-camera also without the use of filters. For tracking low-orbit satellites was used telescope KT-50 on alt-azimuth mounting, which allows one to tracking the objects moving at a high angular velocity. The diameter of main mirror is 0.5 m, focal length is 3 m. For any ?O is given his international (COSPAR) number and NORAD catalog number, and provides information about its form and initial orbital elements. The brightness of satellite presented in magnitudes. He reduced with considering the atmosphere's light extinction and is related to a distance of 1000 km. For each passage and light curve is pointed the date and UTC. The light curves of stabilized CO have only small light variations and they show the dependence from the phase angle. Rotating CO have periodic light curves. The type (kind) and the periods of the light curves change with the time.

  8. Timescale stretch parameterization of Type Ia supernova B-band light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goobar, A.; Hook, I.; Irwin, M.; Kim, M.; Knop, R.A.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.; York, T.

    2001-04-01

    R-band intensity measurements along the light curve of Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Cosmology Project (SCP) are fitted in brightness to templates allowing a free parameter the time-axis width factor w identically equal to s times (1+z). The data points are then individually aligned in the time-axis, normalized and K-corrected back to the rest frame, after which the nearly 1300 normalized intensity measurements are found to lie on a well-determined common rest-frame B-band curve which we call the ''composite curve.'' The same procedure is applied to 18 low-redshift Calan/Tololo SNe with Z < 0.11; these nearly 300 B-band photometry points are found to lie on the composite curve equally well. The SCP search technique produces several measurements before maximum light for each supernova. We demonstrate that the linear stretch factor, s, which parameterizes the light-curve timescale appears independent of z, and applies equally well to the declining and rising parts of the light curve. In fact, the B band template that best fits this composite curve fits the individual supernova photometry data when stretched by a factor s with chi 2/DoF {approx} 1, thus as well as any parameterization can, given the current data sets. The measurement of the data of explosion, however, is model dependent and not tightly constrained by the current data. We also demonstrate the 1 + z light-cure time-axis broadening expected from cosmological expansion. This argues strongly against alternative explanations, such as tired light, for the redshift of distant objects.

  9. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, Gal; Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu

    2012-05-15

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  10. Light Curve Solutions of Eclipsing Binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Rao, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present model light curves for nine eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These systems are detached binaries with nearly circular orbits, and were pseudorandomly selected from three of 21 LMC regions in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) survey. We make use of light curves, orbital periods, and binary classification as reported in Wyrzykowski et al. (2003). We present light curve solutions created with the software PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs (PHOEBE, Prsa & Zwitter 2005). Each solution has the best-fit mass ratio q, system inclination i, component temperatures T1 and T2, and modified Kopal potentials Ω1 and Ω2. PHOEBE employs a Nelder & Mead's Simplex fitting method that adjusts all the input parameters to find the best fit to the light curve. Many of the light curves have significant scatter, which can lead to multiple degenerate best-fit solutions, and we discuss what can be done in the future to refine our results, derive global stellar parameters, and place these nine systems in a larger context. We acknowledge the support of the International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program, which is sponsored by the NSF and administered by NSO/GONG.

  11. A FOURIER OPTICS METHOD FOR CALCULATING STELLAR OCCULTATION LIGHT CURVES BY OBJECTS WITH THIN ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-15

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  12. Comparison of BRDF-Predicted and Observed Light Curves of GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, A.; Dao, P.; Gaylor, D.; Rast, R.; Anderson, J.; Pinon, E., III

    Although the amount of light received by sensors on the ground from Resident Space Objects (RSOs) in geostationary orbit (GEO) is small, information can still be extracted in the form of light curves (temporal brightness or apparent magnitude). Previous research has shown promising results in determining RSO characteristics such as shape, size, reflectivity, and attitude by processing simulated light curve data with various estimation algorithms. These simulated light curves have been produced using one of several existing analytic Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. These BRDF models have generally come from researchers in computer graphics and machine vision and have not been shown to be realistic for telescope observations of RSOs in GEO. While BRDFs have been used for SSA analysis and characterization, there is a lack of research on the validation of BRDFs with regards to real data. In this paper, we compared telescope data provided by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) with predicted light curves from the Ashikhmin-Premoze BRDF and two additional popular illumination models, Ashikhmin-Shirley and Cook-Torrance. We computed predicted light curves based on two line mean elements (TLEs), shape model, attitude profile, observing ground station location, observation time and BRDF. The predicted light curves were then compared with AFRL telescope data. The selected BRDFS provided accurate apparent magnitude trends and behavior, but uncertainties due to lack of attitude information and deficiencies in our satellite model prevented us from obtaining a better match to the real data. The current findings present a foundation for ample future research.

  13. Signatures of strong gravity in the light curves of tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriol, Júlia Alsina; Bogdanovic, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    A star whose orbit takes it on a sufficiently close approach to a massive black hole (MBH) will be shredded by the black hole’s tides. Accretion of stellar debris on the MBH gives rise to a characteristic light curve which has been used as a smoking gun in observational searches for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in the past 20 years. Disruptive encounters that occur very close to the MBHs are subject to relativistic effects, leading to an intriguing possibility that information about the space-time of an MBH can be encoded in the light curve of a TDE. We explore the effect on the fallback rate of the general relativistic precession of the debris deep in the potential well of a Schwarzschild MBH. We investigate the distribution of orbital energy and angular momentum of the debris in such scenarios and use it to assess the magnitude of relativistic effects that may be imprinted in the light curves of TDEs.

  14. The H-alpha light curves of novae in M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Shafter, Allen W.; Ford, Holland C.; Neill, James D.; Shara, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    H-alpha and B light curves are presented for 11 M31 novae, four of which were well observed near maximum. These data, along with the H-alpha light curves of two Galactic novae, demonstrate that a nova's maximum H-alpha flux occurs days or weeks after its continuum maximum at a monochromatic intensity 1-2 magnitudes above its peak flux in B. Moreover, after this maximum is achieved, a typical nova will radiate a third as many photons in H-alpha as in the entire B bandpass. The most interesting part of a nova's H-alpha light curve, however, is its decline. It is found that, regardless of a nova's speed, its H-alpha decay rate after maximum is almost identical to its decay rate in B. This behavior suggests that most of a nova's optical luminosity during early decline is continuum emission from the nebula, rather than direct radiation from the central source.

  15. An efficient method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources. This method has the general advantage that all microimages contributing to the light curve are found. While a source moves along a straight line, all micro images are located either on the primary image track or on the secondary image tracks (loops). The primary image track extends from - infinity to + infinity and is made of many sequents which are continuously connected. All the secondary image tracks (loops) begin and end on the lensing point masses. The method can be applied to any microlensing situation with point masses in the deflector plane, even for the overcritical case and surface densities close to the critical. Furthermore, we present general rules to evaluate the light curve for a straight track arbitrary placed in the caustic network of a sample of many point masses.

  16. A Composite Light Curve Model of the Symbiotic Nova PU Vul (1979)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hachisu, I.

    PU Vul (1979) is a symbiotic nova that shows a long-lasting flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. We made a quasi-evolution model for outbursts on a 0.6 M⊙ white dwarf consisting of a series of static solutions with optically-thin winds. Our theoretical models reproduce well the observed visual/UV light curves as well as the new estimates of the temperature and radius of the hot component. We also modeled the light curve of the 1980 and 1994 eclipses as the total eclipse occulted by a pulsating M-giant companion star. In the second eclipse, the visual magnitude is dominated by nebular emission which is possibly ejected from the hot component between 1990 to 2000. We have quantitatively estimated three components of emission, i.e., the white dwarf, companion and nebular, and made a composite light curve that represents well the evolution of the PU Vul outburst.

  17. The Kepler Light Curve of V344 LYR: Constraining the Thermal-Viscous Limit Cycle Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Still, M. D.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present time dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 90 d light curve of the short period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long term light curves. The data encompass a super outburst, preceded by three normal (i.e., short) outbursts and followed by two normal outbursts. The main decay of the super outburst is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate approx.12 d/mag, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. We show that the standard limit cycle model can account for the light curve, without the need for either the thermal-tidal instability or enhanced mass transfer.

  18. An Internet Database of Ultraviolet Continuum Light Curves for Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jay P.; Jackson, Brian; Deo, Rajesh P.; Farrington, Chris; Das, Varendra; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2006-04-01

    Using the Multimission Archive at STScI (MAST), we have extracted spectra and determined continuum light curves for 175 Seyfert galaxies that have been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. To obtain the light curves as a function of Julian Date, we used fixed bins in the object's rest frame and measured small regions (between 30 and 60 Å) of each spectrum's continuum flux in the range 1150 to 3200 Å. We provide access to the UV light curves and other basic information about the observations in tabular and graphical form via the Internet at http://www.chara.gsu.edu/PEGA/IUE.

  19. The complete catalogue of light curves in equal-mass binary microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebig, Christine; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Bozza, Valerio; Dominik, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The light curves observed in microlensing events due to binary lenses span an extremely wide variety of forms, characterized by U-shaped caustic crossings and/or additional smoother peaks. However, all peaks of the binary-lens light curve can be traced back to features of caustics of the lens system. Moreover, all peaks can be categorized as one of only four types (cusp-grazing, cusp-crossing, fold-crossing or fold-grazing). This enables us to present the first complete map of the parameter space of the equal-mass case by identifying regions in which light curves feature the same number and nature of peaks. We find that the total number of morphologies that can be obtained is 73 out of 232 different regions. The partition of the parameter space so-obtained provides a new key to optimize modelling of observed events through a clever choice of initial conditions for fitting algorithms.

  20. A PHYSICALLY BASED METHOD FOR SCALING CEPHEID LIGHT CURVES FOR FUTURE DISTANCE DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F. E-mail: barry@obs.carnegiescience.ed

    2010-08-10

    We present a technique for decomposing Cepheid light curves into their fundamental constituent parts, that is, their radius and temperature variations. We demonstrate that any given pair of optical luminosity and color curves can be used to predict the shape, amplitude, and phase of a Cepheid's light variation at any other wavelength. With such predictions in hand, a single new observation at any given new wavelength can be used to normalize the properties of the predicted light curve, and in specific, derive a precise value of the time-averaged mean. We suggest that this method will be of great advantage in efficiently observing and precisely obtaining the mean properties of known Cepheids scheduled to be observed at new wavelengths, specifically in the mid-infrared where James Webb Space Telescope will be operating.

  1. A Crowd-Sourced Light Curve for SN 2014G (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) SN 2014G was initially classified as a Type IIn (CBET 3787) and was later revealed to be a Type II-L (ATEL 5935). In addition to having an interesting classification, it was also relatively bright, nearby (peak V ~14.3), and easy to observe with a small- to moderate-sized telescope. We mounted a cooperative effort open to both professional and non-professional observers with the goal of producing a light curve that could accurately measure variations in brightness of 0.1 magnitude with a cadence of one every two days or better. Simply collecting measured magnitudes often results in a light curve with systematic offsets between independent contributors. To minimize that effect without burdening the volunteer observers with too many additional requirements, we collected calibrated images and processed them uniformly to produce the light curve.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of WASP-52b (Chen+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Palle, E.; Nortmann, L.; Murgas, F.; Parviainen, H.; Nowak, G.

    2017-04-01

    We provide here the transit light curves of the hot Jupiter WASP-52b obtained on the night of 2015/08/28 using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m GTC telescope. The data was obtained by using OSIRIS through a 40-arcsec broad slit with the R1000R grism. The white-color light curve covers the wavelength range of 515-905nm, with 755-765nm being excluded. The spectroscopic light curves contain 22 channels of 16.5nm, 3 channels of 1.6nm, and 1 channel of 1.8nm. We provide several auxiliary parameters of the observations, some of which we have used to correct the data from correlated noise, including the position drift of the stars on the CCD detector in spatial and dispersion direction, the relative change in the FWHM of absorption line (dispersion FWHM), seeing (spatial FWHM), air mass, and rotator angle. (3 data files).

  3. ROTATIONAL PROPERTIES OF JUPITER TROJANS. I. LIGHT CURVES OF 80 OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, Stefano; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carsenty, Uri; Hahn, Gerhard; Di Martino, Mario; Carbognani, Albino; Schober, Hans-Josef; Lahulla, Felix; Delbo, Marco; Lagerkvist, Claes-Ingvar

    2011-05-15

    We present the results of a Jupiter Trojans' light curve survey aimed at characterizing the rotational properties of Trojans in the approximate size range 60-150 km. The survey, which was designed to provide reliable and unbiased estimates of rotation periods and amplitudes, resulted in light curves for a total of 80 objects, 56 of which represent the first determinations published to date and nine of which supersede previously published erroneous values. Our results more than double the size of the existing database of rotational properties of Jovian Trojans in the selected size range. The analysis of the distributions of the rotation periods and light curve amplitudes is the subject of companion papers.

  4. On the reduction of occultation light curves. [stellar occultations by planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L.; Veverka, J.

    1973-01-01

    The two basic methods of reducing occultation light curves - curve fitting and inversion - are reviewed and compared. It is shown that the curve fitting methods have severe problems of nonuniqueness. In addition, in the case of occultation curves dominated by spikes, it is not clear that such solutions are meaningful. The inversion method does not suffer from these drawbacks. Methods of deriving temperature profiles from refractivity profiles are then examined. It is shown that, although the temperature profiles are sensitive to small errors in the refractivity profile, accurate temperatures can be obtained, particularly at the deeper levels of the atmosphere. The ambiguities that arise when the occultation curve straddles the turbopause are briefly discussed.

  5. Light curves and spectra from a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf merger

    SciTech Connect

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2016-08-15

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). But, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. We utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1 ${M}_{\\odot }$ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. Finally, we discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.

  6. Light curves and spectra from a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf merger

    DOE PAGES

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; ...

    2016-08-15

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). But, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. We utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1more » $${M}_{\\odot }$$ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. Finally, we discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.« less

  7. Light curves and spectra from a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf merger

    SciTech Connect

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2016-08-15

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). But, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. We utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1 ${M}_{\\odot }$ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. Finally, we discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.

  8. Observable fractions of core-collapse supernova light curves brightened by binary companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Liu, Zheng-Wei; Izzard, Robert G.

    2015-07-01

    Many core-collapse supernova progenitors are presumed to be in binary systems. If a star explodes in a binary system, the early supernova light curve can be brightened by the collision of the supernova ejecta with the companion star. The early brightening can be observed when the observer is in the direction of the hole created by the collision. Based on a population synthesis model, we estimate the fractions of core-collapse supernovae in which the light-curve brightening by the collision can be observed. We find that 0.19 per cent of core-collapse supernova light curves can be observed with the collisional brightening. Type Ibc supernova light curves are more likely to be brightened by the collision (0.53 per cent) because of the high fraction of the progenitors being in binary systems and their proximity to the companion stars. Type II and IIb supernova light curves are less affected (˜10-3 and ˜10-2 per cent, respectively). Although the early, slow light-curve declines of some Type IIb and Ibc supernovae are argued to be caused by the collision with the companion star (e.g. SN 2008D), the small expected fraction, as well as the unrealistically small separation required, disfavour the argument. The future transient survey by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is expected to detect ˜10 Type Ibc supernovae with the early collisional brightening per year, and they will be able to provide information on supernova progenitors in binary systems.

  9. Light Curves and Spectra from a Thermonuclear Explosion of a White Dwarf Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rossum, Daniel R.; Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Double-degenerate (DD) mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs have recently emerged as a leading candidate for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, many outstanding questions surround DD mergers, including the characteristics of their light curves and spectra. We have recently identified a spiral instability in the post-merger phase of DD mergers and demonstrated that this instability self-consistently leads to detonation in some cases. We call this the spiral merger SN Ia model. Here, we utilize the SuperNu radiative transfer software to calculate three-dimensional synthetic light curves and spectra of the spiral merger simulation with a system mass of 2.1 {M}⊙ from Kashyap et al. Because of their large system masses, both violent and spiral merger light curves are slowly declining. The spiral merger resembles very slowly declining SNe Ia, including SN 2001ay, and provides a more natural explanation for its observed properties than other SN Ia explosion models. Previous synthetic light curves and spectra of violent DD mergers demonstrate a strong dependence on viewing angle, which is in conflict with observations. Here, we demonstrate that the light curves and spectra of the spiral merger are less sensitive to the viewing angle than violent mergers, in closer agreement with observation. We find that the spatial distribution of 56Ni and IMEs follows a characteristic hourglass shape. We discuss the implications of the asymmetric distribution of 56Ni for the early-time gamma-ray observations of 56Ni from SN 2014J. We suggest that DD mergers that agree with the light curves and spectra of normal SNe Ia will likely require a lower system mass.

  10. The broken light curves of gamma-ray bursts GRB 990123 and GRB 990510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, S.; Björnsson, G.; Hjorth, J.; Thomsen, B.

    2000-12-01

    We have collected all of the published photometry for GRB 990123 and GRB 990510, the first two gamma-ray bursts where breaks were seen in the light curves of their optical afterglows, and determined the shapes of their light curves and the break times. These parameters were used to investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for the breaks and the nature of the ambient medium that the bursts occurred in. The light curve for GRB 990123 is best fit by a broken power law with a break 1.68 +/- 0.19 days after the burst, a slope of alpha_1 = -1.12 +/- 0.08 before the break, and a slope of alpha_2 = -1.69 +/- 0.06 after the break. This is consistent with a collimated outflow with a fixed opening angle of theta_0 ~ 5degr . In this case the break in the light curve is due to the relativistic fireball slowing to Gamma ~ 1/theta_0 . The light curve for GRB 990510 is best fit by a continuous function with an early-time slope of alpha_1 = -0.54 +/- 0.14, a late-time slope of alpha_2 = -1.98 +/- 0.19, and a slow transition between the two regimes approximately one day after the burst. This is consistent with a collimated outflow with theta_0 ~ 5degr that is initially radiative, but undergoes a sideways expansion that begins approximately one day after the burst. This sideways expansion is responsible for the slow break in the light curve. Partly based on observations collected with the 6m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) which is operated under the financial support of Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43) and on data from the ING Archive and the HST Archive.

  11. The late-time light curve of the Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, G.; Sullivan, M.; Kerzendorf, W.; Ruiter, A. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Taubenberger, S.; Doran, G. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Laher, R. R.; Maguire, K.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Surace, J.

    2017-07-01

    We present late-time optical R-band imaging data from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) for the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe. The stacked PTF light curve provides densely sampled coverage down to R ≃ 22 mag over 200-620 d past explosion. Combining with literature data, we estimate the pseudo-bolometric light curve for this event from 200 to 1600 d after explosion, and constrain the likely near-infrared (Near-IR) contribution. This light curve shows a smooth decline consistent with radioactive decay, except over ˜450 to ˜600 d where the light curve appears to decrease faster than expected based on the radioactive isotopes presumed to be present, before flattening at around 600 d. We model the 200-1600 d pseudo-bolometric light curve with the luminosity generated by the radioactive decay chains of 56Ni, 57Ni and 55Co, and find it is not consistent with models that have full positron trapping and no infrared catastrophe (IRC); some additional energy escape other than optical/near-IR photons is required. However, the light curve is consistent with models that allow for positron escape (reaching 75 per cent by day 500) and/or an IRC (with 85 per cent of the flux emerging in non-optical wavelengths by day 600). The presence of the 57Ni decay chain is robustly detected, but the 55Co decay chain is not formally required, with an upper mass limit estimated at 0.014 M⊙. The measurement of the 57Ni/56Ni mass ratio is subject to significant systematic uncertainties, but all of our fits require a high ratio >0.031 (>1.3 in solar abundances).

  12. Modeling the X-ray light curves of Cygnus X-3. Possible role of the jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhu, O.; Hannikainen, D. C.

    2013-02-01

    Context. We address the physics behind the soft X-ray light curve asymmetries in Cygnus X-3, a well-known microquasar. Aims: Observable effects of the jet close to the line-of-sight were investigated and interpreted within the frame of light curve physics. Methods: The path of a hypothetical imprint of the jet, advected by the Wolf-Rayet-wind, was computed and its crossing with the line-of-sight during the binary orbit determined. We explored the possibility that physically this "imprint" is a formation of dense clumps triggered by jet bow shocks in the wind ("clumpy trail"). Models for X-ray continuum and emission line light curves were constructed using two absorbers: mass columns along the line-of-sight of i) the WR wind and ii) the clumpy trail, as seen from the compact star. These model light curves were compared with the observed ones from the RXTE/ASM (continuum) and Chandra/HETG (emission lines). Results: We show that the shapes of the Cyg X-3 light curves can be explained by the two absorbers using the inclination and true anomaly angles of the jet as derived from gamma-ray Fermi/LAT observations. The clumpy trail absorber is much larger for the lines than for the continuum. We suggest that the clumpy trail is a mixture of equilibrium and hot (shock heated) clumps. Conclusions: A possible way for studying jets in binary stars when the jet axis and the line-of-sight are close to each other is demonstrated. The X-ray continuum and emission line light curves of Cygnus X-3 can be explained by two absorbers: the WR companion wind plus an absorber lying in the jet path (clumpy trail). We propose that the clumpy trail absorber is due to dense clumps triggered by jet bow shocks.

  13. Light Curve Simulation Using Spacecraft CAD Models and Empirical Material Spectral BRDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willison, A.; Bedard, D.

    This paper presents a Matlab-based light curve simulation software package that uses computer-aided design (CAD) models of spacecraft and the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) of their homogenous surface materials. It represents the overall optical reflectance of objects as a sBRDF, a spectrometric quantity, obtainable during an optical ground truth experiment. The broadband bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the basis of a broadband light curve, is produced by integrating the sBRDF over the optical wavelength range. Colour-filtered BRDFs, the basis of colour-filtered light curves, are produced by first multiplying the sBRDF by colour filters, and integrating the products. The software package's validity is established through comparison of simulated reflectance spectra and broadband light curves with those measured of the CanX-1 Engineering Model (EM) nanosatellite, collected during an optical ground truth experiment. It is currently being extended to simulate light curves of spacecraft in Earth orbit, using spacecraft Two-Line-Element (TLE) sets, yaw/pitch/roll angles, and observer coordinates. Measured light curves of the NEOSSat spacecraft will be used to validate simulated quantities. The sBRDF was chosen to represent material reflectance as it is spectrometric and a function of illumination and observation geometry. Homogeneous material sBRDFs were obtained using a goniospectrometer for a range of illumination and observation geometries, collected in a controlled environment. The materials analyzed include aluminum alloy, two types of triple-junction photovoltaic (TJPV) cell, white paint, and multi-layer insulation (MLI). Interpolation and extrapolation methods were used to determine the sBRDF for all possible illumination and observation geometries not measured in the laboratory, resulting in empirical look-up tables. These look-up tables are referenced when calculating the overall sBRDF of objects, where

  14. Generalised Joint Hypermobility in Caucasian Girls with Idiopathic Scoliosis: Relation with Age, Curve Size, and Curve Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) in 155 girls with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) (age 9–18 years, mean 13.8 ± 2.3). The control group included 201 healthy girls. The presence of GJH was assessed with Beighton (B) test. GJH was diagnosed in 23.2% of IS girls and in 13.4% of controls (P = 0.02). The prevalence of GJH was significantly (P = 0.01) lower in IS girls aged 16–18 years in comparison with younger individuals. There was no difference regarding GJH occurrence between girls with mild (11–24°), moderate (25–40°), and severe scoliosis (>40°) (P = 0.78), between girls with single thoracic, single lumbar, and double curve scoliosis (P = 0.59), and between girls with thoracic scoliosis length ≤7 and >7 vertebrae (P = 0.25). No correlation between the number of points in B and the Cobb angle (P = 0.93), as well as between the number of points in B and the number of the vertebrae within thoracic scoliosis (P = 0.63), was noticed. GJH appeared more often in IS girls than in healthy controls. Its prevalence decreased with age. No relation between GJH prevalence and curve size, curve pattern, or scoliosis length was found. PMID:24550704

  15. New Spectroscopic Analysis and Light Curve Model of the Eclipsing Binary V356 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, M.; Mennickent, R.; Djurasević, G.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new orbital solution for the V356 Sgr binary system based on new and accurate radial velocities. It consists of a B3 V star accreting matter from a Roche-Lobe filling A2 II star. The spectra were disentangled using KOREL. The UBV light curves by Popper (1957) and Wilson & Woodward (1995) as well as the ASAS V-band light curve were modeled with a multicomponent synthesis code including an accretion disk. The system parameters, such as the effective temperature and surface gravity for both stars as well as the disk temperature and radius, were determined.

  16. Direct modeling of transiting planet light curves from model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcneil, Joseph; Neilson, H.; Ignace, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent and new observations of extrasolar planets via the transit method are provided unparalleled measurements that enhance our understanding of both the planets and their host stars. However, analysis techniques assume simple parameters to describe the stellar intensity profile. In this work, we compare new planetary transit light curves computed directly from model stellar atmosphere intensity profiles with light curves computed using limb-darkening coefficients. This comparison highlights the need for better models of stellar intensities and atmospheres to better understand the extrasolar planets themselves, especially in the upcoming eras of TESS and PLATO.

  17. THE DIVERSE BROADBAND LIGHT CURVES OF SWIFT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS REPRODUCED WITH THE CANNONBALL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; De Rujula, A. E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: alvaro.derujula@cern.ch

    2009-05-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the Cannonball (CB) model of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows (AGs). Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early until late time and faithfully represent the entire diversity of the broadband light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of 'glory' light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR, which dominates their broadband AG. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical 'humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The 'canonical' and noncanonical X-ray light curves and the chromatic behavior of the broadband AGs are well reproduced. In particular, in canonical X-ray light curves, the initial fast decline and rapid softening of the prompt emission, the transition to the plateau phase, the subsequent gradual steepening of the plateau to an asymptotic power-law decay, and the transition from chromatic to achromatic behavior of the light curves agree well with those predicted by the CB model. The Swift early-time data on XRF 060218 are inconsistent with a blackbody emission from a shock breakout through a stellar envelope. Instead, they are well described by ICS of glory light by a jet breaking out from SN2006aj.

  18. The Diverse Broadband Light Curves of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts Reproduced with the Cannonball Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; De Rújula, A.

    2009-05-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the Cannonball (CB) model of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows (AGs). Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early until late time and faithfully represent the entire diversity of the broadband light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of "glory" light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR, which dominates their broadband AG. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical "humps" in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The "canonical" and noncanonical X-ray light curves and the chromatic behavior of the broadband AGs are well reproduced. In particular, in canonical X-ray light curves, the initial fast decline and rapid softening of the prompt emission, the transition to the plateau phase, the subsequent gradual steepening of the plateau to an asymptotic power-law decay, and the transition from chromatic to achromatic behavior of the light curves agree well with those predicted by the CB model. The Swift early-time data on XRF 060218 are inconsistent with a blackbody emission from a shock breakout through a stellar envelope. Instead, they are well described by ICS of glory light by a jet breaking out from SN2006aj.

  19. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Heather M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Barker, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types; material type and orientation can mask an object s true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon, Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre s ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 180 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  20. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  1. Bolometric light curves and explosion parameters of 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Bersier, D.; James, P. A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fraser, M.; Pian, E.

    2016-03-01

    Literature data are collated for 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SE SNe; i.e. SNe IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-BL) that have good light-curve coverage in more than one optical band. Using bolometric corrections derived in previous work, the bolometric light curve of each SN is recovered and template bolometric light curves provided. Peak light distributions and decay rates are investigated; SNe subtypes are not cleanly distinguished in this parameter space, although some grouping of types does occur and there is a suggestion of a Phillips-like relation for most SNe Ic-BL. The bolometric light curves are modelled with a simple analytical prescription and compared to results from more detailed modelling. Distributions of the explosion parameters show the extreme nature of SNe Ic-BL in terms of their 56Ni mass and the kinetic energy, however ejected masses are similar to other subtypes. SNe Ib and Ic have very similar distributions of explosion parameters, indicating a similarity in progenitors. SNe IIb are the most homogeneous subtype and have the lowest average values for 56Ni mass, ejected mass, and kinetic energy. Ejecta masses for each subtype and SE SNe as a whole are inconsistent with those expected from very massive stars. The majority of the ejecta mass distribution is well described by more moderately massive progenitors in binaries, indicating these are the dominant progenitor channel for SE SNe.

  2. LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Wesson, Roger; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days {approx}300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate {sup 56}Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }) from the bolometric light curve of each of days {approx}150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm{sup -3}) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium ({approx}1 cm{sup -3}). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The {sup 56}Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0

  3. Late-time Light Curves of Type II Supernovae: Physical Properties of Supernovae and Their Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Wesson, Roger; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days ~300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate 56Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 × 10-2 M ⊙) from the bolometric light curve of each of days ~150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 × 10-2 M ⊙). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm-3) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium (~1 cm-3). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The 56Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0.31 × 10-2, supporting the previous work by Maeda et al., who focus on more massive Type II SNe. The

  4. An 80 day X-ray light curve of 3C 371

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Wood, K. S.; Yentis, D. J.; Meekins, J. F.; Smathers, H. W.; Byram, E. T.; Chubb, T. A.; Friedman, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Large Area Sky Survey (LASS) experiment on HEAO 1 that monitored the N galaxy/BL Lacertae object 3C 371 from August 19 to November 7, 1977 is discussed, noting that statistically significant threefold or larger intensity variations were observed in the flux range 0.5-20 keV. It is found that the degree of variability depends on the time of observation, with the source sometimes appearing constant and sometimes changing on time scales of 1 to 2 weeks. Also observed was an X-ray flare that lasted approximately 25 days. The total 80-day X-ray light curve is seen as suggesting either a superposition of X-ray flares or a variable injection rate that changes on weekly time scales. The observed X-ray flux is found to be consistent with that expected by extrapolating the nonthermal optical spectrum, suggesting that the optical to X-ray flux could be synchrotron radiation, provided that it is possible to account for the patterns of variability seen at optical and X-ray wavelengths and to dispose of inverse Compton difficulties.

  5. THE EFFECT OF A TIME-VARYING ACCRETION DISK SIZE ON QUASAR MICROLENSING LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-08-01

    Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting six seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculation in order to correctly model the strong correlations between the structure of the microlensing magnification patterns and the magnitude of the effect. We also comment briefly on the effect of this phenomenon for the stability of time-delay estimates.

  6. THE VARYING LIGHT CURVE AND TIMINGS OF THE ULTRASHORT-PERIOD CONTACT BINARY KIC 9532219

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Park, Jang-Ho E-mail: kshong@kasi.re.kr E-mail: pooh107162@kasi.re.kr

    2016-03-20

    KIC 9532219 is a W UMa-type eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 0.1981549 days that is below the short-period limit (∼0.22 days) of the period distribution for contact binaries. The Kepler light curve of the system exhibits striking changes in both eclipse depths and light maxima. Applying third-body and spot effects, the light-curve synthesis indicates that the eclipsing pair is currently in a marginal contact stage with a mass ratio of q = 1.20, an orbital inclination of i = 66.°0, a temperature difference of T{sub 1}–T{sub 2} = 172 K, and a third light of l{sub 3} = 75.9%. To understand the light variations with time, we divided up the light curve into 312 segments and analyzed them separately. The results reveal that variation of eclipse depth is primarily caused by changing amounts of contamination due to the nearby star KIC 9532228 between the Kepler Quarters and that the variable O’Connell effect originates from the starspot activity on the less massive primary component. Based on our light-curve timings, a period study of KIC 9532219 indicates that the orbital period has varied as a combination of a downward parabola and a light-travel-time (LTT) effect due to a third body, which has a period of 1196 days and a minimum mass of 0.0892 M{sub ⊙} in an orbit of eccentricity 0.150. The parabolic variation could be a small part of a second LTT orbit due to a fourth component in a wider orbit, instead of either mass transfer or angular momentum loss.

  7. SHOCK BREAKOUT AND EARLY LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE OBSERVED WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D; Villar, A.

    2016-03-20

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10{sup −4}M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  8. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos; Olivares E, Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric; Schulze, Steve; Bolt, Luis; Folatelli, Gastón; Freedman, Wendy L.; Krzemiński, Wojtek; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  9. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D.; Villar, A.

    2016-03-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R⊙), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1051 erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10-4M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  10. Characterizing the V-band Light-curves of Hydrogen-rich Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Olivares E., Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Schulze, Steve; Antezana, Roberto; Bolt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Contreras, Carlos; de Jaeger, Thomas; Folatelli, Gastón; Förster, Francisco; Freedman, Wendy L.; González, Luis; Hsiao, Eric; Krzemiński, Wojtek; Krisciunas, Kevin; Maza, José; McCarthy, Patrick; Morrell, Nidia I.; Persson, Sven E.; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the "plateau" phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the "plateau" stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply "SN II" with an "s 2" value giving the decline rate during the "plateau" phase, indicating its morphological type. Based on observations obtained with the du-Pont and Swope telescopes at LCO, and the Steward Observatory's CTIO60, SO90 and CTIO36 telescopes.

  11. Generalized elastica patterns in a curved rotating Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Miranda, José A.

    2017-08-01

    We study a family of generalized elasticalike equilibrium shapes that arise at the interface separating two fluids in a curved rotating Hele-Shaw cell. This family of stationary interface solutions consists of shapes that balance the competing capillary and centrifugal forces in such a curved flow environment. We investigate how the emerging interfacial patterns are impacted by changes in the geometric properties of the curved Hele-Shaw cell. A vortex-sheet formalism is used to calculate the two-fluid interface curvature, and a gallery of possible shapes is provided to highlight a number of peculiar morphological features. A linear perturbation theory is employed to show that the most prominent aspects of these complex stationary patterns can be fairly well reproduced by the interplay of just two interfacial modes. The connection of these dominant modes to the geometry of the curved cell, as well as to the fluid dynamic properties of the flow, is discussed.

  12. Ultraviolet light curves of beta Lyrae: Comparison of OAO A-2, IUE, and Voyager Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji; Mccluskey, George E.; Silvis, Jeffery M. S.; Polidan, Ronald S.; Mccluskey, Carolina P. S.; Eaton, Joel A.

    1994-01-01

    The six-band ultraviolet light curves of beta Lyrae obtained with the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) A-2 in 1970 exhibited a very unusual behavior. The secondary minimum deepened at shorter wavelength, indicating that one was not observing light variations caused primarily by the eclipses of two stars having a roughly Planckian energy distribution. It was then suggested that the light variations were caused by a viewing angle effect of an optically thick, ellipsoidal circumbinary gas cloud. Since 1978 beta Lyrae has been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. We have constructed ultraviolet light curves from the IUE archival data for comparison with the OAO A-2 results. We find that they are in substantial agreement with each other. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer was also used to observe this binary during a period covered by IUE observations. The Voyager results agree with those of the two other satellite observatories at wavelengths longer than about 1350 A. However, in the wavelength region shorter than the Lyman-alpha line at 1216 A, the light curves at 1085 and 965 A show virtually no light variation except an apparent flaring near phase 0.7, which is also in evidence at longer wavelengths. We suggest that the optically thick circumbinary gas cloud, which envelops the two stars completely, assumes a roughly spherical shape when observed at these shorter wavelengths.

  13. [Upright posture impact on spine susceptibility in scoliosis and progression patterns of scoliotic curve].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Qiu, Gui-Xing; Yang, Xin-Yu; Li, Jia-Yi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2007-01-02

    To investigate the impact of upright posture on spine susceptibility in scoliosis and scoliotic curve progression patterns. There were 3 groups designed in the experiment: bipedal rats group (n = 26), quadrupedal rats group (n = 26) and sham operation bipedal control (n = 12). Taking the advantage of bipedal rats' upright-posture simulating effect, operations were exerted with posterior central approach between scapulas. Along the spatial of erector spinae muscle and trunk muscles, left side upper (T2-3 or T3-4) and lower (T10-11 or 11 - 12) ribs were tethered with type4 thread to make asymmetrical stress and simulate a primary thoracic curve. At time of 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-operation (PO), each group were taken dorsoventral X-ray photographs for dynamic observation on the difference of scoliosis turnover and to compare the curvature progression difference between bipedal and quadrupedal rats. Operation resulted in a primary single thoracic curve or thoracolumbar curve convex to the right in both bipedal and quadrupedal rats. At 1 - 4 weeks PO, all asymmetrical tethers became loose because of rib fracture or osteolysis at the tether sites. All scoliosis of quadrupedal rats disappeared and spine resume straight in 1 - 4 weeks later. Analogically, scoliosis disappeared in bipedal rats for those tethers loose in 1 w PO. But prolonged tethering, scoliosis progression rates increased conspicuously. 3 - 4 weeks' tether time led to irreversible scoliosis. Meanwhile, the curvature progression patterns of bipedal rats presented to be various, including the stable single thoracic curve, progressive thoracolumbar single curve and progressive double curve. These curvatures were much alike that of human idiopathic scoliosis. No scoliosis appeared in sham operation bipedal control. The upright posture increased spinal susceptibility in scoliosis; Upright posture changes the progression pattern of scoliosis, leading to variegated scoliotic morphouses during primary

  14. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  15. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES OF SUPERNOVAE WITH THE SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Nousek, John; Vanden Berk, Daniel; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Gehrels, Neil; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin

    2009-05-15

    We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous, while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light-curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high-redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground-based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high-redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.

  16. COMPARING THE LIGHT CURVES OF SIMULATED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS USING DATA-DRIVEN MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kessler, Richard; Graziani, Carlo; Jordan, George C. IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Long, Min; Van Rossum, Daniel R.

    2013-08-20

    We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion model with a large set of observed SNe Ia, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SN Ia parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SN Ia data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of one-, two-, and three-dimensional explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BH Vir BV light curves (Xiang+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, F. Y.; Liu, Q. Y.

    1997-03-01

    Photoelectric observations of the short period eclipsing binary BH Vir in B and V bands are presented. Comparing with earlier published observations, we found that there were smaller variations in the light curve (outside eclipse) in 1991 than in the previous data. (2 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curves of Flora region asteroids (Kryszczynska+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryszczynska, A.; Colas, F.; Polinska, M.; Hirsch, R.; Ivanova, V.; Apostolovska, G.; Bilkina, B.; Velichko, F. P.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Kankiewicz, P.; Vachier, F.; Umlenski, V.; Michalowski, T.; Marciniak, A.; Maury, A.; Kaminski, K.; Fagas, M.; Dimitrov, W.; Borczyk, W.; Sobkowiak, K.; Lecacheux, J.; Behrend, R.; Klotz, A.; Bernasconi, L.; Crippa, R.; Manzini, F.; Poncy, R.; Antonini, P.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Santana-Ros, T.

    2012-07-01

    The files contain asteroid brightness, aspect data and observing information for corresponding date. These files were used for obtaining synodic period rotation. Individual lightcurves within a files are identified with a light curve number, all lightcurves are relative. (2 data files).

  19. Exploring the Potential Diversity of Early Type Ia Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2016-07-01

    During the first several days after explosion, Type Ia supernova light curves probe the outer layers of the exploding star, and therefore provide important clues for identifying their progenitors. We investigate how both the shallow 56Ni distribution and the presence of circumstellar material shape these early light curves. This is performed using a series of numerical experiments with parameterized properties for systematic exploration. Although not all of the considered models may be realized in nature (and indeed there are arguments why some of them should not occur), the spirit of this work is to provide a broader exploration of the diversity of possibilities. We find that shallower 56Ni leads to steeper, bluer light curves. Differences in the shape of the rise can introduce errors in estimating the explosion time, and thus impact efforts to infer upper limits on the progenitor or companion radius from a lack of observed shock cooling emission. Circumstellar material can lead to significant luminosity during the first few days, but its presence can be difficult to identify depending on the degree of nickel mixing. In some cases, the hot emission of circumstellar material may even lead to a signature similar to an interaction with a companion, and thus in the future additional diagnostics should be gathered for properly assessing early light curves.

  20. An analysis of Pluto occultation light curves using an atmospheric radiative-conductive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.; Gulbis, Amanda A. S.; Zhu, Xun; Strobel, Darrell F.; Elliot, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    We use a radiative-conductive model to least-squares fit Pluto stellar occultation light curve data. This model predicts atmospheric temperature based on surface temperature, surface pressure, surface radius, and CH 4 and CO mixing ratios, from which model light curves are to be calculated. The model improves upon previous techniques for deriving Pluto's atmospheric thermal structure from stellar occultation light curves by calculating temperature (as a function of height) caused by heating and cooling by species in Pluto's atmosphere, instead of a general assumption that temperature follows a power law with height or some other idealized function. We are able to fit for model surface radius, surface pressure, and CH 4 mixing ratio with one of the 2006 datasets and for surface pressure and CH 4 mixing ratio for other datasets from the years 1988, 2002, 2006, and 2008. It was not possible to fit for CO mixing ratio and surface temperature because the light curves are not sensitive to these parameters. We determine that the model surface radius, under the assumption of a stratosphere only (i.e. no troposphere) model in radiative-conductive balance, is 1180-10+20km. The CH 4 mixing ratio results are more scattered with time and are in the range of 1.8-9.4 × 10 -3. The surface pressure results show an increasing trend from 1988 to 2002, although it is not as dramatic as the factor of 2 from previous studies.

  1. Starspot signature on the light curve. Learning about the latitudinal distribution of spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. R. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Quasi-periodic modulations of the stellar light curve may result from dark spots crossing the visible stellar disc. Owing to differential rotation, spots at different latitudes generally have different rotation periods. Hence, by studying spot-induced modulations, it is possible to learn about stellar surface (differential) rotation and magnetic activity. Recently, a method based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram of light curves has been proposed to identify the sign of the differential rotation at the stellar surface. Aims: Our goal is to understand how the modulation of the stellar light curve due to the presence of spots and the corresponding periodogram are affected by both the stellar and spot properties. Methods: We generate synthetic light curves of stars with different properties (inclination angle, limb darkening, and rotation rate) and spot configurations (number of spots, latitude, intensity contrast, and size). By analysing their Lomb-Scargle periodograms, we compute the ratio between the heights of the second and first harmonics of the rotation period (peak-height ratio). Results: We find that the peak-height ratios are essentially a function of a single parameter, the fraction of time the spot is visible, which is related to the sinusoidality of the spot modulation. We identify the conditions under which the periodogram analysis can actually provide an estimate of the spot latitudes and/or the stellar inclination angle. We also identify possible sources of error in the identification of the sign of the differential rotation.

  2. The X-ray Variability of NGC 4945: Characterizing the Power Spectrum through Light Curve Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, M

    2003-12-17

    For light curves sampled on an uneven grid of observation times, the shape of the power density spectrum (PDS) includes severe distortion effects due to the window function, and simulations of light curves are indispensable to recover the true PDS. We present an improved method for comparing light curves generated from a PDS model to the measured data and apply it to a 50-day long RXTE observations of NGC 4945, a Seyfert 2 galaxy with well-determined mass from megamaser observations. The improvements over previously reported investigations include the adjustment of the PDS model normalization for each simulated light curve in order to directly investigate how well the chosen PDS shape describes the source data. We furthermore implement a robust goodness-of-fit measure that does not depend on the form of the variable used to describe the power in the periodogram. We conclude that a knee-type function (smoothly broken power law) describes the data better than a simple power law; the best-fit break frequency is {approx} 10{sup -6} Hz.

  3. Fractal Property in the Light Curve of BL Lac Object S5 0716 + 714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J. W.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we compile the historical R-band data of S5 0716 + 714 from literature and obtain its fractal dimension by using a fractal method and then simulate the data with the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (W-M) function. It is considered that the light curve has a fractal property.

  4. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  5. Extending ROSAT Light Curves of Ecliptic Pole AGN Formation and Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkan, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    In collaboration with UCLA graduate student Fred Baganoff, Professor Malkan has obtained the longest continuous light curves ever available for a large sample (# = 60) of active galactic nuclei. This was accomplished by using the ROSATAII-Sky Survey, which covered the ecliptic pole regions once every 9O-minute orbit. Using this Astrophysics Data Processing grant from NASA, we extended these light curves by combining the RASS data with pointed observations over the next several years of operation of the ROSAT PSPC. This lengthens the baselines of about half of the light curves from a few months up to a few years. The proportion of AGN showing variability increases substantially with this improvement. In fact most AGN in this representative sample are now shown to be significantly variable in the X-rays. We are also able to say something about the amplitudes of variability on timescales from days to years, with more detail than previously has been possible. We have also identified some dependence of the X-ray variability properties on a) the luminosity of the AGN; and b) The presence of a "Blazar" nucleus. By extending the ROSAT light curves, we are also able to learn more about the correlation of X-ray and optical emission on longer time-scales. It appears to be very weak, at best.

  6. Variable classification in the LSST era: exploring a model for quasi-periodic light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, J. C.; Kochanek, C. S.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.

    2017-06-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is expected to yield ˜107 light curves over the course of its mission, which will require a concerted effort in automated classification. Stochastic processes provide one means of quantitatively describing variability with the potential advantage over simple light-curve statistics that the parameters may be physically meaningful. Here, we survey a large sample of periodic, quasi-periodic and stochastic Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment-III variables using the damped random walk (DRW; CARMA(1,0)) and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO; CARMA(2,1)) stochastic process models. The QPO model is described by an amplitude, a period and a coherence time-scale, while the DRW has only an amplitude and a time-scale. We find that the periodic and quasi-periodic stellar variables are generally better described by a QPO than a DRW, while quasars are better described by the DRW model. There are ambiguities in interpreting the QPO coherence time due to non-sinusoidal light-curve shapes, signal-to-noise ratio, error mischaracterizations and cadence. Higher order implementations of the QPO model that better capture light-curve shapes are necessary for the coherence time to have its implied physical meaning. Independent of physical meaning, the extra parameter of the QPO model successfully distinguishes most of the classes of periodic and quasi-periodic variables we consider.

  7. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S. K.; Burrows, D. N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments. These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadx activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission: from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve. This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f greater than or approx. equal to 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  8. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. III. CLASSIFICATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Palaversa, Lovro; Eyer, Laurent; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ivezić, Željko; Loebman, Sarah; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Božić, Hrvoje; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesarić, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott; Srdoč, Gregor; and others

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ∼7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg{sup 2} of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ∼0.03 mag at r = 15 to ∼0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ∼200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ∼7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (β Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the

  9. Time delays between Fermi-LAT and GBM light curves of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castignani, G.; Guetta, D.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Puccetti, S.; Dichiara, S.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope exhibit a delay of up to about 10 seconds between the trigger time of the hard X-ray signal as measured by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the onset of the MeV-GeV counterpart detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This delay may hint at important physics, whether it is due to the intrinsic variability of the inner engine or related to quantum dispersion effects in the velocity of light propagation from the sources to the observer. Therefore, it is critical to have a proper assessment of how these time delays affect the overall properties of the light curves. Methods: We cross-correlated the 5 brightest GRBs of the 1st Fermi-LAT Catalog by means of the continuous correlation function (CCF) and of the discrete correlation function (DCF). The former is suppressed because of the low number counts in the LAT light curves. A maximum in the DCF suggests there is a time lag between the curves, whose value and uncertainty are estimated through a Gaussian fitting of the DCF profile and light curve simulation via a Monte Carlo approach. Results: The cross-correlation of the observed LAT and GBM light curves yields time lags that are mostly similar to those reported in the literature, but they are formally consistent with zero. The cross-correlation of the simulated light curves yields smaller errors on the time lags and more than one time lag for GRBs 090902B and 090926A. For all 5 GRBs, the time lags are significantly different from zero and consistent with those reported in the literature, when only the secondary maxima are considered for those two GRBs. Conclusions: The DCF method proves the presence of (possibly multiple) time lags between the LAT and GBM light curves in a given GRB and underlines the complexity of their time behavior. While this suggests that the delays should be ascribed to intrinsic physical mechanisms, more sensitivity and more statistics are

  10. Episodic modulations in supernova radio light curves from luminous blue variable supernova progenitor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges

    2013-09-01

    Context. Ideally, one would like to know which type of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) is produced by different progenitors and what channels of stellar evolution lead to these progenitors. These links have to be very well known to use the observed frequency of different types of SN events for probing the star formation rate and massive star evolution in different types of galaxies. Aims: We investigate the link between luminous blue variables (LBVs) as SN progenitors and the appearance of episodic light curve modulations in the radio light curves of the SN event. Methods: We use the 20 M⊙ and 25 M⊙ models with rotation at solar metallicity, which are part of an extended grid of stellar models computed by the Geneva team. At their pre-SN stage, these two models have recently been shown to have spectra similar to those of LBV stars, and they possibly explode as Type IIb SNe. Based on the wind properties before the explosion, we derive the density structure of their circumstellar medium. This structure is used as input for computing the SN radio light curve. Results: We find that the 20 M⊙ model shows radio light curves with episodic luminosity modulations similar to those observed in some Type IIb SNe. This occurs because the evolution of the 20 M⊙ model terminates in a region of the HR diagram where radiative stellar winds present strong density variations, caused by the bistability limit. Ending its evolution in a zone of the HR diagram where no change of the mass-loss rates is expected, the 25 M⊙ model presents no such modulations in its radio SN light curve. Conclusions: Our results reinforce the link between SN progenitors and LBV stars. We also confirm the existence of a physical mechanism for a single star to have episodic radio light curve modulations. In the case of the 25 M⊙ progenitors, we do not obtain modulations in the radio light curve, but our models may miss some outbursting behavior in the late stages of massive stars.

  11. Phenomenological modeling of the light curves of algol-type eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a special class of functions for mathematical modeling of periodic signals of a special type with a nonuniform distribution of the arguments. This method has been developed for determining the phenomenological characteristics of light curves required for listing in the "General Catalog of Variable Stars" (GCVS) and other data bases. For eclipsing binary stars with smooth light curves (types EB and EW) a trigonometric polynomial of optimal degree in a complete or symmetric form is recommended. For eclipsing binary systems with relatively narrow minima, approximating the light curves by a class of nonpolynomial spline functions is statistically optimal. A combination of a second order trigonometric polynomial (TP2, which describes "reflection", ellipsoidal" and "spotting" effects) and localized contributions of the minima (parametrized with respect to depth and profile separately for the primary and secondary minima) is used. This approach is characterized by a statistical accuracy of the smoothing curve that is a factor of ~1.5-2 times better than for a trigonometric polynomial of statistically optimal degree, and by the absence of false "waves" in the light curve associated with the Gibbs effect. Besides finding the width of the minimum, which cannot be determined using a trigonometric polynomial approximation, this method can be used to determine its depth with better accuracy, and to separate the effects of the eclipse and the part outside the eclipse. For multicolor observations, the improved accuracy of the smoothing curve for each filter makes it possible to obtain more accurate plots of the variation in the color index. The efficiency of the proposed method increases as the width of the eclipse becomes smaller. This method supplements the trigonometric polynomial approximation. The method, referred to as the NAV (New Algol Variable) method, is illustrated by applying it to the eclipsing binary systems VSX J022427.8-104034=USNO-B1.0 0793-0023471 and

  12. SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE POWERED BY MAGNETARS: LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES AND HARD EMISSION LEAKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2015-01-20

    Recently, research performed by two groups has revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810, and CSS121015 but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semianalytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model with the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semianalytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg, and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma-ray and X-ray leakages are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high-quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required.

  13. A LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF CLASSICAL NOVAE: FREE-FREE EMISSION VERSUS PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp

    2015-01-10

    We analyzed light curves of seven relatively slower novae, PW Vul, V705 Cas, GQ Mus, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, based on an optically thick wind theory of nova outbursts. For fast novae, free-free emission dominates the spectrum in optical bands rather than photospheric emission, and nova optical light curves follow the universal decline law. Faster novae blow stronger winds with larger mass-loss rates. Because the brightness of free-free emission depends directly on the wind mass-loss rate, faster novae show brighter optical maxima. In slower novae, however, we must take into account photospheric emission because of their lower wind mass-loss rates. We calculated three model light curves of free-free emission, photospheric emission, and their sum for various white dwarf (WD) masses with various chemical compositions of their envelopes and fitted reasonably with observational data of optical, near-IR (NIR), and UV bands. From light curve fittings of the seven novae, we estimated their absolute magnitudes, distances, and WD masses. In PW Vul and V705 Cas, free-free emission still dominates the spectrum in the optical and NIR bands. In the very slow novae, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, photospheric emission dominates the spectrum rather than free-free emission, which makes a deviation from the universal decline law. We have confirmed that the absolute brightnesses of our model light curves are consistent with the distance moduli of four classical novae with known distances (GK Per, V603 Aql, RR Pic, and DQ Her). We also discussed the reason why the very slow novae are about ∼1 mag brighter than the proposed maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation.

  14. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary.

  15. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  16. The Peculiar Light Curve of J1415+1320: A Case Study in Extreme Scattering Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Hovatta, T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Pearson, T. J.; Blandford, R. D.; Gurwell, M. A.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pavlidou, V.; Ravi, V.; Reeves, R. A.; Richards, J. L.; Tornikoski, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    The radio light curve of J1415+1320 (PKS 1413+135) shows time-symmetric and recurring U-shaped features across the centimeter-wave and millimeter-wave bands. The symmetry of these features points to lensing by an intervening object as the cause. U-shaped events in radio light curves in the centimeter-wave band have previously been attributed to Extreme scattering events (ESE). ESEs are thought to be the result of lensing by compact plasma structures in the Galactic interstellar medium, but the precise nature of these plasma structures remains unknown. Since the strength of a plasma lens evolves with wavelength λ as {λ }2, the presence of correlated variations at over a wide wavelength range casts doubt on the canonical ESE interpretation for J1415+1320. In this paper, we critically examine the evidence for plasma lensing in J1415+1320. We compute limits on the lensing strength and the associated free-free opacity of the putative plasma lenses. We compare the observed and model ESE light curves, and also derive a lower limit on the lens distance based on the effects of parallax due to the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. We conclude that plasma lensing is not a viable interpretation for J1415+1320's light curves and that symmetric U-shaped features in the radio light curves of extragalactic sources do not present prima facie evidence for ESEs. The methodology presented here is generic enough to be applicable to any plasma-lensing candidate.

  17. Search for light curve modulations among Kepler candidates. Three very low-mass transiting companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Ribas, A.; Barrado, D.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Light curve modulations in the sample of Kepler planet candidates allows the disentangling of the nature of the transiting object by photometrically measuring its mass. This is possible by detecting the effects of the gravitational pull of the companion (ellipsoidal modulations) and in some cases, the photometric imprints of the Doppler effect when observing in a broad band (Doppler beaming). Aims: We aim to photometrically unveil the nature of some transiting objects showing clear light curve modulations in the phase-folded Kepler light curve. Methods: We selected a subsample among the large crop of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) based on their chances to show detectable light curve modulations, i.e., close (a< 12 R⋆) and large (in terms of radius, according to their transit signal) candidates. We modeled their phase-folded light curves with consistent equations for the three effects, namely, reflection, ellipsoidal and beaming (known as REB modulations). Results: We provide detailed general equations for the fit of the REB modulations for the case of eccentric orbits. These equations are accurate to the photometric precisions achievable by current and forthcoming instruments and space missions. By using this mathematical apparatus, we find three close-in very low-mass companions (two of them in the brown dwarf mass domain) orbiting main-sequence stars (KOI-554, KOI-1074, and KOI-3728), and reject the planetary nature of the transiting objects (thus classifying them as false positives). In contrast, the detection of the REB modulations and transit/eclipse signal allows the measurement of their mass and radius that can provide important constraints for modeling their interiors since just a few cases of low-mass eclipsing binaries are known. Additionally, these new systems can help to constrain the similarities in the formation process of the more massive and close-in planets (hot Jupiters), brown dwarfs, and very low-mass companions.

  18. Physical Characteristics of Faint Meteors by Light Curve and High-resolution Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The physical structure of a meteoroid may be inferred from optical observations, particularly the light curve, of a meteor. For example: a classically shaped (late peaked) light curve is seen as evidence of a solid single body, whereas a symmetric light curve may indicate a dustball structure. High-resolution optical observations show how the meteoroid fragments: continuously, leaving a long wake, or discretely, leaving several distinct pieces. Calculating the orbit of the meteoroid using two station data then allows the object to be associated with asteroidal or cometary parent bodies. Optical observations thus provide simultaneous information on meteoroid structure, fragmentation mode, and origin.CAMO (the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory) has been continuously collecting faint (masses < 10-4 kg) two station optical meteors with image-intensified narrow field (with a resolution of up to 3 meters per pixel) and wide field (26 by 19 degrees) cameras since 2010. The narrow field, telescopic cameras allow the meteor fragmentation to be studied using a pair of mirrors to track the meteor. The wide-field cameras provide the light curve and trajectory solution.We present preliminary results from classifying light curves and high-resolution optical observations for 3000 faint meteors recorded since 2010. We find that most meteors (both asteroidal and cometary) show long trails, while meteors with short trails are the second most common morphology. It is expected that meteoroids that experience negligible fragmentation have the shortest trails, so our results imply that the majority of small meteoroids fragment during ablation. A surprising observation is that almost equal fractions of asteroidal and cometary meteors fragment (showing long trails), implying a similar structure for both types of meteoroids.

  19. The Information Content in Analytic Spot Models of Broadband Precision Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  20. The Light Curve and Distance of the Kepler Supernova: News from Four Centuries Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2017-06-01

    We study the light curve of SN 1604 using the historical data collected at the time of observation of the outburst. Comparing the supernova with recent SNe Ia of various rates of decline after maximum light, we find that this event looks like a normal SN Ia (stretch s close to 0.9 : 0.9 ± 0.13), a fact that is also favored by the late light curve. The supernova is heavily obscured by 2.7 ± 0.1 mag in V. We obtain an estimate of the distance to the explosion with a value of d=5+/- 0.7 {kpc}. This can help to settle ongoing discussions on the distance to the supernova. It also shows that this supernova is of the same kind as those of the SN Ia samples that we now use for cosmology.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVIc light curves of 57 Cepheids (Berdnikov+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Zhujko, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    In 2008-2013, we obtained 11333 CCD BV Ic frames for 57 Cepheids from the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We performed our observations with the 76-cm telescope of the South AfricanAstronomicalObservatory (SAAO, South Africa) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Astronomical Observatory of the Universidad Catolica del Norte (OCA, Chile) using the SBIG ST-10XME CCD camera. The tables of observations, the plots of light curves, and the current light elements are presented. Comparison of our light curves with those constructed from photoelectric observations shows that the differences between their mean magnitudes exceed 0.05mag in 20% of the cases. This suggests the necessity of performing CCD observations for all Cepheids. (2 data files).

  2. Backlight units based on light extraction from a curved optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Arizono, Kazuma; Nishida, Kazuki; Takigawa, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    A backlight unit is constructed by laying out a plastic optical fiber (POF) in a curved trench fabricated in a light-guide plate. First, the light leaks out of the POF at curved sections and enters the plate. Next, the light is extracted from the plate by some microstructures fabricated on the surfaces of the plate. Coupled to a laser diode, its optical power can be efficiently and uniformly delivered over a large area via the POF. In this experiment, we fabricated a 10 cm×10 cm×3 mm prototype unit with off-the-shelf components. It becomes see-through when the space around the POF is filled with index-matching oil. One can build an arbitrary-shaped planar light source by tiling multiple cells and connecting them by a POF. The light inside the POF is depleted as it propagates downstream. This can be compensated by decreasing the radii of curvature. Microstructures on the light-guide plate can distort the passage of ambient light. For a see-through unit, we can distribute them sparsely and/or use absorbers. A see-through backlight unit is a relatively unexplored device, and it might pave the way for new applications.

  3. Near-infrared light curves of Type Ia supernovae: studying properties of the second maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, S.; Leibundgut, B.; Spyromilio, J.; Maguire, K.

    2015-04-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been proposed to be much better distance indicators at near-infrared (NIR) compared to optical wavelengths - the effect of dust extinction is expected to be lower and it has been shown that SNe Ia behave more like `standard candles' at NIR wavelengths. To better understand the physical processes behind this increased uniformity, we have studied the Y, J and H-filter light curves of 91 SNe Ia from the literature. We show that the phases and luminosities of the first maximum in the NIR light curves are extremely uniform for our sample. The phase of the second maximum, the late-phase NIR luminosity and the optical light-curve shape are found to be strongly correlated, in particular more luminous SNe Ia reach the second maximum in the NIR filters at a later phase compared to fainter objects. We also find a strong correlation between the phase of the second maximum and the epoch at which the SN enters the Lira law phase in its optical colour curve (epochs ˜ 15 to 30 d after B-band maximum). The decline rate after the second maximum is very uniform in all NIR filters. We suggest that these observational parameters are linked to the nickel and iron mass in the explosion, providing evidence that the amount of nickel synthesized in the explosion is the dominating factor shaping the optical and NIR appearance of SNe Ia.

  4. Classification of pulmonary system diseases patterns using flow-volume curve.

    PubMed

    Arabalibeik, Hossein; Jafari, Samaneh; Agin, Khosro

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry is the most common pulmonary function test. It provides useful information for early detection of respiratory system abnormalities. While decision support systems use normally calculated parameters such as FEV1, FVC, and FEV1% to diagnose the pattern of respiratory system diseases, expert physicians pay close attention to the pattern of the flow-volume curve as well. Fisher discriminant analysis shows that coefficients of a simple polynomial function fitted to the curve, can capture the information about the disease patterns much better than the familiar single point parameters. A neural network then can classify the abnormality pattern as restrictive, obstructive, mixed, or normal. Using the data from 205 adult volunteers, total accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for four categories are 97.6%, 97.5% and 98.8% respectively.

  5. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-01-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC. We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm−2, ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world. PMID:22753544

  6. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device.

    PubMed

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-10-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm(−2), ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.

  7. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  8. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Vacuum and Force-Free Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan E.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profiles. We find that, compared to the profiles derived from symmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines, increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission, formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, with vacuum dipole fits being more favorable.

  9. Light Curve Analysis of the Short Period Solar-Type Binary, EK Comae Berenices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Gray, Jamison D.; Carrigan, Brian

    1995-05-01

    The thirteenth mag variable, EK Comae Berenices, was discovered by Kinman (1966) in a study of the fields near the North Galactic Pole. He identified it as a W UMa variable. This binary was brought to our attention by the AAVSO observer,Borovicka, who conducted a thorough visual investigation. Subsequently, we obtained complete B,V photoelectric light curves of the system phased from observations taken 11, 12 and 14 February and 9, 12 May, 1994 at Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona. The 0.78-m National Undergraduate Research Observatory reflector was used with a thermoelectrically cooled PMT. Five epochs of minimicrons light were determined from observations made during two secondary and three primary eclipses. The bisection-of-chords technique was utilized in their determination. Improved linear and quadratic ephemerides were calculated from all available epochs of minima. The quadratic term of the second ephemeris is marginally significant and negative. Because of its small magnitude and doubtful significance, we cannot regard it as proof that the orbital evolution of EK Com is now dominated by magnetic breaking. The B, V simultaneous light curve solution yields an extreme mass ratio of 3.3 and a fill-out of 10%. We also modeled a 12 degree super-luminous region on the cooler component, simultaneously adjusting its parameters in the WD differential corrections procedure along with the other light curve parameters.

  10. Visible and Near-infrared Light Curves of SN 2009nr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Jonathan; Bryngelson, Ginger

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the behavior of SN 2009nr, an apparently normal type Ia supernova (SN Ia). A plot of this object's brightness over time is known as a light curve. Because of the uniformity of their light curves, SNe Ia are valuable markers for determining the expansion of the universe and other cosmological parameters. Understanding the properties of these supernovae is vital in order to build our confidence in their use as standard candles. A small, but increasing number of SN Ia late-time observations have been made in the near-infrared (NIR). Most exhibit a flattening of the NIR power even as the visible light declines at a steady rate. It is still unclear as to why they exhibit this behavior and how typical this is. In order to characterize the late behavior of SNe Ia, images of SN 2009nr were analyzed using the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). NIR (J, H, K) images were taken with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National-Observatory using the FLAMINGOS IR Imaging Spectrometer while visible (B, V, R, I) images used the Mosaic 1 imager. The supernova's apparent magnitude for each night of observation (by filter) was found by using reference stars. We present preliminary light curves of SN 2009nr and a comparison to another SN observed at similar epochs.

  11. Photometric Monitoring of Non-resolved Space Debris and Databases of Optical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, Thomas; Koshkin, Nikolay; Korobeinikova, Elen; Melikiants, Seda; Shakun, Leonid; Strakhova, Svetlana; Linder, Esther; Silha, Jiri; Hager, Monika

    The population of space debris increased drastically during the last years. Collisions involving massive objects may produce large number of fragments leading to significantly growth of the space debris population. An effective remediation measure in order to stabilize the population in LEO, is therefore the removal of large, massive space debris. To remove these objects, not only precise orbits, but also more detailed information about their attitude states will be required. One important property of an object targeted for removal is its spin period and spin axis orientation. If we observe a rotating object, the observer sees different surface areas of the object which leads to changes in the measured intensity. Rotating objects will produce periodic brightness variations with frequencies which are related to the spin periods. Photometric monitoring is the real tool for remote diagnostics of the satellite rotation around its center of mass. This information is also useful, for example, in case of contingency. Moreover, it is also important to take into account the orientation of non-spherical body (e.g. space debris) in the numerical integration of its motion when a close approach with the another spacecraft is predicted. We introduce the two databases of light curves: the AIUB data base, which contains about a thousand light curves of LEO, MEO and high-altitude debris objects (including a few functional objects) obtained over more than seven years, and the data base of the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa University (Ukraine), which contains the results of more than 10 years of photometric monitoring of functioning satellites and large space debris objects in low Earth orbit. AIUB used its 1m ZIMLAT telescope for all light curves. For tracking low-orbit satellites, the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa used the KT-50 telescope, which has an alt-azimuth mount and allows tracking objects moving at a high angular velocity. The diameter of the KT-50 main mirror is

  12. HD 240121 - An ACV variable showing anti-phase variations of the B and V light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbel, Rainer; Hümmerich, Stefan; Paunzen, Ernst; Bernhard, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The variability of HD 240121 = BD+59 2602 was first suspected by Särg and Wramdemark (1970) and later confirmed by Gröbel R. (1992a,b). Because of the observed anti-phase variations of the B and V light curves, the latter author tentatively suggested an ACV type. Apart from its inclusion in the catalog of New Suspected Variables (NSV 25977), no further investigations of the star have been published. HD 240121 was included into our target list of ACV candidates and investigated in order to determine the reason for the observed brightness variations. All available information on HD 240121 were collected via an exhaustive data mining procedure. Data from Gröbel (1992a,b) were re-analysed and photometric observations from the NSVS and Hipparcos archives were procured and investigated. Line-of-sight reddening and stellar parameters were calculated from archival photometric data. HD 240121 is a young, late B-type CP2 star of the silicon subgroup. The observed period, amplitude of light variations and variability pattern (anti-phase variations) are typical of ACV variables. The occurrence of anti-phase variations of the B and V light curves is rarely observed and points to the existence of a null wavelength in the visual spectrum. We therefore strongly encourage further multi-colour photometric observations of this star.

  13. Tracing Analytic Ray Curves for Light and Sound Propagation in Non-Linear Media.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qi; Yeh, Hengchin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-11-01

    The physical world consists of spatially varying media, such as the atmosphere and the ocean, in which light and sound propagates along non-linear trajectories. This presents a challenge to existing ray-tracing based methods, which are widely adopted to simulate propagation due to their efficiency and flexibility, but assume linear rays. We present a novel algorithm that traces analytic ray curves computed from local media gradients, and utilizes the closed-form solutions of both the intersections of the ray curves with planar surfaces, and the travel distance. By constructing an adaptive unstructured mesh, our algorithm is able to model general media profiles that vary in three dimensions with complex boundaries consisting of terrains and other scene objects such as buildings. Our analytic ray curve tracer with the adaptive mesh improves the efficiency considerably over prior methods. We highlight the algorithm's application on simulation of visual and sound propagation in outdoor scenes.

  14. A procedure for maize genotypes discrimination to drought by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging rapid light curves.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Carlos Antônio Ferreira; de Paiva, Dayane Silva; Casari, Raphael Augusto das Chagas Noqueli; de Oliveira, Nelson Geraldo; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; Kobayashi, Adilson Kenji; Magalhães, Paulo Cesar; Gomide, Reinaldo Lúcio; Souza, Manoel Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis can be roughly separated into biochemical and photochemical processes. Both are affected by drought and can be assessed by non-invasive standard methods. Gas exchange, which mainly assesses the first process, has well-defined protocols. It is considered a standard method for evaluation of plant responses to drought. Under such stress, assessment of photochemical apparatus by chlorophyll fluorescence needs improvement to become faster and reproducible, especially in growing plants under field conditions. For this, we developed a protocol based on chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, using a rapid light curve approach. Almost all parameters obtained by rapid light curves have shown statistical differences between control and drought stressed maize plants. However, most of them were affected by induction processes, relaxation rate, and/or differences in chlorophyll content; while they all were influenced by actinic light intensity on each light step of light curve. Only the normalized parameters related to photochemical and non-photochemical quenching were strongly correlated with data obtained by gas exchange, but only from the light step in which the linear electron flow reached saturation. The procedure developed in this study for discrimination of plant responses to water deficit stress proved to be as fast, efficient and reliable as the standard technique of gas exchange in order to discriminate the responses of maize genotypes to drought. However, unlike that, there is no need to perform daily and time consuming calibration routines. Moreover, plant acclimation to the dark is not required. The protocol can be applied to plants growing in both controlled conditions and full sunlight in the field. In addition, it generates parameters in a fast and accurate measurement process, which enables evaluating several plants in a short period of time.

  15. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  16. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  17. Study of a light curve of Beta Persei at 3428 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-Y.; Merrill, J. E.; Richardson, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Photometric light-curve data obtained during Copernicus satellite observations of Beta Persei in the Balmer continuum at 3428 A are analyzed and reduced. A small but significant fluctuation with a period of very nearly 0.069167 day in the photometric counts is tentatively attributed to a small perturbation in spacecraft attitude introduced each time the satellite passes from daylight into darkness. The light curve is intensity-rectified, phase-rectified, and solved on the assumption that the limb darkening follows the linear cosine law. The resulting distributions of luminosity among the three components of Beta Persei are plotted, and it is shown that the effective temperature of Algol B may be higher than 5000 K.

  18. Spotted star light curve numerical modeling technique and its application to HII 1883 surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbin, A. I.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2014-04-01

    We developed a code for imaging the surfaces of spotted stars by a set of circular spots with a uniform temperature distribution. The flux from the spotted surface is computed by partitioning the spots into elementary areas. The code takes into account the passing of spots behind the visible stellar limb, limb darkening, and overlapping of spots. Modeling of light curves includes the use of recent results of the theory of stellar atmospheres needed to take into account the temperature dependence of flux intensity and limb darkening coefficients. The search for spot parameters is based on the analysis of several light curves obtained in different photometric bands. We test our technique by applying it to HII 1883.

  19. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  20. Secondary Standard Sequence and BVRI-H-alpha Light Curves for NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallum, Melissa; Joner, Micheal

    2017-01-01

    We present data for the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 secured at the BYU West Mountain Observatory on 36 nights between 2016 April 2 and 2016 August 14. Observations were made using standard BVRI filters as well as a 20 nm filter centered on the rest wavelength of the H-alpha line of hydrogen. Standardized data are presented for 15 stars in the field of NGC 4151 in each of the BVRI magnitudes. The V magnitude range for the extended sequence is between 11.480 and 16.100. Additionally, we have found light curves for NGC 4151 in each of the five colors using both traditional photometric analysis and image subtraction routines. representative examples of light curves are presented for each of the techniques we have tested. We acknowledge the Brigham Young University Department of Physics and Astronomy for continued support of student research experiences at the West Mountain Observatory.

  1. Transit light curve and inner structure of close-in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Planets orbiting very close to their host stars have been found, some of them on the verge of tidal disruption. The ellipsoidal shape of these planets can significantly differ from a sphere, which modifies the transit light curves. Here we present an easy method for taking the effect of the tidal bulge into account in the transit photometric observations. We show that the differences in the light curve are greater than previously thought. When detectable, these differences provide an estimation of the fluid Love number, which is invaluable information on the internal structure of close-in planets. We also derive a simple analytical expression to correct the bulk density of these bodies, that can be 20% smaller than current estimates obtained assuming a spherical radius. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. The 3.5 micron light curves of long period variable stars. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared observations at an effective wavelength of 3.5 microns of a selected group of long period variable (LPV) stars are presented. Mira type and semiregular stars of M, S, and C spectral classifications were monitored throughout the full cycle of variability. Although the variable infrared radiation does not exactly repeat in intensity or time, the regularity is sufficient to produce mean 3.5 micron light curves. The 3.5 micron maximum radiation lags the visual maximum by about one-seventh of a cycle, while the minimum 3.5 micron intensity occurs nearly one-half cycle after infrared maximum. In some stars, there are inflections or humps on the ascending portion of the 3.5 micron light curve which may also be seen in the visual variations.

  3. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF THE UNIQUE DA WHITE DWARF BOKS 53856

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: howell@noao.edu

    2011-08-15

    The faint (g = 16.9) hot white dwarf BOKS 53856 was observed by the Kepler Mission in short cadence mode during mid-2009. Analysis of these observations reveals a highly stable modulation with a period of 6.1375 hr and a 2.46% half-amplitude. The folded light curve has an unusual shape that is difficult to explain in terms of a binary system containing an unseen companion more luminous than an L0 brown dwarf. Optical spectra of BOKS 53856 show a T{sub eff} = 34,000 K, log g = 8.0 DA white dwarf. There are few, if any, known white dwarfs in this temperature range exhibiting photometric variations similar to those we describe. A magnetic spin-modulated white dwarf model can in principle explain the light curve, an interpretation supported by spectral observations of the H{alpha} line showing evidence of Zeeman splitting.

  4. BINARY CANDIDATES IN THE JOVIAN TROJAN AND HILDA POPULATIONS FROM NEOWISE LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnett, S.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.

    2015-02-01

    Determining the binary fraction for a population of asteroids, particularly as a function of separation between the two components, helps describe the dynamical environment at the time the binaries formed, which in turn offers constraints on the dynamical evolution of the solar system. We searched the NEOWISE archival data set for close and contact binary Trojans and Hildas via their diagnostically large light curve amplitudes. We present 48 out of 554 Hilda and 34 out of 953 Trojan binary candidates in need of follow-up to confirm their large light curve amplitudes and subsequently constrain the binary orbit and component sizes. From these candidates, we calculate a preliminary estimate of the binary fraction without confirmation or debiasing of 14%-23% for Trojans larger than ∼12 km and 30%-51% for Hildas larger than ∼4 km. Once the binary candidates have been confirmed, it should be possible to infer the underlying, debiased binary fraction through estimation of survey biases.

  5. Analysis of Characteristics of Light Curve Profiles of the Flares Erupted from Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duo, Yun; Hua-ning, Wang; Han, He

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares belong to a kind of eruptive phenomena caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy nearby sunspots. It is found that similar flares occurred as well in many Sun-like stars (called as Sun-like star flares). From the data acquired by the Kepler space telescope the SC (Short Cadence) data are mainly selected to make analysis, in order to find the characteristic parameters of light curve profiles of the flares erupted from Sun-like stars for a statistical study, and to summarize the activity features of these stellar flares. The analyzed results show that the light curve profiles and characteristic timescales of the flares of Sun-like stars are quite similar to those of solar flares, which may indicate the same physical mechanism for these two kinds of flares.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ks light curve of 299 SMC new Cepheids (Moretti+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, M. I.; Clementini, G.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Rubele, S.; Cioni, M.-R.; Muraveva, T.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Cross, N. J. G.; Ivanov, V. D.; Piatti, A. E.; de Grijs, R.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a technique to identify variable stars using only the multi-epoch near-infrared photometry obtained by the VMC survey and have specifically tailored it to the identification of Cepheids. The technique exploits colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams, and PL relations defined by known SMC Cepheids, along with template parameter selections and visual inspection of the light curve to identify bona fide Cepheids. The technique was applied to external regions of the SMC for which complete VMC Ks-band observations are available and no comprehensive identification of variable stars from other surveys exists yet. We have identified and present Ks-band light curves for 299 SMC Cepheids. (2 data files).

  7. Ultraviolet light curves of the dwarf novae U Geminorum and VW Hydri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The optical light curves of many dwarf novae show a prominent hump. This hump is attributed to a hot spot located where the gas stream from the cool secondary star strikes the accretion disk around the white dwarf primary. In the present investigation, the energy distribution of the hot spot is obtained from the amplitude of the hump in different wavelength regions. The color temperature of the hot spot is derived, and the temperature and optical thickness for thermal free-free emission models for the spot is discussed. The nature of the disk is studied by comparing its UV-optical energy distribution with computed accretion disk models. The ultraviolet light curves of two quiescent dwarf novae, U Gem and VW Hyi is derived by combining Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS) photometry from several different epochs.

  8. Reliable inference of light curve parameters in the presence of systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Neale P.

    2016-10-01

    Time-series photometry and spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets allow us to study their atmospheres. Unfortunately, the required precision to extract atmospheric information surpasses the design specifications of most general purpose instrumentation. This results in instrumental systematics in the light curves that are typically larger than the target precision. Systematics must therefore be modelled, leaving the inference of light-curve parameters conditioned on the subjective choice of systematics models and model-selection criteria. Here, I briefly review the use of systematics models commonly used for transmission and emission spectroscopy, including model selection, marginalisation over models, and stochastic processes. These form a hierarchy of models with increasing degree of objectivity. I argue that marginalisation over many systematics models is a minimal requirement for robust inference. Stochastic models provide even more flexibility and objectivity, and therefore produce the most reliable results. However, no systematics models are perfect, and the best strategy is to compare multiple methods and repeat observations where possible.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curves of Qatar-2 transit events (Mancini+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Crossfield, I.; Nikolov, N.; Bruni, I.; Zambelli, R.; Henning, T.

    2014-11-01

    17 light curves of five transits of the extrasolar planetary system Qatar-2, observed between 2012 and 2013, are presented. Three of the transits were observed simultaneously in the SDSS griz passbands using the seven-beam GROND imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope. A fourth was observed simultaneously in Gunn grz using the CAHA 2.2-m telescope with BUSCA, and in Gunn r using the Cassini 1.52-m telescope. The last was observed in Cousins I with the CAHA 1.23-m telescope.Every light curve shows small anomalies due to the passage of the planetary shadow over a cool spot on the surface of the host star. (18 data files).

  10. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  11. The Los Alamos Supernova Light Curve Project: Current Projects and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Brandon Kerry; Los Alamos Supernovae Research Group

    2015-01-01

    The Los Alamos Supernova Light Curve Project models supernovae in the ancient and modern universe to determine the luminosities of observability of certain supernovae events and to explore the physics of supernovae in the local universe. The project utilizes RAGE, Los Alamos' radiation hydrodynamics code to evolve the explosions of progenitors prepared in well-established stellar evolution codes. RAGE allows us to capture events such as shock breakout and collisions of ejecta with shells of material which cannot be modeled well in other codes. RAGE's dumps are then ported to LANL's SPECTRUM code which uses LANL's OPLIB opacities database to calculate light curves and spectra. In this paper, we summarize our recent work in modeling supernovae.

  12. REVISITING THE LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE RELATIVISTIC TURBULENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Da-Bin; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Sun, Mou-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    Rapid temporal variability has been widely observed in the light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One possible mechanism for such variability is related to the relativistic eddies in the jet. In this paper, we include the contribution of the inter-eddy medium together with the eddies to the gamma-ray emission. We show that the gamma-ray emission can either lead or lag behind the observed synchrotron emission, where the latter originates in the inter-eddy medium and provides most of the seed photons for producing gamma-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering. As a consequence, we argue that the lead/lag found in non-stationary short-lived light curves may not reveal the intrinsic lead/lag of different emission components. In addition, our results may explain the lead of gamma-ray emission with respect to optical emission observed in GRB 080319B.

  13. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  14. The light curve of a transient X-ray source. [the aeriel satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-V satellite monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on approximately 4 December 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of approximately 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable pre-flare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than approximately 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-V operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, and a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37th power ergs/sec.

  15. BEER analysis of Kepler and CoRoT light curves. III. Spectroscopic confirmation of seventy new beaming binaries discovered in CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The BEER algorithm searches stellar light curves for the BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection photometric modulations that are caused by a short-period companion. These three effects are typically of very low amplitude and can mainly be detected in light curves from space-based photometers. Unlike eclipsing binaries, these effects are not limited to edge-on inclinations. Aims: Applying the algorithm to wide-field photometric surveys such as CoRoT and Kepler offers an opportunity to better understand the statistical properties of short-period binaries. It also widens the window for detecting intrinsically rare systems, such as short-period brown-dwarf and massive-planetary companions to main-sequence stars. Methods: Applying the search to the first five long-run center CoRoT fields, we identified 481 non-eclipsing candidates with periodic flux amplitudes of 0.5-87 mmag. Optimizing the Anglo-Australian-Telescope pointing coordinates and the AAOmega fiber-allocations with dedicated softwares, we acquired six spectra for 231 candidates and seven spectra for another 50 candidates in a seven-night campaign. Analysis of the red-arm AAOmega spectra, which covered the range of 8342-8842 Å, yielded a radial-velocity precision of ~1 km s-1. Spectra containing lines of more than one star were analyzed with the two-dimensional correlation algorithm TODCOR. Results: The measured radial velocities confirmed the binarity of seventy of the BEER candidates - 45 single-line binaries, 18 double-line binaries, and 7 diluted binaries. We show that red giants introduce a major source of false candidates and demonstrate a way to improve BEER's performance in extracting higher fidelity samples from future searches of CoRoT light curves. The periods of the confirmed binaries span a range of 0.3-10 days and show a rise in the number of binaries per ΔlogP toward longer periods. The estimated mass ratios of the double-line binaries and the mass ratios assigned to the single

  16. New Light Curves and Period Studies of V502 OPH W UMA System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, Nabil S.

    NEW LIGHT CURVES AND PERIOD STUDIES OF V502 OPH W UMa SYSTEM N.S.Awadalla National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics( NRIAG ) Helwan Cairo EGYPT New BVR photoelectric observations of the W UMa eclipsing binary system V502 Oph have been presented and analyzed. The geometric and physical elements of the system have been obtained and compared to the previous results. The classification of the system concerning the sub-type of the W UMa binary has been studied as well as its evolution stage. Its period variation in a view of the light time effect has been examin

  17. X-Rays from the Explosion Site: Fifteen Years of Light Curves of SN 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.; Ray, Alak; Immler, Stefan; Pooley, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J in a nearby galaxy M81. This is the only supernova other than SN 1987A, which is so extensively followed in the X-ray bands. Here we report on SN 1993J observations with the Chandra in the year 2005 and 2008, and Swift observations in 2005, 2006 and 2008. We combined these observations with all available archival data of SN 1993J, which includes ROSAT, ASCA, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, observations from 1993 April to 2006 August. In this paper we report the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J, extending up to fifteen years, in the soft (0.3-2.4 keV), hard (2-8 keV) and combined (0.3-8 keV) bands. The hard and soft-band fluxes decline at different rates initially, but after about 5 years they both undergo a t(sup -1) decline. The soft X-rays, which are initially low, start dominating after a few hundred days. We interpret that most of the emission below 8 keV is coming from the reverse shock which is radiative initially for around first 1000-2000 days and then turn into adiabatic shock. Our hydrodynamic simulation also confirms the reverse shock origin of the observed light curves. We also compare the Ha line luminosity of SN 1993J with its X-ray light curve and note that the Ha line luminosity has a fairly high fraction of the X-ray emission, indicating presence of clumps in the emitting plasma.

  18. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nousek, J.A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S.K.; Burrows, D.N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.P.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Falcone, A.D.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Goad, M.; Godet, O.; Hurkett, C.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /NASA, Marshall /Leicester U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /NASA, Marshall /IASF, Palermo /Brera Observ. /Frascati /Milan Bicocca U. /NASA, Goddard

    2005-08-17

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments: (1) an initial very steep decay ({infinity} t{sup -a} with 3 {approx}< a{sub 1} {approx}< 5) , followed by (2) a very shallow decay (0.2 {approx}< a{sub 2} {approx}< 0.8), and finally (3) a somewhat steeper decay (1 {approx}< a{sub 3} {approx}< 1.5). These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times, 300 s {approx}< t{sub break,1} {approx}< 500 s and 10{sup 3} s {approx}< t{sub break,2} {approx}< 10{sup 4} s. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadic activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission, from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve (t{sub break,1}) takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay (a{sub 2}) likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve (t{sub break,2}). This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f {approx}> 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  19. Two bright, variable sources with unusual light curves discovered by ASAS-SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, T.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vallely, P.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shields, J. V.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo

    2017-08-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by ASAS-SN project (Shappee et al. 2014; Kochanek et al. 2017) to characterize and catalog all bright variable stars, we have discovered two bright, variable sources with unusual light curves--ASASSN-V J033455.88-053957.9 (mean V 13.0) and ASASSN-V J211014.40-242105.3 (mean V 14.5).

  20. LFN, QPO and fractal dimension of X-ray light curves from black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvetov, Art; Grebenev, Sergey

    The origin of the low frequency noise (LFN) and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in X-ray flux of Galactic black hole binaries is still not recognized in spite of multiple studies and attempts to model this phenomenon. There are known correlations between the QPO frequency, X-ray power density, X-ray flux and spectral state of the system, but there is no model that can do these dependences understandable. For the low frequency (~1 Hz) QPO we still have no even an idea capable to explain their production and don't know even what part of an accretion disc is responsible for them. Here we attempted to measure the fractal dimension of X-ray light curves of several black hole X-ray binaries and to study its correlation with the frequency of quasi periodic oscillations observed in their X-ray light-curves. The fractal dimension is a measure of the space-filling capacity of the light curves' profile. To measure the fractal dimension we used R/S method, which is fast enough and has good reputation in financial analytic and materials sciences. We found that if no QPO were observed in X-ray flux from the particular source, the fractal dimension is equal to the unique value which is independent on the source, its luminosity or its spectral state. On the other hand if QPO were detected in the flux, the fractal dimension deviated from its usual value. Also, we found a clear correlation between the QPO frequency and the fractal dimension of the emission. The relationship between these two parameters is solid but nonlinear. We believe that the analysis of X-ray light curves of black hole binaries using the fractal dimension has a good scientific potential and may provide an addition information on the geometry of accretion flow and fundamental physical parameters of the system.

  1. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaj, Ján

    2012-04-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. The Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently, a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. ɛ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed a dark, inclined, disk of dust with a central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks: an internal optically thick disk and an external optically thin disk which absorbs and scatters radiation. Shallow mid-eclipse brightening may result from eclipses by nearly edge-on flared (dusty or gaseous) disks. Mid-eclipse brightening may also be due to strong forward scattering and optical properties of the dust which can have an important effect on the light-curves. There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and transiting extrasolar planets. The reflection effect which is briefly reviewed is one of them. The exact Roche shape and temperature distributions over the surface of all currently known transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. In some cases (HAT-P-32b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b), departures from the spherical shape can reach 7-15%.

  2. Presenting new exoplanet candidates for the CoRoT chromatic light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufleur, Rodrigo; Emilio, Marcelo; Andrade, Laerte; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; De La Reza, Ramiro

    2015-08-01

    One of the most promising topics of modern Astronomy is the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets due to its importance for the comprehension of planetary formation and evolution. Missions like MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars Telescope) (Walker et al., 2003) and especially the satellites dedicated to the search for exoplanets CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) (Baglin et al., 1998) and Kepler (Borucki et al., 2003) produced a great amount of data and together account for hundreds of new discoveries. An important source of error in the search for planets with light curves obtained from space observatories are the displacements occuring in the data due to external causes. This artificial charge generation phenomenon associated with the data is mainly caused by the impact of high energy particles onto the CCD (Pinheiro da Silva et al. 2008), although other sources of error, not as well known also need to be taken into account. So, an effective analysis of the light curves depends a lot on the mechanisms employed to deal with these phenomena. To perform our research, we developed and applied a different method to fix the light curves, the CDAM (Corot Detrend Algorithm Modified), inspired by the work of Mislis et al. (2012). The paradigms were obtained using the BLS method (Kovács et al., 2002). After a semiautomatic pre-analysis associated with a visual inspection of the planetary transits signatures, we obtained dozens of exoplanet candidates in very good agreement with the literature and also new unpublished cases. We present the study results and characterization of the new cases for the chromatic channel public light curves of the CoRoT satellite.

  3. Light curve analysis of beta Lyrae type binary star EM TrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkardeş, B.

    2017-02-01

    An analysis of photometric observations of the eclipsing binary system EM TrA (TYC 9258-211-1=CD-67 1660) is presented in this study. The V light curve of the system from All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) was solved using the Wilson-Devinney code. The final solution describes EM TrA as a detached system. The absolute parameters of the components of the system were estimated.

  4. Complexity in the light curves and spectra of slow-evolving superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Nicholl, M.; Chen, T.-W.; Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Krühler, T.; Anderson, J. P.; Baltay, C.; Della Valle, M.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Galbany, L.; Kankare, E.; Maguire, K.; Rabinowitz, D.; Smith, K.; Valenti, S.; Young, D. R.

    2017-07-01

    A small group of the newly discovered superluminous supernovae show broad and slow-evolving light curves. Here we present extensive observational data for the slow-evolving superluminous supernova LSQ14an, which brings this group of transients to four in total in the low-redshift Universe (z < 0.2; SN 2007bi, PTF12dam, SN 2015bn). We particularly focus on the optical and near-infrared evolution during the period from 50 d up to 400 d from peak, showing that they are all fairly similar in their light curve and spectral evolution. LSQ14an shows broad, blueshifted [O III] λλ4959, 5007 lines, as well as a blueshifted [O II] λλ7320, 7330 and [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323. Furthermore, the sample of these four objects shows common features. Semi-forbidden and forbidden emission lines appear surprisingly early at 50-70 d and remain visible with almost no variation up to 400 d. The spectra remain blue out to 400 d. There are small, but discernible light-curve fluctuations in all of them. The light curve of each shows a faster decline than 56Co after 150 d and it further steepens after 300 d. We also expand our analysis presenting X-ray limits for LSQ14an and SN 2015bn and discuss their diagnostic power. These features are quite distinct from the faster evolving superluminous supernovae and are not easily explained in terms of only a variation in ejecta mass. While a central engine is still the most likely luminosity source, it appears that the ejecta structure is complex, with multiple emitting zones and at least some interaction between the expanding ejecta and surrounding material.

  5. Modeling the X-ray - UV Light Curves of NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkeley, A. J.; Kazanas, D.; Ozik, J.

    1999-05-01

    We model the correlated X-ray - UV observations of NGC 7469, for which well sampled data in both these bands have been obtained recently by a multiwavelength monitoring campaign. To this end we derive the response function for reprocessing hard (X-ray) to UV radiation from a point source by an infinite plane, located at a given distance below the source, as a function of the wavelength lambda of the reprocessed radiation and the time lag tau , under the assumption that the X-ray flux is reprocessed and emitted locally as a black body of the appropriate temperature. Using the observed X-ray light curve as input we compute the expected continuum UV emission as a function of time at wavelengths lambda lambda 1360 Angstroms and lambda lambda 4690 Angstroms, assuming that the the X-ray source is located a few Schwarzschild radii above the disk plane, with the mass of the black hole as a free parameter. We searched the parameter space of black hole masses and observer azimuthal angles but we were unable to reproduce a UV light curve which would resemble, even remotely, the observed one. We then explored under what conditions it would be possible to obtain model UV light curves whose autocorrelation function would match those observed. Even though we considered black hole masses as large as 10(9) Msun no such matching was possible. Our results indicate that some of the fundamental assumptions of this model will have to be modified to obtain even approximate agreement between the observed and model X-ray -- UV light curves.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V960 Mon light curves (Hackstein+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackstein, M.; Haas, M.; Kospal, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Chini, R.; Abraham, P.; Moor, A.; Pozo Nunez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Kaderhandt, L.; Fein, C.; Barr Dominguez, A.; Hodapp, K.-W.

    2015-10-01

    Photometric light curves for V960Mon (2MASS J06593158-0405277) from different telescopes at multiple wavelengths between September 2009 to June 2015. This comprises optical observations from Universitaetssternwarte Bochum (USB) in Chile as part of the Bochum Galatic Disk Survey (GDS, 2015AN....336..590H), Konkoly Observatory in Hungary, and the Remote Observatory Atacama Desert (ROAD) in Chile, as well as near-infrared data from USB. (1 data file).

  7. Light curves and spectra from off-axis gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Nappo, F.

    2016-10-01

    If gamma-ray burst prompt emission originates at a typical radius, and if material producing the emission moves at relativistic speed, then the variability of the resulting light curve depends on the viewing angle. This is due to the fact that the pulse evolution time-scale is Doppler contracted, while the pulse separation is not. For off-axis viewing angles θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1, the pulse broadening significantly smears out the light-curve variability. This is largely independent of geometry and emission processes. To explore a specific case, we set up a simple model of a single pulse under the assumption that the pulse rise and decay are dominated by the shell curvature effect. We show that such a pulse observed off-axis is (i) broader, (ii) softer and (iii) displays a different hardness-intensity correlation with respect to the same pulse seen on-axis. For each of these effects, we provide an intuitive physical explanation. We then show how a synthetic light curve made by a superposition of pulses changes with increasing viewing angle. We find that a highly variable light curve (as seen on-axis) becomes smooth and apparently single-pulsed (when seen off-axis) because of pulse overlap. To test the relevance of this fact, we estimate the fraction of off-axis gamma-ray bursts detectable by Swift as a function of redshift, finding that a sizeable fraction (between 10 per cent and 80 per cent) of nearby (z < 0.1) bursts are observed with θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1. Based on these results, we argue that low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts are consistent with being ordinary bursts seen off-axis.

  8. Spotted star mapping by light curve inversion: Tests and application to HD 12545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbin, A. I.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    A code for mapping the surfaces of spotted stars is developed. The concept of the code is to analyze rotational-modulated light curves. We simulate the process of reconstruction for the star surface and the results of simulation are presented. The reconstruction atrifacts caused by the ill-posed nature of the problem are deduced. The surface of the spotted component of system HD 12545 is mapped using the procedure.

  9. An Analysis of Pluto Occultation Light Curves Using an Atmospheric Radiative-conductive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zhu, X.; Strobel, D. F.; Elliot, J. L.

    2009-09-01

    Using the radiative equilibrium temperature profiles obtained from the radiative-conductive model of Strobel et al. 1996 (Icarus, 120, 266-289), we calculate a set of occultation light curves for Pluto for a range of surface pressures and methane mixing ratios, the latter of which is assumed to be constant with height. We have devised a method to interpolate a grid of model light curves in order to perform least-squares fitting to available Pluto occultation data. Fits without a troposphere and with a surface radius of 1152 km to the 2006 June 12 occultation by Pluto observed at Siding Spring (Elliot et al. 2007, AJ 134, 1-13) return a surface pressure and methane mixing ratio of 18.9 +/- 0.8 microbar and 0.0020 +/- 0.0003, respectively. Best fits to the 2002 August 21 occultation observed using the 2.24m University of Hawaii telescope (Pasachoff et al. 2005, AJ 129, 1718-1723) are 18.5 +/- 0.5 microbar and 0.0020 +/- 0.0001, respectively. For each of these fits, surface temperature and CO mixing ratio (also constant with height) were taken to be 37 K and 0.0005, respectively. The model light curves are not found to be sensitive to either of these parameters; CO mixing ratios as high as 0.02 are found to be consistent with the formal error bars on the fits above. The fitted surface pressure values are higher than those derived from the no troposphere models of Lellouch et al. 2009 (Astron. Astrophys. 495, L17-L21), while the methane mixing ratio values are lower. We will present our methodology of comparing atmospheric models to occultation data, fitting results for other stellar occultation light curves, and implications for Pluto's atmospheric structure. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NNX08AE92G, NNX07AK73G, and NNG05GO91G.

  10. CfA3: 185 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES FROM THE CfA

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Bakos, Gaspar; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R.; Caldwell, Nelson; Calkins, Mike; Cho, Richard; Contreras, Maria; Jha, Saurabh; Matheson, Tom; Modjaz, Maryam; Rest, Armin; Michael Wood-Vasey, W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Bragg, Ann; Briceno, Cesar; Ciupik, Larry; Dendy, Kristi-Concannon E-mail: kirshner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-20

    We present multiband photometry of 185 type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), with over 11,500 observations. These were acquired between 2001 and 2008 at the F. L. Whipple Observatory of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). This sample contains the largest number of homogeneously observed and reduced nearby SNe Ia (z {approx}< 0.08) published to date. It more than doubles the nearby sample, bringing SN Ia cosmology to the point where systematic uncertainties dominate. Our natural system photometry has a precision of {approx}<0.02 mag in BVRIr'i' and {approx}<0.04 mag in U for points brighter than 17.5 mag. We also estimate a systematic uncertainty of 0.03 mag in our SN Ia standard system BVRIr'i' photometry and 0.07 mag for U. Comparisons of our standard system photometry with published SN Ia light curves and comparison stars, where available for the same SN, reveal agreement at the level of a few hundredths mag in most cases. We find that 1991bg-like SNe Ia are sufficiently distinct from other SNe Ia in their color and light-curve-shape/luminosity relation that they should be treated separately in light-curve/distance fitter training samples. The CfA3 sample will contribute to the development of better light-curve/distance fitters, particularly in the few dozen cases where near-infrared photometry has been obtained and, together, can help disentangle host-galaxy reddening from intrinsic supernova color, reducing the systematic uncertainty in SN Ia distances due to dust.

  11. A comparative study of multiwavelength theoretical and observed light curves of Cepheid variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Marconi, Marcella; Rejkuba, Marina; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the theoretical light curves of Cepheid variables at optical (UBVRI) and near-infrared (JKL) wavelengths using the Fourier decomposition and principal component analysis methods. The Cepheid light curves are based on the full-amplitude, non-linear, convective hydrodynamical models for chemical compositions representative of Cepheids in the Galaxy (Y = 0.28, Z = 0.02), Large Magellanic Cloud (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.008) and Small Magellanic Cloud (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.004). We discuss the variation of light-curve parameters with different compositions and mass-luminosity levels as a function of period and wavelength, and compare our results with observations. For a fixed composition, the theoretical amplitude parameters decrease while the phase parameters increase with wavelength, similar to the observed Fourier parameters. The optical amplitude parameters obtained using canonical mass-luminosity Cepheid models exhibit a large offset with respect to the observations for periods between 7 and 11 d, when compared to the non-canonical mass-luminosity levels. The central minimum of the Hertzsprung progression for amplitude parameters shifts to the longer periods with decrease/increase in metallicity/wavelength for both theoretical and observed light curves. The principal components for Magellanic Cloud Cepheid models are consistent with observations at optical wavelengths. We also observe two distinct populations in the first principal component for optical and near-infrared wavelengths while the J band contributes to both populations. Finally, we take into account the variation in the convective efficiency by increasing the adopted mixing length parameter from the standard 1.5 to 1.8. This results in a zero-point offset in the bolometric mean magnitudes and in amplitude parameters (except close to 10 d), reducing the systematically large difference in theoretical amplitudes.

  12. Characterizing Extrasolar Planets from Transit Light Curves obtained at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory - Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés Sada, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    At the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory (MPC 720) we have maintained a program for observing extrasolar planet transit light curves with telescopes of modest size and standard photometric filters since 2005. In our archives we have over 325 transits of over 70 known systems. Our goal is to combine individual transit light curves of the same system to increase the S/N of the data. We then analyze it together with the radial velocity information from the literature in order to confirm, improve or revise the main parameters that characterize the transiting system. It is important to continue observing these systems not only to improve and refine our understanding of them, but also to record any possible transient phenomenon and monitor for possible period changes, as reflected in the mid-transit times, due to the gravitational influence of additional planets in the system.In this second presentation we report our observations of 42 individual exoplanet transit light curves and the results from successfully combining six light curves for HAT-P-3 (Ic), twenty-one for TrES-3 (6 in V, 5 in Rc, 6 in Ic and 4 in z’), seven for XO-2 (Ic), four for XO-3 (Ic), and four for XO-4 (Ic). From these we then derive planet sizes (Rp/R*), orbital distances (a/R*) and orbital inclinations (i) for these systems. In most cases we confirm the parameters reported in the literature with similar uncertainties, validating our methodology. From our mid-transit times and those of the literature we do not find any statistically significant deviations from a fixed orbital period for these systems.

  13. MODELING OF GAMMA-RAY PULSAR LIGHT CURVES USING THE FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xuening; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-06-01

    Gamma-ray emission from pulsars has long been modeled using a vacuum dipole field. This approximation ignores changes in the field structure caused by the magnetospheric plasma and strong plasma currents. We present the first results of gamma-ray pulsar light-curve modeling using the more realistic field taken from three-dimensional force-free (FF) magnetospheric simulations. Having the geometry of the field, we apply several prescriptions for the location of the emission zone, comparing the light curves to observations. We find that when the emission region is chosen according to the conventional slot-gap (or two-pole caustic) prescription, the model fails to produce double-peak pulse profiles, mainly because the size of the polar cap in the FF magnetosphere is larger than the vacuum field polar cap. This suppresses caustic formation in the inner magnetosphere. The conventional outer-gap model is capable of producing only one peak under general conditions because a large fraction of open field lines does not cross the null charge surface. We propose a novel 'separatrix layer' model, where the high-energy emission originates from a thin layer on the open field lines just inside of the separatrix that bounds the open flux tube. The emission from this layer generates two strong caustics on the sky map due to the effect we term 'Sky Map Stagnation' (SMS). It is related to the fact that the FF field asymptotically approaches the field of a rotating split monopole, and the photons emitted on such field lines in the outer magnetosphere arrive to the observer in phase. The double-peak light curve is a natural consequence of SMS. We show that most features of the currently available gamma-ray pulsar light curves can be reasonably well reproduced and explained with the separatrix layer model using the FF field. Association of the emission region with the current sheet will guide more detailed future studies of the magnetospheric acceleration physics.

  14. X-Rays from the Explosion Site: Fifteen Years of Light Curves of SN 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.; Ray, Alak; Immler, Stefan; Pooley, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J in a nearby galaxy M81. This is the only supernova other than SN 1987A, which is so extensively followed in the X-ray bands. Here we report on SN 1993J observations with the Chandra in the year 2005 and 2008, and Swift observations in 2005, 2006 and 2008. We combined these observations with all available archival data of SN 1993J, which includes ROSAT, ASCA, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, observations from 1993 April to 2006 August. In this paper we report the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J, extending up to fifteen years, in the soft (0.3-2.4 keV), hard (2-8 keV) and combined (0.3-8 keV) bands. The hard and soft-band fluxes decline at different rates initially, but after about 5 years they both undergo a t(sup -1) decline. The soft X-rays, which are initially low, start dominating after a few hundred days. We interpret that most of the emission below 8 keV is coming from the reverse shock which is radiative initially for around first 1000-2000 days and then turn into adiabatic shock. Our hydrodynamic simulation also confirms the reverse shock origin of the observed light curves. We also compare the Ha line luminosity of SN 1993J with its X-ray light curve and note that the Ha line luminosity has a fairly high fraction of the X-ray emission, indicating presence of clumps in the emitting plasma.

  15. Properties of Magnetars Mimicking 56Ni-powered Light Curves in Type IC Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Many Type Ic superluminous supernovae have light-curve decline rates after their luminosity peak, which are close to the nuclear decay rate of {}56{Co}, consistent with the interpretation that they are powered by {}56{Ni} and possibly pair-instability supernovae. However, their rise times are typically shorter than those expected from pair-instability supernovae, and Type Ic superluminous supernovae are often suggested to be powered by magnetar spin-down. If magnetar spin-down is actually a major mechanism to power Type Ic superluminous supernovae, it should be able to produce decline rates similar to the {}56{Co} decay rate rather easily. In this study, we investigate the conditions for magnetars under which their spin-down energy input can behave like the {}56{Ni} nuclear decay energy input. We find that an initial magnetic field strength within a certain range is sufficient to keep the magnetar energy deposition within a factor of a few of the {}56{Co} decay energy for several hundreds of days. Magnetar spin-down needs to be by almost pure dipole radiation with the braking index close to three to mimic {}56{Ni} in a wide parameter range. Not only late-phase {}56{Co}-decay-like light curves, but also rise time and peak luminosity of most {}56{Ni}-powered light curves can be reproduced by magnetars. Bolometric light curves for more than 700 days are required to distinguish the two energy sources solely by them. We expect that more slowly declining superluminous supernovae with short rise times should be found if they are mainly powered by magnetar spin-down.

  16. Using Gaussian Processes to Model Noise in Eclipsing Binary Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Hambleton, Kelly M.

    2017-01-01

    The most precise data we have at hand arguably comes from NASA's Kepler mission, for which there is no good flux calibration available since it was designed to measure relative flux changes down to ~20ppm level. Instrumental artifacts thus abound in the data, and they vary with the module, location on the CCD, target brightness, electronic cross-talk, etc. In addition, Kepler's near-uninterrupted mode of observation reveals astrophysical signals and transient phenomena (i.e. spots, flares, protuberances, pulsations, magnetic field features, etc) that are not accounted for in the models. These "nuisance" signals, along with instrumental artifacts, are considered noise when modeling light curves; this noise is highly correlated and it cannot be considered poissonian or gaussian. Detrending non-white noise from light curve data has been an ongoing challenge in modeling eclipsing binary star and exoplanet transit light curves. Here we present an approach using Gaussian Processes (GP) to model noise as part of the overall likelihood function. The likelihood function consists of the eclipsing binary light curve generator PHOEBE, correlated noise model using GP, and a poissonian (shot) noise attributed to the actual stochastic component of the entire noise model. We consider GP parameters and poissonian noise amplitude as free parameters that are being sampled within the likelihood function, so the end result is the posterior probability not only for eclipsing binary model parameters, but for the noise parameters as well. We show that the posteriors of principal parameters are significantly more robust when noise is modeled rigorously compared to modeling detrended data with an eclipsing binary model alone. This work has been funded by NSF grant #1517460.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multi-band light curve of WASP-36 (Mancini+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Kemmer, J.; Southworth, J.; Bott, K.; Molliere, P.; Ciceri, S.; Chen, G.; Henning, T.

    2016-05-01

    17 light curves of five transits of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-36, observed between 2012 and 2015, are presented. Four of the transits were observed simultaneously in the SDSS griz passbands using the seven-beam GROND imager on the MPG 2.2-m telescope. A fifth was observed in Cousins R with the CAHA 1.23-m telescope. (2 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ji light curves of WTS-2 (Birkby+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, J. L.; Cappetta, M.; Cruz, P.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Ivanyuk, O.; Mustill, A. J.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Pinfield, D. J.; Sipocz, B.; Kovacs, G.; Saglia, R.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; Campbell, D.; Catalan, S.; Fossati, L.; Galvez-Ortiz, M.-C.; Kenworthy, M.; Lillo-Box, J.; Martin, E. L.; Mislis, D.; de Mooij, E. J. W.; Nefs, S. V.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Stoev, H.; Zendejas, J.; Del Burgo, C.; Barnes, J.; Goulding, N.; Haswell, C. A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Lodieu, N.; Murgas, F.; Palle, E.; Solano, E.; Steele, P.; Tata, R.

    2015-07-01

    The infrared light curves of the WTS were generated from time series photometry taken with the WFCAM imager mounted at the prime focus of UKIRT. In order to confirm the transit of WTS-2 b and to help constrain the transit model, on 2010 July 18 we obtained further time series photometry in the Sloan i band using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at Roque de Los Muchachos, La Palma. (2 data files).

  19. Dusty tails of evaporating exoplanets. II. Physical modelling of the KIC 12557548b light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lieshout, R.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Brogi, M.; de Graaff, T.; Hekker, S.; Kama, M.; Keller, C. U.; Ridden-Harper, A.; van Werkhoven, T. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Evaporating rocky exoplanets, such as KIC 12557548b, eject large amounts of dust, which can trail the planet in a comet-like tail. When such objects occult their host star, the resulting transit signal contains information about the dust in the tail. Aims: We aim to use the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve of KIC 12557548b to constrain the size and composition of the dust grains that make up the tail, as well as the mass loss rate of the planet. Methods: Using a self-consistent numerical model of the dust dynamics and sublimation, we calculated the shape of the tail by following dust grains from their ejection from the planet to their destruction due to sublimation. From this dust cloud shape, we generated synthetic light curves (incorporating the effects of extinction and angle-dependent scattering), which were then compared with the phase-folded Kepler light curve. We explored the free-parameter space thoroughly using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Results: Our physics-based model is capable of reproducing the observed light curve in detail. Good fits are found for initial grain sizes between 0.2 and 5.6 μm and dust mass loss rates of 0.6 to 15.6 M⊕ Gyr-1 (2σ ranges). We find that only certain combinations of material parameters yield the correct tail length. These constraints are consistent with dust made of corundum (Al2O3), but do not agree with a range of carbonaceous, silicate, or iron compositions. Conclusions: Using a detailed, physically motivated model, it is possible to constrain the composition of the dust in the tails of evaporating rocky exoplanets. This provides a unique opportunity to probe to interior composition of the smallest known exoplanets.

  20. Ensemble Learning Method for Outlier Detection and its Application to Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Protopapas, Pavlos; Sim, Brandon; Chen, Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Outlier detection is necessary for automated data analysis, with specific applications spanning almost every domain from financial markets to epidemiology to fraud detection. We introduce a novel mixture of the experts outlier detection model, which uses a dynamically trained, weighted network of five distinct outlier detection methods. After dimensionality reduction, individual outlier detection methods score each data point for “outlierness” in this new feature space. Our model then uses dynamically trained parameters to weigh the scores of each method, allowing for a finalized outlier score. We find that the mixture of experts model performs, on average, better than any single expert model in identifying both artificially and manually picked outliers. This mixture model is applied to a data set of astronomical light curves, after dimensionality reduction via time series feature extraction. Our model was tested using three fields from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. We confirm that the outliers detected using this method belong to rare classes, like Novae, He-burning, and red giant stars; other outlier light curves identified have no available information associated with them. To elucidate their nature, we created a website containing the light-curve data and information about these objects. Users can attempt to classify the light curves, give conjectures about their identities, and sign up for follow up messages about the progress made on identifying these objects. This user submitted data can be used further train of our mixture of experts model. Our code is publicly available to all who are interested.

  1. The search for single exoplanet transits in the Kepler light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Hogg, David W.; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    The planet discoveries made using data from the Kepler mission have revolutionized the field of exoplanet statistics. Thousands of planets have been discovered with orbital periods ranging from hours to two years. Some of the most dynamically interesting planets (Jupiter analogs, for example) only show a single transit in the four-year baseline of the Kepler mission and, as a result, they have not yet been found. Upcoming transit surveys like K2, TESS, and PLATO all have shorter contiguous observation baselines. It is therefore crucial to develop robust techniques for the discovery of single transit events. We present a search procedure designed to find single transits using a supervised classification model. To search for a transit signal in a given month-long light curve from Kepler, we train a random forest classifier on tens of thousands of simulated transit signals injected into the light curve of the same star at other times. Using a different set of simulations, we tune the model to maximize the precision of the recovered signals---minimizing the false alarm rate. With this model, we classify each section of the test light curve into two categories: transit and no transit. We demonstrate that this model is robust to systematic false positives and present an automated catalog of convincing single transit candidates.

  2. New limb-darkening coefficients for modeling binary star light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamme, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present monochromatic, passband-specific, and bolometric limb-darkening coefficients for a linear as well as nonlinear logarithmic and square root limb-darkening laws. These coefficients, including the bolometric ones, are needed when modeling binary star light curves with the latest version of the Wilson-Devinney light curve progam. We base our calculations on the most recent ATLAS stellar atmosphere models for solar chemical composition stars with a wide range of effective temperatures and surface gravitites. We examine how well various limb-darkening approximations represent the variation of the emerging specific intensity across a stellar surface as computed according to the model. For binary star light curve modeling purposes, we propose the use of a logarithmic or a square root law. We design our tables in such a manner that the relative quality of either law with respect to another can be easily compared. Since the computation of bolometric limb-darkening coefficients first requires monochromatic coefficients, we also offer tables of these coefficients (at 1221 wavelength values between 9.09 nm and 160 micrometer) and tables of passband-specific coefficients for commonly used photometric filters.

  3. Analysis of the early spectra and light curve of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, Peter H.; Ensman, Lisa M.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical modeling of supernova spectra, light curves, and hydrodynamics requires physical inputs, numerical techniques, approximations, and assumptions which must be thoroughly understood in order to study the details of supernova explosions. Here, we discuss some of these in the context of the early evolution of supernova 1987A. Gray radiation-hydrodynamics is used to calculate the bolometric light curve and the hydrodynamic evolution of the supernova. Synthetic spectra are then obtained for the resulting density and velocity structure. The spectrum calculations are performed using a special-relativistic treatment of the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame, line blanketing by about 10(exp 5) spectral lines, and departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for H I, He I, Mg II, and Ca II. We find that we are able to simultaneously fit the early light curve and spectra reasonably well, using a progenitor model from Arnett (1991a), without fine-tuning the free parameters. Temperature structures and radiative equilibrium, non-LTE effects, homologous expansion, and mean opacities are discussed.

  4. Mysterious eclipses in the light curve of KIC8462852: a possible explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Budaj, J.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Apart from thousands of "regular" exoplanet candidates, Kepler satellite has discovered a small number of stars exhibiting peculiar eclipse-like events. They are most probably caused by disintegrating bodies transiting in front of the star. However, the nature of the bodies and obscuration events, such as those observed in KIC 8462852, remain mysterious. A swarm of comets or artificial alien mega-structures have been proposed as an explanation for the latter object. Aims: We explore the possibility that such eclipses are caused by the dust clouds associated with massive parent bodies orbiting the host star. Methods: We assumed a massive object and a simple model of the dust cloud surrounding the object. Then, we used the numerical integration to simulate the evolution of the cloud, its parent body, and resulting light-curves as they orbit and transit the star. Results: We found that it is possible to reproduce the basic features in the light-curve of KIC 8462852 with only four objects enshrouded in dust clouds. The fact that they are all on similar orbits and that such models require only a handful of free parameters provides additional support for this hypothesis. Conclusions: This model provides an alternative to the comet scenario. With such physical models at hand, at present, there is no need to invoke alien mega-structures for an explanation of these light-curves.

  5. IMAGING STARSPOT EVOLUTION ON KEPLER TARGET KIC 5110407 USING LIGHT-CURVE INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Monnier, John D.; Harmon, Robert O.; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin

    2013-04-10

    The Kepler target KIC 5110407, a K-type star, shows strong quasi-periodic light curve fluctuations likely arising from the formation and decay of spots on the stellar surface rotating with a period of 3.4693 days. Using an established light-curve inversion algorithm, we study the evolution of the surface features based on Kepler space telescope light curves over a period of two years (with a gap of .25 years). At virtually all epochs, we detect at least one large spot group on the surface causing a 1%-10% flux modulation in the Kepler passband. By identifying and tracking spot groups over a range of inferred latitudes, we measured the surface differential rotation to be much smaller than that found for the Sun. We also searched for a correlation between the 17 stellar flares that occurred during our observations and the orientation of the dominant surface spot at the time of each flare. No statistically significant correlation was found except perhaps for the very brightest flares, suggesting that most flares are associated with regions devoid of spots or spots too small to be clearly discerned using our reconstruction technique. While we may see hints of long-term changes in the spot characteristics and flare statistics within our current data set, a longer baseline of observation will be needed to detect the existence of a magnetic cycle in KIC 5110407.

  6. TESTING MICROVARIABILITY IN QUASAR DIFFERENTIAL LIGHT CURVES USING SEVERAL FIELD STARS

    SciTech Connect

    De Diego, José A.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás; Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; Cepa, Jordi

    2015-08-15

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  7. X-ray Light Curves and Accretion Disk Structure of EX Hydrae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

    2005-04-12

    We present X-ray light curves for the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Deep Survey photometer. We confirm earlier results on the shape and amplitude of the binary light curve and discuss a new feature: the phase of the minimum in the binary light curve, associated with absorption by the bulge on the accretion disk, increases with wavelength. We discuss several scenarios that could account for this trend and conclude that, most likely, the ionization state of the bulge gas is not constant, but rather decreases with binary phase. We also conclude that photoionization of the bulge by radiation originating from the white dwarf is not the main source of ionization, but that it is heated by shocks originating from the interaction between the in-flowing material from the companion and the accretion disk. The findings in this paper provide a strong test for accretion disk models in close binary systems.

  8. Modelling the light curves of ultraluminous X-ray sources as precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, T.; Middleton, M.; Wilms, J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a freely available XSPEC model for the modulations seen in the long-term light curves of multiple ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). By incorporating the physics of multiple electron scatterings (ray traced with a Monte Carlo routine), we go beyond analytical predictions and show that the geometrical beaming of radiation in the conical outflow can be more than a factor of 100 for opening angles smaller than 10°. We apply our new model to the long-term, well-sampled Swift light curve of the recently confirmed ULX pulsar NGC 5907 X-1 with an established period of 78 d. Our results suggest that geometrical beaming together with a slight precession of the conical wind can describe the light curve with a consistent set of parameters for the wind. The small opening angle of roughly 10° - 13° implies a highly supercritical flow and boosting factors of the order of B=60-90 that would yield a fairly low surface magnetic field strength of 2 × 1010 G.

  9. AstroImageJ: Image Processing and Photometric Extraction for Ultra-precise Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Hessman, Frederic V.

    2017-02-01

    ImageJ is a graphical user interface (GUI) driven, public domain, Java-based, software package for general image processing traditionally used mainly in life sciences fields. The image processing capabilities of ImageJ are useful and extendable to other scientific fields. Here we present AstroImageJ (AIJ), which provides an astronomy specific image display environment and tools for astronomy specific image calibration and data reduction. Although AIJ maintains the general purpose image processing capabilities of ImageJ, AIJ is streamlined for time-series differential photometry, light curve detrending and fitting, and light curve plotting, especially for applications requiring ultra-precise light curves (e.g., exoplanet transits). AIJ reads and writes standard Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) files, as well as other common image formats, provides FITS header viewing and editing, and is World Coordinate System aware, including an automated interface to the astrometry.net web portal for plate solving images. AIJ provides research grade image calibration and analysis tools with a GUI driven approach, and easily installed cross-platform compatibility. It enables new users, even at the level of undergraduate student, high school student, or amateur astronomer, to quickly start processing, modeling, and plotting astronomical image data with one tightly integrated software package.

  10. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHAPE AND ROTATION TO EXPLAIN THE LIGHT CURVE OF NEREID

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbrock, Andrew J.; Alexander, S. G.; Harp, Thomas W.; Abel, N. P.

    2013-06-15

    The observed photometric variability of Nereid over both short and long time scales has been known for some time and has remained a mystery. Schaefer et al. have documented some twenty years worth of observations that reveal that Nereid's light curve shows both short period intranight variations and long term active and inactive episodes. In this work, we report on a set of computational simulations of both the orbital and rotational motion of Nereid in an effort to understand Nereid's behavior. We model Nereid as an ellipsoid that is subject to torques from other bodies, and we calculate both its orbital and rotational motion. In addition, we only consider the case where Nereid is uniformly reflecting with no albedo variations on its surface. Thus, any brightness variations are caused solely by Nereid's changing orientation. We find for reasonable geometries, orientation, and spin rates that we can reproduce some of the features, but not all, of the observed light curve for Nereid. In particular, we show how active and inactive episodes can arise; however, our calculated light curve differs from observations in other aspects.

  11. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered, the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study, we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light-curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light-curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  12. THREE FUNDAMENTAL PERIODS IN AN 87 YEAR LIGHT CURVE OF THE SYMBIOTIC STAR MWC 560

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2015-08-15

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  13. Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Fryer, Chris L.; Wollaber, Allan B.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Even, Wesley

    2017-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of optical emission as a probe of spatial asymmetry in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we apply the radiative transfer software SuperNu to a unimodal CCSN model. The SNSPH radiation hydrodynamics software was used to simulate an asymmetric explosion of a 16 {M}⊙ zero-age main-sequence binary star. The ejecta has 3.36 {M}⊙ with 0.024 {M}⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, with unipolar asymmetry along the z-axis. For 96 discrete angular views, we find a ratio between maximum and minimum peak total luminosities of ˜1.36. The brightest light curves emerge from views orthogonal to the z-axis. Multigroup spectra from UV to IR are obtained. We find a shift in wavelength with viewing angle in a near-IR Ca ii emission feature, consistent with Ca being mostly in the unimode. We compare emission from the gray gamma-ray transfer in SuperNu and from the detailed gamma-ray transfer code Maverick. Relative to the optical light curves, the brightness of the gamma-ray emission is more monotonic with respect to viewing angle. UBVRI broadband light curves are also calculated. Parallel with the unimode, the U and B bands have excess luminosity at ≳ 10 days post-explosion, due to 56Ni on the unimode. We compare our CCSN model with SN 2002ap, which is thought to have a similar ejecta morphology.

  14. Pg 1115+080: New Analysis of the Light Curves Confirms Old Time Delay Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, B.; Koptelova, E.; Oknyanskij, V.; Shimanovskaya, E.

    We analyze all publicly available long-term optical observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar PG1115+080 with the aim of measuring time delays between its four components. In particular, we present analysis of the Maidanak light curves of the PG1115+080 components obtained between 2001 and 2006 (Tsvetkova et al. 2010). We find that the light curves of the 2006 observational season show almost linear trend with some fast variations seen only in the A1 and C components. This can be as due to microlensing or observational errors. These fast variations can decrease statistical significance of the time delay estimates or even produce misleading results. Application of the MCCF technique (Oknyanskij 1993) to photometric data collected in the 2004-2005 seasons gives time delay values tBC = 22±3, tAC = 12±3, and tBA = 10±3 days, which are in agreement with previous results of Schechter et al. (1997) and Barkana (1997) reported for the 1995-1996 light curves analyzed using two different statistical methods. The ratio tAC/tBA between our intermediate delays is about 1.2 that is close to the value reported by Barkana ( ∼1.13) and predicted by lens models (∼1.4) unlike the Schechter's and Vakulik's (2009) values (∼ 0.7 and ∼2.7).

  15. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND OPTICAL VARIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Street, Rachel A.; Treu, Tommaso; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Stern, Daniel; Brown, Timothy M.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2009-11-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, as well as the well-studied active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broadband B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, the 2 m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring telescope, the Palomar 60 inch (1.5 m) telescope, and the 0.80 m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.

  16. A light curve and its analysis of Type Ia SN 1604

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Dae-Young; Mihn, Byeong-Hee

    2015-08-01

    SN 1604, known as Kepler’s supernova, was first detected by European observers, but a full light curve including its peak brightness and initial decline part can only be completed by extra data from Korean royal astronomers of four centuries ago. Nowadays, it is considered one of the Type Ia galactic supernovae, which show the empirical correlation between decline rate and peak luminosity - so called Phillips relation or width-luminosity (W-L) relation. Here, we reconstruct a new light curve based on both the Korean and European records of SN 1604. Using this light curve and W-L relation, we present an observed rise time and decline rates after peak, and derive its absolute peak magnitude and distance. In this study, observed rise time (≈ 19±1 days) shows a good agreement with typical mean time of Type Ia SNe, while the initial decline rates such as Δm15(V) and Δm20(V) represent steeper and faster values than the extra-galactic SNe Ia. Moreover, its absolute peak magnitude and distance derived from the W-L relation show much fainter and nearer values, respectively than the estimated results by different methods

  17. The bolometric light curves and physical parameters of stripped-envelope supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The optical and optical/near-infrared pseudo-bolometric light curves of 85 stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) are constructed using a consistent method and a standard cosmology. The light curves are analysed to derive temporal characteristics and peak luminosity Lp , enabling the construction of a luminosity function. Subsequently, the mass of 56 Ni synthesized in the explosion, along with the ratio of ejecta mass to ejecta kinetic energy, are found. Analysis shows that host-galaxy extinction is an important factor in accurately determining luminosity values as it is significantly greater than Galactic extinction in most cases. It is found that broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL)more » and gamma-ray burst SNe are the most luminous subtypes with a combined median Lp , in erg s-1 , of log(Lp) = 43.00 compared to 42.51 for SNe Ic, 42.50 for SNe Ib, and 42.36 for SNe IIb. It is also found that SNe Ic-BL synthesize approximately twice the amount of 56Ni compared with SNe Ic, Ib, and IIb, with median MNi = 0.34, 0.16, 0.14, and 0.11 M ⊙ , respectively. SNe Ic-BL, and to a lesser extent SNe Ic, typically rise from L p /2 to L p more quickly than SNe Ib/IIb; consequently, their light curves are not as broad.« less

  18. Distribution of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts across the Bragg Curve of Light and Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Lacy, S.; Gridley, D. S.; Rusek, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment consists of energetic particles of varying mass and energy, and understanding the :biological Bragg curve" is essential in optimizing shielding effectiveness against space radiation induced biological impacts. The "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Previously, we studied the induction of micronuclei (MN) across the Bragg curve of energetic Fe and Si ions, and observed no increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, was found higher at the Bragg peak location in comparison to the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Here, we report the induction of MN in normal human fibroblast cells across the Bragg curve of incident protons generated at Loma Linda University. Similar to Si and Fe ions, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells showed a clear spike as the protons reached the Bragg peak. Unlike the two heavy ions, however, the MN yield also increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak of heavy, but not light ions are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  19. Distribution of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts across the Bragg Curve of Light and Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Lacy, S.; Gridley, D. S.; Rusek, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment consists of energetic particles of varying mass and energy, and understanding the :biological Bragg curve" is essential in optimizing shielding effectiveness against space radiation induced biological impacts. The "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Previously, we studied the induction of micronuclei (MN) across the Bragg curve of energetic Fe and Si ions, and observed no increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, was found higher at the Bragg peak location in comparison to the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Here, we report the induction of MN in normal human fibroblast cells across the Bragg curve of incident protons generated at Loma Linda University. Similar to Si and Fe ions, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells showed a clear spike as the protons reached the Bragg peak. Unlike the two heavy ions, however, the MN yield also increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak of heavy, but not light ions are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  20. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  1. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVES AND VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT FERMI-DETECTED BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@pg.infn.i E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: sarac@slac.stanford.ed

    2010-10-10

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f {sup {alpha}} PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)-measured for a few blazars showing strong activity-complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  2. Uninterrupted optical light curves of main-belt asteroids from the K2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, R.; Pál, A.; Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Molnár, L.; Kiss, L. L.; Hanyecz, O.; Plachy, E.; Kiss, Cs.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Because the second reaction wheel failed, a new mission was conceived for the otherwise healthy Kepler space telescope. In the course of the K2 mission, the telescope is staring at the plane of the Ecliptic. Thousands of solar system bodies therefore cross the K2 fields and usually cause additional noise in the highly accurate photometric data. Aims: We here follow the principle that some person's noise is another person's signal and investigate the possibility of deriving continuous asteroid light curves. This is the first such endeavor. In general, we are interested in the photometric precision that the K2 mission can deliver on moving solar system bodies. In particular, we investigate space photometric optical light curves of main-belt asteroids. Methods: We studied the K2 superstamps that cover the fields of M35, and Neptune together with Nereid, which were observed in the long-cadence mode (29.4 min sampling). Asteroid light curves were generated by applying elongated apertures. We used the Lomb-Scargle method to determine periodicities that are due to rotation. Results: We derived K2 light curves of 924 main-belt asteroids in the M35 field and 96 in the path of Neptune and Nereid. The light curves are quasi-continuous and several days long. K2 observations are sensitive to longer rotational periods than typical ground-based surveys. Rotational periods are derived for 26 main-belt asteroids for the first time. The asteroid sample is dominated by faint objects (>20 mag). Owing to the faintness of the asteroids and the high density of stars in the M35 field, only 4.0% of the asteroids with at least 12 data points show clear periodicities or trends that signal a long rotational period, as opposed to 15.9% in the less crowded Neptune field. We found that the duty cycle of the observations had to reach 60% to successfully recover rotational periods. Full Tables 1-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130

  3. Optical and X-ray rest-frame light curves of the BAT6 sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Rogantini, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Sbarufatti, B.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Nava, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We present the rest-frame light curves in the optical and X-ray bands of an unbiased and complete sample of the Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), namely, the BAT6 sample. Methods: The unbiased BAT6 sample (consisting of 58 events) has the highest level of completeness in redshift (~95%), allowing us to compute the rest-frame X-ray and optical light curves for 55 and 47 objects, respectively. We compute the X-ray and optical luminosities, which accounte for any possible source of absorption (Galactic and intrinsic) that could affect the observed fluxes in these two bands. Results: We compare the behaviour observed in the X-ray to that in the optical bands to assess the relative contribution of the emission during the prompt and afterglow phases. We unarguably demonstrate that rest-frame optical luminosity distribution of the GRBs is not bimodal and is clustered around the mean value Log(LR) = 29.9 ± 0.8 when estimated at a rest-frame time of 12 h. This is in contrast to what is found in previous works and confirms that the GRB population has an intrinsic unimodal luminosity distribution. For more than 70% of the events, the rest-frame light curves in the X-ray and optical bands have a different evolution, indicating distinct emitting regions and/or mechanisms. The X-ray light curves, which are normalised to the GRB isotropic energy (Eiso), provide evidence for X-ray emission that is still powered by the prompt emission until late times (~hours after the burst event). On the other hand, the same test performed for the Eiso-normalised optical light curves shows that the optical emission is a better proxy of the afterglow emission from early to late times. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables 2 and 3 and data used for the figures are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A72

  4. Gamma-Ray Light Curves And Variability Of Bright Fermi -Detected Blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-09-22

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% ofmore » the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f α PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)—measured for a few blazars showing strong activity—complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  5. Gamma-Ray Light Curves And Variability Of Bright Fermi -Detected Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-09-22

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f α PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)—measured for a few blazars showing strong activity—complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  6. Disentangling planetary and stellar activity features in the CoRoT-2 light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, G.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Meunier, N.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stellar activity is an important source of systematic errors and uncertainties in the characterization of exoplanets. Most of the techniques used to correct for this activity focus on an ad hoc data reduction. Methods: We have developed a software for the combined fit of transits and stellar activity features in high-precision long-duration photometry. Our aim is to take advantage of the modelling to derive correct stellar and planetary parameters, even in the case of strong stellar activity. Results: We use an analytic approach to model the light curve. The code KSint, modified by adding the evolution of active regions, is implemented into our Bayesian modelling package PASTIS. The code is then applied to the light curve of CoRoT-2. The light curve is divided in segments to reduce the number of free parameters needed by the fit. We perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis in two ways. In the first, we perform a global and independent modelling of each segment of the light curve, transits are not normalized and are fitted together with the activity features, and occulted features are taken into account during the transit fit. In the second, we normalize the transits with a model of the non-occulted activity features, and then we apply a standard transit fit, which does not take the occulted features into account. Conclusions: Our model recovers the activity features coverage of the stellar surface and different rotation periods for different features. We find variations in the transit parameters of different segments and show that they are likely due to the division applied to the light curve. Neglecting stellar activity or even only bright spots while normalizing the transits yields a 1.2σ larger and 2.3σ smaller transit depth, respectively. The stellar density also presents up to 2.5σ differences depending on the normalization technique. Our analysis confirms the inflated radius of the planet (1.475 ± 0.031RJ) found by other authors. We show that

  7. Smooth Light Curves from a Bumpy Ride: Relativistic Blast Wave Encounters a Density Jump

    SciTech Connect

    Nakar, Ehud; Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curves show significant variability, which often includes episodes of rebrightening. Such temporal variability had been attributed in several cases to large fluctuations in the external density, or density ''bumps''. Here we carefully examine the effect of a sharp increase in the external density on the afterglow light curve by considering, for the first time, a full treatment of both the hydrodynamic evolution and the radiation in this scenario. To this end we develop a semi-analytic model for the light curve and carry out several elaborate numerical simulations using a one dimensional hydrodynamic code together with a synchrotron radiation code. Two spherically symmetric cases are explored in detail--a density jump in a uniform external medium, and a wind termination shock. The effect of density clumps is also constrained. Contrary to previous works, we find that even a very sharp (modeled as a step function) and large (by a factor of a >> 1) increase in the external density does not produce sharp features in the light curve, and cannot account for significant temporal variability in GRB afterglows. For a wind termination shock, the light curve smoothly transitions between the asymptotic power laws over about one decade in time, and there is no rebrightening in the optical or X-rays that could serve as a clear observational signature. For a sharp jump in a uniform density profile we find that the maximal deviation {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} of the temporal decay index {alpha} from its asymptotic value (at early and late times), is bounded (e.g, {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} < 0.4 for {alpha} = 10); {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} slowly increases with {alpha}, converging to {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} {approx} 1 at very large {alpha} values. Therefore, no optical rebrightening is expected in this case as well. In the X-rays, while the asymptotic flux is unaffected by the density jump, the fluctuations in {alpha} are found to be comparable to

  8. The Astrophysics of Visible-light Orbital Phase Curves in the Space Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi

    2017-07-01

    The field of visible-light continuous time series photometry is now at its golden age, manifested by the continuum of past (CoRoT, Kepler), present (K2), and future (TESS, PLATO) space-based surveys delivering high precision data with a long baseline for a large number of stars. The availability of the high-quality data has enabled astrophysical studies not possible before, including, for example, detailed asteroseismic investigations and the study of the exoplanet census including small planets. This has also allowed to study the minute photometric variability following the orbital motion in stellar binaries and star-planet systems which is the subject of this review. We focus on systems with a main sequence primary and a low-mass secondary, from a small star to a massive planet. The orbital modulations are induced by a combination of gravitational and atmospheric processes, including the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, reflected light, and thermal emission. Therefore, the phase curve shape contains information about the companion’s mass and atmospheric characteristics, making phase curves a useful astrophysical tool. For example, phase curves can be used to detect and measure the mass of short-period low-mass companions orbiting hot fast-rotating stars out of reach of other detection methods. Another interesting application of phase curves is using the orbital phase modulations to look for non-transiting systems, which comprise the majority of stellar binary and star-planet systems. We discuss the science done with phase curves, the first results obtained so far, and the current difficulties and open questions related to this young and evolving subfield.

  9. Supernova 1987A: neutrino-driven explosions in three dimensions and light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The well-observed and well-studied type IIP Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), produced by the explosion of a blue supergiant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is a touchstone for the evolution of massive stars, the simulation of neutrino-driven explosions, and the modeling of light curves and spectra. Aims: In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the dependence of explosion properties on the structure of different blue supergiant progenitors and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of SN 1987A. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics code Prometheus, using of four available presupernova models as initial data. At a stage of almost homologous expansion, the hydrodynamical and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the implicit, Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code Crab to follow the blast-wave evolution into the SN outburst. Results: All of our 3D neutrino-driven explosion models, with explosion energies compatible with SN 1987A, produce 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail. Two of our models (based on the same progenitor) yield maximum velocities of around 3000 km s-1 for the bulk of ejected 56Ni, consistent with observational data. In all of our models inward mixing of hydrogen during the 3D evolution leads to minimum velocities of hydrogen-rich matter below 100 km s-1, which is in good agreement with spectral observations. However, the explosion of only one of the considered progenitors reproduces the shape of the broad light curve maximum of SN 1987A fairly well. Conclusions: The considered presupernova models, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1987A, except for those

  10. CCD Photometric Observations and Light Curve Synthesis of the Near-Contact Binary XZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Park, Jang-Ho; Lee, Jae Woo; Jeong, Jang-Hae

    2009-06-01

    Through the photometric observations of the near-contact binary, XZ CMi, new BV light curves were secured and seven times of minimum light were determined. An intensive period study with all published timings, including ours, confirms that the period of XZ CMi has varied in a cyclic period variation superposed on a secular period decrease over last 70 years. Assuming the cyclic change of period to occur by a light-time effect due to a third-body, the light-time orbit with a semi-amplitude of 0.0056d, a period of 29y and an eccentricity of 0.71 was calculated. The observed secular period decrease of -5.26× 10^{-11} d/P was interpreted as a result of simultaneous occurrence of both a period decrease of -8.20 × 10^{-11} d/P by angular momentum loss (AML) due to a magnetic braking stellar wind and a period increase of 2.94 × 10^{-11} d/P by a mass transfer from the less massive secondary to the primary components in the system. In this line the decreasi! ng rate of period due to AML is about 3 times larger than the increasing one by a mass transfer in their absolute values. The latter implies a mass transfer of dot M_{s}= 3.21 × 10^{-8} M_⊙ y^{-1} from the less massive secondary to the primary. The BV light curves with the latest Wilson-Devinney binary code were analyzed for two separate models of 8200K and 7000K as the photospheric temperature of the primary component. Both models confirm that XZ CMi is truly a near-contact binary with a less massive secondary completely filling Roche lobe and a primary inside the inner Roche lobe and there is a third-light corresponding to about 15-17% of the total system light. However, the third-light source can not be the same as the third-body suggested from the period study. At the present, however, we can not determine which one between two models is better fitted to the observations because of a negligible difference of sum (O-C)^2 between them. The diversity of mass ratios, with which previous investigators were in

  11. Searching for transits in the WTS with the difference imaging light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendejas Dominguez, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    The search for exo-planets is currently one of the most exiting and active topics in astronomy. Small and rocky planets are particularly the subject of intense research, since if they are suitably located from their host star, they may be warm and potentially habitable worlds. On the other hand, the discovery of giant planets in short-period orbits provides important constraints on models that describe planet formation and orbital migration theories. Several projects are dedicated to discover and characterize planets outside of our solar system. Among them, the Wide-Field Camera Transit Survey (WTS) is a pioneer program aimed to search for extra-solar planets, that stands out for its particular aims and methodology. The WTS has been in operation since August 2007 with observations from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, and represents the first survey that searches for transiting planets in the near-infrared wavelengths; hence the WTS is designed to discover planets around M-dwarfs. The survey was originally assigned about 200 nights, observing four fields that were selected seasonally (RA = 03, 07, 17 and 19h) during a year. The images from the survey are processed by a data reduction pipeline, which uses aperture photometry to construct the light curves. For the most complete field (19h-1145 epochs) in the survey, we produce an alternative set of light curves by using the method of difference imaging, which is a photometric technique that has shown important advantages when used in crowded fields. A quantitative comparison between the photometric precision achieved with both methods is carried out in this work. We remove systematic effects using the sysrem algorithm, scale the error bars on the light curves, and perform a comparison of the corrected light curves. The results show that the aperture photometry light curves provide slightly better precision for objects with J < 16. However, difference photometry light curves present a significant improvement for

  12. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-02-07

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330–390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  13. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330-390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  14. FLaapLUC: Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenain, Jean-Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Most high energy sources detected with Fermi-LAT are blazars, which are highly variable sources. High cadence long-term monitoring simultaneously at different wavelengths being prohibitive, the study of their transient activities can help shed light on our understanding of these objects. The early detection of such potentially fast transient events is the key for triggering follow-up observations at other wavelengths. FLaapLUC (Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry Light C↔Urve) uses the simple aperture photometry approach to effectively detect relative flux variations in a set of predefined sources and alert potential users. Such alerts can then be used to trigger observations of these sources with other facilities. The FLaapLUC pipeline is built on top of the Science Tools provided by the Fermi-LAT collaboration and quickly generates short- or long-term Fermi-LAT light curves.

  15. Modeling Type IIn Supernovae: Understanding How Shock Development Effects Light Curves Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie

    2016-06-01

    Type IIn supernovae are produced when massive stars experience dramatic mass loss phases caused by opacity edges or violent explosions. Violent mass ejections occur quite often just prior to the collapse of the star. If the final episode happens just before collapse, the outward ejecta is sufficiently dense to alter the supernova light-curve, both by absorbing the initial supernova light and producing emission when the supernova shock hits the ejecta. Initially, the ejecta is driven by shock progating through the interior of the star, and eventually expands through the circumstellar medium, forming a cold dense shell. As the shock wave approaches the shell, there is an increase in UV and optical radiation at the location of the shock breakout. We have developed a suite of simple semi-analytical models in order to understand the relationship between our observations and the properties of the expanding SN ejecta. When we compare Type IIn observations to a set of modeled SNe, we begin to see the influence of initial explosion conditions on early UV light curve properties such as peak luminosities and decay rate.The fast rise and decay corresponds to the models representing a photosphere moving through the envelope, while the modeled light curves with a slower rise and decay rate are powered by 56Ni decay. However, in both of these cases, models that matched the luminosity were unable to match the low radii from the blackbody models. The effect of shock heating as the supernova material blasts through the circumstellar material can drastically alter the temperature and position of the photosphere. The new set of models redefine the initial modeling conditions to incorporate an outer shell-like structure, and include late-time shock heating from shocks produced as the supernova ejecta travels through the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pleiades members with K2 light curves. I. Periods (Rebull+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Bouvier, J.; Cody, A. M.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Soderblom, D. R.; Valenti, J.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.; Ciardi, D.; Pinsonneault, M.; Stassun, K.; Micela, G.; Aigrain, S.; Vrba, F.; Somers, G.; Christiansen, J.; Gillen, E.; Collier, Cameron A.

    2016-11-01

    Members of the Pleiades were observed in K2 Campaign 4. The NASA K2 mission (Howell et al. 2014PASP..126..398H), using the repurposed 1m Kepler spacecraft, observed the Pleiades cluster nearly continuously for 72 days. All of the stars shown were observed in the long-cadence (~30-minute exposure) mode. Thirty-four of these stars were additionally observed in fast cadence (~1-minute exposure), but those data are beyond the scope of the present work. There are 1020 unique K2 long-cadence light curves (see Table7). Kepler pixel sizes are relatively large, 3.98''*3.98'', and the 95% encircled energy diameter ranges from 3.1 to 7.5 pixels with a median value of 4.2 pixels. During the K2 portion of the mission, because only two reaction wheels can be used, the whole spacecraft slowly drifts and then repositions regularly every 0.245 days. We find periods for 798 out of our sample of 1020 K2 light curves of candidate Pleiads. However, not all of those stars may be members. Our final list of members is in Table2 (for the periodic members). Basic parameters for stars not detected as periodic are listed in Table3. Five of these stars have reported periods in the literature that we do not recover. For some objects, we found a period during our analysis, but individual inspection of the light curves suggests that whatever is causing the repeating pattern is not a spot-modulated rotation period. For a complete list of these objects, see Table4. In Table5, we list the objects that are too bright or too faint for our sample. There are more than 150 stars where a K2 light curve was obtained, presumably because some literature considered these objects as Pleiades members. However, consideration of each of the individual stars, suggests that these are not, in fact, likely to be Pleiades members. They are listed in Table6 with the period(s) we derived. The Table7 gives some of the common synonyms for our targets in the literature. (6 data files).

  17. Identifying designs from incomplete, fragmented cultural heritage objects by curve-pattern matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Yu, Haozhou; Smith, Karen; Wilder, Colin; Yu, Hongkai; Wang, Song

    2017-01-01

    The study of cultural heritage objects with embellished realistic and abstract designs made up of connected and intertwined curves crosscuts a number of related disciplines, including archaeology, art history, and heritage management. However, many objects, such as pottery sherds found in the archaeological record, are fragmentary, making the underlying complete designs unknowable at the scale of the sherd fragment. The challenge to reconstruct and study complete designs is stymied because (1) most fragmentary cultural heritage objects contain only a small portion of the underlying full design, (2) in the case of a stamping application, the same design may be applied multiple times with spatial overlap on one object, and (3) curve patterns detected on an object are usually incomplete and noisy. As a result, traditional curve-pattern matching algorithms, such as Chamfer matching, may perform poorly in identifying the underlying design. We develop a new partial-to-global curve matching algorithm to address these challenges and better identify the full design from a fragmented cultural heritage object. Specifically, we develop the algorithm to identify the designs of the carved wooden paddles of the Southeastern Woodlands from unearthed pottery sherds. A set of pottery sherds, curated at Georgia Southern University, are used to test the proposed algorithm, with promising results.

  18. Microphase separation patterns in diblock copolymers on curved surfaces using a nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Darae; Kim, Junseok

    2015-11-01

    We investigate microphase separation patterns on curved surfaces in three-dimensional space by numerically solving a nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation for diblock copolymers. In our model, a curved surface is implicitly represented as the zero level set of a signed distance function. We employ a discrete narrow band grid that neighbors the curved surface. Using the closest point method, we apply a pseudo-Neumann boundary at the boundary of the computational domain. The boundary treatment allows us to replace the Laplace-Beltrami operator by the standard Laplacian operator. In particular, we can apply standard finite difference schemes in order to approximate the nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation in the discrete narrow band domain. We employ a type of unconditionally stable scheme, which was introduced by Eyre, and use the Jacobi iterative to solve the resulting implicit discrete system of equations. In addition, we use the minimum number of grid points for the discrete narrow band domain. Therefore, the algorithm is simple and fast. Numerous computational experiments are provided to study microphase separation patterns for diblock copolymers on curved surfaces in three-dimensional space.

  19. ANALYTIC MODELS FOR ALBEDOS, PHASE CURVES, AND POLARIZATION OF REFLECTED LIGHT FROM EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-03-01

    New observational facilities are becoming increasingly capable of observing reflected light from transiting and directly imaged extrasolar planets. In this study, we provide an analytic framework to interpret observed phase curves, geometric albedos, and polarization of giant planet atmospheres. We compute the observables for non-conservative Rayleigh scattering in homogeneous semi-infinite atmospheres using both scalar and vector formalisms. In addition, we compute phase curves and albedos for Lambertian, isotropic, and anisotropic scattering phase functions. We provide analytic expressions for geometric albedos and spherical albedos as a function of the scattering albedo for Rayleigh scattering in semi-infinite atmospheres. Given an observed geometric albedo our prescriptions can be used to estimate the underlying scattering albedo of the atmosphere, which in turn is indicative of the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmosphere. We also study the dependence of polarization in Rayleigh scattering atmospheres on the orbital parameters of the planet-star system, particularly on the orbital inclination. We show how the orbital inclination of non-transiting exoplanets can be constrained from their observed polarization parameters. We consolidate the formalism, solution techniques, and results from analytic models available in the literature, often scattered in various sources, and present a systematic procedure to compute albedos, phase curves, and polarization of reflected light.

  20. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  1. NEPTUNE’S DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE FROM KEPLER K2 OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BROWN DWARF LIGHT CURVE ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Jason F.; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gizis, John E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune’s zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune’s clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features. PMID:28127087

  2. Structuring Light by Concentric-Ring Patterned Magnetic Metamaterial Cavities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jinwei; Gao, Jie; Luk, Ting S; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-08-12

    Ultracompact and tunable beam converters pose a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. Here we design and demonstrate concentric-ring patterned structures of magnetic metamaterial cavities capable of tailoring both polarization and phase of light by converting circularly polarized light into a vector beam with an orbital angular momentum. We experimentally illustrate the realization of both radially and azimuthally polarized vortex beams using such concentric-ring patterned magnetic metamaterials. These results contribute to the advanced complex light manipulation with optical metamaterials, making it one step closer to realizing the simultaneous control of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light on a chip.

  3. Red Light Curve of MWC349 in the Years 1967-1981: Possible Periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Kogan, Leonid R.; Strelnitski, Vladimir

    2000-06-01

    The results of a red photographic photometry of the variable masing star MWC 349 are presented for 14 years, 1967-1981. Fourteen plates from the Harvard Damon collection were selected for the photometry. The plates were measured with the Cuffey iris photometer of the Maria Mitchell Observatory and were calibrated with the aid of two standard stars, both brighter than MWC 349. The magnitude of MWC 349 was then determined by extrapolation, assuming that the star is on the linear part of the calibration curve. In spite of larger errors, our results are in good agreement with one photoelectric observation made during the period covered. The obtained red light curve is indicative of periodic light variations. A combined Fourier-least-squares analysis gives a probable period of T=9.1+/-0.3 yr. The deduced period and phase of variations are not incompatible with the subsequent photoelectric photometry of Bergner et al. Possible mechanisms responsible for the periodic light variations are briefly discussed.

  4. APSIDAL MOTION AND A LIGHT CURVE SOLUTION FOR 13 LMC ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarcik, L.

    2015-12-15

    New CCD observations for 13 eccentric eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54 m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. These systems were observed for their times of minimum and 56 new minima were obtained. These are needed for accurate determination of the apsidal motion. Besides that, in total 436 times of minimum were derived from the photometric databases OGLE and MACHO. The O – C diagrams of minimum timings for these B-type binaries were analyzed and the parameters of the apsidal motion were computed. The light curves of these systems were fitted using the program PHOEBE, giving the light curve parameters. We derived for the first time relatively short periods of the apsidal motion ranging from 21 to 107 years. The system OGLE-LMC-ECL-07902 was also analyzed using the spectra and radial velocities, resulting in masses of 6.8 and 4.4 M{sub ⊙} for the eclipsing components. For one system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20112), the third-body hypothesis was also used to describe the residuals after subtraction of the apsidal motion, resulting in a period of about 22 years. For several systems an additional third light was also detected, which makes these systems suspect for triplicity.

  5. Light-Curve Study and Physical Properties of the Contact Binary EQ Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Eaton, Jeffery; Kenning, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    New V, RC, and IC light curves of EQ Tau have been obtained in 2002 and 2003. These show the secondary minimum to be a total eclipse. These new light curves have been analyzed, together with the published radial velocity observations, using the Wilson-Devinney code. The binary has an overcontact configuration, with an orbital inclination of 85°, a difference in component temperature of 80 K, and an overcontact fill-out factor of 16%. Absolute parameters of the component stars have been determined: M1=1.28 Msolar, R1=1.17 Rsolar, L1=1.39 Lsolar, and M2=0.47 Msolar, R2=0.81 Rsolar, L2=0.63 Lsolar. The calculated distance is 180+/-20 pc. A critical review of our new timings of minimum light together with previously published ones suggests a change from one constant period to another one around 1974 rather than a cyclical variation. When corrected for energy transfer in the common envelope, the physical parameters of the two components are in good agreement with those of unevolved single stars of similar masses.

  6. A Simple Model for the Light Curve Generated by a Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Mordecai-Mark, Mac Low

    1995-01-01

    The impact of a typical Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment produced three light peaks as seen from Earth. The first peak is related to the entry of the fragment into the Jovian atmosphere. The second peak occurs when the exploding fireball rises above Jupiter's limb into direct view from Earth. The third peak, much the brightest, occurs when the ejecta plume falls back on the atmosphere. By contrast, Galileo, which had a direct view of the impacts, saw two peaks, one at entry, and one at plumefall. Here we present a simple, highly idealized model of a ballistic plume, which we then use to fit the observed light curve of the R impact as recorded at Mauna Kea and Mount Palomar. From the light curve we find that the nominal R fragment had diameter 450-500 m and mass approx. 2-3 x 10(exp 13) g. The uncertainty in the mass is probably about a factor of 3, with a smaller event more likely than a larger one.

  7. On the necessity of a new interpretation of the stellar light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Granado, J.; Garrido, R.; Suárez, J. C.

    2014-02-01

    The power of asteroseismology relies on the ability to infer the stellar structure from the unambiguous frequency identification of the corresponding pulsation mode. Hence, the use of a Fourier transform is in the basis of asteroseismic studies. Nevertheless, the difficulties with the interpretation of the frequencies found in many stars lead us to reconsider whether Fourier analysis is the most appropriate technique to identify pulsation modes. We have found that the data, usually analyzed using Fourier techniques, present a non-analyticity originating from the lack of connectivity of the underlying function describing the physical phenomena. Therefore, the conditions for the Fourier series to converge are not fulfilled. In the light of these results, we examine in this talk some stellar light curves from different asteroseismology space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and SoHO) in which the interpretation of the data in terms of Fourier frequencies becomes difficult. We emphasize the necessity of a new interpretation of the stellar light curves in order to identify the correct frequencies of the pulsation modes.

  8. Preliminary NIR Late Light Curve of the Type Ia Supernova SN2009nr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Jonathan; Bryngelson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are important in determining the expansion of the universe based on the uniformity of their light curves. It is essential to understand the behavior of these supernovae in order to strengthen our confidence in their use as standard candles. A small, but increasing number of SNe Ia have been observed later than the 200 day epoch in the near-infrared (NIR). Most of these exhibit a flattening of the NIR power, even as the visible light declines at a steady rate. It is unclear as to exactly what causes this behavior, and how typical it is. In order to characterize the late behavior of SNe Ia, images of the supernova SN2009nr were analyzed using the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). These images were taken with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National-Observatory using the FLAMINGOS IR Imaging Spectrometer. The supernova’s magnitude was normalized with respect to the magnitudes of known stars so that traits related to the supernova may be compared to others. We present preliminary NIR (J, H, K) light curves of the observed supernova and compare them to other SNe Ia observed at these epochs.

  9. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  10. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  11. What powers the 3000-day light curve of SN 2006gy?

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Ori D.; Smith, Nathan; Ammons, S. Mark; Andrews, Jennifer; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Dwek, Eli; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Miller, Adam A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2015-10-27

    SN 2006gy was the most luminous supernova (SN) ever observed at the time of its discovery and the first of the newly defined class of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). The extraordinary energetics of SN 2006gy and all SLSNe (>1051 erg) require either atypically large explosion energies (e.g. pair-instability explosion) or the efficient conversion of kinetic into radiative energy (e.g. shock interaction). The mass-loss characteristics can therefore offer important clues regarding the progenitor system. For the case of SN 2006gy, both a scattered and thermal light echo from circumstellar material (CSM) have been reported at later epochs (day ~800), ruling out the likelihood of a pair-instability event and leading to constraints on the characteristics of the CSM. Owing to the proximity of the SN to the bright host-galaxy nucleus, continued monitoring of the light echo has not been trivial, requiring the high resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) or ground-based adaptive optics (AO). Furthermore, we report detections of SN 2006gy using HST and Keck AO at ~3000 d post-explosion and consider the emission mechanism for the very late-time light curve. While the optical light curve and optical spectral energy distribution are consistent with a continued scattered-light echo, a thermal echo is insufficient to power the K'-band emission by day 3000. Instead, we present evidence for late-time infrared emission from dust that is radiatively heated by CSM interaction within an extremely dense dust shell, and we consider the implications on the CSM characteristics and progenitor system.

  12. What powers the 3000-day light curve of SN 2006gy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Smith, Nathan; Ammons, S. Mark; Andrews, Jennifer; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Dwek, Eli; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Miller, Adam A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2015-12-01

    SN 2006gy was the most luminous supernova (SN) ever observed at the time of its discovery and the first of the newly defined class of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). The extraordinary energetics of SN 2006gy and all SLSNe (>1051 erg) require either atypically large explosion energies (e.g. pair-instability explosion) or the efficient conversion of kinetic into radiative energy (e.g. shock interaction). The mass-loss characteristics can therefore offer important clues regarding the progenitor system. For the case of SN 2006gy, both a scattered and thermal light echo from circumstellar material (CSM) have been reported at later epochs (day ˜800), ruling out the likelihood of a pair-instability event and leading to constraints on the characteristics of the CSM. Owing to the proximity of the SN to the bright host-galaxy nucleus, continued monitoring of the light echo has not been trivial, requiring the high resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) or ground-based adaptive optics (AO). Here, we report detections of SN 2006gy using HST and Keck AO at ˜3000 d post-explosion and consider the emission mechanism for the very late-time light curve. While the optical light curve and optical spectral energy distribution are consistent with a continued scattered-light echo, a thermal echo is insufficient to power the K'-band emission by day 3000. Instead, we present evidence for late-time infrared emission from dust that is radiatively heated by CSM interaction within an extremely dense dust shell, and we consider the implications on the CSM characteristics and progenitor system.

  13. What powers the 3000-day light curve of SN 2006gy?

    DOE PAGES

    Fox, Ori D.; Smith, Nathan; Ammons, S. Mark; ...

    2015-10-27

    SN 2006gy was the most luminous supernova (SN) ever observed at the time of its discovery and the first of the newly defined class of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). The extraordinary energetics of SN 2006gy and all SLSNe (>1051 erg) require either atypically large explosion energies (e.g. pair-instability explosion) or the efficient conversion of kinetic into radiative energy (e.g. shock interaction). The mass-loss characteristics can therefore offer important clues regarding the progenitor system. For the case of SN 2006gy, both a scattered and thermal light echo from circumstellar material (CSM) have been reported at later epochs (day ~800), ruling out themore » likelihood of a pair-instability event and leading to constraints on the characteristics of the CSM. Owing to the proximity of the SN to the bright host-galaxy nucleus, continued monitoring of the light echo has not been trivial, requiring the high resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) or ground-based adaptive optics (AO). Furthermore, we report detections of SN 2006gy using HST and Keck AO at ~3000 d post-explosion and consider the emission mechanism for the very late-time light curve. While the optical light curve and optical spectral energy distribution are consistent with a continued scattered-light echo, a thermal echo is insufficient to power the K'-band emission by day 3000. Instead, we present evidence for late-time infrared emission from dust that is radiatively heated by CSM interaction within an extremely dense dust shell, and we consider the implications on the CSM characteristics and progenitor system.« less

  14. An analysis of the massless planet approximation in transit light curve models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Many extrasolar planet transit light curve models use the approximation of a massless planet. They approximate the planet as orbiting elliptically with the host star at the orbit’s focus instead of depicting the planet and star as both orbiting around a common center of mass. This approximation should generally be very good because the transit is a small fraction of the full-phase curve and the planet to stellar mass ratio is typically very small. However, to fully examine the legitimacy of this approximation, it is useful to perform a robust, all-parameter space-encompassing statistical comparison between the massless planet model and the more accurate model.Towards this goal, we establish two questions: (1) In what parameter domain is the approximation invalid? (2) If characterizing an exoplanetary system in this domain, what is the error of the parameter estimates when using the simplified model? We first address question (1). Given each parameter vector in a finite space, we can generate the simplified and more complete model curves. Associated with these model curves is a measure of the deviation between them, such as the root mean square (RMS). We use Gibbs sampling to generate a sample that is distributed according to the RMS surface. The high-density regions in the sample correspond to a large deviation between the models. To determine the domains of these high-density areas, we first employ the Ordering Points to Identify the Clustering Structure (OPTICS) algorithm. We then characterize the subclusters by performing the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) on the transformed Principal Component spaces of each cluster. This process yields descriptors of the parameter domains with large discrepancies between the models.To consider question (2), we start by generating synthetic transit curve observations in the domains specified by the above analysis. We then derive the best-fit parameters of these synthetic light curves according to each model and examine

  15. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  16. Light curves and Fourier coefficients for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; McNamara, B.

    1998-07-01

    We have compiled a sample of Delta Scuti candidates from the MACHO catalog of variable stars in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, and a detailed spectral analysis of this time series data is in progress. The MACHO project (see Alcock et al. 1997) has collected a massive amount of photometry on millions of stars in the directions of the Galactic Bulge and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Many thousands of variable stars have been detected, among them Delta Scuti stars (towards the Galactic Bulge only; Delta Scuti stars in the LMC and SMC are below the detection limits of MACHO). See the discovery paper of Minniti et al. (1997) for more background and sample light curves. Of our initial sample of 136 stars showing variability on timescales less than 0.3d and with (V-R) colors similar to those of Delta Scuti stars, we find that sim 90 are likely Delta Scuti stars, with the remainder being either eclipsing binaries of W Ursa Majoris type ``A'' or which require more detailed observations for classification. The ultimate goal of our study is to determine as accurately as possible the pulsation spectra and pulsation mode types of the candidate Delta Scuti stars. In the present paper, we discuss the general light curve shapes of these objects by analyzing the Fourier harmonics of observed pulsation modes. This technique has been explored in some detail for Cepheids (Simon & Lee 1981) and for Delta Scuti stars (Antonello et al. 1987; Poretti et al. 1990). Recent non-linear modeling work by Bono et al. (1997) suggests that the light curve shape is a strong indicator of the radial overtone number for radially pulsating Delta Scuti stars. Therefore, Fourier analysis of pulsation frequencies and their Fourier harmonics may indicate which overtone a given star is pulsating in. Here, we present the initial results for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars.

  17. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  18. ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM LONG-LIVED BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGER REMNANTS. II. LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo E-mail: riccardo.ciolfi@unitn.it

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ∼10{sup 7} s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} s after the BNS merger with luminosities of L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 46}–10{sup 48} erg s{sup −1}. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  19. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  20. Very Low-energy Supernovae: Light Curves and Spectra of Shock Breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-08-01

    The brief transient emitted as a shock wave erupts through the surface of a pre-supernova star carrying information about the stellar radius and explosion energy. Here, the CASTRO code, which treats radiation transport using multigroup flux-limited diffusion, is used to simulate the light curves and spectra of shock breakout in very low-energy supernovae (VLE SNe), explosions in giant stars with final kinetic energy much less than 1051 erg. VLE SN light curves, computed here with the KEPLER code, are distinctively faint, red, and long-lived, making them challenging to find with transient surveys. The accompanying shock breakouts are brighter, though briefer, and potentially easier to detect. Previous analytic work provides general guidance, but numerical simulations are challenging, due to the range of conditions and lack of equilibration between color and effective temperatures. We consider previous analytic work and extend discussions of color temperature and opacity to the lower energy range explored by these events. Since this is the first application of the CASTRO code to shock breakout, test simulations of normal energy shock breakout of SN 1987A are carried out and compared with the literature. A set of breakout light curves and spectra are then calculated for VLE SNe with final kinetic energies in the range {10}47{--}{10}50 erg for red supergiants with main-sequence masses of 15 and 25 {M}⊙ . The importance of uncertainties in stellar atmosphere model, opacity, and ambient medium is discussed, as are observational prospects with current and forthcoming missions.

  1. Stellar granulation as the source of high-frequency flicker in Kepler light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Saar, Steven H.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2014-02-01

    A large fraction of cool, low-mass stars exhibit brightness fluctuations that arise from a combination of convective granulation, acoustic oscillations, magnetic activity, and stellar rotation. Much of the short-timescale variability takes the form of stochastic noise, whose presence may limit the progress of extrasolar planet detection and characterization. In order to lay the groundwork for extracting useful information from these quasi-random signals, we focus on the origin of the granulation-driven component of the variability. We apply existing theoretical scaling relations to predict the star-integrated variability amplitudes for 508 stars with photometric light curves measured by the Kepler mission. We also derive an empirical correction factor that aims to account for the suppression of convection in F-dwarf stars with magnetic activity and shallow convection zones. So that we can make predictions of specific observational quantities, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of granulation light curves using a Lorentzian power spectrum. These simulations allowed us to reproduce the so-called flicker floor (i.e., a lower bound in the relationship between the full light-curve range and power in short-timescale fluctuations) that was found in the Kepler data. The Monte Carlo model also enabled us to convert the modeled fluctuation variance into a flicker amplitude directly comparable with observations. When the magnetic suppression factor described above is applied, the model reproduces the observed correlation between stellar surface gravity and flicker amplitude. Observationally validated models like these provide new and complementary evidence for a possible impact of magnetic activity on the properties of near-surface convection.

  2. Magnetar-driven Shock Breakout and Double-peaked Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Metzger, Brian D.; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (∼ {10}14 cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths ({T}{{eff}} ≈ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar-driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magnetar heating. A distinct double-peaked light curve may therefore only be conspicuous if thermal heating from the magnetar is suppressed at early times. We describe how such a delay in heating may naturally result from inefficient dissipation and thermalization of the pulsar wind magnetic energy. Without such suppression, the breakout may only be noticeable as a small bump or kink in the early luminosity or color evolution, or as a small but abrupt rise in the photospheric velocity. A similar breakout signature may accompany other central engines in supernovae, such as a black hole accreting fallback material.

  3. The bolometric light curves and physical parameters of stripped-envelope supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Rubin, A.; Corsi, A.; Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Zheng, W.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.

    2016-02-08

    The optical and optical/near-infrared pseudo-bolometric light curves of 85 stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) are constructed using a consistent method and a standard cosmology. The light curves are analysed to derive temporal characteristics and peak luminosity Lp , enabling the construction of a luminosity function. Subsequently, the mass of 56 Ni synthesized in the explosion, along with the ratio of ejecta mass to ejecta kinetic energy, are found. Analysis shows that host-galaxy extinction is an important factor in accurately determining luminosity values as it is significantly greater than Galactic extinction in most cases. It is found that broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL) and gamma-ray burst SNe are the most luminous subtypes with a combined median Lp , in erg s-1 , of log(Lp) = 43.00 compared to 42.51 for SNe Ic, 42.50 for SNe Ib, and 42.36 for SNe IIb. It is also found that SNe Ic-BL synthesize approximately twice the amount of 56Ni compared with SNe Ic, Ib, and IIb, with median MNi = 0.34, 0.16, 0.14, and 0.11 M ⊙ , respectively. SNe Ic-BL, and to a lesser extent SNe Ic, typically rise from L p /2 to L p more quickly than SNe Ib/IIb; consequently, their light curves are not as broad.

  4. Obtaining the curve “Phase shift vs gray level” of a spatial light modulator Holoeye LC2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Granados-Agustín, F. S.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the process to obtain the curve “Graylevel vs phase shift” of a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) HoloeyeLC2012 is described. This work arises from the need that exists for having a new optical surface testing method at INAOE's Optical Workshop. The SLM was placed in one arm of a Twyman-Green interferometer. The fringe shifts in the interference patterns were produced by displaying the different gray levels in the SLM. The gray level images displayed in the SLM were divided in two equal parts, the upper part was varying the different gray levels from 0 to 255 and the lower part stayed fixed with a gray level of 0 as reference. We show the different phase shifts and the experimental interferograms. From this analysis it was found out that a noticeable phase shift can be obtained from the 50 to the 190 gray levels.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick AGN monitoring 2011: light curves (Barth+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. J.; Bennert, V. N.; Canalizo, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gates, E. L.; Greene, J. E.; Li, W.; Malkan, M. A.; Pancoast, A.; Sand, D. J.; Stern, D.; Treu, T.; Woo, J.-H.; Assef, R. J.; Bae, H.-J.; Brewer, B. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Cooper, M. C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Hiner, K. D.; Honig, S. F.; Hsiao, E.; Kandrashoff, M. T.; Lazarova, M. S.; Nierenberg, A. M.; Rex, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Tollerud, E. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    This project was allocated 69 nights at the Lick 3m Shane telescope, distributed between 2011 March 27 and June 13. Observations were conducted using the Kast double spectrograph (3440-5515Å on the blue side and 5410-8200Å on the red side). In order to extend our light curves for two AGNs, we also requested additional observations from other observers using the Kast spectrograph: Mrk 50 from 2011 January through March, and Zw 229-015 in June and July. For Zw 229-015, three additional observations were taken 20-23 days after the end of our main campaign. See section 3. (2 data files).

  6. Attenuation of the Light Curves of the Symbiotic Binary SY Mus by Circumstellar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagatova, N.; Skopal, A.

    2017-02-01

    SY Mus is a potential precursor of the B[e]-phenomenon system. In this contribution we modeled the ultraviolet (UV) fluxes of this system at 10 wavelengths from 1280 to 3080 Å. This way we obtained the contribution to the total flux at each wavelength from a nebula and estimated the upper limit of column densities for the negative hydrogen ion in the neutral wind and the neutral hydrogen atom in the predominantly ionized wind. Most importantly, we justified that the asymmetric distribution of the wind from the red giant component accounts for the observed UV continuum light-curve asymmetry.

  7. The Light Curve of SN 1987A Revisited: Constraining Production Masses of Radioactive Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Timmes, F. X.; Magkotsios, Georgios

    2014-09-01

    We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides 44Ti, 55Fe, 56Co, 57Co, and 60Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at 44Ti, 55Co, 56Ni, 57Ni, and 60Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M(56Ni) = (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10-2 M ⊙ and M(57Ni) = (4.1 ± 1.8) × 10-3 M ⊙. Our best fit 44Ti mass is M(44Ti) = (0.55 ± 0.17) × 10-4 M ⊙, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10-4 M ⊙ recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for 55Co and 60Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M(55Co) < 7.2 × 10-3 M ⊙ and M(60Co) < 1.7 × 10-4 M ⊙. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of 57Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [57Ni/56Ni] = 2.5 ± 1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.

  8. The Automatic Light Curves Generated by Danish 1.54m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoda, Petr

    2015-12-01

    We present the Ondřejov Southern Photometry Survey, being conducted at the Danish 1.54m telescope in remote observing mode by several groups of Czech stellar astronomers. The automatic astrometry and photometry pipelines run on every CCD frame combined with sophisticated parallelized cross-matching and clustering algorithms result in an on-the-fly generation of light curves of every single object in the field. To allow powerful querying and visualization of current database of more than half billion of measurements, the technology of Virtual Observatory is used, combining IVOA protocols and powerful visualization tools as Aladin, TOPCAT and SPLAT-VO.

  9. Supernova Shock Breakout Light Curves and Spectra from CASTRO Multigroup Radiation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of supernova shock breakout with the new multigroup radiation transport version of the CASTRO simulation code. Shock breakout occurs when the outgoing shockwave of a supernova explosion reaches the surface of the progenitor star and produces a bright flash. The breakout flash's spectral temperature, duration, and luminosity carry information about the progenitor star that may otherwise be very difficult to recover. To aid in detection and understanding of this phenomenon, we present integrated light curves and spectra of breakouts from a range of progenitors and explosions, including very low energy supernovae and pair-instability supernovae.

  10. Recent Progress Characterizing Convection Using White Dwarf Light Curves from the Whole Earth Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Dalessio, J.; Montgomery, M. H.; WET Team

    2013-01-01

    Convection remains of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainties in our understanding of stars and other natural phenomena. Montgomery (2005b) shows how precise observations of white dwarf light curves are used to observationally determine the depth of the pulsator's convection zone and its sensitivity to changes in temperature. The Whole Earth Telescope (WET) and the Delaware Asteroseismic Research Center (DARC) are currently conducting a project to map convection across the white dwarf instability strips. We present preliminary results for the DA BPM 31594 and the DB EC 04207-4748 and show the current status of our project mapping convection across the hydrogen white dwarf instability strip.

  11. IMPROVED DARK ENERGY CONSTRAINTS FROM {approx}100 NEW CfA SUPERNOVA TYPE Ia LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin E-mail: kirshner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-08-01

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sup +0.066} {sub -0.068} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  12. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Challis, Peter; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-06

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sub -0.068}{sup +0.066} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {Delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  13. The light curve of SN 1987A revisited: constraining production masses of radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Timmes, F. X.; Magkotsios, Georgios

    2014-09-01

    We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, and {sup 60}Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Co, {sup 56}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, and {sup 60}Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M({sup 56}Ni) = (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 57}Ni) = (4.1 ± 1.8) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}. Our best fit {sup 44}Ti mass is M({sup 44}Ti) = (0.55 ± 0.17) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for {sup 55}Co and {sup 60}Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M({sup 55}Co) < 7.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 60}Co) < 1.7 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of {sup 57}Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [{sup 57}Ni/{sup 56}Ni] = 2.5 ± 1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.

  14. Light Propagation and Visual Patterns: Preinstruction Learners' Conceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Dorothy; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the conceptions and representations of light propagation, image formation, and sight typical to preinstruction learners (N=139). Findings indicate that preinstructional students display some familiarity with optical systems, light propagation, and illumination patterns and have not developed a consistent descriptive and explanatory…

  15. A UNIFORM SEARCH FOR SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF HOT JUPITERS IN KEPLER Q2 LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J. L.; Lopez-Morales, M.

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we present the results of searching the Kepler Q2 public data set for the secondary eclipses of 76 hot Jupiter planet candidates from the list of 1235 candidates published by Borucki et al. This search has been performed by modeling both the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curves and new light curves produced via our own photometric pipeline. We derive new stellar and planetary parameters for each system, while calculating robust errors for both. We find 16 systems with 1{sigma}-2{sigma}, 14 systems with 2{sigma}-3{sigma}, and 6 systems with >3{sigma} confidence level secondary eclipse detections in at least one light curve produced via the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve or our own pipeline; however, results can vary depending on the light curve modeled and whether eccentricity is allowed to vary or not. We estimate false alarm probabilities of 31%, 10%, and 6% for the 1{sigma}-2{sigma}, 2{sigma}-3{sigma}, and >3{sigma} confidence intervals, respectively. Comparing each secondary eclipse result to theoretical expectations, we find that the majority of detected planet candidates emit more light than expected owing to thermal blackbody emission in the optical Kepler bandpass, and present a trend of increasing excess emission with decreasing maximum effective planetary temperature. These results agree with previously published optical secondary eclipse data for other hot Jupiters. We explore modeling biases, significant planetary albedos, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium or other thermal emission, significant internal energy generation, and misidentification of brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, or stellar blends as possible causes of both the excess emission and its correlation with expected planetary temperature. Although we find that no single cause is able to explain all of the planet candidates, significant planetary albedos, with a general trend of increasing planetary albedos with decreasing atmospheric temperatures, are

  16. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Ruan, John J.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Scott, Caroline; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. T.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-02-01

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band (g, r, i, z) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN, we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g ‑ r to g ‑ i and then to g ‑ z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curves for the eclipsing binary V1094 Tau (Maxted+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Hutcheon, R. J.; Torres, G.; Lacy, C. H. S.; Southworth, J.; Smalley, B.; Pavlovski, K.; Marschall, L. A.; Clausen, J. V.

    2015-04-01

    Photometric light curves of the detached eclipsing binary V1094 Tau in the Stroemgren u-,v-,b- and y-bands, and in the Johnson V-band. The curves in the Stroemgren bands were obtained with the Stroemgren Automatic Telescope (SAT) at ESO, La Silla. The curves in the V-band were obtained with the NFO telescope in New Mexico and with the URSA telescope at the University of Arkansas. (6 data files).

  18. Understanding the light curves of the HST-1 knot in M87 with internal relativistic shock waves along its jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, Y.; López-Corona, O.; Mendoza, S.

    2016-10-01

    Knots or blobs observed in astrophysical jets are commonly interpreted as shock waves moving along them. Long-time observations of the HST-1 knot inside the jet of the galaxy M87 have produced detailed multiwavelength light curves. In this paper, we model these light curves using the semi-analytical approach developed by Mendoza et al. This model was developed to account for the light curves produced by working surfaces (blobs) moving along relativistic jets. These working surfaces are generated by periodic oscillations of the injected flow velocity and mass ejection rates at the base of the jet. Using genetic algorithms to fit the parameters of the model, we are able to explain the outbursts observed in the light curves of the HST-1 knot with an accuracy greater than a 2σ statistical confidence level.

  19. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Henze, M.; Birkle, K.; Pietsch, W.; Williams, B.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Nesci, R.; Ertel, S.; Hinze, A.; Bertold, T.; Kaminsky, B.

    2012-12-01

    We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ˜ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame). We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t-5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ˜10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HAT-P-18b wavelength binned light curves (Kirk+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J.; Wheatley, P. J.; Louden, T.; Doyle, A. P.; Skillen, I.; McCormac, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Karjalainen, R.

    2017-04-01

    This table contains the wavelength binned light curves of the transit of HAT-P-18b observed with the ACAM instrument on the William Herschel Telescope on the night of the 2016 April 28. (1 data file).

  1. Rapid Light-curve Changes and Probable Flip-flop Activity of the W UMa-type Binary V410 Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xia; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaobin; Deng, Licai; Luo, Yangping; Luo, Changqing

    2017-09-01

    New photometric observations of a W UMa system, V410 Aur, were carried out over 10 nights from 2014 December 19 to 2015 February 8, from which four sets of light curves were obtained. The light curves show many unusual behavioral features, including changing occultation depths, transit minima, and asymmetric maxima. The four sets of light curves have been separately analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney method. The results suggest a totally eclipsing contact configuration for the system. Over a surprisingly short time span of only 52 days, the dominant spot distortion phase jumped twice between phases 0.0 and 0.5. The light-curve variations can be interpreted by the presence of two cool spots on the massive component. Based on our analysis, it is further suggested that the peculiar behavioral patterns are probably caused by the presence of two permanent, active large spots separated in longitude by about 180°, whose locations remain almost unchanged throughout. Our study demonstrates that the system has been undergoing typical flip-flop activity. We therefore conclude that V410 Aur is a W UMa-type system exhibiting flip-flop activity.

  2. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of CoRoT-29b (Palle+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Chen, G.; Alonso, R.; Nowak, G.; Deeg, H.; Cabrera, J.; Murgas, F.; Parviainen, H.; Nortmann, L.; Hoyer, S.; Prieto-Arranz, J.; Nespral, D.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Iro, N.

    2016-04-01

    2 transit light curves of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-29b obtained on the nights of 2014/7/31 and 2015/7/8 using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m GTC telescope. The light curves have been integrated over the bandpass of 515-915nm, where the wavelength range of 755-765 nm has been excluded due to presence of strong telluric O2 absorption. (2 data files).

  4. ASAS-SN Optical Light Curve of Swift J0243.6+6124 Shows Long Term Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo

    2017-10-01

    Swift J0243.6+6124 (GCN #21960) has been localized (ATel #10809) to likely coincide with B=13 star USNO-B1.0 1514-0083050. Given the statement in ATel #10809 of "no statistically strong evidence of optical variability," we used ASAS-SN Sky Patrol public all-sky light curve interface (Kochanek et al. 2017) to retrieve 1000+ days light curve at the position of USNO-B1.0 1514-0083050.

  5. The effect of background galaxy contamination on the absolute magnitude and light curve speed class of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boisseau, John R.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1991-01-01

    Observational data are presented in support of the hypothesis that background galaxy contamination is present in the photometric data of Ia supernovae and that this effect can account for the observed dispersion in the light curve speeds of most of Ia supernovae. The implication is that the observed dispersion in beta is artificial and that most of Ia supernovae have nearly homogeneous light curves. The result supports the notion that Ia supernovae are good standard candles.

  6. Light curve and fan-shaped coma of comet P/Tempel 2 in 1988-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akisawa, Hiroki; Tsumura, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Akimasa; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    Visual and Photographic Monitoring observations of comet P/Tempel 2 were carried out by a Japanese amateur group 'Hoshi-no-Hiroba' in 1988-1989. We analyzed the light curve and the time variation of the fan-shaped coma. The light curve was asymmetric to the perihelion passage. The fan angle in September-October was wider than that in December. The direction of the fan generally coincided with Sekanina's prediction (1988).

  7. The very short period Cepheid (RR Lyr) variables. 2: Light and color curves of variables in the solar vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggen, Olin J.

    1994-05-01

    Four color and H beta observations for 43 very short period Cepheids (VSPC, RRLyr) variables have been obtained with the Cerro Tololo and Kitt Peak reflectors. The color systems are defined in Eggen (1982). Contemporary, photo-electric V-light curves have been used to establish the phasing and the resulting periods used to compute the phases for the present observations. These phases are then adjusted to fit the V-light curves and the resulting periods and adjusted phases are given.

  8. The effect of background galaxy contamination on the absolute magnitude and light curve speed class of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Boisseau, J.R.; Wheeler, J.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Observational data are presented in support of the hypothesis that background galaxy contamination is present in the photometric data of Ia supernovae and that this effect can account for the observed dispersion in the light curve speeds of most of Ia supernovae. The implication is that the observed dispersion in beta is artificial and that most of Ia supernovae have nearly homogeneous light curves. The result supports the notion that Ia supernovae are good standard candles. 26 refs.

  9. The 1991-2012 light curve of the old nova HR Lyrae

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Shears, J.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W.; Henden, A. A. E-mail: bunburyobservatory@hotmail.com E-mail: Jeff.Robertson@atu.edu

    2014-05-01

    The 22 yr light curve of HR Lyr, acquired with a typical cadence of 2-6 days, is examined for periodic and quasi-periodic variations. No persistent periodicities are revealed. Rather, the light curve variations often take the form of nearly linear rises and falls having typical e-folding times of about 100 days. Occasional ∼0.6 mag outbursts are also seen, with properties similar to those of small outbursts found in some nova-like cataclysmic variables. When the photometry is formed into yearly averages, a decline of 0.012 ± 0.005 mag yr{sup –1} is apparent, consistent with the fading of irradiation-induced M-dot following the nova. The equivalent width of Hα is tabulated at three epochs over the interval 1986-2008 in order to compare with a recent result for DK Lac in which Hα was found to be fading 50 yr after the nova. However, our results for such a fading in HR Lyr are inconclusive.

  10. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  11. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Light-curve Fitting with SNooPy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Christopher R.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Phillips, M. M.; Kattner, ShiAnne; Persson, S. E.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Folatelli, Gaston; Gonzalez, Sergio; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    In providing an independent measure of the expansion history of the universe, the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) has observed 71 high-z Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared bands Y and J. These can be used to construct rest-frame i-band light curves which, when compared to a low-z sample, yield distance moduli that are less sensitive to extinction and/or decline-rate corrections than in the optical. However, working with NIR observed and i-band rest-frame photometry presents unique challenges and has necessitated the development of a new set of observational tools in order to reduce and analyze both the low-z and high-z CSP sample. We present in this paper the methods used to generate uBVgriYJH light-curve templates based on a sample of 24 high-quality low-z CSP SNe. We also present two methods for determining the distances to the hosts of SN Ia events. A larger sample of 30 low-z SNe Ia in the Hubble flow is used to calibrate these methods. We then apply the method and derive distances to seven galaxies that are so nearby that their motions are not dominated by the Hubble flow.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GRB X-ray afterglows light curves analysis (Racusin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-09-01

    All GRBs discovered with Swift-BAT, with X-ray afterglows detected by Swift-XRT and measured redshifts, between 2004 December and 2014 March are included in the analysis. We include only those X-ray afterglows with at least three light-curve bins (>~60 counts) and T90 measurements are available in the BAT catalogs (Sakamoto+ 2008, J/ApJS/175/179; 2011, J/ApJS/195/2 and Lien+ 2016, arXiv:1606.01956). The final sample includes 237 long-duration GRBs (9 short), 47 of which also appear in the Oates et al. (2012MNRAS.426L..86O; 2015MNRAS.453.4121O) sample for the UVOT correlation (sample only extends through 2010). The redshift measurements come from a convolution of databases and the literature and are listed in Table 1. All light curves were retrieved from the University of Leicester Swift XRT Team GRB repository (Evans et al. 2007A&A...469..379E; 2009, J/MNRAS/397/1177). See section 2.2 for further explanations. (2 data files).

  13. Constraints on the Progenitor of SN 2016gkg from Its Shock-cooling Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Brown, Peter J.; Smartt, Stephen J.; Valenti, Stefano; Tartaglia, Leonardo; Piro, Anthony L.; Sanchez, José L.; Nicholls, Brent; Monard, Berto L. A. G.; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Sand, David J.; Tonry, John; Denneau, Larry; Stalder, Brian; Heinze, Ari; Rest, Armin; Smith, Ken W.; Bishop, David

    2017-03-01

    SN 2016gkg is a nearby SN IIb discovered shortly after explosion. Like several other Type IIb events with early-time data, SN 2016gkg displays a double-peaked light curve, with the first peak associated with the cooling of a low-mass extended progenitor envelope. We present unprecedented intranight-cadence multi-band photometric coverage of the first light curve peak of SN 2016gkg obtained from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network, the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System, the Swift satellite, and various amateur-operated telescopes. Fitting these data to analytical shock-cooling models gives a progenitor radius of ˜40-150 {R}⊙ with ˜2-40 × 10-2 {M}⊙ of material in the extended envelope (depending on the model and the assumed host-galaxy extinction). Our radius estimates are broadly consistent with values derived independently (in other works) from HST imaging of the progenitor star. However, the shock-cooling model radii are on the lower end of the values indicated by pre-explosion imaging. Hydrodynamical simulations could refine the progenitor parameters deduced from the shock-cooling emission and test the analytical models.

  14. Numerical Modeling of the Early Light Curves of Type IIP Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Piro, Anthony L.; Renzo, Mathieu; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-10-01

    The early rise of Type IIP supernovae (SN IIP) provides important information for constraining the properties of their progenitors. This can, in turn, be compared to pre-explosion imaging constraints and stellar models to develop a more complete picture of how massive stars evolve and end their lives. Using the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC), we model the first 40 days of SNe IIP to better understand what constraints can be derived from their early light curves. We use two sets of red supergiant (RSG) progenitor models with zero-age main sequence masses in the range between 9 {M}⊙ and 20 {M}⊙ . We find that the early properties of the light curve depend most sensitively on the radius of the progenitor, and thus provide a relation between the g-band rise time and the radius at the time of explosion. This relation will be useful for deriving constraints on progenitors from future observations, especially in cases where detailed modeling of the entire rise is not practical. When comparing to observed rise times, the radii we find are a factor of a few larger than previous semi-analytic derivations and are generally in better agreement with what is found with current stellar evolution calculations as well as direct observations of RSGs.

  15. SNaX: A Database of Supernova X-Ray Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Mathias; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.

    2017-06-01

    We present the Supernova X-ray Database (SNaX), a compilation of the X-ray data from young supernovae (SNe). The database includes the X-ray fluxes and luminosities of young SNe, from days to years after outburst. The original goal and intent of this study was to present a database of Type IIn SNe (SNe IIn), which we have accomplished. Our ongoing goal is to expand the database to include all SNe for which published data are available. The database interface allows one to search for SNe using various criteria, plot all or selected data points, and download both the data and the plot. The plotting facility allows for significant customization. There is also a facility for the user to submit data that can be directly incorporated into the database. We include an option to fit the decay of any given SN light curve with a power-law. The database includes a conversion of most data points to a common 0.3-8 keV band so that SN light curves may be directly compared with each other. A mailing list has been set up to disseminate information about the database. We outline the structure and function of the database, describe its various features, and outline the plans for future expansion.

  16. Hydrodynamics associated to the X-ray light curve of A0620-00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, Y.; Mendoza, S.

    2015-12-01

    From 1975 to 1976, an outburst was detected in the light curve of the X-ray transient A0620-00 using the Ariel V and SAS-3 experiments. In this article we model the outburst with the hydrodynamical model proposed by Mendoza et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 395:1403, 2009). The physical model is constructed assuming basic mass and momentum conservation laws associated to the motion of the shock waves developed inside the expanding relativistic jet of the source. These internal shock waves are produced as a result of periodic variations of the injected mass and velocity of the flow at the base of the jet. The observations of this X-ray light curve present two clear bumps. The first one is modelled assuming periodic variations of the injected velocity at the base of the jet, while the second one can either be modelled by further velocity oscillations, or by a periodic variation of the mass injection rate at the base of the jet at a latter time. This latter model is statistically more significant for the observed data, than the former. The fitting of the data fixes different parameters of the model, such as the mean mass injection rate at the base of the jet and the oscillation frequency of the flow as measured on the rest frame of the central source.

  17. EXTRACTING PERIODIC TRANSIT SIGNALS FROM NOISY LIGHT CURVES USING FOURIER SERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-07-01

    We present a simple and powerful method for extracting transit signals associated with a known transiting planet from noisy light curves. Assuming the orbital period of the planet is known and the signal is periodic, we illustrate that systematic noise can be removed in Fourier space at all frequencies by only using data within a fixed time frame with a width equal to an integer number of orbital periods. This results in a reconstruction of the full transit signal, which on average is unbiased despite no prior knowledge of either the noise or the transit signal itself being used in the analysis. The method therefore has clear advantages over standard phase folding, which normally requires external input such as nearby stars or noise models for removing systematic components. In addition, we can extract the full orbital transit signal (360°) simultaneously, and Kepler-like data can be analyzed in just a few seconds. We illustrate the performance of our method by applying it to a dataset composed of light curves from Kepler with a fake injected signal emulating a planet with rings. For extracting periodic transit signals, our presented method is in general the optimal and least biased estimator and could therefore lead the way toward the first detections of, e.g., planet rings and exo-trojan asteroids.

  18. Statistical Analysis of Quasar Light Curves from Pan-STARRS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Liu, Tingting; Gezari, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of variable quasars in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). PS1 MDS obtained multi-epoch images of 10 fields, each 8 square degrees in size, over 4 years, starting in May 2010. The MDS fields were observed in 5 filters (gp1, rp1, ip1, zp1, and yp1) during their season of visibility, with a typical cadence per filter of 3 days. We extracted the light curves of 670 color-selected quasars in the PS1 MDS using Point Spread Function photometry from the Image Processing Pipeline data products. From the quasar sample, we selected 104 quasars whose variability was at least 2 standard deviations higher than the non-variable reference star sample. We performed a statistical analysis of the light curves of the selected quasars in the g,r,i and z bands using a maximum likelihood method to find the best-fit Damped Random Walk parameters (sigma and tau - also incorporating the Zoghbi et al. 2013 method for uneven sampling). The resulting distributions for sigma and tau were similar to those found in previous studies of quasars.

  19. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE PROJECT. XIII. SIXTEEN TRANSITS OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Joshua A.; Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Berta, Zachory K.; Burke, Christopher J.; Nutzman, Philip

    2011-04-01

    We present optical photometry of 16 transits of the super-Earth GJ 1214b, allowing us to refine the system parameters and search for additional planets via transit timing. Starspot-crossing events are detected in two light curves, and the star is found to be variable by a few percent. Hence, in our analysis, special attention is given to systematic errors that result from starspots. The planet-to-star radius ratio is 0.11610 {+-} 0.00048, subject to a possible upward bias by a few percent due to the unknown spot coverage. Even assuming this bias to be negligible, the mean density of the planet can be either 3.03 {+-} 0.50 g cm{sup -3} or 1.89 {+-} 0.33 g cm{sup -3}, depending on whether the stellar radius is estimated from evolutionary models, or from an empirical mass-luminosity relation combined with the light curve parameters. One possible resolution is that the orbit is eccentric (e {approx} 0.14), which would favor the higher density, and hence a much thinner atmosphere for the planet. The transit times were found to be periodic within about 15 s, ruling out the existence of any other super-Earths with periods within a factor of two of the known planet.

  20. Light Curves and Densities of Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects from the ESO Large Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Davide; Dotto, E.; Barucci, A.; Rossi, A.; de Bergh, C.; Doressoundiram, A.; Fornasier, S.

    2008-09-01

    The analysis of the rotational properties of the small bodies in the outer Solar System is a useful tool for retrieving information on the internal structure of the observed objects and for having hints on the collisional evolution state of the whole population. The sample of known rotational rates is still rater limited, including about 60 Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and a dozen of Centaurs. In order to increase the available data, in the framework of the ESO Large Program 178.C-0036 (P.I.: M. A. Barucci), we carried out at ESO-NTT (La Silla, Chile) photometric observations of 2 Centaurs (12929 1999 TZ1 and 95626 2002 GZ32) and 10 TNOs (42355 Typhon, 47932 2000 GN171, 65489 Ceto, 90568 2004 GV9, 120132 2003 FY128, 144897 2004 UX10, 145451 2005 RM43, 145453 2005 RR43, 2003 UZ117 and 2003 UZ413). Applying the method based on the Fourier analysis of the light curves, developed by Harris et al. 1989 (Icarus, 77, 171), rotational synodic periods were computed. We determined the spin rate for seven objects and we confirmed previously published periods of other two bodies. The computed rotational periods and the obtained light curve amplitudes allowed us to estimate the axis ratio a/b, and hence the density of these nine objects. Putting together our results and already published ones, we investigated density statistics of the small bodies of the outer Solar System. The obtained complete results will be presented and discussed.

  1. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Heinze, Jonas; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  2. CLASSICAL NOVAE IN ANDROMEDA: LIGHT CURVES FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY AND GALEX

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yi; Lou Yuqing; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Neill, James D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Nugent, Peter E.; Law, Nicholas M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-06-20

    We present optical light curves of 29 novae in M31 during the 2009 and 2010 observing seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The dynamic and rapid cadences in PTF monitoring of M31, from one day to ten minutes, provide excellent temporal coverage of nova light curves, enabling us to record the photometric evolution of M31 novae in unprecedented detail. We also detect eight of these novae in the near-ultraviolet (UV) band with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Novae M31N 2009-10b and M31N 2010-11a show prominent UV emission peaking a few days prior to their optical maxima, possibly implying aspherical outbursts. Additionally, our blueshifted spectrum of the recent outburst of PT And (M31N 2010-12a) indicates that it is a recurrent nova in M31 and not a dwarf nova in the Milky Way as was previously assumed. Finally, we systematically searched for novae in all confirmed globular clusters (GCs) of M31 and found only M31N 2010-10f associated with Bol 126. The specific nova rate in the M31 GC system is thus about one per year, which is not enhanced relative to the rate outside the GC system.

  3. Period Estimation for Sparsely-sampled Quasi-periodic Light Curves Applied to Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shiyuan; Yuan, Wenlong; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Long, James; Macri, Lucas M.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a nonlinear semi-parametric Gaussian process model to estimate periods of Miras with sparsely sampled light curves. The model uses a sinusoidal basis for the periodic variation and a Gaussian process for the stochastic changes. We use maximum likelihood to estimate the period and the parameters of the Gaussian process, while integrating out the effects of other nuisance parameters in the model with respect to a suitable prior distribution obtained from earlier studies. Since the likelihood is highly multimodal for period, we implement a hybrid method that applies the quasi-Newton algorithm for Gaussian process parameters and search the period/frequency parameter space over a dense grid. A large-scale, high-fidelity simulation is conducted to mimic the sampling quality of Mira light curves obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. The simulated data set is publicly available and can serve as a testbed for future evaluation of different period estimation methods. The semi-parametric model outperforms an existing algorithm on this simulated test data set as measured by period recovery rate and quality of the resulting period-luminosity relations.

  4. Towards Precision Quasar Light Curve Photometry with the Pan-STARRS1 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tingting; Gezari, S.; Pan-STARRS1 Science Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of the precision photometry technique of inhomogeneous ensemble photometry on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Small Area Survey (SAS), with the motivation of constructing high quality light curves of variable quasars. The PS1 SAS is a test area of ~70 deg2 that was observed in 2011 to the final depth of the PS1 3π survey, an all-sky five-band optical survey above -30 deg declination to be completed in 2014. We follow the methodology of Bhatti et al. (2010), who adapted the technique described in Honeycutt (1992) to the SDSS Stripe 82 survey. By comparing a target object with nearby non-variable stars on a given image, systematic errors due to exposure-to-exposure variations in atmospheric conditions are greatly reduced, thereby providing a powerful tool for variability studies. Our ultimate goal is to obtain a large sample of such precisely measured multi-epoch light curves of quasars in PS1, and to study their variability in a statistical sense in comparison with theoretical predictions. We conclude with the exciting capabilities of similar studies done using future large surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  5. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  6. The X-ray Light Curve and CCD Spectra of SN 1978K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-08-01

    We provide an updated X-ray light curve and spectral fits of SN1978K using all available data from ROSAT,ASCA, Suzaku, Chandra, Swift, and XMM. The light curve and spectra cover 25 years of X-ray observationsof this object. Spectral fits were applied using two models: absorbed dual optically-thin thermal gas('vapec') and an absorbed thermal gas and non-equilibrium ionization model ('vapec' + 'vnei'). The softtemperatures cluster around 0.65-0.7 keV for both models. The hard temperatures lie typically in the 2-3 keVrange, but Several claims over the years have been made for enhanced abundances: Si, claimed to bedetected in a 2003 Chandra observation, is not confirmed. The abundance of He, claimed to be detected inXMM observations, requires more work as it is not consistently detected in all observations. The X-ray lightcurve shows considerable `bouncing', suggesting a variable circumstellar medium, but uncertainties are notnegligible.

  7. Measuring Type Ia Supernova Distances and Redshifts From TheirMulti-band Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Alex G.; Miquel, Ramon

    2007-08-12

    The distance and redshift of a type Ia supernova can bedetermined simultaneously through its multi-band light curves. This factmay beused for imaging surveys that discover and obtain photometry forlarge numbers of supernovae; so many that it would be difficult to obtaina spectroscopic redshift for each. Using available supernova-analysistools we find that there are several conditions in which a viabledistance--redshift can be determined. Uncertainties in the effectivedistance at z~;0.3 are dominated by redshift uncertainties coupled withthe steepness of the Hubble law. By z~;0.5 the Hubble law flattens outand distance-modulus uncertainties dominate. Observations that giveS/N=50 at peak brightness and a four-day observer cadence in each ofgriz-bands are necessary to match the intrinsic supernova magnitudedispersion out to z=1.0. Lower S/N can be tolerated with the addition ofredshift priors (e.g., from a host-galaxy photometric redshift),observationsin an additional redder band, or by focusing on supernovaredshifts that have particular leverage for this measurement. Morestringent S/N requirements are anticipated as improved systematicscontrol over intrinsic color, metallicity, and dust is attempted to bedrawn from light curves.

  8. Jitter radiation images, spectra and light curves from a relativistic spherical blastwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.; Lazzati, Davide; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2009-02-01

    We consider radiation emitted by the jitter mechanism in a Blandford-McKee self-similar blastwave. We assume the magnetic field configuration throughout the whole blastwave meets the condition for the emission of jitter radiation and we compute the ensuing images, light curves and spectra. The calculations are performed for both a uniform and a wind environment. We compare our jitter results to synchrotron results. We show that jitter radiation produces slightly different spectra than synchrotron, in particular between the self-absorption and the peak frequency, where the jitter spectrum is flat, while the synchrotron spectrum grows as ν1/3. The spectral difference is reflected in the early decay slope of the light curves. We conclude that jitter and synchrotron afterglows can be distinguished from each other with good quality observations. However, it is unlikely that the difference can explain the peculiar behaviour of several recent observations, such as flat X-ray slopes and uncorrelated optical and X-ray behaviour.

  9. Electromagnetic field patterning or crystal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słupski, Piotr; Wymysłowski, Artur; Czarczyński, Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Using the orbital angular momentum of light for the development of a vortex interferometer, the underlying physics requires microwave/RF models,1 as well as quantum mechanics for light1, 2 and fluid flow for semiconductor devices.3, 4 The combination of the aforementioned physical models yields simulations and results such as optical lattices,1 or an Inverse Farday effect.5 The latter is explained as the absorption of optical angular momentum, generating extremely high instantenous magnetic fields due to radiation friction. An algorithmic reduction across the computational methods used in microwaves, lasers, quantum optics and holography is performed in order to explain electromagnetic field interactions in a single computational framework. This work presents a computational model for photon-electron interactions, being a simplified gauge theory described using differentials or disturbances (photons) instead of integrals or fields. The model is based on treating the Z-axis variables as a Laplace fluid with spatial harmonics, and the XY plane as Maxwell's equations on boundaries. The result is a unified, coherent, graphical computational method of describing the photon qualitatively, quantitatively and with proportion. The model relies on five variables and is described using two equations, which use emitted power, cavity wavelength, input frequency, phase and time. Phase is treated as a rotated physical dimension under gauge theory of Feynmann's QED. In essence, this model allows the electromagnetic field to be treated with it's specific crystallography. The model itself is described in Python programming language. PACS 42.50.Pq, 31.30.J-, 03.70.+k, 11.10.-z, 67.10.Hk

  10. Phase extraction from fringe pattern via light propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Zhang, Rui; Han, Zhigang

    2017-01-10

    A phase demodulation method via light propagation is proposed, where one or two fringe patterns are viewed as the superposition of complex amplitudes, and then the phase is reconstructed by separating the light field via light propagation. Simulation and experimental results indicated that the proposed method can extract the phase from a single shot effectively, thereby realizing dynamic phase retrieval. In addition, the accuracy of phase reconstruction can be improved by adding another fringe pattern with an unknown phase shift. The carrier requirement is relatively low, and, thus, the proposed method can be applied to the measurements with an environment disturbance, an inaccurate phase shift, and the requirement of a high speed capture.

  11. An analysis of the light curve of the post common envelope binary MT Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, A.; Vaz, L. P. R.; Diaz, M. P.

    2001-10-01

    Photometric observations of MT Ser, the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 41 are presented. The periodic modulations detected by Grauer & Bond (\\cite{Gra83}) are confirmed, thus firmly establishing the binary nature of MT Ser. The significantly enlarged time base permits us to derive more accurate ephemeris. The orbital period is either P1 = 0.113226533 days or twice that value, P2 = 0.226453066 days. We analyze the light curve (after a careful subtraction of the nebular contribution) with the Wilson-Devinney light curve synthesis routine. Since it is not a priori clear which is the true orbital period of MT Ser, two radically different models, one based on P1 the other on P2 are considered: (1) A low temperature component orbiting around a hot sub-dwarf. The variability is then due to a reflection effect together with ellipsoidal variations of one or both components. (2) Two hot sub-dwarfs of similar temperature and luminosity, partially eclipsing each other and exhibiting ellipsoidal variations. In both models, the primary as well as the secondary component are required to almost fill their respective Roche lobes. A contact configuration is possible. Pros and cons can be found for either of the two models. A final decision between them has to await the observations of a radial velocity curve. The orbital period is currently decreasing at a rate of dot {P}/P = -1.15 x 10-9 d-1. Interpreting this as due to mass loss via a stellar winds permits us to estimate mass loss rates depending on the different model assumptions. Based on observations obtained at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, LNA/MCT, Itajubá, Brazil.

  12. The bumpy light curve of Type IIn supernova iPTF13z over 3 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyholm, A.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Moriya, T. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Roy, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.; Masci, F. J.

    2017-08-01

    A core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) of Type IIn is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g. SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a Type IIn SN discovered on 2013 February 1 by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). This SN showed at least five bumps in its declining light curve between 130 and 750 days after discovery. We analyse this peculiar behaviour and try to infer the properties of the CSM, of the SN explosion, and the nature of the progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra during the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse the photometry and the spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. In particular we derive absolute magnitudes, colours, a pseudo-bolometric light cur