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Sample records for light diffraction ellipsometry

  1. Diffraction Ellipsometry Studies on Insect Flight Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sui

    Characterization of the orientation and distribution of myosin cross-bridge at rigor, relax, low ionic strength (36 mM) and activation (pCa 4.3) conditions are of great interest since these states have been proposed to be transient steps in the cyclical interaction of myosin heads with actin during contraction. Measurements sensitive to the cross-bridge orientation in chemically skinned single muscle fibers of the insect, Lethocerus collossicus have been performed under various physiological conditions using laser diffraction ellipsometry. Determination of both the total birefringence, Deltan, and the differential field ratio, rm DFR (defined as {E_parallel -E_|over E_parallel-E _|}),is necessary for complete characterization of the optical polarization state. For rigor insect fiber, the birefringence value was close to the value we obtained from chemically skinned frog muscle fibers. However, the differential field ratio, DFR, was a negative value for insect fiber, while we always measured a positive value from frog muscle fibers. Polarization states of light diffracted from fibers exhibited a dependence on configurations of structural proteins at different conditions: fluid index matching using o-toluidine, alpha -chymotrypsin cleavage, KCl myosin extraction, rigor state, relaxed state, exogenous S-1 binding on rigor fiber, low ionic strength state, activation state at resting or stretched length. Results of our data analysis suggested that: (1) the negative DFR value of the insect flight muscle was contributed by alpha-actinin arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis in the Z-line, (2) in rigor fiber, 70% of myosin heads are doubly bound (45^circ and 90^ circ) while the rest of 30% are in single head binding configuration (90^circ), (3) myosin heads are randomly oriented in relaxed fiber, (4) mean axial angle is about 62^ circ for exogenous myosin heads binding on rigor fiber, (5) at low ionic strength, 25% of the total myosin heads are weakly attached to actin

  2. Diffraction patterns and limits of Brewster angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehly, L.; Verrier, Isabelle; Froehly, Claude; Brun, Gerald; Veillas, C.

    2000-03-01

    The Vectorial Modulation Transfer Function (VMTF) calculation will be used for the explanation of diffraction patterns obtained with Brewster ellipsometers. The method used to study these phenomena lays on protection of the incident monochromatic distribution on a basis constituted of monochromatic plane wave components. The first point examined is how the plane wave spectrum could be propagated through a polarizing pate considering the polarization distortions introduced by diffraction. The same calculation is realized for the whole system in order to establish the expression of the whole VMTF. Paraxial approximations are used in order to analyze more easily the reflected beam pattern and to compare it with experimental results. The good agreement between experimental results and model allows a quantitative valuation of index measurement accuracy as a function of the interface mean surface roughness of the experimental sample considering the specular reflection on the homogeneous plane interface. Taking into account the amount of light scatter by the interfaces irregularities it is then possible to specify the theoretical uncertainties limits affecting as well refractive index and refractive index gradients measurements.

  3. Influence of the light incidence angle on the precision of generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fuentes, C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, J. B.; Fallarino, L.; Arregi, J. A.; Berger, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the influence of the light incidence angle φ0 on the precision of generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry (GME). A brief review of the GME methodology is presented together with a study of the error propagation from measurement uncertainties to the precision of the resulting complex index of refraction N and magneto-optical constant Q. The results are compared with longitudinal GME measurements on bulk polycrystalline cobalt. We observe a strong increase of the resulting relative error as φ0 decreases below 45°. We tested our theoretical estimates by performing GME measurements for polycrystalline cobalt (N = 2.20 + 3.42 i; Q =(2.25 - 0.80 i) ×10-2)) and found GME measurements to clearly exhibit improved reliability for φ0 > 30 °.

  4. Fraunhofer diffraction of light by human enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W J

    1988-02-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction patterns of human enamel samples were photographed with a helium-neon laser beam (lambda = 633 nm). The first-order diffraction angle was in reasonable agreement with a prediction based upon enamel prisms acting as a two-dimensional grating. These results support the hypothesis that enamel diffracts light because of the periodic structure of enamel prisms with interprismatic spaces, which act as slits.

  5. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  6. Atomic oxygen effects on thin film space coatings studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Woollam, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently evaluating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) simulation techniques as well as a variety of thin film protective coatings to withstand atomic oxygen (AO) degradation. Both oxygen plasma ashers and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source are being used for LEO simulation. Thin film coatings are characterized by optical techniques including Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Optical spectrophotometry, and laser light scatterometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is also used to characterize surface morphology. Results on diamondlike carbon (DLC) films show that DLC degrades with simulated AO exposure at a rate comparable to Kapton polyimide. Since DLC is not as susceptible to environmental factors such as moisture absorption, it could potentially provide more accurate measurements of AO fluence on short space flights.

  7. Ellipsometry-like analysis of polarization state for micro cracks using stress-induced light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Sakai, Kazufumi; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), are important to glass substrate manufacturing. When these techniques involve mechanical interaction in the form of friction between the abrasive and the substrate surface during polishing, latent flaws may form on the product. Fine polishing induced latent flaws in glass substrates may become obvious during a subsequent cleaning process if the glass surface is eroded away by chemical interaction with a cleaning liquid. Thus, latent flaws reduce product yield. A novel technique (the stress-induced light scattering method; SILSM) which was combined with light scattering method and stress effects was proposed for inspecting surface to detect polishing induced latent flaws. This method is able to distinguish between latent flaws and tiny particles on the surface. In this method, an actuator deforms a sample inducing stress effects around the tip of a latent flaw caused by the deformation, which in turn changes the refractive index of the material around the tip of the latent flaw because of the photoelastic effect. A CCD camera detects this changed refractive index as variations in light-scattering intensity. In this study, the changes in reflection coefficients and polarization states after application of stress to a glass substrate were calculated and evaluated qualitatively using Jones matrix-like ellipsometry. As the results, it was shown that change in the polarization states around the tip of latent flaw were evaluated between before and after applied stress, qualitatively.

  8. Characterization of excimer laser annealed polycrystalline Si1-xGex alloy thin films by x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guolin; Krishna, Kalaga Murali; Shao, Chunlin; Umeno, Masayoshi; Soga, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Junji; Jimbo, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of Si1-xGex alloys of different compositions x have been deposited, on single-crystal Si (100) surface and glass substrates, by simple ion beam sputtering, at room temperature. Crystallization of these films has been done using excimer laser annealing. Structural and optical properties of as-deposited and annealed Si1-xGex alloy films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), uv-visible spectrophotometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The as-deposited films, both on Si and glass, have been found to be amorphous by XRD. Polycrystalline nature of laser-annealed samples has been evidenced by both x-ray and SE measurements. The results of x-ray, uv-visible, AES, and SE are compared and discussed. The poly-Si1-xGex films were oriented predominantly to (111) and the grain sizes were determined from half-width of x-ray peaks. The compositions x of Si1-xGex films have been evaluated from the SE dielectric function ɛ(ω) data, using the second-derivative technique, and are found to be 0.23 and 0.36 for two different compositions. A detailed analysis of ɛ(ω) with the effective-medium theory has demonstrated the volume fraction of crystalline Si1-xGex increases with the increasing energy of laser irradiation.

  9. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  10. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  11. Hair treatment device for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, Bruce E.; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2016-01-26

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  12. Explication of diffraction lights on an optical imaging system from a Fraunhofer diffraction perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki

    2012-06-01

    Low-height camera modules are demanded for such applications as cellular phones and vehicles. For designing optical lens, it has widely been recognized that a trade-off exists between reducing the number of lenses and camera resolution. The optical performance of imaging lenses has been improved by diffraction gratings, which have a peculiar inverse dispersion in the wavelength and exhibit the efficacy of correction for chromatic aberration. We can simultaneously reduce the number of lenses and maintain optical resolution using diffraction gratings. However, we have found a generation of striped flare lights under intense light sources that differ from unnecessary order diffraction lights. In this paper, we reveal the generation mechanism of these new striped diffraction lights and suggest a novel structure of diffraction gratings that can decrease them.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on lamellar gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, R.; Ohlidal, I.; Mistrik, J.; Murakami, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Pistora, J.; Horie, M.; Visnovsky, S.

    2005-05-01

    Deep lamellar diffraction gratings fabricated by etching a transparent quartz plate are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis is used to calculate the optical response of the gratings. Three parameters of the rectangular profile are determined by utilizing the least-square method. Detailed investigation of the spectral dependences demonstrates the uniqueness of the solution. Observing the spectral dependences of Wood anomalies suggests that even complicated profiles can be fitted with high authenticity.

  14. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  15. Tailoring non-diffractive beams from amorphous light speckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Battista, D.; Ancora, D.; Leonetti, M.; Zacharakis, G.

    2016-09-01

    Bessel beams are non-diffracting light structures, which maintain their spatial features after meters of propagation and are realized with simple optical elements such as axicon lenses, spatial filters, and lasers. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for generating non diffractive Bessel-like beams through a heavily scattering system, exploiting wavefronts shaped by a spatial light modulator. With the proposed method starting from amorphous speckle patterns, it is possible to produce at user defined positions configurable and non-diffracting light distributions which can improve depth-of-field in speckled illumination microscopy.

  16. Ultrasonic diffraction of Bessel light beams in uniaxial gyrotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyi, V. N.; Kulak, G. V.; Krokh, G. V.; Ropot, P. I.; Shakin, O. V.

    2016-09-01

    Specific features of the acousto-optic diffraction of Bessel light beams propagating in the vicinity of the optical axis of a uniaxial gyrotropic crystal have been investigated. The dependences of the diffraction efficiency on the acousto-optic interaction length, ultrasound power, and polarization state of the incident Bessel light beam have been analyzed using the coupled-wave equations and the overlap-integral method. It is shown that polarization-independent diffraction of Bessel light beams is observed in paratellurite crystals, when the Bragg diffraction efficiency is independent of the polarization state of the incident beam. The physical reason for this diffraction has been established (both theoretically and experimentally) to be simultaneous implementation of two processes of anisotropic scattering, at which the Bragg synchronism conditions are satisfied for orthogonal polarized Bessel beams with elliptical polarization.

  17. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  18. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  19. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  20. Ultrasonic light diffraction in optically isotropic media with induced birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomme, Erik; Sliwinski, Antoni

    2001-11-01

    Optically isotropic media which are susceptible to acoustically induced birefringence can be used as acousto- optic polarization converters. A comparative study between fused silica and dense flint shows that at normal light incidence 52% of the light can be converted from linear to circular in the case of fused silica and only 20% in the case of dense flint. In each case the conversion appears at moderate sound amplitudes and at frequencies which are typical for the intermediate regime of diffraction. Applying oblique light incidence, most interesting effects can be obtained with fused silica at high sound frequencies which are typical for the Bragg regime of diffraction and in the neighborhood of the Bragg angle. The possibility is shown to use an AO cell fabricated of fused silica as a laser-beam splitter, converting a linearly polarized beam of light partially into a circularly polarized beam and a linearly polarized beam, the light intensity of the two beams being equal. In addition, it is seen that the temporal light intensity modulations which can be observed in the near field of the light diffracted under these specific conditions, can be understood from the polarization changes taking place.

  1. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  2. White-light diffraction tomography of unlabelled live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Zhou, Renjie; Mir, Mustafa; Babacan, S. Derin; Carney, P. Scott; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    We present a technique called white-light diffraction tomography (WDT) for imaging microscopic transparent objects such as live unlabelled cells. The approach extends diffraction tomography to white-light illumination and imaging rather than scattering plane measurements. Our experiments were performed using a conventional phase contrast microscope upgraded with a module to measure quantitative phase images. The axial dimension of the object was reconstructed by scanning the focus through the object and acquiring a stack of phase-resolved images. We reconstructed the three-dimensional structures of live, unlabelled, red blood cells and compared the results with confocal and scanning electron microscopy images. The 350 nm transverse and 900 nm axial resolution achieved reveals subcellular structures at high resolution in Escherichia coli cells. The results establish WDT as a means for measuring three-dimensional subcellular structures in a non-invasive and label-free manner.

  3. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  4. Computation of Diffractive Beam Propagation of Monochromatic Light

    1999-02-20

    Computation of diffractive beam propagation of monochromatic light through a l-dimensional (slab) structure defined by a piecewise continuous complex index of refraction. Finite difference equations are fourth-order-accurate in the lateral grid size and include discontinuities of higher-order field derivatives at dielectric interfaces. Variable grid spacing is allowed, and all dielectric interfaces are assumed to coincide with grid points.

  5. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  6. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  7. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  8. Diffractive simultaneous bidirectional shearing interferometry using tailored spatially coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Nercissian, Vanusch; Harder, Irina; Mantel, Klaus; Berger, Andreas; Leuchs, Gerd; Lindlein, Norbert; Schwider, Johannes

    2011-02-01

    Measurements of wavefront deformations can be carried out with the help of lateral shearing interferometers. Here the focus is on a setup providing two shears along orthogonal directions simultaneously to generate the data needed for a reconstruction. We describe a diffractive solution using Ronchi phase gratings with a suppressed zeroth order for both the doubling of the wavefront under test and the bidirectional shearing unit. A series arrangement of the gratings offers an on-axis geometry, which minimizes the systematic errors of the test. For illumination, an extended incoherent monochromatic light source is used. High-contrast fringes can be obtained by tailoring the degree of coherence via a periodic intensity distribution.

  9. Fluctuations of optical phase of diffracted light for Raman-Nath diffraction in acousto-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cun-Cheng, Weng; Zhang, Xiao-Man

    2015-01-01

    The Raman-Nath diffraction in acousto-optic effect was studied theoretically and experimentally in the paper. Up to now, each order of diffracted light in Raman-Nath diffraction was still considered simply to be just frequency-shifted and to be a plane wave. However, we find that the phase and frequency shifts occur simultaneously and individually in Raman-Nath diffraction. The findings demonstrate that, in addition to the frequency shift, the optical phase of each order of diffracted light is also shifted by the sound wave and fluctuates with the sound wave and is related to the location in the acoustic field from which the diffracted light originates. As a result, the wavefront of each order of diffracted light is modulated to fluctuate spatially and temporally with the sound wave. Obviously, these findings are significant for applications of Raman-Nath diffraction in acousto-optic effect because the optical phase plays an important role in optical coherence technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178089) and the Science and Technology Program of the Educational Office of Fujian Province of China (Grant Nos. JB12012 and JB13003).

  10. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  11. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  13. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  14. Generalized Ellipsometry in Unusual Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Holcomb, David Eugene; Hunn, John D; Rouleau, Christopher M; Wright, Gomez W

    2006-01-01

    Most ellipsometry experiments are performed by shining polarized light onto a sample at a large angle of incidence, and the results are interpreted in terms of thin film thicknesses and isotropic optical functions of the film or substrate. However, it is possible to alter the geometrical arrangement, either by observing the sample in transmission or at normal-incidence reflection. In both cases, the experiment is fundamentally the same, but the interpretation of the results is considerably different. Both configurations can be used in conjunction with microscope optics, allowing for images to be made of the sample. The results of three examples of these different configurations using the two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) are reported: (1) spectroscopic birefringence measurements of ZnO, (2) electric field-induced birefringence (Pockels effect) in GaAs, and (3) normal-incidence reflection anisotropy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG).

  15. Anomalous behaviors of the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for a class of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro

    2003-02-24

    In this paper, we investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a class of partially coherent light diffracted by a circular aperture. It is shown that by the illumination of partially coherent light of the special spatial correlation function, the anomalous behaviors of the diffraction patterns are found. We find that the decrease of the spatial coherence of the light in the aperture leads to the drastic changes of the diffraction pattern. Specifically, when the light in the aperture is fully coherent, the diffraction pattern is just an Airy disc. However, as the coherence decreases, the diffraction pattern becomes an annulus, and the radius of the annulus increases with the decrease of the coherence. Flattened annuli can be achieved, when the parameters characterizing the correlation of the partially coherent light are chosen with suitable values. Potential applications of modulating the coherence to achieve desired diffraction patterns are discussed.

  16. Forward light scattering for arbitrary sharp-edged convex crystals in Fraunhofer and anomalous diffraction approximations.

    PubMed

    Heffels, C; Heitzmann, D; Hirleman, E D; Scarlett, B

    1995-10-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction is a well-known physical model for describing forward light scattering from opaque particles much larger than the wavelength of the light. Analytical expressions exist for diffraction from circular- or rectangular-shaped apertures. An expression is derived for diffraction by apertures of a general polygonal shape. From this expression the exact solution for anomalous diffraction by arbitrary convex crystals is calculated. These expressions are useful in characterizing crystal size and shape, by laser diffraction instruments, when measured in a solution.

  17. Diffraction-dependent spin splitting in spin Hall effect of light on reflection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaodong; Xie, Linguo; Qiu, Jiangdong; Zhang, Zhiyou; Du, Jinglei; Gao, Fuhua

    2015-07-27

    We report on a diffraction-dependent spin splitting of the paraxial Gaussian light beams on reflection theoretically and experimentally. In the case of horizontal incident polarization, the spin splitting is proportional to the diffraction length of light beams near the Brewster angle. However, the spin splitting is nearly independent with the diffraction length for the vertical incident polarization. By means of the angular spectrum theory, we find that the diffraction-dependent spin splitting is attributed to the first order expansion term of the reflection coefficients with respect to the transverse wave-vector which is closely related to the diffraction length.

  18. Polarization states of diffracted light. Changes accompanying fiber activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J S; Baskin, R J; Baskin, R J; Burton, K; Shen, S; Yeh, Y

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of the state of optical polarization of light diffracted from single, skinned and intact fibers of anterior tibialis muscle from Rana pipiens revealed a dependence upon rigor, activation, and sarcomere length (SL) change. Changes in total birefringence, delta nT, and differential field ratio value, rT, were determined. In a relaxed, skinned fiber the total birefringence value, delta nT, decreases as sarcomere length is increased from 2.1 microns to approximately 2.8-3.0 microns. From there it increases significantly to a value of approximately 1.8 x 10(-3) at a sarcomere length of 3.6 microns. The differential field ratio, rT, also shows a biphasic response to increasing sarcomere length, first exhibiting a rapid decrease over shorter SL and leveling out after the SL is beyond 3.0 microns. In comparison, relaxed intact fibers change substantially less upon sarcomere length change, showing little change in birefringence and a small bi-phasic change in rT. Skinned fibers were activated using a solution that has the same ionic strength as the relaxing solution and allows repeatable, and sustained activation. A decrease in both delta nT and rT was observed upon fiber activation. The decrease in delta nT and rT was slightly larger at shorter sarcomere lengths than at longer lengths. Relaxed fibers placed in rigor showed changes in delta nT and rT similar to those observed in activated fibers. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, after activation, a significant portion of the thick filament cross-bridges rotate towards the actin filament resulting in redistribution of the interfilament mass content. They are also consistent with an average orientation of crossbridges in the overlap region different from that in the nonoverlap region. PMID:2790140

  19. Polarization states of diffracted light. Changes accompanying fiber activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Baskin, R J; Baskin, R J; Burton, K; Shen, S; Yeh, Y

    1989-09-01

    Measurement of the state of optical polarization of light diffracted from single, skinned and intact fibers of anterior tibialis muscle from Rana pipiens revealed a dependence upon rigor, activation, and sarcomere length (SL) change. Changes in total birefringence, delta nT, and differential field ratio value, rT, were determined. In a relaxed, skinned fiber the total birefringence value, delta nT, decreases as sarcomere length is increased from 2.1 microns to approximately 2.8-3.0 microns. From there it increases significantly to a value of approximately 1.8 x 10(-3) at a sarcomere length of 3.6 microns. The differential field ratio, rT, also shows a biphasic response to increasing sarcomere length, first exhibiting a rapid decrease over shorter SL and leveling out after the SL is beyond 3.0 microns. In comparison, relaxed intact fibers change substantially less upon sarcomere length change, showing little change in birefringence and a small bi-phasic change in rT. Skinned fibers were activated using a solution that has the same ionic strength as the relaxing solution and allows repeatable, and sustained activation. A decrease in both delta nT and rT was observed upon fiber activation. The decrease in delta nT and rT was slightly larger at shorter sarcomere lengths than at longer lengths. Relaxed fibers placed in rigor showed changes in delta nT and rT similar to those observed in activated fibers. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, after activation, a significant portion of the thick filament cross-bridges rotate towards the actin filament resulting in redistribution of the interfilament mass content. They are also consistent with an average orientation of crossbridges in the overlap region different from that in the nonoverlap region.

  20. Coherent control of atomic beam diffraction by standing light waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Bijoy K.

    2003-02-01

    Quantum interference is shown to deliver a means of regulating the diffraction pattern of a thermal atomic beam interacting with two standing-wave electric fields. Parameters have been identified to enhance the diffraction probability of one momentum component over the others, with specific application to Rb atoms.

  1. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  2. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  3. Enhanced light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with quasiperiodic diffraction grating layer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Bin; Cho, Kwan Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Yong-Cheol

    2016-08-01

    We presented enhanced light extraction efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) cells with a nano-sized diffraction grating layer. Various diffraction gratings of different morphologies including linear, cubic, hexagonal and quasiperiodic patterns were fabricated by multiplexing light interference exposure on an azobenzene thin film. The effect of diffraction grating layer on device performances including luminous properties and quantum efficiency was investigated. In contrast to periodic grating patterns, the quasiperiodic structures leading broadband light extraction resulted in improved external quantum efficiency and power efficiency by 73% and 63%, respectively, compared to conventional OLED with flat surface of glass substrate.

  4. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  5. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOEpatents

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  6. Doppler shift generated by a moving diffraction grating under incidence by polychromatic diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossou, Kokou B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the spectral response of moving diffraction gratings, in which the incident light extends over a broad angular range and where the diffracted light is observed from a specific angle. We show that the dispersion relation between the frequency perceived by an observer who is looking at a moving grating and the incident frequency can exhibit some unique features, such as a flat band (i.e., a local minimum). An observer can see the light diffracted into a non-specular diffraction order from a multitude of incident light rays and the angle of incidence of each ray is frequency-dependent, as a consequence, when the grating is moving, each incident ray experiences a Doppler shift in frequency that depends on its angle of incidence. We find that remarkable features appear near a Wood anomaly where the angle of incidence, for a given diffraction angle, can change very quickly with frequency. This means that light of multiple frequencies and incident from multiple angles can be mixed by the motion of the grating into the same diffracted ray and their frequencies can be compressed into a narrower range. The existence of a flat band means that a moving grating can be used as a device to increase the intensity of the perceived diffracted light due to spectral compression. The properties of a grating in motion in sunlight can also be relevant to the study of naturally occurring gratings which are typically in oscillatory motion.

  7. Doppler shift generated by a moving diffraction grating under incidence by polychromatic diffuse light.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Kokou B

    2016-05-20

    We consider the spectral response of moving diffraction gratings, in which the incident light extends over a broad angular range and where the diffracted light is observed from a specific angle. We show that the dispersion relation between the frequency perceived by an observer who is looking at a moving grating and the incident frequency can exhibit some unique features, such as a flat band (i.e., a local minimum). An observer can see the light diffracted into a nonspecular diffraction order from a multitude of incident light rays, and the angle of incidence of each ray is frequency dependent; as a consequence, when the grating is moving, each incident ray experiences a Doppler shift in frequency that depends on its angle of incidence. We find that remarkable features appear near a Wood anomaly where the angle of incidence, for a given diffraction angle, can change very quickly with frequency. This means that light of multiple frequencies and incident from multiple angles can be mixed by the motion of the grating into the same diffracted ray and their frequencies can be compressed into a narrower range. The existence of a flat band means that a moving grating can be used as a device to increase the intensity of the perceived diffracted light due to spectral compression. The properties of a grating in motion in sunlight can also be relevant to the study of naturally occurring gratings which are typically in oscillatory motion.

  8. Light scattering by red blood cells in ektacytometry: Fraunhofer versus anomalous diffraction.

    PubMed

    Streekstra, G J; Hoekstra, A G; Nijhof, E J; Heethaar, R M

    1993-05-01

    In the present literature on ektacytometry, small angle light scattering by ellipsoidal red blood cells is commonly approximated by Fraunhofer diffraction. Calculations on a sphere with the size and relative refractive index of a red cell, however, show that Fraunhofer diffraction deviates significantly from exact Mie theory. Anomalous diffraction is found to be a much better approximation. The anomalous diffraction theory is used to calculate the intensity distribution of the light scattered by an ellipsoidally deformed red blood cell. The derived expression shows that the ellipticity of isointensity curves in forward scattered light are equal to the ellipticity of the red blood cell. The theoretical expression is fitted to the intensity patterns measured with an ektacytometer. For the small observation angles used in ektacytometry, the experimental results confirm the validity of the anomalous diffraction approach.

  9. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  10. Diffractive light trapping in crystal-silicon films: experiment and electromagnetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dirk N; Lee, Benjamin G; Richmond, Dustin A; Nemeth, William; Wang, Qi; Keszler, Douglas A; Branz, Howard M

    2011-10-10

    Diffractive light trapping in 1.5 μm thick crystal silicon films is studied experimentally through hemispherical reflection measurements and theoretically through rigorous coupled-wave analysis modeling. The gratings were fabricated by nanoimprinting of dielectric precursor films. The model data, which match the experimental results well without the use of any fitting parameters, are used to extract the light trapping efficiency. Diffractive light trapping is studied as a function of incidence angle, and an enhancement of light absorption is found for incidence angles up to 50° for both TE and TM polarizations.

  11. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  12. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  13. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept.

  14. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes.

  15. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes. PMID:26393758

  16. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  17. Diffractive optical devices produced by light-assisted trapping of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, J F; Jubera, M; Matarrubia, J; García-Cabañes, A; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2016-01-15

    One- and two-dimensional diffractive optical devices have been fabricated by light-assisted trapping and patterning of nanoparticles. The method is based on the dielectrophoretic forces appearing in the vicinity of a photovoltaic crystal, such as Fe:LiNbO3, during or after illumination. By illumination with the appropriate light distribution, the nanoparticles are organized along patterns designed at will. One- and two-dimensional diffractive components have been achieved on X- and Z-cut Fe:LiNbO3 crystals, with their polar axes parallel and perpendicular to the crystal surface, respectively. Diffraction gratings with periods down to around a few micrometers have been produced using metal (Al, Ag) nanoparticles with radii in the range of 70-100 nm. Moreover, several 2D devices, such as Fresnel zone plates, have been also produced showing the potential of the method. The diffractive particle patterns remain stable when light is removed. A method to transfer the diffractive patterns to other nonphotovoltaic substrates, such as silica glass, has been also reported.

  18. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  19. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  20. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-shan Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-06-15

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive.

  1. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  2. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context.

  3. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  4. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  5. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context. PMID:20555963

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis: Measured vs. calculated quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a very powerful technique for optical characterization of thin-film and bulk materials, but the technique measures functions of complex reflection coefficients, which are usually not of interest per se. The interesting characteristics such as film thickness, surface roughness thickness, and optical functions can be determined only by modeling the near-surface region of the sample. However, the measured quantities are not equivalent to those determined from the modeling. Ellipsometry measurements determine elements of the sample Mueller matrix, but the usual result of modeling calculations are elements of the sample. Often this difference is academic, but if the sample depolarizes the light, it is not. Ellipsometry calculations also include methods for determining the optical functions of materials. Data for bulk materials are usually accurate for substrates, but are not appropriate for most thin films. Therefore, reasonable parameterizations are quite useful in performing spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis. Recently, there has been an increased interest in anisotropic materials, both in thin-film and bulk form. A generalized procedure will be presented for calculating the elements of the Jones matrix for any number of layers, any one of which may or may not be uniaxial.

  7. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  8. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-11-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such experiments. It would, however, be possible for students to analyze data from scientific experiments by analogy to experiments they themselves had performed. Based on this rationale, this paper describes two pairs of experiments that may be of interest to teachers aiming to teach the wave nature of light and of particles to upper secondary school (or to college) students. Specifically, students are asked to (i) carry out a double-slit experiment by using monochromatic light, thus repeating in a way the historical experiment of Young,1 and then analyze real data from Jönsson's2-3 scientific double-slit experiment with electrons, and (ii) perform an experiment involving diffraction of monochromatic light using a compact disc (CD) as a reflection grating, and then by analogy analyze data from the experiment of Davisson and Germer.4 The proposed real experiments are not original, and different versions of them have been wi dely described in the literature.5,6 The educational value of the present work lies in the use of the analogy between experiments carried out in the school lab and experiments performed in the scientific lab.

  9. Light trapping by backside diffraction gratings in silicon solar cells revisited.

    PubMed

    Wellenzohn, Markus; Hainberger, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    This numerical study investigates the influence of rectangular backside diffraction gratings on the efficiency of silicon solar cells. Backside gratings are used to diffract incident light to large propagation angles beyond the angle of total internal reflection, which can significantly increase the interaction length of long wavelength photons inside the silicon layer and thus enhance the efficiency. We investigate the influence of the silicon thickness on the optimum grating period and modulation depth by a simulation method which combines a 2D ray tracing algorithm with rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) for calculating the grating diffraction efficiencies. The optimization was performed for gratings with period lengths ranging from 0.25 µm to 1.5 µm and modulation depths ranging from 25 nm to 400 nm under the assumption of normal light incidence. This study shows that the achievable efficiency improvement of silicon solar cells by means of backside diffraction gratings strongly depends on the proper choice of the grating parameters for a given silicon thickness. The relationship between the optimized grating parameters resulting in maximum photocurrent densities and the silicon thickness is determined. Moreover, the thicknesses of silicon solar cells with and without optimized backside diffraction gratings providing the same photocurrent densities are compared.

  10. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  11. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-08-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy.

  12. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  13. Light coupling in a Scotch tape waveguide via an integrated metal diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor

    2016-01-15

    We report on the first demonstration of a flexible optical waveguide interconnecting device made of a general purpose pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape embedding nanopatterned Al thin film diffractive grating couplers. The diffractive elements allow selected broadband light to be perpendicularly coupled/decoupled into/from a PSA tape waveguide in which they are integrated. Waveguide losses and coupling efficiency are evaluated. The versatility and low cost of the used materials make the presented configuration very promising for cost-effective, ready-to-use short-distance optical interconnections.

  14. Reducing the diffraction artifacts while implementing a phase function on a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Benoît-Pasanau, Céline; Goudail, François; Chavel, Pierre; Cano, Jean-Paul; Ballet, Jérôme

    2011-02-01

    Spatial light modulators are often used to implement phase modulation. Since they are pixelated, the phase function is usually approximated by a regularly sampled piecewise constant function, and the periodicity of the pixel sampling generates annoying diffraction peaks. We theoretically investigate two pixelation techniques: the isophase method and a new nonperiodic method derived from the Voronoi tessellation technique. We show that, for a suitable choice of parameters, the diffraction peaks disappear and are replaced by a smoothly varying halo. We illustrate the potential of these two techniques for implementing a lens function and wavefront correction. PMID:21283242

  15. Anisotropic light diffraction in crystals with a large acoustic-energy walk-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakshy, V. I.; Voloshin, A. S.; Molchanov, V. Ya.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of energy walk-off in an acoustic beam on the characteristic of anisotropic Bragg diffraction of light has been investigated by the example of paratellurite crystal. The angular and frequency characteristics of acousto-optic diffraction have been calculated in wide ranges of ultrasound frequencies and Bragg angles using the modified Raman-Nath equations. It is shown that the walk-off of an acoustic beam may change (either widen or narrow) significantly the frequency and angular ranges. The calculation results have been experimentally checked on an acousto-optic cell made of 10.5°-cut paratellurite crystal.

  16. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  17. Scattering of white light from levitated oblate water drops near rainbows and other diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H J; Marston, P L

    1991-08-20

    Oblate drops of water illuminated perpendicular to their symmetry axis generate a hyperbolic-umbilic diffraction catastrophe near the primary rainbow [P. L. Marston and E. H. Trinh, Nature London 312, 529-531 (1984)]. Observations were made of this diffraction catastrophe generated by white-light illumination of acoustically levitated drops of water in air. The observations suggest what generalized rainbows would look like if they were produced in nature when sunlight illuminates large raindrops. Unlike the usual rainbow arc, the transverse cusp of the unfolded catastrophe is not distinctly colored. The hyperbolic-umbilic focal section is distinctly colored as is another diffraction catastrophe generated in the rainbow region when the drop is highly oblate. PMID:20706412

  18. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoern Petersen, Steffen; Kold di Gennaro, Ane; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Skovsen, Esben; Parracino, Antonietta

    2010-10-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demonstrate that, by shaping the pattern of the UV light used to induce molecular immobilization, one can control the pattern of immobilized molecules onto the surface. Using a single-aperture spatial mask, combined with the Fourier transforming property of a focusing lens, we show that submicrometer (0.7 {mu}m) resolved patterns of immobilized prostate-specific antigen biomolecules can be created. If a dual-aperture spatial mask is used, the results differ from the expected Fourier transform pattern of the mask. It appears as a superposition of two diffraction patterns produced by the two apertures, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed.

  19. Theoretical study of the anisotropic diffraction of light waves by acoustic waves in lithium niobate crystals.

    PubMed

    Rouvaen, J M; Waxin, G; Gazalet, M G; Bridoux, E

    1990-03-20

    The anisotropic diffraction of light by high frequency longitudinal ultrasonic waves in the tangential phase matching configuration may present some definite advantages over the same interaction using transverse acoustic waves. A systematic search for favorable crystal cuts in lithium niobate was worked out. The main results of this study are reported here; they enable the choice of the best configuration for a given operating center frequency.

  20. Strain measurements of Ge epilayers on Si by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Fernando, N.; Medina, A. A.; Nelson, C. M.; Zollner, S.; Xu, S. C.; Menendez, J.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2014-03-01

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry, we determined the strain of a Ge epilayer grown on a Si (100) substrate. This strain depends on the sample temperature and arises because of the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between Si and Ge. It can be calculated since the thermal expansion coefficients of Si and Ge are known very precisely, if we assume that the Ge epilayer was fully relaxed at the growth temperature, leading to an increase in strain as the temperature decreases. We calculate in-plane tensile strain values of 0.12% at 300 K or 0.19% at 77K for our Ge on Si layer, that compares favorably with an in-plane strain of 0.11% derived from shifts of the Ge lattice reflection at 300 K by x-ray diffraction. This temperature-dependent strain affects the energies of the E1 and E1+Delta1 critical points of the Ge epilayer, which can be measured very precisely using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 77 to 800 K.From the difference in the critical point energies between our Ge epilayers on Si and bulk Ge (up to 20 meV), we can calculate the strain from the known elastic constants and deformation potentials. The strain determined from ellipsometry agrees well with the strain calculated from the temperature-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. This work was supported by AFOSR, Award Number FA9550-13-1-0022.

  1. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  2. Fraunhofer diffraction of light with orbital angular momentum by a slit.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Queila S; Jesus-Silva, Alcenísio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S; Hickmann, Jandir M

    2011-08-15

    We study the Fraunhofer diffraction problem while taking into account the orbital angular momentum of light. In this case, the phase singularity of the light beam is incident on the slit in two different cases: in one, it is incident slightly above the slit, and in the other it is centered on the slit. We observed that the symmetry and the fringe formation in the interference pattern strongly depend on the amount of orbital angular momentum and the slit position in relation to the beam.

  3. Evaluation of photoelectric processes in photorefractive crystals via the exposure characteristics of light diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kadys, A; Gudelis, V; Sudzius, M; Jarasiunas, K

    2005-01-12

    We demonstrate a novel way to analyse carrier recombination and transport processes in photorefractive semiconductors via the exposure characteristics of light induced diffraction. The results of a picosecond four-wave mixing on free carrier gratings in semi-insulating GaAs crystals at various grating periods and modulation depths of a light interference pattern are discussed. The role of a deep-trap recharging in carrier diffusion and recombination is sensitively revealed through a feedback effect of a space-charge field to non-equilibrium carrier transport.

  4. High resolution light diffraction tomography: nearfield measurements of 10 MHz continuous wave ultrasound

    PubMed

    Almqvist; Holm; Jansson; Persson; Lindstrom

    1999-06-01

    Light diffraction tomography is an ultrasound measurement method that offers possibilities to make high spatial resolution measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial resolution of light diffraction tomography by characterizing the complex pressure and phase patterns 0.5-1 mm from the surface of a 5 mm diameter 10 MHz ultrasound transducer. Three different transducers were measured with a detection width of 5 microm, sample distances of 20-40 microm and 50-100 projections/180 degrees. They were excited with a 10 Vpp CW-signal. To verify the results the optical measurements were compared with 75 microm diameter hydrophone measurements and with theoretical calculations. The light diffraction tomography results show very good agreement with the hydrophone measurements and pressure peaks separated 160 microm were resolved. Comparison with the theoretical calculation shows that small distortions, caused by defects in the matching layer or in the piezo-electric disc, disturb the symmetric ring-pattern characteristic of an ideal piston source. PMID:10499805

  5. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guijun Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-09

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400–800 nm) and bottom (800–1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  6. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  7. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments.

  8. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-14

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  9. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  10. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  11. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  12. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  13. Theoretical Fraunhofer light diffraction patterns calculated from three-dimensional sarcomere arrays imaged from isolated cardiac cells at rest.

    PubMed

    Roos, K P; Leung, A F

    1987-08-01

    Sarcomere striation positions have been obtained throughout the volumes of calcium-tolerant resting heart cells by direct computer interfaced high-resolution optical imaging. Each sarcomere position is stored in a three-dimensional (3-D) matrix array from which Fraunhofer light diffraction patterns have been calculated using numerical methods based on Fourier transforms. Diffraction patterns have been calculated from heart cell data arrays oriented normal to a theoretical laser beam. Twelve characteristic features have been identified and described from these diffraction patterns that correlate to diffraction phenomena observed from both cardiac and skeletal muscle. This numerical approach provides the means to directly assess diffraction pattern formulation, the precision of layer line angular separation, layer-line intensity and angular asymmetries, line widths and fine structures in terms of the known diffracting source structures. These results confirm that theoretical calculations can predict real muscle diffraction patterns and their asymmetries.

  14. Near-field surface plasmon effects on Au-double-slit diffraction for polychromatic light

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The surface plasmon effects on near-field diffraction for polychromatic light are studied. An Au-double-slit is used as the model and Fresnel integral is employed to perform the theoretic analysis. The results are illustrated with numerical examples and they show that, compared with the normal double-slit, the plasmon effect changes the spectral shift from redshift to blueshift and also enhances the intensity peak. This effect can be used in optical data transmission or specific spectral selectors. PMID:25386100

  15. Measurement of angular parameters of divergent optical radiation by light diffraction on sound

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N

    2010-12-09

    A method is proposed to measure the scattering angle of optical radiation, the method employing two Bragg diffraction processes in which divergent optical radiation propagates close to the optical axis of a uniaxial crystal, while the acoustic wave - orthogonally to this axis. The method does not require additional angular tuning of the acousto-optic cell. We suggest using a mask to measure the light divergence that is larger than the angle of Bragg scattering. The method can be used to measure the size of the polished glass plate inhomogeneities. (laser applications and other aspects of quantum electronics)

  16. Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittet, Pierre-Yves; Mantz, Ulrich; Weidner, Peter; Stehle, Jean-Louis; Bucchia, Marc; Bourtault, Sophie; Zahorski, Dorian

    2004-05-01

    Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE) metrology is an emerging technology in semiconductor production environment. Infineon Technologies SC300 implemented the first worldwide automated IRSE in a class 1 clean room in 2002. Combining properties of IR light -- large wavelength, low absorption in silicon -- with a short focus optics -- no backside reflection -- which allow model-based analysis, a large number of production applications were developed. Part of Infineon IRSE development roadmap is now focused on depth monitoring for arrays of 3D dry-etched structures. In trench DRAM manufacturing, the areal density is high, and critical dimensions are much lower than mid-IR wavelength. Therefore, extensive use of effective medium theory is made to model 3D structures. IR-SE metrology is not limited by shrinking critical dimensions, as long as the areal density is above a specific cut-off value determined by trenches dimensions, trench-filling and surrounding materials. Two applications for depth monitoring are presented. 1D models were developed and successfully applied to the DRAM trench capacitor structures. Modeling and correlation to reference methods are shown as well as dynamic repeatability and gauge capability results. Limitations of the current tool configuration are reviewed for shallow structures.

  17. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  18. Scattering of a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic light wave by quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping; Wu, Zhefu

    2015-09-01

    While remaining accurate under the first-order Born approximation and the paraxial assumption, the scattering of a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic light wave by a quasi-homogeneous (QH) medium is specifically addressed in this study. Analytical expressions are derived for spectral density as well as the spectral degree of coherence of the scattered field. As long as the components of the complex amplitude of incident waves are proportional to each other, the resultant scattered light in the far field is proven to satisfy two reciprocity relations, namely, that the spectral density is proportional to the spatial Fourier transformation of the normalized correlation coefficient of the scattering potential, while the spectral degree of coherence is dependent only on the spatial Fourier transformation of the strength of the scattering potential.

  19. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-10-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided-wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point-spread-function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47 - 53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully-optimised guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  20. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction.

  1. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  2. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  3. Determining Concentration of Nanoparticles from Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chipman, Russell

    2008-01-01

    A method of using ellipsometry or polarization analysis of light in total internal reflection of a surface to determine the number density of gold nanoparticles on a smooth substrate has been developed. The method can be modified to enable determination of densities of sparse distributions of nanoparticles in general, and is expected to be especially useful for measuring gold-nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules on microarrays. The method is based on theoretical calculations of the ellipsometric responses of gold nanoparticles. Elements of the calculations include the following: For simplicity, the gold nanoparticles are assumed to be spherical and to have the same radius. The distribution of gold nanoparticles is assumed to be a sub-monolayer (that is, sparser than a monolayer). The optical response of the sub-monolayer is modeled by use of a thin-island-film theory, according to which the polarizabilities parallel and perpendicular to the substrate are functions of the wavelength of light, the dielectric functions (permittivities expressed as complex functions of frequency or wavelength) of the gold and the suspending medium (in this case, the suspending medium is air), the fraction of the substrate area covered by the nanoparticles, and the radius of the nanoparticles. For the purpose of the thin-island-film theory, the dielectric function of the gold nanoparticles is modeled as the known dielectric function of bulk gold plus a correction term that is necessitated by the fact that the mean free path length for electrons in gold decreases with decreasing radius, in such a manner as to cause the imaginary part of the dielectric function to increase with decreasing radius (see figure). The correction term is a function of the nanoparticle radius, the wavelength of light, the mean free path and the Fermi speed of electrons in bulk gold, the plasma frequency of gold, and the speed of light in a vacuum. These models are used to calculate ellipsometric responses for

  4. Progress on the prevention of stray light and diffraction effects on the Thai National Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisset, Christophe; Prasit, Apirat; Leckngam, Apichat; Lépine, Thierry; Poshyajinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Irawati, Puji; Richichi, Andrea; Sawangwit, Utane; Dhillon, Vik; Hardy, Liam K.

    2015-09-01

    The 2.4-m Thai National Telescope (TNT) is the main facility of the Thai National Observatory located on the Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain. The first astronomical images obtained at the TNT suffered from diffraction and stray light problems: bright spikes spread from bright stellar images over few arcminutes in the focal plane, and the images taken during observations in bright moon conditions were contaminated by high levels of stray light. We performed targeted investigations to identify the origin of these problems. In a first time, these investigations consisted of analyzing the irradiance distribution of defocused stellar images and of identifying the contributors. We concluded that these bright spikes around the bright stellar images were due to the chamfer and the wavefront error at the mirror edge. We thus installed an annular mask along the edge of the primary mirror that fully suppressed these spikes and we quantified the improvement by observing the double star Sirius. In a second time, we identified the contributors to the stray light by placing a pinhole camera at the TNT focal plane. Then, we designed a new baffle to improve the stray light rejection. The final design of the baffle comprises 21 diaphragms, is painted with an ordinary black paint and was designed, developed and installed on the TNT in less than 8 months. We assessed the improvement on the performance by measuring the variation of the stray light signal before and after installing the baffle in the telescope structure. These steps significantly improved the image quality and enhanced the rejection of the stray light at the focal plane level. In this paper, we present our investigations, we describe the method used to design the TNT baffle, and we present the improvement in quantitative terms.

  5. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  6. Correlation between the light diffraction pattern and the structure of a muscle fibre realized with Ewald's construction.

    PubMed

    Zite-Ferenczy, F; Häberle, K D; Rüdel, R; Wilke, W

    1986-06-01

    Ewald's construction of reciprocal space is used to explain the diffraction pattern obtained by illumination of a skeletal muscle fibre with laser light. The question of whether the illuminated fibre segment acts as a monocrystal or as a conglomerate of crystallites is answered by determining the longitudinal extension of the layer lines; neither the whole muscle fibre nor the single myofibril acts as the diffracting unit. The characteristic fine structure within a layer line ('streaks') is explained by Ewald's formalism as being caused by diffraction from partial volumes of the illuminated fibre segment. These partial volumes constitute the main diffracting units. Any cross-section of a 100 micron diameter fibre contains 3-6 such units. They are delineated from each other by the skew of the diffracting planes with respect to the fibre axis, and possibly by small differences in sarcomere length. Within a unit, skew angle and sarcomere length are nearly constant. Light intensity measurements along the length of a layer line at various tilt angles (omega) between fibre and beam axis provide an overview of the size and the skew angle of the various diffracting units within the illuminated fibre segment. The cross-sections of the diffracting units were measured in 'mini'-omega-scans of streaks created by them and from the maximal streak length. In general, the units had noncircular cross-section, the length of the main axis ranging between 10 micron and the fibre diameter. The axial extensions of the diffracting units determined in fibre length scans was 100-300 micron. The results of diffraction experiments reported in the literature as well as the data from light and electron microscopy are in agreement with the fibre structure suggested above. Sarcomere length determination by light diffractometry is discussed within the framework of the Ewald formalism, and recommendations for an experimental procedure are given.

  7. Visible light dynamical diffraction in a 1-D photonic crystal-based interferometer with an extremely thin spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of light diffraction in a Fabry-Pérot-like interferometer composed of two 1-D photonic crystals and a nanometer-thick spacer layer are analytically investigated. It is shown that the resonant enhancement of light wave intensity in such a layer is possible because of light dynamical diffraction from the photonic crystals of the interferometer. Numerical simulations of (i) light reflectivity and transmittance curves of the interferometer having an ultra-thin spacer layer (its thickness changes from less than 1 nm to about 10 nm) and (ii) the resonant distribution of the light wave intensity in the vicinity of the layer are performed. Based on the numerical simulations, potentialities for the determination of the structural parameters (e.g., thicknesses and refraction indexes) of ultra-thin spacer films are discussed. A difference is found to appear in resonant intensity enhancements inside the ultra-thin spacer layers between s- and p-polarized light waves.

  8. Development of diffractive XUV-VUV light extractors for fusion plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Caravelli, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2009-11-01

    The diagnostic and control of next generation MFE and ICF fusion experiments will require optical light extractors capable of withstanding intense plasma and radiation exposure. A solution applicable from the XUV to the infrared is to use free-standing diffractive optics such as transmission gratings or zone plates. Here we present results on XUV-VUV diffractive extractors for the diagnostic of boundary MFE plasmas. For the VUV range we developed Si transmission gratings having 1 μm period, 5 μm thickness, 40% open fraction, 1x2 mm active area, and coated with Ni, while for the XUV range we use SiN gratings having 0.2 μm period, 0.3 μm thickness, 1x1 mm area, and coated with Ta. The grating extractors are spectrally and spatially calibrated in the laboratory using a newly developed extended XUV-VUV source and will be employed for imaging spectrometry on the NSTX experiment. The operational characteristics of the extended source and first space resolved XUV-VUV spectra will be presented. Work supported by DoE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54523 at JHU and Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PU.

  9. Anisotropic Light Diffraction by Ultrasound in Crystals with Strong Acoustic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, Andrey S.; Balakshy, Vladimir I.

    In modern acousto-optics, crystalline materials are used predominantly for manufacturing acousto-optic instruments. Among these materials, such crystals as paratellurite, tellurium, calomel, TAS and some others occupy a prominent place, which are distinguished by exceptionally large anisotropy of acoustic properties. In this work, the influence of acoustic beam energy walk-off on characteristics of Bragg diffraction of light is studied by the example of tellurium crystal. It is shown that the walk-off can substantially change angular and frequency ranges, resulting in their narrowing or broadening subject to position of the operating point in the Bragg angle frequency characteristic. Coefficients of broadening are introduced for characterization of this effect.

  10. Modular sub-wavelength diffractive light modulator for high-definition holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Richard; Rochus, Veronique; Rottenberg, Xavier; Cosemans, Stefan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Severi, Simone; Van der Plas, Geert; Lafruit, Gauthier; Donnay, Stephane

    2013-02-01

    Holography is undoubtedly the ultimate 3D visualization technology, offering true 3D experience with all the natural depth cues, without the undesirable side-effects of current stereoscopic systems (uncomfortable glasses, strained eyes, fatiguing experience). Realization of a high-definition holographic display however requires a number of breakthroughs from existing prototypes. One of the main challenges lies in technology scaling, as holography is based on light diffraction and interference - to achieve wide viewing angles, the light-modulating pixels need to be spaced close to or below the wavelength of the used visible light. Furthermore, achieving high 3D image quality, hundreds of millions of such individually programmable pixels are needed. As a solution, we develop a modular sub-wavelength light modulator, consisting of three main sub-systems: the optical sub-system, comprising a 2D array of sub-wavelength pixels; the driver sub-system for individual pixel control, and the holographic computational engine. Based on conclusions from our state-of-the art studies, numerous experiments and holographic demonstrators, we have focused on reflective phase-modulating MEMS-based system and its scaling beyond 500nm pitch. We have devised a unique binary-programmable phase-modulating pixel architecture realizing vertical pixel displacement of up to 150nm at 500nm by 500nm pixel pitch, while sustaining low operating voltages compatible with CMOS driver circuitry. IMEC SiGe MEMS technology enables integration of the CMOS pixel-line drivers, scan-line drivers and I/O circuits underneath the 2D MEMS array, resulting in a compact and modular single-chip system design. Refresh rates of few hundred frames per second are achieved using our patented segmented driver-array architecture. Integrated circuits implementing parallel holographic computational engines can be added to the module using advanced 3D stacking technology. Herein we further report on our progress in realizing

  11. Breaking the diffraction barrier outside of the optical near-field with bright, collimated light from nanometric apertures.

    PubMed

    Stark, Peter R H; Halleck, Allison E; Larson, Dale N

    2007-11-27

    The optical diffraction limit has been the dominant barrier to achieving higher optical resolution in the fields of microscopy, photolithography, and optical data storage. We present here an approach toward imaging below the diffraction barrier. Through the exposure of photosensitive films placed a finite and known distance away from nanoscale, zero-mode apertures in thin metallic films, we show convincing, physical evidence that the propagating component of light emerging from these apertures shows a very strong degree of collimation well past the maximum extent of the near-field (lambda(0)/4n-lambda(0)/2n). Up to at least 2.5 wavelengths away from the apertures, the transmitted light exhibits subdiffraction limit irradiance patterns. These unexpected results are not explained by standard diffraction theory or nanohole-based "beaming" rationalizations. This method overcomes the diffraction barrier and makes super-resolution fluorescence imaging practical.

  12. Breaking the diffraction barrier outside of the optical near-field with bright, collimated light from nanometric apertures

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Peter R. H.; Halleck, Allison E.; Larson, Dale N.

    2007-01-01

    The optical diffraction limit has been the dominant barrier to achieving higher optical resolution in the fields of microscopy, photolithography, and optical data storage. We present here an approach toward imaging below the diffraction barrier. Through the exposure of photosensitive films placed a finite and known distance away from nanoscale, zero-mode apertures in thin metallic films, we show convincing, physical evidence that the propagating component of light emerging from these apertures shows a very strong degree of collimation well past the maximum extent of the near-field (λ0/4n–λ0/2n). Up to at least 2.5 wavelengths away from the apertures, the transmitted light exhibits subdiffraction limit irradiance patterns. These unexpected results are not explained by standard diffraction theory or nanohole-based “beaming” rationalizations. This method overcomes the diffraction barrier and makes super-resolution fluorescence imaging practical. PMID:18024583

  13. microARPES and nanoARPES at diffraction-limited light sources: opportunities and performance gains.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Eli; Bostwick, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    The scientific opportunities for microARPES and nanoARPES techniques are discussed, and the benefits to these techniques at diffraction-limited light sources are presented, in particular the impact on spectromicroscopic ARPES (angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy) of upgrading the Advanced Light Source to diffraction-limited performance. The most important consideration is whether the space-charge broadening, impacting the energy and momentum resolution, will limit the possible benefits for ARPES. Calculations of energy broadening due to space-charge effects will be presented over a wide range of parameters, and optimum conditions for ARPES will be discussed. The conclusion is that spectromicroscopic ARPES will greatly benefit from the advent of diffraction-limited light sources; space-charge broadening effects will not be a limiting factor. PMID:25177993

  14. Photonic spatial reformatting of stellar light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; MacLachlan, D. G.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Brown, G.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm full width at half-maximum, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20 per cent depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 ± 4 per cent. We show how a fully-optimized device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  15. Combined front and back diffraction gratings for broad band light trapping in thin film solar cell.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianqin; Drouard, Emmanuel; Gomard, Guillaume; Peretti, Romain; Fave, Alain; Seassal, Christian

    2012-09-10

    In this paper, we present the integration of combined front and back 1D and 2D diffraction gratings with different periods, within thin film photovoltaic solar cells based on crystalline silicon layers. The grating structures have been designed considering both the need for incident light absorption enhancement and the technological feasibility. Long wavelength absorption is increased thanks to the long period (750 nm) back grating, while the incident light reflection is reduced by using a short period (250 nm) front grating. The simulated short circuit current in a solar cell combining a front and a back grating structures with a 1.2 µm thick c-Si layer, together with the back electrode and TCO layers, is increased up to 30.3 mA/cm2, compared to 18.4 mA/cm2 for a reference stack, as simulated using the AM1.5G solar spectrum intensity distribution from 300 nm to 1100 nm, and under normal incidence.

  16. Light beam diffraction on inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the influence of spatially non-uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the theoretical model of two-dimensional Bragg diffraction of quasimonochromatic light beams on amplitude- and phase- inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the impact of spatially non-uniform electric field is proposed. The selfconsistent solutions for the light diffraction on PDLC structure with uniform amplitude and quasi-quadratic profiles are obtained for the case of influence of linearly varying electric field. The possibility to compensate the PDLC structure response inhomogeneity by the impact of non-unifrom external field is shown.

  17. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-02-05

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  18. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-02-01

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  19. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Tarun Kr; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Roy, Anushree; Kar, Sayan

    2006-06-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this paper, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (e.g. for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analysis seem to support the claim that this simple, low cost apparatus is capable of providing a wealth of information on liquids and liquid surface waves in a non-destructive way.

  20. High throughput imaging of blood smears using white light diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    While automated blood cell counters have made great progress in detecting abnormalities in blood, the lack of specificity for a particular disease, limited information on single cell morphology and intrinsic uncertainly due to high throughput in these instruments often necessitates detailed inspection in the form of a peripheral blood smear. Such tests are relatively time consuming and frequently rely on medical professionals tally counting specific cell types. These assays rely on the contrast generated by chemical stains, with the signal intensity strongly related to staining and preparation techniques, frustrating machine learning algorithms that require consistent quantities to denote the features in question. Instead we opt to use quantitative phase imaging, understanding that the resulting image is entirely due to the structure (intrinsic contrast) rather than the complex interplay of stain and sample. We present here our first steps to automate peripheral blood smear scanning, in particular a method to generate the quantitative phase image of an entire blood smear at high throughput using white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a single shot and common path interferometric imaging technique.

  1. Optical fiber diameter measurement by the diffraction method with digital processing of the light scattering indicatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokodii, N. G.; Natarova, A. O.

    2016-07-01

    Relations between the position of the first diffraction minima and the fiber diameter are derived based on the solution of the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction on a transparent fiber with a circular cross section. The obtained formulas are used to measure the fiber diameter. The diffraction pattern is recorded with a digital camera. The obtained image is digitally processed to determine the positions of the first two scattering indicatrix minima.

  2. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  3. Generalized Ellipsometry on Ferromagnetic Sculptured Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Hofmann, Tino; Mok, Kah; Schmidt, Heidemarie; Skomski, Ralf; Schubert, Eva; Schubert, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    We present and discuss generalized ellipsometry and generalized vector-magneto-optic ellipsometry investigations on cobalt nanostructured thin films with slanted, highly-spatially coherent, columnar arrangement. The samples were prepared by glancing angle deposition. The thin films are highly transparent and reveal strong form-induced birefringence. We observe giant Kerr rotation in the visible spectral region, tunable by choice of the nanostructure geometry. Spatial magnetization orientation hysteresis and magnetization magnitude hysteresis properties are studied using a 3-dimensional Helmholtz coil arrangement allowing for arbitrary magnetic field direction at the sample position for field strengths up to 0.4 Tesla. Analysis of data obtained within this novel vector-magneto-optic setup reveals magnetization anisotropy of the Co slanted nanocolumns supported by mean-field theory modeling.

  4. Degeneration of Fraunhofer diffraction on bacterial colonies due to their light focusing properties examined in the digital holographic microscope system.

    PubMed

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Liżewski, Kamil; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Podbielska, Halina

    2013-11-01

    The degeneration of Fraunhofer diffraction conditions in the optical system with converging spherical wave illumination for bacteria species identification based on diffraction patterns is analyzed by digital holographic methods. The obtained results have shown that the colonies of analyzed bacteria species act as biological lenses with the time-dependent light focusing properties, which are characterized and monitored by means of phase retrieval from sequentially captured digital holograms. This significantly affects the location of Fraunhofer patterns observation plane, which is continuously shifted across optical axis in time.

  5. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N; Daurer, Benedikt J; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Reddy, Hemanth K N; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S D; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N Duane; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Sierra, Raymond G; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here.

  6. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N; Daurer, Benedikt J; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Reddy, Hemanth K N; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S D; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N Duane; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Sierra, Raymond G; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Laura J; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment-protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1-RC `core' complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a=b=109.36, c=80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum

    PubMed Central

    Cranston, Laura J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment–protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1–RC ‘core’ complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.36, c = 80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer. PMID:24915099

  9. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F.; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G.; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A.; Reddy, Hemanth K.N.; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N. Duane; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O.; Williams, Garth J.; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  10. Instrumentation considerations in multichannel ellipsometry for real-time spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ilsin; Cong, Yue; Nguyen, N. V.; Pudliner, B. S.; Collins, R. W.

    Experimental procedures are described to enhance the accuracy of a novel rotating polarizer multichannel ellipsometer, designed for real-time spectroscopic studies of film growth and surfaces. For the fastest such instrument 128-point (psi, delta) spectra from 1.5 to 4.5 eV can be acquired in less than 10 ms. Ellipsometry places stringent demands on the photodiode-array-based detection system, as the irradiance incident on the separate pixels is waveform analyzed. A detailed characterization of the detection system is presented which provides the means to correct for stray light, image persistence, non-linearity, and integration errors. We also outline techniques for characterization of imperfection associated with the source and polarization optics. We present calibration and data reduction equations which have been derived to include source and polarization system imperfection parameters to first order.

  11. Diffraction rings obtained from a suspension of skeletal myofibrils by laser light illumination. Study of internal structure of sarcomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwata, S; Okamura, N

    1989-01-01

    Diffraction rings corresponding to the first, second, and third order were obtained by laser light illumination from a suspension of rabbit glycerinated psoas myofibrils (diameter, 1-2 microns; average length of the straight region, 44 microns; average sarcomere length, 2.2-2.6 microns) of which the optical thickness was appropriately chosen. Dispersed myofibrils were nearly randomly oriented in two dimensions, so that the effects of muscle volume were minimized; these effects usually interfere significantly with a quantitative analysis of laser optical diffraction in the fiber system. The diameters of diffraction rings represented the average sarcomere length. By using this system, we confirmed the ability of the unit cell (sarcomere) structure model to explain the intensity change of diffraction lines accompanying the dissociation from both ends of thick filaments in a high salt solution. The length of an A-band estimated from the relative intensity of diffraction rings and that directly measured on phase-contrast micrographs coincided well with each other. Also, we found that myofibrils with a long sarcomere length shorten to a slack length accompanying the decrease in overlap between thick and thin filaments produced by the dissociation of thick filaments. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 PMID:2692720

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V.; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  13. Overcoming the diffraction limit using multiple light scattering in a highly disordered medium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kang, Pilsung; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Choi, Wonshik

    2011-07-01

    We report that disordered media made of randomly distributed nanoparticles can be used to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional imaging system. By developing a method to extract the original image information from the multiple scattering induced by the turbid media, we dramatically increase a numerical aperture of the imaging system. As a result, the resolution is enhanced by more than 5 times over the diffraction limit, and the field of view is extended over the physical area of the camera. Our technique lays the foundation to use a turbid medium as a far-field superlens.

  14. Microstructured Air Cavities as High-Index Contrast Substrates with Strong Diffraction for Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Moon, Daeyoung; Jang, Jeonghwan; Na, Jin-Young; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Kim, Sunghee; Bae, Dukkyu; Park, Eun Hyun; Park, Yongjo; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional high-index-contrast dielectric gratings exhibit unconventional transmission and reflection due to their morphologies. For light-emitting devices, these characteristics help guided modes defeat total internal reflections, thereby enhancing the outcoupling efficiency into an ambient medium. However, the outcoupling ability is typically impeded by the limited index contrast given by pattern media. Here, we report strong-diffraction, high-index-contrast cavity engineered substrates (CESs) in which hexagonally arranged hemispherical air cavities are covered with a 80 nm thick crystallized alumina shell. Wavelength-resolved diffraction measurements and Fourier analysis on GaN-grown CESs reveal that the high-index-contrast air/alumina core/shell patterns lead to dramatic excitation of the low-order diffraction modes. Large-area (1075 × 750 μm(2)) blue-emitting InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on a 3 μm pitch CES exhibit ∼39% enhancement in the optical power compared to state-of-the-art, patterned-sapphire-substrate LEDs, while preserving all of the electrical metrics that are relevant to LED devices. Full-vectorial simulations quantitatively demonstrate the enhanced optical power of CES LEDs and show a progressive increase in the extraction efficiency as the air cavity volume is expanded. This trend in light extraction is observed for both lateral- and flip-chip-geometry LEDs. Measurements of far-field profiles indicate a substantial beaming effect for CES LEDs, despite their few-micron-pitch pattern. Near-to-far-field transformation simulations and polarization analysis demonstrate that the improved extraction efficiency of CES LEDs is ascribed to the increase in emissions via the top escape route and to the extraction of transverse-magnetic polarized light.

  15. Reverse color sequence in the diffraction of white light by the wing of the male butterfly Pierella luna (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla; Aiello, Annette; Bay, Annick; Windsor, Donald M; Colomer, Jean-François; Rassart, Marie

    2010-08-01

    The butterfly Pierella luna (Nymphalidae) shows an intriguing rainbow iridescence effect: the forewings of the male, when illuminated along the axis from the body to the wing tip, decompose a white light beam as a diffraction grating would do. Violet light, however, emerges along a grazing angle, near the wing surface, while the other colors, from blue to red, exit respectively at angles progressively closer to the direction perpendicular to the wing plane. This sequence is the reverse of the usual decomposition of light by a grating with a periodicity parallel to the wing surface. It is shown that this effect is produced by a macroscopic deformation of the entire scale, which curls in such a way that it forms a "vertical" grating, perpendicular to the wing surface, and functions in transmission instead of reflection.

  16. Tunable diffraction grating using ultraviolet-light-induced spatial phase modulation in dual-frequency liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.-T.; Liang Xiao; Ren Hongwen; Wu, S.-T.

    2004-08-16

    An electrically tunable diffraction phase grating using ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced spatial dielectric modulation of a dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) cell is demonstrated. A photomask with transparent and opaque stripes was used for fabricating the grating. In the UV-exposed stripes, the negative dielectric anisotropy ({delta}{epsilon}) tolane compound of the DFLC mixture is partially polymerized resulting in a decreased threshold voltage as compared to that of the unexposed region. Upon applying a constant voltage, the phase difference between the adjacent pixels is produced. The first-order diffraction efficiency reaches {approx}60% which agrees well with the simulation results. Due to the dual-frequency addressing at 30 V{sub rms}, the response time of the DFLC phase grating was measured to be {approx}1 ms at room temperature.

  17. Tunable diffraction grating using ultraviolet-light-induced spatial phase modulation in dual-frequency liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pao-Tai; Liang, Xiao; Ren, Hongwen; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-08-01

    An electrically tunable diffraction phase grating using ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced spatial dielectric modulation of a dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) cell is demonstrated. A photomask with transparent and opaque stripes was used for fabricating the grating. In the UV-exposed stripes, the negative dielectric anisotropy (Δɛ) tolane compound of the DFLC mixture is partially polymerized resulting in a decreased threshold voltage as compared to that of the unexposed region. Upon applying a constant voltage, the phase difference between the adjacent pixels is produced. The first-order diffraction efficiency reaches ˜60% which agrees well with the simulation results. Due to the dual-frequency addressing at 30Vrms, the response time of the DFLC phase grating was measured to be ˜1ms at room temperature.

  18. Application of diffraction tomography theory to determine size and shape of spheroidal particles from light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chizhu; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Wei; Guo, Wenping; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xia, Min

    2014-10-01

    Discerning the geometry of spheroidal scatterers of micron order is an important topic in identifying marine microbes. Optical diffraction tomography theory indicates that under the first-order Born approximation for weak scattering, scattering amplitude in the far zone and scattering potential of the scatterer have a Fourier relationship. In this paper, we describe a method based on diffraction tomography theory and determine the size and the shape of spheroidal scatterers by reconstructing the distribution of scattering potential from angular resolved scattered field. As a demonstration of this method, the scattering from spheroidal particles with equal-volume-sphere radii of 0.5429, 1.00, and 2.00 μm and an aspect ratio that varies from 0.4 to 1.5 was modeled by using T-matrix theory and used as test data. Simulation results show that in the case of low contrast, size and shape determination can be achieved with sub-wavelength precision.

  19. Performance of ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators for polarization and color diffractive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ignacio; García-Martínez, P.; Sánchez-López, M. M.; Martínez-García, A.; Martínez, J. L.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we applied a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon (FLCoS) display for implementing monochrome and color diffractive optical elements (DOE). We first apply a reverse engineering process specifically adapted to characterize the optical parameters of a commercial FLCoS display, specifically the phase shift and the tilt angle. We then analyze the performance of the device for implementing a binary polarization diffraction grating (PDG), and how it adopts the form of either a binary amplitude grating or a binary phase grating as particular cases when the polarization states emerging from the display are projected to an analyzer. As a final experiment, we have applied the FLCoS display to generate RGB improved dynamic color binary-phase Fourier computer-generated holograms (CGHs). We have electronically synchronized the properly scaled image addressed to the display with a color filter wheel with RGB filters. Experimental results show an excellent chromatic compensation of the color image reconstruction.

  20. Orbital motion of spherical microparticles trapped in diffraction patterns of circularly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Hiroto; Akahoshi, Shin; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2007-06-15

    We investigate arrays and rotation of spherical microparticles trapped by focusing a circularly polarized Gaussian beam just above the top coverslip-water interface. Particles are trapped in various patterns due to a Fresnel diffraction, such as rings and close-packed structures. We find that rings of particles orbit around the beam axis, whereas close-packed arrays spin in the opposite sense on the beam axis. The sense of the orbiting, as well as that of the spinning, is determined by the input circular polarization handedness. The results are interpreted on the assumption that the spin angular momentum carried by a circularly polarized beam is converted into the orbital angular momentum in the optical process by which the focused Gaussian beam's shape is transformed due to diffraction.

  1. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro Sánchez, Juan; Sáenz, Jacobo; de la Torre, Luis; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Heradio, Rubén; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This work describes two experiments: "study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation" and "the photoelectric effect". Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  2. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Correlation of quantum intensity fluctuations in Raman-Nath diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodzhants, A. P.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kryukchan, G. Yu

    1993-07-01

    A new method of generating correlated fluctuations in optical fields, based on Raman-Nath diffraction by a fine grating, is discussed. A nonclassical effect is predicted: a suppression of quantum fluctuations below the level of full coherence in the sum or difference photon numbers for the transmitted and scattered waves. The physics of this phenomenon involves a correlation of quantum fluctuations in the intensities of two modes that are coupled nonlinearly. This correlation is most effective in the limit of parametric interaction between the waves in the medium.

  3. Vectorial algorithm for the computation of light propagation equation based on Huygens' principle using the scalar theory of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morucci, Stephane; Noirard, Pierre; Grossetie, Jean-Claude

    1996-03-01

    In digital holography, computation of holograms is often reduced to calculations of fast Fourier transforms if the distance between the object plane and the hologram plane is large enough. Two classical approximations for solving this problem include a binomial series expansion of the distance and an elimination of the so-called inclination factor. We present here a vectorial algorithm which computes the discrete form of the light propagation equation obtained by the Huygens' principle for a bidimensional object. None of the approximations mentioned above have been used. This enables the computation of a diffraction pattern at any distance compatible with the scalar theory of diffraction. This vectorial algorithm has been implemented on workstations, on a Convex C-220 and on a Cray YMP computer. We focus our attention on the computing granularity of the problem and we present processing times and the associated performances for bidimensional images. Various holograms are computed and compared with those obtained by two traditional methods, namely, Fresnel transforms and the resolution of the rigorous scalar diffraction equation using discrete convolutions. We then consider the 3D case and modifications are proposed in order to parallelize this algorithm.

  4. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  5. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  6. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  7. Potential Modulation on Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Niu, Yu; Viana, A S; Correia, Jorge P; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical-total internal reflection ellipsometry (EC-TIRE) has been proposed as a technique to observe the redox reactions on the electrode surface due to its high phase sensitivity to the electrolyte/electrode interface. In this paper, we mainly focus on the influence of the potential modulation on the TIRE response. The analysis suggests that both dielectric constant variation of gold and the electric double layer transformation would modulate the reflection polarization of the surface. For a nonfaradaic process, the signal of TIRE would be proportional to the potential modulation. To testify the analysis, linear sweep voltammetry and open circuit measurement have been performed. The results strongly support the system analysis. PMID:26889871

  8. Characterization on Smart Optics Using Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, NASA Langley Research Center developed a smart active optical concept to filter narrow band pass or to control optical intensity. To characterize developed smart optics materials, we have measured thickness and reflection properties of the materials using a WVASE32 ellipsometry. This project allowed us to: (1) prepare the smart optical materials for measurement of thickness and optical properties at NASA Langley Research Center; (2) measure thickness and optical properties of the smart optical materials; (3) evaluate the measured properties in terms of applications for narrow band-pass filters. The outcomes of this research provide optical properties and physical properties of the smart optics on a selected spectral range. The applications of this development were used for field-controlled spectral smart filters.

  9. Measurement of yarn twist based on backward light scattering and small-angle far-field diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Z. G.; Tao, X. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive, non-contact method for measuring the twist of a yarn based on light scattering and diffraction. The surface twist angle is measured by determining the direction of the line with the highest intensity on the backward light scattering pattern which is perpendicular to the surface fibers, which is verified by both theoretical analysis based on Beckmann’s scattering model and experiments. The yarn diameter is measured with good accuracy by using the small-angle far-field diffraction pattern of the yarn body. Yarn twist is then derived from the measured surface twist angle and yarn diameter. Further studies reveal that the measured yarn twists by the proposed method are comparable to those measured based on microscopic images of the yarn. This method requires no high-magnification optics and is able to pick up short-term variations of twist with less labor intensity, indicating its potential application in the on-line measuring of yarn twist and its distribution.

  10. Optimal illumination of phase-only diffractive element using GPC light shaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Kopylov, Oleksii; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-03-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated optimal beam shaping of contiguous light patterns using the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method. The concept has been packaged into a compact add-on module, which we call the GPC light shaper (LS) that can be conveniently integrated to existing optical setups requiring optimal illumination of devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs). In this work, we integrated the GPC LS into a holography setup to generate more intense focal spots and extended patterns. The output of the holography setup with the GPC LS is compared with a similar setup but using only hard-truncated beams. Our results show that, we get a ~3x gain in intensity of the generated patterns when using GPC LS.

  11. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  12. OPTICAL WAVEPACKETS (OPTICAL BULLETS): A NEW DIFFRACTION FREE FORM OF LIGHT TRAVEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. FUNK; J. NICHOLSON; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We conducted studies of the propagation of self-confined packets of light or ''Optical Bullets'' through air. These packets are self-forming and require no active optics. At the present time, theoretical explanations provide an incomplete description of this process. Generation of these pulses requires a light source of sufficient energy and with a short enough pulse-width that the intensity exceeds a critical wavelength dependent value. We used a Ti:Sapphire based system to generate the pulses and we observed pulse-splitting and chirp-dependent control of the formation of these filaments. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm for extracting the phase and electric field of these pulses using Frequency Resolved Optical Gating coupled to genetic algorithms for pulse retrieval.

  13. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  14. Hybrid refractive/diffractive optical system design for light and compact uncooled longwave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Bai, Yu; Luo, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Compares with traditional optics,the difractive optical element(DOE) has unique property of minus dispersion.The special state can be used in the optical system to improve performance,lighten weight and reduce volume effectively.In the paper,an infrared optical system with DOE for LWIR thermal imager is proposed.The primary optical parameters of thermal imager are wavelength range 8.0- 12.0μm,effective focal length (EFL) 150 mm,f/numbe 1.0 and field of view 8.58 degrees.The system uses uncooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The f/number matches the sensitivity range of detector array. The infrared optical system is designed by CODE-V optical design software.It is consisted of two lens,the materials of the two lenses are Germanium.The DOE is fabricated on the convex of the first lens and it can be fabricated by diamond turning technology.The imaging quafity of the optical system approached to diffraction limit.The value of modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency(11lp/mm) is great than 0.78.

  15. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  16. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cindy B; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  17. Tomographic incoherent phase imaging, a diffraction tomography alternative for any white-light microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, Pierre; Aknoun, Shérazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of making tomographic reconstruction of the refractive index of a microscopic sample using a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer, under incoherent illumination. A Z-stack is performed and the acquired incoherent elecromagnetic fields are deconvoluted before to retrieve in a quantitative manner the refractive index. The results are presented on polystyrene beads and can easily be expanded to biological samples. This technique is suitable to any white-light microscope equipped with nanometric Z-stack module.

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of novel nanostructured transparent conducting oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroabadi, Akram A.; Norwood, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to find the optical constants, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, thickness and volume fraction of nanostructured transparent conducting oxides including indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO). We observed sharp features in the ellipsometry data, with the spectral peaks and positions depending on the nanostructure dimensions and material. A superposition of Lorentzian oscillators and the effective medium approximation has been applied to determine the volume ratio of voids and nanopillars, thereby providing the effective optical constants.

  19. A new 3D shape precision measurement system calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ya; Zhou, Liping; Li, Wenlong; Gan, Jianghong; Xu, Long

    2016-03-01

    Phase calculation-based fringe projection techniques are widely used in three-dimensional shape measurement fields to obtain the 3D shape data of the object's surface. One important step of the phase calculation is calibration, which determines the relationship between the image phase and depth information. The traditional calibration methods are too complex and require many parameters. In this paper, model of 3D shape precision calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light fringes projection is proposed, which is consist of camera model, fringe phase obtaining, height-phase relationship model. This method is simple, convenient and there is no approximation in it, which can satisfy the precision measurement.

  20. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  1. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  2. Beyond crystallography: diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K; Murnane, Margaret M

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  3. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Robinson, I. K.; Murnane, M. M.

    2015-04-30

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  4. Creation of vector beams from a polarization diffraction grating using a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badham, Katherine Emily

    This thesis presents the ability of complete polarization control of light to create a polarization diffraction grating (PDG). This system has the ability to create diffracted light with each order having a separate high-order polarization state in one location on the optical axis. First, an external Excel program is used to create a grating phase profile from userspecified target diffraction orders. High-order vector beams in this PDG are created using a combination of two devices---a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) manufactured by Seiko Epson, and a tunable q -plate from Citizen Holdings Co. The transmissive SLM is positioned in an optical setup with a reflective architecture allowing control over both the horizontal and vertical components of the laser beam. The SLM has its LC director oriented vertically only affecting the vertically polarized state, however, the optical setup allows modulation of both vertical and horizontal components by the use of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a mirror to rotate the polarizations 90 degrees. Each half of the SLM is encoded with an anisotropic phase-only diffraction grating which are superimposed to create a select number of orders with the desired polarization states and equally distributed intensity. The technique of polarimetry is used to confirm the polarization state of each diffraction order. The q-plate is an inhomogeneous birefringent waveplate which has the ability to convert zero-order vector beams into first-order vector beams. The physical placement of this device into the system converts the orders with zero-order polarization states to first-order polarization states. The light vector patterns of each diffraction order confirm which first-order polarization state of is produced. A specially made PDG sextuplicator is encoded onto the SLM to generate six diffraction orders with separate states of polarization.

  5. Investigation on bandgap, diffraction, interference, and refraction effects of photonic crystal structure in GaN/InGaN LEDs for light extraction.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saroj Kanta; Adhikari, Sonachand; Pal, Suchandan

    2014-06-20

    In this paper, we have made a clear differentiation among bandgap, diffraction, interference, and refraction effects in photonic crystal structures (PhCs). For observing bandgap, diffraction, and refraction effects, PhCs are considered on the top p-GaN surface of light emitting diodes (LEDs), whereas for interference effect, hole type PhCs are considered to be embedded within n-GaN layer of LED. From analysis, it is observed that at a particular lattice periodicity, for which bandgap lies within the wavelength of interest shows a significant light extraction due to inhibition of guided mode. Beyond a certain periodicity, diffraction effect starts dominating and light extraction improves further. The interference effect is observed in embedded photonic crystal LEDs, where depth of etching supports constructive interference of outward light waves. We have also shed light on refraction effects exhibited by the PhCs and whether negative refraction properties of PhCs may be useful in case of LED light extraction.

  6. Interferometric method for phase calibration in liquid crystal spatial light modulators using a self-generated diffraction-grating.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, José Luis Martínez; Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-27

    An auto-referenced interferometric method for calibrating phase modulation of parallel-aligned liquid crystal (PAL) spatial light modulators (SLM) is described. The method is experimentally straightforward, robust, and requires solely of a collimated beam, with no need of additional optics. This method uses the SLM itself to create a tilted plane wave and a reference wave which mutually interfere. These waves are codified by means of a binary diffraction grating and a uniformly distributed gray level area (piston) into the SLM surface. Phase shift for each gray level addressed to the piston section can then be evaluated. Phase modulation on the SLM can also be retrieved with the proposed method over spatially resolved portions of the surface. Phase information obtained with this novel method is compared to other well established calibration procedures, requiring extra elements and more elaborated optical set-ups. The results show a good agreement with previous methods. The advantages of the new method include high mechanical stability, faster performance, and a significantly easier practical implementation. PMID:27410574

  7. Ellipsometry study of (0001) cadmium crystal faces during vapour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauch, M.; Quentel, G.

    1981-07-01

    Ellipsometry analysis of (0001) cadium faces during vapour growth reveal periodic fluctuations of the dielectric constant which are related to supersaturation. We show that they can be interpreted by the instability of monoatomic step trains produced by spiral growth. Such a model of surface roughness is also treated using the effective medium approximation of Bruggeman, which corroborates the experimental results.

  8. Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry for line-width control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ha-Young; Bang, Kyoung-Yoon; Lee, Jaeho; Bak, Heungin; Sohn, Young-Soo; An, Ilsin

    2002-07-01

    Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry (RCSE) was applied to the characterization of line-width in deep UV photoresist films. Variation of line-width in few nm was distinguishable by comparing the features in conventional ellipsometry parameters or the degree of polarization spectra obtainable form RCSE. The variations in the former spectra were caused by the density change in patterned PR films. Meanwhile, the variations in latter spectra wee caused by the surface profile of the film. Once the spectral positions of the features were related to the result of CD- SEM, both spectra could be used to estimate the line-width of patterned PR without in-depth analysis. Further, when uniaxial anisotropy was assumed for the film, the line-width could be roughly deduced in the process of extracting the optical properties of film via an effective medium approximation.

  9. Far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask for linearly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Anping; Wang, Xianyou; Zhang, Zhihai; Li, Yuyan; Wen, Zhongquan; Li, Chen; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Senling; Lin, Feng

    2016-05-16

    Planar lenses are attractive photonic devices due to its minimized size and easy to integrate. However, planar lenses designed in traditional ways are restricted by the diffraction limit. They have difficulties in further reducing the focal spot size beyond the diffraction limit. Super-oscillation provides a possible way to solve the problem. However, lenses based on super-oscillation have always been affected by huge sidelobes, which resulted in limited field of view and difficulties in real applications. To address the problem, in the paper, a far-field sub-diffraction lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask was demonstrated under illumination of linearly polarized plane wave at wavelength 632.8 nm. The lens realized a long focal length of 148λ (94 µm), and the full width at half maximum of the focal line was 0.406λ, which was super-oscillatory. More important is that such a flat lens has small sidelobes and wide field of view. Within the measured range of [-132λ, + 120λ], the maximum sidelobe observed on the focal plane was less than 22% of the central peak. Such binary amplitude-phase planar lens can also be extended to long focal length far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens for other spectrum ranges.

  10. Sensitivity analysis for OMOG and EUV photomasks characterized by UV-NIR spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Meiner, K.; Richter, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the potentials, applicability and advantages of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for the characterization of high-end photomasks. The SE measurements were done in the ultraviolet-near infrared (UVNIR) wavelength range from 300 nm to 980 nm, at angle of incidences (AOI) between 10 and 70° and with a microspot size of 45 x 10 μm2 (AOI=70°). The measured Ψ and 𝛥 spectra were modeled using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to determine the structural parameters of a periodic array, i.e. the pitch and critical dimension (CD). Two different types of industrial photomasks consisting of line/space structures were evaluated, the reflecting extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and the transmitting opaque MoSi on glass (OMOG) mask. The Ψ and 𝛥 spectra of both masks show characteristic differences, which were related to the Rayleigh singularities and the missing transmission diffraction in the EUV mask. In the second part of the paper, a simulation based sensitivity analysis of the Fourier coefficients α and β is presented, which is used to define the required measurement precision to detect a CD deviation of 1%. This study was done for both mask types to investigate the influence of the stack transmission. It was found that sensitivities to CD variations are comparable for OMOG and EUV masks. For both masks, the highest sensitivities appear close to the Rayleigh singularities and significantly increase at very low AOI. To detect a 1% CD deviation for pitches below 150 nm a measurement precision in the order of 0.01 is required. This measurement precision can be realized with advanced optical hardware. It is concluded that UV-NIR ellipsometry is qualified to characterize photomasks down to the 13 nm technology node in 2020.

  11. Electromagnetic diffraction of light focused through a planar interface between materials of mismatched refractive indices: structure of the electromagnetic field. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, P.; Varga, P.; Booker, G. R.

    1995-10-01

    We consider the diffraction occurring when light is focused by a lens without spherical aberration through a planar interface between materials of mismatched refractive indices, which focusing produces spherical aberration. By means of a rigorous vectorial electromagnetic treatment that was previously developed for this problem [Torok et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 12, 325 (1995)], the diffraction integrals are transformed into a form that is computable. Time-averaged electric energy density distributions in the region of the focused probe are numerically evaluated for air-glass and air-silicon interfaces as a function of lens numerical aperture and probe depth corresponding to a wide range of spherical aberration. Two-dimensional lateral ( x - y ) and meridional ( x - z ) electric energy density plots show how the energy, the size, and the position of the various axial and lateral maxima changed, providing new information concerning the

  12. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  13. Correlation between intensity fluctuations of light generated by scattering of Young’s diffractive electromagnetic waves by a quasi-homogeneous, anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Feinan

    2016-11-01

    Based on the first-order Born approximation, formulas are derived for the correlation between intensity fluctuations (CIF) of light generated by a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic wave scattered by a spatially quasi-homogeneous (QH), anisotropic medium. It is shown that the CIF of the scattered field can be written as the summation of the Fourier transforms of the strengths and normalized correlation coefficients (NCCs) of the scattering potentials. The differences between our results and those obtained in the previous literature are discussed. Our results might be important in investigating the high-order intensity correlation of an electromagnetic wave scattered from a 3D anisotropic object.

  14. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  15. Comparison between ray-tracing and physical optics for the computation of light absorption in capillaries--the influence of diffraction and interference.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuan; Michalowski, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Yang, Sen; Graf, Thomas; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-11-19

    Ray-tracing is the commonly used technique to calculate the absorption of light in laser deep-penetration welding or drilling. Since new lasers with high brilliance enable small capillaries with high aspect ratios, diffraction might become important. To examine the applicability of the ray-tracing method, we studied the total absorptance and the absorbed intensity of polarized beams in several capillary geometries. The ray-tracing results are compared with more sophisticated simulations based on physical optics. The comparison shows that the simple ray-tracing is applicable to calculate the total absorptance in triangular grooves and in conical capillaries but not in rectangular grooves. To calculate the distribution of the absorbed intensity ray-tracing fails due to the neglected interference, diffraction, and the effects of beam propagation in the capillaries with sub-wavelength diameter. If diffraction is avoided e.g. with beams smaller than the entrance pupil of the capillary or with very shallow capillaries, the distribution of the absorbed intensity calculated by ray-tracing corresponds to the local average of the interference pattern found by physical optics.

  16. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  17. Versatile transmission ellipsometry to study linear ferrofluid magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Kooij, E S; Gâlcă, A C; Poelsema, B

    2006-12-01

    Linear birefringence and dichroism of magnetite ferrofluids are studied simultaneously using spectroscopic ellipsometry in transmission mode. It is shown that this versatile technique enables highly accurate characterisation of magneto-optical phenomena. Magnetic field-dependent linear birefringence and dichroism as well as the spectral dependence are shown to be in line with previous results. Despite the qualitative agreement with established models for magneto-optical phenomena, these fail to provide an accurate, quantitative description of our experimental results using the bulk dielectric function of magnetite. We discuss the results in relation to these models, and indicate how the modified dielectric function of the magnetite nanoparticles can be obtained. PMID:16997315

  18. Implementation of Single-Shot Ellipsometry on Gas Gun Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Sean; Ao, Tommy; Bernstein, Aaron; Davis, Jean-Paul; Ditmire, Todd; Dolan, Daniel; Lin, Jung-Fu; Seagle, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We have built and implemented a time-resolved ellipsometry diagnostic for dynamic testing at Sandia National Laboratories. This diagnostic measures refractive index of a sample under dynamic conditions with a time resolution of a few nanoseconds. We show and discuss results from our first dynamic experiments on a gas gun. Future work will study geophysical materials under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-0376 A.

  19. Application of imaging ellipsometry to the detection of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    An, Ilsin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging ellipsometry (IE) is applied to visualize latent fingermarks on specular surfaces. Instead of a real image, IE provides images related to the polarization states, which are changed by the imprinted layer on a surface. Fingermarks formed on the surfaces of various materials are investigated, including a shiny metal and a black-colored plastic. Relatively clear IE images are obtained from most surfaces on which the optical properties are distinguishable from those of the fingermarks. Also, it is shown that discernible IE images can be obtained even after a fingermark is vigorously rubbed with lab tissues.

  20. Application of imaging ellipsometry to the detection of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    An, Ilsin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging ellipsometry (IE) is applied to visualize latent fingermarks on specular surfaces. Instead of a real image, IE provides images related to the polarization states, which are changed by the imprinted layer on a surface. Fingermarks formed on the surfaces of various materials are investigated, including a shiny metal and a black-colored plastic. Relatively clear IE images are obtained from most surfaces on which the optical properties are distinguishable from those of the fingermarks. Also, it is shown that discernible IE images can be obtained even after a fingermark is vigorously rubbed with lab tissues. PMID:26042438

  1. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek

    2014-08-01

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF6 shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  2. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    DOE PAGES

    Dufek, Eric J.

    2014-08-28

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF₆ shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  3. Spectral ellipsometry studying of iron's optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernukha, Yevheniia; Stashchuk, Vasyl S.; Polianska, Olena; Oshtuk, Olexsandr

    2014-05-01

    Fe's optical and electronic properties were investigated at room temperature in different structural states. The sample's surface was explored in wide spectral range λ = 0,23-17,0 μm (E = 4,96 - 0,07 еV ) by the Beatty's spectral ellipsometry method. While an experiment was carried out ellipsometry parameters Δ and ψ were measure near the principal angle of incidence. The refraction index R , permittivity Ɛ and optical conductivity σ( hν ) , that is proportional to the interband density of electronic states, were calculated using these parameters. Fe's optical conductivities in liquid, amorphous and crystalline states were compared in this work. The optical conductivity was calculated using the published data of the iron's density of electronic states in crystalline, amorphous and liquid states for the comparison of the experimental and theoretical results. It is shown that, at structural transformations "amorphous, liquid state- crystalline state", the optical properties of metallic iron are determined, in the first turn, by the nearest neighborhood, and the electronic structure is not subjected to significant modifications.

  4. In situ ellipsometry of surface layer of non-metallic transparent materials during its finish processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Oleksandr Y.; Poperenko, Leonid V.

    2006-10-01

    For modern technology applications it is important to develop non-contact methods of control of the modification of dielectric materials surface layer. The aim of the work is to determine the level of roughness changes in the surface layer of non-metallic material, optical glass BK-7, and to control it by in situ ellipsometry. The probing light spot was formed at a second (lower) reflective surface of the plate being studied during its mechanical processing at direct observation of these changes. The fine mechanical polishing was carried out for 2 hours by using the grinding-polishing machine installed directly on the sample table of ellipsometer LEF-3M. The angle of light incidence was close to 70 degree. The ellipsometric parameters, were determined within the mechanically processed area. For this purpose, the probing light beam passed two times through the sample and then returned to the initial (air) medium, where its polarization state was studied. The polarized beam falls on lower plate surface polished by conventional technology using grinding-polishing CeO 2-based instrument "Aquapol" (grain size 1 micron). The time dependences of the ellipsometric parameters during the surface layer treatment were studied. In these dependences the tendency of changes of ellipsometric parameters indicates the surface roughness enhancement.

  5. Sensing of human plasma fibrinogen on polished, chemically etched and carbon treated titanium surfaces by diffractive optical element based sensor.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vetterl, Vladimir; Hason, Stanislav; Tuononen, Heikki; Silvennoinen, Martti; Myller, Kari; Cvrcek, Ladislav; Vanek, Jiri; Prachar, Patrik

    2008-07-01

    Adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on 6 differently treated titanium samples (polished, polished and etched, and 4 titanium carbide coatings samples produced by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method) is investigated by using diffractive optical element (DOE) sensor. Permittivity (susceptibility) change and fluctuation in optical roughness (R(opt)) of treated titanium surface in the presence of background electrolyte without and with HPF molecules are sensed by using DOE sensor and optical ellipsometry. Correlation between transmitted light and thickness of molecule layer was found. The findings allow to sense temporal organization and severity of adsorption of nano-scale HPF molecules on polished, on polished and etched, and on titanium carbide surface.

  6. Cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological samples at SACLA: a correlative approach with cryo-electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Yonekura, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging at cryogenic temperature (cryo-CXDI) allows the analysis of internal structures of unstained, non-crystalline, whole biological samples in micrometre to sub-micrometre dimensions. Targets include cells and cell organelles. This approach involves preparing frozen-hydrated samples under controlled humidity, transferring the samples to a cryo-stage inside a vacuum chamber of a diffractometer, and then exposing the samples to coherent X-rays. Since 2012, cryo-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments have been carried out with the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Complementary use of cryo-electron microscopy and/or light microscopy is highly beneficial for both pre-checking samples and studying the integrity or nature of the sample. This article reports the authors' experience in cryo-XFEL-CDI of biological cells and organelles at SACLA, and describes an attempt towards reliable and higher-resolution reconstructions, including signal enhancement with strong scatterers and Patterson-search phasing. PMID:26919369

  7. Cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological samples at SACLA: a correlative approach with cryo-electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Yonekura, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging at cryogenic temperature (cryo-CXDI) allows the analysis of internal structures of unstained, non-crystalline, whole biological samples in micrometre to sub-micrometre dimensions. Targets include cells and cell organelles. This approach involves preparing frozen-hydrated samples under controlled humidity, transferring the samples to a cryo-stage inside a vacuum chamber of a diffractometer, and then exposing the samples to coherent X-rays. Since 2012, cryo-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments have been carried out with the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Complementary use of cryo-electron microscopy and/or light microscopy is highly beneficial for both pre-checking samples and studying the integrity or nature of the sample. This article reports the authors' experience in cryo-XFEL-CDI of biological cells and organelles at SACLA, and describes an attempt towards reliable and higher-resolution reconstructions, including signal enhancement with strong scatterers and Patterson-search phasing.

  8. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  9. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed.

  10. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan

    2013-11-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  11. The calculation of thin film parameters from spectroscopic ellipsometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterization, but the results of SE experiments must first be compared with calculations to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions. This process requires 4 steps: (1) The quantities measured must be specified and the equivalent calculated parameters identified. (2) The film structure must be modeled, where the number of films is specified and certain characteristics of each layer specified, such as whether or not the film is isotropic or anisotropic, homogeneous or graded. (3) The optical functions of each layer must be specified or parameterized. (4) The data must be compared with the calculated spectra, where a quantifiable figure of merit is used for the comparison. The last step is particularly important because without it, no {open_quotes}goodness of fit{close_quotes} parameter is calculated and one does not know whether or not the calculated spectrum fits the data.

  12. Adsorption of water on porous Vycor glass studied by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Herrero, A; Heredero, R L; Bernabeu, E; Levy, D

    2001-02-01

    The variation of the optical properties of porous Vycor glass (Corning, Model 7930) under different relative-humidity conditions was studied. The adsorption of water into the glass pores was investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The change of the refractive index was Deltan approximately 0.04 between 5% and 90% relative humidity. A linear relation between the ellipsometer parameter tan Psi, the amount of water adsorbed in the glass pores, and information about the pore-size distributions was established. The results are in accord with the values obtained from N2 isotherms, transmission electron microscope micrographs, and the manufacturer's specifications (radius of approximately 20 A). The possibility of using this material as a transducer for implementation in a fiber-optic sensor to measure humidity was evaluated. PMID:18357027

  13. Visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances and lighting conditions after implantation of an aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to evaluate the visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances under photopic and mesopic lighting conditions in patients bilaterally implanted with aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses. Methods In this retrospective–prospective study, 16 patients with a mean age of 66.2±9.2 years (range: 50–81 years) who had undergone bilateral phacoemulsification surgery with implantation of a Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lens (ZMB00) were evaluated. Monocular and binocular uncorrected and distance-corrected visual acuities were measured at distance (20 ft), intermediate (70–80 cm), and near (35–40 cm) under photopic (85 cd/m2) and mesopic (3 cd/m2) lighting conditions and were compared using the paired t-test. All patients also completed a subjective questionnaire. Results At a mean follow-up of 9.5±3.9 months, distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity improved significantly from preoperative acuity. Under photopic and mesopic conditions, 93.8% and 62.5% of patients, respectively, had binocular uncorrected intermediate visual acuity of 20/40 or better, and 62.5% and 31.3% of patients had binocular uncorrected near visual acuity of 20/20 or better. All patients were satisfied with their overall vision without using glasses and/or contact lenses when compared with before surgery. A total of 87.5% of patients reported no glare and 68.8% of patients reported no halos around lights at night. Conclusion Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses provide good distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity under photopic as well as mesopic lighting conditions. High levels of spectacle independence with low levels of photic phenomenon were achieved, resulting in excellent patient satisfaction. PMID:27536061

  14. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  15. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Synowicki, R. A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs0.911Sb0.089 bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs1-xSbx (x ˜ 0.1-0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and -380 and -367 meV for the valence band.

  16. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-12-28

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs{sub 0.911}Sb{sub 0.089} bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} (x ∼ 0.1–0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and −380 and −367 meV for the valence band.

  17. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Piovera, C; Dallera, C; Gupta, A; Carpene, E

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark.

  18. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark.

  19. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  20. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface sensitive tool to probe thin film growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    1999-02-19

    Sputtered thin film and multilayer x-ray mirrors are made routinely at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the APS users. Precise film growth control and characterization are very critical in fabricating high-quality x-ray mirrors. Film thickness calibrations are carried out using in situ and ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, interferometry, and x-ray scattering. To better understand the growth and optical properties of different thin film systems, we have carried out a systematic study of sputtered thin films of Au, Rh, Pg Pd, Cu, and Cr, using in situ ellipsometry. Multiple data sets were obtained in situ for each film material with incremental thicknesses and were analyzed with their correlation in mind. We found that in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface-sensitive tool can also be used to probe the growth and morphology of the thin film system. This application of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for metal thin film systems will be discussed.

  1. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  2. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-06-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  3. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-08-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  4. Characterization by spectroscopic Ellipsometry, the physical properties of silver nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coanga, Jean-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are able to change their minds through their experiments. I think it is time to go kick the curse and go further in research if we want a human future. I work in the Nano-Optics and Plasmonics research. I defined with ellipsomètrie the structure of new type of Nano particles of silver. It's same be act quickly to replace the old dirty leaded electronic-connexion chip and by the other hand to find a new way for the heath care of cancer disease by nanoparticles the next killers of bad cells. Silver nanoparticle layers are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering are investigated as an alternative to lead alloy based material for solder joint in power mechatronics modules. These layers are characterized by mean of conventional techniques that is the dilatometry technique, the resistivity measurement through the van der Pauw method, and the flash laser technique. Furthermore, the nanoparticles of silver layer are deeply studied by UV-Visible spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectroscopic angles parameters are determined in function of temperature and dielectric constants are deduced and analyzed through an optical model which takes into account a Drude and a Lorentz component within the Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA). The relaxation times and the electrical conductivity are plot in function of temperature. The obtained electrical conductivity give significant result in good agreement to those reported by four points electrical measurement method.

  5. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Miller, B.; Parzinger, E.; Thiesen, P.; Holleitner, A. W.; Wurstbauer, U.

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1-2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  6. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Miller, B.; Parzinger, E.; Thiesen, P.; Holleitner, A. W.; Wurstbauer, U.

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1–2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  7. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2.

    PubMed

    Funke, S; Miller, B; Parzinger, E; Thiesen, P; Holleitner, A W; Wurstbauer, U

    2016-09-28

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1-2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  8. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  9. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  10. Electric-field-induced reorientation and flip in domain magnetization and light diffraction in an yttrium-iron-garnet/lead-zirconate-titanate bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavislyak, I. V.; Sohatsky, V. P.; Popov, M. A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2013-04-01

    A continuous reorientation and an abrupt flip to a canted structure in the magnetization of stripe domains are observed under the influence of an electric field in an yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG)/lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bilayer. Magneto-optic techniques have been utilized for the observation of the domain structure and the magnetization flip. It is found that electrically generated mechanical stress in PZT induces an uniaxial anisotropy field in YIG, which is large enough to initially cause a gradual change in the domain magnetization and then a transition from out-of-plane orientation to a canted state for a threshold electric field. Additional evidence for the spin flip has been obtained from data on the modulation of intensity of linearly polarized light due to diffraction by the stripe domains. A comprehensive theory for the voltage-induced magnetization flip is discussed and compared with the data. The magnetic transitions and the theory discussed here are of interests for electric-field-controlled magneto-optic and spintronic devices.

  11. Effect of Ta concentration on the refractive index of TiO2:Ta studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfani, Eka; Kurniawan, Robi; Muhammady, Shibghatullah; Marlina, Resti; Sutjahja, Inge M.; Winata, Toto; Rusydi, Andrivo; Darma, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated optical properties of Ta-doped TiO2 thin film on LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) at room temperature. Amplitude ratio Ψ and phase difference L1 between p- and s- polarized light waves are obtained by multiple incident angles measurement (60°, 70°, and 80°) at energy range of 0.5 - 6.5 eV. In order to obtain optical properties for every Ta concentrations (0.01, 0.4, and 5 at. %), multilayer modelling was performed simultaneously by using Drude-Lorentz model. Refractive index and optical dispersion parameters were determined by Wemple-DiDomenico relation. In general, refractive index at zero photon energy n(0) increases by increasing Ta concentration. Furthermore, optical band gap shows a significant increasing due to presence of Ta dopant. In addition, other optical constants are discussed as well.

  12. Kinetic analysis of biomolecular interactions by surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Mo; Chegal, Won; Cho, Yong Jai; Won, Jong Myoung; Lee, Hak Min; Jo, Jae Heung

    2011-10-01

    We present the application of ellipsometry to the phase measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in biomolecular detection. In this work, the experimental setup for the SPR sensor was based on a custom-built rotating analyzer ellipsometer, which was equipped with a SPR cell and a microfluidic system. We investigate the sensitivity of SPR sensor which is dependent on the thickness and roughness of metal film, alignment of optical system, and stability of microfluidics. In the drug discovery process, to directly monitor the interaction of small molecule-protein, it is necessary to design a high-sensitivity SPR sensor with a sensitivity of greater than 1 pg/mm2. Our sensor demonstrates a much better sensitivity in comparison to other SPR sensors based on reflectometry or phase measurements. The results of calibration indicate that the phase change, δ▵, had an almost linear response to the concentration of ethanol in the double-distilled water solutions. A quantitative analysis of refractive index variation was possible using the results of the ellipsometric model fits for the multilayered thin film on the gold film. Thus, this method is applicable not only to sensor applications, such as affinity biosensors, but also to highly sensitive kinetics for drug discovery. In this paper, we demonstrate how a custom-built rotating analyzer ellipsometer in the SPR condition can be used to directly obtain the interactions and binding kinetics of analytes (biotins, peptides) with immobilized ligand (streptavidin, antibody). We achieved a detection limit of lower than 1.0 x10-7 RIU, which is the equivalent of 0.1 pg/mm2.

  13. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb: Experiment and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Mu {tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[{equals}{epsilon}{sub 1}(E) + i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3--5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0}(direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}), E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} and (E{sub 0}{prime}), E{sub 0}{prime} + {Delta}{sub 0}{prime} doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function [Phys.Rev.B 56, 4037 (1997)] based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0}and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} CPS was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/{rvec k} {center_dot} {rvec p} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}.

  14. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  15. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  16. In situ nanoparticle diagnostics by multi-wavelength Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, G.; Winter, J.

    2003-04-01

    We present and discuss the method of multiple-wavelength Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry for the in situ analysis of nanoparticles. It is applied to the problem of nanoparticles suspended in low-pressure plasmas. We discuss experimental results demonstrating that the size distribution and the complex refractive index can be determined with high accuracy and present a study on the in situ analysis of etching of melamine-formaldehyde nanoparticles suspended in an oxygen plasma. It is also shown that particles with a shell structure (core plus mantle) can be analysed by Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry. Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry is also applicable to in situ analysis of nanoparticles under high gas pressures and in liquids.

  17. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of hydrogen ion bombardment of crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.Z.; Li, M.; Conrad, K.; Andres, J.W.; Irene, E.A.; Denker, M.; Ray, M.; McGuire, G.

    1992-05-01

    Hydrogen-bombardment induced damage in single crystal silicon as a function of the substrate temperature, ion energy, and ion dose was studied using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry over the photon energy range 2.0-5.5 eV under high vacuum conditions. The incident hydrogen ion energies were 300 and 1000 eV, and the doses were 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry results showed that the damage layer thicknesses for the samples bombarded at elevated temperatures are smaller than for samples bombarded at room temperature and subsequently annealed at the same elevated temperature. The diffusion coefficient for hydrogen in silicon of 6 x 10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup {minus}2}/s was obtained from the in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry data. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on Si/SiO{sub 2}/graphene tri-layer system exposed to downstream hydrogen plasma: Effects of hydrogenation and chemical sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Baran; Fu, Wangyang; Marot, Laurent Calame, Michel; Steiner, Roland; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-05

    In this work, the optical response of graphene to hydrogen plasma treatment is investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Although the electronic transport properties and Raman spectrum of graphene change after plasma hydrogenation, ellipsometric parameters of the Si/SiO2/graphene tri-layer system do not change. This is attributed to plasma hydrogenated graphene still being electrically conductive, since the light absorption of conducting 2D materials does not depend on the electronic band structure. A change in the light transmission can only be observed when higher energy hydrogen ions (30 eV) are employed, which chemically sputter the graphene layer. An optical contrast is still apparent after sputtering due to the remaining traces of graphene and hydrocarbons on the surface. In brief, plasma treatment does not change the light transmission of graphene; and when it does, this is actually due to plasma damage rather than plasma hydrogenation.

  20. Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopic analysis of graphene films grown directly on Si substrate via CVD technique for estimating the graphene atomic planes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hazmi, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Alshahrie, Ahmed; Shokr, F. S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E.

    2016-08-01

    Two reliable approaches for estimating the number of atomic planes of graphene films grown on Si substrate were demonstrated by Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopies. The first approach depends on the measurement of the ratio of the integrated Raman scattering intensity of the graphene G band to the optical phonon band of Si substrate (IG/ISi). The second approach belongs to ellipsometry measurement of the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected polarized light from the surface of the graphene films to the amplitude of reflected polarized light from the surface of the Si substrate (ΨG/ΨSi). These two approaches could efficiently recognize the number of atomic planes in the graphene films (1 ≤ n ≤ 10). The results were compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement and showed a linear regression with slope of 0.36 ± 0.01 nm/graphene layer. The Two approaches will open a new avenue to efficiently count the number of graphene layers during the preparation process.

  1. Quantifying protein adsorption on combinatorially sputtered Al-, Nb-, Ta- and Ti-containing films with electron microprobe and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. M.; Lohstreter, L.; Filiaggi, M. J.; Bai, Zhijun; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Although metallic biomaterials are widely used, systematic studies of protein adsorption onto such materials are generally lacking. Combinatorial binary libraries of Al 1-xNb x, Al 1-xTa x, Al 1-xTi x, Nb 1-xTa x, Nb 1-xTi x, and Ta 1-xTi x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) and a ternary library of Al 1-xTi xTa y (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1 and 0 ⩽ y ⩽ 0.7), along with their corresponding pure element films were sputtered onto glass substrates using a unique magnetron sputtering technique. Films were characterized with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fibrinogen and albumin adsorption amounts were measured by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) equipment, both high throughput techniques with automated motion stage capabilities. Protein adsorption onto these films was found to be closely correlated to the alumina surface fraction, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin. Protein adsorption amounts obtained with WDS and SE were in good agreement for all films.

  2. Ellipsometry with polarisation analysis at cryogenic temperatures inside a vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.; Grees, B.; Spitzer, D.; Beck, M.; Bottesch, R.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Schäfer, T.; Wegmann, A.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Ostrick, B.; Telle, H. H.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper we describe a new variant of null ellipsometry to determine thicknesses and optical properties of thin films on a substrate at cryogenic temperatures. In the PCSA arrangement of ellipsometry the polarizer and the compensator are placed before the substrate and the analyzer after it. Usually, in the null ellipsometry the polarizer and the analyzer are rotated to find the searched minimum in intensity. In our variant we rotate the polarizer and the compensator instead, both being placed in the incoming beam before the substrate. Therefore the polarisation analysis of the reflected beam can be realized by an analyzer at fixed orientation. We developed this method for investigations of thin cryogenic films inside a vacuum chamber where the analyzer and detector had to be placed inside the cold shield at a temperature of T≈ 90 K close to the substrate. All other optical components were installed at the incoming beam line outside the vacuum chamber, including all components which need to be rotated during the measurements. Our null ellipsometry variant has been tested with condensed krypton films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate (HOPG) at a temperature of T≈ 25 K. We show that it is possible to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG substrate as well as thickness of krypton films with reasonable accuracy.

  3. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  4. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  5. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  6. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G. A.; Schülli, T. U.; Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G.; Richard, M.-I.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup −5} (Δa/a) with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 μm. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive μ-Raman and μ-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  7. Photoinduced diffraction in polymer waveguides.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J H; Singer, K D

    1993-11-20

    We report on techniques for measuring photoinduced diffraction in prism-coupled slab polymer waveguides. Diffraction effects resulting from photochromic gratings in slab waveguides of Disperse Red 1 dye in polymethylmethacrylate were studied. Optical damage in the form of diffractive mode conversion was observed when we coupled in light with a wavelength slightly longer than the absorption edge of Disperse Red 1 dye. Slowly growing satellite beams in the outcoupled light were attributed to anisotropic scattering between the lowest-order TE mode and the lowest-order TM mode caused by self-diffraction from a grating produced through the photochromic effect. We have also investigated the effect of mode-coupling changes on the determination of diffraction efficiency and sensitivity in waveguide experiments. Diffraction efficiencies predicted by measurements of the modulation depth in the guide are found to overstate the actual diffraction efficiencies that could be observed in this geometry. Techniques for overc ming this limitation and for improving estimates of the energy density and interaction length in the guide are noted.

  8. Symmetry and light stuffing of H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 characterized by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroudi, Kristen; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Cava, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    The H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 pyrochlores were studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction to determine whether the (002) peak, forbidden in the pyrochlore space group F d -3 m but observed in single crystal neutron scattering measurements, is present due to a deviation of their pyrochlore structure from F d -3 m symmetry. Synchrotron diffraction measurements on precisely synthesized stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric powders and a crushed floating zone crystal of H o2T i2O7 revealed that the (002) reflection is absent in all cases to a sensitivity of approximately one part in 30 000 of the strongest x-ray diffraction peak. This indicates to high sensitivity that the space group of the crystal structure of these rare earth titanate pyrochlores is F d -3 m , and that, thus, the (002) peak observed in the neutron scattering experiments has a nonstructural origin. The cell parameters and internal strain for lightly stuffed H o2 +xT i2 -xO7 are also presented.

  9. Dielectric function of the ferromagnetic semiconductor CdMnCrTe studied by using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Younghun; Um, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    We describe the pseudo-dielectric function of Cd1- x- y Mn x Cr y Te ferromagnetic semiconductor alloys by using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the 1.0 ~ 6.0 eV spectral range at room temperature. The ellipsometry data include structures that can be attributed to the effects of Cr concentration on the E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 critical points. Critical-point (CP) parameters were obtained by fitting standard critical point (SCP) model line shapes to the numerically-calculated second- energy derivatives of ɛ( ω) = ɛ 1( ω) + iɛ 2( ω). The E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 energies decreased with Cr content y; this phenomenon is related to the hybridization of the valence and the conduction bands in CdTe with the 3 d states of Mn and Cr.

  10. Fundamental study of photoresist dissolution with real time spectroscopic ellipsometry and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sean D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Trinque, Brian C.; Willson, James; Wunderlich, Jennifer; Tsiartas, Pavlos C.; Taylor, James C.; Burns, Ryan L.; Wilson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    The use of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is demonstrated as a technique for studying photoresist dissolution. Experiments carried out using a J.A.Woollam M-2000 ellipsometer and a custom built cell designed for in situ film measurements show that bulk dissolution rate measurements using the SE technique agree with dissolution rate data obtained using multiwavelength interferometry. SE is also demonstrated as a method for measuring thin film dissolution rates, water sorption, and films that swell. An additional focus of this work was the topic of interfacial "gel" layer formation during photoresist dissolution. Ellipsometry and interferometry were used to test several photoresist resins, with an emphasis on phenolic polymers. Single and multiple layer models were used to analyze the data, and were compared to model calculations predicting formation of a gel layer. For the materials studied, interfacial gel layer formation in low molecular weight phenolic polymers was not detected, within the resolution of the experimental techniques (< 15 nm).

  11. Single shot ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) of laser-driven shocks in single crystal explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Von H; Mcgrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Eakins, Dan E; Bolme, Cindy A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first experiments to measure states in shocked energetic single crystals with dynamic ellipsometry. We demonstrate that these ellipsometric techniques can produce reasonable Hugoniot values using small amounts of crystalline RDX and PETN. Pressures, particle velocities and shock velocities obtained using shocked ellipsometry are comparable to those found using gas-gun flyer plates and molecular dynamics calculations. The adaptation of the technique from uniform thin films of polymers to thick non-perfect crystalline materials was a significant achievement. Correct sample preparation proved to be a crucial component. Through trial and error, we were able to resolve polishing issues, sample quality problems, birefringence effects and mounting difficulties that were not encountered using thin polymer films.

  12. Modeling Ellipsometry Measurements of Molecular Thin-Film Contamination on Genesis Array Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a molecular thin-film contamination on Genesis flown array samples changed the course of preliminary assessment strategies. Analytical techniques developed to measure solar wind elemental abundances must now compensate for a thin-film contamination. Currently, this is done either by experimental cleaning before analyses or by depth-profiling techniques that bypass the surface contamination. Inside Johnson Space Center s Genesis dedicated ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom laboratory, the selection of collector array fragments allocated for solar wind analyses are based on the documentation of overall surface quality, visible surface particle contamination greater than 1 m, and the amount of thin film contamination measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Documenting the exact thickness, surface topography, and chemical composition of these contaminates is also critical for developing accurate cleaning methods. However, the first step in characterization of the molecular film is to develop accurate ellipsometry models that will determine an accurate thickness measurement of the contamination film.

  13. Microsecond-resolved SDR-based cavity ring down ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, D; Spiliotis, A K; Stamataki, K; Katsoprinakis, G E; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Loppinet, B; Rakitzis, T P; Surligas, M; Papadakis, S

    2015-06-20

    We present an experimental apparatus that allows microsecond-resolved ellipsometric and absorption measurements. The apparatus is based on an optical cavity containing a Dove prism, in which light undergoes total internal reflection (TIR), while the data acquisition is based on software defined radio technology and custom-built drivers. We demonstrate the ability to sense rapid variations in the refractive index above the TIR interface for arbitrarily long times with a temporal resolution of at least 2 μs. PMID:26193040

  14. Sensitivity enhancement for evanescent-wave sensing using cavity-ring-down ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Stamataki, Katerina; Everest, Michael A; Papadakis, Vassilis; Stehle, Jean-Louis; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2013-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to increase the sensitivity of the s-p phase shift under total internal reflection (TIR) for optical sensing. This is achieved by the introduction of two simple dielectric layers to the TIR surface of a fused silica prism. The enhanced sensitivity is demonstrated using evanescent-wave cavity-ring-down-ellipsometry by measuring the refractive index of liquid mixtures and by studying the adsorption of polymers to the TIR surface of the fused silica prism.

  15. Differences in stationary-phase cells of a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast grown in aerobic and microaerophilic batch cultures assessed by electric particle analysis, light diffraction and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Portell, X; Ginovart, M; Carbó, R; Vives-Rego, J

    2011-01-01

    We applied electric particle analysis, light diffraction and flow cytometry to obtain information on the morphological changes during the stationary phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reported analyses of S. cerevisiae populations were obtained under two different conditions, aerobic and microaerophilic, at 27°C. The samples analysed were taken at between 20 and 50 h from the beginning of culture. To assist in the interpretation of the observed distributions a complexity index was used. The aerobically grown culture reached significantly greater cell density. Under these conditions, the cell density experienced a much lower reduction (3%) compared with the microaerophilic conditions (30%). Under aerobic conditions, the mean cell size determined by both electric particle analysis and light diffraction was lower and remained similar throughout the experiment. Under microaerophilic conditions, the mean cell size determined by electric particle analysis decreased slightly as the culture progressed through the stationary phase. Forward and side scatter distributions revealed two cell subpopulations under both growth conditions. However, in the aerobic growing culture the two subpopulations were more separated and hence easier to distinguish. The distributions obtained with the three experimental techniques were analysed using the complexity index. This analysis suggested that a complexity index is a good descriptor of the changes that take place in a yeast population in the stationary phase, and that it aids in the discussion and understanding of the implications of these distributions obtained by these experimental techniques.

  16. Broadband beam shaping with harmonic diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2014-09-22

    We consider spatial shaping of broadband (either stationary or pulsed) spatially coherent light, comparing refractive, standard diffractive, and harmonic diffractive (modulo 2πM) elements. Considering frequency-integrated target profiles we show that, contrary to common belief, standard diffractive (M = 1) elements work reasonably well for, e.g., Gaussian femtosecond pulses and spatially coherent amplified-spontaneous-emission sources such as superluminescent diodes. It is also shown that harmonic elements with M ≥ 5 behave in essentially the same way as refractive elements and clearly outperform standard diffractive elements for highly broadband light.

  17. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drévillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine. PMID:12477127

  18. Study of the Dielectric Function of Graphene from Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Florence

    For more than 60 years, semiconductor research has been advancing up the periodic table. The first transistor was made from germanium. This later gave way to silicon-based devices due to the latter's ability to form an excellent interface with thermally-grown oxide. Now for the last ˜8 years, the focus has moved up one more row to carbon for post-CMOS devices in order to comply with the scaling limitations of Moore's law. However, for each of these, the measurements of film properties and dimensions have always been required for technological applications. These measurement methods often incorporate the use of light or electrons in order to take advantage of a wavelength that is on the order of, or smaller than, the feature sizes of interest. This thesis compares the dielectric function of graphene measured by an optical method to that obtained from an electron energy loss method in order to observe the effect of contamination and substrate on the optical properties of graphene exposed to the environment. Whether viewed in terms of how light affects a material (dielectric function) or how a material affects light (refractive index), the optical response is a quantity that may be used to obtain information about a film's thickness, energy structure, and the types of excitations that are responsible for energy loss. The three main experimental methods used in this thesis work are spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). SE is commonly used in clean-room environments for optical measurement over the energy range of ˜0-5 eV. This method is used to study graphene's dielectric function from the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) regions through use of an oscillator dispersion model. A nearly constant absorbance over the IR and into the visible region is observed due to vertical transitions between graphene's linearly dispersed pi-bands at the Dirac points. An exciton

  19. Asymmetric information hiding and noise-free recovery based on rotating analyzer ellipsometry and quick-response code.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Wang, Zhisong

    2014-08-01

    We report an asymmetric optical information hiding method based on a rotating analyzer ellipsometry technique. This asymmetric hiding architecture not only avoids the interception of keys during transmission or distribution but also makes the cyphertext more inconspicuous for attackers. A new kind of one-way optical trapdoor function is constructed based on the fact that the state of polarization (SOP) of elliptical polarized light cannot be recovered with only the knowledge of intensity captured after passing through a linear polarizer. Meanwhile, the SOP of a polarization ellipse could be calculated by rotating the polarizer to record two scenes of intensity after it. Introduction of a quick response code as a container leads to noise-free recovery for original information and enhances practicality of the proposed cryptosystem with versatile key sensitivity and fault tolerance capability. Numerical simulation results that support theoretical analysis are presented. Analysis on the relationship between hiding effect or quality of decryption and parameters of the algorithm also is provided.

  20. Structure and thermotropic phase behavior of fluorinated phospholipid bilayers: a combined attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy and imaging ellipsometry study.

    PubMed

    Schuy, Steffen; Faiss, Simon; Yoder, Nicholas C; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Kumar, Krishna; Janshoff, Andreas; Vogel, Reiner

    2008-07-17

    Lipid bilayers consisting of lipids with terminally perfluoroalkylated chains have remarkable properties. They exhibit increased stability and phase-separated nanoscale patterns in mixtures with nonfluorinated lipids. In order to understand the bilayer properties that are responsible for this behavior, we have analyzed the structure of solid-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and of a DPPC analogue with 6 terminal perfluorinated methylene units (F6-DPPC). Polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that for F6-DPPC, the tilt of the lipid acyl chains to the bilayer normal is increased to 39 degrees as compared to 21 degrees for native DPPC, for both lipids in the gel phase. This substantial increase of the tilt angle is responsible for a decrease of the bilayer thickness from 5.4 nm for DPPC to 4.5 nm for F6-DPPC, as revealed by temperature-controlled imaging ellipsometry on microstructured lipid bilayers and solution atomic force microscopy. During the main phase transition from the gel to the fluid phase, both the relative bilayer thickness change and the relative area change are substantially smaller for F6-DPPC than for DPPC. In light of these structural and thermotropic data, we propose a model in which the higher acyl-chain tilt angle in F6-DPPC is the result of a conformational rearrangement to minimize unfavorable fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon interactions in the center of the bilayer due to chain staggering.

  1. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core–shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core–shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip.

  2. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core-shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core-shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip.

  3. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI–CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kamiński, Radosław; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, Elżbieta; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies. PMID:25238405

  4. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  5. Real-Time Ellipsometry-Based Transmission Ultrasound Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Poco, J F; Ashby, A E

    2007-02-14

    -Perot system has never been fully implemented for area imaging, and the critical angle modulation system is not sensitive enough for medical imaging. We proposed an entirely new way of using acoustic pressure to modulate a light beam. This new technology should be sensitive enough to be useful for medical imaging and have a large enough aperture to speed acquisition by orders of magnitude over point sampling. Unfortunately, we were unable to bring this technology to fruition.

  6. Diffraction Analysis of Solar Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Douglas M.; gong, qian

    2016-05-01

    The design of a solar coronagraph is predicated on controlling diffracted and scattered light using principles dating back to Bernard Lyot in the 1930’s. The existence of many successful ground- and space-based coronagraphs testifies to our ability to apply these principles in specific cases, but it is difficult to explore a significant range of design parameters because the calculations are tricky and time-consuming. Indeed, scattered light is so design-specific that ad hoc analysis is unavoidable once guidelines from experience are used to create a first-guess system of baffles and low-scatter surfaces. Here we describe a combination of analytic and computational approaches that has the potential to explore coronagraph design space somewhat more systematically with respect to diffracted light.

  7. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  8. Diffraction model for thermoreflectance data.

    PubMed

    Kureshi, S; Fabris, D; Tokairin, S; Cardenas, C V; Yang, C Y

    2015-06-10

    Thermoreflectance imaging provides the capability to map temperature spatially on the submicrometer scale by using a light source and CCD camera for data acquisition. The ability to achieve such spatial resolution and observe detailed features is influenced by optical diffraction. By combining diffraction from both the sample and substrate, a model is developed to determine the intensity of the thermoreflectance signal. This model takes into account the effective optical distance, sample width, wavelength, signal phase shift, and reflectance intensity, while showing qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental thermoreflectance images from 1 and 10 μm wide gold lines at two wavelengths.

  9. Keyhole coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Brian; Nugent, Keith A.; Williams, Garth J.; Clark, Jesse N.; Peele, Andrew G.; Pfeifer, Mark A.; de Jonge, Martin; McNulty, Ian

    2008-05-01

    The availability of third-generation synchrotrons and ultimately X-ray free-electron lasers is driving the development of many new methods of microscopy. Among these techniques, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is one of the most promising, offering nanometre-scale imaging of non-crystallographic samples. Image reconstruction from a single diffraction pattern has hitherto been possible only for small, isolated samples, presenting a fundamental limitation on the CDI method. Here we report on a form of imaging we term `keyhole' CDI, which can reconstruct objects of arbitrary size. We demonstrate the technique using visible light and X-rays, with the latter producing images of part of an extended object with a detector-limited resolution of better than 20nm. Combining the improved resolution of modern X-ray optics with the wavelength-limited resolution of CDI, the method paves the way for detailed imaging of a single quantum dot or of a small virus within a complex host environment.

  10. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  11. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  12. Oxidation of SiC investigated by ellipsometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Szilagyi, E.; Petrik, P.; Lohner, T.; Koos, A. A.; Fried, M.; Battistig, G.

    2008-07-01

    Oxidation of SiC was performed in Ar-O{sub 2} mixture of atmospheric pressure at 1100 deg. C and compared with that of Si. The partial pressure of O{sub 2} varied from 100 to 1000 mbar, while the oxidation time ranged from 0.5 to 45 h. The thickness of the oxide films was determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The time and the pressure dependence of the oxidation kinetics of SiC are well described by the modified Deal-Grove model. In the diffusion-limited region, even for the faster case, the oxidation kinetics of the C-terminated face of SiC is not clearly limited by oxygen indiffusion, as for pure silicon. To interpret the ellipsometry spectra, two models of possible structure were used. In the case of the one-layer model, for layer thicknesses above 30 nm, the refractive index of the oxide layers is identical to that of thermally oxidized Si, and it increases rapidly with decreasing thickness below about 15 nm. This increase is significantly larger for C-terminated than for Si-terminated faces, and this difference can be explained by a transition layer introduced into the two-layer model. This model contains a pure SiO{sub 2} layer and a transition layer modeled by a mixture of 50 % SiO{sub 2} and 50 % SiC. The transition layer is thicker on the C-terminated surface than on the Si-terminated one. The thickness ratio of the transition layers is slightly larger than the surface roughness ratio on the two different sides determined by atomic force microscopy. The density of the oxide films, which can be determined from the backscattering and spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra, decreases with decreasing thickness below about 30 nm. For thicker films, the density of the oxide is equal to the bulk density of SiO{sub 2}.

  13. Combined ellipsometry and refractometry technique for characterisation of liquid crystal based nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Warenghem, Marc; Henninot, Jean François; Blach, Jean François; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Kaczmarek, Malgosia; Stchakovsky, Michel

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a technique especially well suited to measure the effective optical properties of a composite material. However, as the sample is optically thick and anisotropic, this technique loses its accuracy for two reasons: anisotropy means that two parameters have to be determined (ordinary and extraordinary indices) and optically thick means a large order of interference. In that case, several dielectric functions can emerge out of the fitting procedure with a similar mean square error and no criterion to discriminate the right solution. In this paper, we develop a methodology to overcome that drawback. It combines ellipsometry with refractometry. The same sample is used in a total internal reflection (TIR) setup and in a spectroscopic ellipsometer. The number of parameters to be determined by the fitting procedure is reduced in analysing two spectra, the correct final solution is found by using the TIR results both as initial values for the parameters and as check for the final dielectric function. A prefitting routine is developed to enter the right initial values in the fitting procedure and so to approach the right solution. As an example, this methodology is used to analyse the optical properties of BaTiO(3) nanoparticles embedded in a nematic liquid crystal. Such a methodology can also be used to analyse experimentally the validity of the mixing laws, since ellipsometry gives the effective dielectric function and thus, can be compared to the dielectric function of the components of the mixture, as it is shown on the example of BaTiO(3)/nematic composite.

  14. In Situ Potentiometry and Ellipsometry: A Promising Tool to Study Biofouling of Potentiometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Bobacka, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2016-03-15

    In situ potentiometry and null ellipsometry was combined and used as a tool to follow the kinetics of biofouling of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The study was performed using custom-made solid-contact K(+)-ISEs consisting of a gold surface with immobilized 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol as ion-to-electron transducer that was coated with a potassium-selective plasticized polymer membrane. The electrode potential and the ellipsometric signal (corresponding to the amount of adsorbed protein) were recorded simultaneously during adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the surface of the K(+)-ISEs. This in situ method may become useful in developing sensors with minimized biofouling.

  15. Observation of Frenkel and charge transfer excitons in pentacene single crystals using spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dongchen; Su, Haibin; Bastjan, M.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Palstra, T. M.; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Rübhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the emerging and admixture of Frenkel and charge transfer (CT) excitons near the absorption onset in pentacene single crystals. Using high energy-resolution spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry with in-plane polarization dependence, the excitonic nature of three lowest lying excitations is discussed. Their distinct polarization dependence strongly indicates the presence of both Frenkel and CT types of excitons near the excitation onset. In particular, the peculiar polarization behavior of the second excitation can only be rationalized by taking into account the inherent CT transition dipole moment. This observation has important implications for the pentacene-based optoelectronic devices.

  16. An ellipsometry study of silica nanoparticle layers at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Stocco, Antonio; Langevin, Dominique; Wei, Bingbo; Binks, Bernard P

    2009-11-01

    We have studied silica nanoparticle layers spread at the air/water interface. The surface pressure of the layers has been determined in a Langmuir trough via two orthogonal Wilhelmy plates. We observed significant differences in surface pressure according to the preparation protocol: layers spread then compressed or layers obtained after successive spreading steps. We also studied the two types of layers by multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry. We introduce a two-layer model which enables us to evaluate the radius of interfacial aggregates and their contact angle with the air/water interface. PMID:19830337

  17. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin Shen, Chih-Chiang; Su, Sheng-Han; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2014-11-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  18. Optical diagnostics of anisotropic nanoscale films on transparent isotropic materials by integrating reflectivity and ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Peep

    2009-11-01

    The reflection of s- and p-polarized electromagnetic plane waves from an anisotropic ultrathin dielectric film on transparent isotropic substrate is investigated in the long-wavelength limit. The analytical approximate formulas are obtained for the reflection coefficients and ellipsometric angles that agree with the exact computer solution of the reflection problem for anisotropic systems. The possibilities of using the obtained expressions for resolving the inverse problem for ultrathin anisotropic dielectric films upon isotropic dielectric substrates are discussed. It is shown that a promising technique for determining the optical constants of anisotropic dielectric films on transparent substrates is the integration of ellipsometry and differential reflectivity. PMID:19881659

  19. Electronic and structural properties of molybdenum thin films as determined by real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J. D.; Khatri, H.; Ranjan, V.; Li Jian; Collins, R. W.; Marsillac, S.

    2009-04-06

    Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) is shown to be an effective contactless probe of radio frequency magnetron sputtered molybdenum thin films used as the back electrode in chalcopyrite [Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}] solar cells. A series of Mo thin films was sputtered onto soda-lime glass substrates at Ar pressures ranging from 4 to 20 mTorr. RTSE measurements reveal how Ar pressure affects the nucleation and growth mechanisms that influence the films' ultimate grain structure and properties. Determinations of the free electron relaxation times at optical frequencies reveal that higher pressures lead to a smaller average grain size and increased void volume fraction.

  20. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of homoepitaxial diamond multilayers and delta-doped structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet, J.; Chicot, G.; Eon, D.; Bustarret, E.

    2014-01-13

    The optimization of diamond-based unipolar electronic devices such as pseudo-vertical Schottky diodes or delta-doped field effect transistors relies in part on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p{sup –}) and heavily boron doped (p{sup ++}) layers with well-controlled thicknesses and steep interfaces. Optical ellipsometry offers a swift and contactless method to characterize the thickness, roughness, and electronic properties of semiconducting and metallic diamond layers. We report ellipsometric studies carried out on delta-doped structures and other epitaxial multilayers with various boron concentrations and thicknesses (down to the nanometer range). The results are compared with Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and transport measurements.

  1. Ionization of covalent immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) monolayers measured by ellipsometry, QCM and SPR

    PubMed Central

    Uppalapati, Suji; Kong, Na; Norberg, Oscar; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    Covalently immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) monolayer films were fabricated by spin coating PVP on perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized surface followed by UV irradiation. The pH-responsive behavior of these PVP ultrathin films was evaluated by ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By monitoring the responses of these films to pH in situ, the ionization constant of the monolayer thin films was obtained. The apparent pKa value of these covalently immobilized PVP monolayers, 13.4 by SPR, was 3 units higher than that of the free polymer in aqueous solution. PMID:26097271

  2. Ionization of covalent immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) monolayers measured by ellipsometry, QCM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppalapati, Suji; Kong, Na; Norberg, Oscar; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-07-01

    Covalently immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) monolayer films were fabricated by spin coating PVP on perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized surfaces followed by UV irradiation. The pH-responsive behavior of these PVP ultrathin films was evaluated by ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By monitoring the responses of these films to pH in situ, the ionization constant of the monolayer thin films was obtained. The apparent pKa value of these covalently immobilized PVP monolayers, 13.4 by SPR, was 3 units higher than that of the free polymer in aqueous solution.

  3. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  4. Characterization of the diffraction properties of quantum-dot-array diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chuanke; Kuang Longyu; Wang Zhebin; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Cao Leifeng; Foerster, Eckhart; Wang Deqiang; Xie Changqing; Ye Tianchun

    2007-05-15

    A new dispersive element named as quantum-dot-array diffraction grating [L. F. Cao, China patent No. 200410081499 (August 10, 2004)] for visible light has been developed and characterized experimentally. A large number of quantum dots distributed on a substrate as sinusoidal function can be used to diffract x rays without higher-order diffraction. The experimental patterns show that the higher-order diffractions which inevitably exist in the spectrum recorded using traditional diffraction gratings can be eliminated effectively by this newly designed element. It indicates that quantum-dot-array diffraction grating could be an attractive alternative of presently used diffraction grating in soft x-ray spectroscopy application to get rid of the higher-order diffraction distortions.

  5. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  6. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  7. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer phase grating designs

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction phase gratings are employed in phase-shifting point diffraction interferometers to improve the interferometric fringe contrast. The diffraction phase grating diffracts a zeroth-order diffraction of light at a first power level to the test-beam window of a mask that is positioned at the image plane and a first-order diffraction at a second power to the reference-beam pinhole. The diffraction phase grating is preferably selected to yield a desired ratio of the first power level to second power level.

  8. Electrospinning deposition of hydrogel fibers used as scaffold for biomembranes. Thermal stability of DPPC corroborated by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    González-Henríquez, C M; Sarabia-Vallejos, M A

    2015-09-01

    DPPC bilayers were deposited over thin hydrogel scaffolds using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique (with DPPC thickness ∼ 6.2 nm). Wrinkled hydrogels films were used to maintain a moist environment in order to enhance DPPC bilayer stability. Polymer mixtures were prepared using HEMA (as a base monomer) and DEGDMA, PEGDA575, PEGDA700 or AAm (as crosslinking agents); a thermal initiator was added to obtain a final pre-hydrogel (oligomer) with an adequate viscosity for thin film formation. This mixture was deposited as wrinkled film/fibers over hydrophilic silicon wafers using an electrospinning technique. Later, these samples were exposed to UV light to trigger photopolymerization, generating crosslinking bonds between hydrogel chains; this process also generated remnant surface stresses in the films that favored wrinkle formation. In the cases where DEGDMA and AAm were used as crosslinking agents, HEMA was added in higher amounts. The resultant polymer film surface showed homogenous layering with some small isolated clusters. If PEGDA575/700 was used as the crosslinking agent, we observed the formation of polymer wrinkled thin films, composed by main and secondary chains (with different dimensions). Moreover, water absorption and release was found to be mediated through surface morphology, ordering and film thickness. The thermal behavior of biomembranes was examined using ellipsometry techniques under controlled heating cycles, allowing phases and phase transitions to be detected through slight thickness variations with respect to temperature. Atomic force microscopy was used to determinate surface roughness changes according to temperature variation, temperature was varied sufficiently for the detection and recording of DPPC phase limits. Contact angle measurements corroborated and quantified system wettability, supporting the theory that wrinkled hydrogel films act to enhance DPPC bilayer stability during thermal cycles.

  9. Optical characterization of the PtSi/Si by using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Van Long; Kim, Tae Jung; Park, Han Gyeol; Kim, Hwa Seob; Yoo, Chang Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Uk; Kim, Young Dong; Kim, Junsoo; Im, Solyee; Choi, Won Chul; Moon, Seung Eon; Nam, Eun Soo

    2016-08-01

    We report an optical characterization of PtSi films for thermoelectric device applications which was done by using nondestructive spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A Pt monolayer and a Pt-Si multilayer which consisted of three pairs of Pt and Si layers were deposited on p-doped-silicon substrates by using sputtering method; then, rapid annealing process was done to form PtSi films through intermixing of Pt and Si atoms at the interface. Pseudodielectric function data < ɛ > = < ɛ 1 > + i < ɛ 2 > for the PtSi/Si samples were obtained from 1.12 to 6.52 eV by using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Employing the Tauc-Lorentz and the Drude models, determined the dielectric function ( ɛ) of the PtSi films. We found that the composition ratio of Pt:Si was nearly 1:1 for the PtSi monolayer and we observed transitions between occupied and unoccupied states in the Pt 5 d states. We also observed the formation of PtSi layers in the Pt-Si multilayer sample. The SE results were confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-21

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  11. Immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) for the determination of orientation gradients in photoalignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. C.; Stumpe, J.

    2014-09-01

    The capability of the method of immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) (Jung et al. Int Patent WO, 2004/109260) to not only determine three-dimensional refractive indices in anisotropic thin films (which was already possible in the past), but even their gradients along the z-direction (perpendicular to the film plane) is investigated in this paper. It is shown that the determination of orientation gradients in deep-sub-μm films becomes possible by applying ITE in combination with reflection ellipsometry. The technique is supplemented by atomic force microscopy for measuring the film thickness. For a photo-oriented thin film, no gradient was found, as expected. For a photo-oriented film, which was subsequently annealed in a nematic liquid crystalline phase, an order was found similar to the one applied in vertically aligned nematic displays, with a tilt angle varying along the z-direction. For fresh films, gradients were only detected for the refractive index perpendicular to the film plane, as expected.

  12. Probing initial-stages of ALD growth with dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2015-02-01

    The initial stages of ALD surface reactions are probed using dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) technique during plasma-enhanced ALD of zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films in spectral range of 0.73-6.4 eV. The measured change in the ellipsometry parameter Δ, with every precursor (TDMAZr) and reactant (forming gas plasma) exposure is interpreted as the combined effect of film growth and change in surface chemistry during ALD. We present application of Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (B-EMA) in the analysis of d-iSE data to determine fractional surface coverage (θ) of ALD grown film at the end of every deposition cycle. During the deposition of first few ZrN monolayers, d-iSE datasets are analyzed on the basis of surface diffusion enhanced ALD growth, where the surface adsorbed precursor molecules can diffuse over substrate surface to occupy energetically favorable surface sites. The determined surface coverage of ZrN films highlights the effects of substrate enhanced ALD growth.

  13. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry during atomic layer deposition of Pt, Ru and Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leick, N.; Weber, J. W.; Mackus, A. J. M.; Weber, M. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    The preparation of ultra-thin platinum-group metal films, such as Pt, Ru and Pd, by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was monitored in situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range of 0.75-5 eV. The metals’ dielectric function was parametrized using a ‘flexible’ Kramers-Kronig consistent dielectric function because it was able to provide accurate curve shape control over the optical response of the metals. From this dielectric function, it was possible to extract the film thickness values during the ALD process. The important ALD process parameters, such as the nucleation period and growth per cycle of Pt, Ru and Pd could be determined from the thickness evolution. In addition to process parameters, the film resistivity in particular could be extracted from the modeled dielectric function. Spectroscopic ellipsometry thereby revealed itself as a feasible and valuable technique to be used in research and development applications, as well as for process monitoring during ALD.

  14. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767

  15. Ultrafast pump-probe ellipsometry setup for the measurement of transient optical properties during laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Stephan; Kaiser, Michael; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers offer a high potential in precise and efficient material processing and deep understanding of the fundamental laser-material interaction aspects is of great importance. The transient pulse reflectivity in conjunction with the transient absorption influences decisively the laser-material interaction. Direct measurements of the absorption properties by ultrafast time-resolved ellipsometry are missing to date. In this work, a unique pump-probe ellipsometry microscope is presented allowing the determination of the transient complex refractive index with a sub-ps temporal resolution. Measurements on molybdenum show ultrafast optical penetration depth changes of -6% to + 77% already within the first 10 ps after the laser pulse impact. This indicates a significant absorption variation of the pump pulse or subsequent pulses irradiating the sample on this timescale and paves the road towards a better understanding of pulse duration dependent laser ablation efficiency, double or burst mode laser ablation and lattice modifications in the first ps after the laser pulse impact. PMID:27505728

  16. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry study of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Han; Qi, Jie; Willis, Brian G.

    2014-07-01

    Selective area copper atomic layer deposition on palladium seed layers has been investigated with in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry to probe the adsorption/desorption and reaction characteristics of individual deposition cycles. The reactants are copper bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) vapor and hydrogen gas. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition was observed in the temperature range of 135–230 °C in a low pressure reactor. Under optimal conditions, growth occurs selectively on palladium and not on silicon dioxide or silicon nitride layers. Based on in-situ ellipsometry data and supporting experiments, a new mechanism for growth is proposed. In the proposed mechanism, precursor adsorption is reversible, and dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen are the stable surface intermediates between growth cycles. The mechanism is enabled by continuous diffusion of palladium from the seed layer into the deposited copper film and strong H* binding to palladium sites. Less intermixing can be obtained at low growth temperatures and short cycle times by minimizing Cu/Pd inter-diffusion.

  17. Calibration of misalignment errors in composite waveplates using Mueller matrix ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Honggang; Liu, Shiyuan; Chen, Xiuguo; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-02-01

    Composite waveplates consisting of two or more single waveplates are widely used in optical instruments, such as ellipsometry, polarimetry, cryptography, and photoelasticity. Accurate calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates is of great importance (to minimize or correct the spurious artifacts in the final collected spectral data of these instruments induced by the misalignment errors). In this paper, we choose the fast axis azimuth and the rotary angle of composite waveplates as the detected characteristic parameters to calibrate the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. We first derive a general analytical model to describe the relationship between the mislignment errors and the characteristic parameters, and then propose an inverse approach to the calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. An experimental device based on the dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry principle is set up to measure the characteristic parameters of composite waveplates. Both numerical simulations and experiments on an MgF(2)-MgF(2)-quartz triplate demonstrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed approach. It is expected that the proposed approach can be readily extended to calibrate the misalignment errors in more complex composite waveplates. PMID:25967775

  18. Evolution of optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D X; Shen, B; Zheng, Y X; Wang, S Y; Zhang, J B; Yang, S D; Zhang, R J; Chen, L Y; Wang, C Z; Ho, K M

    2014-03-24

    The temperature dependent optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The dielectric function of liquid Sn was different from solid, and an interband transition near 1.5 eV was easily observed in solid while it apparently disappeared upon melting. From the evolution of optical properties with temperature, an optical measurement to acquire the melting point by ellipsometry was presented. From first principles calculation, we show that the local structure difference in solid and liquid is responsible for this difference in the optical properties observed in experiment.

  19. Phase function design of a diffraction grating lens for an optical imaging system from a Fraunhofer diffraction perspective.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki

    2013-09-10

    The potential exists to apply diffraction gratings to optical imaging systems to improve camera resolution and shorten optical length. However, we have noted the generation of striped flare lights, which differ from unnecessary-order diffraction lights, under intense lighting. We have elucidated the generation principle of these new striped lights and have discovered that they are caused by narrow diffraction grating rings. In this paper, using an analysis based on Fraunhofer diffraction, we suggest a way of minimizing them by designing an appropriate phase function structure, and test the efficacy of this design using our own manufactured prototype.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  1. Electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocker, R. P.; Marathay, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    A plane wave theory was developed to study electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings of infinite extent. A computer program was written to calculate the energy distribution in the various orders of diffraction for the cases when the electric or magnetic field vectors are parallel to the grating grooves. Within the region of validity of this theory, results were in excellent agreement with those in the literature. Energy conservation checks were also made to determine the region of validity of the plane wave theory. The computer program was flexible enough to analyze any grating profile that could be described by a single value function f(x). Within the region of validity the program could be used with confidence. The computer program was used to investigate the polarization and blaze properties of the diffraction grating.

  2. X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holography.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Minas

    2013-09-01

    An X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holographic scheme is proposed. Theoretically it is shown that the reconstruction of the object image by visible light is possible. The spatial and temporal coherence requirements of the incident X-ray beam are considered. As an example, the hologram recording as well as the reconstruction by visible light of an absolutely absorbing wire are discussed.

  3. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  4. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and structural study of HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Cantas, Ayten; Aygun, Gulnur; Basa, Deepak Kumar

    2014-08-28

    We have investigated the reduction of unwanted interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer at HfO{sub 2}/Si interface brought about by the deposition of thin Hf metal buffer layer on Si substrate prior to the deposition of HfO{sub 2} thin films for possible direct contact between HfO{sub 2} thin film and Si substrate, necessary for the future generation devices based on high-κ HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics. Reactive rf magnetron sputtering system along with the attached in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was used to predeposit Hf metal buffer layer as well as to grow HfO{sub 2} thin films and also to undertake the in-situ characterization of the high-κ HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on n-type 〈100〉 crystalline silicon substrate. The formation of the unwanted interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer and its reduction due to the predeposited Hf metal buffer layer as well as the depth profiling and also structure of HfO{sub 2} thin films were investigated by in-situ SE, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction. The study demonstrates that the predeposited Hf metal buffer layer has played a crucial role in eliminating the formation of unwanted interfacial layer and that the deposited high-κ HfO{sub 2} thin films are crystalline although they were deposited at room temperature.

  5. A high throughput approach to quantify protein adsorption on combinatorial metal/metal oxide surfaces using electron microprobe and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T.; Lohstreter, L.; Filiaggi, M. J.; Bai, Zhijun; Dahn, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Although metallic biomaterials are widely used, systematic studies of protein adsorption onto such materials are generally lacking. Combinatorial binary films of Al 1-xTi x and Al 1-xNb x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) and corresponding pure element films were produced on glass substrates using a unique magnetron sputtering technique. Fibrinogen and albumin adsorption amounts were measured by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) equipment, both high throughput techniques with automated motion stage capabilities. X-ray diffraction revealed that the binary films have crystalline phases present near the ends of the compositional gradient with an amorphous region throughout the interior of the gradient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided the surface chemistry along the binary films and showed that Al 2O 3 preferentially formed at the surface. Protein adsorption onto these films was found to be closely correlated to the alumina surface fraction, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin. Protein adsorption amounts obtained with WDS and SE were in excellent agreement for all films. This suggests that this combinatorial materials approach combined with these state-of-the-art, automated high throughput instruments provides a novel way to accurately monitor protein adsorption taking place at the surfaces of these metal/metal oxide materials.

  6. Confinement effects on glass transition temperature, transition breadth, and expansivity: Comparison of ellipsometry and fluorescence measurements on polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Hewlett, S. A.; Roth, C. B.; Torkelson, J. M.

    2009-09-01

    Using ellipsometry, we characterized the nanoconfinement effect on the glass transition temperature (T gof supported polystyrene (PS) films employing two methods: the intersection of fits to the temperature (Tdependences of rubbery- and glassy-state thicknesses, and the transition mid-point between rubbery- and glassy-state expansivities. The results demonstrate a strong effect of thickness: ensuremath Tg(bulk)-Tg(23{ nm})= 10 circ C. The T -range needed for accurate measurement increases significantly with decreasing thickness, an effect that arises from the broadening of the transition with confinement and a region below T g where expansivity slowly decreases with decreasing T . As determined from expansivities, the T g breadth triples in going from bulk films to a 21-nm-thick film; this broadening of the transition may be a more dramatic effect of confinement than the T g reduction itself. In contrast, there is little effect of confinement on the rubbery- and glassy-state expansivities. Compared with ellipsometry, T g ’s from fluorescence agree well in bulk films but yield lower values in nanoconfined films: T g(bulk) - T g(23 nm) = 15° C via fluorescence. This small difference in the T g confinement effect reflects differences in how fluorescence and ellipsometry report “average T g ” with confinement. With decreasing nanoscale thickness, fluorescence may slightly overweight the contribution of the free-surface layer while ellipsometry may evenly weight or underweight its contribution. in here

  7. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  8. Optical functions of uniaxial ZnO determined by generalized ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. , Jr. and; Boatner, L.A.

    1998-08-01

    The optical functions of uniaxial ZnO have been determined using two-modulator generalized ellipsometry, where a single measurement is sufficient to determine the optical functions from appropriately aligned uniaxial crystals. Above the direct band edge ({approximately}3.3thinspeV), this technique produces the most accurate values of the optical functions of ZnO presently available, while the refractive indices determined below the direct band edge agree with minimum-deviation methods. Near the direct band edge, the optical functions are modified by the excitonic interaction with a three-dimensional critical point. The optical dielectric response functions are fit to a recent formulation by Holden {ital et al.} [Phys. Rev. B {bold 56}, 4037 (1997)]. One isotropic point in the spectrum was observed at 3.114 eV, and a near-isotropic point near 3.31{endash}3.34 eV. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Ellipsometry study on gold-nanoparticle-coated gold thin film for biosensing application

    PubMed Central

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2011-01-01

    The amplified plasmonic response from various distributions of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on top of gold thin film was studied via ellipsometry under total internal reflection mode. The surface plasmon resonance dip can be tuned from the visible to near infrared by simply varying the AuNP concentration. Theoretical modeling based on effective medium theory with a multi-slice model has been employed to fit the experimental results. Additionally, this experimental tool has been further extended to study bio-molecular interactions with metal surfaces as well as in studying protein-protein interaction without any labeling. Hence, this technique could provide a non-destructive way of designing tunable label-free optical biosensors with very high sensitivity. PMID:21991549

  10. Composition Dependence of the Optical Conductivity of NiPt Alloys Determined by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Lina; Tawalbeh, Tarek; Vasiliev, Igor; Zollner, Stefan; Lavoie, Christian; Ozcan, Ahmet; Raymond, Mark

    2012-10-01

    The complex dielectric function of different Ni-Pt alloys (0% to 25% Pt concentration, 10nm thickness) was determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry over a broad photon energy range from 0.6 to 6.6eV. Data were fitted using basis spline functions as well as Drude-Lorentz oscillators to describe free carrier absorption and interband transitions. We found absorption peaks at 1.5 and 4.7 eV due to interband transitions. Results showed a broadening in the absorption peak of Nickel with increasing the Platinum concentration in the alloy. The experimental results were compared with ab initio density functional theory band structure calculations which showed that adding Platinum enhances the density of states of Nickel especially at low energies. Annealing the metals at 500^o C for 30 s increases the optical conductivity.

  11. Optical detection of melting point depression for silver nanoparticles via in situ real time spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, S. A.; Begou, T.; Collins, R. W.; Marsillac, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle films were deposited by sputtering at room temperature and were annealed while monitoring by real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The nanoparticle dielectric functions (0.75 eV-6.5 eV) obtained by SE were modeled using Lorentz and generalized oscillators for the nanoparticle plasmon polariton (NPP) and interband transitions, respectively. The nanoparticle melting point could be identified from variations in the oscillator parameters during annealing, and this identification was further confirmed after cooling through significant, irreversible changes in these parameters relative to the as-deposited film. The variation in melting point with physical thickness, and thus average nanoparticle diameter, as measured by SE enables calculation of the surface energy density.

  12. Rapid, non-destructive evaluation of ultrathin WSe{sub 2} using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hossain, Lorraine; Eichfeld, Chad M.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) in electronic and optoelectronic devices depends on the ability to understand and control the process-property relationship during synthesis. We demonstrate that spectroscopic ellipsometry is an excellent technique for accurate, non-destructive determination of ultra-thin (<30 nm) WSe{sub 2} properties. The refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k) were found to be independent of thickness down to 1.3 nm, and were used to determine film thickness, which was confirmed to be within 9% of values found via atomic force microscopy. Finally, the optical bandgap was found to closely correlate with thickness, ranging from 1.2 to 1.55 eV as the WSe{sub 2} is thinned to the equivalent of 2 atomic layers.

  13. Probing the carrier concentration profiles in phosphorus-implanted germanium using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry with photon energy in the 0.045-0.65 eV range was used to investigate germanium samples implanted with 30 keV phosphorus ions and annealed at 700 °C. The infrared response of implanted layers is dominated by free carrier absorption which is modeled using a Drude oscillator. The carrier concentration profiles were modeled using an error function, and compared with those obtained by electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the flat region of the carrier concentration profile, average carrier concentration and mobility of 1.40 × 1019 cm-3 and 336 cm2V-1s-1, respectively, were obtained. A phosphorus diffusivity of ˜1.2 × 10-13 cm2/s was obtained. The mobility versus carrier concentration relationships obtained for the implanted samples are close to the empirical relationship for bulk Ge.

  14. Ga adsorption on si(111) analysed by in situ ellipsometry: 2D and 3D growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, S.; d'Avitaya, F. Arnaud; Pfister, J. C.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, Ga adsorption on Si(111) is analysed by in situ ellipsometry. Three regimes of adsorption and two orders of desorption are distinguished. The results are interpreted as amorphous growth at room temperature, Stranski-Krastanov growth in the substrate temperature range 400-600°C, and Volmer-Weber growth at higher temperatures. The difference in ellipsometric response between both growth modes allows an estimation of the critical coverage at which three-dimensional nucleation takes place. A phase diagram is thus proposed, taking into account the 3 × 3 superstructures occurring between 0 and 1/3 ML on Si(111). These results are compared to those obtained on Si(100), and show marked similarities.

  15. In Situ Infrared Ellipsometry for Protein Adsorption Studies on Ultrathin Smart Polymer Brushes in Aqueous Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kroning, Annika; Furchner, Andreas; Aulich, Dennis; Bittrich, Eva; Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Seeber, Michael; Luzinov, Igor; Kilbey, S. Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Minko, Sergiy; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2015-02-10

    The protein-adsorbing and -repelling properties of various smart nanometer-thin polymer brushes with high potential for biosensing and biomedical applications are studied by in-situ infrared-spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). IRSE as a highly sensitive non-destructive technique allows us to investigate protein adsorption on polymer brushes in aqueous environment in dependence of external stimuli like temperature and pH. These stimuli are, for instance, relevant in switchable mixed brushes containing poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid), respectively. We use such brushes as model surfaces for controlling protein adsorption of human serum albumin and human fibrinogen. IRSE can distinguish between polymer-specific vibrational bands, which yield insights into the hydration state of the brushes, and changes in the protein-specific amide bands, which are related to changes of the protein secondary structure.

  16. In Situ Potentiometry and Ellipsometry: A Promising Tool to Study Biofouling of Potentiometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Bobacka, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2016-03-15

    In situ potentiometry and null ellipsometry was combined and used as a tool to follow the kinetics of biofouling of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The study was performed using custom-made solid-contact K(+)-ISEs consisting of a gold surface with immobilized 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol as ion-to-electron transducer that was coated with a potassium-selective plasticized polymer membrane. The electrode potential and the ellipsometric signal (corresponding to the amount of adsorbed protein) were recorded simultaneously during adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the surface of the K(+)-ISEs. This in situ method may become useful in developing sensors with minimized biofouling. PMID:26864883

  17. Monitoring adsorption and sedimentation using evanescent-wave cavity ringdown ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Stamataki, Katerina; Papadakis, Vassilis; Everest, Michael A; Tzortzakis, Stelios; Loppinet, Benoit; Peter Rakitzis, T

    2013-02-10

    We monitor the adsorption of Rhodamine 800, and the sedimentation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) suspension at the surface of a fused-silica prism, by measuring both the absorption and s-p phase shift Δ of a 740 nm probe laser beam, using evanescent-wave cavity ringdown ellipsometry (EW-CRDE). The two systems demonstrate the complementary strengths of EW-CRDE, as the progress of adsorption of the Rhodamine 800 dye can only be observed sensitively via the measurement of absorption, whereas the progress of sedimentation of PTFE can only be observed sensitively via the measurement of Δ. We show that EW-CRDE provides a sensitive method for the measurement of Δ and demonstrates precision in Δ of about 10(-4) deg.

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals

    SciTech Connect

    León, M. Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R.; Levcenko, S.; Gurieva, G.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Arushanov, E.; Schorr, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.

    2014-08-11

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E{sub 0}, E{sub 1A}, and E{sub 1B} interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range.

  19. Detection of a MoSe{sub 2} secondary phase layer in CZTSe by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Demircioğlu, Özden; Riedel, Ingo; Gütay, Levent; Mousel, Marina; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Weiss, Thomas; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2015-11-14

    We demonstrate the application of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for identification of secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} in polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) samples. A MoSe{sub 2} reference sample was analyzed, and its optical constants (ε{sub 1} and ε{sub 2}) were extracted by SE analysis. This dataset was implemented into an optical model for analyzing SE data from a glass/Mo/CZTSe sample containing MoSe{sub 2} at the back side of the absorber. We present results on the n and k values of CZTSe and show the extraction of the thickness of the secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} layer. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm the SE results.

  20. In situ ellipsometry of Cu surfaces immersed in benzotriazole-hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Eiichi; Kawakami, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Jin, Lianhua; Hamada, Satomi; Shima, Shohei; Hiyama, Hirokuni

    2016-06-01

    In the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Cu, the Cu surface is oxidized and is concurrently removed by the mechanical function of an abrasive. Surface oxidation can lead to severe surface corrosion, and to prevent this, a corrosion inhibitor is added to slurries. Accurate understanding of the competition between oxidation and passivation is essential for advanced Cu CMP technologies. In this work, layer formation on clean Cu surfaces in benzotriazole (BTA), H2O2, and BTA-H2O2 aqueous solutions was studied by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. Time changes of ellipsometric parameters are discussed with respect to BTA and H2O2 concentrations. It was found that the BTA adsorbs onto the Cu surface and the adsorbed BTA transforms into a Cu-BTA complex in about 3 min after the onset of adsorption. The BTA/complex layer passivates the Cu surface against oxidation by H2O2.

  1. In Situ Infrared Ellipsometry for Protein Adsorption Studies on Ultrathin Smart Polymer Brushes in Aqueous Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Kroning, Annika; Furchner, Andreas; Aulich, Dennis; Bittrich, Eva; Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Seeber, Michael; Luzinov, Igor; Kilbey, S. Michael; et al

    2015-02-10

    The protein-adsorbing and -repelling properties of various smart nanometer-thin polymer brushes with high potential for biosensing and biomedical applications are studied by in-situ infrared-spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). IRSE as a highly sensitive non-destructive technique allows us to investigate protein adsorption on polymer brushes in aqueous environment in dependence of external stimuli like temperature and pH. These stimuli are, for instance, relevant in switchable mixed brushes containing poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid), respectively. We use such brushes as model surfaces for controlling protein adsorption of human serum albumin and human fibrinogen. IRSE can distinguish between polymer-specific vibrational bands, which yield insights intomore » the hydration state of the brushes, and changes in the protein-specific amide bands, which are related to changes of the protein secondary structure.« less

  2. Electronic Excitations in B12As2 and their Temperature Dependence by Vacuum Ultraviolet Ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    S Bakalova; Y Gong; C Cobet; N Esser; Y Zhang; J Edgar; Y Zhang; M Dudley; M Kuball

    2011-12-31

    The dielectric response function of epitaxial B{sub 12}As{sub 2} films on 4H-SiC was determined at room temperature and at 10 K in the spectral region of 3.6-9.8 eV, i.e., in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region, by synchrotron ellipsometry. The experimental dielectric function was simulated with the critical point parabolic band model. The parameters of the dispersive structures were derived by numerical fitting of the experimental data to the proposed model. New high energy optical transitions are resolved at 5.95, 7.8 and 8.82 eV and their lineshape and origin are discussed. The temperature dependence of the critical point energies and transition strengths was determined, and the excitonic effect is considered.

  3. Evaluation of Mercaptobenzothiazole Anticorrosive Layer on Cu Surface by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-05-01

    Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) anticorrosive layer on copper surface prepared in MBT solutions was analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The results showed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed on Cu2O layer in the MBT solution at temperatures higher than 50 °C. Additionally, it was confirmed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed in the MBT solution at room temperature by adding about 20 wt % acetone to the solution. From polishing experiments of MBT anticorrosive layer and benzotriazole (BTA) layer, it was revealed that MBT anticorrosive layer was physically stronger than BTA layer. It is considered that dishing amount in Cu chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) can be reduced by using MBT. However, MBT anticorrosive layer was not formed in the MBT solution including Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggesting that slurry should be composed without H2O2 in order to use MBT for Cu CMP.

  4. Generalized phase diffraction gratings with tailored intensity.

    PubMed

    Albero, Jorge; Moreno, Ignacio; Davis, Jeffrey A; Cottrell, Don M; Sand, David

    2012-10-15

    We report the generation of continuous phase masks designed to generate a set of target diffraction orders with defined relative intensity weights. We apply a previously reported analytic calculation that requires resolving a single equation with a set of parameters defining the target diffraction orders. Then the same phase map is extended to other phase patterns such as vortex generating/sensing gratings. Results are demonstrated experimentally with a parallel-aligned spatial light modulator.

  5. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net. PMID:25242914

  6. Hard Diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    We present results on diffractive production of hard processes in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron using the CDF detector. The signatures used to identify diffractive events are the forward rapidity gap and/or the detection of a recoil antiproton with high forward momentum. We have observed diffractive W- boson, dijet, and heavy quark production. We also present results on double-pomeron production of dijets.

  7. Novel Aspects of Hard Diffraction in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and nuclear shadowing and antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency.

  8. Transmittance analysis of diffraction phase grating.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xufeng; Jin, Yunxia

    2011-03-20

    In order to accurately analyze and design the transmittance characteristic of a diffraction phase grating, the validity of both the scalar diffraction theory and the effective medium theory is quantitatively evaluated by the comparison of diffraction efficiencies predicted from both simplified theories to exact results calculated by the rigorous vector electromagnetic theory. The effect of surface profile parameters, including the normalized period, the normalized depth, and the fill factor for the precision of the simplified methods is determined at normal incidence. It is found that, in general, when the normalized period is more than four wavelengths of the incident light, the scalar diffraction theory is useful to estimate the transmittance of the phase grating. When the fill factor approaches 0.5, the error of the scalar method is minimized, and the scalar theory is accurate even at the grating period of two wavelengths. The transmittance characteristic as a function of the normalized period is strongly influenced by the grating duty cycle, but the diffraction performance on the normalized depth is independent of the fill factor of the grating. Additionally, the effective medium theory is accurate for evaluating the diffraction efficiency within an error of less than around 1% when no higher-order diffraction waves appear and only the zero-order waves exist. The precision of the effective medium theory for calculating transmittance properties as a function of the normalized period, the normalized groove depth, and the polarization state of incident light is insensitive to the fill factor of the phase grating. PMID:21460923

  9. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  10. Mapping atomic arrays in crystals by interpreting electron diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Bryan; Lanning, Nick; Ware, William; Wigginton, Spencer; Lee, Chris; Bahrim, Cristian

    2012-03-01

    Analyzing diffraction of light and electrons allows one to map the geometric structure of nettings and crystals. There is a strong analogy between light and electron diffraction because in both cases the diffraction angles are small and the patterns may be described as images of a Fourier transform. Light diffraction patterns may be interpreted as the optical transforms of 2D-nettings and therefore are simpler to understand. The interpretation of electron diffraction patterns is more sophisticated and requires the visualization of the crystal's reciprocal lattice using vector algebra. With light we can analyze the redistribution of energy in diffraction patterns. Our studies indicate a deviation of about 1% from the exact conservation of energy when the ratio between slit width and slit separation approaches 1. Such a deviation is expected to show up in electron diffraction patterns produced by super dense materials. We focused our studies on electron diffraction by graphite for understanding the mechanism of electron transmission through Carbon atoms. From measuring diffraction patterns and applying the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, we are able to estimate the atomic transmission time of the projectile electron and the group velocity of the electron passing through the crystal. Finally, our analysis leads to the estimation of the C-C bond in a hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) graphite crystal and the volume of the Carbon atom which diffracts the projectile electron. Sponsored by the STAIRSTEP-NSF-DUE grant# 0757057.

  11. Monitoring of the Binding Between EGFR Protein and EGFR Aptamer Using In-Situ Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu Ri; Byun, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Jung; Park, Han Gyeol; Park, Jae Chan; Barange, Nilesh; Nam, Koo Hyun; Kim, Young Dong

    2016-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein has received significant attention in medical biotechnology because it is an important component in cell growth and division. We report the results of a study on the binding between the EGFR protein and the associated aptamer, measured in real time. Aptamers can be used for clinical purposes including macromolecular medicine and basic research. In particular, EGFR aptamers are promising molecular agents for targeting cancer. The data were obtained in-situ with total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), which combines the analytic capability of spectroscopic ellipsometry with the high surface sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance measurements. Our results show that TIRE can be used to determine adsorption of nanoscale biomolecules. Our results are supported by additional data obtained by liquid atomic-force-microscopy. PMID:27427733

  12. Neutron reflectometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) after irradiation at 172 nm.

    PubMed

    Graubner, Vera-Maria; Clemens, Daniel; Gutberlet, Thomas; Kötz, Rüdiger; Lippert, Thomas; Nuyken, Oskar; Schnyder, Bernhard; Wokaun, Alexander

    2005-09-13

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was irradiated under ambient conditions in air with a Xe2-excimer lamp. The formation of atomic oxygen and ozone during irradiation in air by V-UV photons results in the transformation of PDMS to silicon oxide. The irradiated surfaces were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry. The measurements revealed the formation of a rough, i.e., between 11 and 20 nm, oxidized surface layer and a decrease of the total layer thickness. The thickness of the oxidized layer decreased for a given PDMS thickness when the polymer was irradiated for longer times and/or higher intensities. The composition of the oxidized layer after irradiation was not uniform through the layer and consisted of a mixture of original polymer and silicon bonded to three or four oxygen atoms (SiOx). The refractive index n determined by ellipsometry reaches a value similar to values reported for SiO2.

  13. Immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE): a new method for the precise determination of the 3D indicatrix of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. C.; Stumpe, J.

    2005-02-01

    The new method of immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) [1] has been developed. It allows the highly accurate determination of the absolute three-dimensional (3D) refractive indices of anisotropic thin films. The method is combined with conventional ellipsometry in transmission and reflection, and the thickness determination of anisotropic films solely by optical methods also becomes more accurate. The method is applied to the determination of the 3D refractive indices of thin spin-coated films of an azobenzene-containing liquid-crystalline copolymer. The development of the anisotropy in these films by photo-orientation and subsequent annealing is demonstrated. Depending on the annealing temperature, oblate or prolate orders are generated.

  14. Parametric Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.; Evans, John S. O.

    The rapidity with which powder diffraction data may be collected, not only at neutron and X-ray synchrotron facilities but also in the laboratory, means that the collection of a single diffraction pattern is now the exception rather than the rule. Many experiments involve the collection of hundreds and perhaps many thousands of datasets where a parameter such as temperature or pressure is varied or where time is the variable and life-cycle, synthesis or decomposition processes are monitored or three-dimensional space is scanned and the three-dimensional internal structure of an object is elucidated. In this paper, the origins of parametric diffraction are discussed and the techniques and challenges of parametric powder diffraction analysis are presented. The first parametric measurements were performed around 50 years ago with the development of a modified Guinier camera but it was the automation afforded by neutron diffraction combined with increases in computer speed and memory that established parametric diffraction on a strong footing initially at the ILL, Grenoble in France. The theoretical parameterisation of quantities such as lattice constants and atomic displacement parameters will be discussed and selected examples of parametric diffraction over the past 20 years will be reviewed that highlight the power of the technique.

  15. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  16. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  17. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  18. Mueller matrix ellipsometry studies of the optical phonons and crystal field excitations in multiferroic orthoferrites RFeO3 (R=Tb,Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, V. A.; Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Sirenko, A. A.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Wang, Yazhong; Cheong, S. W.

    Optical properties of multiferroic orthoferrites RFeO3 (R=Tb,Dy) bulk crystals have been studied in the far-infrared range from 50 to 1000 cm-1 and temperatures from 7 K to 300 K. Mueller matrix and rotating analyzer ellipsometry measurements were carried out at the U4IR beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Lab. Optical phonon spectra and crystal field excitations were measured for all three orthorhombic axes of RFeO3. In the experimental temperature dependencies of the phonon frequencies we found non-Grüneisen behavior caused by the electron-phonon and spin-phonon interactions. We determined the symmetries and selection rules for the crystal field transitions in Tb3+ and Dy3+ ions. Magnetic field dependencies of the optical spectra allowed us to determine anisotropy of the crystal field g-factors for Tb3+ and Dy3+ ions. This Project is supported by collaborative DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER46382 between Rutgers U. and NJIT. Use of NSLS-BNL was supported by DOE DE-AC02-98CH10886. V.A. Martinez was supported by NEU NSF-1343716.

  19. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel; Sanz, Angel S.

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  20. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist DIll parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulate directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  1. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist Dill parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulated directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  2. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  3. InGaP grown on Ge (100) by molecular beam epitaxy: a spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Khai Loke, Wan; Zhou, Qian; Fatt Yoon, Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the optical properties of disordered In0.52Ga0.48P alloys by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the far-infrared to ultraviolet energy range (0.037-5.1 eV). The alloys were grown on Ge (100) substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The far-infrared dielectric function reveals two absorption peaks that can be attributed to InP- and GaP-like vibrational modes. The visible-UV dielectric function of In0.52Ga0.48P alloys nearly lattice-matched to Ge shows the critical points E 0, E 1, and E 2, energies of which are determined using a derivative analysis. A weak transition that can be identified as the E 1 + Δ1 critical point is revealed. The vibrational frequencies and the transition energies in In0.52Ga0.48P are lower relative to In0.49Ga0.51P lattice-matched to GaAs. The downward shifts in E 0 and phonons can be estimated using the compositional dependence of E 0 and phonons of bulk alloys.

  4. Kramers-Kronig-consistent optical functions of anisotropic crystals: generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on pentacene.

    PubMed

    Dressel, M; Gompf, B; Faltermeier, D; Tripathi, A K; Pflaum, J; Schubert, M

    2008-11-24

    The Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and imaginary parts of a response function are widely used in solid-state physics to evaluate the corresponding quantity if only one component is measured. They are among the most fundamental statements since only based on the analytical behavior and causal nature of the material response [Phys. Rev. 104, 1760-1770 (1956)]. Optical losses, for instance, can be obtained from the dispersion of the dielectric constant at all wavelengths, and vice versa [Handbook of optical constants of solids, Vol. 1, p. 35]. Although the general validity was never casted into doubt, it is a longstanding problem that Kramers-Kronig relations cannot simply be applied to anisotropic crystalline materials because contributions from different directions mix in a frequency-dependent way. Here we present a general method to identify frequency-independent principal polarizability directions for which the Kramers-Kronig relations are obeyed even in materials with lowest symmetry. Using generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on a single crystal surface of triclinic pentacene, as an example, enables us to evaluate the complex dielectric constant and to compare it with band-structure calculations along the crystallographic directions. A general recipe is provided how to proceed from a macroscopic measurement on a low symmetry crystal plane to the microscopic dielectric properties of the unit cell, along whose axes the Kramers-Kronig relations hold.

  5. Probing the carrier concentration profiles in phosphorus-implanted germanium using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-02-21

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry with photon energy in the 0.045–0.65 eV range was used to investigate germanium samples implanted with 30 keV phosphorus ions and annealed at 700 °C. The infrared response of implanted layers is dominated by free carrier absorption which is modeled using a Drude oscillator. The carrier concentration profiles were modeled using an error function, and compared with those obtained by electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the flat region of the carrier concentration profile, average carrier concentration and mobility of 1.40 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} and 336 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, respectively, were obtained. A phosphorus diffusivity of ∼1.2 × 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s was obtained. The mobility versus carrier concentration relationships obtained for the implanted samples are close to the empirical relationship for bulk Ge.

  6. Fast IR laser mapping ellipsometry for the study of functional organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Furchner, Andreas; Sun, Guoguang; Ketelsen, Helge; Rappich, Jörg; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2015-03-21

    Fast infrared mapping with sub-millimeter lateral resolution as well as time-resolved infrared studies of kinetic processes of functional organic thin films require a new generation of infrared ellipsometers. We present a novel laboratory-based infrared (IR) laser mapping ellipsometer, in which a laser is coupled to a variable-angle rotating analyzer ellipsometer. Compared to conventional Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) ellipsometers, the IR laser ellipsometer provides ten- to hundredfold shorter measurement times down to 80 ms per measured spot, as well as about tenfold increased lateral resolution of 120 μm, thus enabling mapping of small sample areas with thin-film sensitivity. The ellipsometer, equipped with a HeNe laser emitting at about 2949 cm(-1), was applied for the optical characterization of inhomogeneous poly(3-hexylthiophene) [P3HT] and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAm] organic thin films used for opto-electronics and bioapplications. With the constant development of tunable IR laser sources, laser-based infrared ellipsometry is a promising technique for fast in-depth mapping characterization of thin films and blends.

  7. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of anisotropic materials: application to the optical constants of HgI2.

    PubMed

    En Naciri, A; Johann, L; Kleim, R; Sieskind, M; Amann, M

    1999-02-01

    A variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic fixed-polarizer, rotating-polarizer, fixed-analyzer ellipsometer (PRPSE) across a spectral range from 300 to 800 nm is used to determine the optical properties of anisotropic uniaxial tetragonal red mercuric iodide (HgI(2)). For the first time, to our knowledge, the bulk crystal HgI(2) surface measured by ellipsometry was not subjected to potassium iodide cutting or etching. Measurements were made at an air-HgI(2) interface with the optic axis parallel to the sample surface. To determine the optical constants, we varied both the angle of incidence and the azimuth of the optic axis with the plane of incidence. The detailed formulas needed for reliable procedures for analyzing the data are presented. The ordinary and extraordinary complex indices of refraction, (n(o)--ik(o)) and (n(e)--ik(e)), respectively, are determined. Good agreement between PRPSE and the prism technique for the refractive index is observed. The surface aging effects of the ellipsometric parameters of HgI(2), during 30 h of exposure to air, were detected by PRPSE. PMID:18305658

  9. Vanadium oxide-carbon nanotube composite films characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiong; Xu, Xiangdong; Gu, Yu; Wang, Meng; Yao, Jie; Jiang, Yadong; Sun, Minghui; Ao, Tianhong; Lian, Yuxiang; Wang, Fu; Li, Xinrong

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is utilized to characterize the vanadium oxide (VO x )-single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite films prepared by sol-gel. Five Tauc-Lorentz oscillators model is employed to describe the dispersions in the optical responses of VO x and VO x -SWCNT thin films. Results reveal that if the SWCNT concentration in the composite film is increased, the refractive index is decreased, while the extinction coefficient is increased. Moreover, higher SWCNT content leads to lower optical band gap (E g) but larger localized state (E e). Interestingly, both E g and E e values reach saturated at a SWCNT content of ~8 wt%. Particularly, the peak transition energies of the 5 Tauc-Lorentz oscillators have been assigned to the specific transitions according to the band structures of VO x . This work reveals the feasibility of investigating the optical properties and microstructures of VO x -SWCNT composite films by SE. These experimental results will be helpful for better understanding the VO x -SWCNT composite films, and promoting future characterizations of other SWCNT-based composites by SE.

  10. Fast IR laser mapping ellipsometry for the study of functional organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Furchner, Andreas; Sun, Guoguang; Ketelsen, Helge; Rappich, Jörg; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2015-03-21

    Fast infrared mapping with sub-millimeter lateral resolution as well as time-resolved infrared studies of kinetic processes of functional organic thin films require a new generation of infrared ellipsometers. We present a novel laboratory-based infrared (IR) laser mapping ellipsometer, in which a laser is coupled to a variable-angle rotating analyzer ellipsometer. Compared to conventional Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) ellipsometers, the IR laser ellipsometer provides ten- to hundredfold shorter measurement times down to 80 ms per measured spot, as well as about tenfold increased lateral resolution of 120 μm, thus enabling mapping of small sample areas with thin-film sensitivity. The ellipsometer, equipped with a HeNe laser emitting at about 2949 cm(-1), was applied for the optical characterization of inhomogeneous poly(3-hexylthiophene) [P3HT] and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAm] organic thin films used for opto-electronics and bioapplications. With the constant development of tunable IR laser sources, laser-based infrared ellipsometry is a promising technique for fast in-depth mapping characterization of thin films and blends. PMID:25668189

  11. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A S; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J F; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity.

  12. Silicon fin line edge roughness determination and sensitivity analysis by Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry based scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhairya; O'Mullane, Samuel; Sunkoju, Sravan; Hosler, Erik R.; Kamineni, Vimal; Preil, Moshe; Keller, Nick; Race, Joseph; Muthinti, Gangadhara Raja; Diebold, Alain C.

    2015-03-01

    Measurement and control of line edge roughness (LER) is one of the most challenging issues facing patterning technology. As the critical dimensions (CD) of patterned structures decrease, LER of only a few nanometers can negatively impact device performance. Here, Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MMSE) based scatterometry is used to determine LER in periodic line-space structures in 28 nm pitch Si fin samples fabricated by directed selfassembly (DSA) patterning. The optical response of the Mueller matrix (MM) elements is influenced by structural parameters like pitch, CD, height, and side-wall angle (SWA), as well as the optical properties of the materials. Evaluation and decoupling MM element response to LER from other structural parameters requires sensitivity analysis using simulations of optical models that include LER. Here, an approach is developed that quantifies Si fin LER by comparing the optical responses generated by systematically varying the grating shape and measurement conditions. Finally, the validity of this approach is established by comparing the results obtained from top down scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and cross-sectional TEM image of the 28 nm pitch Si fins.

  13. The influences of roughness on film thickness measurements by Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, David A.; Ludema, Kenneth C.

    1994-09-01

    The accuracy of measurement of the thickness of uniform thin films on solid substrates by null ellipsometry is severely limited when the substrate is rough. It is impossible to separate these two effects experimentally with the null ellipsometer, and there is no theoretical basis or generally used model available to separate these effects. Thus, a dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometer has been constructed to carry out film thickness measurements on rough substrates. Measurements were made on a set of specially prepared specimens of 8630 steel, roughened by grit blasting with aluminum oxide. Grit sizes and blasting pressures were varied to produce 11 different roughness values ranging from 0.01 to 1.295 μm Ra, as measured with a stylus tracer device. Upon each of the 11 roughness groups, films of magnesium fluoride were overlaid to thicknesses of 89, 180, 254, and 315 nm. One set of specimens was left uncoated. Experimental results for film thickness measurements on rough surfaces matched the ideal (for smooth surfaces) form well for roughnesses up to 0.13 μm Ra, at most angles of incidence. For rougher specimens, significant deviations in results were observed for all but the largest angles of incidence. The nonideal data were attributed to the cross-polarization effects of surface geometry, and apparent depolarization. The resolution of thickness measurements was 1 nm for polished specimens, and decreased continuously to 10 nm for the roughest specimens examined.

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometry for characterization of InAs/Ga1-xInxSb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Schmitz, J.; Herres, N.; Fuchs, F.; Walther, M.

    1998-05-01

    The pseudodielectric function of InAs/Ga1-xInxSb superlattices (SLs) grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy, was measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for photon energies ranging from 1.2 to 5 eV. The width of the extrema in the SL pseudodielectric function derived from the E1 and E1+Δ1 interband transitions of the SL constituents InAs and Ga1-xInxSb, was found to depend on the structural quality of the SL. Differences in the SL quality caused by different sequences of InSb- like and GaAs-like interfaces, were easily detected by SE. The formation of the intended interface alternations was verified by Raman spectroscopy. The extrema in the SL pseudodielectric function originating from the E1 and E1+Δ1 interband transitions of Ga1-xInxSb were found to shift to lower energies with increasing In content x. Finally SE has been applied to the analysis of a complete InAs/Ga1-xInxSb SL detector structure.

  15. Spin-dependent diffraction of evanescent waves by subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-08-15

    We present a way to observe the spin-to-orbital conversion phenomenon. A spinning evanescent wave can be asymmetrically transformed into propagation waves through one certain diffraction order by a periodical subwavelength grating. By detecting diffraction field distribution behind the grating, we observed spin-dependent diffraction patterns. Furthermore, replacing the periodical grating by a Fibonacci grating, we can simultaneously observe multiple order diffractions of a spin evanescent wave. In this case, the multiple diffraction beams can interfere with each other behind the quasi-periodical grating to form asymmetric interference patterns. Our work provides another way toward the realization of spin-to-orbital conversion of light. PMID:26274640

  16. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  17. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; de Jonge, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  18. Multigap Diffraction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2005-10-06

    The large rapidity interval available at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers an arena in which the QCD aspects of diffraction may be explored in an environment free of gap survival complications using events with multiple rapidity gaps.

  19. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  20. Optical response of ferromagnetic YTiO3 studied by spectral ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Boris, A. V.; Yordanov, P.; Maljuk, A.; Brücher, E.; Strempfer, J.; Konuma, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Bernhard, C.; Stoneham, A. M.; Keimer, B.

    2007-10-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra of an electrically insulating, nearly stoichiometric YTiO3 single crystal with ferromagnetic Curie temperature TC=30K . The optical response exhibits a weak but noticeable anisotropy. Using a classical dispersion analysis, we identify three low-energy optical bands at 2.0, 2.9, and 3.7eV . Although the optical conductivity spectra are only weakly temperature dependent below 300K , we are able to distinguish high- and low-temperature regimes with a distinct crossover point around 100K . The low-temperature regime in the optical response coincides with the temperature range in which significant deviations from a Curie-Weiss mean-field behavior are observed in the magnetization. Using an analysis based on a simple superexchange model, the spectral weight rearrangement can be attributed to intersite di1dj1→di2dj0 optical transitions. In particular, Kramers-Kronig consistent changes in optical spectra around 2.9eV can be associated with the high-spin-state (T13) optical transition. This indicates that other mechanisms, such as weakly dipole-allowed p-d transitions and/or exciton-polaron excitations, can contribute significantly to the optical band at 2eV . The recorded optical spectral weight gain of the 2.9eV optical band is significantly suppressed and anisotropic, which we associate with complex spin-orbit-lattice phenomena near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature in YTiO3 .

  1. Pyrolysis, crystallization, and sintering of mesostructured titania thin films assessed by in situ thermal ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Bass, John D; Grosso, David; Boissiere, Cédric; Sanchez, Clément

    2008-06-25

    In-situ thermal ellipsometric analysis is used to elucidate new and fine-scale details on the thermally driven densification, pyrolysis, crystallization, and sintering of dense and ordered mesoporous titania thin films prepared by evaporation-induced self-assembly. The role of the heating schedule, initial film thickness, nature of the substrate and templating agent, solution aging, and presence of water and other additives in the calcination environment is examined. Each of these parameters is shown to have unique and often substantial effects on the final film structure, while the technique itself provides detailed insight into the chemical origin and evolution of these effects. In-situ monitoring and control over the governing chemical processes, such as high-temperature adsorption phenomena that impact nanocrystal growth, is also demonstrated. The evolution of both the porosity and chemical processes occurring inside these materials are evaluated, including extraction of kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of the template and crystallization of the matrix walls. The latter is shown to be strongly dependent on the presence of mesoscale ordering with ordered cubic films indicating a 1D diffusion-limited crystallization process and dense films following a 3D diffusion-limited process. Less well-ordered mesoporous films, despite similarities in pore volume and pore size distributions, are kinetically more reminiscent of dense films in terms of crystallization. In-situ thermal ellipsometry, by detailing the evolution of the thermally driven chemistry and ceramization that dictate the final film properties, provides immensely important insight into the synthesis and optimization of advanced functional materials based on titania and other metal oxide thin films.

  2. Sub-nanometer expansions of redox responsive polymer films monitored by imaging ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Feng, Xueling; Ramos, Lionel Dos; Hempenius, Mark A; Schön, Peter; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-10-21

    We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of a micro-patterned substrate containing circular patterns of passive (non-redox active) 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU) within a redox-responsive oligoethylene sulfide end-functionalized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (ES-PFS) film on a gold substrate. The non-redox responsive MCU layer was used as a molecular reference layer for the direct visualization of the minute thickness variations of the ES-PFS film. The ellipsometric microscopy images were recorded in aqueous electrolyte solutions at potentials of -0.1 V and 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl corresponding to the reduced and oxidized redox states of ES-PFS, respectively. The ellipsometric contrast images showed a 37 (±2)% intensity increase in the ES-PFS layer upon oxidation. The thickness of the ES-PFS layer reversibly changed between 4.0 (±0.1) nm and 3.4 (±0.1) nm upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, as determined by IE. Additionally, electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) was used to verify the redox controlled thickness variations. The proposed method opens novel avenues to optically visualize minute and rapid height changes occurring e.g. in redox active (and other stimulus responsive) polymer films in a fast and non-invasive manner.

  3. Optical properties of As33S67-xSex bulk glasses studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Šik, J.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.

    2008-04-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was employed to study the optical properties of As33S67-xSex (x =0, 17, 33.5, 50, and 67at.%) bulk glasses in the UV-vis-NIR (near infrared) spectral region for photon energies from 0.54to4.13eV (photon wavelengths from 2300to300nm). For data analysis, we employed Tauc-Lorentz (TL) dispersion model in the entire measured near bandgap spectral region and standard Cauchy dispersion model in the spectral region below the bandgap. With increasing Se content (x) in the bulk glass, we observed a linear decrease in optical bandgap energy Egopt from 2.52±0.02eV for As33S67 to 1.75±0.01eV for As33Se67 and linear increase in refractive index nTL in the NIR spectral region, e.g., at 0.80eV from 2.327 for As33S67 to 2.758 for As33Se67. The amplitude A decreased with increasing Se content. The peak transition energy E0 and broadening C had a maximum value for x =33.5at.% and systematically decreased for higher S or Se content in glasses. Our study showed that TL model is suitable to describe dielectric functions of studied chalcogenide bulk glasses in the broad spectral region. The bulk glasses had a higher refractive index compared to thin films of corresponding composition. The bulk glasses with high S content had higher value of optical bandgap energy than was previously reported for thin films. The optical bandgap energy of glasses with higher Se content was very similar to the thin films.

  4. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb and GaInAsSb: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Mu {tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-06-30

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[={epsilon}{sub 1}(E)+i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single-crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3-5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0} (direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1}) and (E{sub 0}{prime}, E{sub 0}{prime}+{Delta}{sub 0}{prime}) doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} CPs was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/k{sup {rightharpoonup}}{center_dot}p{sup {rightharpoonup}} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}. The experimental results were compared to other evaluations of the optical constants of GaSb.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levallois, J.; Tran, M. K.; Pouliot, D.; Presura, C. N.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J. N.; Uccelli, J.; Giannini, E.; Gu, G. D.; Leggett, A. J.; van der Marel, D.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 -x single crystals: underdoped with Tc=60 , 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with Tc=91 K ; overdoped with Tc=84 , 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 O10 +x with Tc=110 K . Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through Tc, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—Tc depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π ,π ).

  6. Study of CuPt-type ordering and dopant effect of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}P/GaAs using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. |; Klein, M.V.; Olson, J.M.; Hsieh, K.C.

    1994-09-01

    The CuPt-type ordering and dopant effects of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}P/GaAs epitaxial layers have been studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry and transmission electron microscopy. The degree of ordering was estimated by both transmission electron diffraction and direct band edge, E{sub 0}. Conventional lineshape fitting of E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1}, and E{sub 2} gaps using the second derivative of pseudo dielectric functions shows that the peak position and oscillator strength of the E{sub 1} gap are basically a function of CuPt-type ordering whereas their broadening and phase depend mainly on carrier concentration. The decrease of E{sub 1} gap is explained in terms of CuPt-type ordering. In contrast to the E{sub 1} gap, all the lineshape parameters of the E{sub 2} gap depend mainly on CuPt-type ordering. This difference is discussed in terms of apparent {open_quotes}CuAu-type ordering{close_quotes} or Y2 structure which was observed by transmission electron diffraction.

  7. Diffraction by nanocrystals II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Millane, Rick P

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystals with more than one molecule in the unit cell will generally crystallize with incomplete unit cells on the crystal surface. Previous results show that the ensemble-averaged diffraction by such crystals consists of a usual Bragg component and two other Bragg-like components due to the incomplete unit cells. Using an intrinsic flexibility in the definition of the incomplete-unit-cell part of a crystal, the problem is formulated such that the magnitude of the Bragg-like components is minimized, which leads to a simpler and more useful interpretation of the diffraction. Simulations show the nature of the relative magnitudes of the diffraction components in different regions of reciprocal space and the effect of crystal faceting. PMID:25121528

  8. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  9. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  10. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  11. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  12. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-04-15

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  13. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  14. Encapsulation process for diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Ratzsch, Stephan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2015-07-13

    Encapsulation of grating structures facilitates an improvement of the optical functionality and/or adds mechanical stability to the fragile structure. Here, we introduce novel encapsulation process of nanoscale patterns based on atomic layer deposition and micro structuring. The overall size of the encapsulated structured surface area is only restricted by the size of the available microstructuring and coating devices; thus, overcoming inherent limitations of existing bonding processes concerning cleanliness, roughness, and curvature of the components. Finally, the process is demonstrated for a transmission grating. The encapsulated grating has 97.5% transmission efficiency in the -1st diffraction order for TM-polarized light, and is being limited by the experimental grating parameters as confirmed by rigorous coupled wave analysis.

  15. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  16. Diffraction with wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Quiney, H. M.; Chapman, H. N.

    2005-05-01

    Modern X-ray optics can produce a focused synchrotron beam with curvature on a scale comparable to that of an isolated biomolecule or to the lattice spacing of a biomolecular crystal. It is demonstrated that diffraction of phase-curved beams from such systems allows unique and robust phase recovery.

  17. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  18. Diffract, then destroy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2016-09-01

    A new implementation of X-ray diffraction using free-electron lasers can take snapshots of biological molecules that are inaccessible via X-ray crystallography. As Philip Ball reports, the technique can even be used to create stop-motion films of dynamic molecular processes

  19. Radiometric analysis of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, R.; Betancur, R.; Herrera, J.; Carrasquilla, J.

    2008-04-01

    A description of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction of quasi-homogenous optical fields in any state of spatial coherence is presented, which clearly differs from the classical formalism. Instead of the propagation of the cross-spectral density from the diffracting aperture to the observation plane, the diffracting aperture is regarded as a planar quasi-homogeneous source, whose generalised radiance is carried by the spatial coherence wavelets, and the power distribution at the observation plane is expressed in terms of the generalised radiant intensity. It allows interpreting the negative values of the generalised radiance as "negative energies" emitted along specific directions and subjected to the achievement of the conservation law of energy. This interpretation is not evident in the classical formalism. Consequently, interference can be thought as resulting of energy transfer over a given wavefront, due to the addition of equal amounts of "positive" and "negative" energies, along specific directions, to the contributions provided by the individual radiators of the radiant source. In this sense, the radiant flux from the source, which is provided only by the individual contributions, is redistributed depending on the spatial coherence properties of the field. This redistribution characterises the diffraction phenomenon. It is also shown that the supports of the complex degree of spatial coherence near the aperture edge are vignetted by the edge. This feature is a cause for the generalised radiance providing "negative energies", and constitutes the actual effect of the edge on diffraction. The approach is validated by the close concordance between the numerical and the experimental results, which should be regarded as a proof of the physical existence of the spatial coherence wavelets.

  20. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection. PMID:27410900

  1. High-end spectroscopic diffraction gratings: design and manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Tilman

    2015-02-01

    Diffraction gratings are key components for spectroscopic systems. For high-end applications, they have to meet advanced requirements as, e.g., maximum efficiency, lowest possible scattered light level, high numerical aperture, and minimal aberrations. Diffraction gratings are demanded to allow spectrometer designs with highest resolution, a maximal étendue, and minimal stray light, built within a minimal volume. This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of different high-end spectroscopic gratings, their theoretical design and manufacturing technologies.

  2. Impedance Matched to Vacuum, Invisible Edge, Diffraction Suppressed Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G. (Inventor); Roman, Patrick A. (Inventor); Shiri, Sharham (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction suppressed mirrors having an invisible edge are disclosed for incident light at both targeted wavelengths and broadband incident light. The mirrors have a first having at least one discontiguous portion having a plurality of nanostructured apertures. The discontiguous mirror portion impedance matches a relatively high impedance portion of the mirror to a relatively low impedance portion of the mirror, thereby reducing the diffraction edge effect otherwise present in a conventional mirror.

  3. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  4. Corrosion under argon irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range: A study coupling AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on a recent study of the corrosion under argon ion irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range (1-9 MeV), associating AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. Irradiation with MeV Arn+ (n = 1, 3) ions produces damages on the titanium surface. Large craters form on the oxidized titanium surface whose characteristics vary as a function of the argon energy between 2 and 9 MeV. The superficial oxide grows thicker under irradiation over the same energy range, especially near 3 MeV. It is suggested that collisions cascades play a significant role in the overall damage process.

  5. Temperature-dependent adsorption of tellurium and mercury species on cadmium telluride studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badano, Giacomo

    In this study, a subsonic molecular beam of Hg was directed on CdTe surfaces and the absorption spectra were measured for the first time by ellipsometry. We analyze the optical spectra of Hg adsorbed on CdTe surfaces, over the range 1.6--4.5 eV, for a variety of temperatures and Hg fluxes. When a CdTe(211)B surface is subjected to a Hg flux, various effects can occur. Hg will be present on and just beneath the surface in a variety of forms: chemisorbed on the Te sites or on excess Te (forming a 2D surface, 1D chains or isolated atoms or clusters), physisorbed as a 2D liquid, or diffused into the CdTe bulk. In our analysis of the change in the pseudo dielectric function, we made several approximations. We treated the different constituents as separate layers, which is strictly speaking not true, because the various Hg forms are probably mixed. Second, we used the 3D form of the Hg1- xCdxTe e(□; x) dielectric function to mimic chemisorbed Hg on the surface. Also, we used a Drude function to model the presence of physisorbed Hg, although that is probably a good approximation. Third, we fit only the imaginary part of the dielectric function, , because it has a more direct physical meaning, and unlike the real part does not depend on the presence of out-of-range critical points. In addition, the limited resolution of the M88 ellipsometer prevented us from using a critical point analysis to interpret the data. These limitations notwithstanding, our analysis gives surprisingly good results, in that it reproduces the expected dependence of the thickness of the chemisorbed and physisorbed components correctly as a function of temperature and pressure and gives reasonable values for the composition of the Hg1-xCd xTe. Although we do not at present believe the absolute numbers that the analysis provides, we believe that this approach confirms our general ideas regarding the nature of the CdTe(211) surface under Hg, and is valuable at least technologically, to

  6. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  7. Visible diffraction from quasi-crystalline arrays of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Timothy P.; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Large area arrays of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are patterned in a quasi-crystalline Penrose tile arrangement through electron beam lithography definition of Ni catalyst dots and subsequent nanotube growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. When illuminated with a 532 nm laser beam high-quality and remarkable diffraction patterns are seen. The diffraction is well matched to theoretical calculations which assume apertures to be present at the location of the VACNTs for transmitted light. The results show that VACNTs act as diffractive elements in reflection and can be used as spatially phased arrays for producing tailored diffraction patterns.

  8. Nonlocal Interactions between Two Spatially Divided Light Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, R. Sh.; Karamyan, G. G.; Gevorkyan, A. S.; Manukyan, A. M.; Va rdanyan, V. T.; Nikoghosyan, A. G.; Sargsyan, V. R.

    2011-03-01

    Experiments with light scattering from diffraction slit are carried out. The changes in light intensities were observed when light was propagated through the remote coil of optical fiber in vicinity of diffraction slit. The time dependencies of intensities of scattered light in different diffraction zones are measured and analyzed. The qualitative interpretation of observed effects is proposed.

  9. The Newton two-knife experiment: Intricacies of wedge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Strange, Wayne

    1996-06-01

    About a century before Young's celebrated two-slit experiment, Isaac Newton quantitatively investigated the diffraction of light from a wedge aperture, but failed to understand the implications of his findings. We have reexamined this unusual system theoretically within the framework of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory, and experimentally using a laser light source with pinhole spatial filter and CCD camera. Both the far-field shadow region and near-field directly illuminated region reveal aesthetically striking images that are deducible from the mathematical analysis, but whose interpretation is subtle and best elucidated by an alternative and less widely known perspective of diffraction.

  10. Multiple wavelength diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Teichmann, Sven; Abbey, Brian; Peele, Andrew G.; Williams, Garth J.; Hannaford, Peter; van Dao, Lap; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate coherent diffraction imaging using multiple harmonics from a high-harmonic generation source. An algorithm is presented that builds the known incident spectrum into the reconstruction procedure with the result that the useable flux is increased by more than an order of magnitude. Excellent images are obtained with a resolution of (165±5)nm and compare very well with images from a scanning electron microscope.

  11. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  12. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  13. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  14. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  15. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  16. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J; Stubley, Paul G; Hawreliak, James A; Ciricosta, Orlando; Comley, Andrew J; Collins, Gilbert W; Eggert, Jon H; Foster, John M; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  17. Programmable diffractive lens for ophthalmic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Romero, Lenny A.; Ramírez, Natalia

    2014-06-01

    Pixelated liquid crystal displays have been widely used as spatial light modulators to implement programmable diffractive optical elements, particularly diffractive lenses. Many different applications of such components have been developed in information optics and optical processors that take advantage of their properties of great flexibility, easy and fast refreshment, and multiplexing capability in comparison with equivalent conventional refractive lenses. We explore the application of programmable diffractive lenses displayed on the pixelated screen of a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator to ophthalmic optics. In particular, we consider the use of programmable diffractive lenses for the visual compensation of refractive errors (myopia, hypermetropia, astigmatism) and presbyopia. The principles of compensation are described and sketched using geometrical optics and paraxial ray tracing. For the proof of concept, a series of experiments with artificial eye in optical bench are conducted. We analyze the compensation precision in terms of optical power and compare the results with those obtained by means of conventional ophthalmic lenses. Practical considerations oriented to feasible applications are provided.

  18. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.; Comley, Andrew J.; Foster, John M.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  19. Investigation and development of magnetooptical methods of ellipsometry and vector magnetometry of structures with one and two magnetic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pufall, Matthew Read

    2000-07-01

    Magneto-optical methods of vector magnetometry and ellipsometry were developed to study magnetic thin film structures consisting of one or two magnetic layers and several nonmagnetic layers. The method of Generalized Magneto-Optical Ellipsometry was developed to determine both the magnetization vector of the magnetic layer, and the optical and magneto-optical constants. High- resolution DC vector hysteresis loop measurements were made of Co thin films using the method. The technique was able to determine both the magnitude and direction of M throughout the reversal of the magnetization. The method was also used to examine the ripple-state of a NiFe thin film. By making such measurements at multiple angles of incidence, the thickness and optical constant of a non-magnetic overlayer on a magnetic layer were determined, with reasonable accuracy. Measurements at multiple angles of incidence also allowed the resolution of the individual layer magnetizations in a magnetic bilayer structure. By changing the angle of incidence, the magneto-optical sensitivity to each layer changed dramatically, enabling discrimination of the signal from each layer. Both the magnitude and direction of the magnetization of each layer was determined throughout a hysteresis cycle.

  20. Focusing Diffraction Grating Element with Aberration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength in a single plane, called dispersion plane. Traditional gratings on flat substrates do not perform wavefront transformation in the plane perpendicular to the dispersion plane. The device proposed here exhibits regular diffraction grating behavior, dispersing light. In addition, it performs wavelength transformation (focusing or defocusing) of diffracted light in a direction perpendicular to the dispersion plane (called sagittal plane). The device is composed of a diffraction grating with the grooves in the form of equidistant arcs. It may be formed by defining a single arc or an arc approximation, then translating it along a certain direction by a distance equal to a multiple of a fixed distance ("grating period") to obtain other groove positions. Such groove layout is nearly impossible to obtain using traditional ruling methods, such as mechanical ruling or holographic scribing, but is trivial for lithographically scribed gratings. Lithographic scribing is the newly developed method first commercially introduced by LightSmyth Technologies, which produces gratings with the highest performance and arbitrary groove shape/spacing for advanced aberration control. Unlike other types of focusing gratings, the grating is formed on a flat substrate. In a plane perpendicular to the substrate and parallel to the translation direction, the period of the grating and, therefore, the projection of its k-vector onto the plane is the same for any location on the grating surface. In that plane, no waveform transformation by the grating k-vector occurs, except of simple redirection.

  1. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  2. Asymmetric diffraction based on a passive parity-time grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xue-Yi; Xu, Ye-Long; Zou, Yi; Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Lu, Ming-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Optical structures with balanced loss and gain provide an efficient platform to study the features of light propagation under non-Hermitian parity-time symmetry. Here, we report a feasible design of one-dimensional parity-time symmetric diffraction grating, where the real and imaginary parts of refractive index are separately modulated. Due to the spontaneous breaking of parity-time symmetry at the exceptional point, asymmetric diffractions are observed between a pair of oblique incident light. This asymmetric phenomenon, determined by the modulation direction of the introduced parity-time symmetry, is also polarization-dependent. The coupled-mode theory is implemented to theoretically analyze the polarization dependent asymmetric diffraction, showing consistence with numerical simulations. Our findings may provide a feasible way for manipulating light and instructively inspire the development of diffraction optics.

  3. Atomic structure of Zr-Cu glassy alloys and detection of deviations from ideal solution behavior with Al addition by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron light in transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgarakis, K.; Yavari, A. R.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Antonowicz, J.; Stoica, M.; Li, Y.; Satta, M.; LeMoulec, A.; Vaughan, G.; Inoue, A.

    2009-05-01

    The atomic structure of Zr-Cu binary amorphous alloys was studied using real space pair distribution functions derived from x-ray diffraction. The structure can be modeled by an ideal solution approximation because of relatively weak Cu-Zr atomic interactions. Addition of Al to Zr-Cu metallic glasses modifies the atomic structure in the short and medium range order because of the strongly attractive interaction between Al and Zr atoms. These interactions generate strong deviations from the ideal solution behavior.

  4. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  5. Hands-on Fourier analysis by means of far-field diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceffa, Nicolo' Giovanni; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Coherent sources of light are easily available to university undergraduate laboratory courses and the demonstration of electro-magnetic wave diffraction is typically made with light. However, the construction of arbitrary patterns for the study of light diffraction is particularly demanding due to the small linear scale needed when using sub-micrometer wavelengths, limiting the possibility to thoroughly investigate diffraction experimentally. We describe and test a simple and affordable method to develop arbitrary light diffraction patterns with first year undergraduate or last year high school students. This method is exploited to investigate experimentally the connection between diffraction and the Fourier transform, leading to the development of the concept of spectral analysis of a (2D) signal. We therefore discuss the possibility of building a teaching unit for first year undergraduate or last year high school students on the interdisciplinary topic of spectral analysis starting from an experimental approach to light diffraction.

  6. Calibration of Two Difrerent Types of Modulators for an Application in Spectroscopic Phase Modulated Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouko, S. L.; Llinares, C.

    1995-08-01

    In order to choose a photoelastic modulator for an application in spectroscopic phase modulated ellipsometry a complete calibration of two different types of photoelastic modulators is achieved. First the model that describes the behavior of each of them is accurately determined since the calibration procedure depends on it. Both modulators behave as a static strain model with a phase shift of the form δ = δ_0 + {\\cal A}sin ω t. Using the suitable procedures, the driving voltage V_mod and the static strain δ_0 of both devices are accurately determined as a function of the wavelength from 0.25 μm to 0.75 μm. A method to reduce the errors due to incorrect settings of the modulation voltage and the static birefringence is also proposed. An accuracy check of the calibration done by comparing the indexes of refraction of two silica prisms obtained with our ellipsometer and with the high precision goniometer method shows a very good agreement. Dans le but de choisir un modulateur photoélastique pour une application en ellipsométrie spectroscopique à modulation de phase, le calibrage de deux modulateurs a été réalisé. Dans un premier temps, le modèle décrivant chacun des modulateurs a été déterminé avec précision vu que la procédure de calibrage dépend de celui-ci : les deux modulateurs fonctionnent suivant le modèle avec biréfringence statique ayant un déphasage de la forme δ = δ_0 + {\\cal A}sin ω t. En utilisant les procédures de calibrage appropriées, la tension de pilotage V_mod et la biréfringence statique δ_0 ont été déterminées avec précision en fonction de la longueur d'onde dans la gamme spectrale s'étendant de 0,25 μm à 0,75 μm. Une méthode pour réduire les erreurs dues au calibrage de la tension de modulation et à la biréfringence résiduelle est également proposée. Un test de la précision du calibrage fait en comparant les indices de réfraction de deux prismes de silice obtenus avec notre ellipsomètre et avec

  7. Optical Metrology for Directed Self-assembly Patterning Using Mueller Matrix Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Based Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhairya J.

    The semiconductor industry continues to drive patterning solutions that enable devices with higher memory storage capacity, faster computing performance, lower cost per transistors, and higher transistor density. These developments in the field of semiconductor manufacturing along with the overall minimization of the size of transistors require cutting-edge metrology tools for characterization. Directed self-assembly (DSA) patterning process can be used to fabricate nanoscale line-space patterns and contact holes via thermodynamically driven micro-phase separation of block copolymer (BCP) films with boundary constraints from guiding templates. Its main advantages are high pattern resolution (~10 nm), high throughput, no requirement of a high-resolution mask, and compatibility with standard fab-equipment and processes. Although research into DSA patterning has demonstrated a high potential as a nanoscale patterning process, there are critical challenges that must be overcome before transferring DSA into high volume manufacturing, including achievement of low defect density and high process stability. For this, advances in critical dimension (CD) and overlay measurement as well as rapid defect characterization are required. Both scatterometry and critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM) are routinely used for inline dimensional metrology. CD-SEM inspection is limited, as it does not easily provide detailed line-shape information, whereas scatterometry has the capability of measuring important feature dimensions including: line-width, line-shape, sidewall-angle, and thickness of the patterned samples quickly and non-destructively. The present work describes the application of Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MMSE) based scatterometry to optically characterize DSA patterned line- space grating and contact hole structures fabricated with phase-separated polystyrene-b-polymethylmethacrylate (PS-b-PMMA) at various integration steps of BCP DSA

  8. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  9. Diffraction of a plane wave by an infinitely long circular cylinder or a sphere: solution from Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianqi; Jia, Xiaowei

    2013-08-10

    Diffraction of an infinitely long circular cylinder normally illuminated by a plane wave is discussed from the classical Mie theory. A rigorous expression of the diffracted light is obtained, which is simply characterized by a factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) and the sinc function sin(αθ)/(αθ). Numerical calculation shows an apparent difference between our results and those from scalar wave diffraction theory, especially in large diffraction angles. The factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) is introduced into the diffracted light by a sphere, which leads to an alternative approximation of the diffracted light.

  10. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  11. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  12. Six Classes of Diffraction-Based Optoelectronic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Fuhr, Peter; Schipper, John

    2003-01-01

    Six classes of diffraction-based optoelectronic instruments have been invented as means for wavelength-based processing of light. One family of anticipated applications lies in scientific instrumentation for studying chemical and physical reactions that affect and/or are affected differently by light of different wavelengths or different combinations of wavelengths. Another family of anticipated applications lies in optoelectronic communication systems.

  13. Non Specular Diffractive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunjin; Overcash, Dan; Morawice, Pawel; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2009-11-01

    Geometrically decorated two-dimensional (2D) discrete surfaces can be more effective than conventional smooth reflectors in managing wave radiation. Constructive non-specular wave scattering permits the scattering angle to be other than twice that of incidence and can result in gross violations of the law of reflection. A wide range of novel reflective behaviors ensues; including the phenomenon of negative reflection were energy transport remains on the same side of the normal. Also, at a critical incidence coherent superposition can force both the transmitted and reflected waves to graze the scattering surface thus synergistically reinforcing the diffractive process in a behavior reminiscent of critical internal reflection of ray optics. We experimentally demonstrate the concept with measurements on a one-dimensionally periodic system (grating) where the scattering angle is shown to be an inverse circular function of a function that depends on the diffractive index and the two angles. Excellent agreement is found between experimental data and theory. A preliminary report on our observations will be discussed.

  14. Modeling the field diffracted from photo mask at oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Tawfik Elazhary, Tamer; Hisham Morshed, Ahmed; Khalil, Diaa

    2010-08-01

    In optical lithography, light diffracted from photo mask structures has been customarily assumed to be constant with the angle of incidence of the light illuminating the photo mask. As numerical aperture increases to unity and beyond, to cope with the continuous demand for shrinking integrated circuits, device dimensions, and densities, this approximation is no longer valid. In this paper we use the physical theory of diffraction to study, understand, and model the variation of light diffracted from photo mask structures of the order of the wavelength, with the angle of light incidence. We present a semianalytical model that is fast, accurate, and compatible with existing professional software in this domain. The accuracy of the model is studied using the finite-difference time-domain technique and is shown to be below 5% at the image plane, within angles of incidence between +/-20 degrees .

  15. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  16. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  17. LED color mixing with diffractive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa; Baumgart, Jörg; Wendel, Simon; Neumann, Cornelius

    2013-03-01

    Lighting solutions with colored LEDs provide many opportunities for illumination. One of these opportunities is to create a color tunable light source. In this way different kinds of white light (color temperature) as well as discrete colors may be realized. This opens the field for applications as mood lighting. But there is always a spatial separation of the distinct LEDs that might get converted into an angular separation by any collimating optics. This angular separation causes such problems like color fringes and colored shadows that cannot be accepted in most applications. Conventional methods to solve these problems include e.g. mixing rods or dichroic filters. A new approach is the use of the dispersive effect of a diffractive structure to compensate the angular separation of the different colors. In this contribution the potential and limitations of diffractive structures in LED color mixing applications are discussed. Ray tracing simulations were performed to analyze such important parameters like efficiency, color performance and the cross section of the color mixing optics. New means for the estimation of color mixing performance were developed. A software tool makes it possible to detect the color distribution within ray trace data and it provides a quality factor to estimate the color mixing performance. It can be shown that the spectral band width has a large influence on the mixing process. Ray tracing simulations are compared with results of an experimental setup such that both measured as well as simulated data is presented.

  18. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  19. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  20. Ultrafast Coherent Diffractive Imaging at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N

    2006-11-29

    Using the FLASH facility we have demonstrated high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging with single soft-X-ray free-electron laser pulses [1]. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. Our experiments are an important milestone in the development of single-particle diffractive imaging with future X-ray free-electron lasers [2, 3]. Our apparatus provides a new and unique tool at FLASH to perform imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits [2, 4] and to acquire images of ultrafast processes initiated by an FEL pulse or other laser pulse. Coherent diffractive imaging is an ideal method for high-resolution ultrafast imaging with an FEL. Since no optical element is required, the method can in principle be scaled to atomic resolution with short enough wavelength. Spatial and temporal coherence are necessary to ensure that the scattered light waves from all positions across the sample are correlated when they interfere at the detector, giving rise to a coherent diffraction pattern that can be phased and inverted to give a high-resolution image of the sample. In contrast to crystals, where scattering from the many unit cells constructively interfere to give Bragg spots, the coherent diffraction pattern of a non-periodic object is continuous. Such a coherent diffraction pattern contains as much as twice the information content of the pattern of its crystallized periodic counterpart--exactly the amount of information needed to solve the phase problem and deterministically invert the pattern to yield an image of the object [5, 6]. The computer algorithm that performs this function replaces the analogue computations of a lens: summing the complex-valued amplitudes of scattered waves to form an image at a particular plane. Our experimental geometry is shown in Fig. 1. We focus a coherent X-ray pulse from the FLASH

  1. Approach to quantitative detection of CD146 with the label-free protein biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yu; Liu, Li; Yan, Xiyun; Jin, Gang

    2011-03-01

    CD146 glycoprotein belonging to cell adhesion molecules is considered to be a novel target on endothelial cell involved in tumor angiogenesis. The biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry (BIE) which is performed in null and off-null mode is used for CD146 detection as a trial by the following steps. Firstly, anti-CD146 antibody as ligand is immobilized on Protein G modified silicon substrate. Then, CD146 test is carried out and its calibration curve is established for the requirement of quantitative detection. Finally, 18 serum samples are detected quantitatively and their results are validated by ELISA's. The sensitivity for CD146 detection achieves the order of ng/ml and the relationship between BIE signal y (grayscale value) and CD146 concentration x (ng/ml) is y=3.3ln(x) +91.3. Compared with ELISA's, the majority of results are in agreement, and the results of two approaches have significant statistic relevance.

  2. Temperature dependence of the electronic transitions in BiFeO{sub 3} thin film studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T. D.; Jeon, B. C.; Moon, S. J.

    2015-04-07

    The temperature dependence of the electronic response of BiFeO{sub 3} thin film grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate is investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry. By analyzing the pseudodielectric function, we identify two d-d crystal field transitions of Fe{sup 3+} ions in the energy region between 1 and 2 eV. The d-d transitions show abnormal temperature dependence that cannot be attributed to conventional electron-phonon interactions. The origin of the abnormal temperature dependence is discussed in terms of spin-charge coupling. The temperature dependence of the charge transfer transitions located above 2.5 eV is characterized by standard critical point model analysis of the 2nd derivatives of the dielectric function. This analysis provides detailed information of the critical point parameters for charge transfer transitions.

  3. Measurement of ionic polarization of SrTiO3 single crystal by far-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanehara, Kazuki; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2014-07-01

    We developed a far-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometer for measuring the complex permittivity of high-permittivity materials in the terahertz (THz) region and demonstrated the dielectric function of SrTiO3 single crystal at 0.75-21 THz. The responses of the Slater, Last, and O6 displacive modes, which are all optical phonon modes of SrTiO3 at room temperature, were clearly observed. The complex permittivity measured by the ellipsometer agreed with the permittivity simulated by a damped harmonic oscillator model. The far-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry is useful to analyze the phonon modes of high-permittivity materials, which enable us to understand the contribution of the ionic polarizations to the low-frequency permittivity.

  4. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  5. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  6. Using electrochemistry - total internal refection imaging ellipsometry to monitor biochemical oxygen demand on the surface tethered polyelectrolyte modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Meng; Lv, Bei'er; Chen, YanYan; Ma, Hongwei; Jin, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Our previous work has proposed an electrochemistry - total internal reflection imaging ellipsometry (EC-TIRIE) technique to observe the dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction on Clark electrode since high interface sensitivity makes TIRIE a useful tool to study redox reactions on the electrode surface. To amplify the optical signal noise ratio (OSNR), a surface tethered weak polyelectrolyte, carboxylated poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-random- 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (abbreviated as carboxylated poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA)), has been introduced on the electrode surface. Since Clark electrode is widely used in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) detection, we use this technique to measure BOD in the sample. The dynamic range of the system is from 0 ˜ 25 mg/L. Two samples have been measured. Compared with the conventional method, the deviation of both optical and electrical signals are less than 10%.

  7. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  8. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  9. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  10. In-situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry of the Cu Deposition Process from Supercritical Fluids: Evidence of an Abnormal Surface Layer Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Tamegai, Yukihiro; Ueno, Takahiro; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Jin, Lianhua; Kondoh, Eiichi

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we report in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry of Cu deposition from supercritical carbon dioxide fluids. The motivations of this work were 1) to perform a detailed observation of Cu growth with precision optical metrology, 2) to study substrate dependence on Cu growth, particularly for Ru and TiN substrates in the present case, and 3) to demonstrate the possibility and usefulness of ellipsometry for diagnosing supercritical fluid processing. The Cu deposition was carried out through hydrogen reduction of a Cu β-diketonate precursor at 160-180 °C. During growth, a very large deviation of ellipsometric parameters (Ψ and Δ) from a single-layer model prediction was observed; this deviation was much larger than that expected from island formation which has been frequently reported in in-situ ellipsometric observation of the vapor growth of thin films. From model analyses, it was found that an abnormal dielectric layer having a high refractive index and a thickness of 10-50 nm is present on the growing Cu surface. The refractive index of this layer was (1.5-2) + (0.2-0.3)i and from this, we concluded that this layer is the condensed precursor. The condensed layer develops prior to Cu nucleation. As for the substrate dependence on Cu growth, both layers develop faster on Ru than on TiN. This corresponds to the fact that chemisorption occurs more easily on Ru. The deposition kinetics under the presence of the condensed layer are also discussed.

  11. Investigating organic multilayers by spectroscopic ellipsometry: specific and non-specific interactions of polyhistidine with NTA self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Ilaria; Parisse, Pietro; Gramazio, Federico; Casalis, Loredana; Canepa, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: A versatile strategy for protein–surface coupling in biochips exploits the affinity for polyhistidine of the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group loaded with Ni(II). Methods based on optical reflectivity measurements such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) allow for label-free, non-invasive monitoring of molecule adsorption/desorption at surfaces. Results: This paper describes a SE study about the interaction of hexahistidine (His6) on gold substrates functionalized with a thiolate self-assembled monolayer bearing the NTA end group. By systematically applying the difference spectra method, which emphasizes the small changes of the ellipsometry spectral response upon the nanoscale thickening/thinning of the molecular film, we characterized different steps of the process such as the NTA-functionalization of Au, the adsorption of the His6 layer and its eventual displacement after reaction with competitive ligands. The films were investigated in liquid, and ex situ in ambient air. The SE investigation has been complemented by AFM measurements based on nanolithography methods (nanografting mode). Conclusion: Our approach to the SE data, exploiting the full spectroscopic potential of the method and basic optical models, was able to provide a picture of the variation of the film thickness along the process. The combination of δΔi +1 ,i(λ), δΨi +1 ,i(λ) (layer-addition mode) and δΔ† i ', i +1(λ), δΨ† i ', i +1(λ) (layer-removal mode) difference spectra allowed us to clearly disentangle the adsorption of His6 on the Ni-free NTA layer, due to non specific interactions, from the formation of a neatly thicker His6 film induced by the Ni(II)-loading of the NTA SAM. PMID:27335745

  12. Effects of aberrations in vortex-beams generated with amplitude diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuartas-Vélez, Carlos; Echeverri-Chacón, Santiago; Restrepo, René

    2016-03-01

    We present a mathematical model for the generation of vortex-beams by using a square profile amplitude fork diffraction grating with arbitrary topological charge. The mathematical framework of aberrations in the forked-shape diffraction grating is analysed, and the resulting diffracted pattern is simulated. Three cases of desired distortions (aberrations) in the diffraction grating are considered, obtaining phase modulation from the amplitude grating. Experimental optical vortices are generated by using a transmission spatial light modulator, which is used as a dynamic diffraction grating, allowing us to aberrate it. We show the effect of aberrations in the experimental diffracted vortex-beams and compare it with the numerical simulation.

  13. Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in paratellurite by the sidelobes of the spatial radiation spectrum of an acoustic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in paratellurite is investigated within the two first diffraction orders for the case of diffraction by the sidelobes of the spatial radiation spectrum of an acoustic transducer. One of the diffraction orders is due to anisotropic diffraction, and the other, to isotropic diffraction. Such a diffraction regime is achieved when the diffraction plane is inclined toward the optical axis of the crystal. For light with a wavelength of 0.63 × 10-4 cm diffracted by a "slow" sound wave with a frequency of 26 MHz, the effect manifests itself when the angle between the acousto-optic diffraction plane and the optical axis of paratellurite is ~3°. The effect is experimentally verified. The diffraction efficiency is 20% for each of the diffraction orders for a microwave signal of 8 V at the transducer.

  14. Diffractive optics technology and the NASA Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael; Michaels, Robert L.; Faklis, Dean

    1992-01-01

    Diffractive (or binary) optics offers unique capabilities for the development of large-aperture, high-performance, light-weight optical systems. The Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO) will consist of a variety of instruments to monitor the environmental conditions of the earth and its atmosphere. The aim of this investigation is to analyze the design of the GEO instrument that is being proposed and to identify the areas in which diffractive (or binary) optics technology can make a significant impact in GEO sensor design. Several potential applications where diffractive optics may indeed serve as a key technology for improving the performance and reducing the weight and cost of the GEO sensors have been identified. Applications include the use of diffractive/refractive hybrid lenses for aft-optic imagers, diffractive telescopes for narrowband imaging, subwavelength structured surfaces for anti-reflection and polarization control, and aberration compensation for reflective imaging systems and grating spectrometers.

  15. Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Magdich, L N; Yushkov, K B; Voloshinov, V B

    2009-04-30

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 {mu}m. (light modulation)

  16. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI-CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kami,; #324; ski, Radoslaw; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, El; #380; bieta,; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2014-11-14

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies.

  17. Results on hard diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1995-07-01

    The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained a HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation, as dictated by unitarity, the pomeron emerges as a combination of valence quark and gluon color singlets in a ratio suggested by asymptopia.

  18. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  19. CDF experimental results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental results on diffraction from the Fermilab Tevatron collider obtained by the CDF experiment are reviewed and compared. We report on the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production in the range 0 < Q{sup 2} < 10,000 GeV{sup 2}, and on the |t| distribution in the region 0 < |t| < 1 GeV{sup 2} for both soft and hard diffractive events up to Q{sup 2} {approx} 4,500 GeV{sup 2}. Results on single diffractive W/Z production, forward jets, and central exclusive production of both dijets and diphotons are also presented.

  20. Phase-diffractive coating for daylight control on smart window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perennes, Frederic; Twardowski, Patrice J.; Gesbert, D.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    1992-11-01

    Daylight can be processed by a smart window in a transmission, reflective, refractive, and diffractive mode. In the future an optimization will be realized by a mixing of these approaches depending on the applied cases. Non-imaging diffractive optics has its roots in the work done in holographic diffractive coating for head up displays (HUD) and helmet mounted displays. For having globally good results on smart window with diffractive coating, a very high diffraction efficiency must be reached close to 100% without having a too important lowering of the control of other parameters of the light processed by a smart window (direction and frequency control essentially). We propose a method for designing, realizing, and using diffractive coating for a smart window that is based on a new organic material and diffractive model that were already validated in HUD. Potential low cost is possible for mass production on a large surface with an adapted investment. We describe the present technology and its limits and the ones that can be reached in the future. In this work, we present a holographic way to modify the slant of sun rays through a window, and to filter infrared radiations by using dichromated gelatin material. In this way it would be able to ensure a more uniform lighting and a more pleasant temperature inside buildings or vehicles, without using dye or photochromics glasses.

  1. Rigorous diffraction analysis using geometrical theory of diffraction for future mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Gek S.; Tay, Cho J.; Quan, Chenggen; Lin, Qunying

    2004-05-01

    Advanced lithographic techniques such as phase shift masks (PSM) and optical proximity correction (OPC) result in a more complex mask design and technology. In contrast to the binary masks, which have only transparent and nontransparent regions, phase shift masks also take into consideration transparent features with a different optical thickness and a modified phase of the transmitted light. PSM are well-known to show prominent diffraction effects, which cannot be described by the assumption of an infinitely thin mask (Kirchhoff approach) that is used in many commercial photolithography simulators. A correct prediction of sidelobe printability, process windows and linearity of OPC masks require the application of rigorous diffraction theory. The problem of aerial image intensity imbalance through focus with alternating Phase Shift Masks (altPSMs) is performed and compared between a time-domain finite-difference (TDFD) algorithm (TEMPEST) and Geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Using GTD, with the solution to the canonical problems, we obtained a relationship between the edge on the mask and the disturbance in image space. The main interest is to develop useful formulations that can be readily applied to solve rigorous diffraction for future mask technology. Analysis of rigorous diffraction effects for altPSMs using GTD approach will be discussed.

  2. Monitoring Volumetric Changes in Silicon Thin-Film Anodes through In Situ Optical Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duay, Jonathon; Schroder, Kjell W; Murugesan, Sankaran; Stevenson, Keith J

    2016-07-13

    A high-resolution in situ spectroelectrochemical optical diffraction experiment has been developed to understand the volume expansion/contraction process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film anodes. Electrodes consisting of 1D transmissive gratings of silicon have been produced through photolithographic methods. After glovebox assembly in a home-built Teflon cell, monitoring of the diffraction efficiency of these gratings during the lithiation/delithiation process is performed using an optical microscope equipped with a Bertrand lens. When the diffraction efficiency along with optical constants obtained from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is utilized, volume changes of the active materials can be deduced. Unlike transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization methods of observing silicon's volume expansion, this experiment allows for real-time monitoring of the volume change at charge/discharge cycles greater than just the first few along with an experimental environment that directly mimics that of a real battery. This technique shows promising results that provide needed insight into understanding the lithium alloying reaction and subsequent induced capacity fade during the cycling of alloying anodes in lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27311132

  3. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  4. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  5. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  6. Ptychographic Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Abbey, B.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Clark, J. N.; de Jonge, M. D.; McNulty, I.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports improved reconstruction of complex wave fields from extended objects. The combination of ptychography with Fresnel diffractive imaging results in better reconstructions with fewer iterations required to convergence than either method considered separately. The method is applied to retrieve the projected thickness of a gold microstructure and comparative results using ptychography and Fresnel diffractive imaging are presented.

  7. Color Perception with Diffraction Gratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglak, Haym; Campbell, Don

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment enabling students to apply concept of diffraction, determine limits of their color perception, learn how to measure wavelength with a simple apparatus, observe continuous and line spectra, and associate colors with corresponding wavelengths. The homemade diffraction-grating spectrometer used is easily constructed. (JN)

  8. Diffraction intensity analysis of a transmission prism grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guosheng

    2010-11-01

    Because of the inherent structures, most common gratings always produce an unexpected loss of the input signal, which limits the use of gratings in many fields to some extent. Considering that, a design of grating with many periodical micro isosceles prisms is proposed. Based on the scalar diffraction theory, the transmittance is derived from the definition of an optical path when a parallel light passes through a singular prism element. And according to the multi-slit Fraunhofer diffraction, the expression of light intensity distribution for the prism grating on the frequency plane is deduced and analyzed by means of Fourier transform.

  9. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Studies of Ag and ZnO Thin Films and Their Interfaces for Thin Film Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, Deepak

    Many modern optical and electronic devices, including photovoltaic devices, consist of multilayered thin film structures. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a critically important characterization technique for such multilayers. SE can be applied to measure key parameters related to the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the components of multilayers with high accuracy and precision. One of the key advantages of this non-destructive technique is its capability of monitoring the growth dynamics of thin films in-situ and in real time with monolayer level precision. In this dissertation, the techniques of SE have been applied to study the component layer materials and structures used as back-reflectors and as the transparent contact layers in thin film photovoltaic technologies, including hydrogenated silicon (Si:H), copper indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe). The component layer materials, including silver and both intrinsic and doped zinc oxide, are fabricated on crystalline silicon and glass substrates using magnetron sputtering techniques. These thin films are measured in-situ and in real time as well as ex-situ by spectroscopic ellipsometry in order to extract parameters related to the structural properties, such as bulk layer thickness and surface roughness layer thickness and their time evolution, the latter information specific to real time measurements. The index of refraction and extinction coefficient or complex dielectric function of a single unknown layer can also be obtained from the measurement versus photon energy. Applying analytical expressions for these optical properties versus photon energy, parameters that describe electronic transport, such as electrical resistivity and electron scattering time, can be extracted. The SE technique is also performed as the sample is heated in order to derive the effects of annealing on the optical properties and derived electrical transport parameters, as well as the

  10. Shaping non-diffracting beams with a digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Lu, Rong-De

    2016-02-01

    The micromechanical digital micromirror device (DMD) performs as a spatial light modulator to shape the light wavefront. Different from the liquid crystal devices, which use the birefringence to modulate the light wave, the DMD regulates the wavefront through an amplitude modulation with the digitally controlled mirrors switched on and off. The advantages of such device are the fast speed, polarization insensitivity, and the broadband modulation ability. The fast switching ability for the DMD not only enables the shaping of static light mode, but also could dynamically compensate for the wavefront distortion due to scattering medium. We have employed such device to create the higher order modes, including the Laguerre-Gaussian, Hermite-Gaussian, as well as Mathieu modes. There exists another kind of beam with shape-preservation against propagation, and self-healing against obstacles. Representative modes are the Bessel modes, Airy modes, and the Pearcey modes. Since the DMD modulates the light intensity, a series of algorithms are developed to calculate proper amplitude hologram for shaping the light. The quasi-continuous gray scale images could imitate the continuous amplitude hologram, while the binary amplitude modulation is another means to create the modulation pattern for a steady light field. We demonstrate the generation of the non-diffracting beams with the binary amplitude modulation via the DMD, and successfully created the non-diffracting Bessel beam, Airy beam, and the Pearcey beam. We have characterized the non-diffracting modes through propagation measurements as well as the self-healing measurements.

  11. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  12. Micron-scale lens array having diffracting structures

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2013-10-29

    A novel micron-scale lens, a microlens, is engineered to concentrate light efficiently onto an area of interest, such as a small, light-sensitive detector element in an integrated electronic device. Existing microlens designs imitate the form of large-scale lenses and are less effective at small sizes. The microlenses described herein have been designed to accommodate diffraction effects, which dominate the behavior of light at small length scales. Thus a new class of light-concentrating optical elements with much higher relative performance has been created. Furthermore, the new designs are much easier to fabricate than previous designs.

  13. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  14. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  15. Diffraction techniques in engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarczek, K.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.

    1995-12-31

    Diffraction techniques applied to crystalline materials provide quantitative information about the crystallographic structure and mechanical condition of the material. Those two characteristics influence the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of a Component. A concerted application of x-ray and neutron diffraction allows one to comprehensively study the bulk and subsurface variations of such material characteristics as crystallographic texture, residual stress, and cold work. The Residual Stress User Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers academic and industrial researchers both neutron and x-ray diffraction capabilities. Recent examples of the application of work related to thin film, metal, ceramic and composite material technologies are presented.

  16. Diffraction effects in freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Melissa N.; Winston, Roland; Oliker, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Freeform optics is a relatively new field; it uses the methods necessary to describe surfaces lacking symmetry, and/or surfaces that create non-symmetrical irradiance distributions. The Supporting Quadrics Method (SQM) developed by Oliker is a superb for generating any desired irradiance distribution. The SQM uses an envelope of quadrics to create prescribed irradiance distributions. These optical systems are tested in ray trace software, where diffraction effects are not taken into account. It is important to understand the diffraction effects present in an optic, when moving from the ray trace stage to the prototype stage. Here we study the diffraction effects of Supporting Quadrics Method.

  17. Diffractive optics in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrmann, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation at the Army Research Laboratory is in progress to characterize DOE performance in mil-spec environments. One of the most significant environmental influences is temperature. An analysis of a diffractive lens is presented in which optical performance is described as a function of temperature. In particular, we review the thermal dependence of focal length and diffraction efficiency. It is shown that the change in these parameters is independent of lens shape and relates only to material properties. Thermalized hybrid refractive/diffractive designs are discussed.

  18. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  19. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry for quick prediction of number density of nanoparticles bound to non-transparent solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Rajendra R.; Genzer, Jan

    2005-12-01

    We report on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in predicting number density of nanoparticles bound to the surfaces decorated with either organic monolayers or surface-grafted polymers. Two systems are considered that comprise citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles adsorbed on: (1) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer (SAM), and (2) surface-tethered polyacrylamide (PAAm). Number density of gold nanoparticles on the surface is varied systematically by gradually increasing either the concentration of APTES molecules in the SAM or molecular weight of grafted PAAm. The adsorption of gold nanoparticles on APTES gradient surfaces is monitored via atomic force microscopy (AFM), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and SE. The partition of gold nanoparticles on PAAm gradient assemblies is characterized by AFM, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and SE. By correlating the results obtained from the various techniques on nanoparticle coatings, we derive an empirical linear relationship between the number density of nanoparticles on surfaces and cos ( Δ) parameter measured in SE. Excellent agreement between nanoparticle number density determined experimentally from AFM scans and that predicted by SE proves the potential of SE as a quick, predictive technique to estimate number density of nanoparticles bound to solid, non-transparent substrates.

  20. Studying the reversal mode of the magnetization vector versus applied field angle using generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pufall, M. R.; Berger, A.

    1999-10-26

    The authors used the technique of vector Generalized Magneto-optical Ellipsometry to study the behavior of the magnetization vector of a 50 Co thin film as a function of external field magnitude and direction. With this method, which determines the both the direction and magnitude of the magnetization, averaged over the 1 mm incident laser beam, they were able to determine the relative contributions of magnetization rotation and domain formation to the reversal of M. The Co sample had a uniaxial in-plane anisotropy. The authors found that when the angle between the applied field and the easy axis was greater than {approximately} 40 degrees, the reversal occurred primarily by rotation of the magnetization, accompanied by a small reduction of the magnitude of M. In this angular region, the critical field-the field at which there is a large jump in the angle of M -- as a function of applied field angle followed a coherent rotation model. However, at applied field angles less than 40 degrees to the easy axis, they found a larger reduction in {vert_bar}M{vert_bar} occurring before and during the jump in the magnetization angle. The jump also occurred at fields much lower than those predicted by the coherent rotation model, indicating a reversal mode initiated by domain formation.

  1. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  2. A view of the implanted SiC damage by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Battistig, G.; Khanh, N. Q.; Petrik, P.; Lohner, T.; Dobos, L.; Pecz, B.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Morilla, Y.

    2006-11-01

    4H-SiC single crystalline substrates were implanted at room temperature with 150 keV Al{sup +} ions using fluences of 4x10{sup 14}, 1x10{sup 15}, and 2x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} with current density of 2.5 {mu}A cm{sup -2}. The samples were subsequently annealed at 1100 deg. C in N{sub 2} for 1 h in order to analyze their structural recovery. The disorder induced in both sublattices by the Al{sup +} ions was studied by backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry with a 3.5 MeV He{sup 2+} beam. The results were compared with the optical properties of the samples measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In a previous work, we concluded that during the postimplantation annealing of a highly damaged SiC crystalline material the short distance order can be recovered, while the long distance disorder remains. We also presented the possibility to have grains of different polytypes oriented faraway from the original direction. Now, this alternative is confirmed by the cross-sectional transmission and high resolution electron microscopy studies, carried out to obtain information about the crystal structure.

  3. Etching of a-Si:H thin films by hydrogen plasma: A view from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjadj, Aomar Larbi, Fadila; Gilliot, Mickaël; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2014-08-28

    When atomic hydrogen interacts with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), the induced modifications are of crucial importance during a-Si:H based devices manufacturing or processing. In the case of hydrogen plasma, the depth of the modified zone depends not only on the plasma processing parameters but also on the material. In this work, we exposed a-Si:H thin films to H{sub 2} plasma just after their deposition. In situ UV-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were performed to track the H-induced changes in the material. The competition between hydrogen insertion and silicon etching leads to first order kinetics in the time-evolution of the thickness of the H-modified zone. We analyzed the correlation between the steady state structural parameters of the H-modified layer and the main levers that control the plasma-surface interaction. In comparison with a simple doped layer, exposure of a-Si:H based junctions to the same plasma treatment leads to a thinner H-rich subsurface layer, suggesting a possible charged state of hydrogen diffusing.

  4. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Jörg; Gargouri, Hassan; Naumann, Franziska; Gruska, Bernd; Arens, Michael; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report on results on the preparation of thin (<100 nm) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt) and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate) over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films. PMID:24367741

  5. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  6. Tg-Confinement Effects in Polymer Thin Films, Nanotubes, and Nanospheres as Measured by DSC, Ellipsometry and Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkelson, John; Tan, Anthony; Chen, Lawrence

    The effect of nanoscale confinement on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of supported and free-standing polymer films has been studied for two decades by various techniques. However, conventional DSC, which is the most common method for measuring Tg of bulk polymers, is not well suited for such measurements. Here, we demonstrate that Tg-confinement effects measured by conventional DSC in nanotubes of polymer supported in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates compare well with with Tg-confinement effects measured in supported polymer films by ellipsometry and fluorescence. We further show that Tg-confinement effect data for nanotubes obtained by fluorescence agree well with data obtained by DSC. Finally, we draw comparisons between the Tg-confinement behavior of nanoprecipitated polymer nanospheres as measured by fluorescence to Tg-confinement effects for both supported and free-standing polymer films. The roles, if any, of confinement dimensionality (1-D vs 2-D vs 3-D) and measurement technique on the observed Tg-confinement effect will be discussed.

  7. Characterization of Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si Heterostructures for Device Applications Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieg, R. M.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Croke, E. T.; Harrell, M. J.; Tanner, M.; Wang, K. L.; Mena, R. A.; Young, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of several complex Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si heterostructures prepared for device fabrication, including structures for heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT), p-type and n-type heterostructure modulation doped field effect transistors, has been performed. We have shown that SE can simultaneously determine all active layer thicknesses, Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x) compositions, and the oxide overlayer thickness, with only a general knowledge of the structure topology needed a priori. The characterization of HBT material included the SE analysis of a Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x) layer deeply buried (600 nanometers) under the silicon emitter and cap layers. In the SE analysis of n-type heterostructures, we examined for the first time a silicon layer under tensile strain. We found that an excellent fit can be obtained using optical constants of unstrained silicon to represent the strained silicon conduction layer. We also used SE to measure lateral sample homogeneity, providing quantitative identification of the inhomogeneous layer. Surface overlayers resulting from prior sample processing were also detected and measured quantitatively. These results should allow SE to be used extensively as a non-destructive means of characterizing Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si heterostructures prior to device fabrication and testing.

  8. Determination of the optical properties and size dispersion of Si nanoparticles within a dielectric matrix by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, A.-S.; Naciri, A. En Battie, Y.; Delachat, F.; Carrada, M.; Ferblantier, G.; Slaoui, A.

    2014-09-14

    We report on a comparative study between dielectric functions of Si nanoparticles (Si-NPs) obtained from Bruggeman effective medium approximation (BEMA), Maxwell-Garnett (MG), and a modified Maxwell-Garnett (MMG) models. Unlike BEMA and MG, a size-distribution dependent dielectric function of Si-NPs is considered in the introduced MMG model. We show that the standard deviation σ of a size distribution can be evaluated by analyzing the imaginary part of the dielectric functions of Si-NPs extracted from BEMA and MMG. In order to demonstrate this, several samples composed of Si-NPs embedded in silicon-rich silicon nitride are investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry over the photon energy range varying between 2 and 4 eV. Assuming a lognormal size distribution of the Si nanoparticles, it is evidenced that the parameter σ ranges between 1.15 and 1.35. The values of size dispersion deduced by this methodology are in good agreement with TEM observations.

  9. Characterization of a water-dispersible metal protective coating with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, modulated differential scanning calorimetry, and ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Stamatis C; Douvas, Antonios M; Argyropoulos, Vassilike; Siatou, Amalia; Vlachopoulou, Marilena

    2012-05-01

    An ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymer, formulated by BASF as a waterborne suspension of its alkylammonium salt and used, among other applications, in art conservation as a temporary protective coating was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy aided by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and ellipsometry. The thermal conversion of thin copolymer films from the freshly applied state, where carboxylic acid and carboxylate ion functional groups co-exist, to a purely acidic working state was spectroscopically followed. Transmission mid-infrared data of the working state showed a 1 : 12 ratio of methacrylic acid towards ethylene units. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) in the same state was found at 45 °C. Copolymer films spin-coated on mechanically polished bronze and iron coupons were characterized with transflection infrared spectroscopy and compared to corresponding transmission mid-infrared spectra of copolymer films spin-coated on silicon wafers. In the case of bronze coupons, evidence for interaction of the carboxylate ion with the copper substrate was obtained. The chemical structure and the thermal behavior of the coating, as well as some implications on its protective capability towards iron and copper alloys, is discussed as this material has received considerable attention in the field of metal conservation and coatings.

  10. Effect of solvent casting on reduced entanglement density in thin films studied by ellipsometry and neutron reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, B.B.; Walsh, D.J. . Central Research and Development)

    1994-01-17

    Neutron reflection (NR) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used for the investigation of the interfaces between films of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME, glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) = [minus]31 C) and polystyrene (PS, T[sub g][approximately] 105 C). The transport of PVME into PS at temperatures below the glass transition of PS was highly non-Fickian. The linear dependence of the front propagation with time, along with the high activation energy for transport indicates some similarities to classical case 2 transport of solvent into polymer glasses. The variation of PVME transport rate with PS molecular weight (MW) illustrates one significant difference as compared to classical case 2 transport. The strong dependence of PVME transport rate on PS MW is attributed to the MW dependence of the rate of swelling and dissolution of PS in the swollen front region. It was also found that the transport rate (front velocity) of PVME into PS depended strongly on the temperature and time of preannealing of the single spin coated PS layer. Preannealing at temperature well above T[sub g] for higher MW PS films was necessary. Birefringence measurements on PS films proved that internal stress was not a factor. A systematic MW study indicated that the major factor was the reduced entanglement density due to spinning of PS films from solution.

  11. Bioinspired micrograting arrays mimicking the reverse color diffraction elements evolved by the butterfly Pierella luna

    PubMed Central

    England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Kim, Philseok; Khan, Mughees; Muñoz, Philip; Mazur, Eric; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, diffraction elements that reverse the color sequence normally observed in planar diffraction gratings have been found in the wing scales of the butterfly Pierella luna. Here, we describe the creation of an artificial photonic material mimicking this reverse color-order diffraction effect. The bioinspired system consists of ordered arrays of vertically oriented microdiffraction gratings. We present a detailed analysis and modeling of the coupling of diffraction resulting from individual structural components and demonstrate its strong dependence on the orientation of the individual miniature gratings. This photonic material could provide a basis for novel developments in biosensing, anticounterfeiting, and efficient light management in photovoltaic systems and light-emitting diodes. PMID:25288730

  12. Quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions with inclined rectangular apertures gratings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuwei; Zhu, Xiaoli; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Wenhai; Fan, Quanping; Wei, Lai; Yang, Zuhua; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Yong; He, Weihua; Wu, Yinzhong; Yan, Zhuoyang; Hua, Yilei; Zhao, Yidong; Cui, Mingqi; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhang, Baohan; Xie, Changqing; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the fundamentals and applications of diffraction gratings have received much attention. However, conventional diffraction gratings often suffer from higher-order diffraction contamination. Here, we introduce a simple and compact single optical element, named inclined rectangular aperture gratings (IRAG), for quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions. We show, both in the visible light and soft x-ray regions, that IRAG can significantly suppress higher-order diffractions with moderate diffraction efficiency. Especially, as no support strut is needed to maintain the free-standing patterns, the IRAG is highly advantageous to the extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions. The diffraction efficiency of the IRAG and the influences of fabrication constraints are also discussed. The unique quasi-single order diffraction properties of IRAG may open the door to a wide range of photonic applications. PMID:26563588

  13. Quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions with inclined rectangular apertures gratings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Zhu, Xiaoli; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Wenhai; Fan, Quanping; Wei, Lai; Yang, Zuhua; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Yong; He, Weihua; Wu, Yinzhong; Yan, Zhuoyang; Hua, Yilei; Zhao, Yidong; Cui, Mingqi; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhang, Baohan; Xie, Changqing; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the fundamentals and applications of diffraction gratings have received much attention. However, conventional diffraction gratings often suffer from higher-order diffraction contamination. Here, we introduce a simple and compact single optical element, named inclined rectangular aperture gratings (IRAG), for quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions. We show, both in the visible light and soft x-ray regions, that IRAG can significantly suppress higher-order diffractions with moderate diffraction efficiency. Especially, as no support strut is needed to maintain the free-standing patterns, the IRAG is highly advantageous to the extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions. The diffraction efficiency of the IRAG and the influences of fabrication constraints are also discussed. The unique quasi-single order diffraction properties of IRAG may open the door to a wide range of photonic applications.

  14. Quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions with inclined rectangular apertures gratings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Zhu, Xiaoli; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Wenhai; Fan, Quanping; Wei, Lai; Yang, Zuhua; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Yong; He, Weihua; Wu, Yinzhong; Yan, Zhuoyang; Hua, Yilei; Zhao, Yidong; Cui, Mingqi; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhang, Baohan; Xie, Changqing; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the fundamentals and applications of diffraction gratings have received much attention. However, conventional diffraction gratings often suffer from higher-order diffraction contamination. Here, we introduce a simple and compact single optical element, named inclined rectangular aperture gratings (IRAG), for quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions. We show, both in the visible light and soft x-ray regions, that IRAG can significantly suppress higher-order diffractions with moderate diffraction efficiency. Especially, as no support strut is needed to maintain the free-standing patterns, the IRAG is highly advantageous to the extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions. The diffraction efficiency of the IRAG and the influences of fabrication constraints are also discussed. The unique quasi-single order diffraction properties of IRAG may open the door to a wide range of photonic applications. PMID:26563588

  15. Waveform analysis with optical multichannel detectors: Applications for rapid-scan spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ilsin; Collins, R. W.

    1991-08-01

    A unique rapid-scanning ellipsometer employing a rotating polarizer optical configuration and a multichannel detector for a 1.5-4.5 eV spectral range, has been developed recently for real time studies of film growth and surfaces. This is a new application of the photodiode array-based optical multichannel detector that entails waveform analysis of the incident irradiance at each photon energy. For accurate ellipsometric spectra {ψ(hν),Δ(hν)}, the raw data in the form of photon counts, integrated over four or more equal sectors of polarizer rotation, must be corrected for systematic errors originating from the detection system. Simple procedures are described to characterize and correct for the most significant errors including detection system nonlinearity, image persistence, and scattered stray light in the spectrograph/detector enclosure.

  16. Optical functions of silicon from reflectance and ellipsometry on silicon-on-insulator and homoepitaxial samples

    SciTech Connect

    Humlíček, J.

    2015-11-21

    The optical properties of silicon have been determined from 0.2 to 6.5 eV at room temperature, using reflectance spectra of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and ellipsometric spectra of homoepitaxial samples. Optimized Fabry-Perot-type SOI resonators exhibit high finesse even in near ultraviolet. Very high precision values of the real part of the refractive index are obtained in infrared up to a photon energy of 1.3 eV. The spectra of the extinction coefficient, based on observations of light attenuation, extend to 3.2 eV due to measurements on SOI layers as thin as 87 nm. These results allowed us to correct spectroellipsometric data on homoepitaxial samples for the presence of reduced and stabilized surface layers.

  17. Real-time characterization of film growth on transparent substrates by rotating-compensator multichannel ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Collins, R W

    1998-07-01

    A multichannel spectroscopic ellipsometer in the fixed-polarizer-sample-rotating-compensator-fixed-analyzer (PSC(R)A) configuration has been developed and applied for real-time characterization of the nucleation and growth of thin films on transparent substrates. This rotating-compensator design overcomes the major disadvantages of the multichannel ellipsometer in the rotating-polarizer-sample-fixed-analyzer (P(R)SA) configuration while retaining its high speed and precision for the characterization of thin-film processes in real time. The advantages of the PSC(R)A configuration include (i) its high accuracy and precision for the detection of low-ellipticity polarization states that are generated upon reflection of linearly polarized light from transparent film-substrate systems, and (ii) the ability to characterize depolarization of the reflected light, an effect that leads to errors in ellipticity when measured with the P(R)SA configuration. A comparison of the index of refraction spectra for a glass substrate obtained in the real-time PSC(R)A mode in 2.5 s and in the ex situ fixed-polarizer-fixed-compensator-sample-rotating-analyzer (PCSA(R)) mode in ~10 min show excellent agreement, with a standard deviation between the two data sets of 8 x 10(-4), computed over the photon energy range from 1.5 to 3.5 eV. First, we describe the PSC(R)A ellipsometer calibration procedures developed specifically for transparent substrates. In addition, we describe the application of the multichannel PSC(R)A instrument for a study of thin-film diamond nucleation and growth on glass in a low-temperature microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. PMID:18285868

  18. Compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinghua

    2016-06-20

    This paper presents a compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer (LCDS) that includes an echelle grating for horizontally dispersing the incident light beam into several high diffraction orders, a prism for vertically separating the overlapping diffraction orders, and a shared focusing lens used for both the incident and dispersed beams. The unique design of the optics enables the LCDS to give high dispersion on the detector without requiring a large field of view and, therefore, to achieve the benefits of high spectral resolution and compactness. The use of the Littrow conical diffraction coupled with the shared focusing lens makes the LCDS more compact. The formulas of the footprint of the dispersed spectra are derived, and the numerical simulation is given. The design calculations for application of the LCDS to an optical coherence tomography system are illustrated by an example.

  19. Coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD) and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Q.

    1996-09-01

    We show that an x-ray interference phenomenon, coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD), can be used to study lateral nanostructure arrays on crystal surfaces and interfaces. Compared to Fraunhofer grating diffraction of visible light, x-ray grating diffraction contains information not only about geometric profiles of the surface but also about the internal crystalline structures and lattice strain distributions in the grating features. The grating diffraction pattern can also be measured in a white-beam Laue method using highly collimated polychromatic synchrotron radiation, which provides a parallel data collection scheme and may be useful in {ital in} {ital situ} studies on evolution of nanostructure arrays. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Chambers, D. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Britten, J. A.; Shore, B. W.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The application of specialized rectangular relief transmission gratings to coherent lidar beam scanning is presented. Two types of surface relief transmission grating approaches are studied with an eye toward potential insertion of a constant thickness, diffractive scanner where refractive wedges now exist. The first diffractive approach uses vertically oriented relief structure in the surface of an optical flat; illumination of the diffractive scanner is off-normal in nature. The second grating design case describes rectangular relief structure slanted at a prescribed angle with respect to the surface. In this case, illumination is normal to the diffractive scanner. In both cases, performance predictions for 2.0 micron, circularly polarized light at beam deflection angles of 30 or 45 degrees are presented.

  1. Relation between the diffraction pattern visibility and dispersion of particle sizes in an ektacytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Priezzhev, A V; Ustinov, V D

    2011-09-30

    We have calculated the angular distribution of the light intensity in the diffraction pattern arising upon scattering of a laser beam on a suspension of red blood cells in an ektacytometer. We have estimated the diffraction pattern visibility in the region of the first diffraction minimum and the first diffraction maximum as a function of particle size variation. It is shown that in this fragment of the diffraction pattern its visibility decreases already twofold in the case of a standard deviation of the particle size from the average value, equal to 8%.

  2. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  3. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered.

  4. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered. PMID:27505363

  5. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  6. A Practical Method of Simulating X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisse, F.; Sundararajan, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the beam of X-rays is simulated through the use of a laser as a monochromatic light source and the crystal is replaced by photographically prepared masks. A strong diffraction pattern as large as 20 cm. can be obtained. (GS)

  7. Diffraction-controlled backscattering threshold and application to Raman gap

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey A.; Mounaix, Philippe

    2011-04-15

    In most classic analytical models of linear stimulated scatter, light diffraction is omitted, a priori. However, modern laser optic typically includes a variant of the random phase plate [Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984)], resulting in diffraction limited laser intensity fluctuations - or localized speckles - which may result in explosive reflectivity growth as the average laser intensity approaches a critical value [H. A. Rose and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2883 (1994)]. Among the differences between stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scatter is that the SRS scattered light diffracts more strongly than the laser light with increase of electron density. This weakens the tendency of the SRS light to closely follow the most amplified paths, diminishing gain. Let G{sub 0} be the one-dimensional power gain exponent of the stimulated scatter. In this paper we show that differential diffraction gives rise to an increase of G{sub 0} at the SRS physical threshold with increase of electron density up to a drastic disruption of SRS as electron density approaches one fourth of its critical value from below. For three wave interaction lengths not small compared to a speckle length, this is a physically robust Raman gap mechanism.

  8. Diffraction imaging characteristics of slit for ultra-short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang-yang; Wu, Kun-xi; Lu, Long-zhao

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple and concise mathematical method based on the Fraunhofer approximation to analyze the imaging characteristics of slit for broadband light sources. Taking Gaussian-shaped ultra-short laser pulse for example, we investigated the diffraction imaging characteristics of ultra-short light sources through a single-slit and a double-slit. We deduced the mathematical expressions of the intensity distribution of far-field diffraction, and conducted numerical calculation and analysis. It turns out the pulse width of the ultra-short light source plays an important role in the diffraction imaging characteristics of slit. We also provide a quantitative criterion to measure the deviation in terms of far-field diffraction intensity distribution between broadband light source and the ideal monochromatic light source.

  9. Diffractive-optics-based sensor as a tool for detection of biocompatibility of titanium and titanium-doped hydrocarbon samples.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Raimo; Hasoň, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír; Penttinen, Niko; Silvennoinen, Martti; Myller, Kari; Cernochová, Pavlína; Bartáková, Sonia; Prachár, Patrik; Cvrček, Ladislav

    2010-10-10

    Adsorption of the elongated human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) and globular human serum albumin molecules on a titanium-based surface is monitored by analyzing permittivity and optical roughness of protein-modified surfaces by using a diffractive optical element (DOE)-based sensor and variable angle spectro-ellipsometry (VASE). Both DOE and VASE confirmed that fibrinogen forms a thicker and more packed surface adlayer compared to a more porous and weakly adsorbed albumin adlayer. A linear relation of the permittivity (ε(')) and dielectric loss (ε('')) was found for some of the dry titanium-doped hydrocarbon (TDHC) surfaces with excellent HPF adsorption ability. We discuss some aspects of TDHC's aging and its possible effects on fibrinogen adsorption.

  10. Diffraction described by virtual particle momentum exchange: the "diffraction force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Particle diffraction can be described by an ensemble of particle paths determined through a Fourier analysis of a scattering lattice where the momentum exchange probabilities are defined at the location of scattering, not the point of detection. This description is compatible with optical wave theories and quantum particle models and provides deeper insights to the nature of quantum uncertainty. In this paper the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Fresnel-Kirchoff theories are analyzed for diffraction by a narrow slit and a straight edge to demonstrate the dependence of particle scattering on the distance of virtual particle exchange. The quantized momentum exchange is defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and is consistent with the formalism of QED. This exchange of momentum manifests the "diffraction force" that appears to be a universal construct as it applies to neutral and charged particles. This analysis indicates virtual particles might form an exchange channel that bridges the space of momentum exchange.

  11. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  12. Energy circulations in singular beams diffracted through an isosceles right triangular aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, Monika; Senthilkumaran, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Poynting vector in a singular optical field follows a helical path. Hence, it is the presence of a phase singularity that provides the circulating energy flow component to an optical field. These circulations in turn are responsible for the orbital angular momentum of light. This field when diffracted through an isosceles right triangular aperture generates straight line fringes in the far-field diffraction. We have addressed the modifications that happen to the energy circulations and the orbital angular momentum of light due to diffraction. Transverse components of the energy circulations in the diffracted field are studied by the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition method. Interference experiments are presented to reveal the presence of phase singularities in the diffraction. This paper presents a complete analysis of the phase, phase gradient, and the intensity distributions in the diffraction pattern.

  13. Integrating SPR-ellipsometry and electrochemical measurements for performance evaluation of label-free thiophene-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Chou, Shin-Ting; Chang, Yu-Ting; Lee, Adam Shih-Yuan; Lee, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    The surface plasmon resonance reflectance changes measured with a circularly polarized ellipsometry and an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were identified to be able to characterize the critical roles of biomolecules for vastly different biological functions and processes. Throughout the course of this study, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was chosen as the biomarker to test and to verify the performance of this newly developed system for Tuberculosis detection. The interactions of IFN-γ with immobilized anti-IFN-γ antibody at various concentrations were interrogated both optically and electrochemically. A semi-conductive linker bis-thiophene was thiolated to ensure the cross-linked monoclonal human IFN-γ antibody got self-assembled onto the gold thin film and form a label-free biosensor. The functional features of the bis-thiophene coated-gold film were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy methods. The association of IFN-γ to the bis-thiophene bridging units via antibody-antigen interactions provided the basis for ultrasensitive detection of IFN-γ by tracking the conformation changes in surface-bound protein molecules. The phase shift can be attributed to the average thickness and the real-time index of refraction of the protein layer in different protein layer. Experimental results obtained by impedance spectroscopy and by phase-interrogation SPR showed linear dynamic range. Our experimental results verified that an increase in the concentration of the IFN-γ usually accompanied by phase increase in SPR and an impedance decrease in EIS. These results indicated that our newly developed integrated biosensing system can potentially provide new insight into various conjugate phenomena and interfacial processes for observing molecular conformation changes.

  14. Influence of annealing temperature and Sn doping on the optical properties of hematite thin films determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Lígia P.; Chaves, Rodrigo O. G.; Malachias, Angelo; Paniago, Roberto; Ferreira, Sukarno O.; Ferlauto, Andre S.

    2016-06-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) thin films were prepared by sol-gel route and investigated for application in H2 generation by photo-assisted water splitting. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance was shown to increase significantly for films deposited on SnO2:F/glass subjected to high temperature (T) annealing (>750 °C). Strong correlation was found between photogenerated current, donor concentration, and Sn concentration as determined by Mott-Schottky analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of thermal annealing and Sn addition in the resulting microstructure and optical properties of hematite films deposited on fused silica substrates were determined by a combination of structural characterization techniques and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thermal annealing (>600 °C) induces a higher optical absorption that is associated directly to film densification and grain growth; however, it promotes no changes in the energy positions of the main Fe2O3 electronic transitions. The band gap energy was found to be 2.21 eV and independent of microstructure and of Sn concentration for all studied films. On the other hand, Sn can be incorporated in the Fe2O3 lattice for concentration up to Sn/Fe ˜2%, leading to an increase in energy split of the main absorption peak, attributed to a distortion of the Fe2O3 lattice. For higher concentrations, Sn incorporation leads to a reduction in absorption, associated with higher porosity and the formation of a secondary Sn-rich phase. In summary, the variation in the optical properties induced by thermal annealing and Sn addition cannot account for the order of magnitude increase of the current density generated by photoanodes annealed at high T (>750 °C); thus, it is concluded that the major contribution for the enhanced PEC performance comes from improved electronic properties induced by the n-type doping caused by Sn diffusion from the SnO2:F substrate.

  15. Ellipsometry and energy characterization of the electron impact polymerization in the range 0-20 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyn, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    The electron impact polymerization of adsorbed vapors of a hydrocarbon vacuum oil with molecular mass 450 Da (C32H66) has been studied in-situ in the range 0-20 eV using ellipsometry and a servo system with the Kelvin's vibrating probe. This allowed registering at the same time the two energy-dependent characteristics (spectra) of the process: the film growth rate and the electrical potential of the irradiated surface. The first spectrum has two resonance maxima near 2.5 and 9.5 eV while the surface potential has only one weak extremum near 9.5 eV. The first growth rate peak at 2.5 eV was connected with a creation of radicals through a resonant process of the dissociative electron attachment and beginning polymerization. The peaks at 9.5 eV in both the spectra mean accelerating polymerization and decreasing surface charge owing to simultaneous birth of highly active radicals and free electrons. The single resonant process controlling both the processes simultaneously is the dissociative attachment of an electron to an anti-bonding molecular orbital, almost the same as at the 2.5 eV but differing by deeper decomposition of the transient anion, among the products of which are now not the radicals only but also free electrons. The kinetic curves obtained in pulsed regimes of the electron bombardment were qualitatively identical for different precursors and were used for calculations of cross sections of these processes.

  16. Spatially resolved contrast measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk; Rückerl, Florian; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Shorte, Spencer; Wagner, Michael; Schenk, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Diffractive micromirror arrays (MMA) are a special class of optical MEMS, serving as spatial light modulators (SLM) that control the phase of reflected light. Since the surface profile is the determining factor for an accurate phase modulation, high-precision topographic characterization techniques are essential to reach highest optical performance. While optical profiling techniques such as white-light interferometry are still considered to be most suitable to this task, the practical limits of interferometric techniques start to become apparent with the current state of optical MEMS technology. Light scatter from structured surfaces carries information about their topography, making scatter techniques a promising alternative. Therefore, a spatially resolved scatter measurement technique, which takes advantage of the MMA's diffractive principle, has been implemented experimentally. Spectral measurements show very high contrast ratios (up to 10 000 in selected samples), which are consistent with calculations from micromirror roughness parameters obtained by white-light interferometry, and demonstrate a high sensitivity to changes in the surface topography. The technique thus seems promising for the fast and highly sensitive characterization of diffractive MMAs.

  17. Twenty-meter space telescope based on diffractive Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Early, James T.; Hyde, Roderick; Baron, Richard L.

    2004-02-01

    Diffractive lenses offer two potential advantages for very large aperture space telescopes; very loose surface-figure tolerances and physical implementation as thin, flat optical elements. In order to actually realize these advantages one must be able to build large diffractive lenses with adequate optical precision and also to compactly stow the lens for launch and then fully deploy it in space. We will discuss the recent fabrication and assembly demonstration of a 5m glass diffractive Fresnel lens at LLNL. Optical performance data from smaller full telescopes with diffractive lens and corrective optics show diffraction limited performance with broad bandwidths. A systems design for a 20m space telescope will be presented. The primary optic can be rolled to fit inside of the standard fairings of the Delta IV vehicle. This configuration has a simple deployment and requires no orbital assembly. A twenty meter visible telescope could have a significant impact in conventional astronomy with eight times the resolution of Hubble and over sixty times the light gathering capacity. If the light scattering is made acceptable, this telescope could also be used in the search for terrestrial planets.

  18. Twenty Meter Space Telescope Based on Diffractive Fresnel Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Hyde, R; Baron, R

    2003-06-26

    Diffractive lenses offer two potential advantages for very large aperture space telescopes; very loose surface-figure tolerances and physical implementation as thin, flat optical elements. In order to actually realize these advantages one must be able to build large diffractive lenses with adequate optical precision and also to compactly stow the lens for launch and then fully deploy it in space. We will discuss the recent fabrication and assembly demonstration of a 5m glass diffractive Fresnel lens at LLNL. Optical performance data from smaller full telescopes with diffractive lens and corrective optics show diffraction limited performance with broad bandwidths. A systems design for a 20m space telescope will be presented. The primary optic can be rolled to fit inside of the standard fairings of the Delta IV vehicle. This configuration has a simple deployment and requires no orbital assembly. A twenty meter visible telescope could have a significant impact in conventional astronomy with eight times the resolution of Hubble and over sixty times the light gathering capacity. If the light scattering is made acceptable, this telescope could also be used in the search for terrestrial planets.

  19. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  20. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  1. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  2. Femtosecond free-electron laser x-ray diffraction data sets for algorithm development.

    PubMed

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Steinbrener, Jan; Lomb, Lukas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Hampton, Christina Y; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barends, Thomas R M; Bostedt, Christoph; Bott, Mario; Bozek, John D; Coppola, Nicola; Cryle, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Doak, R Bruce; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Hömke, André; Holl, Peter; Jönsson, Olof; Kimmel, Nils; Krasniqi, Faton; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R N C; Marchesini, Stefano; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schulz, Joachim; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C H; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Stier, Gunter; Svenda, Martin; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Bogan, Michael J; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-02-13

    We describe femtosecond X-ray diffraction data sets of viruses and nanoparticles collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The data establish the first large benchmark data sets for coherent diffraction methods freely available to the public, to bolster the development of algorithms that are essential for developing this novel approach as a useful imaging technique. Applications are 2D reconstructions, orientation classification and finally 3D imaging by assembling 2D patterns into a 3D diffraction volume.

  3. Femtosecond free-electron laser x-ray diffraction data sets for algorithm development.

    PubMed

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Steinbrener, Jan; Lomb, Lukas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Hampton, Christina Y; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barends, Thomas R M; Bostedt, Christoph; Bott, Mario; Bozek, John D; Coppola, Nicola; Cryle, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Doak, R Bruce; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Hömke, André; Holl, Peter; Jönsson, Olof; Kimmel, Nils; Krasniqi, Faton; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R N C; Marchesini, Stefano; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schulz, Joachim; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C H; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Stier, Gunter; Svenda, Martin; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Bogan, Michael J; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-02-13

    We describe femtosecond X-ray diffraction data sets of viruses and nanoparticles collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The data establish the first large benchmark data sets for coherent diffraction methods freely available to the public, to bolster the development of algorithms that are essential for developing this novel approach as a useful imaging technique. Applications are 2D reconstructions, orientation classification and finally 3D imaging by assembling 2D patterns into a 3D diffraction volume. PMID:22418172

  4. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  5. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  6. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  7. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  8. Wavelength-division multiplexed optical integrated circuit with vertical diffraction grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Forouhar, Siamak (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor optical integrated circuit for wave division multiplexing has a semiconductor waveguide layer, a succession of diffraction grating points in the waveguide layer along a predetermined diffraction grating contour, a semiconductor diode array in the waveguide layer having plural optical ports facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a first direction, respective semiconductor diodes in the array corresponding to respective ones of a predetermined succession of wavelengths, an optical fiber having one end thereof terminated at the waveguide layer, the one end of the optical fiber facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a second direction, wherein the diffraction grating points are spatially distributed along the predetermined contour in such a manner that the succession of diffraction grating points diffracts light of respective ones of the succession of wavelengths between the one end of the optical fiber and corresponding ones of the optical ports.

  9. Aptamer-functionalized hydrogel diffraction gratings for the human thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Xiaogong

    2013-07-01

    The aptamer-functionalized hydrogel diffraction gratings were successfully fabricated by incorporating an aptamer and its complementary sequence as crosslinking junctions in the network structure. The gratings showed a sensitive response to human thrombin as read out from the diffracted light.

  10. Studies on X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Huijie

    This dissertation includes three main parts: studies on coherence requirements for the diffraction microscopy experiments, ice formation on frozen-hydrated sample during data collection, and centering of the diffraction data sets. These three subjects are all in support of our groups overall goal of high resolution 3D imaging of frozen hydrated eukaryotic cells via x-ray diffraction microscopy. X-ray diffraction microscopy requires coherent illumination. However, the actual degree of coherence at some beamlines has never been tested. In research on coherence, our first aim is to determine the transverse coherence width at the sample plane at BL 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An analytical calculation of the coherence at the sample plane is presented. Experimental diffraction patterns of pinhole-pair samples were also taken at the beamline to determine the coherence. Due to the irregular shape of the pinholes and other optics complexity, it was very difficult to fit the data with known theoretical equations as it was traditionally done with 1D data. However, we found out that the auto-correlation function shows clearly three spots. Theoretical calculation have been carried out to show that the degree of coherence can be obtained from the intensities of the three spots. These results are compared with the results from the analytical calculation. We then perform a simulation, showing the required transverse coherence width for reconstructing samples with a given size. Ice accumulation has been a major problem in X-ray diffraction microscopy with frozen hydrated samples. Since the ice structure is different from point to point, we cannot subtract the scattering from ice, nor assume a completely "empty" region outside the finite support constraint area as required for reconstruction. Ice forms during the sample preparation and transfer. However, from the tests we did in September 2007, we found that the ice layer thickens

  11. Hand held phase-shifting diffraction Moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1994-09-20

    An interferometer is described in which a coherent beam of light is generated within a remote case and transmitted to a hand held unit tethered to said remote case, said hand held unit having optical elements for directing a pair of mutually coherent collimated laser beams at a diffraction grating. Data from the secondary or diffracted beams are then transmitted to a separate video and data acquisition system for recording and analysis for load induced deformation or for identification purposes. Means are also provided for shifting the phase of one incident beam relative to the other incident beam and being controlled from within said remote case. 4 figs.

  12. Hand held phase-shifting diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    An interferometer in which a coherent beam of light is generated within a remote case and transmitted to a hand held unit tethered to said remote case, said hand held unit having optical elements for directing a pair of mutually coherent collimated laser beams at a diffraction grating. Data from the secondary or diffracted beams are then transmitted to a separate video and data acquisition system for recording and analysis for load induced deformation or for identification purposes. Means are also provided for shifting the phase of one incident beam relative to the other incident beam and being controlled from within said remote case.

  13. Hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophe and rainbow scattering from spheroidal drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Trinh, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    Short-wavelength scattering from drops whose shapes closely approximate that of an oblate spheroid with a vertical short or symmetry axis have been studied. The drops were illuminated by a horizontally propagating gaussian beam with a wavelength of 633 nm. The drops were observed to scatter in the horizontal rainbow region with patterns like those of hyperbolic-umblic (classification D4(+)) diffraction catastrophes. Visible D4(+) diffraction patterns observed previously include light transmitted by frosted glass surfaces and by liquid lenses clinging to tilted glass plates.

  14. Additive manufacturing of a trifocal diffractive-refractive lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, Ulf; El-Tamer, Ayman; Doskolovich, Leonid L.; Bezus, Evgeni A.; Reiß, Stefan; Stolz, Heinrich; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Stachs, Oliver; Chichkov, Boris

    2016-08-01

    The application of two-photon polymerization and molding for the fabrication of a multifocal diffractive-refractive lens operating in water is studied. The fabricated lens is of aspheric shape and combines diffractive and refractive parts in a single element to generate three foci. The lens performance is characterized by visualization of the beam propagation in a transparent basin filled with water containing fluorescein. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the theoretical description. The obtained results are promising for the realization of trifocal intraocular lenses with predetermined light intensity distribution between the foci.

  15. Diffractive Higgs Production from Intrinsic Heavy Flavors in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Kopeliovich, Boris; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, Jacques

    2006-03-31

    We propose a novel mechanism for exclusive diffractive Higgs production pp {yields} pHp in which the Higgs boson carries a significant fraction of the projectile proton momentum. This mechanism will provide a clear experimental signal for Higgs production due to the small background in this kinematic region. The key assumption underlying our analysis is the presence of intrinsic heavy flavor components of the proton bound state, whose existence at high light-cone momentum fraction x has growing experimental and theoretical support. We also discuss the implications of this picture for exclusive diffractive quarkonium and other channels.

  16. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  17. Optical Transitions in Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells: Ellipsometry, Density Functional Theory, and Quantum Efficiency Analyses for CH3NH3PbI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirayama, Masaki; Kadowaki, Hideyuki; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Sugita, Takeshi; Tamakoshi, Masato; Kato, Masato; Fujiseki, Takemasa; Murata, Daisuke; Hara, Shota; Murakami, Takurou N.; Fujimoto, Shohei; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced photocarrier generation is an essential process in all solar cells, including organic-inorganic hybrid (CH3NH3PbI3 ) solar cells, which exhibit a high short-circuit current density (Jsc ) of approximately 20 mA /cm2 . Although the high Jsc observed in the hybrid solar cells relies on strong electron-photon interaction, the optical transitions in the perovskite material remain unclear. Here, we report artifact-free CH3NH3PbI3 optical constants extracted from ultrasmooth perovskite layers without air exposure and assign all of the optical transitions in the visible and ultraviolet region unambiguously, based on density-functional theory (DFT) analysis that assumes a simple pseudocubic crystal structure. From the self-consistent spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of the ultrasmooth CH3NH3PbI3 layers, we find that the absorption coefficients of CH3NH3PbI3 (α =3.8 ×104 cm-1 at 2.0 eV) are comparable to those of CuInGaSe2 and CdTe, and high α values reported in earlier studies are overestimated seriously by the extensive surface roughness of CH3NH3PbI3 layers. The polarization-dependent DFT calculations show that CH3NH3 + interacts strongly with the PbI3 - cage, modifying the CH3NH3PbI3 dielectric function in the visible region rather significantly. In particular, the transition matrix element of CH3NH3PbI3 varies, depending on the position of CH3NH3 + within the Pb—I network. When the effect of CH3NH3 + on the optical transition is eliminated in the DFT calculation, the CH3NH3PbI3 dielectric function deduced from DFT shows an excellent agreement with the experimental result. As a result, distinct optical transitions observed at E0(Eg)=1.61 eV , E1=2.53 eV , and E2=3.24 eV in CH3NH3PbI3 are attributed to the direct semiconductor-type transitions at the R , M , and X points in the pseudocubic Brillouin zone, respectively. We further perform the quantum efficiency (QE) analysis for a standard hybrid-perovskite solar cell incorporating a mesoporous TiO2

  18. Fresnel Diffraction for CTR Microbunching

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.

    2009-01-22

    Laser beams of high intensities are routinely used for IFEL experiments. Such beams can potentially destroy microbunching diagnostic tools such as coherent transition radiation foils due to their low damage thresholds. Near-field Fresnel diffraction scheme for termination of CO{sub 2} laser beam has been experimentally studied and is presented in this paper. Novel THz camera was utilized for such study.

  19. Diffraction Plates for Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the computer generation of random and regular arrays of apertures on photographic film and their applications for classroom demonstrations of the Fraunhofer patterns produced by simple and complex apertures, Babinet's principle, resolution according to the Rayleigh criterion, and many other aspects of diffraction. (LC)

  20. Phonons from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Louca, D.; Roeder, H. )

    1999-09-01

    The spherically averaged structure function S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) obtained from pulsed neutron powder diffraction contains both elastic and inelastic scattering via an integral over energy. The Fourier transformation of S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) to real space, as is done in the pair density function (PDF) analysis, regularizes the data, i.e., it accentuates the diffuse scattering. We present a technique which enables the extraction of off-center ([vert bar][bold q][vert bar][ne]0) phonon information from powder diffraction experiments by comparing the experimental PDF with theoretical calculations based on standard interatomic potentials and the crystal symmetry. This procedure [dynamics from powder diffraction] has been [ital successfully] implemented as demonstrated here for two systems, a simple metal fcc Ni and an ionic crystal CaF[sub 2]. Although computationally intensive, this data analysis allows for a phonon based modeling of the PDF, and additionally provides off-center phonon information from neutron powder diffraction. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society