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Sample records for light microscopic analysis

  1. Automated dimensional analysis using a light-sectioning microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, J.; Lightman, A.; Poe, A.; Caldwell, R.

    1988-12-31

    A computer vision system has been integrated with a modified light-sectioning microscope for quality control and inspection of a machined part whose critical dimensions are 30 to 300 {mu}m. Height measurements were determined by analysis of the projected light-section line. Transverse measurements were made using the microscope in a traditional configuration with illumination from selected elements of an external LED ring array. The light section irradiance was under computer control to accommodate the spatial variations in surface reflectance whose dynamic range exceeded that of the vision system. Part features are located by the vision system. Edges and line centers are then measured to sub-pixel resolution with a gray-level analysis algorithm. This paper describes the design and operation of this system. Details of the measurement process and analysis algorithms are provided.

  2. Microscopic vision modeling method by direct mapping analysis for micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezong; Zhao, Zhizhong; Wang, Junshuai

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel and high-precision microscopic vision modeling method, which can be used for 3D data reconstruction in micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope. This method consists of four parts: image distortion correction, disparity distortion correction, initial vision model and residual compensation model. First, the method of image distortion correction is proposed. Image data required by image distortion correction comes from stereo images of calibration sample. The geometric features of image distortions can be predicted though the shape deformation of lines constructed by grid points in stereo images. Linear and polynomial fitting methods are applied to correct image distortions. Second, shape deformation features of disparity distribution are discussed. The method of disparity distortion correction is proposed. Polynomial fitting method is applied to correct disparity distortion. Third, a microscopic vision model is derived, which consists of two models, i.e., initial vision model and residual compensation model. We derive initial vision model by the analysis of direct mapping relationship between object and image points. Residual compensation model is derived based on the residual analysis of initial vision model. The results show that with maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1mm in X direction, 2.9mm in Y direction and 2.25mm in Z direction, our model achieves a precision of 0.01mm in X and Y directions and 0.015mm in Z direction. Comparison of our model with traditional pinhole camera model shows that two kinds of models have a similar reconstruction precision of X coordinates. However, traditional pinhole camera model has a lower precision of Y and Z coordinates than our model. The method proposed in this paper is very helpful for the micro-gripping system based on SLM microscopic vision.

  3. Light microscopic analysis of mitochondrial heterogeneity in cell populations and within single cells.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Stefan; Stoldt, Stefan; Neumann, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the shapes of individual multicellular organisms is a daily experience. Likewise, even a quick glance through the ocular of a light microscope reveals the morphological heterogeneities in genetically identical cultured cells, whereas heterogeneities on the level of the organelles are much less obvious. This short review focuses on intracellular heterogeneities at the example of the mitochondria and their analysis by fluorescence microscopy. The overall mitochondrial shape as well as mitochondrial dynamics can be studied by classical (fluorescence) light microscopy. However, with an organelle diameter generally close to the resolution limit of light, the heterogeneities within mitochondria cannot be resolved with conventional light microscopy. Therefore, we briefly discuss here the potential of subdiffraction light microscopy (nanoscopy) to study inner-mitochondrial heterogeneities.

  4. Light microscopic image analysis system to quantify immunoreactive terminal area apposed to nerve cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. C.; D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Polyakov, I.; Daunton, N. G.

    1997-01-01

    The present report describes a desktop computer-based method for the quantitative assessment of the area occupied by immunoreactive terminals in close apposition to nerve cells in relation to the perimeter of the cell soma. This method is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routines incorporated in NIH-Image public domain software. Pyramidal cells of layer V of the somatosensory cortex outlined by GABA immunolabeled terminals were chosen for our analysis. A Leitz Diaplan light microscope was employed for the visualization of the sections. A Sierra Scientific Model 4030 CCD camera was used to capture the images into a Macintosh Centris 650 computer. After preprocessing, filtering was performed on the power spectrum in the frequency domain produced by the FFT operation. An inverse FFT with filter procedure was employed to restore the images to the spatial domain. Pasting of the original image to the transformed one using a Boolean logic operation called 'AND'ing produced an image with the terminals enhanced. This procedure allowed the creation of a binary image using a well-defined threshold of 128. Thus, the terminal area appears in black against a white background. This methodology provides an objective means of measurement of area by counting the total number of pixels occupied by immunoreactive terminals in light microscopic sections in which the difficulties of labeling intensity, size, shape and numerical density of terminals are avoided.

  5. Semi-automated 3D leaf reconstruction and analysis of trichome patterning from light microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Failmezger, Henrik; Jaegle, Benjamin; Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin; Tresch, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Trichomes are leaf hairs that are formed by single cells on the leaf surface. They are known to be involved in pathogen resistance. Their patterning is considered to emerge from a field of initially equivalent cells through the action of a gene regulatory network involving trichome fate promoting and inhibiting factors. For a quantitative analysis of single and double mutants or the phenotypic variation of patterns in different ecotypes, it is imperative to statistically evaluate the pattern reliably on a large number of leaves. Here we present a method that enables the analysis of trichome patterns at early developmental leaf stages and the automatic analysis of various spatial parameters. We focus on the most challenging young leaf stages that require the analysis in three dimensions, as the leaves are typically not flat. Our software TrichEratops reconstructs 3D surface models from 2D stacks of conventional light-microscope pictures. It allows the GUI-based annotation of different stages of trichome development, which can be analyzed with respect to their spatial distribution to capture trichome patterning events. We show that 3D modeling removes biases of simpler 2D models and that novel trichome patterning features increase the sensitivity for inter-accession comparisons.

  6. Semi-automated 3D Leaf Reconstruction and Analysis of Trichome Patterning from Light Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin; Tresch, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Trichomes are leaf hairs that are formed by single cells on the leaf surface. They are known to be involved in pathogen resistance. Their patterning is considered to emerge from a field of initially equivalent cells through the action of a gene regulatory network involving trichome fate promoting and inhibiting factors. For a quantitative analysis of single and double mutants or the phenotypic variation of patterns in different ecotypes, it is imperative to statistically evaluate the pattern reliably on a large number of leaves. Here we present a method that enables the analysis of trichome patterns at early developmental leaf stages and the automatic analysis of various spatial parameters. We focus on the most challenging young leaf stages that require the analysis in three dimensions, as the leaves are typically not flat. Our software TrichEratops reconstructs 3D surface models from 2D stacks of conventional light-microscope pictures. It allows the GUI-based annotation of different stages of trichome development, which can be analyzed with respect to their spatial distribution to capture trichome patterning events. We show that 3D modeling removes biases of simpler 2D models and that novel trichome patterning features increase the sensitivity for inter-accession comparisons. PMID:23637587

  7. Multiparameter breast cancer cell image analysis for objective estimation of nuclear grade: comparison with light microscopic observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzins, Juris; Sneiders, Uldis; Plegere, Daina; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Grigalinovica, Romalda

    2000-04-01

    We performed a multi parameter image analysis assessment of breast cancer cell population nuclear grade (NG), which is regarded as one of the main prognostic factors for treatment efficacy and survival of the patients and compared it with light microscopic estimation of NG. Cytological imprint slides from 20 ductal carcinomas were stained according to Leischmann-AzureII-eosine method, and NG was estimated by light microscopic observation according to Black in Fisher's modification. Simultaneously, using specially elaborated software, in each patient 100 cancer cells were analyzed for nuclear perimeter, diameter, area, nucleolar area, and average intensity of staining. The chromatin structure was assessed using mean diameter of chromatin grains and relatively chromatic are within the nucleus. Light microscopic estimation revealed 4/15 grade 2 and 7/15 grade 3 tumors out of 15 filtrating ductal carcinomas, with 4/15 classified as intermediate between grade 2-3. Multifactoral linear correlation coefficient r equals 0.39, p < 0.001 for ductal cancer, higher NG comes with increasing nucleolar area, nuclear roundness factor, nuclear are, and chromatin area within the cell nucleus. Image analysis may yield precise information on NG as a prognostic factor in breast cancer patients.

  8. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  9. Light and electron microscopic analysis of tattoos treated by Q-switched ruby laser

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.R.; Anderson, R.R.; Gange, R.W.; Michaud, N.A.; Flotte, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    Short-pulse laser exposures can be used to alter pigmented structures in tissue by selective photothermolysis. Potential mechanisms of human tattoo pigment lightening with Q-switched ruby laser were explored by light and electron microscopy. Significant variation existed between and within tattoos. Electron microscopy of untreated tattoos revealed membrane-bound pigment granules, predominantly within fibroblasts and macrophages, and occasionally in mast cells. These granules contained pigment particles ranging from 2-in diameter. Immediately after exposure, dose-related injury was observed in cells containing pigment. Some pigment particles were smaller and lamellated. At fluences greater than or equal to 3 J/cm2, dermal vacuoles and homogenization of collagen bundles immediately adjacent to extracellular pigment were occasionally observed. A brisk neutrophilic infiltrate was apparent by 24 h. Eleven days later, the pigment was again intracellular. Half of the biopsies at 150 d revealed a mild persistent lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no fibrosis except for one case of clinical scarring. These findings confirm that short-pulse radiation can be used to selectively disrupt cells containing tattoo pigments. The physial alteration of pigment granules, redistribution, and elimination appear to account for clinical lightening of the tattoos.

  10. Desmosomes: A light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of desmosomes in odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Pratima; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Desmosomes together with adherens junctions represent the major adhesive cell–cell junctions of epithelial cells. Any damage to these junctions leads to loss of structural balance. Aim: The present study was designed to analyze the desmosomal junctions in different odontogenic cysts and compare them with their corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)   stained sections. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cysts (DCs), radicular cysts (RCs) and normal mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sections was then carried out of all the sections. The area of interest on H and E stained section was marked and this marking was later superimposed onto the corresponding unstained sections and were subjected to SEM analysis. Results and Observations: OKC at ×1000 magnification showed many prominent desmosomes. However, an increase in the intercellular space was also noted. SEM analysis demonstrated similar findings with the presence of many desmosomes, though they were seen to be damaged and fragile. H and E stained DC under oil immersion did not show any prominent desmosomes. SEM analysis of the same confirmed the observation and very minimal number were seen with a very condense arrangement of the epithelial cells. RC at ×1000 magnification revealed plenty of desmosomes, which were again confirmed by SEM. Conclusion: The number and quality of desmosomal junctions in all the cysts has a role in the clinical behavior of the cyst. PMID:25948985

  11. Light microscopic and color television image analysis of the development of staining on chlorhexidine-treated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Prayitno, S W

    1980-01-01

    Tooth staining with the use of chlorhexidine preparations is the major problem of long term application. Evidence suggests that the staining arises from a cationic/anionic interacation of chlorhexidine with components of certain dietary materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare visually the development of tea and coffee staining on acrylic and tooth specimens treated with chlorhexidine and to follow the development of tea staining on perspex by light microscopy and color television image analysis. All specimens were maintained in their respective beverage for 5 days with test specimens removed three times a day and placed for 2 minutes in an 0.2% chlorhexidine solution. Both test tooth and acrylic specimens showed comparably and markedly increased staining by the beverages compared with control specimens. Color television image analysis of test specimens demonstrated more marked and rapid development of tea staining when studied on a daily basis. Microscopic examination revealed the staining to be made up of small particles of material which increased in size and coalesced with time. Again, marked differences were apparent in the stain on test and control specimens. The results of this in vitro method provided further evidence for a dietary aetiology to chlorhexidine staining and were consistent with clinical findings. Such a method may be useful to assess staining arising from the use of other anti-plaque agents.

  12. Light and electron microscopic analysis of the somata and parent axons innervating the rat upper molar and lower incisor pulp.

    PubMed

    Paik, S K; Park, K P; Lee, S K; Ma, S K; Cho, Y S; Kim, Y K; Rhyu, I J; Ahn, D K; Yoshida, A; Bae, Y C

    2009-09-15

    The morphology of intradental nerve fibers of permanent teeth and of continuously growing rodent incisors has been studied in detail but little information is available on the parent axons that give rise to these fibers. Here we examined the axons and somata of trigeminal neurons that innervate the rat upper molar and lower incisor pulp using tracing with horseradish peroxidase and light and electron microscopic analysis. The majority (approximately 80%) of the parent axons in the proximal root of the trigeminal ganglion that innervated either molar or incisor pulp were small myelinated fibers (<20 microm(2) cross-sectional area). The remaining approximately 20% of the fibers were almost exclusively large myelinated for the molar pulp and unmyelinated for the incisor pulp. The majority of neuronal somata in the trigeminal ganglion that innervated either molar (48%) or incisor pulp (62%) were medium in size (300-600 microm(2) cross-sectional area). Large somata (>600 microm(2)) constituted 34% and 20% of the trigeminal neurons innervating molar and incisor pulp, respectively, while small somata (<300 microm(2)) constituted 17% of the molar and 18% of the incisor neurons. The present study revealed that the morphology of parent axons of dental primary sensory neurons may differ from that of their intradental branches, and also suggests that the nerve fiber function may be carried out differently in the molar and incisor pulp in the rat.

  13. Microscope spectrometer for light scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, Aude; Lopez-Rios, Tomas; Dumont, Sylvain; Gay, Frederic; Quemerais, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We describe a setup including a microscope to study volumes of a few {mu}m{sup 3} by static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) in a backscattering configuration. Light scattered by individual objects of micrometric size can be analyzed in the 400-800 nm spectral range. This setup can also be employed to study both diluted and concentrated colloidal solutions by DLS measurements. For diluted solutions we found evidence of the fluctuations of the number of particles in a confocal volume. We discuss their contribution to the autocorrelation function of the scattered intensity measured as a function of time.

  14. Quantitative characterization of carbon/carbon composites matrix texture based on image analysis using polarized light microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Hou, Xianghui; Li, Hejun

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative characteristic method was proposed for characterizing the matrix texture of carbon/carbon(C/C) composites, which determined the mechanical and physical properties of C/C composites. Based on the cloud theory that was commonly used for uncertain reasoning and the transformation between quantitative and qualitative characterization, so the relationship between the extinction angle and texture types was built by the cloud models for describing the texture of microstructure, moreover, linguistic controllers were established to analyze the matrix texture in accordance with the features of the polarized light microscope (PLM) image. On this basis, the extinction angle could be calculated from the PLM image of the C/C composites. In contrast to the results of measurement, the errors between calculative values and measured values were maintained 1-2° in basically. Meanwhile, the PLM image of C/C composites was segmented by the component, in particular, the matrix with mixed textures was further segmented by the difference of texture. It means that the quantitative characterization of C/C composites matrix based on single PLM image has been realized.

  15. Analysis of signal processing in vestibular circuits with a novel light-emitting diodes-based fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Direnberger, Stephan; Banchi, Roberto; Brosel, Sonja; Seebacher, Christian; Laimgruber, Stefan; Uhl, Rainer; Felmy, Felix; Straka, Hans; Kunz, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Optical visualization of neural network activity is limited by imaging system-dependent technical tradeoffs. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a powerful low-cost and flexible imaging system with high spectral variability and unique spatio-temporal precision for simultaneous optical recording and manipulation of neural activity of large cell groups. The system comprises eight high-power light-emitting diodes, a camera with a large metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor and a high numerical aperture water-dipping objective. It allows fast and precise control of excitation and simultaneous low noise imaging at high resolution. Adjustable apertures generated two independent areas of variable size and position for simultaneous optical activation and image capture. The experimental applicability of this system was explored in semi-isolated preparations of larval axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) with intact inner ear organs and central nervous circuits. Cyclic galvanic stimulation of semicircular canals together with glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-uncaging caused a corresponding modulation of Ca(2+) transients in central vestibular neurons. These experiments revealed specific cellular properties as well as synaptic interactions between excitatory and inhibitory inputs, responsible for spatio-temporal-specific sensory signal processing. Location-specific GABA-uncaging revealed a potent inhibitory shunt of vestibular nerve afferent input in the predominating population of tonic vestibular neurons, indicating a considerable impact of local and commissural inhibitory circuits on the processing of head/body motion-related signals. The discovery of these previously unknown properties of vestibular computations demonstrates the merits of our novel microscope system for experimental applications in the field of neurobiology.

  16. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  17. Microscopic Imaging and Spectroscopy with Scattered Light

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Optical contrast based on elastic scattering interactions between light and matter can be used to probe cellular structure and dynamics, and image tissue architecture. The quantitative nature and high sensitivity of light scattering signals to subtle alterations in tissue morphology, as well as the ability to visualize unstained tissue in vivo, has recently generated significant interest in optical scatter based biosensing and imaging. Here we review the fundamental methodologies used to acquire and interpret optical scatter data. We report on recent findings in this field and present current advances in optical scatter techniques and computational methods. Cellular and tissue data enabled by current advances in optical scatter spectroscopy and imaging stand to impact a variety of biomedical applications including clinical tissue diagnosis, in vivo imaging, drug discovery and basic cell biology. PMID:20617940

  18. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  19. Adding an extra dimension to what students see through the light microscope: a lab exercise demonstrating critical analysis for microscopy students.

    PubMed

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate aspects of a problem-based learning approach, envisaging growth not just in two dimensions, but in three dimensions. For some cells, what appears to be pulsatile growth could also be explained by growth at a constant rate up and down in the z-axis. Depending on the diffraction pattern generated by the tip of the cell, this movement in the z-axis could go undetected. This raises the possibility that pulsatile growth seen in some species may be an artifact generated by the limitations of the light microscope. Students were subsequently asked to rate their awareness of the need to think critically about what they see through a microscope, using a scale of 1 (unaware) to 5 (very much aware). Prior to doing the lab exercise, the mean rating was 2.7; this increased to 4.4 after the lab. The students also indicated a likelihood of being more critical in their thinking in other aspects of their biology curriculum.

  20. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-03-15

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04).

  1. Achondrogenesis type I: light and electron-microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Molz, G; Spycher, M A

    1980-06-01

    The light- and electron-microscopic structure of articular and costal cartilage in a case of achondrogenesis type I has been described. The most characteristic ultrastructural change in the chondrocytes was conspicuous dilatation of the rough endoplasmatic reticulum (RER) which contained amorphous electronopaque material. This change in the RER was accompanied by marked hypertrophy of the Golgi apparatus; the matrix was basically unchanged.

  2. Long-working-distance incoherent-light interference microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; de Boer, Maarten P; Corwin, Alex D

    2005-12-20

    We describe the design and operation of a long-working-distance, incoherent light interference microscope that has been developed to address the growing demand for new microsystem characterization tools. The design of the new microscope is similar to that of a Linnik interference microscope and thus preserves the full working distance of the long-working-distance objectives utilized. However, in contrast to a traditional Linnik microscope, the new microscope does not rely on the use of matched objectives in the sample and the reference arms of the interferometer. An adjustable optical configuration has been devised that allows the total optical path length, wavefront curvature, and dispersion of the reference arm to be matched to the sample arm of the interferometer. The reference arm configuration can be adjusted to provide matching for 5x, 10x, and 20x long-working-distance objectives in the sample arm. In addition to retaining the full working distance of the sample arm objectives, the new design allows interference images to be acquired in situations in which intervening windows are necessary, such as occur with packaged microsystems, microfluidic devices, and cryogenic, vacuum, or environmental chamber studies of microsystem performance. The interference microscope is compatible with phase-shifting interferometry, vertical scanning interferometry, and stroboscopic measurement of dynamic processes.

  3. Long working-distance, incoherent light interference microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David

    2005-06-01

    We describe the design and operation of a long-working-distance, incoherent light interference microscope that has been developed to address the growing demand for new microsystem characterization tools. The design of the new microscope is similar to that of a Linnik interference microscope and thus preserves the full working distance of the long-working-distance objectives utilized. However, in contrast to a traditional Linnik microscope, the new microscope does not rely on the use of matched objectives in the sample and the reference arms of the interferometer. An adjustable optical configuration has been devised that allows the total optical path length, wavefront curvature, and dispersion of the reference arm to be matched to the sample arm of the interferometer. The reference arm configuration can be adjusted to provide matching for 5x, 10x, and 20x long-working-distance objectives in the sample arm. In addition to retaining the full working distance of the sample arm objectives, the new design allows interference images to be acquired in situations in which intervening windows are necessary, such as occur with packaged microsystems, microfluidic devices, and cryogenic, vacuum, or environmental chamber studies of microsystem performance. The interference microscope is compatible with phase-shifting interferometry, vertical scanning interferometry, and stroboscopic measurement of dynamic processes.

  4. Light sheet microscopes: Novel imaging toolbox for visualizing life's processes.

    PubMed

    Heddleston, John M; Chew, Teng-Leong

    2016-11-01

    Capturing dynamic processes in live samples is a nontrivial task in biological imaging. Although fluorescence provides high specificity and contrast compared to other light microscopy techniques, the photophysical principles of this method can have a harmful effect on the sample. Current advances in light sheet microscopy have created a novel imaging toolbox that allows for rapid acquisition of high-resolution fluorescent images with minimal perturbation of the processes of interest. Each unique design has its own advantages and limitations. In this review, we describe several cutting edge light sheet microscopes and their optimal applications.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic report of four fractured implants.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Piattelli, M; Scarano, A; Montesani, L

    1998-01-01

    Although they are fortunately rare, implant fractures can cause significant problems for both clinicians and patients. The authors present a light and scanning electron microscopic study of four fractured implants in two patients. Both patients had parafunctional habits (bruxism), hypertrophic masticatory muscles, and wear of occlusal surfaces. The scanning electron microscopic study of the fractured surfaces of all four implants showed the presence of fatigue striations. Bending overload was probably created by a combination of parafunctional forces, bone resorption, posterior location of the implants, and implant diameter.

  6. Thin laser light sheet microscope for microbial oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Eran; Jaffe, Jules S.; Long, Richard A.; Azam, Farooq

    2002-01-01

    Despite a growing need, oceanographers are limited by existing technological constrains and are unable to observe aquatic microbes in their natural setting. In order to provide a simple and easy to implement solution for such studies, a new Thin Light Sheet Microscope (TLSM) has been developed. The TLSM utilizes a well-defined sheet of laser light, which has a narrow (23 micron) axial dimension over a 1 mm x 1 mm field of view. This light sheet is positioned precisely within the depth of field of the microscope’s objective lens. The technique thus utilizes conventional microscope optics but replaces the illumination system. The advantages of the TLSM are two-fold: First, it concentrates light only where excitation is needed, thus maximizing the efficiency of the illumination source. Secondly, the TLSM maximizes image sharpness while at the same time minimizing the level of background noise. Particles that are not located within the objective's depth of field are not illuminated and therefore do not contribute to an out-of-focus image. Images from a prototype system that used SYBR Green I fluorescence stain in order to localize single bacteria are reported. The bacteria were in a relatively large and undisturbed volume of 4ml, which contained natural seawater. The TLSM can be used for fresh water studies of bacteria with no modification. The microscope permits the observation of interactions at the microscale and has potential to yield insights into how microbes structure pelagic ecosystems.

  7. Teaching Optics to Biology Students Through Constructing a Light Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    The microscope is familiar to many disciplines, including physics, materials science, chemistry, and the life sciences. It demonstrates fundamental aspects of ray and wave optics, making it an ideal system to help educate students in the basic concepts of optics and in measurement principles and techniques. We present an experimental system developed to teach students the basics of ray and wave optics. The students design, build, and test a light microscope made from optics components. We describe the equipment and the basic measurements that students can perform to develop experimental techniques to understand optics principles. Students measure the magnification and test the resolution of the microscope. The system is open and versatile to allow advanced projects such as epi-fluorescence, total internal reflection fluorescence, and optical trapping. We have used this equipment in an optics course, an advanced laboratory course, and graduate-level training modules.

  8. An auto-focusing system for white light microscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming; Deka, Juti Rani; Chen, Pei Jung; Chen, Yu Kuan; Cui, Changcai

    2008-12-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology the demand for high resolution measuring system is evolving at an ever-increasing pace. Microscope was initially used to detect the defect by connecting charge couple device (CCD) as an auxiliary device. In general, for microscopic measurement human eyes are used to focus on the sample. The adjustment depends on the operator's astute measurement ability, which affected the repeatability and accuracy of the readings. There is a need of high-speed microscope auto focusing system for industrial applications. The present investigation describes about the development of an autofocus system to carry out microscopic measurement more precisely and accurately with less time. The measurement system consists of a light source, two beam splitters, a movable sample stage and a Mirau's interferometer, a photo-detector and 8051 microcontroller (MCU89C51). The light reflected from the sample surface interferes with the light reflected from the reference and produce an interference pattern, which is imaged onto a CCD array. In the setup developed for the autofocus one extra beam splitter is placed in the path of interfered beam to the CCD. The beam splitter is placed at equal distances from the CCD and the photodetector. The focus position is determined from the voltage developed in the photo-detector due to the movement of sample stage of the microscope. The maximum voltage that obtained at the focus position is confirmed with the CCD image. Microcontroller is used to stop the controller at the focus position immediately once the sample stage reaches it. Software is developed to locate the maximum intensity position. The design may autofocus the interferometer within 4mm distance in 1 second. The auto-focusing not only provides enhanced repeatability and accuracy of the results at a faster rate but also minimizes operator involvement.

  9. Elastofibroma. A correlated light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kindblom, L G; Spicer, S S

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of elastofibroma located in the subscapular region of 3 men aged 66, 74, and 83 years, and a woman 70 years old are reported. A correlated light and electron microscopic study including ultrastructural examination of Verhoeff's iron-hematoxylin (VIH)-stained sections was performed. Light microscopically, the elastofibromas were characterized by connective tissue built up by collagen fibers and sclerotic masses mingled with numerous fibers and globules of elastin material. In one micron thick Epon sections these elastin fibers often revealed a central axis surrounded by a mantle composed of periodic segments giving them a necklace-like appearance. The ultrastructural findings of these elastin structures, stained with VIH, and the appearance of the stroma cells and their relation to the elastin indicate that elastofibroma is a non-neoplastic reactive lesion in which elastin material is synthesized by the stromal cells and predominantly laid down around preexisting elastic fibers.

  10. Versatile multispectral microscope based on light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Jayaweera, Hiran; Ålebring, Jens; Svanberg, Sune

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of a novel multispectral microscope, based on light-emitting diodes, capable of acquiring megapixel images in thirteen spectral bands from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The system captures images and spectra in transmittance, reflectance, and scattering modes. We present as examples of applications ground truth measurements for remote sensing and parasitology diagnostics. The system is a general purpose scientific instrument that could be used to develop dedicated simplified instruments with optimal bands and mode selection.

  11. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C; Sheridan, John T; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-06

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  12. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale. PMID:28059149

  13. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  14. Neuronal development in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus of the duck under normal and hypothyroid states: I. A light microscopic morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Y; Narayanan, C H

    1987-01-01

    Light microscopic morphometric procedures were used in order to examine the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) on the development of the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in the duck. A single vascular injection of a 0.2% solution of PTU was administered at a dosage of 2 microliter/gm embryo weight on embryonic day nine (E9). Control embryos received a similar dose of Ringer's solution. The following parameters of cytodifferentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V were studied: somal area profiles, nuclear area, and nuclear cytoplasmic ratios. In addition, the frequency of beak clapping was recorded from E16. Significant differences were observed in somal area profiles in the experimental group at E16 and E18 and in nuclear area profiles from E16 through hatching. Beak activity in the experimental embryos was drastically reduced. It is concluded that PTU induces a retardation in the differentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V which may lead to behavior deficits as evidenced by reduction of beak activity. These observations provide a basis for the study of interactions between thyroid hormone and specific neuronal systems in the emergence of an adaptive function.

  15. The Light Microscope Module Designed for Space Biological Science Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao

    The real-time observation and imaging techniques for the space science experiments has become more and more important. This paper will introduce the Light Microscope Module (LMM), which is an automatic acquisition mini-microscope designed for space biological science re-searches. The sample features including the shape and fluorescence images would be observed. The LMM consists of an illumination system of super bright LEDs, an optical system, a colour CCD camera, and a moving machine. Illumination will be provided in three colors (white, blue, and ultraviolet). It would search for the samples, then automatic focus on them and produce digital images. The LLM had been used in the biological science experiments on the Shijian-8 Satellite, which observed sample features including rat embryos and plant flowers, and researched the influence of samples in the space environments.

  16. Three-dimensional microscopic light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Ni, Rui; Pendlebury, Jonathon; McEwen, Bryce

    2017-03-01

    A microscopic particle image velocimetry (μ {PIV}) technique is developed based on light field microscopy and is applied to flow through a microchannel containing a backward-facing step. The only hardware difference from a conventional μPIV setup is the placement of a microlens array at the intermediate image plane of the microscope. The method combines this optical hardware alteration with post-capture computation to enable 3D reconstruction of particle fields. From these particle fields, we measure three-component velocity fields, but find that accurate velocity measurements are limited to the two in-plane components at discrete depths through the volume (i.e., 2C-3D). Results are compared with a computational fluid dynamics simulation.

  17. Microscopic theory of diffraction of light from a small hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2014-10-01

    On the basis of the Maxwell-Lorentz local-field equations and nonlocal linear response theory, a self-consistent microscopic Green function theory of diffraction of light from a single hole in a thin and plane metallic screen is established. By subtracting the scattering of identical incident fields from screens with and without a hole, a causal effective optical aperture response tensor is introduced. An approximate expression is derived for the aperture response tensor in the limit where the screen behaves like an electric-dipole absorber and radiator. In this limit the internal electron dynamics is that of a quantum well. For a screen so thin that its bound electron motion can be described by a single quantum level, a approach for a quantum mechanical calculation of the aperture response tensor is presented. When the linear dimensions of the hole become sufficiently small the so-called aperture field, defined as the difference between the prevailing electric field with and that without a hole, becomes identical to the field from an incident-field-induced electric dipole with anisotropic linear polarizability. Our theory is formulated in such a manner that preknowledge only of (i) the incident electromagnetic field and (ii) the light-unperturbed optical electron properties (the microscopic conductivity tensor) of the screen with the geometrically given hole is needed. Since the microscopic theory allows for the presence of an (oscillating) component of the sheet current density perpendicular to the plane of the screen, a generalization of (i) the standard jump conditions of the field across the sheet and (ii) the reflection symmetries of the various fields in the plane of the screen is worked out. As our theory deviates radically from the approach of all classical diffraction theories, which are based on the macroscopic Maxwell equations and some kind of pheno-menological expression for the screen conductivity σ (often just σ →∞), we give a brief review of

  18. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  19. Microscopic saw mark analysis: an empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Wiersema, Jason M; Peters, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic saw mark analysis is a well published and generally accepted qualitative analytical method. However, little research has focused on identifying and mitigating potential sources of error associated with the method. The presented study proposes the use of classification trees and random forest classifiers as an optimal, statistically sound approach to mitigate the potential for error of variability and outcome error in microscopic saw mark analysis. The statistical model was applied to 58 experimental saw marks created with four types of saws. The saw marks were made in fresh human femurs obtained through anatomical gift and were analyzed using a Keyence digital microscope. The statistical approach weighed the variables based on discriminatory value and produced decision trees with an associated outcome error rate of 8.62-17.82%.

  20. A light and electron microscopic analysis of the convergent insular cortical and amygdaloid projections to the posterior lateral hypothalamus in the rat, with special reference to cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Tsumori, Toshiko; Yokota, Shigefumi; Qin, Yi; Oka, Tatsuro; Yasui, Yukihiko

    2006-11-01

    The synaptic organization between and among the insular cortex (IC) axons, central amygdaloid nucleus (ACe) axons and posterolateral hypothalamus (PLH) neurons was investigated in the rat using double anterograde tracing and anterograde tracing combined with postembedding immunogold analysis. After ipsilateral injections of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the IC and Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L) into the ACe, the conspicuous overlapping distribution of BDA-labeled axon terminals and PHA-L-labeled axon terminals was found in the PLH region just medial to the subthalamic nucleus ipsilateral to the injection sites. At the electron microscopic level, approximately two-thirds of the IC terminals made synapses with small-sized dendrites and the rest did with dendritic spines of the PLH neurons, whereas about 79%, 16% and 5% of the ACe terminals established synapses with small- to medium-sized dendrites, somata, and dendritic spines, respectively, of the PLH neurons. In addition, the IC axon terminals contained densely packed round clear vesicles and their synapses were of asymmetrical type. On the other hand, most of the ACe terminals contained not only pleomorphic clear vesicles but also dense-cored vesicles and their synapses were of symmetrical type although some ACe terminals contained densely packed round clear vesicles and formed asymmetrical synapses. Most of the postsynaptic elements received synaptic inputs from the IC or ACe terminals, and some of single postsynaptic elements received convergent synaptic inputs from both sets of terminals. Furthermore, almost all the ACe terminals were revealed to be immunoreactive for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), by using the anterograde BDA tracing technique combined with immunohistochemistry for GABA. The present data suggest that single PLH neurons are under the excitatory influence of the IC and/or inhibitory influence of the ACe in the circuitry involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions.

  1. Adding an Extra Dimension to What Students See through the Light Microscope: A Lab Exercise Demonstrating Critical Analysis for Microscopy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate…

  2. Light and electron microscopic analysis of enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in the basolateral amygdala, including evidence for convergence of enkephalin-containing axon terminals and norepinephrine transporter-containing axon terminals onto common targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyi; McDonald, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Modulatory interactions of opioids and norepinephrine (NE) in the anterior subdivision of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLa) are critical for the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing experiences. Although there have been several studies of the noradrenergic system in the amygdalar basolateral nuclear complex (BLC), little is known about the chemical neuroanatomy of opioid systems in this region. To address this knowledge gap the present study first examined the distribution of met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity (ENK-ir) in the BLC at the light microscopic level, and then utilized dual-labeling immunocytochemistry combined with electron microscopy to investigate the extent of convergence of NE and ENK terminals onto common structures in the BLa. Antibodies to ENK and the norepinephrine transporter (NET) were used in these studies. Light microscopic examination revealed that a subpopulation of small nonpyramidal neurons expressed ENK-ir in all nuclei of the BLC. In addition, the somata of some pyramidal cells exhibited light to moderate ENK-ir. ENK+ axon terminals were also observed. Ultrastructural analysis confined to the BLa revealed that most ENK+ axon terminals formed asymmetrical synapses that mainly contacted spines and shafts of thin dendrites. ENK+ terminals forming symmetrical synapses mainly contacted dendritic shafts. Approximately 20% of NET+ terminals contacted a structure that was also contacted by an ENK+ terminal and 6% of NET+ terminals contacted an ENK+ terminal. These findings suggest that ENK and NE terminals in the BLa may interact by targeting common dendrites and by direct interactions between the two types of terminals. PMID:26835559

  3. Light Microsopy Module, International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Brown, Daniel F.; O'Toole, Martin A.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Abbot-Hearn, Amber Ashley; Atherton, Arthur Johnson; Beltram, Alexander; Bozioney, Christopher M.; Brinkman, John Michael; Chestney, Louis S.; Czernec, Richard P.; Dial, William B.; Dombrosky, Deena M.; Eustace, John G.; Reid, Ryan James; Reinke, Sharon A.; Rogers, Christopher R.; Samrani, Joseph T.; Shumway, Steven Scott; Smith, Teresa Ann; Stroh, James R.; Storck, Jennifer L.; Werner, Christopher Raymond; Wilkinson, Myron A.; Zoldak, John T.; Grant, Nechelle M.; Loucks, Brian C.; Plastow, Richard A.; Pestak, Mark W.; Fletcher, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2015, if all goes as planned, five experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with a manual sample base -3 (ACE-M-3), [2] the Advanced Colloids Experiment with a Heated Base -1 (ACE-H-1), [3] (ACE-H-2), [4] the Advanced Plant Experiment -03 (APEX-03), and [5] the Microchannel Diffusion Experiment (MDE). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] New York University: Paul Chaikin, Andrew Hollingsworth, and Stefano Sacanna, [2] University of Pennsylvania: Arjun Yodh and Matthew Gratale, [3] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al., [4] from the University of Florida and CASIS: Anna-Lisa Paul and Rob Ferl, and [5] from the Methodist Hospital Research Institute from CASIS: Alessandro Grattoni and Giancarlo Canavese.

  4. Light-microscopic observations of individual microtubules reconstituted from brain tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, R; Miki-Noumura, T

    1975-12-01

    The course of polymerization of individual brain microtubules could be observed with a light microscope employing dark-field illumination. Statistical analysis of the increase in microtubule length during the polymerization was in accordance with the time course of viscosity change of the tubulin solution. After a plateau level in viscosity was attained, there was no significant change in histograms showing length distribution. These observations were confirmed with fixed and stained microtubules, using a phase-contrast microscope. Observations with dark-field illumination revealed that reconstituted microtubules depolymerized and disappeared immediately upon exposure to buffer containing CaCl2 or sulphydryl reagents such as p-chloromercuriphenyl sulphonic acid (PCMPS) and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). They were also cold-labile. The growth of heterogeneous microtubules which were assembled by mixing purified tubulin dimers with ciliary outer fibres could also be followed with these optical systems.

  5. X ray microscope assembly and alignment support and advanced x ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft x ray application in microscopy and projection lithography. The spherical Schwarzschild microscope consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for x ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. In order to reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles have been considered in this investigation. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical head reflecting two mirror microscope configurations.

  6. Dome lighting for insect imaging under a microscope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most basic element of photography is the interaction of light on the subject being imaged. In cases where magnification and clarity is of great importance, such as the imaging of insects for scientific illustration, controlling light can be especially challenging. The intense light needed to v...

  7. Using a university characterization facility to educate the public about microscopes: light microscopes to SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Nancy; Henderson, Walter

    2015-10-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN)1is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. The NNIN education office is located at the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. At Georgia Tech we offer programs that integrate the facility and its resources to educate the public about nanotechnology. One event that has proved highly successful involves using microscopes in our characterization suite to educate a diverse audience about a variety of imaging instruments. As part of the annual Atlanta Science Festival (ATLSF)2 we provided an event entitled: "What's all the Buzz about Nanotechnology?" which was open to the public and advertised through a variety of methods by the ATLSF. During the event, we provided hands-on demos, cleanroom tours, and activities with three of our microscopes in our recently opened Imaging and Characterization Facility: 1. Keyence VHX-600 Digital Microscope; 2. Hitachi SU823 FE-SEM; and 3. Hitachi TM 3000. During the two hour event we had approximately 150 visitors including many families with school-aged children. Visitors were invited to bring a sample for scanning with the TM-3000. This paper will discuss how to do such an event, lessons learned, and visitor survey results.

  8. Enhancing the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Noy; Yang, Samuel; Andalman, Aaron; Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Horowitz, Mark; Levoy, Marc

    2014-10-06

    Light field microscopy has been proposed as a new high-speed volumetric computational imaging method that enables reconstruction of 3-D volumes from captured projections of the 4-D light field. Recently, a detailed physical optics model of the light field microscope has been derived, which led to the development of a deconvolution algorithm that reconstructs 3-D volumes with high spatial resolution. However, the spatial resolution of the reconstructions has been shown to be non-uniform across depth, with some z planes showing high resolution and others, particularly at the center of the imaged volume, showing very low resolution. In this paper, we enhance the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding techniques. By including phase masks in the optical path of the microscope we are able to address this non-uniform resolution limitation. We have also found that superior control over the performance of the light field microscope can be achieved by using two phase masks rather than one, placed at the objective's back focal plane and at the microscope's native image plane. We present an extended optical model for our wavefront coded light field microscope and develop a performance metric based on Fisher information, which we use to choose adequate phase masks parameters. We validate our approach using both simulated data and experimental resolution measurements of a USAF 1951 resolution target; and demonstrate the utility for biological applications with in vivo volumetric calcium imaging of larval zebrafish brain.

  9. Shaping light: MOEMS deformable mirrors for microscopes and telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) have enabled rapid advances in applications ranging from large telescope astronomy and free space laser communication to biological microscopy and retinal imaging over the past decade. In this talk I describe our efforts at Boston University and at Boston Micromachines Corporation to design, fabricate, and control MOEMS DMs for adaptive optics (AO) applications. Integration of the DMs in AO systems is described, along with results demonstrating unprecedented advances in resolution and contrast in microscopes and telescopes challenged by unavoidable wavefront aberrations. MEMS-DM research offers the rare opportunity to introduce technology that is both more economical and more capable than the state-of-the-art.

  10. Pigmentosis tubae, a new entity: light and electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, G.A.; Reimann, B.E.; Greenberg, H.L.; Miles, P.A.

    1983-03-01

    The authors noted an unusual finding in the fallopian tubes of a 31-year-old woman who had received external and internal whole pelvis radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Aggregates of macrophages containing pigment, identified in a subepithelial location, were reminiscent of melanosis coli, which is caused by abuse of anthracene-containing laxatives. Electron microscopic examination of the pigment revealed cytoplasmic material with the appearance of lipofuscin, identical to the pigment described in cases of colonic melanosis. After a careful study of possible etiologic agents, it was concluded that the pigment most likely resulted from cellular damage caused by radiotherapy. The authors are not aware of any other reported case of this entity, which will be called pigmentosis tubae.

  11. Analysis on enhanced depth of field for integral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Tae; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Kim, Nam

    2012-10-08

    Depth of field of the integral imaging microscope is studied. In the integral imaging microscope, 3-D information is encoded as a form of elemental images Distance between intermediate plane and object point decides the number of elemental image and depth of field of integral imaging microscope. From the analysis, it is found that depth of field of the reconstructed depth plane image by computational integral imaging reconstruction is longer than depth of field of optical microscope. From analyzed relationship, experiment using integral imaging microscopy and conventional microscopy is also performed to confirm enhanced depth of field of integral imaging microscopy.

  12. Microscopic analysis of pear-shaped nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sd f interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  13. Design and analysis of multilayer x ray/XUV microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The design and analysis of a large number of normal incidence multilayer x ray microscopes based on the spherical mirror Schwarzschild configuration is examined. Design equations for the spherical mirror Schwarzschild microscopes are summarized and used to evaluate mirror parameters for microscopes with magnifications ranging from 2 to 50x. Ray tracing and diffraction analyses are carried out for many microscope configurations to determine image resolution as a function of system parameters. The results are summarized in three publication included herein. A preliminary study of advanced reflecting microscope configurations, where aspherics are used in place of the spherical microscope mirror elements, has indicated that the aspherical elements will improve off-axis image resolution and increase the effective field of view.

  14. Study of filtered light on potential retinal photic hazards with operation microscopes used for ocular surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Robert J.; Miller, Sharon A.; Byrnes, Gordon A.

    2002-02-01

    There have been numerous reports of retinal photic injury from operation microscopes used during cataract surgery. The risk of injury has been associated with the intensity of the light directed into the eye, short-wavelength emission, user technique, exposure time, and direct axial lighting. We evaluated use of light transmission filters to modify a tungsten-halogen light source spectrum to reduce the risk of retinal photic injury. A two-light source filter combination was found with a color profile acceptable for intraocular surgery that reduces the risk of retinal photic injury by a factor of approximately 2.5.

  15. Real-time restoration of white-light confocal microscope optical sections

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Iyengar, S. Sitharama; Beuerman, Roger W.; Reynaud, Juan; Wolenski, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Confocal microscopes (CM) are routinely used for building 3-D images of microscopic structures. Nonideal imaging conditions in a white-light CM introduce additive noise and blur. The optical section images need to be restored prior to quantitative analysis. We present an adaptive noise filtering technique using Karhunen–Loéve expansion (KLE) by the method of snapshots and a ringing metric to quantify the ringing artifacts introduced in the images restored at various iterations of iterative Lucy–Richardson deconvolution algorithm. The KLE provides a set of basis functions that comprise the optimal linear basis for an ensemble of empirical observations. We show that most of the noise in the scene can be removed by reconstructing the images using the KLE basis vector with the largest eigenvalue. The prefiltering scheme presented is faster and does not require prior knowledge about image noise. Optical sections processed using the KLE prefilter can be restored using a simple inverse restoration algorithm; thus, the methodology is suitable for real-time image restoration applications. The KLE image prefilter outperforms the temporal-average prefilter in restoring CM optical sections. The ringing metric developed uses simple binary morphological operations to quantify the ringing artifacts and confirms with the visual observation of ringing artifacts in the restored images. PMID:20186290

  16. Light microscopic, electron microscopic, and immunohistochemical comparison of Bama minipig (Sus scrofa domestica) and human skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Jun-ying; Shang, Hai-tao; Liu, Chang-e; Wang, Yong; Niu, Rong; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-04-01

    Here we sought to evaluate the possibility of using Chinese Bama miniature pig skin as a suitable animal model for human skin. Morphologic features of the skin of Bama miniature pigs resemble those of human skin, including skin layer thickness, development of a superficial vascular system, structure of the dermal-epidermal interface, and extracellular matrix. The characteristics and densities of Langerhans cells, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and mast cells were similar between Bama pig and human skin. Immunohistochemistry showed that miniature pigs and humans have the same antigenic determinants of human laminin, fibronectin, filaggrin, collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, and keratin but not CD34, ICAM1, or S100. In addition, collagen type I from Bama miniature pig skin exhibited physicochemical characteristics resembling those of human skin, in regard to HPLC chromatography, UV spectroscopy, amino-acid composition, and SDS-PAGE analysis. Given these results, we concluded that Bama miniature pigs have great potential as a human skin model and for developing dermal substitute materials in wound repair. However, we also observed some disparities between the skin of Bama miniature pigs and humans, including pigment cell distribution, sweat gland types, and others. Therefore, further studies are needed to completely evaluate the effects of these interspecies differences on the actual application of the model.

  17. Evolution of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell trait: an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Hasleton, P S; Orr, K; Webster, A; Lawson, R A

    1989-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies of a patient with sickle cell trait who had an episode of sickling during coronary artery surgery, from which he died, showed fibrin thrombi, focal alveolar wall necrosis, and epithelial cell damage. It is suggested that in cases of sickle trait full precautionary measures should be taken to prevent sickling in these circumstances. Images PMID:2617448

  18. Macroanatomic, light and scanning electron microscopic studies of the pecten oculi in the stork (Ciconia ciconia).

    PubMed

    Onuk, Burcu; Tutuncu, Serife; Alan, Aydin; Kabak, Murat; Ince, Nazan Gezer

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the pecten oculi of stork by using macroscopic, light and electron microscopic techniques. A total of 20 eyes that were obtained from 10 storks were used. The eyes were cleaned and isolated by dissection. After various procedures, four of the pecten oculi were examined by light microscope while the other four with an electron microscope. The remaining 12 eyes were assigned for macroscopic investigation. Pecten oculi of the stork were determined as accordion-like structures that originated from n. opticus, consisting of 15-17 plica and projecting up to 2/5 of the diameter of the bulbus oculi. Light microscopic examination revealed two types of blood vessels. Afferent-efferent vessels were larger in diamater (40-45 µm), fewer in numbers, and the capillary vessels were smaller in diamater (2-5 µm) and more in numbers. There were granules including amount of melanin pigment at the apical part of the pleats. These granules were fewer and scattered randomly on the basal part of the pleats. As a result, pecten oculi in the stork, which is a migrating bird, were determined to be similar to those of other diurnal birds.

  19. Tomographic incoherent phase imaging, a diffraction tomography alternative for any white-light microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, Pierre; Aknoun, Shérazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of making tomographic reconstruction of the refractive index of a microscopic sample using a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer, under incoherent illumination. A Z-stack is performed and the acquired incoherent elecromagnetic fields are deconvoluted before to retrieve in a quantitative manner the refractive index. The results are presented on polystyrene beads and can easily be expanded to biological samples. This technique is suitable to any white-light microscope equipped with nanometric Z-stack module.

  20. Minimizing inter-microscope variability in dental microwear texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arman, Samuel D.; Ungar, Peter S.; Brown, Christopher A.; DeSantis, Larisa R. G.; Schmidt, Christopher; Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2016-06-01

    A common approach to dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) uses confocal profilometry in concert with scale-sensitive fractal analysis to help understand the diets of extinct mammals. One of the main benefits of DMTA over other methods is the repeatable, objective manner of data collection. This repeatability, however, is threatened by variation in results of DMTA of the same dental surfaces yielded by different microscopes. Here we compare DMTA data of five species of kangaroos measured on seven profilers of varying specifications. Comparison between microscopes confirms that inter-microscope differences are present, but we show that deployment of a number of automated treatments to remove measurement noise can help minimize inter-microscope differences. Applying these same treatments to a published hominin DMTA dataset shows that they alter some significant differences between dietary groups. Minimising microscope variability while maintaining interspecific dietary differences requires then that these factors are balanced in determining appropriate treatments. The process outlined here offers a solution for allowing comparison of data between microscopes, which is essential for ongoing DMTA research. In addition, the process undertaken, including considerations of other elements of DMTA protocols also promises to streamline methodology, remove measurement noise and in doing so, optimize recovery of a reliable dietary signature.

  1. Automated image mosaics by non-automated light microscopes: the MicroMos software tool.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, F; Bevilacqua, A; Lucarelli, E

    2013-12-01

    Light widefield microscopes and digital imaging are the basis for most of the analyses performed in every biological laboratory. In particular, the microscope's user is typically interested in acquiring high-detailed images for analysing observed cells and tissues, meanwhile being representative of a wide area to have reliable statistics. The microscopist has to choose between higher magnification factor and extension of the observed area, due to the finite size of the camera's field of view. To overcome the need of arrangement, mosaicing techniques have been developed in the past decades for increasing the camera's field of view by stitching together more images. Nevertheless, these approaches typically work in batch mode and rely on motorized microscopes. Or alternatively, the methods are conceived just to provide visually pleasant mosaics not suitable for quantitative analyses. This work presents a tool for building mosaics of images acquired with nonautomated light microscopes. The method proposed is based on visual information only and the mosaics are built by incrementally stitching couples of images, making the approach available also for online applications. Seams in the stitching regions as well as tonal inhomogeneities are corrected by compensating the vignetting effect. In the experiments performed, we tested different registration approaches, confirming that the translation model is not always the best, despite the fact that the motion of the sample holder of the microscope is apparently translational and typically considered as such. The method's implementation is freely distributed as an open source tool called MicroMos. Its usability makes building mosaics of microscope images at subpixel accuracy easier. Furthermore, optional parameters for building mosaics according to different strategies make MicroMos an easy and reliable tool to compare different registration approaches, warping models and tonal corrections.

  2. MICROSCOPE: A Software System for Multivariate Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Design Work Unit Number 3 (Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing) Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112...2 where eps and aps are random numbers between -1 and +1. The addition of 1 2 the eps term is not standard but appropriate in the present context. 2...because in investigations with MICROSCOE small numbers are often due to taking differences between very close large numbers , leading to a cancellation

  3. From Animaculum to single molecules: 300 years of the light microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wollman, Adam J. M.; Nudd, Richard; Hedlund, Erik G.; Leake, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Although not laying claim to being the inventor of the light microscope, Antonj van Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) was arguably the first person to bring this new technological wonder of the age properly to the attention of natural scientists interested in the study of living things (people we might now term ‘biologists’). He was a Dutch draper with no formal scientific training. From using magnifying glasses to observe threads in cloth, he went on to develop over 500 simple single lens microscopes (Baker & Leeuwenhoek 1739 Phil. Trans. 41, 503–519. (doi:10.1098/rstl.1739.0085)) which he used to observe many different biological samples. He communicated his finding to the Royal Society in a series of letters (Leeuwenhoek 1800 The select works of Antony Van Leeuwenhoek, containing his microscopical discoveries in many of the works of nature, vol. 1) including the one republished in this edition of Open Biology. Our review here begins with the work of van Leeuwenhoek before summarizing the key developments over the last ca 300 years, which has seen the light microscope evolve from a simple single lens device of van Leeuwenhoek's day into an instrument capable of observing the dynamics of single biological molecules inside living cells, and to tracking every cell nucleus in the development of whole embryos and plants. PMID:25924631

  4. From Animaculum to single molecules: 300 years of the light microscope.

    PubMed

    Wollman, Adam J M; Nudd, Richard; Hedlund, Erik G; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    Although not laying claim to being the inventor of the light microscope, Antonj van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) was arguably the first person to bring this new technological wonder of the age properly to the attention of natural scientists interested in the study of living things (people we might now term 'biologists'). He was a Dutch draper with no formal scientific training. From using magnifying glasses to observe threads in cloth, he went on to develop over 500 simple single lens microscopes (Baker & Leeuwenhoek 1739 Phil. Trans. 41, 503-519. (doi:10.1098/rstl.1739.0085)) which he used to observe many different biological samples. He communicated his finding to the Royal Society in a series of letters (Leeuwenhoek 1800 The select works of Antony Van Leeuwenhoek, containing his microscopical discoveries in many of the works of nature, vol. 1) including the one republished in this edition of Open Biology. Our review here begins with the work of van Leeuwenhoek before summarizing the key developments over the last ca 300 years, which has seen the light microscope evolve from a simple single lens device of van Leeuwenhoek's day into an instrument capable of observing the dynamics of single biological molecules inside living cells, and to tracking every cell nucleus in the development of whole embryos and plants.

  5. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R; Russell, Aidan N; Wheeler, Richard J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M

    2016-02-08

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  6. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Wheeler, Richard J.; Nord, Ashley L.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-02-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  7. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Wheeler, Richard J.; Nord, Ashley L.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy. PMID:26853732

  8. 3D scanning of internal structure in gel engineering materials with visual scanning microscopic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yosuke; Gong, Jing; Masato, Makino; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-04-01

    The 3D printing technology, causing much attention from the beginning of 2013, will be possibly an alternative method to fabricate the biological soft tissues. Recently our group of Yamagata University has developed the world-first 3D Gel Printer to fabricate the complicated gel-materials with high-strength and biocompatibility. However, there are no 3D scanners that collect the data from the internal structure of complicated gel objects such as eye lens. It means that a new system for scanning the internal structure is needed now. In this study, firstly, we have tried to investigate the gel network of synthetic and biological gel with scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS). We calculated the Young's modulus of synthetic gels with the SMILS and with the tensile test, and precisely compared the results between them. The temperature dependences of the inside structure and the transparency are observed in the pig crystalline lens. The quantitative analysis indicates the importance of the internal structure of real object. Secondary, we show the new system named Gel-scanner that can provide the 2-dimentional data of the internal structure. From examining our findings, the scanning of internal structure will enable us to expect physical properties of the real object. We convince that the gelscanner will play major role in the various fields.

  9. Light microscopic identification of immature glial cells in semithin sections of the developing mouse corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R R

    1976-01-01

    Four distinct types of glial cell were recognized in the corpus callosum of young postnatal mice: the early glioblast; the small glioblast; the large glioblast; and the young astrocyte. As well as these, mature microglia could be recognized from birth. In semithin, toluidine blue stained sections early glioblasts had large, fair to moderately stained nuclei, and a thin rim of pale cytoplasm; small glioblasts had small, dark nuclei and a rim of darkly stained cytoplasm; large glioblasts had moderately unevenly stained nuclei and a thin rim of moderately stained cytoplasm; and young astrocytes had fairly small nuclei, moderately stained cytoplasm, and one or more processes, which could usually be seen extending for 5 mum or more from the perikaryon. Differential glial counts using the criteria described above, in conjunction with electron microscopic analysis, suggested that early glioblasts gave rise to small glioblasts and large glioblasts; that small glioblasts gave rise directly to astrocytes, large glioblasts, oligodendrocytes and possibly microglia; that large glioblasts formed oligodendrocytes only, and might be immature light oligodendrocytes; and that part of the microglial population might arise from vascular pericytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:795801

  10. Scanning tunneling microscope light emission: Effect of the strong dc field on junction plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J.

    2016-07-01

    The observed energies of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited at the tip-sample junction of a scanning tunneling microscope, as identified by spectral peaks in the light output, are very significantly redshifted with respect to calculations that use standard optical data for the tip and sample material, gold in this case. We argue that this anomaly depends on the extreme field in the sub-nm tunneling proximity of the tip and the sample, across which a dc bias (1-2 V) is applied. Finite element modeling analysis is presented of a gold nanosphere-plane (NS-P) combination in tunneling proximity and, crucially, in the presence of a high static electric field (˜109V /m ). It is argued that the strong dc field induces nonlinear corrections to the dielectric function of the gold via the effect of a large background polarizability through the nonlinear, χ(3 ) susceptibility contribution. When fed into the model system the modified optical data alters the LSP cavity modes of the NS-P system to indeed reveal a large redshift in energy compared to those of the virgin gold NS-P system. The net outcome may be regarded as equivalent to lowering the bulk plasmon energy, the physical interpretation being that the intense field of the tunneling environment leads to surface charge screening, effectively reducing the density of free electrons available to participate in the plasmon oscillations.

  11. The Light Microscopy Module: An On-Orbit Multi-User Microscope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.

    2002-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility, allowing flexible scheduling and operation of fluids and biology experiments within the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) on the International Space Station (ISS). The LMM will be the first integrated payload with the FIR to conduct four fluid physics experiments. A description of the LMM diagnostic capabilities, including video microscopy, interferometry, laser tweezers, confocal, and spectrophotometry, will be provided.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of a handheld light microscope for field diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Andrews, Jason R; Speich, Benjamin; Ame, Shaali M; Ali, Said M; Stothard, J Russell; Utzinger, Jürg; Keiser, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the Newton Nm1, a commercially available handheld light microscope and compared it with conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth infections. A total of 91 Kato-Katz thick smears were examined by experienced microscopists and helminth eggs were counted and expressed as eggs per gram of stool (EPG). Mean egg counts were significantly higher with the conventional light microscope (5,190 EPG versus 2,386 EPG for Ascaris lumbricoides; 826 versus 456 for Trichuris trichiura; both P < 0.05). Using regression coefficients and accounting for intensity of infection, we found that the agreement between the two devices was excellent for both species (κ = 0.90, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.99 for A. lumbricoides and κ = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.91-1.00 for T. trichiura). The Newton Nm1 microscope may be a useful tool for the detection and quantification of soil-transmitted helminth infection in clinical, epidemiologic, and public health settings.

  13. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S.; Besbes, M.; Schilder, N. J.; Jenkins, S. D.; Sauvan, C.; Ruostekoski, J.; Greffet, J.-J.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences.

  14. Automatic analysis for neuron by confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Kouhei; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Mataga, Nobuko; Hensh, Takao K.; Taki, Katuhiko

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that recognizes both the macro- and microscopic configurations of nerve cells and automatically performs the necessary 3-D measurements and functional classification of spines. The acquisition of 3-D images of cranial nerves has been enabled by the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope, although the highly accurate 3-D measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves and their classification based on their configurations have not yet been accomplished. In this study, in order to obtain highly accurate measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves, existing positions of spines were predicted by the 2-D image processing of tomographic images. Next, based on the positions that were predicted on the 2-D images, the positions and configurations of the spines were determined more accurately by 3-D image processing of the volume data. We report the successful construction of an automatic analysis system that uses a coarse-to-fine technique to analyze the microscopic structures of cranial nerves with high speed and accuracy by combining 2-D and 3-D image analyses.

  15. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  16. A compact light-sheet microscope for the study of the mammalian central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Haslehurst, Peter; Scott, Suzanne; Emptage, Nigel; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of the transient processes integral to neuronal function demands rapid and high-resolution imaging techniques over a large field of view, which cannot be achieved with conventional scanning microscopes. Here we describe a compact light sheet fluorescence microscope, featuring a 45° inverted geometry and an integrated photolysis laser, that is optimized for applications in neuroscience, in particular fast imaging of sub-neuronal structures in mammalian brain slices. We demonstrate the utility of this design for three-dimensional morphological reconstruction, activation of a single synapse with localized photolysis, and fast imaging of neuronal Ca2+ signalling across a large field of view. The developed system opens up a host of novel applications for the neuroscience community.

  17. A compact light-sheet microscope for the study of the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengyi; Haslehurst, Peter; Scott, Suzanne; Emptage, Nigel; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transient processes integral to neuronal function demands rapid and high-resolution imaging techniques over a large field of view, which cannot be achieved with conventional scanning microscopes. Here we describe a compact light sheet fluorescence microscope, featuring a 45° inverted geometry and an integrated photolysis laser, that is optimized for applications in neuroscience, in particular fast imaging of sub-neuronal structures in mammalian brain slices. We demonstrate the utility of this design for three-dimensional morphological reconstruction, activation of a single synapse with localized photolysis, and fast imaging of neuronal Ca2+ signalling across a large field of view. The developed system opens up a host of novel applications for the neuroscience community. PMID:27215692

  18. Light and electron microscopic evaluation of thymuses from feline leukemia virus-infected kittens.

    PubMed

    Pack, F D; Chapman, W L

    1980-01-01

    Light microscopic and electron microscopic findings in thymuses from 4-week old feline leukemia virus-infected and 4- and 9-week old noninfected kittens were evaluated and found to be morphologically similar to each other. Thymuses from 9-week old feline leukemia virusinfected kittens were markedly atrophied and individual lobules within each thymus varied in the severity of atrophy. Loubules having the least severe atrophy had a moderate thinning of the cortex and a heterogeneous thymuses included intense eosinopoiesis at the corticomedullary junction, increased prominence of vasculature, and enlarged Hassal's corpuscles. In addition to these changes lobules of thymus having the most severe atrophy had a marked cortical thymocyte depletion, lobule collapse, and increased numbers of mast cells. Degeneration of epithelial cells in most lobules was indicated by electronlucency of the cytoplasmic matrix and often greatly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  19. Effects of iloprost on vasospasm after experimental spinal cord injury: an electron and light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Attar, A; Tuna, H; Ugur, H C; Sargon, M F; Egemen, N

    2001-12-01

    It has been increasingly reported that traumatic and ischemic insults to the spinal cord may produce tissue damage through both direct and indirect mechanisms. In spite of many theories about post-traumatic spinal cord injury, there is still no satisfactory account of the exact mechanism. Vasospasm may be related to the trauma and release of vasoconstrictor or vasoactive amines. This study aims at studying the possible protective mechanisms of iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, after spinal cord injury on the rabbit. Forty-two adult male rabbits (New Zealand albino) were inflicted injuries by epidural application of an aneurysm clip to the spinal cord. Twenty-one rabbits received an i.v. infusion of 25 microg kg(-1) x h(-1) iloprost. The remaining twenty-one rabbits received an i.v. infusion of saline as the control group. Intravenous treatment started immediately after the infliction of the spinal cord injury and lasted for 1 h. Iloprost treatment had no side effects on the general physiological parameters in the rabbits. Control and iloprost treatment groups were divided into three sub-groups. The first group of animals was deeply anesthetized and spinal cords were removed 15 min after treatment. Second and third group animals were sacrificed in the 3rd and 24th hours respectively. All spinal cords were removed for light and electron microscopic examination. The width of anteriolar smooth muscle cells and the ultrastructural analysis of sulcal arterioles and venules in the ventral median fissure of spinal cords treated by iloprost revealed less thickening in all groups especially on the 24th hour group (p < 0.01), but less thickening was observed on the 3rd hour group. Iloprost-treated groups had limited edema and moderate protection of myelin and axons. These results suggest that iloprost treatment after spinal cord injury has a highly protective effect, and the possible protective effect of iloprost is resolution of vasospasm due to spinal cord injury.

  20. Sub-diffuse structured light imaging provides macroscopic maps of microscopic tissue structure (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    The onset and progression of cancer introduces changes to the intra-cellular ultrastructural components and to the morphology of the extracellular matrix. While previous work has shown that localized scatter imaging is sensitive to pathology-induced differences in these aspects of tissue microstructure, wide adaptation this knowledge for surgical guidance is limited by two factors. First, the time required to image with confocal-level localization of the remission signal can be substantial. Second, localized (i.e. sub-diffuse) scatter remission intensity is influenced interchangeably by parameters that define scattering frequency and anisotropy. This similarity relationship must be carefully considered in order to obtain unique estimates of biomarkers that define either the scatter density or features that describe the distribution (e.g. shape, size, and orientation) of scatterers. This study presents a novel approach that uses structured light imaging to address both of these limitations. Monte Carlo data were used to model the reflectance intensity over a wide range of spatial frequencies, reduced scattering coefficients, absorption coefficients, and a metric of the scattering phase function that directly maps to the fractal dimension of scatter sizes. The approach is validated in tissue-simulating phantoms constructed with user-tuned scattering phase functions. The validation analysis shows that the phase function can be described in the presence of different scatter densities or background absorptions. Preliminary data from clinical tissue specimens show quantitative images of both the scatter density and the tissue fractal dimension for various tissue types and pathologies. These data represent a novel wide-field quantitative approach to mapping microscopic structural biomarkers that cannot be obtained with standard diffuse imaging. Implications for the use of this approach to assess surgical margins will be discussed.

  1. NASA Lighting Research, Test, & Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Toni

    2015-01-01

    The Habitability and Human Factors Branch, at Johnson Space Center, in Houston, TX, provides technical guidance for the development of spaceflight lighting requirements, verification of light system performance, analysis of integrated environmental lighting systems, and research of lighting-related human performance issues. The Habitability & Human Factors Lighting Team maintains two physical facilities that are integrated to provide support. The Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) provides a controlled darkroom environment for physical verification of lighting systems with photometric and spetrographic measurement systems. The Graphics Research & Analysis Facility (GRAF) maintains the capability for computer-based analysis of operational lighting environments. The combined capabilities of the Lighting Team at Johnson Space Center have been used for a wide range of lighting-related issues.

  2. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  3. Microscopic analysis of recycled paper effect on print quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Kibirkštis, Edmundas; Kabelkaitė, Asta; Markowski, Leszek; Miliūnas, Valdas

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether the geometrical accuracy of small printed elements does not worsen on recycled paper, microscopic analysis of the dot area and the graphic elements raggedness printed on different types of recycled and coated papers at different screen ruling was carried out. Experimental tests have shown that geometrical accuracy of small elements printed on recycled paper/cardboard, in comparison to pictures printed on primary production paper is almost the same.

  4. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent.

  5. Ferrimagnetic resonance excitation by light-wave mixing in a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr-Löser, Th.; Krieger, W.; Walther, H.; Kirschner, J.

    1999-12-01

    Ferrimagnetic resonance is measured in a scanning tunneling microscope. The infrared light of two lasers is focused into the tunneling junction and a difference-frequency signal in the microwave region is generated. This microwave signal is used to excite spin waves in an yttrium-iron-garnet film with a thin Au capping. The coupling of the light to the tunneling junction is explained by an antenna mechanism. Characteristic antenna patterns of the angle-dependent receiving efficiency are obtained. The mixing of the two laser frequencies is due to the nonlinearity of the tunneling junction. The microwave signal obtained is absorbed in the ferromagnetic sample if the resonance condition is fulfilled. This method might allow the measurement of magnetic properties with a lateral resolution down to the nm scale.

  6. A light microscope-based double retrograde tracer strategy to chart central neuronal connections.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Tom J H; Apps, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes a double retrograde tracing method to chart divergent projections in the CNS using light microscope techniques. It is based on immunohistochemical visualization of retrograde transport of cholera toxin b-subunit (CTb) and silver enhancement of a gold-lectin conjugate. Production of the gold-lectin is explained in detail, and a technique is offered to record through the injection pipettes, to help guide accurate placement of injections. Visualization of the two tracers results in light brown staining of CTb-labeled neurons and labeling by black particles of gold-lectin-containing neurons. Both types of label are easily recognized in the same neuron. The labeling is permanent and is well suited for studies in which large areas of the brain need to be surveyed. The whole procedure (excluding survival time) takes approximately 5-7 d to complete.

  7. Hyperspectral microscopic analysis of normal, benign and carcinoma microarray tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, Mauro; Davis, Gustave L.; Warner, Frederick J.; Geshwind, Frank B.; Coppi, Andreas C.; DeVerse, Richard A.; Coifman, Ronald R.

    2006-02-01

    We apply a unique micro-optoelectromechanical tuned light source and new algorithms to the hyper-spectral microscopic analysis of human colon biopsies. The tuned light prototype (Plain Sight Systems Inc.) transmits any combination of light frequencies, range 440nm 700nm, trans-illuminating H and E stained tissue sections of normal (N), benign adenoma (B) and malignant carcinoma (M) colon biopsies, through a Nikon Biophot microscope. Hyper-spectral photomicrographs, randomly collected 400X magnication, are obtained with a CCD camera (Sensovation) from 59 different patient biopsies (20 N, 19 B, 20 M) mounted as a microarray on a single glass slide. The spectra of each pixel are normalized and analyzed to discriminate among tissue features: gland nuclei, gland cytoplasm and lamina propria/lumens. Spectral features permit the automatic extraction of 3298 nuclei with classification as N, B or M. When nuclei are extracted from each of the 59 biopsies the average classification among N, B and M nuclei is 97.1%; classification of the biopsies, based on the average nuclei classification, is 100%. However, when the nuclei are extracted from a subset of biopsies, and the prediction is made on nuclei in the remaining biopsies, there is a marked decrement in performance to 60% across the 3 classes. Similarly the biopsy classification drops to 54%. In spite of these classification differences, which we believe are due to instrument and biopsy normalization issues, hyper-spectral analysis has the potential to achieve diagnostic efficiency needed for objective microscopic diagnosis.

  8. UV-visible microscope spectrophotometric polarization and dichroism with increased discrimination power in forensic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Dale Kevin

    Microanalysis of transfer (Trace) evidence is the application of a microscope and microscopical techniques for the collection, observation, documentation, examination, identification, and discrimination of micrometer sized particles or domains. Microscope spectrophotometry is the union of microscopy and spectroscopy for microanalysis. Analytical microspectroscopy is the science of studying the emission, reflection, transmission, and absorption of electromagnetic radiation to determine the structure or chemical composition of microscopic-size materials. Microscope spectrophotometry instrument designs have evolved from monochromatic illumination which transmitted through the microscope and sample and then is detected by a photometer detector (photomultiplier tube) to systems in which broad-band (white light) illumination falls incident upon a sample followed by a non-scanning grating spectrometer equipped with a solid-state multi-element detector. Most of these small modern spectrometers are configured with either silicon based charged-couple device detectors (200-950 nm) or InGaAs based diode array detectors (850-2300 nm) with computerized data acquisition and signal processing being common. A focus of this research was to evaluate the performance characteristics of various modern forensic (UV-Vis) microscope photometer systems as well as review early model instrumental designs. An important focus of this research was to efficiently measure ultraviolet-visible spectra of microscopically small specimens for classification, differentiation, and possibly individualization. The first stage of the project consisted of the preparation of microscope slides containing neutral density filter reference materials, molecular fluorescence reference materials, and dichroic reference materials. Upon completion of these standard slide preparations analysis began with measurements in order to evaluate figures of merit for comparison of the instruments investigated. The figures of

  9. Light and electron microscopical visualization of anterogradely labelled corticospinal growth cones using a new combination of HRP staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Joosten, E A

    1991-05-01

    Up until now, the ultrastructural visualization of growth cones of developing long fibre tracts could only be achieved by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) application 'en route', resulting in axonal damage, which in turn may affect growth cone morphology. Besides, this technique results in labelling of passing fibres, thus hampering the identification of axon origin as well as the interpretation of growth cone configuration. In the present investigation a new combination of HRP staining and intensification techniques is presented which makes it possible to visualize anterogradely labelled corticospinal growth cones over long distances in developing rat spinal cord at the light as well as the electron microscopical level. HRP was applied to the originating cells of the corticospinal tract, located in the sensorimotor cortex, and after 24 h was visualized using a procedure which essentially consists of 3 subsequent steps: first a tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)/ammoniumheptamolybdate (AHM) reaction; second diaminobenzidine (DAB)/nickel (Ni) stabilization and finally glucose oxidase intensification. As was verified at the EM level, the staining procedure here described reveals a complete intense black staining of HRP-labelled growth cones of outgrowing corticospinal axons. Therefore, the method described here guarantees a correct analysis of growth cone morphology at the light microscopical and the ultrastructural level. The present procedure is especially valuable in studying the development of long central nervous fibre systems.

  10. Visualization and analysis of 3D microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Long, Fuhui; Zhou, Jianlong; Peng, Hanchuan

    2012-01-01

    In a wide range of biological studies, it is highly desirable to visualize and analyze three-dimensional (3D) microscopic images. In this primer, we first introduce several major methods for visualizing typical 3D images and related multi-scale, multi-time-point, multi-color data sets. Then, we discuss three key categories of image analysis tasks, namely segmentation, registration, and annotation. We demonstrate how to pipeline these visualization and analysis modules using examples of profiling the single-cell gene-expression of C. elegans and constructing a map of stereotyped neurite tracts in a fruit fly brain.

  11. Visualization and Analysis of 3D Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Long, Fuhui; Zhou, Jianlong; Peng, Hanchuan

    2012-01-01

    In a wide range of biological studies, it is highly desirable to visualize and analyze three-dimensional (3D) microscopic images. In this primer, we first introduce several major methods for visualizing typical 3D images and related multi-scale, multi-time-point, multi-color data sets. Then, we discuss three key categories of image analysis tasks, namely segmentation, registration, and annotation. We demonstrate how to pipeline these visualization and analysis modules using examples of profiling the single-cell gene-expression of C. elegans and constructing a map of stereotyped neurite tracts in a fruit fly brain. PMID:22719236

  12. A light sheet confocal microscope for image cytometry with a variable linear slit detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Khan, Foysal Z.; Powless, Amy J.; Benson, Devin; Hunter, Courtney; Fritsch, Ingrid; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a light sheet confocal microscope (LSCM) capable of high-resolution imaging of cell suspensions in a microfluidic environment. In lieu of conventional pressure-driven flow or mechanical translation of the samples, we have employed a novel method of fluid transport, redox-magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD). This method achieves fluid motion by inducing a small current into the suspension in the presence of a magnetic field via electrodes patterned onto a silicon chip. This on-chip transportation requires no moving parts, and is coupled to the remainder of the imaging system. The microscopy system comprises a 450 nm diode 20 mW laser coupled to a single mode fiber and a cylindrical lens that converges the light sheet into the back aperture of a 10x, 0.3 NA objective lens in an epi-illumination configuration. The emission pathway contains a 150 mm tube lens that focuses the light onto the linear sensor at the conjugate image plane. The linear sensor (ELiiXA+ 8k/4k) has three lateral binning modes which enables variable detection aperture widths between 5, 10, or 20 μm, which can be used to vary axial resolution. We have demonstrated redox-MHD-enabled light sheet microscopy in suspension of fluorescent polystyrene beads. This approach has potential as a high-throughput image cytometer with myriad cellular diagnostic applications.

  13. Comparison of Light and Electron Microscopic Determinations of the Number of Bacteria and Algae in Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Kerstin; Weibull, Claes; Cronberg, Gertrud

    1978-01-01

    Determinations of the number of microorganisms in lake water samples with the bright-field light microscope were performed using conventional counting chambers. Determinations with the fluorescence microscope were carried out after staining the organisms with acridine orange and filtering them onto Nuclepore filters. For transmission electron microscopy, a water sample was concentrated by centrifugation. The pellet was solidifed in agar, fixed, dehydrated, embedded in Epon, and cut into thin sections. The number and area of organism profiles per unit area of the sections were determined. The number of organisms per unit volume of the pellet was then calculated using stereological formulae. The corresponding number in the lake water was obtained from the ratio of volume of solidified pellet/volume of water sample. Control experiments with pure cultures of bacteria and algae showed good agreement between light and electron microscopic counts. This was also true for most lake water samples, but the electron microscopic preparations from some samples contained small vibrio-like bodies and ill-defined structures that made a precise comparison more difficult. Bacteria and small blue-green and green algae could not always be differentiated with the light microscope, but this was easily done by electron microscopy. Our results show that transmission electron microscopy can be used for checking light microscopic counts of microorganisms in lake water. Images PMID:16345279

  14. Stray Light Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Based on a Small Business Innovation Research contract from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, TracePro is state-of-the-art interactive software created by Lambda Research Corporation to detect stray light in optical systems. An image can be ruined by incidental light in an optical system. To maintain image excellence from an optical system, stray light must be detected and eliminated. TracePro accounts for absorption, specular reflection and refraction, scattering and aperture diffraction of light. Output from the software consists of spatial irradiance plots and angular radiance plots. Results can be viewed as contour maps or as ray histories in tabular form. TracePro is adept at modeling solids such as lenses, baffles, light pipes, integrating spheres, non-imaging concentrators, and complete illumination systems. The firm's customer base includes Lockheed Martin, Samsung Electronics and other manufacturing, optical, aerospace, and educational companies worldwide.

  15. Multimodal Spectral Imaging of Cells Using a Transmission Diffraction Grating on a Light Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Xu, Yang; Copus, Tyler; Saraswat, Suraj; Nauli, Surya M.

    2011-01-01

    A multimodal methodology for spectral imaging of cells is presented. The spectral imaging setup uses a transmission diffraction grating on a light microscope to concurrently record spectral images of cells and cellular organelles by fluorescence, darkfield, brightfield, and differential interference contrast (DIC) spectral microscopy. Initially, the setup was applied for fluorescence spectral imaging of yeast and mammalian cells labeled with multiple fluorophores. Fluorescence signals originating from fluorescently labeled biomolecules in cells were collected through triple or single filter cubes, separated by the grating, and imaged using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Cellular components such as nuclei, cytoskeleton, and mitochondria were spatially separated by the fluorescence spectra of the fluorophores present in them, providing detailed multi-colored spectral images of cells. Additionally, the grating-based spectral microscope enabled measurement of scattering and absorption spectra of unlabeled cells and stained tissue sections using darkfield and brightfield or DIC spectral microscopy, respectively. The presented spectral imaging methodology provides a readily affordable approach for multimodal spectral characterization of biological cells and other specimens. PMID:21639978

  16. Spectroscopy of Light Emission from a Scanning Tunneling Microscope in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péchou, R.; Coratger, R.; Girardin, C.; Ajustron, F.; Beauvillain, J.

    1996-11-01

    Light emission has been detected at the tip-sample junction of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (S.T.M.) in air on noble metallic surfaces. A spectroscopic study of emitted photons for Au-Au and PtIr-Au tunneling junctions is presented. The general aspect of the spectra depends on the materials used in the junctions; a study of the spectra as a function of tunneling current and surface bias voltage reveals similar and reproducible characteristics. Une émission de lumière a été détectée au niveau de la jonction pointe-surface d'un microscope à effet tunnel dans l'air sur des surfaces de métaux nobles. Une étude spectroscopique des photons émis par des jonctions tunnel Au-Au et PtIr-Au est présentée. L'aspect général des spectres dépend des matériaux utilisés ; une étude en fonction du courant tunnel et de la tension de polarisation de la jonction révéle des caractéristiques similaires et reproductibles.

  17. Pseudocyanotic pigmentation of the skin induced by amiodarone: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Delage, C.; Lagacé, R.; Huard, J.

    1975-01-01

    An unusual bluish discolouration of the nose was noticed in a woman 9 months after she had begun treatment with a coronary vasodilator, amiodarone hydrochloride. Cutaneous biopsies of the nose were obtained 6 and 9 months later for light and electron microscopic studies. In the dermis were histiocytes containing cytoplasmic yellow-brown granules with histochemical properties of melanin and lipofuscin. Ultrastructurally the granules appeared as lysosomal membrane-bound dense bodies similar to lipofuscin. Similar granules were observed at diascopy in both corneas. The pathogenesis is obscure. A storage disease involving the drug or its metabolites cannot be ruled out. Another possibility is that amiodarone accelerates the normal cellular autophagocytosis, resulting in increased production of lipofuscin, which then accumulates in lysosomes because of a deficiency in lipolytic enzymes. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:47784

  18. A wide field fluorescence lifetime imaging system using a light sheet microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Phil M.; Moore, Lamar; Li, Xiaofei; Phillips, Roger; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has allowed scientists to discern information about the chemical properties of biological processes and has become a vital tool in the life sciences and medical research communities. Measuring the spatial lifetime distribution of the fluorophores as well as the intensity distribution enables users to discern vital information about the chemical environment. It however, remains challenging and often involves slow scanning. We present a new microscope system based on light sheet illumination that uses a micro channel plate (MCP) device called a Capacitive Division Imaging Readout (CDIR) which has been developed by Photek Ltd. The device uses an array of capacitors to move the charge site from the MCP to four pre-amplifiers and time-over-threshold discriminators. This camera has the ability to image photons as well as measure the arrival time, enabling high speed FLIM imaging of biological samples.

  19. An aberration corrected photoemission electron microscope at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; MacDowell, A.A.; Duarte, R.; Doran, A.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.; Munson, D.; Padmore, H.; Petermann, K.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2003-11-01

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further.

  20. Tip-geometry effects in circularly polarized light emission from a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimovas, Egidijus; Johansson, Peter

    1999-02-01

    We present a calculation of the degree of circular polarization ρ, of the light emitted from a scanning tunneling microscope due to tip asymmetry. In order to take into account the essential geometrical features of an imperfect tip its shape is approximated by a tilted spheroid. We work in the nonretarded limit and use experimentally measured dielectric functions to describe the electromagnetic properties of the tip (W and Ir) and sample (noble metals) materials. The results show that the polarization can reach 20-30 % for what we think are moderately asymmetric tips. This result, as well as the strong dependence of ρ on the azimuthal observation angle, is in reasonable agreement with experimental findings [A. L. Vázquez de Parga and S. F. Alvarado, Europhys. Lett. 36, 577 (1996)].

  1. The Columbia Debris Loan Program; Examples of Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick; Thurston, Scott; Smith, Stephen; Marder, Arnold; Steckel, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Following the tragic loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia NASA formed The Columbia Recovery Office (CRO). The CRO was initially formed at the Johnson Space Center after the conclusion of recovery operations on May 1,2003 and then transferred .to the Kennedy Space Center on October 6,2003 and renamed The Columbia Recovery Office and Preservation. An integral part of the preservation project was the development of a process to loan Columbia debris to qualified researchers and technical educators. The purposes of this program include aiding in the advancement of advanced spacecraft design and flight safety development, the advancement of the study of hypersonic re-entry to enhance ground safety, to train and instruct accident investigators and to establish an enduring legacy for Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew. Along with a summary of the debris loan process examples of microscopic analysis of Columbia debris items will be presented. The first example will be from the reconstruction following the STS- 107 accident and how the Materials and Proessteesa m used microscopic analysis to confirm the accident scenario. Additionally, three examples of microstructural results from the debris loan process from NASA internal, academia and private industry will be presented.

  2. The mechanism of light emission from a scanning tunnelling microscope operating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogez, B.; Cao, S.; Dujardin, G.; Comtet, G.; Le Moal, E.; Mayne, A.; Boer-Duchemin, E.

    2016-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) may be used as a low-energy, electrical nanosource of surface plasmon polaritons and light. In this article, we demonstrate that the optimum mode of operation of the STM for maximum photon emission is completely different in air than in vacuum. To this end, we investigate the emission of photons, the variation in the relative tip-sample distance and the measured current as a function of time for an STM operating in air. Contrary to the case of an STM operating in vacuum, the measured current between the tip and sample for an STM in air is very unstable (rapidly fluctuating in time) when the applied voltage between the tip and sample is in the ˜1.5-3 V range (i.e., in the energy range of visible photons). The photon emission occurs in short (50 μs) bursts when the STM tip is closest to the sample. The current instabilities are shown to be a key ingredient for producing intense light emission from an STM operating in air (photon emission rate several orders of magnitude higher than for stable current). These results are explained in terms of the interplay between the tunnel current and the electrochemical current in the ubiquitous thin water layer that exists when working in air.

  3. Automated, highly reproducible, wide-field, light-based cortical mapping method using a commercial stereo microscope and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Su; Liu, Ya-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Min; Liu, Ke-Fei; Zhang, Ding-Hong; Li, Yi-Ding; Yu, Ai-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Yi; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Zeng, Shao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a more flexible optogenetics-based mapping system attached on a stereo microscope, which offers automatic light stimulation to individual regions of interest in the cortex that expresses light-activated channelrhodopsin-2 in vivo. Combining simultaneous recording of electromyography from specific forelimb muscles, we demonstrate that this system offers much better efficiency and precision in mapping distinct domains for controlling limb muscles in the mouse motor cortex. Furthermore, the compact and modular design of the system also yields a simple and flexible implementation to different commercial stereo microscopes, and thus could be widely used among laboratories. PMID:27699114

  4. Biochemical and microscopic analysis of sperm in copper deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.; Jackson, P.; Allison, S.

    1986-03-01

    The Mottle Brindle Mouse Syndrome is a disease in mice which mimics Menkes Syndrome in humans. Treatment of affected male mice has led to varying survival rates in mice and few attempts have led to the development of virile male offsprings in mice and none in humans. In this study the authors examined sperm produced by Brindle mice in an attempt to ascertain reasons for the observed failure of the Brindle mice to reproduce. Microscopic analysis revealed that sperm counts in these mice are higher than sperm counts of the C57/BL or the C57/6J (normal) mice. Microscopically, sperm from Brindle mice showed changes in the acrosomal and flagellum regions. Motility of these sperm were 10% to 50% that of sperm from normal mice. Biochemically, cytochrome oxidase activity was 10% to 50% of the activity seen in normal mice. Hexokinase activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was equal to that observed in normal mice. These observations suggest that infertility in Brindle male mice is due to an impairment of testicular copper transport which leads to a decline in copper dependent processes.

  5. The closer we look the more we see? Quantitative microscopic analysis of the pulmonary surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The surfactant system of the lung has essential biophysical and immunomodulatory functions. Only at the electron microscopic level does surfactant reveal its morphological complexity--and beauty. Therefore, morphological tools are indispensible to characterize the surfactant system in health and disease. Stereology provides the gold standard for obtaining quantitative (morphometric) data in microscopy. The combination of microscopy and stereology allows for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the intraalveolar as well as the intracellular surfactant pool, both in its preserved microorganization and localization within the lung. Surfactant-producing alveolar epithelial type II cells can be counted and sampled for size estimation with physical disectors at a high magnification light microscopic level. The number of their surfactant storing lamellar bodies can be estimated using physical disectors at the electron microscopic level. Electron tomography allows for high resolution 3D visualization of lamellar body fusion pores. Intraalveolar surfactant subtypes can be quantitated in situ, thus reflecting the functional state of the intraalveolar surfactant pool. By immunoelectron microscopy, surfactant protein distribution can be analyzed. These methods allow for a comprehensive quantitative analysis of surfactant (ultra-)structure. Here, we give an overview on the analysis of the normal and disordered surfactant system by electron microscopy and stereology.

  6. Classical microscopic theory of dispersion, emission and absorption of light in dielectrics. Classical microscopic theory of dielectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, Andrea; Galgani, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    This paper is a continuation of a recent one in which, apparently for the first time, the existence of polaritons in ionic crystals was proven in a microscopic electrodynamic theory. This was obtained through an explicit computation of the dispersion curves. Here the main further contribution consists in studying electric susceptibility, from which the spectrum can be inferred. We show how susceptibility is obtained by the Green-Kubo methods of Hamiltonian statistical mechanics, and give for it a concrete expression in terms of time-correlation functions. As in the previous paper, here too we work in a completely classical framework, in which the electrodynamic forces acting on the charges are all taken into account, both the retarded forces and the radiation reaction ones. So, in order to apply the methods of statistical mechanics, the system has to be previously reduced to a Hamiltonian one. This is made possible in virtue of two global properties of classical electrodynamics, namely, the Wheeler-Feynman identity and the Ewald resummation properties, the proofs of which were already given for ordered system. The second contribution consists in formulating the theory in a completely general way, so that in principle it applies also to disordered systems such as glasses, or liquids or gases, provided the two general properties mentioned above continue to hold. A first step in this direction is made here by providing a completely general proof of the Wheeler-Feynman identity, which is shown to be the counterpart of a general causality property of classical electrodynamics. Finally it is shown how a line spectrum can appear at all in classical systems, as a counterpart of suitable stability properties of the motions, with a broadening due to a coexistence of chaoticity. The relevance of some recent results of the theory of dynamical systems in this connection is also pointed out.

  7. Microscopic description of octupole shape-phase transitions in light actinide and rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Vretenar, D.; Nikšić, T.; Lu, Bing-Nan

    2014-02-01

    A systematic analysis of low-lying quadrupole and octupole collective states is presented based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sdf interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson condensate state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The study is based on the global relativistic energy density functional DD-PC1. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in four isotopic chains characteristic for two regions of octupole deformation and collectivity: Th, Ra, Sm, and Ba. Consistent with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2-β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  8. Current microscopic methods for the neural ECM analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeug, Andre; Stawarski, Michal; Bieganska, Katarzyna; Korotchenko, Svetlana; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Dityatev, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) occupies the space between both neurons and glial cells and thus provides a microenvironment that regulates multiple aspects of neural activities. Because of the vital role of ECM as a natural environment of cells in vivo, there is a growing interest to develop methodology allowing for the detailed structural and functional analyses of ECM. In this chapter, we provide the detailed overview of current microscopic methods used for ECM analysis and also describe general labeling strategies for ECM visualization. Since ECM remodeling involves the proteolytic cleavage of ECM, we will also describe current experimental approaches to image the proteolytic reorganization and/or degradation of ECM. The special focus of this chapter is set to the application of Förster resonance energy transfer-based approaches to monitor intracellular and extracellular matrix functions with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  9. Microscopic analysis of currency and stock exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, L.

    1999-08-01

    Recently it was shown that distributions of short-term price fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange exhibit striking similarities to those of velocity differences in turbulent flows. Similar profiles represent the spectral-diffusion behavior of impurity molecules in disordered solids at low temperatures. It is demonstrated that a microscopic statistical theory of the spectroscopic line shapes can be applied to the other two phenomena. The theory interprets the financial data in terms of information which becomes available to the traders and their reactions as a function of time. The analysis shows that there is no characteristic time scale in financial markets, but that instead stretched-exponential or algebraic memory functions yield good agreement with the price data. For an algebraic function, the theory yields truncated Lévy distributions which are often observed in stock exchange markets.

  10. Microscopic analysis of currency and stock exchange markets.

    PubMed

    Kador, L

    1999-08-01

    Recently it was shown that distributions of short-term price fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange exhibit striking similarities to those of velocity differences in turbulent flows. Similar profiles represent the spectral-diffusion behavior of impurity molecules in disordered solids at low temperatures. It is demonstrated that a microscopic statistical theory of the spectroscopic line shapes can be applied to the other two phenomena. The theory interprets the financial data in terms of information which becomes available to the traders and their reactions as a function of time. The analysis shows that there is no characteristic time scale in financial markets, but that instead stretched-exponential or algebraic memory functions yield good agreement with the price data. For an algebraic function, the theory yields truncated Lévy distributions which are often observed in stock exchange markets.

  11. Light- and electron-microscopic autoradiographic analysis of proliferating cells during the early stages of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat induced by feeding N-2-fluorenylacetamide in a choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Sell, S; Salman, J

    1984-02-01

    Proliferating cells that appear after feeding the hepatocarcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide in a choline-deficient diet were identified by autoradiographic electron and light microscopy. Labeled cells are first seen as nondescript periductular cells 1 day after feeding carcinogen. Proliferation of duct lining cells begins at 2-3 days. For the next three weeks there is proliferation and extension of a mixture of nondescript cells and cells with a duct like appearance from the portal zone into the adjacent liver. By 3-4 weeks the entire liver lobule contains this new cell population. At 3 weeks more differentiated duct like structures are seen at the edge of the advancing new cell population. Newly appearing duct like cells differ from normal duct cells in that they contain AFP and albumin. It is concluded that the new cell population may arise from duct cells or periportal "stem" cells, or both.

  12. Light and electron microscope observations on Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. (Prasinophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C. K.; Jiao-Fen, Chen; Zhe-Fu, Zhang; Hui-Qi, Zhang

    1994-09-01

    Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. is described on the basis of light and electron microscope observations of cultured material originally collected and isolated from seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The periplasts on the cell body and flagella are covered by five types of scales, two types on the flagella and three on the body. Among these, the morphology and the number of spines of large stellate body scales differ remarkably from those of previously described species of Nephroselmis. Apart from these, the unusual fine structure of the eyespot (stigma) is very characteristic. As in the other species of Nephroselmis, the eyespot lies immediately under the two-membraned chloroplast envelope; unlike the others, however, it is not composed of a number of osmiophilic globules, but consists of about 14 curved rod-shaped osmiophilic bodies arranged loosely and randomly. This feature distinguishes the present new species not only from the other species of Nephroselmis but also from the other motile algal species, the eyespots structure of which had been previously described.

  13. Quantitative characterization of the carbon/carbon composites components based on video of polarized light microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Chao, Xujiang

    2017-02-13

    The components of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have significant influence on the thermal and mechanical properties, so a quantitative characterization of component is necessary to study the microstructure of C/C composites, and further to improve the macroscopic properties of C/C composites. Considering the extinction crosses of the pyrocarbon matrix have significant moving features, the polarized light microscope (PLM) video is used to characterize C/C composites quantitatively because it contains sufficiently dynamic and structure information. Then the optical flow method is introduced to compute the optical flow field between the adjacent frames, and segment the components of C/C composites from PLM image by image processing. Meanwhile the matrix with different textures is re-segmented by the length difference of motion vectors, and then the component fraction of each component and extinction angle of pyrocarbon matrix are calculated directly. Finally, the C/C composites are successfully characterized from three aspects of carbon fiber, pyrocarbon, and pores by a series of image processing operators based on PLM video, and the errors of component fractions are less than 15%.

  14. Comparative light-microscopic and immunohistochemical study of traumatic and palisaded encapsulated neuromas of the skin.

    PubMed

    Argenyi, Z B; Santa Cruz, D; Bromley, C

    1992-12-01

    The primary hyperplastic nature of palisaded encapsulated neuromas (PENs) has been recently challenged by suggesting a traumatic origin. We studied eight cases of traumatic neuroma (TN) and 12 cases of PEN by routine light-microscopic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical methods to assess evidence of previous tissue injury. Sections from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, trichrome, elastic, reticulin, Giemsa, colloidal iron (with and without hyaluronidase), and Bielschowsky silver stains. Antibodies were applied to collagen types I, III, and IV, MAC 387, factor XIIIa, alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), Leu-7, and myelin basic protein using ABC techniques. We found that (a) in TN the individual fascicles were usually surrounded by perineurial cells, whereas in PEN the perineurial cells were observed mainly in the capsular areas and only rarely within the fascicles as evidenced by EMA antibodies; (b) histochemically TN contained considerably larger amounts of collagen (types I and III), acidic mucin, and myelin products than did PEN; and (c) neither PEN nor TN contained increased inflammatory cells or cells positive for factor XIIIa, MAC 387, or A1AT. We conclude that (a) there are substantial structural and histochemical differences between TN and PEN, (b) the changes suggest that the classic form of PEN has a different histogenesis than TN, and (c) on histologic grounds, chronic minor trauma could not be excluded as an etiologic factor for PEN.

  15. Equine phacoclastic uveitis: the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and therapy of 7 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, B H; Cullen, C L

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study describes the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic lens rupture in the horse. Rupture of the lens capsule in the horse usually results in a chronic, blinding inflammation (phacoclastic uveitis) unless prompt surgical and medical therapies are implemented. The clinical manifestations of acute lens capsule rupture included: cataract; intralenticular displacement of iridal pigment; lens cortical fragments attached to the perforated lens capsule, iris, and corneal endothelium; miosis; aqueous flare; and usually a corneal or scleral perforation with ulceration or focal full thickness corneal edema and scarring. The clinical signs of chronic phacoclastic uveitis include blindness, phthisis bulbi, and generalized corneal opacification related to scarring, vascularization, pigmentation, and edema. In one horse, acute phacoclastic uveitis was successfully treated with phacoemulsification to remove the ruptured lens and medical therapy to control the accompanying inflammation. The affected eyes of the horses with chronic phacoclastic uveitis were enucleated because of persistent clinical signs of nonulcerative keratitis and uveitis, despite long-term medical management. The clinical manifestations and lack of improvement with medical therapy are similar in the horse, dog, cat, and rabbit. However, the histologic findings in equine phacoclastic uveitis differ significantly from those in the dog, and rabbit. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:10816830

  16. Automated pollen identification using microscopic imaging and texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Marcos, J Víctor; Nava, Rodrigo; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Redondo, Rafael; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Bueno, Gloria; Déniz, Óscar; González-Porto, Amelia; Pardo, Cristina; Chung, François; Rodríguez, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Pollen identification is required in different scenarios such as prevention of allergic reactions, climate analysis or apiculture. However, it is a time-consuming task since experts are required to recognize each pollen grain through the microscope. In this study, we performed an exhaustive assessment on the utility of texture analysis for automated characterisation of pollen samples. A database composed of 1800 brightfield microscopy images of pollen grains from 15 different taxa was used for this purpose. A pattern recognition-based methodology was adopted to perform pollen classification. Four different methods were evaluated for texture feature extraction from the pollen image: Haralick's gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), log-Gabor filters (LGF), local binary patterns (LBP) and discrete Tchebichef moments (DTM). Fisher's discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour were subsequently applied to perform dimensionality reduction and multivariate classification, respectively. Our results reveal that LGF and DTM, which are based on the spectral properties of the image, outperformed GLCM and LBP in the proposed classification problem. Furthermore, we found that the combination of all the texture features resulted in the highest performance, yielding an accuracy of 95%. Therefore, thorough texture characterisation could be considered in further implementations of automatic pollen recognition systems based on image processing techniques.

  17. Macroscopic and Microscopic Analysis of the Thumb Carpometacarpal Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Amy L.; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Background: Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Methods: Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Results: Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p < 0.001) than the volar ligaments, with a significantly greater cellularity and greater sensory innervation compared with the anterior oblique ligament (p < 0.001). The anterior oblique ligament was consistently a thin structure with a histologic appearance of capsular tissue with low cellularity. Conclusions: The dorsal deltoid ligament

  18. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  19. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  20. A confocal video-rate laser-beam scanning reflected-light microscope with no moving parts.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S R; Hubin, T; Rosenthal, S; Washburn, C

    1990-01-01

    A no-moving-parts, 30 frames/s, laser-beam scanning confocal reflected-light microscope has been developed. In principle, the technique can be extended to fluorescence and transmission light microscopy. Acousto-optic beam deflectors controlled by digital electronics move a laser beam in a 512-line interlaced 8.5 x 8.5-mm raster. The light passes through a beam splitter, enters an inverted microscope through the side camera port, and is imaged at the object by the microscope objective. Reflected light returns through the objective, exits the camera port, is reflected off the beam splitter, and is imaged on to the photocathode of an image dissector tube (IDT). Confocality is provided by raster scanning the IDT aperture coincident with the congruent image of the laser beam incident on the object. Real-time jitter-free reflected light images of a variety of biological objects have been produced. Computer-controlled alignment of the laser scan and IDT is performed in several seconds.

  1. Design and analysis of soft X-ray imaging microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Cheng, Wang; Wu, Jiang; Hoover, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The spherical Schwarzschild microscope for soft X-ray applications in microscopy and projection lithography consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for X-ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. To reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles are here considered. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical Head reflecting two-mirror microscope configurations. The Head microscope with a NA of 0.4 achieves diffraction limited performance for objects with a diameter of 40 microns. Thus, it seems possible to record images with a feature size less than 100 A with a 40x microscope when using 40 A radiation.

  2. Light and electron microscopic study on the pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae Smith.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, M A; Merhige, M E

    1977-03-09

    The pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae was studied light and electron microscopically. It consists of two vesicles representing parapineal and pineal organs. Both occur intracranially and openly communicate with each other and the brain ventricle. The entire complex shows a striking photoreceptor morphology with sensory, ependymal and nerve cells. The last cell type is more abundant in the parapineal vesicle than in the pineal organ. The following ultrastructural details of the parapineal are noteworthy: 1. The sensory cells possess large inner and outer segments protruding freely in the vesicular cavity. The outer segments measure 8-10 mum in length and consist of as many as 275 lamellae. The basal processes of these cells terminate in neuropil-like regions. Occasionally, dense granules (500-1000 A) of uncertain identity occur in the perinuclear and inner segment cytoplasm of the cells. 2. The supporting cells are of the ependymal type. Their cytoplasm contains a filamentous feltwork and pinocytotic vesicles, but lacks secretory granules. Cytosomes are particularly abundant in cell processes in the neuropil-like zones. The basal end-feet of these cells isolate the receptor and nerve cells from the perivascular space. 3. In the neuropil-like regions, terminals of sensory cells make synaptic contacts with neuronal dendrites. Synaptic ribbon-like profiles in the terminals characterize the contact zones. Only unmyelinated nerve fibers could be observed in the small area of the tissue examined. The results are discussed with regard to photoreceptive and secretory functions of the pineal complex and its evolution in lower vertebrates.

  3. Visualization of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin Meshwork in Human Fibrinopurulent Inflammatory Lesions: III. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Takaki, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from dead neutrophils at the site of inflammation represent webs of neutrophilic DNA stretches dotted with granule-derived antimicrobial proteins, including lactoferrin, and play important roles in innate immunity against microbial infection. We have shown the coexistence of NETs and fibrin meshwork in varied fibrinopurulent inflammatory lesions at both light and electron microscopic levels. In the present study, correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) employing confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to bridge light and electron microscopic images of NETs and fibrin fibrils in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, autopsied lung sections of legionnaire’s pneumonia. Lactoferrin immunoreactivity and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) reactivity were used as markers of NETs, and fibrin was probed by fibrinogen gamma chain. Of note is that NETs light microscopically represented as lactoferrin and DAPI-colocalized dots, 2.5 μm in diameter. CLEM gave super-resolution images of NETs and fibrin fibrils: “Dotted” NETs were ultrastructurally composed of fine filaments and masses of 58 nm-sized globular materials. A fibrin fibril consisted of clusters of smooth-surfaced filaments. NETs filaments (26 nm in diameter) were significantly thinner than fibrin filaments (295 nm in diameter). Of note is that CLEM was applicable to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of autopsy material. PMID:27917008

  4. Supravital uptake of methylene blue by dendritic cells within stratified squamous epithelia: a light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Müller, T

    1996-03-01

    Electron microscopic data on methylene blue staining of dendritic cells in the epithelia of the soft palate and skin of the mouse after supravital dye injection are presented. The ultra-structural details were compared with corresponding light microscopic findings. Methylene blue stained tissue was fixed by immersion in a paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde solution containing phosphomolybdic acid. The ensuing dye precipitate was stabilized by ammonium heptamolybdate. The light microscopic investigation revealed that selective staining of dendritic cells depended on the presence of ambient oxygen. In addition, delicate morphological characteristics, like spinous structures of the dendrites, were visible. Some cells also showed terminal enlargements of the dendrites close to the surface of the epithelium. In general, visualization of morphological detail was superior to that obtained by conventional histological and immunohistochemical procedures. Nerve fibers were also stained within the epithelium as well as the subepithelial connective tissue. At the electron microscopic level, the dye was clearly identified as an electron dense precipitate that accumulated primarily within the cytoplasm near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, it was bound to the chromatin of the nuclei. No significant staining of mitochondria or other organelles was seen. Within the cytoplasm, the oxygen-dependent binding sites may be associated with heme proteins that attract both the dye in its reduced lipophilic leuco form and oxygen, followed by generation of oxygen radicals and a reoxidation of the leuco form to the cationic blue dye. Because of its selectivity for intraepithelial dendritic cells, the method described here supplements immunocytochemical procedures at both the light and electron microscopic levels.

  5. A desktop extreme ultraviolet microscope based on a compact laser-plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-01-01

    A compact, desktop size microscope, based on laser-plasma source and equipped with reflective condenser and diffractive Fresnel zone plate objective, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region at the wavelength of 13.8 nm, was developed. The microscope is capable of capturing magnified images of objects with 95-nm full-pitch spatial resolution (48 nm 25-75% KE) and exposure time as low as a few seconds, combining reasonable acquisition conditions with stand-alone desktop footprint. Such EUV microscope can be regarded as a complementary imaging tool to already existing, well-established ones. Details about the microscope, characterization, resolution estimation and real sample images are presented and discussed.

  6. Efficacy of Light-Activated Sealant on Enamel Demineralization in Orthodontic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscope Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shinaishin, Suzi F; Ghobashy, Safaa A; EL-Bialy, Tarek H

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of (Pro Seal) sealant in preventing enamel decalcification in-vivo and compare its effect with fluoride varnish and unfilled sealant using atomic force microscopy. Materials and Methods: Eight orthodontic patients who were candidates for extraction of all first premolars for orthodontic treatment were recruited to this study. Thirty two premolars (upper and lower) were randomly divided into four groups (n=8) for each group, 4 maxillary and 4 mandibular); Control (no -treatment); Fluoride varnish, Unfilled sealant (Light Bond) and filled sealant (Pro-Seal). After two months the brackets were debonded and the teeth were extracted and prepared for Atomic force microscopic scanning. Each sample was scanned twice at two different scan areas 50 and 10µm at the buccal cervical third of the crown. Images were recorded with slow scan rate and resolution and the mean roughness height and total surface area were calculated for each scan area. Comparison between groups was performed using one way analysis of variance test with level of significance was set to be 0.05. Results: Pro Seal treated samples show the lowest roughness height and total surface area. Conclusion: Pro Seal was the most effective prophylaxis technique in preventing enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment. PMID:22207889

  7. Special pattern of endochondral ossification in human laryngeal cartilages: X-ray and light-microscopic studies on thyroid cartilage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    Endochondral ossification is a process that also occurs in the skeleton of the larynx. Differences in the ossification mechanism in comparison to growth plates are not understood until now. To get deeper insights into this process, human thyroid cartilage was investigated by the use of X-rays and a series of light-microscopic stainings. A statistical analysis of mineralization was done by scanning areas of mineralized cartilage and of ossification. We detected a special mode of endochondral ossification which differs from the processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilage ossifies very slowly and in a gender-specific manner. Compared with age-matched women, bone formation in thyroid cartilage of men is significantly higher in the age group 41-60 years. Endochondral ossification is prepared by internal changes of extracellular matrix leading to areas of asbestoid fibers with ingrowing cartilage canals. In contrast to growth plates, bone is deposited on large areas of mineralized cartilage, which appear at the rims of cartilage canals. Furthermore, primary parallel fibered bone was observed which was deposited on woven bone. The predominant bone type is cancellous bone with trabeculae, whereas compact bone with Haversian systems was seldom found. Trabeculae contain a great number of reversal and arresting lines meaning that the former were often reconstructed and that bone formation was arrested and resumed again with advancing age. It is hypothesized that throughout life trabeculae of ossified thyroid cartilage undergo adaptation to different loads due to the use of voice.

  8. Compact, light-weight and cost-effective microscope based on lensless incoherent holography for telemedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Mudanyali, Onur; Tseng, Derek; Oh, Chulwoo; Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Seo, Sungkyu; Khademhosseini, Bahar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-06-07

    Despite the rapid progress in optical imaging, most of the advanced microscopy modalities still require complex and costly set-ups that unfortunately limit their use beyond well equipped laboratories. In the meantime, microscopy in resource-limited settings has requirements significantly different from those encountered in advanced laboratories, and such imaging devices should be cost-effective, compact, light-weight and appropriately accurate and simple to be usable by minimally trained personnel. Furthermore, these portable microscopes should ideally be digitally integrated as part of a telemedicine network that connects various mobile health-care providers to a central laboratory or hospital. Toward this end, here we demonstrate a lensless on-chip microscope weighing approximately 46 grams with dimensions smaller than 4.2 cm x 4.2 cm x 5.8 cm that achieves sub-cellular resolution over a large field of view of approximately 24 mm(2). This compact and light-weight microscope is based on digital in-line holography and does not need any lenses, bulky optical/mechanical components or coherent sources such as lasers. Instead, it utilizes a simple light-emitting-diode (LED) and a compact opto-electronic sensor-array to record lensless holograms of the objects, which then permits rapid digital reconstruction of regular transmission or differential interference contrast (DIC) images of the objects. Because this lensless incoherent holographic microscope has orders-of-magnitude improved light collection efficiency and is very robust to mechanical misalignments it may offer a cost-effective tool especially for telemedicine applications involving various global health problems in resource limited settings.

  9. Compact, Light-weight and Cost-effective Microscope based on Lensless Incoherent Holography for Telemedicine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mudanyali, Onur; Tseng, Derek; Oh, Chulwoo; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Seo, Sungkyu; Khademhosseini, Bahar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the rapid progress in optical imaging, most of the advanced microscopy modalities still require complex and costly set-ups that unfortunately limit their use beyond well equipped laboratories. In the meantime, microscopy in resource-limited settings has requirements significantly different from those encountered in advanced laboratories, and such imaging devices should be cost-effective, compact, light-weight and appropriately accurate and simple to be usable by minimally trained personnel. Furthermore, these portable microscopes should ideally be digitally integrated as part of a telemedicine network that connects various mobile health-care providers to a central laboratory or hospital. Toward this end, here we demonstrate a lensless on-chip microscope weighing ~46 grams with dimensions smaller than 4.2cm × 4.2cm × 5.8cm that achieves sub-cellular resolution over a large field of view of ~24 mm2. This compact and light-weight microscope is based on digital in-line holography and does not need any lenses, bulky optical/mechanical components or coherent sources such as lasers. Instead, it utilizes a simple light-emitting-diode (LED) and a compact opto-electronic sensor-array to record lensless holograms of the objects, which then permits rapid digital reconstruction of regular transmission or differential interference contrast (DIC) images of the objects. Because this lensless incoherent holographic microscope has orders-of-magnitude improved light collection efficiency and is very robust to mechanical misalignments it may offer a cost-effective tool especially for telemedicine applications involving various global health problems in resource limited settings. PMID:20401422

  10. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  11. Short Report: Quantitative Evaluation of a Handheld Light Microscope for Field Diagnosis of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Isaac I.; Andrews, Jason R.; Speich, Benjamin; Ame, Shaali M.; Ali, Said M.; Stothard, J. Russell; Utzinger, Jürg; Keiser, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the Newton Nm1, a commercially available handheld light microscope and compared it with conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth infections. A total of 91 Kato-Katz thick smears were examined by experienced microscopists and helminth eggs were counted and expressed as eggs per gram of stool (EPG). Mean egg counts were significantly higher with the conventional light microscope (5,190 EPG versus 2,386 EPG for Ascaris lumbricoides; 826 versus 456 for Trichuris trichiura; both P < 0.05). Using regression coefficients and accounting for intensity of infection, we found that the agreement between the two devices was excellent for both species (κ = 0.90, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.99 for A. lumbricoides and κ = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.91–1.00 for T. trichiura). The Newton Nm1 microscope may be a useful tool for the detection and quantification of soil-transmitted helminth infection in clinical, epidemiologic, and public health settings. PMID:25246697

  12. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  13. Design, operation and applications of a visible-light confocal scanning Fourier transform Raman microscope for volumetric Raman spectrochemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin John Herbert

    A new type of confocal Raman microscope called a Fourier transform confocal Raman microscope (FT-CRM) was designed, built and characterized with respect to its spatio-spectral imaging properties. Several different applications of the FT-CRM are presented that take advantage of its unique spectral and spatial imaging characteristics. The instrument combines focused illumination with spatially-filtered detection in a confocal optical configuration to collect photons scattered from a diffraction-limited volume in the sample (typically [<]5×10-18/ m3) and reject photons from outside that region. The molecular vibrational information encoded in the inelastic, or Raman, spectral component of light scattered from the confocal volume is measured with a visible light Fourier transform Raman spectrometer. By scanning the sample relative to the confocal volume, a volumetric Raman spectrochemical image of the sample can be constructed. Raman scattering is an inherently inefficient process; hence an optimal radius pinhole must be found that balances the FT-CRM optical throughput against the microscope spatial resolution and image contrast. Detailed experimental measurements mapped out the FT-CRM spatial response (axial and lateral), optical throughput and image signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios as a function of pinhole radius. Excellent agreement was found between these measurements and the predictions of a theoretical microscope model also developed as part of this thesis. Several applications of the FT-CRM included volumetric compositional imaging of three-dimensional chemically inhomogeneous materials such as cellulose and polyester fibers in water or two immiscible optically- similar liquids, water and trichloroehthylene, in a porous quartz sandstone matrix. The potential of the FT- CRM for non-invasive spectrochemical detection and imaging through a turbid tissue-like medium was demonstrated and a new spectral estimator, Fast Orthogonal Search, was evaluated

  14. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  15. Three-body model of light nuclei with microscopic nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Theeten, M.; Baye, D.; Matsumura, H.; Orabi, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2007-11-15

    A three-body cluster model involving microscopic nonlocal interactions is developed and compared with a fully microscopic cluster model. The energy-independent nonlocal interactions are obtained from a renormalization of the energy-dependent kernels of the resonating-group method. Such interactions are derived for the {alpha}{alpha} and {alpha}n systems. The role and importance of nonlocality are discussed. These interactions are employed in three-body studies of the {alpha}nn,{alpha}{alpha}n, and 3{alpha} descriptions of the {sup 6}He, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 12}C nuclei. A comparison with fully microscopic calculations provides a measure of the importance of three-cluster exchanges in those states. The differences between both cluster-model calculations are in general small, except in the densities at short distances.

  16. The nucleus of Darkschewitsch in the cat: a Nissl, Golgi, and electron microscope analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, R; Gioia, M

    1986-10-01

    A light and electron microscope study was carried out to elucidate the cytoarchitectural organization of the nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND) in the cat. From the anatomical staining methods, including Nissl and Golgi-Cox, it appears that the ND shows a clear heterogeneity of shape and size of the neuronal population. The small or medium-sized neurons show a high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and a modest basophilia. Spiny extrusions are present on many of the neurons, arranged either as varicosities giving a rosary feature or clumped in small groups over the dendritic processes; these are absent at the level of the soma. From the electron microscope analysis it appears that the neuropil is not very extensive because the neuronal bodies are numerous and compact. The synaptic complex is extensive both at the level of the nerve cell bodies and at the level of the neuropil. Since many of the synapses display the features typical of the inhibitory synapses, it is possible that they represent the anatomical basis of an inhibitory integrative function.

  17. Electron Microscopic Analysis of Hippocampal Axo‐Somatic Synapses in a Chronic Stress Model for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Csabai, Dávid; Seress, László; Varga, Zsófia; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress can alter the number and morphology of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, but nothing is known about the effect of stress on inhibitory synapses. Here, we used an animal model for depression, the chronic mild stress model, and quantified the number of perisomatic inhibitory neurons and their synapses. We found reduced density of parvalbumin‐positive (PV+) neurons in response to stress, while the density of cholecystokinin‐immunoreactive (CCK+) neurons was unaffected. We did a detailed electron microscopic analysis to quantify the frequency and morphology of perisomatic inhibitory synapses in the hippocampal CA1 area. We analyzed 1100 CA1 pyramidal neurons and 4800 perisomatic terminals in five control and four chronically stressed rats. In the control animals we observed the following parameters: Number of terminals/soma = 57; Number of terminals/100 µm cell perimeter = 10; Synapse/terminal ratio = 32%; Synapse number/100 terminal = 120; Average terminal length = 920nm. None of these parameters were affected by the stress exposure. Overall, these data indicate that despite the depressive‐like behavior and the decrease in the number of perisomatic PV+ neurons in the light microscopic preparations, the number of perisomatic inhibitory synapses on CA1 pyramidal cells was not affected by stress. In the electron microscope, PV+ neurons and the axon terminals appeared to be normal and we did not find any apoptotic or necrotic cells. This data is in sharp contrast to the remarkable remodeling of the excitatory synapses on spines that has been reported in response to stress and depressive‐like behavior. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27571571

  18. Microscopic analysis of quadrupole-octupole shape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kosuke

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sdf interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in large sets of nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  19. Performance analysis of an inexpensive Direct Imaging Transmission Ion Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Patrick; Pallone, Arthur

    2013-03-01

    A direct imaging transmission ion microscope (DITIM) is built from a modified webcam and a commercially available polonium-210 antistatic device mounted on an optics rail. The performance of the DITIM in radiographic mode is analyzed in terms of the line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF) for an opaque edge. Limitations of, potential uses for, and suggested improvements to the DITIM are also discussed. Faculty sponsor

  20. Microscopic analysis of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain from Malaysia that produces exosporium-enclosed parasporal inclusion.

    PubMed

    Chai, Pui Fun; Rathinam, Xavier; Solayappan, Maheswaran; Ahmad Ghazali, Amir Hamzah; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-10-01

    The current study focused on the microscopic studies of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain isolated from Malaysia, Bt-S84-13a, that produced an unusual crystal type. Primary detection of parasporal inclusions using a phase contrast microscope presented one to two small crystal proteins in the sporulating cells of Bt-S84-13a. Compound light microscopic examination of autolysed Bt-S84-13a cells stained with 0.133% Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed two types of crystal morphology: small crystals independent of spores and spore-associated crystals. Surface structure analysis with a scanning electron microscope revealed spherical-like, coarse and wrinkled-looking crystal in Bt-S84-13a. A close-up observation of the crystal morphology using a transmission electron microscope also demonstrated two parasporal inclusions in Bt-S84-13a. One inclusion was deposited against the forespore and was in a shape of incomplete rectangular. Another smaller inclusion was developed within the exosporium and was rectangular in shape. However, the latter inclusion was found lack in another bacterial cell which was still in the early stages of sporulation. This unique crystal morphology may imply some biological potential in Bt-S84-13a.

  1. Low Efficiency Upconversion Nanoparticles for High-Resolution Coalignment of Near-Infrared and Visible Light Paths on a Light Microscope.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Sriramkumar; Garcia Badaracco, Adrian; Hirsch, Sophia M; Park, Jun Hong; Davies, Tim; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Kummel, Andrew C; Canman, Julie C

    2017-03-08

    The combination of near-infrared (NIR) and visible wavelengths in light microscopy for biological studies is increasingly common. For example, many fields of biology are developing the use of NIR for optogenetics, in which an NIR laser induces a change in gene expression and/or protein function. One major technical barrier in working with both NIR and visible light on an optical microscope is obtaining their precise coalignment at the imaging plane position. Photon upconverting particles (UCPs) can bridge this gap as they are excited by NIR light but emit in the visible range via an anti-Stokes luminescence mechanism. Here, two different UCPs have been identified, high-efficiency micro(540)-UCPs and lower efficiency nano(545)-UCPs, that respond to NIR light and emit visible light with high photostability even at very high NIR power densities (>25 000 Suns). Both of these UCPs can be rapidly and reversibly excited by visible and NIR light and emit light at visible wavelengths detectable with standard emission settings used for Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), a commonly used genetically encoded fluorophore. However, the high efficiency micro(540)-UCPs were suboptimal for NIR and visible light coalignment, due to their larger size and spatial broadening from particle-to-particle energy transfer consistent with a long-lived excited state and saturated power dependence. In contrast, the lower efficiency nano-UCPs were superior for precise coalignment of the NIR beam with the visible light path (∼2 μm versus ∼8 μm beam broadening, respectively) consistent with limited particle-to-particle energy transfer, superlinear power dependence for emission, and much smaller particle size. Furthermore, the nano-UCPs were superior to a traditional two-camera method for NIR and visible light path alignment in an in vivo Infrared-Laser-Evoked Gene Operator (IR-LEGO) optogenetics assay in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In summary, nano-UCPs are powerful new tools

  2. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  3. Assembly of ovarian follicles in the caecilians Ichthyophis tricolor and Gegeneophis ramaswamii: light and transmission electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Beyo, R S; Sreejith, P; Divya, L; Oommen, O V; Akbarsha, M A

    2007-08-01

    Though much is known about various aspects of reproductive biology of amphibia, there is little information on the cellular and mechanistic basis of assembly of ovarian follicles in this group. This is especially true of the caecilians. Therefore, taking advantage of the abundant distribution of caecilians in the Western Ghats of India, two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis tricolor and Gegeneophis ramaswamii, were subjected to light and transmission electron microscopic analysis to trace the sequential changes during the assembly of ovarian follicles. The paired ovaries of these caecilians are elongated sac-like structures each including numerous vitellogenic follicles. The follicles are connected by a connective tissue stroma. This stroma contains nests of oogonia, primary oocytes and pregranulosa cells as spatially separated nests. During assembly of follicles the oocytes increase in size and enter the meiotic prophase when the number of nucleoli in the nucleus increases. The mitochondrial cloud or Balbiani vitelline body, initially localized at one pole of the nucleus, disperses through out the cytoplasm subsequently. Synaptonemal complexes are prominent in the pachytene stage oocytes. The pregranulosa cells migrate through the connective tissue fibrils of the stroma and arrive at the vicinity of the meiotic prophase oocytes. On contacting the oocyte, the pregranulosa cells become cuboidal in shape, wrap the diplotene stage oocyte as a discontinuous layer and increase the content of cytoplasmic organelles and inclusions. The oocytes increase in size and are arrested in diplotene when the granulosa cells become flat and form a continuous layer. Soon a perivitelline space appears between the oolemma and granulosa cells, completing the process of assembly of follicles. Thus, the events in the establishment of follicles in the caecilian ovary are described.

  4. Light and electron microscopic studies of the Harderian gland in Bilgorajska goose (Anser anser).

    PubMed

    Klećkowska-Nawrot, Joanna; Chęć, Aleksandra; Goździewska-Harłajczuk, Karolina; Nowaczyk, Renata; Barszcz, Karolina

    2015-09-01

    The Harderian gland (HG) in birds is the dominant orbital gland, which plays an important role in immunological response. Tissue sections taken from adult females of Bilgorajska goose were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Azan, PAS, AB pH 2.5, AF and HDI. Based on the histological structure the HG in Bilgorajska geese had compound tubular structure with multiple lobules and two types of epithelial cells lining the tubules. Epithelial cells in the central part of the lobes were dark in color and contained serous fluid, while in the deeper layers, epithelial cells were lightly coloured and contained mucous fluid. Histochemical studies showed the presence of neutral mucopolysaccharides and carboxylated acid mucopolysaccharides in the secretory cells. The small number of single plasma cells were present in HDI staining below the basement membrane of the secondary and primary ducts, near the crypts of the main duct. TEM study demonstrated that plasma cells had a large nucleus with condensed heterochromatin and were rich in rough endoplasmic reticulum. The knowledge of gland's structure, and above all an analysis of the immune system components may affect clinical practice and properly conducted immunization of birds.

  5. Microscopic analysis of order parameters in nuclear quantum phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-12-15

    Microscopic signatures of nuclear ground-state shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes are studied using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. As a function of the physical control parameter, the number of nucleons, energy gaps between the ground state and the excited vibrational states with zero angular momentum, isomer shifts, and monopole transition strengths exhibit sharp discontinuities at neutron number N=90, which is characteristic of a first-order quantum phase transition.

  6. Control and acquisition systems for new scanning transmission x-ray microscopes at Advanced Light Source (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyliszczak, T.; Hitchcock, P.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Ade, H.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Fakra, S.; Steele, W. F.; Warwick, T.

    2002-03-01

    Two new scanning x-ray transmission microscopes are being built at beamline 5.3.2 and beamline 7.0 of the Advanced Light Source that have novel aspects in their control and acquisition systems. Both microscopes use multiaxis laser interferometry to improve the precision of pixel location during imaging and energy scans as well as to remove image distortions. Beam line 5.3.2 is a new beam line where the new microscope will be dedicated to studies of polymers in the 250-600 eV energy range. Since this is a bending magnet beam line with lower x-ray brightness than undulator beam lines, special attention is given to the design not only to minimize distortions and vibrations but also to optimize the controls and acquisition to improve data collection efficiency. 5.3.2 microscope control and acquisition is based on a PC computer running WINDOWS 2000. All mechanical stages are moved by stepper motors with rack mounted controllers. A dedicated counter board is used for counting and timing and a multi-input/output board is used for analog acquisition and control of the focusing mirror. A three axis differential laser interferometer is being used to improve stability and precision by careful tracking of the relative positions of the sample and zone plate. Each axis measures the relative distance between a mirror placed on the sample stage and a mirror attached to the zone plate holder. Agilent Technologies HP 10889A servo-axis interferometer boards are used. While they were designed to control servo motors, our tests show that they can be used to directly control the piezo stage. The use of the interferometer servo-axis boards provides excellent point stability for spectral measurements. The interferometric feedback also provides active vibration isolation which reduces deleterious impact of mechanical vibrations up to 20-30 Hz. It also can improve the speed and precision of image scans. Custom C++ software has been written to provide user friendly control of the microscope

  7. Thermal effects of white light illumination during microsurgery: clinical pilot study on the application safety of surgical microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hibst, Raimund; Saal, David; Russ, Detlef; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Kienle, Alwin; Stock, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Modern operating microscopes offer high power illumination to ensure optimal visualization, but can also cause thermal damage. The aim of our study is to quantify the thermal effects in vivo and discuss conditions for safe use. In a pilot study on volunteers, we measured the temperature at the skin surface during microscope illumination, including the influence of anaesthesia and the effects of staining, draping, or moistening of the skin. Irradiation within the limit given by safety regulations (200 mW/cm(2)) results in skin surface temperature of 43 degrees C. Higher intensities (forearm 335 mW/cm(2), back 250 mW/cm(2)) are tolerated, resulting in reversible hyperaemia. At a very high illumination intensity (750 mW/cm(2)), pain occurs within 30 s at temperatures of 46 degrees C+/-1 degrees C (hand and forearm), and 43 degrees C+/-2 degrees C (back), respectively. Anaesthesia has no distinct effect on the temperature, whereas staining and drapes result in much higher temperatures (>100 degrees C). Moistening at practicable flow rates can reduce temperature efficiently when combined with a light absorbing and water absorbent drape. In conclusion, surgeons must be aware that surgical microscope illumination without protective means can cause skin temperatures to rise much above pain threshold, which in our study serves as a (conservative) benchmark for potential damage.

  8. Thermal effects of white light illumination during microsurgery: clinical pilot study on the application safety of surgical microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Saal, David; Russ, Detlef; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Kienle, Alwin; Stock, Karl

    2010-07-01

    Modern operating microscopes offer high power illumination to ensure optimal visualization, but can also cause thermal damage. The aim of our study is to quantify the thermal effects in vivo and discuss conditions for safe use. In a pilot study on volunteers, we measured the temperature at the skin surface during microscope illumination, including the influence of anaesthesia and the effects of staining, draping, or moistening of the skin. Irradiation within the limit given by safety regulations (200 mW/cm2) results in skin surface temperature of 43 °C. Higher intensities (forearm 335 mW/cm2, back 250 mW/cm2) are tolerated, resulting in reversible hyperaemia. At a very high illumination intensity (750 mW/cm2), pain occurs within 30 s at temperatures of 46 °C+/-1 °C (hand and forearm), and 43 °C+/-2 °C (back), respectively. Anaesthesia has no distinct effect on the temperature, whereas staining and drapes result in much higher temperatures (>100 °C). Moistening at practicable flow rates can reduce temperature efficiently when combined with a light absorbing and water absorbent drape. In conclusion, surgeons must be aware that surgical microscope illumination without protective means can cause skin temperatures to rise much above pain threshold, which in our study serves as a (conservative) benchmark for potential damage.

  9. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope.

    PubMed

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-10-21

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method.

  10. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  11. Asymptotic analysis of microscopic impenetrability constraints for atomistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braides, A.; Gelli, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze systems of atomistic interactions on a triangular lattice allowing for fracture under a geometric condition on the triangles corresponding to a microscopic impenetrability constraint. Such systems can be thought as a computational simulation of materials undergoing brittle fracture. We show that in the small-deformation regime such approximation can be validated analytically in the framework of variational models of fracture. Conversely, in a finite-deformation regime various pathologies show that the continuum approximation of such a system differs from the usual variational representations of fracture and either needs new types of formulations on the continuum, or a proper interpretation of the atomistic constraints limiting their range and adapting them to a dynamical framework.

  12. Light and electron microscopic study of an avian pretectal nucleus, the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon, magnocellular division.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, M D; McKenna, O C

    1986-06-01

    Using several light microscopic methods we have identified the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon, magnocellular division, by its position in the pretectum, its cellular composition, and its complement of retinal afferents and have distinguished it from neighboring structures. At the light microscopic level large neurons (approximately 30 X 21 microns) and small neurons (approximately 13 X 9 microns), which are more numerous, are seen interspersed among myelinated axons. The large neurons are generally ovoid and contain an eccentrically located nucleus and large clumps of Nissl-stained material. In the electron microscope the most notable feature of these neurons is the presence of ribosome rosettes and many parallel arrays of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). On the basis of cytological and ultrastructural features, we conclude that only one class of large neuron is present. Although in the light microscope the small neurons appear to be similar, at the ultrastructural level three neuron types have been distinguished: (1) ovoid shape with cytoplasm densely packed with organelles especially RER, (2) round shape with very little cytoplasm with few organelles, and (3) triangular shape with a pale cytoplasmic matrix with some RER. Subsurface membrane configurations are often seen in the somata of all neuron types. In addition, axon terminals, some containing flat vesicles, and other less frequent ones containing round vesicles are seen terminating on the somata of all neuronal cell types. In the neuropil, three types of presynaptic profiles can be identified. Two of these profiles are axodendritic and the third is dendrodendritic. The type R profile, which is often as large as 4 micron 2, is the most numerous, contains large round synaptic vesicles, and is often seen synapsing on several dendritic profiles. The type F profile contains flat vesicles and a relatively dense cytoplasm, and is smaller in area than type R. The third profile, which contains small

  13. Light Microscopy Module: An On-Orbit Microscope Planned for the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Griffin, DeVon W.

    2001-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of fluids and biology experiments within NASA Glenn Research Center's Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. Within the Fluids and Combustion Facility, four fluids physics experiments will utilize an instrument built around a light microscope. These experiments are the Constrained Vapor Bubble experiment (Peter C. Wayner of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment-2 (Paul M. Chaikin of Princeton University), the Physics of Colloids in Space-2 experiment (David A. Weitz of Harvard University), and the Low Volume Fraction Colloidal Assembly experiment (Arjun G. Yodh of the University of Pennsylvania). The first experiment investigates heat conductance in microgravity as a function of liquid volume and heat flow rate to determine, in detail, the transport process characteristics in a curved liquid film. The other three experiments investigate various complementary aspects of the nucleation, growth, structure, and properties of colloidal crystals in microgravity and the effects of micromanipulation upon their properties. Key diagnostic capabilities for meeting the science requirements of the four experiments include video microscopy to observe sample features including basic structures and dynamics, interferometry to measure vapor bubble thin film thickness, laser tweezers for colloidal particle manipulation and patterning, confocal microscopy to provide enhanced three-dimensional visualization of colloidal structures, and spectrophotometry to measure colloidal crystal photonic properties.

  14. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  15. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  16. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  17. Spatio-angular light control in microscopes using micro mirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückerl, F.; Bellow, S.; Berndt, D.; Tinevez, J.-Y.; Heber, J.; Wagner, M.; Shorte, S.

    2015-03-01

    Micromirror arrays (MMA) are spatial light modulators (SLM) used in a wide variety of applications for structured light manipulation i.e. structured illumination microscopy. In our setup, we use a combination of two micromirror arrays, which allow not only to spatially structure the light in the field of view, but also to control the direction and angle of the incident light. In order to achieve this, a first MMA is imaged in the focal plane and used as a black and white (or even greyscale) mask. With a fully illuminated objective, this image would normally be formed from the complete light cone. By imaging the second MMA onto the backfocal plane of the objective only a portion of the light cone is used to form the image. This enables avoiding the unwanted illumination of out of focus objects. The MMAs in our setup consist of an array of 256x256 micromirrors, that can each be individually and continuously tilted up to 450nm, allowing the creation of greyscale images in real time in the illumination pattern. The mirrors themselves can be tilted for times as short as 10μs up to several seconds. This gives unprecedented control over the illumination times and intensities in the sample. Furthermore, our enhanced coating technology yields a high reflectivity over a broad optical spectrum (240- 1000nm). Overall, the setup allows targetted illumination of subcellular regions enabling the precise, localized activation of optogenetic probes or the activation and deactivation of signaling cascades using photo-activated ion-channels.

  18. iFit and Light Dilution: Ultraviolet volcanic SO2 measurements under the microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Michael; Sawyer, Georgina

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic SO2 flux measurement systems are a staple of volcano monitoring networks, as this volcanic gas flux reflects the magma input rate into the volcano's feeding system. SO2 flux monitoring has been used since the seventies, with some notable successes at Pinatubo, Mt. St. Helens, Montserrat and Italian volcanoes. However, there are some subtle aspects of the atmospheric radiative transfer processed inherent in the technique which have been ignored for many years; or perhaps better, they have been forgotten, as these subtleties were clearly spelt out in early COSPEC papers by Millán and co-workers. Recent work by Kern et al. (2010, 2012) has re-focussed attention on the light dilution effect during SO2 plume measurements. This occurs when solar radiation is scattered into the slant column observed by a UV spectrometer or imaging system below the height of the volcanic plume, such that it has not passed through the plume. This below-plume light dilutes the SO2 absorption produced by light passing through the plume from above, apparently reducing the amount of SO2 present. Fortunately, the light dilution process leaves a signature in the shape of the SO2 absorption spectrum, due to the non-linear behaviour of absorption lines with respect to gas amount, following the Beer-Lamber law. This signature can be used to quantify the magnitude of the light dilution in real field spectra. We developed a new intensity spectrum UV fitting code called iFit that allows fitting of the light dilution signature, and applied this to examples from Stromboli and Etna. here we summarise the results from these studies and highlight the importance of this previously ignored process for quantify SO2 gas emissions from volcanoes.

  19. Comparison of the distribution of convulsant/barbiturate and benzodiazepine receptors using light microscopic autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wamsley, J.K.; Gee, K.W.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1983-12-05

    Some convulsant drugs elicit CNS excitation by blocking neuronal activitty at GABAergic synapses whereas depressant compounds may result in the enhancement of GABAergic transmission. These effects are thought to involve drug actions at a multireceptor complex involving a benzodiazepine receptor, GABA receptor, picrotoxin receptor and a chloride ionophore. A radiolabeled convulsant, (/sup 35/S) t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)-TBT) has been developed and used to characterize the binding to the ''picrotoxin'' or convulsant/barbiturate site. The microscopic distribution of the convulsant/barbiturate sites are reported in this communication, as demonstrated by receptor autoradiography after labeling tissue sections with (/sup 35/S)-TBT. Comparison of the distribution of these sites with those of the benzodiazepine receptors show a close regional correlation in many areas. The convulsant/barbiturate sites and the benzodiazepine receptors, however, are unevenly distributed in the cerebellum and exist in separate lamina.

  20. Congenital adenoma of the iris and ciliary body: light and electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, I G; Parsons, M A; Palmer, C A

    1992-01-01

    A 23-year-old man had a lesion in the right inferior iris which appeared to have enlarged since it was first seen when the patient was aged 5 years. The lesion was excised by a partial iridocyclectomy. Histopathologically the neoplasm was composed of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells. Pseudoacini, containing acid mucopolysaccharides, were present throughout the tumour matrix. Electron microscopically the non-pigmented cells were found to possess a convoluted plasmalemma, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and numerous desmosomes and gap junctions. The pigmented cells contained large, round, mature melanosomes, occasional premelanosomes, and desmosomes, which resembled the posterior pigment epithelium of the iris. The intercellular matrix contained fine collagen fibrils resembling vitreous. We believe that this neoplasm represents a congenital adenoma of the ciliary body and iris. Images PMID:1420064

  1. The Sensura Neglecta in the Pigeon: A Scanning Electron and Light Microscope Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Both scanning electron and light microscopy have been used to observe the tiny sensura neglecta which is located in the inferior utricula sinus of...the vestibular labyrinth in the pigeon. Observations indicate that the sensura neglecta in the pigeon has both crista- and macula-like features. It is

  2. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, B M

    2015-01-01

    The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI) Stations is limited.

  3. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  4. Design and analysis of a fast, two-mirror soft-x-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Wang, C.; Jiang, W.; Jin, L.; Hoover, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    During the past several years, a number of investigators have addressed the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft-x-ray applications using multilayer coatings. Some of these systems have demonstrated diffraction limited resolution for small numerical apertures. Rigorously aplanatic, two-aspherical mirror Head microscopes can provide near diffraction limited resolution for very large numerical apertures. The relationships between the numerical aperture, mirror radii and diameters, magnifications, and total system length for Schwarzschild microscope configurations are summarized. Also, an analysis of the characteristics of the Head-Schwarzschild surfaces will be reported. The numerical surface data predicted by the Head equations were fit by a variety of functions and analyzed by conventional optical design codes. Efforts have been made to determine whether current optical substrate and multilayer coating technologies will permit construction of a very fast Head microscope which can provide resolution approaching that of the wavelength of the incident radiation.

  5. A Customized Light Sheet Microscope to Measure Spatio-Temporal Protein Dynamics in Small Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rieckher, Matthias; Kourmoulakis, Georgios; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM) platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT) modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples. PMID:26000610

  6. A new non-microscopic study of cluster structures in light alpha-conjugate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghi-Foumani, Niloufar; Shojaei, Mohammad Reza; Rajabi, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the alpha-cluster state in light alpha-conjugate nuclei is studied and a new suitable local potential model for the α-cluster phase of these nuclei is suggested. Using the generalized Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method, the clusterization energy for 8Be, 12C, 16O and 20Ne nuclei is calculated. Based on the obtained results, the clustering phenomenon is more probable at energies among excited levels and it happens neither at ground state nor at excited states of light alpha-conjugate nuclei. It is found that the presented formulation for clustering phenomenon reproduces the results of previous experimental and theoretical attempts for the mentioned nuclei. The consistency of the obtained results with the previous experimental and theoretical predictions indicates the reliability of this formulation for various types of alpha-conjugate, nuclei.

  7. Analysis of photon-scanning tunneling microscope images of inhomogeneous samples: determination of the local refractive index of channel waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourillot, E.; de Fornel, F.; Goudonnet, J. P.; Persegol, D.; Kevorkian, A.; Delacourt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Channel waveguides are imaged by a photon-scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). The polarization of the light and its orientation with respect to the guide axis are shown to be very important parameters in the analysis of the images of such samples. We simulated image formation for the plane of incidence parallel to the axis of the guide. Our theoretical results are qualitatively in agreement with our measurements. These results show the ability of the PSTM to give information about the local refractive-index variations of a sample.

  8. Free-form Light Actuators — Fabrication and Control of Actuation in Microscopic Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) are smart materials capable of reversible shape-change in response to external stimuli, and have attracted researchers' attention in many fields. Most of the studies focused on macroscopic LCE structures (films, fibers) and their miniaturization is still in its infancy. Recently developed lithography techniques, e.g., mask exposure and replica molding, only allow for creating 2D structures on LCE thin films. Direct laser writing (DLW) opens access to truly 3D fabrication in the microscopic scale. However, controlling the actuation topology and dynamics at the same length scale remains a challenge. In this paper we report on a method to control the liquid crystal (LC) molecular alignment in the LCE microstructures of arbitrary three-dimensional shape. This was made possible by a combination of direct laser writing for both the LCE structures as well as for micrograting patterns inducing local LC alignment. Several types of grating patterns were used to introduce different LC alignments, which can be subsequently patterned into the LCE structures. This protocol allows one to obtain LCE microstructures with engineered alignments able to perform multiple opto-mechanical actuation, thus being capable of multiple functionalities. Applications can be foreseen in the fields of tunable photonics, micro-robotics, lab-on-chip technology and others. PMID:27285398

  9. Combined light and electron microscopic visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    The study of neuronal connections and neuron to neuron (or neuron to glia) communication is of fundamental importance in understanding brain structure and function. Therefore, ultrastructural investigation by the use of immunocytochemical techniques is a really precious tool to obtain an exact map of the localization of neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) and their receptors at different types of synapses. However, in immunocytochemical procedures one has always to search for the optimal compromise between structural preservation and retention of antigenicity. This is often made difficult by the need to localize not only small transmitter molecules, as in the case of transmitter amino acids and neuropeptides, but also their specific receptors that are usually large proteins very sensitive to fixation procedures. We describe here a preembedding procedure employing the Fluoronanogold™ reagent, a probe consisting of fluorescein-tagged antibodies conjugated with ultrasmall gold particles that can be made visible under the electron microscope by a gold intensification procedure. This technique permits correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy observations, providing a very useful tool for the study of neuronal connectivity. Moreover, the Fluoronanogold™ procedure can be combined with conventional postembedding immunogold techniques in multiple labeling studies.

  10. Cell Aging of Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Observed by Light and Electron Microscopic Radioautography

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    The term “cell aging” initially means how the cells change due to their aging. There are two meanings, i.e. how a cell changes when it is isolated from original animals such as in vitro cells in cell culture, otherwise how all the cells of an animal change in vivo due to the aging of the individual animal. We have been studying the latter changes from the viewpoint of the cell nutrients, the precursors for the macromolecular synthesis such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, glucides and lipids, which are incorporated and synthesized into various cells of individual animals. Therefore, this article deals with only the cell aging of animal cells in vivo, how the metabolism, i.e. incorporations and syntheses of respective nutrient precursors in various kinds of cells change due to the aging of individual experimental animals such as mice by means of microscopic radioautography to localize the RI-labeled precursors. The incorporations and syntheses of various precursors for macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glucides, lipids and others in various kinds of cells of various organs in the gastrointestinal tract such as the mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are reviewed referring many original papers already published from our laboratory during these 60 years since the late 20th century. PMID:27785275

  11. Improvement of light collection efficiency of lens-coupled YAG screen TV system for a high-voltage electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Tanji, T; Hibino, M; Schauer, P; Autrata, R

    2000-06-15

    A new lens coupling television (TV) system using a YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet: Y(3)Al(5)O(12) : Ce(3+)) single crystal screen has been developed for a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM), and its performance is examined. The system, using a combination of YAG and lenses, is less damaged by high-energy electron irradiation and reduces the influence of X-rays on the image. YAG screens have not been used for lens-coupling systems, because the high refractive index (n = 1.84) of YAG results in a low light collection efficiency for emitted light. This disadvantage is overcome by combining a thin YAG disk screen (thickness; 100 microm) with a glass hemisphere whose refractive index is 1.81. We found that the light intensity is almost the same as that obtained with a conventional P22 powder screen and lenses system. The resolution is about 55 microm on the YAG screen, and this value is 1.3 times higher than that measured by the conventional system. Shading and distortion do not affect TV observation. Detection quantum efficiency, obtained after correction of the channel mixing effect, is about 0.1.

  12. Light and electron microscopic study of a Rickettsiella species from the cockroach Blatta orientalis.

    PubMed

    Radek, R

    2000-11-01

    An infection with Rickettsiella sp. was responsible for an illness causing heavy body swelling in the Oriental cockroach Blatta orientalis. Reproduction of the colony stagnated. Vacuoles with parasitic bacteria occurred mainly in the fat body, but also in nearly all other organs, such as gut epithelium, Malpighian tubules, blood cells, and ovarioles. The parasites clearly differed from the symbiotic bacteria of the genus Blattabacterium, which regularly occur in the mycetocytes of B. orientalis. The vacuoles contained four stages of Rickettsiella: (1) infectious, electron-dense, rod-like elementary bodies (mean size 300 x 145 nm); (2) an electron-dense, flat intermedium stage, called flat body (mean size 515 x 255 x 125 nm); (3) an electron-light, spherical intermedium stage, called condensing sphere (mean size 340 nm); portions of cytoplasm condensed crescent-like at the border or in the center of the cell; and (4) large, spherical, electron-light initial bodies that multiplied by binary fission (mean size 600 nm). The initial bodies had a three-layered cell boundary, but all other stages had a five-layered cell boundary. Elementary and flat bodies contained an electron-light, oblique lamella and an oval structure with an array of ribosome-like granules, respectively. In contrast to other species of Rickettsiella, crystal formation or multiple division did not occur. The described species of Rickettsiella is different from "R. blattae," which belongs to the R. popilliae group. Instead, it shares more similarities with the R. chironomi group. To avoid confusion, it was provisionally named "R. crassificans."

  13. Qualitative Analysis of Collagen Fibers in Oral Submucous Fibrosis using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sekaran, Preethi; Narasimhan, Malathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF) is an oral potentially malignant condition caused predominantly by areca nut chewing. Early recognition with accurate staging of the disease and appropriate treatment planning is of utmost importance to prevent the malignant transformation and to improve the quality of life of the patient. Picrosirius red stain is specific for collagen and enhances its birefringence under polarising light producing different colours in different stages of the disease. Aim To compare the clinical and functional staging with histopathologic staging methods used to assess the severity of OSMF and to perform a qualitative analysis of the collagen fibres in various histopathologic stages of OSMF using picrosirius red stain and polarising microscope. Materials and Methods It is a retrospective study done on archival samples. The study sample included a total of 30 cases which was divided into two groups. Group I comprised of 20 OSMF samples and Group II comprised of 10 normal tissue samples. Clinical, functional and histopathological staging was performed for all OSMF samples. Comparative analysis between clinical and functional stages with the histopathological staging was done using chi square test. Picrosirius red- stained sections of OSMF were analysed using polarising microscopy to evaluate the qualitative changes in the collagen fibers. Statistical Analysis Used Descriptive data which includes frequency and percentages were calculated for each group. Categorical data were analysed by chi-square test. A p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Results Comparative analysis between clinical and functional stages with the histopathological staging revealed a significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the functional and histopathological stage. Enhanced birefringence of the collagen fibers due to picrosirius red stain yielded characteristic prominent polarising colours in different stages of OSMF. Conclusion Comparison

  14. The lamina propria of vertebrate seminiferous tubules: a comparative light and electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Christl, H W

    1990-01-01

    The lamina propria of the seminiferous tubules was compared by means of light and electron microscopy in specimens obtained from the following vertebrates: Mute swan, northern mallard, blackbird, grey short-tailed opossum, north american opossum, european rabbit, mouse, rat, golden hamster, mini pig, bull, llama, roebuck, horse, coati, cat, dog, java monkey, orang utan. The lamina propria consists of basal lamina, ground substance, collagen fibers, fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Myofibroblasts are characterized by myofilaments, dense patches and a basal lamina covering their plasmalemma. The layers of myofibroblasts always lie adjacent to the germinal epithelium, while the surrounding fibroblast layers are located peripherally.

  15. Correlative light and electron microscopic analyses of mitochondrial distribution in blastomeres of early fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongming; Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-02-01

    Early embryos of vertebrates undergo remarkable dynamic molecular events, such as embryonic gradient, cellular polarity, and asymmetry necessary for cell fate decisions. Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful tool to investigate rare or dynamic molecular events and has been developed for relatively small cells in culture and tissues but is not yet available for large cells of early development stage embryos. Here we report the capability of CLEM in blastomeres of medaka fish by using the mitochondria detection system. A short N-terminal signal peptide of the mitochondrial protein Tom20 was linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP), resulting in a fusion protein termed Tom20:GFP. The subcellular location of Tom20:GFP in medaka blastomeres reveals the lack of mitochondrial distribution in pseudopodia as well as inconspicuous redistribution during divisions. Blastomeres, after sample preparation procedures including high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution, are able to preserve fluorescence, antigenicity, and fine structures, which allows for precise correlation between the Tom20:GFP fluorescence and mitochondria on merged light and electron micrographs. Furthermore, nanogold immunostaining for Tom20:GFP and endogenous Tom20 revealed their specific localization on the mitochondrial outer membrane. Our results extend the CLEM approach to early development stage embryos of a vertebrate.

  16. Multilayer mounting enables long-term imaging of zebrafish development in a light sheet microscope.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Anna; Mickoleit, Michaela; Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Light sheet microscopy techniques, such as selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), are ideally suited for time-lapse imaging of developmental processes lasting several hours to a few days. The success of this promising technology has mainly been limited by the lack of suitable techniques for mounting fragile samples. Embedding zebrafish embryos in agarose, which is common in conventional confocal microscopy, has resulted in severe growth defects and unreliable results. In this study, we systematically quantified the viability and mobility of zebrafish embryos mounted under more suitable conditions. We found that tubes made of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) filled with low concentrations of agarose or methylcellulose provided an optimal balance between sufficient confinement of the living embryo in a physiological environment over 3 days and optical clarity suitable for fluorescence imaging. We also compared the effect of different concentrations of Tricaine on the development of zebrafish and provide guidelines for its optimal use depending on the application. Our results will make light sheet microscopy techniques applicable to more fields of developmental biology, in particular the multiview long-term imaging of zebrafish embryos and other small organisms. Furthermore, the refinement of sample preparation for in toto and in vivo imaging will promote other emerging optical imaging techniques, such as optical projection tomography (OPT).

  17. Per-Pixel Lighting Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Inanici, Mehlika

    2005-08-01

    This report presents a framework for per-pixel analysis of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of luminous environments. Recognizing the need for better lighting analysis capabilities and appreciating the new measurement abilities developed within the LBNL Lighting Measurement and Simulation Toolbox, ''Per-pixel Lighting Data Analysis'' project demonstrates several techniques for analyzing luminance distribution patterns, luminance ratios, adaptation luminance and glare assessment. The techniques are the syntheses of the current practices in lighting design and the unique practices that can be done with per-pixel data availability. Demonstrated analysis techniques are applicable to both computer-generated and digitally captured images (physically-based renderings and High Dynamic Range photographs).

  18. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  19. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with rice bodies: light and electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne-Roberts, C R; Cassidy, J T

    1979-01-01

    Rice bodies obtained from a young man with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were found by light and electron microscopy to contain cells that appeared viable. The majority of these cells closely resembled type B synovial lining cells. Type A-like cells were also seen. The cells contained few mitochondria but often much lipid and glycogen, observations which suggested a dependence on anaerobic metabolic pathways in the avascular synovial fluid environment. Cells within the rice bodies lay in a matrix of collagen fibres, fibrin, and amorphous material. The source of the collagen appeared to be the cells themselves. The relatively normal appearance of the cells suggested that they were protected from many of the inflammatory stimuli present in rheumatoid synovia. This 'reversion' towards a normal appearance suggested that the stimuli inducing chronic rheumatoid inflammation might not originate in the synovial lining. Images PMID:434952

  20. Image Analysis, Microscopic, and Spectrochemical Study of the PVC Dry Blending Process,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The dry blending process used in the production of electrical grade pvc formulations has been studies using a combination of image analysis , microscopic...by image analysis techniques. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess morphological differences. Spectrochemical techniques were used to indicate chemical changes.

  1. Light and electron microscopic alterations in spinal cord myelin sheaths after decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J J; Yaffe, L J

    1985-09-01

    Pathological examination of spinal cords from animals subjected to experimental decompression sickness (DCS) was undertaken in an attempt to explain the disparate response to treatment observed. Eight experimental animals, four undived control animals, and two dived but untreated animals were perfusion fixed, and the spinal cords were removed. Light microscopy of toluidine blue stained, ultrathin sections from dived animals demonstrated a distinctive widened myelin sheath showing a banded pattern of myelin disruption. This pattern was confirmed by electron microscopy and showed the separation to be between abutting double layers of myelin. Artifactual changes were also present in dived and undived animals. These previously unreported changes may be caused by DCS. They are compatible with the major mechanisms proposed in the pathophysiology of spinal cord DCS and may also account for the response to treatment seen in our experimental animals. It is suggested that these findings may also explain the response to treatment seen in patients, together with the formation of late lesions described in the spinal cords of long-term survivors of DCS.

  2. Histogenesis of the stomach of the pre-hatching quail: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Soha A; Ahmed, Yasser A; Abdelsabour-Khalaf, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    The current study conducted a careful description of the histological events during the embryonic development of quail stomach. Daily histological specimens from the quail stomach from day 4 to day 17 post incubation were examined by light microscopy. The primitive gut tube of the embryonic quail appeared at day 4 post incubation. The gut tube consisted of an endodermal epithelium of pseudostratified type, surrounded by splanchnic mesenchyme. The prospective glandular epithelium invaginated at day 5 in the proventriculus and gradually developed to prospective proventricular glands. The muscular coat became distinguished at day 7 and day 8 in the proventriculus and gizzard, respectively. Transformation into simple columnar epithelium occurred in both proventriculus and the gizzard at day 12. The gizzard epithelium gave rise to tubular invaginations also at day 12. Canalization of the gizzard tubular glands was recognized at day 14. By day 15, the proventricular surface epithelium invaginated in a concentric manner around a central cavity to form immature secretory units that contained inactive oxyntico-peptic cells. The mucosal folding in the gizzard appeared at day 15 to form plicae and sulci. The wall of the proventriculus and gizzard at day 17 acquired histological features of post-hatching birds.

  3. Light and scanning electron microscopic and immunohistochemical studies on permeability of hypertensive rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Kawaharada, U; Takatama, M; Ooneda, G

    1985-09-01

    Experimental hypertensive rats were intravenously injected with carbon and iron as tracers, and their mesenteric arteries exhibiting hypertensive arterial lesions were observed by light and scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Early arterial lesions showing intense medial damages, deposition of fibrinoid substance consisting of fibrin in the intima and/or media, and granulation tissue in the adventitia were characterized by marked insudation of intravenously injected tracers. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated numerous leukocytes and platelets adhering to endothelial surface, opened endothelial cell junctions, and desquamation of these cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed laminin and low stainability of fibronectin in the subendothelium. Advanced lesions showed deposition of a large amount of fibrinoid substance and no insudation of tracers in the intima, but scanning electron microscopy manifested opening of endothelial cell junctions, desquamation of endothelial cells, and adherence of leukocytes and platelets. Immunohistochemistry revealed fibronectin in the intima and laminin just beneath the endothelium. In the healed lesions disclosing fibrocellular intimal thickening, there was no insudation of tracers. Scanning electron microscopy showed opened endothelial cell junctions, endothelial cell defects, and adherence of leukocytes and platelets. There were fibronectin in the intima and laminin beneath the endothelium. It was suggested that the opening of endothelial cells junctions and desquamation of endothelial cells would be necessary for the arterial increased permeability in hypertensive rats, and that fibrin-fibronectin complex, fibronectin-acid mucopolysaccharide complex, and basement membrane would together inhibit the increased permeability in the mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats in spite of endothelial cell injuries and their defects.

  4. Light- and Electron-microscopical Study of Belonocystis marina sp. nov. (Eukaryota: incertae sedis).

    PubMed

    Klimov, Vladimir I; Zlatogursky, Vasily V

    2016-11-01

    BelonocystisRainer, 1968 is an enigmatic protist genus, which currently lacks any supergroup affiliation. The spherical cells of this organism move on the substratum using fine non-branching pseudopodia. The cell surface is surrounded with a spiky covering. Belonocystis marina sp. nov. was studied using light- and electron microscopy. It was clearly shown that the surface structures of Belonocystis were scales, not a capsule. The new species could be distinguished by the morphology of the scales, which had a bulbous base with three "skirts" (circular latticed structures) and a spike consisting of many twisted fibrils. Each scale was associated with a short cytoplasmic outgrowth. The organic nature of these scales was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Large multinucleated stages were discovered in the life-cycle of this organism. A survey of the cell ultrastructure revealed all the common eukaryotic organelles, including mitochondria with tubular cristae. No microtubules were detected in ultrathin sections of pseudopodia. Examination of food vacuole contents confirmed that this organism was bacterivorous. The finding of Belonocystis marina is the first record of the genus in a marine habitat. Many similarities in the scale structure and fine structure of the cell between Belonocystis and Luffisphaera were discussed.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Phalacrocoracidae, Aves).

    PubMed

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Andrzejewski, Wojciech; Godynicki, Szymon

    2006-02-01

    The tongue of the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo is a small, immobile structure with a length of 1.4 cm, situated in the middle part of the elongated lower bill. The uniquely shaped tongue resembles a mushroom, with a short base and an elongated dorsal part with sharpened anterior and posterior tips. A median crest can be observed on the surface of the tongue. Examination by light and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the whole tongue is formed by a dense connective tissue with many bundles of elastic fibers. The lingual mucosa is covered by a multilayered keratinized epithelium. The thickest, horny layer of the lingual epithelium was observed on the surface of the median crest and on the posterior tip of the tongue. Lingual glands are absent in cormorants. The framework of the tongue is composed of a hyoid cartilage incorporated into the base. The localization and structure of the tongue in the cormorant show that it is a rudimentary organ and that the lingual body, usually well-developed in birds, is conserved.

  6. Objective Morphological Quantification of Microscopic Images Using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Samuel E.; Cao, Tuoxin; Talauliker, Pooja M.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) using image intensity depends on a number of variables. These variables add a subjective complexity in keeping a standard within and between laboratories. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) algorithms, however, allow for a rapid and objective quantification (via statistical analysis) using cell morphologies when the microscopic structures are oriented or aligned. Quantification of alignment is given in terms of a ratio of FFT intensity to the intensity of an orthogonal angle, giving a numerical value of the alignment of the microscopic structures. This allows for a more objective analysis than alternative approaches, which rely upon relative intensities. PMID:27134700

  7. Objective Morphological Quantification of Microscopic Images Using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel E; Cao, Tuoxin; Talauliker, Pooja M; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    Quantification of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) using image intensity depends on a number of variables. These variables add a subjective complexity in keeping a standard within and between laboratories. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) algorithms, however, allow for a rapid and objective quantification (via statistical analysis) using cell morphologies when the microscopic structures are oriented or aligned. Quantification of alignment is given in terms of a ratio of FFT intensity to the intensity of an orthogonal angle, giving a numerical value of the alignment of the microscopic structures. This allows for a more objective analysis than alternative approaches, which rely upon relative intensities.

  8. Protein conjugation with PAMAM nanoparticles: Microscopic and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-02-01

    PAMAM dendrimers form strong protein conjugates that are used in drug delivery systems. We report the thermodynamic and binding analysis of polyamidoamine (PAMAM-G4) conjugation with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Hydrophobicity played a major role in PAMAM-protein interactions with more hydrophobic b-LG forming stronger polymer-protein conjugates. Thermodynamic parameters showed PAMAM-protein bindings occur via hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts for b-LG, while van der waals and H-bonding interactions prevail in HSA and BSA-polymer conjugates. The protein loading efficacy was 45-55%. PAMAM complexation induced major alterations of protein conformation. TEM images show major polymer morphological changes upon protein conjugation.

  9. The liver of the brown trout, Salmo trutta fario: a light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E; Monteiro, R A; Pereira, C A

    1994-01-01

    A qualitative study by light and electron microscopy was undertaken on the liver of the brown trout, Salmo trutta fario. Vessels and bile ducts were observed to be scattered without any apparent order within the parenchyma. Venous profiles appeared either isolated or included in 'venous-arteriolar tracts' (VAT) and 'venous-biliary-arteriolar tracts' (VBAT). Bile ducts also appeared either isolated or in groups which often included an arteriole. The parenchyma was organised in tubules of hepatocytes encircling biliary passages radially. Those cells were uninucleate and contained large cytoplasmic areas of rough endoplasmic reticulum; lipid droplets and dense bodies sometimes also occupied a considerable portion of the cytoplasm. Microvilli extended from hepatocytes into biliary passages and towards the space of Disse. Other cell types encountered comprised biliary epithelial cells, macrophages (including melanin laden cells), fat-storing cells and endothelial cells. The biliary tree was formed sequentially by intra- and intercellular canaliculi, preductules, ductules and ducts. Canaliculi without microvilli are described for the first time in fishes. Structural differences between the brown trout and other fishes were noted. In contradistinction to other fishes, in brown trout the triads (i.e. the VBAT) are not just occasional structures; also, they probably transmit portal veins. Our observations support the concept of a tubular arrangement of hepatocytes in fish. The possibility that the axis of the tubule may be a sinusoid instead of a biliary passage is questioned. Homology between, on one hand, the segment formed by preductules and ductules and, on the other, the canal of Hering of mammals is defended. It is concluded that among salmonids notable interspecific differences do not seem to exist. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:7961130

  10. Environmental scanning electron microscope imaging examples related to particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Wight, S A; Zeissler, C J

    1993-08-01

    This work provides examples of some of the imaging capabilities of environmental scanning electron microscopy applied to easily charged samples relevant to particle analysis. Environmental SEM (also referred to as high pressure or low vacuum SEM) can address uncoated samples that are known to be difficult to image. Most of these specimens are difficult to image by conventional SEM even when coated with a conductive layer. Another area where environmental SEM is particularly applicable is for specimens not compatible with high vacuum, such as volatile specimens. Samples from which images were obtained that otherwise may not have been possible by conventional methods included fly ash particles on an oiled plastic membrane impactor substrate, a one micrometer diameter fiber mounted on the end of a wire, uranium oxide particles embedded in oil-bearing cellulose nitrate, teflon and polycarbonate filter materials with collected air particulate matter, polystyrene latex spheres on cellulosic filter paper, polystyrene latex spheres "loosely" sitting on a glass slide, and subsurface tracks in an etched nuclear track-etch detector. Surface charging problems experienced in high vacuum SEMs are virtually eliminated in the low vacuum SEM, extending imaging capabilities to samples previously difficult to use or incompatible with conventional methods.

  11. Color Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  12. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(ii) and Cu(ii) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(ii) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of Na

  13. Three Linked Vasculopathic Processes Characterize Kawasaki Disease: A Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Orenstein, Jan Marc; Shulman, Stanford T.; Fox, Linda M.; Baker, Susan C.; Takahashi, Masato; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Russo, Pierre A.; Mierau, Gary W.; de Chadarévian, Jean Pierre; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Trevenen, Cynthia; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Kalelkar, Mitra B.; Rowley, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease is recognized as the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in the developed world. Clinical, epidemiologic, and pathologic evidence supports an infectious agent, likely entering through the lung. Pathologic studies proposing an acute coronary arteritis followed by healing fail to account for the complex vasculopathy and clinical course. Methodology/Principal Findings Specimens from 32 autopsies, 8 cardiac transplants, and an excised coronary aneurysm were studied by light (n=41) and transmission electron microscopy (n=7). Three characteristic vasculopathic processes were identified in coronary (CA) and non-coronary arteries: acute self-limited necrotizing arteritis (NA), subacute/chronic (SA/C) vasculitis, and luminal myofibroblastic proliferation (LMP). NA is a synchronous neutrophilic process of the endothelium, beginning and ending within the first two weeks of fever onset, and progressively destroying the wall into the adventitia causing saccular aneurysms, which can thrombose or rupture. SA/C vasculitis is an asynchronous process that can commence within the first two weeks onward, starting in the adventitia/perivascular tissue and variably inflaming/damaging the wall during progression to the lumen. Besides fusiform and saccular aneurysms that can thrombose, SA/C vasculitis likely causes the transition of medial and adventitial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into classic myofibroblasts, which combined with their matrix products and inflammation create progressive stenosing luminal lesions (SA/C-LMP). Remote LMP apparently results from circulating factors. Veins, pulmonary arteries, and aorta can develop subclinical SA/C vasculitis and SA/C-LMP, but not NA. The earliest death (day 10) had both CA SA/C vasculitis and SA/C-LMP, and an “eosinophilic-type” myocarditis. Conclusions/Significance NA is the only self-limiting process of the three, is responsible for the earliest morbidity/mortality, and is consistent with

  14. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Ploger; Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 x 105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  15. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3×105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

  16. Diagnosis of breast cancer in light microscopic and mammographic images textures using relative entropy via kernel estimation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevcan Aytac; Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Poyraz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to provide early detection of breast cancer by using both mammography and histopathology images of the same patient. When the studies in the literature are examined, it is seen that the mammography and histopathology images of the same patient are not used together for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Mammographic and microscopic images can be limited when using only one of them for the early detection of the breast cancer. Therefore, multi-modality solutions that give more accuracy results than single solutions have been realized in this paper. 3 × 50 microscopic (histopathology) and 3 × 50 mammography image sets have been taken from Firat University Medicine Faculty Pathology and Radiology Laboratories, respectively. Optimum feature space has been obtained by minimum redundancy and maximum relevance via mutual information method applying to the 3 × 50 microscopic and mammography images. Then, probabilistic values of suspicious lesions in the image for selected features have been found by exponential curve fitting. Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measurements have been used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. It has been proved that these measures have been related to each other. Weight values for selected each feature have been found using these measures. These weight values have been used in object function. Afterward, histopathology and mammography images have been classified as normal, malign, and benign utilizing object function. In the result of this classifier, the accuracy of diagnosis of breast cancer has been estimated probabilistically. Furthermore, classifications have been probabilistically visualized on a pie chart. Consequently, the performances of Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measures have been compared with ROC analysis using histopathology and mammography test images. It has been observed that Jensen Shannon measure has higher performance than Hellinger and Triangle measures. Accuracy rates of

  17. Naturally Occurring Immune-Complex Glomerulonephritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca irus). I. Light, Immunofluorescence, and Electron Microscopic Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IMMUNOGLOBULINS, *VETERINARY MEDICINE, *MONKEYS, PATHOLOGY, FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUES, DISEASES , GAMMA GLOBULIN, ANTIGENS, ANTIBODIES, HISTOLOGY, ETIOLOGY, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, MICROSCOPES, IMMUNOLOGY.

  18. HSI colour-coded analysis of scattered light of single plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Lei, Gang; Zheng, Lin Ling; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) analysis with dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) has attracted much attention in recent years. The ability for quantitative analysis of iDFM is critical, but cumbersome, for characterizing and analyzing the scattered light of single PNPs. Here, a simple automatic HSI colour coding method is established for coding dark-field microscopic (DFM) images of single PNPs with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattered light, showing that hue value in the HSI system can realize accurate quantitative analysis of iDFM and providing a novel approach for quantitative chemical and biochemical imaging at the single nanoparticle level.Single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) analysis with dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) has attracted much attention in recent years. The ability for quantitative analysis of iDFM is critical, but cumbersome, for characterizing and analyzing the scattered light of single PNPs. Here, a simple automatic HSI colour coding method is established for coding dark-field microscopic (DFM) images of single PNPs with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattered light, showing that hue value in the HSI system can realize accurate quantitative analysis of iDFM and providing a novel approach for quantitative chemical and biochemical imaging at the single nanoparticle level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01089j

  19. Microscopic air void analysis of hardened Portland cement concrete by the isolated shadow technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Basil Mark

    The Isolated Shadow Technique is an image processing and analysis procedure for identifying and characterizing surface voids dispersed on an otherwise flat plane of heterogeneous solids. The objective of the Isolated Shadow Technique is to capture, process, and analyze images of a flat surface in which all of the features, save the boundary outlines of any surface voids, are eliminated. In short, the technique utilizes a series of digital images of the subject planar surface; where each image of the series is subjected to a unique lighting condition. By positioning the lights such that the shadows cast into the craters vary between images, these variations can be sequestered and the edges of the voids can subsequently be reconstructed from the isolated shadows. The primary purpose of this work was the development of the Isolated Shadow Technique for the particular application of quantitatively describing the microscopic voids in hardened Portland cement concrete. The Isolated Shadow System was developed for this application of the technique. The hardware and software of the system are described and the function is demonstrated. The system was found to have an average accuracy of 2.7% with a maximum deviation of 5.0% when compared to physical measurements. The results of polished sections of concrete specimens characterized by the Isolated Shadow System are compared to the results obtained with the commonly used standard methods (ASTM C 457; A and B). The coefficients of variation of parameters calculated to describe the air-void system (according to the ASTM C 457 formulations) are shown to be in the neighborhood of one percent when the observed test area includes at least 7,830 mmsp2 of polished concrete (with paste contents ranging from approximately 28% to 32%). The sensitivity of the air-void system parameters (as computed by the system) to changes in magnification and mosaic size are evaluated. A critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of the ASTM C

  20. Observation of electron trapping along scratches on SiO2 surface in mirror electron microscope images under ultraviolet light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Shimakura, Tomokazu

    2010-04-01

    Surface charge distribution change caused by electrons trapped at defects of a SiO2 surface has been observed by using a mirror electron microscope (MEM) under monochromatized ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. Scratches on the SiO2 surface on a silicon wafer were formed by mechanically polishing to create spatially distributed defects on the SiO2 surface. Exposure of the SiO2 surface by UV light with energy above 4.25 eV, which is the threshold energy for internal photoemission from silicon to SiO2, produced significant change in the contrast in the MEM images. This contrast change is mainly due to negative charging by the photoexcited electrons trapped at the defects along the scratches. The negative charging changes the curvature of the electrostatic equipotential surface above the scratches from a concave shape to a convex shape; as a result, their contrast in the MEM image becomes reversed. The surface density of the trapped electrons at a typical scratch was roughly estimated to be 1010 cm-2. This result of analysis of the contrast change shows that the MEM can be used for spatially resolved and spectroscopic characterizations of defects relating charge trapping in insulator films in conjunction with a charge-injection technique such as UV irradiation.

  1. The temperature gradient-forming device, an accessory unit for normal light microscopes to study the biology of hyperthermophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maximilian; Bellack, Annett; Ugele, Matthias; Hopf, Johann; Wirth, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    To date, the behavior of hyperthermophilic microorganisms in their biotope has been studied only to a limited degree; this is especially true for motility. One reason for this lack of knowledge is the requirement for high-temperature microscopy-combined, in most cases, with the need for observations under strictly anaerobic conditions-for such studies. We have developed a custom-made, low-budget device that, for the first time, allows analyses in temperature gradients up to 40°C over a distance of just 2 cm (a biotope-relevant distance) with heating rates up to ∼5°C/s. Our temperature gradient-forming device can convert any upright light microscope into one that works at temperatures as high as 110°C. Data obtained by use of this apparatus show how very well hyperthermophiles are adapted to their biotope: they can react within seconds to elevated temperatures by starting motility-even after 9 months of storage in the cold. Using the temperature gradient-forming device, we determined the temperature ranges for swimming, and the swimming speeds, of 15 selected species of the genus Thermococcus within a few months, related these findings to the presence of cell surface appendages, and obtained the first evidence for thermotaxis in Archaea.

  2. The effects of electromagnetic field on the microstructure of seminal vesicles in rat: a light and transmission electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Zarrintan, Sina; Khaki, Arash; Zahedi, Afshin

    2008-03-01

    In the industrial world, almost everyone is unavoidably exposed to ambient electromagnetic field (EMF) generated from various technical and household appliances. Controversy exists about the effects of EMF on various tissues of the living bodies. Seminal vesicles as one of these accessory glands play an important role in natural seminal fluid formation and the effects of EMF on its tissue is worthy of investigation. In order to examine this 30 rat were selected and kept for one weeks in quarantine and 15 (experimental group) were exposed to 50 Hz (non-ionizing radiation) during postnatal life for 2 months. The materials were processed and observed under a light and transmission electron microscope. In the experimental rats epithelial and basal cells showed significant destructions presented by heterochromatin and dense nuclei. Cell debris and abnormal areas was recognizable in the stromal connective tissue. Obvious vacuolization was present within the epithelial cell cytoplasm and also between the cellular organelles. The nuclei of the endothelial cells of the blood vessels were more rigid and endothelial cell cytoplasm contained a lot of vacuoles and pinoctotic vesicles. The results suggested that EMF exposure may cause profound changes in the vesicle seminal tissues. Therefore exposure to EMF may result in pathological changes that lead to sub fertility and infertility.

  3. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  4. Ultra-high resolution water window x ray microscope optics design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, C.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been focused on the design and analysis of an ultra-high resolution water window soft-x-ray microscope. These activities have been accomplished by completing two tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results from this work confirm: (1) that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use spherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary in order to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater; (2) that surface contour errors will have a significant effect on the optical performance of the microscope and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror; and (3) that tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has been shown that the water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance of operations with 130 A radiation. These results have been included in a manuscript included in the appendix.

  5. A noise reduction method for quantifying nanoparticle light scattering in low magnification dark-field microscope far-field images

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dali

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have become a powerful tool for cell imaging, biomolecule and cell and protein interaction studies, but are difficult to rapidly and accurately measure in most assays. Dark-field microscope (DFM) image analysis approaches used to quantify nanoparticles require high-magnification near-field (HN) images that are labor intensive due to a requirement for manual image selection and focal adjustments needed when identifying and capturing new regions of interest. Low-magnification far-field (LF) DFM imagery is technically simpler to perform but cannot be used as an alternate to HN-DFM quantification, since it is highly sensitive to surface artifacts and debris that can easily mask nanoparticle signal. We now describe a new noise reduction approach that markedly reduces LF-DFM image artifacts to allow sensitive and accurate nanoparticle signal quantification from LF-DFM images. We have used this approach to develop a “Dark Scatter Master” (DSM) algorithm for the popular NIH image analysis program ImageJ, which can be readily adapted for use with automated high-throughput assay analyses. This method demonstrated robust performance quantifying nanoparticles in different assay formats, including a novel method that quantified extracellular vesicles in patient blood sample to detect pancreatic cancer cases. Based on these results, we believe our LF-DFM quantification method can markedly decrease the analysis time of most nanoparticle-based assays to impact both basic research and clinical analyses. PMID:28177210

  6. High-speed video imaging and digital analysis of microscopic features in contracting striated muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kenneth P.; Taylor, Stuart R.

    1993-02-01

    The rapid motion of microscopic features such as the cross striations of single contracting muscle cells are difficult to capture with conventional optical microscopes, video systems, and image processing approaches. An integrated digital video imaging microscope system specifically designed to capture images from single contracting muscle cells at speeds of up to 240 Hz and to analyze images to extract features critical for the understanding of muscle contraction is described. This system consists of a brightfield microscope with immersion optics coupled to a high-speed charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera, super-VHS (S- VHS) and optical media disk video recording (OMDR) systems, and a semiautomated digital image analysis system. Components are modified to optimize spatial and temporal resolution to permit the evaluation of submicrometer features in real physiological time. This approach permits the critical evaluation of the magnitude, time course, and uniformity of contractile function throughout the volume of a single living cell with higher temporal and spatial resolutions than previously possible.

  7. Sertoli cells in the testis of caecilians, Ichthyophis tricolor and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): light and electron microscopic perspective.

    PubMed

    Smita, Mathew; Oommen, Oommen V; George, Jancy M; Akbarsha, M A

    2003-12-01

    The caecilians have evolved a unique pattern of cystic spermatogenesis in which cysts representing different stages in spermatogenesis coexist in a testis lobule. We examined unsettled issues relating to the organization of the caecilian testis lobules, including the occurrence of a fatty matrix, the possibility of both peripheral and central Sertoli cells, the origin of Sertoli cells from follicular cells, and the disengagement of older Sertoli cells to become loose central Sertoli cells. We subjected the testis of Ichthyophis tricolor (Ichthyophiidae) and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani (Uraeotyphliidae) from the Western Ghats of Kerala, India, to light and transmission electron microscopic studies. Irrespective of the functional state of the testis, whether active or regressed, Sertoli cells constitute a permanent feature of the lobules. The tall Sertoli cells adherent to the basal lamina with basally located pleomorphic nuclei extend deeper into the lobule to meet at the core. There they provide for association of germ cells at different stages of differentiation, an aspect that has earlier been misconceived as the fatty matrix. Germ cells up to the 4-cell stage remain in the intercalating region of the Sertoli cells and they are located at the apices of the Sertoli cells from the 8-cell stage onwards. The developing germ cells are intimately associated with the Sertoli cell adherent to the basal lamina until spermiation. There are ameboid cells in the core of the lobules that appear to interact with the germ cells at the face opposite to their attachment with the Sertoli cells. Adherence of the Sertoli cells to the basal lamina is a permanent feature of the caecilian testicular lobules. The ameboid cells in the core are neither Sertoli cells nor their degeneration products.

  8. Effect of microscopic modeling of skin in electrical and thermal analysis of transcranial direct current stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-12-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation scheme where a small current is delivered to the brain via two electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrode design is an important topic, not only as regards efficacy, but also from a safety perspective, as tDCS may be related to skin lesions that are sometimes observed after stimulation. Previous computational models of tDCS have omitted the effects of microscopic structures in the skin, and the different soak conditions of the electrodes, and model validation has been limited. In this study, multiphysics and multiscale analysis are proposed to demonstrate the importance of microscopic modeling of the skin, in order to clarify the effects of the internal electric field, and to examine temperature elevation around the electrodes. This novel microscopic model of the skin layer took into consideration the effect of saline/water penetration in hair follicles and sweat ducts on the field distribution around the electrodes. The temperature elevation in the skin was then computed by solving the bioheat equation. Also, a multiscale model was introduced to account for macroscopic and microscopic tissues of the head and skin, which was validated by measurement of the head resistance during tDCS. As a result, the electric field in the microscopic model of the skin was less localized when the follicles/ducts were filled with saline instead of hair or tap water. Temperature elevation was also lessened with saline, in comparison with other substances. Saline, which may penetrate the hair follicles and sweat ducts, suppressed the field concentration around the electrodes. For conventional magnitudes of current injection, and a head resistance of less than 10 kΩ, the temperature elevation in the skin when using saline-soaked electrodes was low, less than 0.1 °C, and unlikely to cause adverse thermal effects.

  9. A scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meller, S T; Dennis, B J

    1993-09-01

    An examination of the surface of the cerebral aqueduct with the scanning electron microscope revealed that the walls of the cerebral aqueduct were so heavily ciliated that most of the ependymal surface was obscured, yet certain specialized supraependymal structures could be discerned lying on (or embedded within) this matt of cilia. These structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and Golgi analysis to be either macrophages, supraependymal neurons, dendrites from medial periaqueductal gray neurons, or axons of unknown origin. Some axons, which were found to contain vesicles, appeared to make synaptic contacts with ependymal cells. Using the transmission electron microscope, the ependymal lining was found to consist of two different cell types: normal ependymal cells and tanycytes which have a long tapering basal process that was observed to contact blood vessels or, more rarely, seemed to terminate in relation to neuronal elements. While there have been previous reports on the structure of the third and lateral ventricles in other species, there are limited reports in the rabbit. The present report is not only the first description for the rabbit, but it is the first complete scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in any species.

  10. Characterization of two types of crystalloids in pleomorphic adenomas of minor salivary glands. A light-microscopic, electron-microscopic, and histochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. G.; Priest, R. E.; Weathers, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crystalloids have been previously described in salivary gland tumors. In order to ascertain the incidence of these structures, the authors reviewed a series of 294 minor salivary gland tumors. One hundred thirty pleomorphic adenomas were identified, and 6 of these contained crystalloids. No crystalloids were found in other benign or malignant salivary gland tumors. These six file cases and a recent seventh case containing crystalloids were studied by light and electron microscopy and with histochemistry. Two types of crystalloids were found. One case contained previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids, and the other six contained crystalloids composed of radially arranged collagen fibers. Both types of crystalloids are further characterized and discussed. Images Figure 1-3 Figure 4-6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2982270

  11. Regression of blood vessels in the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis Daudin during metamorphosis: light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Bartel, H; Lametschwandtner, A

    2000-08-01

    Structural changes of the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles from late prometamorphosis (stage 58) to the height of metamorphic climax (stage 62) were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Special emphasis was given to the blood vessel regression. Early changes of velar capillaries were formation of luminal and abluminal endothelial cell processes, vacuolation, and cytoplasmic and nuclear chromatin condensation. At the height of metamorphic climax, transmission electron microscopy revealed apoptotic endothelial cells with nuclear condensation and fragmentation, intraluminal bulging of rounded endothelial cells which narrowed or even plugged the capillary, and different stages of endothelial cell detachment ('shedding') into the vessel lumen. These changes explain the 'miniaturisation' of the velar microvascular bed as well as the typical features found in resin-casts of regressing velar vessels which have been observed in a previous scanning electron microscopy study of the ventral velum.

  12. Ion microscope and ion microprobe analysis under oxygen, cesium and gallium bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migeon, H.-N.; Saldi, F.; Gao, Y.; Schuhmacher, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article concentrates on dynamic SIMS analysis using a magnetic sector instrument at micron and sub-micron resolutions with the ion microscope and ion microprobe modes. The advantages and drawbacks of both alternatives for recording measurements in laterally heterogeneous specimens are highlighted expecially concerning transmission and acquisition times. The ionization efficiencies and matrix effects under oxygen, cesium and gallium bombardment are compared. The ion microscope is shown to provide fast acquisition times owing to the parallel detection of the entire analyzed area and the most adequate mode for lateral resolutions above 1 [mu]m, whereas the ion microprobe provides better sensitivity and is best suited for high resolution. Combining cesium and oxygen ion sources provides, in most cases, a better ionization efficiency than the gallium beam but all three sources induce matrix effects which are shown to be much less critical using cationized species.

  13. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa Kawayama, Iwao Murakami, Hironaru Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-15

    A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM) can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL), and laser beam induced current (LBIC), as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  14. Light and electron microscopic examination of various doses of given vitamin A on the development of cornea in mice. Partly presented in ICEM 13-Paris.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, D; Karabay, G

    1997-06-01

    Vitamin A (0.2 micrograms, 0.6 micrograms, 1.2 micrograms) was administered orally to the mice on days 8-11 of gestation. Fetuses were removed on day 17 of gestation. No external malformation of the fetuses was seen on the stereomicroscope investigation. Corneal degeneration was seen on the light and electron microscopic examination. As a result it was accepted that vitamin A taken during the critical periods of gestation affected the development of cornea.

  15. Light and Electron Microscopic Studies of the Rat Kidney After Administration of Inhibitors of the Citric Acid Cycle In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Elizabeth M.

    1972-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies of morphologic changes in the rat proximal convoluted tubule after intraperitoneal injection of sodium fluoroacetate (FAc), 60, 20 and 3.5 mg/kg body weight, have been made. Particular attention was directed toward appreciating different changes in the first (S1) and second (S2) segments of the proximal tubule. The earliest change was loss of mitochondrial granules and pallor of the mitochondrial matrix, not necessarily associated with matrix swelling. Matrix swelling was greatest at 3 hours after 3.5 mg/kg and was reversible. However, the mitochondria retained their elongate shape and cristae persisted. At 48 hours, some mitochondria appeared normal; in others, abnormal matrix densities of unknown nature were present. Mitochondrial changes were similar in S1 and S2 at all times. Enlarged apical vacuoles, most pronounced in S1, occurred in all rats after 20 mg/kg. The change was uncommon after 3.5 mg/kg. The hypothesis proposed is that vacuoles arise during an FAc-induced hyperglycemic phase, when pinocytotic activity is maintained but the normal pathway of glucose catabolism is inhibited. Moderate dilatation of the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum occurred during the first 2-hour period in S1 and S2 tubules after high and low doses, but between 6 and 24 hours, dilatation was extensive in S1 tubules after 3.5 mg/kg. This change was reversible. Two types of abnormal vacuolar bodies, large and small, have been described, and were unique to S1 tubules. Acid phosphatase activity was demonstrated in a proportion of the small ones, indiciating that they were a type of lysosome. The larger ones shared features in common with cytosomes of control cells, but acid phosphatase activity was not demonstrated in them and their origins and functions remain obscure. The biochemical lesions induced by fluoroacetate have been discussed and a tentative interpretation of some of the morphologic changes has ben made. ImagesFig 20Fig 21Fig 1Fig

  16. Evaluation of Malaria Diagnoses Using a Handheld Light Microscope in a Community-Based Setting in Rural Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Jean T; Ouattara, Mamadou; Keiser, Jennifer; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2016-10-05

    Portable microscopy may facilitate quality diagnostic care in resource-constrained settings. We compared a handheld light microscope (Newton Nm1) with a mobile phone attachment to conventional light microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum in a cross-sectional study in rural Côte d'Ivoire. Single Giemsa-stained thick blood film from 223 individuals were prepared and read by local laboratory technicians on both microscopes under 1,000× magnification with oil. Of the 223 samples, 162 (72.6%) were P. falciparum positive, and the overall mean parasite count was 1,392/μL of blood. Sensitivity and specificity of the handheld microscope was 80.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 73.1-85.9%) and 100.0% (95% CI: 92.6-100.0%), respectively, with a positive and negative predictive value of 100.0% (95% CI: 96.4-100.0%) and 65.6% (95% CI: 54.9-74.9%), respectively. If sensitivity can be improved, handheld light microscopy may become a valuable public health tool for P. falciparum diagnosis.

  17. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  18. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    1997-03-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 20 figs.

  19. Directly probing rapid membrane protein dynamics with an atomic force microscope: a study of light-induced conformational alterations in bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A; Rousso, I; Khachatryan, E; Brodsky, I; Lieberman, K; Sheves, M

    1996-05-01

    This paper demonstrates that an atomic force microscope can be used to directly monitor rapid membrane protein dynamics. For this demonstration the membrane-bound proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, has been investigated. It has been unequivocally shown that the light-induced dynamic alterations that have been observed do not arise from external artifacts such as heating of the sample by the incident light, but that these changes can be directly linked to the light-induced protein conformational alterations in this membrane. In essence, it has been shown that the light energy absorbed by bacteriorhodopsin is converted not only to chemical energy but also to mechanical energy. In summary a new ultrasensitive tool is described for monitoring the molecular dynamics of materials with wide applicability to fundamental and applied science.

  20. Determination of three-dimensional imaging properties of a light microscope system. Partial confocal behavior in epifluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Y; Sedat, J W; Agard, D A

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional image-forming properties of an epifluorescence microscope for use in obtaining very high resolution three-dimensional images of biological structures by image processing methods. Three-dimensional microscopic data is collected as a series of two-dimensional images recorded at different focal planes. Each of these images contains not only in-focus information from the region around the focal plane, but also out-of-focus contributions from the remainder of the specimen. Once the imaging properties of the microscope system are characterized, powerful image processing methods can be utilized to remove the out-of-focus information and to correct for image distortions. Although theoretical calculations for the behavior of an aberration-free microscope system are available, the properties of real lenses under the conditions used for biological observation are often far from an ideal. For this reason, we have directly determined the image-forming properties of an epifluorescence microscope under conditions relevant to biological observations. Through-focus series of a point object (fluorescently-coated microspheres) were recorded on a charge-coupled device image detector. From these images, the three-dimensional point spread function and its Fourier transform, the optical transfer function, were derived. There were significant differences between the experimental results and the theoretical models which have important implications for image processing. The discrepancies can be explained by imperfections of the microscope system, nonideal observation conditions, and partial confocal effects found to occur with epifluorescence illumination. Understanding the optical behavior of the microscope system has indicated how to optimize specimen preparation, data collection, and processing protocols to obtain significantly improved images. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:2317554

  1. Analysis of light regime in continuous light distributions in photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Brindley, Celeste; Fernández, F G Acién; Fernández-Sevilla, J M

    2011-02-01

    Maximum photobioreactor (PBR) efficiency is a must in applications such as the obtention of microalgae-derived fuels. Improving PBR performance requires a better understanding of the "light regime", the varying irradiance that microalgal cells moving in a dense culture are exposed to. We propose a definition of light regime that can be used consistently to describe the continuously varying light patterns in PBRs as well as in light/dark cycles. Equivalent continuous and light/dark regimes have been experimentally compared and the results show that continuous variations are not well represented by light/dark cycles, as had been widely accepted. It has been shown that a correct light regime allows obtaining photosynthetic rates higher than the corresponding to continuous light, the so-called "flashing light effect" and that this is possible in commercial PBRs. A correct PBR operation could result in photosynthetic efficiency close to the optimum eight quanta per O(2).

  2. Analysis of Microvascular Free Flap Failure Focusing on the Microscopic Findings of the Anastomosed Vessels.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi Hyun; Kim, Soung Min; Huan, Fan; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Suk Keun

    2015-10-01

    Microvascular flap reconstruction is known as successful technique, although vascular thrombosis can cause free flap failure. To analyze the histologic characteristics and causes of free flap failure, this clinical study examined failed free flaps, including the microanastomosed sites. This study included a total of 5 failed flaps, including 3 radial forearm free flaps, 1 latissimus dorsi free flap, and 1 fibular free flap, all performed with microvascular reconstruction surgery from 2009 to 2011 at Seoul National University Dental Hospital. At the resection surgeries of the failed nonviable flaps, histologic specimens including the microanastomosed vessels were acquired. For light microscope observation, the slides were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and also with Masson trichrome. Selected portions of graft tissue were also observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that the cause of flap failure was the occlusion of vessels because of thrombi formation. During the microanastomosis, damage to the vessel endothelium occurred, followed by intimal hyperplasia and medial necrosis at the anastomosed site. In the TEM findings, some smooth muscle cells beneath endothelium were atrophied and degenerated. The formation of thrombi and the degeneration of the smooth muscle cells were coincident with vascular dysfunction of graft vessel. The damaged endothelium and the exposed connective tissue elements might initiate the extrinsic pathway of thrombosis at the microanastomotic site. Therefore, it is suggested that accurate surgical planning, adequate postoperative monitoring, and skillful technique for minimizing vascular injury are required for successful microvascular transfer.

  3. Microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data. PMID:23180940

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of liquid bridge for fixed volume in atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; He, MengFu; Zhao, WenBin; Li, Yang

    2013-10-01

    In ambient condition, capillary forces are the major contributors to the adhesive forces between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the sample. In general, capillary forces are thought to be related to water film thickness, contact time and relative humidity and so on. In this paper, an original analysis regarding the liquid bridge, based on the surface and interface thermodynamic theory, is proposed. The cases covered in the study include the capillary forces and temperature of liquid bridge for quickly drawn liquid bridge, and for nonvolatile liquid bridge. The study results show that variation in temperature may occur in the liquid bridge when it is stretched.

  5. The use of silver-enhanced 1-nm gold probes for light and electron microscopic localization of intra- and extracellular antigens in skin.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Eady, R A

    1992-06-01

    We used colloidal gold (1-nm diameter) with silver enhancement, in conjunction with a low-temperature post-embedding immunolabeling technique, to localize several antigens in normal skin at both the light and the electron microscopic level within the same tissue blocks. Normal skin subjected to cyrofixation and cryosubstitution and embedded in Lowicryl K11M was used as a substrate. Semi-thin sections (1 micron) were incubated in primary antibody (against epidermal basement membrane zone associated antigens and two keratin sub-types), biotinylated secondary antibodies, and then in 1-nm gold-conjugated streptavidin. Finally, the 1-nm gold label was enhanced using silver staining. Labeling of both basement membrane and keratin antigens was well demonstrated, and the area in the semi-thin sections showing the best structural preservation and the greatest intensity of immunolabeling was used to identify the part of the block to be used for ultra-thin sectioning. Ultra-thin sections were treated using a similar procedure to that employed for semi-thin sections. The labeling with silver-enhanced 1-nm gold probes was intense and readily visible by electron microscopy, even at low magnification. We have found this technique to have a high degree of specificity and sensitivity for labeling both intra- and extracellular antigens in skin, with the added advantage of providing the means for studies at both light microscopic and electron microscopic level.

  6. Preparation of adult Drosophila eyes for thin sectioning and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Andreas

    2011-08-27

    Drosophila has long been used as model system to study development, mainly due to the ease with which it is genetically tractable. Over the years, a plethora of mutant strains and technical tricks have been developed to allow sophisticated questions to be asked and answered in a reasonable amount of time. Fundamental insight into the interplay of components of all known major signaling pathways has been obtained in forward and reverse genetic Drosophila studies. The fly eye has proven to be exceptionally well suited for mutational analysis, since, under laboratory conditions, flies can survive without functional eyes. Furthermore, the surface of the insect eye is composed of some 800 individual unit eyes (facets or ommatidia) that form a regular, smooth surface when looked at under a dissecting microscope. Thus, it is easy to see whether a mutation might affect eye development or growth by externally looking for the loss of the smooth surface ('rough eye' phenotype; Fig. 1) or overall eye size, respectively (for examples of screens based on external eye morphology see e.g.). Subsequent detailed analyses of eye phenotypes require fixation, plastic embedding and thin-sectioning of adult eyes. The Drosophila eye develops from the so-called eye imaginal disc, a bag of epithelial cells that proliferate and differentiate during larval and pupal stages (for review see e.g.). Each ommatidium consists of 20 cells, including eight photoreceptors (PR or R-cells; Fig. 2), four lens-secreting cone cells, pigment cells ('hexagon' around R-cell cluster) and a bristle. The photoreceptors of each ommatidium, most easily identified by their light sensitive organelles, the rhabdomeres, are organized in a trapezoid made up of the six "outer" (R1-6) and two "inner" photoreceptors (R7/8; R8 [Fig. 2] is underneath R7 and thus only seen in sections from deeper areas of the eye). The trapezoid of each facet is precisely aligned with those of its neighbors and the overall anteroposterior

  7. Methyl green and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride co-expression in colon tissue: A hyperspectral microscopic imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Sun, Zhen; Guo, Fangmin; Zhu, Jianzhong

    2014-12-01

    Histological observation of dual-stained colon sections is usually performed by visual observation under a light microscope, or by viewing on a computer screen with the assistance of image processing software in both research and clinical settings. These traditional methods are usually not sufficient to reliably differentiate spatially overlapping chromogens generated by different dyes. Hyperspectral microscopic imaging technology offers a solution for these constraints as the hyperspectral microscopic images contain information that allows differentiation between spatially co-located chromogens with similar but different spectra. In this paper, a hyperspectral microscopic imaging (HMI) system is used to identify methyl green and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride in dual-stained colon sections. Hyperspectral microscopic images are captured and the normalized score algorithm is proposed to identify the stains and generate the co-expression results. Experimental results show that the proposed normalized score algorithm can generate more accurate co-localization results than the spectral angle mapper algorithm. The hyperspectral microscopic imaging technology can enhance the visualization of dual-stained colon sections, improve the contrast and legibility of each stain using their spectral signatures, which is helpful for pathologist performing histological analyses.

  8. Microscopic basis for kinetic gating in Cytochrome c oxidase: insights from QM/MM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Puja; Yang, Shuo; Cui, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of vectorial proton pumping in biomolecules requires establishing the microscopic basis for the regulation of both thermodynamic and kinetic features of the relevant proton transfer steps. For the proton pump cytochrome c oxidase, while the regulation of thermodynamic driving force for key proton transfers has been discussed in great detail, the microscopic basis for the control of proton transfer kinetics has been poorly understood. Here we carry out extensive QM/MM free energy simulations to probe the kinetics of relevant proton transfer steps and analyze the effects of local structure and hydration level. We show that protonation of the proton loading site (PLS, taken to be a propionate of heme a3) requires a concerted process in which a key glutamic acid (Glu286H) delivers the proton to the PLS while being reprotonated by an excess proton coming from the D-channel. The concerted nature of the mechanism is a crucial feature that enables the loading of the PLS before the cavity containing Glu286 is better hydrated to lower its pKa to experimentally measured range; the charged rather than dipolar nature of the process also ensures a tight coupling with heme a reduction, as emphasized by Siegbahn and Blomberg. In addition, we find that rotational flexibility of the PLS allows its protonation before that of the binuclear center (the site where oxygen gets reduced to water). Together with our recent study (P. Goyal, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 110:18886-18891, 2013) that focused on the modulation of Glu286 pKa, the current work suggests a mechanism that builds in a natural sequence for the protonation of the PLS prior to that of the binuclear center. This provides microscopic support to the kinetic constraints revealed by kinetic network analysis as essential elements that ensure an efficient vectorial proton transport in cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25678950

  9. Quantification of Colloid Retention in Unsaturated Porous Media Using Microscopic Image Analysis Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dathe, A.; Zevi, Y.; Gao, B.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2006-05-01

    The movement of contaminants via colloidal transport mechanisms through the vadose zone to groundwater is of growing concern. Normally-immobile contaminants can enter an aquifer via colloid-facilitated transport, and pathogens themselves (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum) are colloidal in scale. Little is known about the complex pore-scale mechanisms of transport and retention of colloids in soils. Measurements of colloid and microbial transport have been typically limited to the evaluation of breakthrough curves from column experiments (which yield only an integrated signal of all retention processes in the column) or to the visualization in micromodels with limited applicability to realistic conditions. The objective of the work discussed here is to observe and model colloid transport and retention on the pore scale. Flow experiments were run in a horizontal flow chamber containing clean quartz sand as the porous medium. Synthetic fluorescent microspheres were used as easily-detected colloid surrogates. A syringe inlet pump and peristaltic outlet pump controlled the chamber moisture content and flow rate. The chamber was mounted under a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (Leica TCS SP2, 10x 0.40 UV objective) which allowed the acquisition of time series images and 3D reconstruction of pore-scale images. Three spectral channels were used to detect: 1) fluorescent microsphere emissions (500 to 540 nm) excited at 488 nm by an argon laser; 2) water phase emissions (555 to 650 nm) due to Rhodamine B stain excited at 543 nm by a green HeNe laser; and 3) reflectance of laser light at the grain surfaces. Three 8-bit images were detected simultaneously for every time step. The system is also capable of obtaining image stacks in the z-direction, which allow the determination of the position of attached colloids relative to the interface between air, water menisci, and solid grains. The 3D z-axis stacks reveal that the colloids are attaching at the air/water meniscus/solid (AWm

  10. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  11. Quantitative interferometric microscopic flow cytometer with expanded principal component analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Jin, Ying; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang; Liu, Fei; Li, Zhenhua

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative interferometric microscopy is used in biological and medical fields and a wealth of applications are proposed in order to detect different kinds of biological samples. Here, we develop a phase detecting cytometer based on quantitative interferometric microscopy with expanded principal component analysis phase retrieval method to obtain phase distributions of red blood cells with a spatial resolution ~1.5 μm. Since expanded principal component analysis method is a time-domain phase retrieval algorithm, it could avoid disadvantages of traditional frequency-domain algorithms. Additionally, the phase retrieval method realizes high-speed phase imaging from multiple microscopic interferograms captured by CCD camera when the biological cells are scanned in the field of view. We believe this method can be a powerful tool to quantitatively measure the phase distributions of different biological samples in biological and medical fields.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  13. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  14. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

    1995-01-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  15. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  16. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  17. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed.

  18. Frequency of apoptotic keratinocytes in the feline epidermis: a retrospective light-microscopic study of skin-biopsy specimens from 327 cats with normal skin or inflammatory dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jeff W; Scott, Danny W; Erb, Hollis N

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective light-microscopic study was performed on 294 biopsy specimens of haired skin from cats with various feline inflammatory dermatoses and specimens from cats with normal skin. Conditions expected to frequently have apoptotic epidermal keratinocytes (AKs) (including erythema multiforme, systemic lupus erythematosus, thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis, solar dermatitis, and viral dermatopathies) were found to have significantly more AKs than other types of inflammatory dermatoses. Nevertheless, we found more than two AKs in many skin-biopsy specimens from inflammatory conditions not expected to have frequent AKs (especially those from ectoparasitic dermatoses). Only a single AK was found in 1/33 cats with normal skin.

  19. Micro optical power meter for direct in situ measurement of light transmitted from microscopic systems and focused on micro-samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gangping; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports a micro optical power meter which is able to perform effective and precise measurement on the optical power at the focus of different microscopic systems. The power meter can be easily placed on the stages of different microscopes and even partly immersed into solution to directly measure the optical power transmitted from the microscope objective and focused on the sample suspended in solution. The testing experiments demonstrated that the power meter has the characteristics of high precision, excellent linearity, high sensitivity, good stability, and high responding speed. It can accurately measure power levels from 0.1 to 50 mW in visible wavelength in various conditions and environments, which may encounter in practical applications. The optical power measurements using the power meter performed in some biological cell culturing solutions and in air for the same laser light reveal the first time that the powers measured in solutions were about 5%-8% greater than that measured in air at the same position. This not only suggests the necessity of performing direct measurement in situ in solution to obtain the real optical power projected on the suspended samples, but also indicates that such a micro optical power meter can meet almost all the requirements of optical power measurement in different fields from biomedicine to material sciences.

  20. In vitro capsaicin-induced cytological changes and alteration in calcium distribution in giant serotonergic neurons of the snail Helix pomatia: a light- and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Hernádi, L; Erdélyi, L; Párducz, A; Szabadi, H; Such, G; Jancsó, G

    1995-12-01

    Morphological changes induced by capsaicin were studied in the serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons of the cerebral ganglia of Helix pomatia under in vitro conditions. Capsaicin at a concentration of 10(-4)M caused characteristic structural alterations in the giant serotonergic neurons but did not significantly influence serotonin immunoreactivity in the neurons. At the light-microscopic level, the most conspiciuous structural alterations were swelling of the cell bodies, which contained a swollen pale nucleus. Under the electron microscope, the nuclei, mitochondria and the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum were swollen in the capsaicin-affected metacerebral giant neurons. Electron-microscopic cytochemical techniques for calcium demonstration revealed electron-dense deposits in the swollen mitochondria and in the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting an increased Ca2+ influx. The serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons could be labelled by cobalt (1mM) in the presence of capsaicin (10(-4)M) suggesting that capsaicin opens the cation chanels of the capsaicin-sensitive neuronal membrane. The morphological and cytochemical alterations induced by capsaicin in the serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons of Helix pomatia closely resemble those induced in sensory neurons of mammalian dorsal root ganglion.

  1. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy. PMID:26819828

  2. Maximum probability domains for the analysis of the microscopic structure of liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Federica; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Savin, Andreas; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2015-02-14

    We introduce the concept of maximum probability domains (MPDs), developed in the context of the analysis of electronic densities, in the study of the microscopic spatial structures of liquids. The idea of locating a particle in a three dimensional region, by determining the domain where the probability of finding that, and only that, particle is maximum, gives an interesting characterization of the local structure of the liquid. The optimization procedure, required for the search of the domain of maximum probability, is carried out by the implementation of the level set method. Results for a couple of case studies are presented, to illustrate the structure of liquid water at ambient conditions and upon increasing pressure from the point of view of MPDs and to compare the information encoded in the solvation shells of sodium in water with, once again, that extracted from the MPDs.

  3. A comparison of microscopic and spectroscopic identification methods for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Lee, Jongmyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-04-15

    The analysis of microplastics in various environmental samples requires the identification of microplastics from natural materials. The identification technique lacks a standardized protocol. Herein, stereomicroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FT-IR) identification methods for microplastics (<1mm) were compared using the same samples from the sea surface microlayer (SML) and beach sand. Fragmented microplastics were significantly (p<0.05) underestimated and fiber was significantly overestimated using the stereomicroscope both in the SML and beach samples. The total abundance by FT-IR was higher than by microscope both in the SML and beach samples, but they were not significantly (p>0.05) different. Depending on the number of samples and the microplastic size range of interest, the appropriate identification method should be determined; selecting a suitable identification method for microplastics is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution.

  4. Slit-scanning microscope with a high-NA objective lens for analysis of synaptic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Wakazono, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji; Terakawa, Susumu

    2004-07-01

    By employing the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope with an ultra high NA (1.65) objective lens, we demonstrated detailed dynamics of exocytosis in various types of secretory vesicles. However, the TIRF microscopy could be applied to observations only on the plasma membrane and its immediate vicinity. To observe the vesicles in the deeper region of cytoplasm, we modified the TIRF optics to project a slit beam thinner than 1 μm in width to the cell. The slit beam illumination spotted single secretory vesicles inside the cell better and their movement and exocytosis easier. By scanning the slit beam, a fluorescence microscopy was possible at a high signal-to-noise ratio useful for measurement and analysis of single exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells.

  5. Microscopic droplet formation and energy transport analysis of condensation on scalable superhydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, GuanQiu; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Yuan, ShaoJun; Liu, HaoRan; Ghaferi, Amal Al; Zhang, TieJun

    2014-12-09

    Utilization of nanotechnologies in condensation has been recognized as one opportunity to improve the efficiency of large-scale thermal power and desalination systems. High-performance and stable dropwise condensation in widely-used copper heat exchangers is appealing for energy and water industries. In this work, a scalable and low-cost nanofabrication approach was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper oxide (CuO) nanoneedle surfaces to promote dropwise condensation and even jumping-droplet condensation. By conducting systematic surface characterization and in situ environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) condensation experiments, we were able to probe the microscopic formation physics of droplets on irregular nanostructured surfaces. At the early stages of condensation process, the interfacial surface tensions at the edge of CuO nanoneedles were found to influence both the local energy barriers for microdroplet growth and the advancing contact angles when droplets undergo depinning. Local surface roughness also has a significant impact on the volume of the condensate within the nanostructures and overall heat transfer from the vapor to substrate. Both our theoretical analysis and in situ ESEM experiments have revealed that the liquid condensate within the nanostructures determines the amount of the work of adhesion and kinetic energy associated with droplet coalescence and jumping. Local and global droplet growth models were also proposed to predict how the microdroplet morphology within nanostructures affects the heat transfer performance of early-stage condensation. Our quantitative analysis of microdroplet formation and growth within irregular nanostructures provides the insight to guide the anodization-based nanofabrication for enhancing dropwise and jumping-droplet condensation performance.

  6. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Oshima, M.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-01

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 μm and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60° as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  7. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiba, K.; Oshima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-15

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 {mu}m and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60 deg. as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  8. An easy, fast and "low-tech"-equipment-requiring alternative method to optimize immunolabelling conditions for pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopy and to correlate light and electron microscopical immunogold labelling results.

    PubMed

    Suiwal, Shweta; Kiefer, Gabriele; Schmitz, Frank; Schwarz, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Correlating light microscopic immunolabelling results with electron microscopic data is of great interest in many fields of biomedical research but typically requires very specialized, expensive equipment and complex procedures which are not available in most labs. In this technical study, we describe an easy and "low-tech"-equipment-requiring pre-embedding immunolabelling approach that allows correlation of light microscopical immunolabelling results with electron microscopic (EM) data as demonstrated by the example of immunolabelled synaptic ribbons from retinal rod photoreceptor synapses. This pre-embedding approach does not require specialized embedding devices but only commonly available equipment. The cryostat section-based procedure allows optimization of the pre-embedding immunolabelling conditions at the less laborious and time-consuming light microscopic (LM) level before the ultrastructural analyses of the immunolabelled structures can be performed on the same sample after ultrathin sectioning without further modification. The same photoreceptor synapse that has been first studied at the light microscopic level can be subsequently analyzed with this approach at the electron microscopic level at individual ultrathin sections or serial ultrathin sections from individual, identical synapses. Higher resolution EM analyses of the immunolabelled synapses can be performed with only minor modifications of the combined LM/EM procedure. The detergent-free procedure is applicable even for weakly fixed cryostat sections which is a relevant aspect for many antibodies that do not work with more strongly fixed biological samples.

  9. Intrauterine structure of foot muscles in talipes equinovarus due to high-level myelomeningocele: a light microscopic study in fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Omeroğlu, Suna; Peker, Tuncay; Omeroğlu, Hakan; Gülekon, Nadir; Mungan, Tamer; Danişman, Nuri

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the light microscopic structure of extrinsic foot muscles in talipes equinovarus (TEV) deformity that developed during intrauterine life due to high-level myelomeningocele. Ten feet of five fetal cadavers ranging in age from 18 to 20 weeks were dissected. Five feet had typical TEV deformity and the other five feet did not have any deformity (control group). Under light microscopic examination quantitative measurement of both muscle fiber sizes and fibrosis in the muscle tissue were performed to investigate the denervation muscle atrophy. Mean muscle fiber size of the TEV group was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group in all foot muscles except the gastrocnemius muscle. The proportion of fibrosis due to denervation atrophy was significantly higher in the TEV group than in the control group in all muscles. This situation was most evident in the peroneus longus muscle. It was concluded that muscular imbalance due to significant muscular atrophy might be the cause of TEV deformity that developed during intrauterine life due to high-level myelomeningocele.

  10. A Polarized Light Microscopic Study to Comparatively evaluate Four Remineralizing Agents on Enamel viz CPP-ACPF, ReminPro, SHY-NM and Colgate Strong Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramesh; Bhaskaran, Bibin; Kumar, Suresh V

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To compare and evaluate the remineralizing potential of four commercially available products namely SHY-NM, GC Tooth Mousse Plus, ReminPro and Colgate strong teeth on demineralized human teeth. Materials and methods: The study included 50 extracted premolars having 3 × 3 mm window prepared on the middle third of the tooth, which was then subjected to demineralization for 48 hours at 37°C. Teeth were randomly selected and grouped into five study groups of 10 teeth in each. Each group was treated with respective remineralizing agent and sectioned using hard-tissue microtome. Each section obtained was visualized under polarized light microscope and analyzed using Image J software. Results: The statistically evaluated results revealed that SHY-NM has the most remineralizing potential followed by ReminPro, GC Tooth Mousse Plus and fluoridated toothpaste. Conclusion: Based on the study, the SHY-NM was superior to the GC Tooth Mousse Plus, ReminPro and Colgate strong teeth on demineralized human teeth. How to cite this article: Rajan R, Krishnan R, Bhaskaran B, Kumar SV. A Polarized Light Microscopic Study to Comparatively evaluate Four Remineralizing Agents on Enamel viz CPP-ACPF, ReminPro, SHY-NM and Colgate Strong Teeth. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):42-47. PMID:26124580

  11. Sarcocystis infecting reptiles in Saudi Arabia : 1--Light and electron microscopic study on Sarcocysts of Sarcocystis turcicii sp. nov. infecting the gecko Hemidactylus turcicus Linnaeus.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Al Nasr, Ibrahim; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In the present study, sarcocysts of a Sarcocystis species infecting the gecko Hemidactylus turcicus was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. Six out of 26 (23%) H. turcicus were found to be infected with cysts of Sarcocystis. Examined muscle samples of different sites showed high intensity of infection in the tail and hind limb skeletal muscles. Microscopically visible cysts reached a mean size of 80 x 720 mum. These cysts are characterized by a light microscopically thick cyst wall and inner prominent septa dividing their interior into a large number of compartments enclosing the different zoites. Ultrastructural characteristics of the primary cyst wall and its long, mostly not upright protrusions were investigated. Two widely differentiated zoites (metrocytes and cyst merozoites) were clearly identified; they all showed the characteristic architecture of the Apicomplexa and especially that of the genus Sarcocystis. The about 5-7 mum sized cyst merozoites seemed to be differentiated into those being either poorly or richly supplied with reserve materials (amylopectin, lipids). This finding may indicate the existence of different developmental stages. Events of endodyogeny represented the only mode of reproduction inside the cysts. While comparing the morphology of these cysts with other descriptions of cysts in reptiles, they were described as a new species (Sarcocystis turcicii).

  12. Localization of excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in human postmortem cortex: a light and electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Roche, Joy K.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The process of glutamate release, activity, and reuptake involves the astrocyte, the presynaptic and postsynaptic neuron. Glutamate is released into the synapse and may occupy and activate receptors on both neurons and astrocytes. Glutamate is rapidly removed from the synapse by a family of plasma membrane excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), also localized to neurons and astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to examine EAAT labeling in postmortem human cortex at the light and electron microscopic levels. Postmortem prefrontal cortex was processed for EAAT1 and EAAT2 immunohistochemistry. At the light microscopic level, EAAT1 and EAAT2 labeling was found in both grey and white matter. Most cellular labeling was in small cells which were morphologically similar to glia. In addition, EAAT1 labeled neurons were scattered throughout, some of which were pyramidal in shape. At the electron microscopic level, EAAT1 and EAAT2 labeling was found in astrocytic soma and processes surrounding capillaries. EAAT labeling was also found in small astocytic processes adjacent to axon terminals forming asymmetric (glutamatergic) synapses. While EAAT2 labeling was most prevalent in astrocytic processes, EAAT1 labeling was also present in neuronal processes including the soma, axons, and dendritic spines. Expression of EAAT1 protein on neurons may be due to the hypoxia associated with the postmortem interval, and requires further confirmation. The localization of EAATs on the astrocytic plasma membrane and adjacent to excitatory synapses is consistent with the function of facilitating glutamate reuptake and limiting glutamate spillover. Establishment that EAAT1 and EAAT2 can be measured at the EM level in human postmortem tissues will permit testing of hypotheses related to these molecules in diseases lacking analogous animal models. PMID:25064059

  13. Structural analysis of light aircraft using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Bruce, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    An application of NASTRAN to the structural analysis of light aircraft was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness. A model of the Baby Ace D model homebuilt aircraft was used. The NASTRAN model of the aircraft consists of 193 grid points connected by 352 structural members. All members are either rod or beam elements, including bending of unsymmetrical cross sections and torsion of noncircular cross sections. The aerodynamic loads applied to the aircraft were in accordance with FAA regulations governing the utility category aircraft.

  14. Design and analysis of aspherical multilayer imaging X-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Jiang, WU; Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft X-ray applications in microscopy and projection lithography employ two concentric spherical mirrors that are configured such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Based on incoherent, sine-wave MTF calculations, the object-plane resolution of a magnification-factor-20 microscope is presently analyzed as a function of object height and numerical aperture of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical two-mirror microscope configurations.

  15. Spectral analysis of scattered light from flowers' petals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Atsumi; Uehara, Tomomi; Sekiguchi, Fumihiko; Imai, Hajime

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for studying absorption characteristics of opaque samples based on the light scattering spectroscopy. Measurements were made in white, red and violet petals of Petunia hybrida, and gave the absorption spectra in a non-destructive manner without damaging the cell structures of the petal. The red petal has absorption peak at 550 nm and the violet has three absorption peaks: at 450, 670, and 550 nm. The results were discussed in correlation with the microscopic cell structures of the petal observed with optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Only the cells placed in the surface have the pigments giving the color of the petal.

  16. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107. PMID:27920949

  17. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana-light and scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Sapoznikov, Olga; Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  18. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  19. Microscopic analysis of the quality of obturation and physical properties of MTA Fillapex.

    PubMed

    Amoroso-Silva, Pablo Andrés; Guimarães, Bruno Martini; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Almeida, Marcela Milanezi de; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzed the quality of obturation and physical properties of MTA Fillapex and AH Plus sealer. A sample of 30 human maxillary central incisors were instrumented with Protaper until a F5 (50/05) file. Both sealers were mixed with Rhodamine-B dye to allow visualization on a confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM). Next, the canals were filled using the single cone technique. After setting, all samples were sectioned at 2, 4, and 6 mm from the apex. CLSM was used to analyze the gaps and sealer penetration into the dentinal tubules. All samples were scanned 10 µm below the dentin surface and images were recorded at 100× magnification using the fluorescent mode. Additionally, the solubility, flowability and setting time of the sealers were evaluated. All the measured quantities of the examined materials were evaluated for significant differences by means of statistical analysis. The CLSM analysis of the MTA Fillapex showed the highest percentage of gaps at all sections (P = 0.0001). Physical tests revealed adequate properties for both sealers except for a higher solubility of the MTA Fillapex (P = 0.0001). The MTA Fillapex presented flowability and intratubular penetration similar to the AH Plus. Nevertheless, the MTA Fillapex sealer presented a higher solubility and considerable quantity of gaps between the sealer/dentin interface in relation to the AH Plus sealer. Clinicians must take into consideration, the quality of endodontic sealers as it is essential in the outcome of the root canal filling.

  20. Learning templates for artistic portrait lighting analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowu; Jin, Xin; Wu, Hongyu; Zhao, Qinping

    2015-02-01

    Lighting is a key factor in creating impressive artistic portraits. In this paper, we propose to analyze portrait lighting by learning templates of lighting styles. Inspired by the experience of artists, we first define several novel features that describe the local contrasts in various face regions. The most informative features are then selected with a stepwise feature pursuit algorithm to derive the templates of various lighting styles. After that, the matching scores that measure the similarity between a testing portrait and those templates are calculated for lighting style classification. Furthermore, we train a regression model by the subjective scores and the feature responses of a template to predict the score of a portrait lighting quality. Based on the templates, a novel face illumination descriptor is defined to measure the difference between two portrait lightings. Experimental results show that the learned templates can well describe the lighting styles, whereas the proposed approach can assess the lighting quality of artistic portraits as human being does.

  1. Microscope basics.

    PubMed

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides information on how microscopes work and discusses some of the microscope issues to be considered in using a video camera on the microscope. There are two types of microscopes in use today for research in cell biology-the older finite tube-length (typically 160mm mechanical tube length) microscopes and the infinity optics microscopes that are now produced. The objective lens forms a magnified, real image of the specimen at a specific distance from the objective known as the intermediate image plane. All objectives are designed to be used with the specimen at a defined distance from the front lens element of the objective (the working distance) so that the image formed is located at a specific location in the microscope. Infinity optics microscopes differ from the finite tube-length microscopes in that the objectives are designed to project the image of the specimen to infinity and do not, on their own, form a real image of the specimen. Three types of objectives are in common use today-plan achromats, plan apochromats, and plan fluorite lenses. The concept of mounting video cameras on the microscope is also presented in the chapter.

  2. Degeneration of Fraunhofer diffraction on bacterial colonies due to their light focusing properties examined in the digital holographic microscope system.

    PubMed

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Liżewski, Kamil; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Podbielska, Halina

    2013-11-04

    The degeneration of Fraunhofer diffraction conditions in the optical system with converging spherical wave illumination for bacteria species identification based on diffraction patterns is analyzed by digital holographic methods. The obtained results have shown that the colonies of analyzed bacteria species act as biological lenses with the time-dependent light focusing properties, which are characterized and monitored by means of phase retrieval from sequentially captured digital holograms. This significantly affects the location of Fraunhofer patterns observation plane, which is continuously shifted across optical axis in time.

  3. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  4. Development of the oxytalan fiber system in the rat molar periodontal ligament evaluated by light- and electron-microscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kouji; Hara, Yaiko; Sato, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    In the elastic fiber system of the periodontal ligaments only oxytalan fibers can be identified, whereas all three types of fibers, oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers, are present in the gingiva. However, little information is available concerning their organization in the developing periodontal ligament. In the present study, growth and distribution of the oxytalan fiber system were examined in the developing periodontal ligament of rat molars using the specific staining for oxytalan, elastic and collagen fibers, and electron-microscopic analyses. Oxytalan staining clearly confirmed the earliest oxytalan fibers in a bell-staged tooth germ at embryonic day 18, which were tiny violet-colored fibers in the dental follicle. Their cross images were made up of dot-like microfibrils of 10-15nm in diameter close to fibroblasts in the dental follicle of the rat molars aged 1 day. These microfibrils appeared to be linked to one another through delicate filaments in 3-nm-diameter. At the beginning of root formation, the cross figures of oxytalan fibers were found as dot-like structures around the root sheath as well as in areas very close to blood vessels. As development proceeded, longer oxytalan fibers were produced in the apico-occlusal direction along with blood vessels. In addition, the immunoreactive products to anti-amyloid β protein on the surface of blood vessels suggest that this molecule might be involved in the adhesion of oxytalan fibers to vascular basement membranes. Thus, the oxytalan fiber system might regulate periodontal ligament function through tensional variations registered on the walls of the vascular structures.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscope investigations comparing calculus removal using an Er:YAG laser and a frequency-doubled alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.

    1997-05-01

    With respect to lasers emitting within the mid-IR spectral domain fiber applicators are being developed. Intended is the use of these lasers in periodontal therapy and their application inside the gingival pocket. Aim of the study presented here is to compare the effect of an Er:YAG laser on dental calculus with the results following irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser. The surface of freshly extracted wisdom teeth and of extracted teeth suffering from severe periodontitis were irradiated with both laser wavelengths using a standardized application protocol. Calculus on the enamel surface, at the enamel cementum junction and on the root surface was irradiated. For light microscope investigations undecalcified histological sections were prepared after treatment. For the scanning electron microscope teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. Investigations revealed that with both laser systems calculus can be removed. Using the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser selective removal of calculus is possible while engaging the Er:YAG laser even at lowest energies necessary for calculus removal healthy cementum is ablated without control.

  6. Testing the Equivalence Principle in space with MICROSCOPE: the data analysis challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergé, Joel; Baghi, Quentin; Pires, Sandrine

    2014-05-01

    Theories beyond the Standard Model and General Relativity predict a violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) just below the current best experimental upper limits. MICROSCOPE (Micro-Satellite à traînée Compensée pour l'Observation du Principe d'Equivalence) will allow us to lower them by two orders of magnitude, and maybe to detect a WEP violation. However, analyzing the MICROSCOPE data will be challenging, mostly because of missing data and a colored noise burrying the signal of interest. In this communication, we apply an inpainting technique to simulated MICROSCOPE data and show that inpainting will help detect a WEP violation signal.

  7. Distributions of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster: light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography following intraperitoneal injection of these compounds to hamsters. Exposed silver grains of /sup 35/S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera, and cornea, and grains of /sup 3/H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells of the angular aqueous plexus and the trabecular meshwork. The grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the region adjacent to the angular aqueous sinus. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the angular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid.

  8. Hot isostatic pressing-processed hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants: light microscopic and scanning electron microscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    Wie, H; Herø, H; Solheim, T

    1998-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used in a new procedure to produce hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on a commercially pure titanium (cpTi) substrate for osseous implantation. Eighteen HIP-processed HA-coated implants were placed in the inferior border of the mandibles in 2 Labrador retriever dogs and left submerged for 3 months. As control specimens, 12 sandblasted cpTi implants were placed in the same mandibles and, to compare the bone reaction, 2 additional plasma-sprayed HA-coated implants (Integral) were placed. Tissue reactions at the bony interfaces of the implants were studied in ground sections with the implants in situ, using ordinary, fluorescent, and polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The HIP-processed HA coatings displayed an increased density in light microscopy and SEM as compared to plasma-sprayed coatings. Direct bone-implant contact was found in all 3 types of surfaces. However, the production of new bone was far more abundant for the HA-coated implants than for sandblasted cpTi implants. The presence of bone-forming and bone-resorbing cells indicated active bone remodeling in the interface area at 3 months after implant placement. The present results support the view that epitaxial bone growth may occur from the HA-coated implant surface. It was concluded that the increased density of the present HIP-processed HA material does not reduce the bioactive properties of the coatings.

  9. The fine structure of the human fetal urinary bladder. Development and maturation. A light, transmission and scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J; Antonakopoulos, G N

    1989-01-01

    The urinary bladders of 27 human fetuses, aged 7 weeks to full term, were studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy to establish the sequence of events in the development and maturation of the organ during fetal life. In the early specimens, 7-12 weeks old, the urinary bladder was lined by a bilayered, cuboidal and glycogen-rich epithelium. During the 13-17th weeks the epithelium thickened, a third layer developed and by light microscopy it now resembled urothelium. By 21 weeks this had evolved into a 3-4 layer thick epithelium with typical ultrastructural urothelial characteristics. Smooth muscle cells emerged from the condensed mesenchyme of the bladder wall by the 12th week of gestation, initially in the cephalic part of the organ but spreading within a week into the caudal end. Our findings indicate that the human fetal bladder undergoes a series of vital developmental changes during 13-21 weeks of gestation finally acquiring the typical urothelial lining and a well-developed muscular coat. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:2621133

  10. Microscopic analysis of structural changes in diode-laser-welded corneal stroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Pini, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    Diode laser welding of the cornea is a technique used to provide immediate sealing of corneal wounds: the cut is stained with a water solution of Indocyanine Green and is then irradiated with an 810 nm laser at low power densities (12-16 W/cm2), which induces a localized heating of the stroma in the range 55-66 °C range. In this study, we present a microscopic analysis aimed at evaluating the structural modifications induced in the stromal collagen of pig eyes during the laser welding of corneal wounds. Cornea samples obtained from twenty freshly-enucleated eyes were cut with a pre-calibrated knife and subjected to the laser welding procedure. Histological slices of the laser-welded stroma were examined by means of optical and transmission electron microscopy. These analyses indicated that bridges of lamellar structures crossed the wound edges with no presence of a coagulation effect. After laser welding, collagen fibrils appeared differently oriented among themselves in comparison with those of the control samples, but with similar mean fibril diameters. The laser-induced effect appeared to be confined to the ICG stained area of the cut walls, and no heat damage was observed at the operative power levels of laser corneal welding.

  11. Measurement of RBC agglutination with microscopic cell image analysis in a microchannel chip.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ju Yeon; Nyeck, Agnes E; Lim, Chae Seung; Hur, Dae Sung; Chung, Chanil; Chang, Jun Keun; An, Seong Soo A; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-01-01

    Since Landsteiner's discovery of ABO blood groups, RBC agglutination has been one of the most important immunohematologic techniques for ABO and RhD blood groupings. The conventional RBC agglutination grading system for RhD blood typings relies on macroscopic reading, followed by the assignment of a grade ranging from (-) to (4+) to the degree of red blood cells clumping. However, with the new scoring method introduced in this report, microscopically captured cell images of agglutinated RBCs, placed in a microchannel chip, are used for analysis. Indeed, the cell images' pixel number first allows the differentiation of agglutinated and non-agglutinated red blood cells. Finally, the ratio of agglutinated RBCs per total RBC counts (CRAT) from 90 captured images is then calculated. During the trial, it was observed that the agglutinated group's CRAT was significantly higher (3.77-0.003) than that of the normal control (0). Based on these facts, it was established that the microchannel method was more suitable for the discrimination between agglutinated RBCs and non-agglutinated RhD negative, and thus more reliable for the grading of RBCs agglutination than the conventional method.

  12. [Microscopic colitis].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Johan

    2002-02-11

    Microscopic colitis is an umbrella term for a newly described group of colitides, belonging to the inflammatory bowel diseases, which are only diagnosable by microscopic evaluation of a macroscopically normal colon mucosa. Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis are the most common of these colitides. Microscopic colitis is characterised clinically by chronic non-bloody watery diarrhoea. Crampy abdominal pain, nocturnal diarrhoea, urgency, and initial weight loss are usual. Concomitant diseases of autoimmune origin and arthralgia are commonly seen. Treatment of microscopic colitis follows the guidelines for treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases, but a substantial part of the patients with microscopic colitis enter spontaneous remission after some years. A minor part, however, have very troublesome symptoms and are almost refractory to treatment. Microscopic colitis has apparently no malignant potential.

  13. LIGHT AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPE LOCALIZATION OF BINDING SITES OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST OVINE LUTEINIZING HORMONE AND ITS TWO SUBUNITS IN RAT ADENOHYPOPHYSIS USING PEROXIDASE-LABELED ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Tougard, C.; Kerdelhue, B.; Tixier-Vidal, A.; Jutisz, M.

    1973-01-01

    The binding sites of antisera generated in the guinea pig against ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH) and its two subunits (oLHα and oLHβ) have been localized in rat anterior pituitaries taken from normal or castrated males and from ovariectomized females with the peroxidase-labeled antibody method, using light and electron microscopy. With the light microscope, the cells positive with antiserum to ovine luteinizing hormone (A-oLH) were violet after the Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff (AB-PAS) staining; they were also positive for A-oLHα and for A-oLHβ and, from castrated males, they displayed an increased affinity for A-oLHβ. Another cell type which was blue after the AB-PAS method reacted with the A-oLHα only; these cells, presumably thyrotropic cells, were retracted after castration and, besides their affinity for A-oLHα, acquired an affinity for A-oLHβ. As seen through the electron microscope, two cell types were positive for A-oLH, A-oLHβ, and A-oLHα and may be identified as luteinizing hormone-secreting cells. Type A cells were characterized by two classes of rounded, secretory granules. Type B cells were smaller and contained only small secretory granules. 1 mo after the rats were castrated the type A cells were hypertrophied and vacuolized. In both cases the secretory granules were the main sites of the antigenicity with the three antisera. A positive reaction was also found in the cytoplasm, particularly in hypertrophied cells from ovariectomized females and with A-oLHβ. The cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum were usually negative, except in highly degranulated cells from ovariectomized females and with A-oLHβ. PMID:4583879

  14. Light Microscopy Module: On-Orbit Microscope Planned for the Fluids Integrated Rack on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a remotely controllable, automated, on-orbit facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of physical science and biological science experiments within the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) on the International Space Station. Initially four fluid physics experiments in the FIR will use the LMM the Constrained Vapor Bubble, the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment-2, Physics of Colloids in Space-2, and Low Volume Fraction Entropically Driven Colloidal Assembly. The first experiment will investigate heat conductance in microgravity as a function of liquid volume and heat flow rate to determine, in detail, the transport process characteristics in a curved liquid film. The other three experiments will investigate various complementary aspects of the nucleation, growth, structure, and properties of colloidal crystals in microgravity and the effects of micromanipulation upon their properties.

  15. Light and electron microscopic examinations of methane-producing biofilms from anaerobic fixed-bed reactors. [Methanothrix spp. ; Methanosarcina spp

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.W.; Akin, D.E.; Nordstedt, R.A.; Thomas, M.V.; Aldrich, H.C.

    1984-07-01

    Ultrastructural examinations were performed on biofilms from eight anaerobic fixed-bed reactors filled with various packing materials and operated on fresh swine waste. By using light, UV, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, the distribution of a diverse microbial population composed of bacteria and a few yeasts was determined. This is the first time that the ultrastructure of in situ anaerobic digestor biofilms has been reported. A large number of methanogenic bacteria were identified by their fluorescence under 420 nm of radiation. Of these, two morphologically distinct types were most prevalent in the films. Methanothrix spp. was present in high numbers at the film surface, whereas Methanosarcina spp. were commonly embedded in the lower regions of the of the film. Inhabitants of the film were surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix that was very dense toward the base. An extensive network of channels was observed throughout the matrix that may facilitate gas and nutrient exchange to the lower regions of the film.

  16. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    PubMed Central

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  17. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  18. Empirical investigation on safety constraints of merging pedestrian crowd through macroscopic and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Ye, Zhirui; Shiwakoti, Nirajan; Tang, Dounan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    A recent crowd stampede during a New Year's Eve celebration in Shanghai, China resulted in 36 fatalities and over 49 serious injuries. Many of such tragic crowd accidents around the world resulted from complex multi-direction crowd movement such as merging behavior. Although there are a few studies on merging crowd behavior, none of them have conducted a systematic analysis considering the impact of both merging angle and flow direction towards the safety of pedestrian crowd movement. In this study, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the safety constraints of merging pedestrian crowd movements considering merging angle (60°, 90° and 180°) and flow direction under slow running and blocked vision condition. Then, macroscopic and microscopic properties of crowd dynamics are obtained and visualized through the analysis of pedestrian crowd trajectory data derived from video footage. It was found that merging angle had a significant influence on the fluctuations of pedestrian flows, which is important in a critical situation such as emergency evacuation. As the merging angle increased, mean velocity and mean flow at the measuring region in the exit corridors decreased, while mean density increased. A similar trend was observed for the number of weaving and overtaking conflicts, which resulted in the increase of mean headway. Further, flow direction had a significant impact on the outflow of the individuals while blocked vision had an influence on pedestrian crowd interactions and merging process. Finally, this paper discusses safety assessments on crowd merging behaviors along with some recommendations for future research. Findings from this study can assist in the development and validation of pedestrian crowd simulation models as well as organization and control of crowd events.

  19. SU-E-T-293: Dosimetric Analysis of Microscopic Disease in SBRT for Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, R; Tian, L; Ge, H; Zhang, Y; Ren, L; Gao, R; Yin, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetry of microscopic disease (MD) region of lung cancer in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: For simplicity, we assume organ moves along one dimension. The probability distribution function of tumor position was calculated according to the breathing cycle. The dose to the MD region was obtained through accumulating the treatment planning system calculated doses at different positions in a breathing cycle. A phantom experiment was then conducted to validate the calculated results using a motion phantom (The CIRS ‘Dynamic’ Thorax Phantom). The simulated breathing pattern used a cos4(x) curve with an amplitude of 10mm. A 3-D conformal 7-field plan with 6X energy was created and the dose was calculated in the average intensity projection (AIP) simulation CT images. Both films (EBT2) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors were inserted in the target of the phantom to measure the dose during radiation delivery (Varian Truebeam) and results were compared to planning dose parameters. Results: The Gamma analysis (3%/3mm) between measured dose using EBT2 film and calculated dose using AIP was 80.5%, indicating substantial dosimetric differences. While the Gamma analysis (3%/3mm) between measured dose using EBT2 and accumulated dose using 4D-CT was 98.9%, indicating the necessity of dose accumulation using 4D-CT. The measured doses using OSL and theoretically calculated doses using probability distribution function at the corresponding position were comparable. Conclusion: Use of static dose calculation in the treatment planning system could substantially underestimate the actually delivered dose in the MD region for a moving target. Funding Supported by NSFC, No.81372436.

  20. Diffraction light analysis method for a diffraction grating imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Tanida, Jun

    2014-04-10

    We have developed a new method to analyze the amount and distribution of diffraction light for a diffraction grating lens. We have found that diffraction light includes each-order diffraction light and striped diffraction light. In this paper, we describe characteristics of striped diffraction light and suggest a way to analyze diffraction light. Our analysis method, which considers the structure of diffraction grating steps, can simulate the aberrations of an optical system, each-order diffraction light, and striped diffraction light simultaneously with high accuracy. A comparison between the simulation and experimental results is presented, and we also show how our analysis method can be used to optimize a diffraction grating lens with low flare light.

  1. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  2. Analysis of amyloplast dynamics involved in gravity sensing using a novel centrifuge microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Masatsugu; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    Plants sense gravity and change their growth orientation, a phenomenon known as gravitropism. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis, sedimentation of high-density starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts) within endodermal cells appears to be involved in gravity sensing of Arabidop-sis shoots. Recent studies suggest, however, that amyloplasts are never static but continu-ously show dynamic and complicated movements due to interaction with vacuole/cytoskeleton. Therefore, it remains unclear what movement/state of amyloplasts is required for gravity sens-ing. To address this critical issue, we analyzed gravitropism and amyloplast dynamics under hypergravity condition where sedimentation by gravity is more dominant than other movements. Segments of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem showed a gravitropism in response to hypergrav-ity (10g) that had been applied perpendicularly to the growth axis for 30 s in a conventional centrifuge, suggesting that amyloplast dynamics during this short time period is involved in gravity sensing. Real-time imaging of amyloplasts during the 10g stimulation was performed using a novel centrifuge microscope (NSK Ltd, Japan): all optical devices including objective lens, light source (LED) and CCD camera are mounted on an AC motor, enabling bright-field imaging with a temporal resolution of 30 frames/sec during rotation. Almost all amyloplasts started to move toward 10g and some reached the one side of endodermal cell within 30 s. These results clearly support the starch-statolith hypothesis that redistribution of amyloplasts to gravity is important for gravity sensing. Furthermore, we analyzed the shoot gravitropic mutant, sgr2, that has non-sedimentable amyloplasts and shows little gravitropism at 1g. An obvious gravitropism was induced by 30g for 5 min where amyloplasts were moved to the hyper-gravity but not by 10g where amyloplasts were not moved. These results not only suggest that gravity sensing of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems is

  3. Protective effects of melatonin against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats: a light microscopic and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kus, Ilter; Ogeturk, Murat; Oner, Hakan; Sahin, Semsettin; Yekeler, Hayrettin; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the protective effects of melatonin against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in the rat. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Group I was used as a control. Rats in group II were injected every other day with CCl4 for 1 month, whereas rats in group III were injected every other day with CCl4 and melatonin for 1 month. At the end of the experiment, all animals were killed by decapitation and blood samples were obtained. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total and conjugated bilirubin levels were determined. For histopathological evaluation, livers of all rats were removed and processed for light microscopy. All serum biochemical parameters were significantly higher in animals treated with CCl4 than in the controls. When rats injected with CCl4 were treated with melatonin, significantly reduced elevations in serum biochemical parameters were found. In liver sections of the CCl4-injected group, necrosis, fibrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration, haemorrhage, fatty degeneration and formation of regenerative nodules were observed. Additionally, apoptotic figures, microvesicular steatosis and hydropic degeneration in hepatocytes were seen in this group. In contrast, the histopathological changes observed after administration of CCl4 were lost from rats treated with CCl4 and melatonin. Except for mild hydropic degeneration of the hepatocytes, a normal lobular appearance was seen in the livers of this group. The results of our study indicate that melatonin treatment prevents CCl4-induced liver damage in rats.

  4. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Hama, Natsuki; Shindo, Junji; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2009-07-01

    We observed the three-dimensional structures of the external surface and connective tissue cores CTCs, after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, and foliate papillae) of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius) using scanning electron microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Following unique features were found; typical vallate papillae with a circumferential furrow were not observable. Instead, numerous large fungiform papillae were rather densely distributed on the posterior of the lingual prominence. Taste buds were observable only on the dorsal epithelium. Serous lingual gland was not seen in the lamina propria; however, mucous-rich mixed lingual glands were found and in a few of orifices were seen on the large fungiform tops. Lingual prominence was diminished their width. Rather long and slender conical papillae were distributed on the lingual prominence and were similar to nonruminant herbivore, that is donkey. Beside this narrow lingual prominence, lateral slopes were situated with numerous short spine-like protrusions. After removal of the epithelium, CTCs of lateral slopes exhibited attenuated flower bud structures. Large-conical papillae were situated on the root of the tongue. These large conical papillae were not seen among ruminants and seen on the lingual root of omnivores and carnivores. It implies that lingual structure of common hippopotamus possessed mixed characteristics between Perissodactyls, Ruminantia, and nonherbivores such as Suiformes because of their unique evolutionally taxonomic position. Moreover, adaptation for soft grass diet and associating easier mastication may be also affecting these mixed morphological features of the tongue.

  5. A new species of the genus Heterobothrium (Monogenea: Diclidophoridae) parasitizing the gills of tiger puffer fish Tetraodon lineatus (Tetraodontidae). A light and scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Kareem; Saady, Hoda; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Quraishy, Saleh Al; Adel, Asmaa

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, the morphology and morphometric characterization of Heterobothrium lineatus, a monogenean gill parasite infecting the gills and wall of the bronchial cavity of the tiger pufferfish Tetraodon lineatus, were described by means of light and scanning electron microscopy for the first time from the River Nile at Qena Governorate, South Valley, Egypt. In wet mount preparation, the adult worms exhibited an elongated body with anterior pointed and posterior broad ends. The adult worm measured 1.15-1.76 mm (1.53 ± 0.2) in length and 0.30-0.42 mm (0.35 ± 0.02) in width. Light and scanning electron microscopic observations showed the presence of two buccal organs situated anteriorly around the mouth opening. The opisthohaptor was subdivided into four pairs of clamps but had no isthmus separating it from the body proper. The present Heterobothrium species differs from all other described species in the genus, by its lower dimensions of the worm measurements and the presence of a copulatory organ armed with 12-15 genital hooks. Furthermore, it is easily distinguished from Heterobothrium tetrodonis and Heterobothrium okamotoi by the absence of a distinct isthmus, and resembles Heterobothrium lamothei described from the gills of Sphoeroides testodineus in Mexico in its general appearance and the presence of rectangular haptor with the fourth pair of clamps smaller than the previous ones.

  6. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common raccoon, Procyon lotor.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2010-08-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs), after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate papillae) of the common raccoon (Procyon lotor) using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The tongue was elongated and their two-third width was almost fixed. Numerous filiform papillae were distributed along the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and fungiform papillae were distributed between the filiform papillae. Eight vallate papillae that had a weak circumferential ridge were distributed in a V-shape in the posterior part of the tongue and numerous taste buds were observable in the circumferential furrows of vallate papillae. Weak fold-like foliate papillae were observable at the lateral edge in the posterior part of the tongue and a few salivary duct orifices were observable beneath the foliate papillae. An islet-like structure with numerous taste buds, was observable on the deep part of the salivary duct of foliate papillae. Large conical papillae were distributed at the posterior part and root of the tongue. After removal of epithelium, filiform papillae of CTCs were appeared to be a thumb or cone-like main core and associating several finger-like short accessory cores. These cores were surrounded an oval concavity. The main core was situated behind the concavity and associated with accessory cores. CTCs of fungiform papillae were cylinder-like with numerous vertically running ridges and with a few concavities seen at the top of the cores. CTCs of vallate papillae and their surrounded circumferential ridge were covered with numerous pimple-like protrusions. The lingual papillae of Common raccoon's tongue had morphological feature of carnivore species.

  7. A LIGHT AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF LONG-TERM ORGANIZED CULTURES OF RAT DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Bunge, Richard P.; Peterson, Edith R.; Murray, Margaret R.

    1967-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia from fetal rats were explanted on collagen-coated coverslips and carried in Maximow double-coverslip assemblies for periods up to 3 months. These cultured ganglia were studied in the living state, in stained whole mounts, and in sections after OsO4 fixation and Epon embedment. From the central cluster of nerve cell bodies, neurites emerge to form a rich network of fascicles which often reach the edge of the carrying coverslip. The neurons resemble their in vivo counterparts in nuclear and cytoplasmic content and organization; e.g., they appear as "light" or "dark" cells, depending on the amount of cytoplasmic neurofilaments. Satellite cells form a complete investment around the neuronal soma and are themselves everywhere covered by basement membrane. The neuron-satellite cell boundary is complicated by spinelike processes arising from the neuronal soma. Neuron size, myelinated fiber diameter, and internode length in the cultures do not reach the larger of the values known for ganglion and peripheral nerve in situ (30). Unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers and associated Schwann cells and endoneurial and perineurial components are organized into typical fascicles. The relationship of the Schwann cell and its single myelinated fiber or numerous unmyelinated fibers and the properties of myelin, such as lamellar spacing, mesaxons, Schmidt-Lanterman clefts, nodes of Ranvier, and protuberances, mimic the in vivo pattern. It is concluded that cultivation of fetal rat dorsal root ganglia by this technique fosters maturation and long-term maintenance of all the elements that comprise this cellular community in vivo (except vascular components) and, furthermore, allows these various components to relate faithfully to one another to produce an organotypic model of sensory ganglion tissue. PMID:10976233

  8. Spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman microscopic analysis of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tender, Leonard M

    2014-02-03

    When grown on the surface of an anode electrode, Geobacter sulfurreducens forms a multi-cell thick biofilm in which all cells appear to couple the oxidation of acetate with electron transport to the anode, which serves as the terminal metabolic electron acceptor. Just how electrons are transported through such a biofilm from cells to the underlying anode surface over distances that can exceed 20 microns remains unresolved. Current evidence suggests it may occur by electron hopping through a proposed network of redox cofactors composed of immobile outer membrane and/or extracellular multi-heme c-type cytochromes. In the present work, we perform a spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman (CRR) microscopic analysis to investigate anode-grown Geobacter biofilms. The results confirm the presence of an intra-biofilm redox gradient whereby the probability that a heme is in the reduced state increases with increasing distance from the anode surface. Such a gradient is required to drive electron transport toward the anode surface by electron hopping via cytochromes. The results also indicate that at open circuit, when electrons are expected to accumulate in redox cofactors involved in electron transport due to the inability of the anode to accept electrons, nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm are oxidized. The same outcome occurs when a comparable potential to that measured at open circuit (-0.30 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode, whereas nearly all hemes are reduced when an exceedingly negative potential (-0.50 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode. These results suggest that nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm can be electrochemically accessed by the electrode, but most have oxidation potentials too negative to transport electrons originating from acetate metabolism. The results also reveal a lateral heterogeneity (x-y dimensions) in the type of c-type cytochromes within the biofilm that may affect electron transport to the

  9. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival.

  10. An analysis of magnetization patterns measured using a magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Gomez, R. D.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    1994-05-01

    In a previous paper, we made a complete analysis of the interaction between the probe tip of a magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope (MFSTM) and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded pattern. In this paper we show how the magnetization distribution in the recorded media can be determined from the measurements by obtaining expressions for the magnetic fields from a Fourier series expansion for the recorded magnetizations. We have used these techniques to find the magnetic fields from many different distributions, including all those we could find in the literature. The probe tip displacement, which is the quantity measured using the MFSTM, can be calculated using these magnetic fields. The results can then be compared to the experimental data. For one set of experiments on high density recording we have found that the best fit is with a magnetization that has a modified arctan transition. The modification eliminates the discontinuity in the slope of the transitions as they are joined together, giving a more realistic representation of the magnetic distribution. The transition width can then be used as an adjustable parameter to find the best fit to the data. The MFSTM can, therefore, be used as a quantitative tool to find the magnetic recording transition widths. These theoretical techniques are not necessarily restricted to the use of a MFSTM, but can be applied to other problems in magnetic recording. For instance, we show how the probe tip displacement corresponds to the flux picked up by a conventional read head. The response of the head as a function of different magnetization patterns can then be studied and compared to experimental results. The measurable quantities are expressed in Fourier series but we show how these series can be easily evaluated with a PC and the appropriate software.

  11. Analysis of reactive oxygen species in the guard cell of wheat stoma with confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei; Shi, Peiguo; Wang, Xue; Cai, Weiwei

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the laser-scanning confocal microscope has become a routine technique and indispensable tool for cell biological studies. Previous studies indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in tobacco epidermal cells with confocal microscope. In the present studies, the probe 2',7'-dichlorof luorescein diacetate (H₂DCF-DA) was used to research the change of ROS in the guard cell of wheat stoma, and catalase (CAT) was used to demonstrate that ROS had been labeled. The laser-scanning mode of confocal microscope was XYT, and the time interval between two sections was 1.6351 s. Sixty optical sections were acquired with the laser-scanning confocal microscope, and CAT (60,000 U mg⁻¹) was added after four optical sections were scanned. Furthermore, the region of interest (ROI) was circled and the fluorescence intensity of ROS was quantified with Leica Confocal Software. The quantitative data were exported and the trend chart was made with software Excell. The results indicated that ROS were produced intracellularly in stomatal guard cells, and the quantified fluorescence intensity of ROS was declined with CAT added. It is a good method to research the instantaneous change of ROS in plant cells with confocal microscope and fluorescence probe H₂DCF-DA.

  12. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  13. Comments on "A new algorithm for border description of polarized light surface microscopic images of pigmented skin lesions".

    PubMed

    Burroni, Marco; Alparone, Luciano; Argenti, Fabrizio

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, discrepancies and reference inaccuracies in the paper (Grana et al., 2003) are pointed out. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the definitions of "lesion gradient" and "skin lesion gradient," widely used in a number of medical papers on computer analysis of pigmented skin lesions, are unambiguous, and that the "new algorithm for border description" described in the subject paper substantially relies on well-established concepts dating back over one decade ago.

  14. Macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic paradox: A Constructal law analysis of atoms as open systems

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The relation between macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic reversibility is a present unsolved problem. Constructal law is introduced to develop analytically the Einstein’s, Schrödinger’s, and Gibbs’ considerations on the interaction between particles and thermal radiation (photons). The result leads to consider the atoms and molecules as open systems in continuous interaction with flows of photons from their surroundings. The consequent result is that, in any atomic transition, the energy related to the microscopic irreversibility is negligible, while when a great number of atoms (of the order of Avogadro’s number) is considered, this energy related to irreversibility becomes so large that its order of magnitude must be taken into account. Consequently, macroscopic irreversibility results related to microscopic irreversibility by flows of photons and amount of atoms involved in the processes. PMID:27762333

  15. Macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic paradox: A Constructal law analysis of atoms as open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-10-01

    The relation between macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic reversibility is a present unsolved problem. Constructal law is introduced to develop analytically the Einstein’s, Schrödinger’s, and Gibbs’ considerations on the interaction between particles and thermal radiation (photons). The result leads to consider the atoms and molecules as open systems in continuous interaction with flows of photons from their surroundings. The consequent result is that, in any atomic transition, the energy related to the microscopic irreversibility is negligible, while when a great number of atoms (of the order of Avogadro’s number) is considered, this energy related to irreversibility becomes so large that its order of magnitude must be taken into account. Consequently, macroscopic irreversibility results related to microscopic irreversibility by flows of photons and amount of atoms involved in the processes.

  16. Modern contaminants affecting microscopic residue analysis on stone tools: A word of caution.

    PubMed

    Pedergnana, A; Asryan, L; Fernández-Marchena, J L; Ollé, A

    2016-07-01

    Residue analysis is a method frequently used to infer the function of stone tools and it is very often applied in combination with use-wear analysis. Beyond its undeniable potential, the method itself has several intrinsic constraints. Apart from the exceptional circumstances necessary for residues to survive, the correct identification of the residue type is a very debatable topic. Before attempting to recognise ancient residues, a proper method should allow analysts to identify possible modern contaminants and exclude them from the final interpretation. Therefore, analysts should not underestimate the presence of modern contaminants and might learn how to discriminate the background noise due to handling. The main aim of this research is to provide some methodological improvements to residue analysis through the characterisation of some modern residues often present on the surface of stone tools (e.g. skin flakes, modelling clay). This characterisation was done by using both optical light microscopy (OLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, a special care in the post-excavation treatment of stone tools is claimed in order to avoid major contamination of the samples.

  17. Endoscopic versus microscopic transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgery: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery has gradually come to be regarded as a preferred option in the treatment of pituitary adenomas because of its advantages of improved visualization and its minimal invasiveness. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the outcomes and complications of endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal surgery in the treatment of pituitary adenomas. Methods We performed a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and the Web of Science between January 1992 and May 2013. Studies with consecutive patients that explicitly and fully compared endoscopic and microscopic approaches in the treatment of pituitary adenomas were included. Results A total of 15 studies (n = 1,014 patients) met the inclusion criteria among 487 studies that involved endoscopic surgery and 527 studies that dealt with microscopic surgery. The rate of gross tumor removal was higher in the endoscopic group than in the microscopic group. The post-operative rates of septal perforation were less frequent in patients who underwent endoscopic surgery. There was no significant difference between the two techniques in the incidence rates of meningitis, diabetes insipidus, cerebrospinal fluid leak, epistaxis or hypopituitarism. The post-operative hospital stay was significantly shorter for the endoscopic surgery group compared with the microscopic surgery group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the length of the operation (P > 0.05). Conclusions The present study indicates that the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach is safer and more effective than microscopic surgery in the treatment of pituitary adenomas. PMID:24721812

  18. Transcranial light-tissue interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulakh, Kavleen; Zakaib, Scott; Willmore, William G.; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    The penetration depth of light plays a crucial role in therapeutic medical applications. In order to design effective medical photonic devices, an in-depth understanding of light's ability to penetrate tissues (including bone, skin, and fat) is necessary. The amount of light energy absorbed or scattered by tissues affects the intensity of light reaching an intended target in vivo. In this study, we examine the transmittance of light through a variety of cranial tissues for the purpose of determining the efficacy of neuro stimulation using a transcranial laser. Tissue samples collected from a pig were irradiated with a pulsed laser. We first determine the optimal irradiation wavelength of the laser to be 808nm. With varying peak and average power of the laser, we found an inverse and logarithmic relationship between the penetration depth and the intensity of the light. After penetrating the skin and skull of the pig, the light decreases in intensity at a rate of approximately 90.8 (+/-0.4) percent for every 5 mm of brain tissue penetrated. We also found the correlation between the irradiation time and dosage, using three different lasers (with peak power of 500, 1000, and 1500mW respectively). These data will help deduce what laser power is required to achieve a clinically-realistic model for a given irradiation time. This work is fundamental and the experimental data can be used to supplement existing and future research on the effects of laser light on brain tissue for the design of medical devices.

  19. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical study on the innervation of the pineal gland of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis), with special reference to peptidergic synaptic junctions with pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Kado, M; Yoshida, A; Hira, Y; Sakai, Y; Matsushima, S

    1999-09-25

    Conventional and immunocytochemical, light- and electron-microscopic studies on the innervation of the pineal gland of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis) were made. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive fibers, which were abundantly distributed in the gland, disappeared almost completely after superior cervical ganglionectomy, suggesting that these fibers are mostly postganglionic sympathetic fibers. By contrast, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive fibers, which were less numerous than NPY-fibers, remained in considerable numbers in ganglionectomized animals, indicating the innervation of TH-positive fibers from extrasympathetic sources. Bundles of substance P (SP)- or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive fibers, entering the gland at its distal end, were left intact after ganglionectomy. SP-fibers were numerous, but CGRP-fibers were scarce in the gland. SP-immunoreactive fibers were myelinated and nonmyelinated, and were regarded as peripheral fibers because of the presence of a Schwann cell sheath. NPY- and SP-immunoreactive fibers and endings were mainly localized in the pineal parenchyma. NPY-immunoreactive endings synapsed frequently, and SP-positive ones did less frequently, with the cell bodies of pinealocytes. The results suggest that NPY and SP directly control the activity of pinealocytes. Sections stained for myelin showed that thick and less thick bundles of myelinated fibers entered the gland by way of the habenular and posterior commissures, respectively. Under the electron microscope, the bundles were found to contain also unmyelinated fibers. A considerable number of nerve endings synapsing with the cell bodies of pinealocytes remained in ganglionectomized animals; these endings were not immunoreactive for TH or SP. Such synaptic endings may be the terminals of commissural fibers.

  20. Rapid and early detection of salmonella serotypes with hyperspectral microscope and multivariate data analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to evaluate hyperspectral microscope images for early and rapid detection of Salmonella serotypes: S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, S. Infantis, S. Kentucky, and S. Typhimurium at incubation times of 6, 8, 10, 12, and 24 hours. Images were collected by an acousto-optical tunab...

  1. Exploring the Moon at the Microscale: Analysis of Apollo Samples with the Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, J. I.; Farmer, J. D.; Sellar, R. G.; Allen, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI), similar to a geologist’s handlens, creates multispectral, microscale reflectance images of geological samples, in which each image pixel is comprised of a VNIR spectrum. This enables the discrimination of a wide variety of rock-forming minerals, especially Fe- and Mg-bearing phases, within a microtextural framework. The MMI composite images provide crucial geologic and contextual information: 1) for the in-situ analysis of rocks and soils to support hypothesis-driven, field-based exploration; 2) to guide sub-sampling of geologic materials for return to laboratories on Earth; and 3) in support of astronaut investigations during EVAs, or in a lunar base laboratory. To assess the value of the MMI as a tool for lunar exploration, we used a field-portable, tripod-mounted version of the MMI to image 18 lunar rocks and four soils, from a reference suite spanning the full compositional range found in the Apollo collection, housed in the Lunar Experiment Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The MMI composite images faithfully resolved the microtextural features of samples, while the application of ENVI-based spectral end-member mapping faithfully revealed the distribution of Fe-bearing mineral phases (olivine, pyroxene and magnetite), along with plagioclase feldspars within samples, over a broad range of lithologies and grain sizes (figure 1). The MMI composite images also revealed secondary mineral phases, glasses, and effects of space weathering in samples, where present. Our MMI-based petrogenetic interpretations compared favorably with thin section-based descriptions published in the literature, revealing the value of MMI images for astronaut and rover-mediated lunar exploration. We present our latest results from these analyses and their application to future lunar exploration. Figure 1. Multispectral images of Apollo sample 14321,88. Left: R = 635 nm; G = 525 nm; B = 470 nm. Right: R = 1450 nm; G = 975 nm; B = 525

  2. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  3. Hybrid Al/steel-joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW): Process comparison, nondestructive testing and microscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2017-03-01

    The process of friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which proved its potential in joining dissimilar metals that are poorly fusion weldable. This ability opens a wide range for applications in industrial fields, where weight reduction by partial substitution of conventional materials through lightweight materials is a current central aim. As a consequence of this, the realization of aluminum / steel-joints is of great interest. For this material compound, several friction stir welds were carried out by different researchers for varying Al/steel-joints, whereas the definition of optimal process parameters as well as the increase of mechanical properties was in the focus of the studies. To achieve further improved properties for this dissimilar joint a newly developed hybrid process named “ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW)” was applied. In this paper the resulting properties of Al/steel-joints using FSW and USE-FSW will be presented and compared. Furthermore, first results by using the nondestructive testing method “computer laminography” to analyze the developed joining area will be shown supplemented by detailed light-microscopic investigations, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and EDX.

  4. Binding sites of Ulex europaeus-lectin I in human parotid gland. A light-microscopic and ultrastructural study using the immunoperoxidase technique and immunocryoultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Born, I A; Zimmer, K P; Schwechheimer, K; Maier, H; Möller, P

    1987-05-01

    Twenty non-neoplastic parotid glands (removed during neck dissection for regional tumours) were examined for cellular and subcellular binding sites of Ulex europaeus-lectin I (UEA-I), a lectin reported to be specific for alpha-L-fucose. For light microscopy, an extended peroxidase-antiperoxidase method was applied; for the evaluation of the subcellular localization of bound lectin, three of these glands were examined following immunocryoultramicrotomy and staining by the protein A-gold technique. In addition to the known cytoplasmic affinity of UEA-I for capillary endothelium, acinar cells bound the lectin within the cytoplasmic compartment; the number and distribution of stained acinar cells varied among individuals. Furthermore, cytomembrane-bound labelling that occurred most markedly at the luminar surface was observed in striated-duct epithelium. Using the electron microscope, protein A-gold particles were seen in zymogen granules and in Golgi cisternae of serous acinar cells; primary saliva secreted in the lumina exhibited strong labelling; serous acinar cells had binding sites on their cell membranes, striated-duct epithelium had binding sites on its surface membrane and in the vicinity of apical vesicles. Our results show that UEA-I is a useful tool for the study of the structure and functional states of the parotid gland epithelium and its associated pathological alterations.

  5. Effect of exposure to radio frequency radiation emitted by cell phone on the developing dorsal root ganglion of chick embryo: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ingole, I V; Ghosh, S K

    2012-12-01

    With an ever increasing number of cell phone users since late twentieth [corrected] century, magnitude of the problem of exposure to radiation emitted by cell phone is self evident. Extensive research had been devoted to incriminate or absolve it as a health hazard. Radiofrequency radiation emitted by cell phone had been stated to be a potent carcinogen, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and neurobehavioral teratogen. Its effect on the brain had been a subject of extensive research evidently due to its proximity to the user's brain. While considering the biological effects of radiofrequency radiation, its intensity, frequency and the duration of exposure are important determinants. Nevertheless the results of these different studies have not been unequivocal. Considering the contradictory reports, the present work was undertaken to study the effect of such an exposure on the developing neural tissue of chick embryo. The processes of cell division and differentiation are fundamental to the development of any living being and are a sensitive index of any insult sustained at this stage. Neurons of dorsal root ganglion were selected for the present study as these ganglia were fully differentiated as early as fourth day of embryonic life. By varying duration of exposure, the embryos were exposed to different doses of radiation, sacrificed at different periods of incubation and subjected to histological processing. On light microscopic study it was observed that developing neurons of dorsal root ganglion suffered a damage which was dose dependent and persisted in spite of giving the exposure-free period between two exposures.

  6. Raphe of the posterior neural tube in the chick embryo: its closure and reopening as studied in living embryos with a high definition light microscope.

    PubMed

    van Straaten, H W; Jaskoll, T; Rousseau, A M; Terwindt-Rouwenhorst, E A; Greenberg, G; Shankar, K; Melnick, M

    1993-09-01

    Chick embryos cultured on a curved substratum show a transient enlargement of the posterior neuropore (PN), mimicking the temporary delay of PN closure as seen in the curly tail (ct) mouse mutant (van Straaten et al. [1993] Development 117:1163-1172). In the present study the PN enlargement in the chick embryo was investigated further with a high definition light microscope (HDmic), allowing high resolution viewing of living embryos in vitro. The temporary PN enlargement appeared due to considerable reopening of the raphe of the posterior neural tube, which was followed by reclosure after several hours. The raphe was subsequently studied in detail. It appeared very irregular, with small zones of apposed, open and fused neural folds. During closure, these raphe features shifted posteriorly. A distinct fusion sequence between surface epithelium and neuroepithelium was not seen. During experimental reopening of the raphe in vitro, small bridges temporarily arose, broke and disappeared quickly; they likely represented the first adhesion sites between the neural folds. More prominent adhesion sites partly detached, resulting in bridging filopodia-like connections; they probably represented the first anteroposterior locations of neural fold fusion. Our observations in the living chick embryo in vitro thus show that the caudal neural tube has an irregular raphe with few adhesion sites, which can be readily reopened. As a result of the irregularity, the PN does not close zipper-like, but button-like by forming multiple closure sites.

  7. The possible protective role of pumpkin seed oil in an animal model of acid aspiration pneumonia: Light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Omar, Nesreen Moustafa; Sarhan, Nahla Reda

    2017-03-01

    Aspiration pneumonitis is a common problem occurring in many clinical disorders. Pumpkin seed oil (PO) is a rich source of antioxidants. This work aimed to assess the effect of PO on the lung histopathological changes induced by acid aspiration. Forty male albino rats assigned to four groups were used. Rats of control group were instilled intratracheally with normal saline 2mL/kg. HCL group instilled with 2mL/kg of HCL 0.1N, pH 1.25. PO group received pumpkin seed oil (PO) orally (∼1375mg/kgbw/day) for 7days. HCL+PO group instilled with 2mL/kg of HCL 0.1N, pH 1.25 and received PO at the same dose of PO group. Lung tissue samples were processed for light, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study using anti inducible NO synthase (iNOS). The lung of HCL group demonstrated thickened interalveolar septa, inflammatory cell infiltration and significant increase in the area percent of collagenous fibers and immune expression of iNOS. Ultra structurally, disrupted alveolocapillay membrane, degenerated type II pneumocytes and plentiful alveolar macrophages were evident. PO administration partially attenuated these histological and ultra structural alterations and reduced iNOS immune-expression in lung tissue. In conclusion, PO has a protective effect against HCL aspiration lung injury most probably through its antioxidant activity.

  8. Prevalence of apoptotic epidermal keratinocytes in eosinophilic dermatoses of the cat: a retrospective light-microscopic study of 145 skin-biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Joya S; Scott, Danny W; Erb, Hollis N

    2010-02-01

    A retrospective light-microscopic study was performed on skin-biopsy specimens from 145 cats with eosinophilic inflammatory dermatoses in order to determine the prevalence of apoptotic epidermal keratinocytes (AKs), the prevalence of eosinophils in close proximity to AKs, and whether there was a difference in the prevalence of AKs or the prevalence of eosinophils in close proximity to AKs based on histopathological reaction pattern. Overall, 62/145 (43%) specimens had AKs. Of the cases in which AKs were seen, 18% had eosinophils in close proximity to the AKs. The specimens were divided into three groups based on histopathological reaction pattern: perivascular-to-interstitial, diffuse, and nodular. No difference in the prevalence of AKs was found among the three histological groups. Because the sample size containing eosinophils in close proximity to AKs was too small to compare the three histological patterns individually, nodular and non-nodular patterns were compared. No difference in the presence of eosinophils in close proximity to AKs was found in these two subsets. More AKs were present if eosinophils were in close proximity to the AKs (range 1-9 with eosinophils near compared to 0-7 without).

  9. Immunocytochemistry of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the rat brain: a light and electron microscopical study using the tyramide signal amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Stanarius, A; Töpel, I; Schulz, S; Noack, H; Wolf, G

    1997-11-01

    There are many inconsistencies in the literature about the cellular and subcellular distribution of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the brain. We have re-investigated its localization by light and electron microscopical (LM, EM) immunocytochemistry and the NADPH-diaphorase reaction. Using bovine aortic tissue as a positive control the protocols for the fixation and staining procedure were optimized. Only cryosections immersion-fixed with aceton and a mixture of aldehydes exhibited a clear-cut immunostaining. In rat brain tissue the endothelium of the entire vasculature showed immunoreactivity and, in addition to that, the epithelial cells of the choroid plexuses, whereas neurons never displayed any signs of immunostaining. EM immunoprecipitates were seen irregularly distributed in the cytosol or attached to endocellular membranes. EM NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry using the tetrazolium salt BSPT provided incoherent pictures in so far as the reaction product was exclusively bound to membranes. The restriction of eNOS within brain tissue to the vasculature may have implications for the differential significance of NOS isoforms in brain function.

  10. Microscopic analysis of sharp force trauma in bone and cartilage: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Christian; Rainwater, Christopher W; Fridie, Jeannette S

    2013-09-01

    Sharp force trauma research lacks agreement on reported error rates for correctly identifying toolmark characteristics on bone and cartilage. This study provides error rates for determining blade class (serrated, partially serrated, nonserrated) and type of edge bevel (left, right, even). Three analysts examined cuts to a wax medium, cartilage, and bone using two types of microscopes. Additionally, the observers examined impressions taken from the wax medium and the cartilage. Overall, a total of 504 observations were performed. Serrated blades were distinguishable from nonserrated blades due to their patterned striations. Some difficulties were encountered in distinguishing serrated and partially serrated blades; however, when these groups were considered together as one classification type (serrated), classification accuracy improved from 79% to 96%. Classification accuracy for edge bevel was 65%. Error rates were similar when comparing direct observation of the cut marks versus indirect observation (impressions). Additionally, the type of microscope used did not affect error rates.

  11. Microscopic cluster model analysis of 14O+p elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The 14O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the 15C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the 14O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed.

  12. Microscopic cluster model analysis of {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The {sup 14}O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the {sup 15}C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in {sup 15}F are discussed.

  13. Analysis on near field scattering spectra around nanoparticles by using parametric indirect microscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guoyan, Liu; Kun, Gao; Xuefeng, Liu; Guoqiang, Ni

    2016-10-01

    We report the simulation and measurement results of near field spatial scattering spectra around nanoparticles. Our measurement and simulations results have indicated that Parametric Indirect Microscopic Imaging can image the near field spatial scattering to a much larger distance from the scattering source of the particle under measurement whereas this part of spatial scattering was lost in the conventional microscopy. Both FDTD modeling and measurement provided evidence that parameters of indirect optical wave vector have higher sensitivity to near field scattering.

  14. Semiautomated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: Microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens.

    PubMed

    Minker, Katharine R; Biedrzycki, Meredith L; Kolagunda, Abhishek; Rhein, Stephen; Perina, Fabiano J; Jacobs, Samuel S; Moore, Michael; Jamann, Tiffany M; Yang, Qin; Nelson, Rebecca; Balint-Kurti, Peter; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Wisser, Randall J; Caplan, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-25

    The study of phenotypic variation in plant pathogenesis provides fundamental information about the nature of disease resistance. Cellular mechanisms that alter pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy; however, systematic phenotyping platforms-from sample processing to image analysis-to investigate this do not exist. We have developed a platform for 3D phenotyping of cellular features underlying variation in disease development by fluorescence-specific resolution of host and pathogen interactions across time (4D). A confocal microscopy phenotyping platform compatible with different maize-fungal pathosystems (fungi: Setosphaeria turcica, Cochliobolus heterostrophus, and Cercospora zeae-maydis) was developed. Protocols and techniques were standardized for sample fixation, optical clearing, species-specific combinatorial fluorescence staining, multisample imaging, and image processing for investigation at the macroscale. The sample preparation methods presented here overcome challenges to fluorescence imaging such as specimen thickness and topography as well as physiological characteristics of the samples such as tissue autofluorescence and presence of cuticle. The resulting imaging techniques provide interesting qualitative and quantitative information not possible with conventional light or electron 2D imaging. Microsc. Res. Tech., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  16. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  17. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  18. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  19. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  20. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Seo, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a “microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa”, which was distinct from classical polyarteritis nodosa. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article will review the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA. PMID:20688249

  1. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacterial Biofilms by Bioluminescence Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Silvia C.; Azambuja, Nilton; Fregnani, Eduardo R.; Rodriguez, Helena M.H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to test photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an alternative approach to biofilm disruption on dental hard tissue, We evaluated the effect of methylene blue and a 660 nm diode laser on the viability and architecture of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms. Materials and methods: Ten human teeth were inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterococcus faecalis to form 3 day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify and evaluate the bacterial viability, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging was used to assess architecture and morphology of bacterial biofilm before and after PDT employing methylene blue and 40 mW, 660 nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 300 μm fiber for 240 sec, resulting in a total energy of 9.6 J. The data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. Results: The bacterial reduction showed a dose dependence; as the light energy increased, the bioluminescence decreased in both planktonic suspension and in biofilms. The SEM analysis showed a significant reduction of biofilm on the surface. PDT promoted disruption of the biofilm and the number of adherent bacteria was reduced. Conclusions: The photodynamic effect seems to disrupt the biofilm by acting both on bacterial cells and on the extracellular matrix. PMID:23822168

  2. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  3. Representative Image Subsets in Soil Analysis Using the Mars Exploration Rover Microscopic Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrol, N. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Grin, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Assessing texture and morphology is a critical step in evaluating the plausible origin and evolution of soil particles. Both are essential to the understanding of martian soils beyond Gusev and Meridiani. In addition to supporting rover operations, what is being learned at both landing sites about soil physical characteristics and properties provides essential keys to model with more precision the nature of martian soils at global scale from the correlation of ground-based and orbital data. Soil and particles studies will improve trafficability predictions for future missions, whether robotic or human, ultimately increasing safety and mission productivity. Data can also be used to assist in pre-mission hardware testing, and during missions to support engineering activities including rover extrication, which makes the characterization of soils at the particle level and their mixing critical. On Mars, this assessment is performed within the constraints of the rover’s instrumentation. The Microscopic Imager allows the identification of particles ≥ 100 µm across. Individual particles of clay, silt and very fine sand are not accessible. Texture is, thus, defined here as the relative proportion of particles ≥ 100 µm. Analytical methods are consistent with standard sedimentologic techniques applied to the study of thin sections and digital images on terrestrial soils. Those have known constraints and biases and are well adapted to the limitations of documenting three-dimensional particles on Mars through the two-dimensional FoV of the MI. Biases and errors are linked to instrument resolution and particle size. Precision improves with increasing size and is unlikely to be consistent in the study of composite soil samples. Here, we address how to obtain a statistically sound and accurate representation of individual particles and soil mixings without analyzing entire MI images. The objectives are to (a) understand the role of particle-size in selecting statistically

  4. Electron Microscopic Analysis of the Effects of Psoralen and Interferon on Replicative Intermediates Formed During Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection of Mouse L Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-24

    AUG 1987 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electron Microscopic Analysis of the Effects of Psoralen and Interferon...Analysis of the Effects of Psoralen and Interferon on Replicative Intermediates Formed During Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection of Mouse L Cells...certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the dissertation manuscript entitled: "Electron microscopic analysis of the effects of psoralen and

  5. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons, simultaneously measuring the electron dosage and x-ray intensities for each sample of element to determine a "K.sub.AB " value to be used in the equation ##EQU1## where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B, and exposing the multielement sample to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  6. A microscopic analysis of in-cylinder swirl generated by directed ports

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Liu, R.; Xiao, F.; Guan, L.

    1994-09-01

    Based on 3-dimensional velocity data at intake valve exit area of typical SI engine intake ports (horizontal and sloping directed ports) measured by hot wire anemometry in a steady flow rig, the magnitudes and compositions of inflow angular momentum flux and swirl ratios at the end of induction process generated by each velocity component were computed at different intake valve lifts and distances along valve axis. A microscopic evaluation method was provided for evaluating intake port characteristics according to intake valve exit flow field. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, W.E.

    1986-01-06

    This disclosure describes a method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons. Simultaneously the electron dosage and x-ray intensities are measured for each sample of element to determine a ''K/sub AB/'' value to be used in the equation (I/sub A/I/sub B/) = K/sub AB/ (C/sub A//C/sub B/), where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B. The multielement sample is exposed to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  8. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    PubMed

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics.

  9. Analysis of DNA methylation in FFPE tissues using the MethyLight technology.

    PubMed

    Dallol, Ashraf; Al-Ali, Waleed; Al-Shaibani, Amina; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2011-01-01

    Novel biomarkers are sought after by mining DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Such tissues offer the great advantage of often having complete clinical data (including survival), as well as the tissues are amenable for laser microdissection targeting specific tissue areas. Downstream analysis of such DNA includes mutational screens and methylation profiling. Screening for mutations by sequencing requires a significant amount of DNA for PCR and cycle sequencing. This is self-inhibitory if the gene screened has a large number of exons. Profiling DNA methylation using the MethyLight technology circumvents this problem and allows for the mining of several biomarkers from DNA extracted from a single microscope slide of the tissue of interest. We describe in this chapter a detailed protocol for MethyLight and its use in the determination of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype status in FFPE colorectal cancer samples.

  10. SS433 Trek 2: light curve analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.; Obana, Y.; Okugami, M.

    The authors have calculated theoretical light curves of SS433 during eclipse and precession, using a model in which SS433 consists of a geometrically thick torus around a compact star and a companion star filling the Roche lobe. The favorite combination is that the mass ratio is about 2 (a compact star is a black hole) and the surface temperature of the companion is around 17000K.

  11. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  12. Photon path distribution and optical responses of turbid media: theoretical analysis based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y

    2001-08-01

    A concise theoretical treatment has been developed to describe the optical responses of a highly scattering inhomogeneous medium using functions of the photon path distribution (PPD). The treatment is based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law and has been found to yield a complete set of optical responses by time- and frequency-domain measurements. The PPD is defined for possible photons having a total zigzag pathlength of l between the points of light input and detection. Such a distribution is independent of the absorption properties of the medium and can be uniquely determined for the medium under quantification. Therefore, the PPD can be calculated with an imaginary reference medium having the same optical properties as the medium under quantification except for the absence of absorption. One of the advantages of this method is that the optical responses, the total attenuation, the mean pathlength, etc are expressed by functions of the PPD and the absorption distribution.

  13. Lighting Condition Analysis for Mars Moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul; De Carufel, Guy

    2016-01-01

    A manned mission to Phobos may be an important precursor and catalyst for the human exploration of Mars, as it will fully demonstrate the technologies for a successful Mars mission. A comprehensive understanding of Phobos' environment such as lighting condition and gravitational acceleration are essential to the mission success. The lighting condition is one of many critical factors for landing zone selection, vehicle power subsystem design, and surface mobility vehicle path planning. Due to the orbital characteristic of Phobos, the lighting condition will change dramatically from one Martian season to another. This study uses high fidelity computer simulation to investigate the lighting conditions, specifically the solar radiation flux over the surface, on Phobos. Ephemeris data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) DE405 model was used to model the state of the Sun, the Earth, and Mars. An occultation model was developed to simulate Phobos' self-shadowing and its solar eclipses by Mars. The propagated Phobos' state was compared with data from JPL's Horizon system to ensure the accuracy of the result. Results for Phobos lighting condition over one Martian year are presented in this paper, which include length of solar eclipse, average solar radiation intensity, surface exposure time, total maximum solar energy, and total surface solar energy (constrained by incident angle). The results show that Phobos' solar eclipse time changes throughout the Martian year with the maximum eclipse time occurring during the Martian spring and fall equinox and no solar eclipse during the Martian summer and winter solstice. Solar radiation intensity is close to minimum at the summer solstice and close to maximum at the winter solstice. Total surface exposure time is longer near the north pole and around the anti- Mars point. Total maximum solar energy is larger around the anti-Mars point. Total surface solar energy is higher around the anti-Mars point near the equator. The

  14. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    PubMed

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3.

  15. Scanning electron microscope analysis of gunshot defects to bone: an underutilized source of information on ballistic trauma.

    PubMed

    Rickman, John M; Smith, Martin J

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen increasing involvement by forensic anthropologists in the interpretation of skeletal trauma. With regard to ballistic injuries, there is now a large literature detailing gross features of such trauma; however, less attention has been given to microscopic characteristics. This article presents analysis of experimentally induced gunshot trauma in animal bone (Bos taurus scapulae) using full metal jacket (FMJ), soft point (SP), and captive bolt projectiles. The results were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional analysis was conducted on a purported parietal gunshot lesion in a human cranial specimen. A range of features was observed in these samples suggesting that fibrolamellar bone response to projectile impact is analogous to that observed in synthetic composite laminates. The results indicate that direction of bullet travel can be discerned microscopically even when it is ambiguous on gross examination. It was also possible to distinguish SP from FMJ lesions. SEM analysis is therefore recommended as a previously underexploited tool in the analysis of ballistic trauma.

  16. Quantitative analysis for a color-change of humidity indicator by microscopic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Mitsumura, Yoko; Miyamoto, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Jin; Shiragami, Tsutomu; Fueda, Yoshiyuki; Nobuhara, Kazunori; Yasuda, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and easily distinguishable cobalt-free humidity indicator of porphyrin-silica gel-MgCl(2) composite was prepared from pH-induced spectra changeable tetraarylporphyrin, silica gel (SiO(2)), and MgCl(2). The pH change arose from proton release under dry conditions, and proton capture under humid conditions by a reversible reaction between MgCl(2) and a silanol group of SiO(2). A pink-orange porphyrin-Si(OH)(2)-MgCl(2) composite was dried to give a green protonated porphyrin-SiO(2)Mg composite. The optimized concentrations of MgCl(2) to make the concentrations of protonated porphyrin maximum under dry conditions were determined by absorption spectrometry of the green composite using a confocal laser scanning microscope as a microscopic spectrometer. Moreover, the green composite was prepared by heating dichloro(tetraarylporphyrinato)phosphorus chloride with MgCl(2) and SiO(2). The humidity-sensitivity of the green composite was evaluated by the absorption spectra under controlled humidity. A distinguishable color change of the green composite took place below 30% of relative humidity.

  17. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  18. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  19. The effects of an electromagnetic field on the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules of the rat: A light and transmission electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Khaki, A A; Tubbs, R S; Shoja, M M; Rad, J S; Khaki, A; Farahani, R M; Zarrintan, S; Nag, T C

    2006-08-01

    Human beings are unavoidably exposed to ambient electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated from various electrical devices and from power transmission lines. Controversy exists about the effects of EMF on various organs. One of the critical issues is that EMF may adversely affect the reproductive system. In order to examine this 30 rat pups were exposed to 50 Hz EMF (non-ionising radiation) during in utero development (approximately 3 weeks) and postnatal life (5 weeks). Groups of exposed rats were subsequently left in an environment free of EMF in order to observe recovery, if any, from the changes induced by EMF on the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules. The materials were processed and observed under a light and a transmission electron microscope. In the experimental rats boundary tissue was found disrupted at various layers. This tissue showed infoldings, which were perhaps due to the loss of collagen and reticular fibrils from the inner and outer non-cellular layers. The outer non-cellular layer, which was thinner than that of the control, was stripped away from the myoid cell layer in multiple regions, giving a "blister-like" appearance. The myoid cells showed fewer polyribosomes, pinocytotic vesicles and glycogen granules. Most mitochondria were found to lack cristae. The connections between individual myoid cells were apparently lost. There were signs of recovery in the boundary tissue following withdrawal from EMF exposure. These results suggest that EMF exposure may cause profound changes in the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules. Therefore exposure to EMF may result in pathological changes that lead to subfertility and infertility.

  20. Multispectral Video-Microscope Modified for Skin Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubins, U.; Zaharans, J.; Ļihačova, I.; Spigulis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Commercial DinoLite AD413 digital microscope was modified for skin diagnostics purposes. The original LED ring (4 white and 4 ultraviolet light emitters) of microscope was replaced by a custom-designed 16-LED ring module consisting of four LED groups (450, 545, 660 and 940 nm), and an onboard LED controller with USB hub was added. The video acquisition and LED switching are performed using custom-designed Matlab software which provides real-time spectral analysis of multi-spectral images and calculation of skin chromophore optical density. The developed multispectral video-microscope is mainly meant for diagnostics of skin malformations, e.g. skin cancerous lesions.

  1. Innovative parameters obtained for digital analysis of microscopic images to evaluate in vitro hemorheological action of anesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alet, Analía. I.; Basso, Sabrina; Delannoy, Marcela; Alet, Nicolás. A.; D'Arrigo, Mabel; Castellini, Horacio V.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Drugs used during anesthesia could enhance microvascular flow disturbance, not only for their systemic cardiovascular actions but also by a direct effect on the microcirculation and in particular on hemorheology. This is particularly important in high-risk surgical patients such as those with vascular disease (diabetes, hypertension, etc.). Therefore, in this work we propose a set of innovative parameters obtained by digital analysis of microscopic images to study the in vitro hemorheological effect of propofol and vecuronium on red blood cell from type 2 diabetic patients compared to healthy donors. Obtained innovative parameters allow quantifying alterations in erythrocyte aggregation, which can increase the in vivo risk of microcapillary obstruction.

  2. [Electron microscope analysis of cardiomyocytes in the rat left ventricle under simulation of weightlessness effects and artificial gravitation].

    PubMed

    Varenik, E N; Lipina, T V; Shornikova, M V; Krasnov, I B; Chentsov, Iu S

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopic study of left ventricle cardiomyocytes and quantitative analysis of their mitochondriom was performed in rats exposed to tail-suspension, as a model of weightlessness effects, to artificial gravity produced by intermittent 2G centrifugation and a combination of these effects. It was found that the cardiomyocytes ultrastructure changed slightly after tail-suspension and after intermittent 2G influence, as well as under a combination of these effects. However, the number of intermitochondrial junctions increased significantly in the interfibrillar zone of cardiomyocytes under a combination of tail-suspension and intermittent 2G influence, which agrees with the cell hypertrophy described earlier.

  3. Study of erythrocyte membrane fluctuation using light scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Lee, Sangyun; Park, YongKeun; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-03-01

    It is commonly known that alteration of erythrocyte deformability lead to serious microcirculatory diseases such as retinopathy, nephropathy, etc. Various methods and technologies have been developed to diagnose such membrane properties of erythrocytes. In this study, we developed an innovative method to measure hemorheological characteristics of the erythrocyte membrane using a light scattering analysis with simplified optic setting and multi-cell analysis as well. Light scattering intensity through multiple erythrocytes and its power density spectrum were obtained. The results of light scattering analyses were compared in healthy control and artificially hardened sample which was treated with glutaraldehyde. These results were further compared with conventional assays to measure deformable property in hemorheology. We found that light scattering information would reflect the disturbance of membrane fluctuation in artificially damaged erythrocytes. Therefore, measuring fluctuation of erythrocyte membrane using light scattering signal could facilitate simple and precise diagnose of pathological state on erythrocyte as well as related complications.

  4. Lighting Condition Analysis for Mars' Moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; de Carufel, Guy; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study used high fidelity computer simulation to investigate the lighting conditions, specifically the solar radiation flux over the surface, on Phobos. Ephemeris data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) DE405 model was used to model the state of the Sun, Earth, Moon, and Mars. An occultation model was developed to simulate Phobos' self-shadowing and its solar eclipses by Mars. The propagated Phobos state was compared with data from JPL's Horizon system to ensure the accuracy of the result. Results for Phobos lighting conditions over one Martian year are presented, which include the duration of solar eclipses, average solar radiation intensity, surface exposure time, and radiant exposure for both sun tracking and fixed solar arrays. The results show that: Phobos' solar eclipse time varies throughout the Martian year, with longer eclipse durations during the Martian northern spring and fall seasons and no eclipses during the Martian northern summer and winter seasons; solar radiation intensity is close to minimum in late spring and close to maximum in late fall; exposure time per orbit is relatively constant over the surface during the spring and fall but varies with latitude during the summer and winter; and Sun tracking solar arrays generate more energy than a fixed solar array. A usage example of the result is also present in this paper to demonstrate the utility.

  5. Lighting Condition Analysis for Mars' Moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; de Carufel, Guy; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study used high fidelity computer simulation to investigate the lighting conditions, specifically the solar radiation flux over the surface, on Phobos. Ephemeris data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) DE405 model was used to model the state of the Sun, Earth, Moon, and Mars. An occultation model was developed to simulate Phobos' self-shadowing and its solar eclipses by Mars. The propagated Phobos state was compared with data from JPL's Horizon system to ensure the accuracy of the result. Results for Phobos lighting conditions over one Martian year are presented, which include the duration of solar eclipses, average solar radiation intensity, surface exposure time, available energy per unit area for sun tracking arrays, and available energy per unit area for fixed arrays (constrained by incident angle). The results show that: Phobos' solar eclipse time varies throughout the Martian year, with longer eclipse durations during the Martian spring and fall seasons and no eclipses during the Martian summer and winter seasons; solar radiation intensity is close to minimum at the summer solstice and close to maximum at the winter solstice; exposure time per orbit is relatively constant over the surface during the spring and fall but varies with latitude during the summer and winter; and Sun tracking solar arrays generate more energy than a fixed solar array. A usage example of the result is also present in this paper to demonstrate the utility.

  6. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Halkai, Rahul S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Halkai, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. Methodology: One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Results: Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Conclusion: Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration. PMID:27994316

  7. Comparative microscopic analysis of nail clippings from patients with cutaneous psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Gabriela Poglia; Werner, Betina; Seidel, Gabriela; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nail involvement in psoriasis is related to psoriatic arthritis and may represent a predictor of the disease. OBJECTIVES To analyze, through nail clipping, clinically normal and dystrophic nails of patients with cutaneous psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS This is a cross-sectional multicenter study, conducted between August 2011 and March 2012. Patients were divided into four groups: patients with cutaneous psoriasis and onychodystrophy, patients with cutaneous psoriasis and clinically normal nails, patients with psoriatic arthritis and onychodystrophy and patients with psoriatic arthritis and clinically normal nails. We calculated NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index) of the nail with more clinically noticeable change. After collection and preparation of the nail clipping, the following microscopic parameters were evaluated: thickness of the nail plate and subungual region, presence or absence of parakeratosis, serous lakes, blood, and fungi. RESULTS There were more layers of parakeratosis (p=0.001) and a greater thickness of the subungual region in patients with cutaneous psoriasis and onychodystrophy (p=0.002). Serous lakes were also more present in the same group (p=0.008) and in patients with psoriatic arthritis and normal nails (p=0.047). The other microscopic parameters showed no significant difference between normal and dystrophic nails or between patients with psoriatic arthritis or cutaneous psoriasis. STUDY LIMITATIONS Small sample size and use of medications. CONCLUSIONS Nail clipping is a simple and quick method to assess the nails of patients with nail psoriasis although does not demonstrate difference between those with joint changes or exclusively cutaneous psoriasis. PMID:28225951

  8. Atmospheric particulate analysis using angular light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Using the light scattering matrix elements measured by a polar nephelometer, a procedure for estimating the characteristics of atmospheric particulates was developed. A theoretical library data set of scattering matrices derived from Mie theory was tabulated for a range of values of the size parameter and refractive index typical of atmospheric particles. Integration over the size parameter yielded the scattering matrix elements for a variety of hypothesized particulate size distributions. A least squares curve fitting technique was used to find a best fit from the library data for the experimental measurements. This was used as a first guess for a nonlinear iterative inversion of the size distributions. A real index of 1.50 and an imaginary index of -0.005 are representative of the smoothed inversion results for the near ground level atmospheric aerosol in Tucson.

  9. PAPR analysis for OFDM visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaheng; Xu, Yang; Ling, Xintong; Zhang, Rong; Ding, Zhi; Zhao, Chunming

    2016-11-28

    Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a practical technology in visible light communication (VLC) for high-speed transmissions. However, one of its operational limitations is the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmitted signal. In this paper, we analyze the PAPR distributions of four VLC OFDM schemes, namely DC-biased optical OFDM (DCO-OFDM), asymmetrically clipped optical OFDM (ACO-OFDM), pulse amplitude modulated discrete multitone (PAM-DMT), and Flip-OFDM. Both lower and upper clippings are considered. We analytically derive the complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) of the PAPRs of the clipped VLC OFDM signals, and investigate the impact of lower and upper clippings on PAPR distributions. Our analytical results, as verified by numerical simulations, provide useful insights and guidelines for VLC OFDM system designs.

  10. Voxel-based approach to generate entire human metacarpal bone with microscopic architecture for finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, C Y; Tsui, C P; Tang, Y M; Wei, L; Wong, C T; Lam, K W; Ip, W Y; Lu, W W J; Pang, M Y C

    2014-01-01

    With the development of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology, it is possible to construct three-dimensional (3D) models of human bone without destruction of samples and predict mechanical behavior of bone using finite element analysis (FEA). However, due to large number of elements required for constructing the FE models of entire bone, this demands a substantial computational effort and the analysis usually needs a high level of computer. In this article, a voxel-based approach for generation of FE models of entire bone with microscopic architecture from micro-CT image data is proposed. To enable the FE analyses of entire bone to be run even on a general personal computer, grayscale intensity thresholds were adopted to reduce the amount of elements. Human metacarpal bone (MCP) bone was used as an example for demonstrating the applicability of the proposed method. The micro-CT images of the MCP bone were combined and converted into 3D array of pixels. Dual grayscale intensity threshold parameters were used to distinguish the pixels of bone tissues from those of surrounding soft tissues and improve predictive accuracy for the FE analyses with different sizes of elements. The method of selecting an appropriate value of the second grayscale intensity threshold was also suggested to minimize the area error for the reconstructed cross-sections of a FE structure. Experimental results showed that the entire FE MCP bone with microscopic architecture could be modeled and analyzed on a personal computer with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Combined molecular ecological and confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of peat bog methanogen populations.

    PubMed

    Upton, M; Hill, B; Edwards, C; Saunders, J R; Ritchie, D A; Lloyd, D

    2000-12-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy, using fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of different physiological groups of methanogens, was used to identify which methanogenic genera were present and to describe their in situ spatial locations in samples taken at different depths from blanket peat bog cores. Total bacterial DNA was also extracted and purified from the samples and used as template for amplification of 16S rRNA and regions of methyl CoM reductase-encoding genes using the polymerase chain reaction, as well as for oligonucleotide hybridisation experiments. These techniques, used in concert, demonstrated that methanogens of several physiological groups were present in highest numbers in the mid regions of 25 cm deep peat cores. Some discrepancies were apparent in the findings of the microscopic and molecular methods, though these may be partially accounted for by the different sensitivities of the techniques employed. The combined approaches used in this study gave an insight into the diversity and distribution of methanogens in peat environments not possible using molecular ecological methods alone.

  12. Real-Time Analysis of Magnetic Hyperthermia Experiments on Living Cells under a Confocal Microscope.

    PubMed

    Connord, Vincent; Clerc, Pascal; Hallali, Nicolas; El Hajj Diab, Darine; Fourmy, Daniel; Gigoux, Véronique; Carrey, Julian

    2015-05-01

    Combining high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is an efficient way to induce biological responses through several approaches: magnetic hyperthermia, drug release, controls of gene expression and neurons, or activation of chemical reactions. So far, these experiments cannot be analyzed in real-time during the AMF application. A miniaturized electromagnet fitting under a confocal microscope is built, which produces an AMF of frequency and amplitude similar to the ones used in magnetic hyperthermia. AMF application induces massive damages to tumoral cells having incorporated nanoparticles into their lysosomes without affecting the others. Using this setup, real-time analyses of molecular events occurring during AMF application are performed. Lysosome membrane permeabilization and reactive oxygen species production are detected after only 30 min of AMF application, demonstrating they occur at an early stage in the cascade of events leading eventually to cell death. Additionally, lysosomes self-assembling into needle-shaped organization under the influence of AMF is observed in real-time. This experimental approach will permit to get a deeper insight into the physical, molecular, and biological process occurring in several innovative techniques used in nanomedecine based on the combined use of MNPs and high-frequency magnetic fields.

  13. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M.; Koch, S. W.

    2016-02-07

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  14. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  15. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of arterial line filters used in cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kim, W G; Kim, K B; Yoon, C J

    2000-11-01

    The clinical value of arterial line filters is still a controversial issue. Proponents of arterial line filtration argue that filters remove particulate matter and undissolved gas from circulation while opponents argue the absence of conclusive clinical data. We conducted scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of arterial line filters used clinically in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuits during adult cardiac surgery and analyzed the types and characteristics of materials entrapped in the arterial line filters. Twelve arterial line filters were obtained during routine hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in 12 adult cardiac patients. The arterial line filter was a screen type with a pore size of 40 microm (Baxter Health Care Corporation, Bentley Division, Irvine, CA, U.S.A. ). After opening the housing, the woven polyester strands were examined with SEM. All segments examined (120 segments, each 2.5 x 2. 5 cm) contained no embolic particles larger in their cross-sectional area than the pore size of the filter (40 microm). The origins of embolic particulates were mostly from environmental foreign bodies. This may suggest a possible need for more aggressive filtration of smaller particulates than is generally carried out at the present time.

  16. Spontaneous oscillation of tension and sarcomere length in skeletal myofibrils. Microscopic measurement and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Anazawa, T; Yasuda, K; Ishiwata, S

    1992-01-01

    We have devised a simple method for measuring tension development of single myofibrils by micromanipulation with a pair of glass micro-needles. The tension was estimated from the deflection of a flexible needle under an inverted phase-contrast microscope equipped with an image processor, so that the tension development is always accompanied by the shortening of the myofibril (auxotonic condition) in the present setup. The advantage of this method is that the measurement of tension (1/30 s for time resolution and about 0.05 micrograms for accuracy of tension measurement; 0.05 microns as a spatial resolution for displacement of the micro-needle) and the observation of sarcomere structure are possible at the same time, and the technique to hold myofibrils, even single myofibrils, is very simple. This method has been applied to study the tension development of glycerinated skeletal myofibrils under the condition where spontaneous oscillation of sarcomeres is induced, i.e., the coexistence of MgATP, MgADP and inorganic phosphate without free Ca2+. Under this condition, we found that the tension of myofibrils spontaneously oscillates accompanied by the oscillation of sarcomere length with a main period of a few seconds; the period was lengthened and shortened with stretch and release of myofibrils. A possible mechanism of the oscillation is discussed. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:1600075

  17. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  18. Microscopic analysis of 11 Li elastic scattering on protons and breakup processes within 9Li+2n cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analysis of the elastic scattering and breakup in interactions of the 11Li nucleus with protons are presented. The hybrid model of the microscopic optical potential (OP) is applied. The OP includes the single-folding real part, while its imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation (HEA) theory. The spin-orbit contribution to the OP is also included. The differential cross sections of 11Li+p elastic scattering and the total reaction cross sections are calculated at energies of 62, 68.4, and 75 MeV/nucleon and are compared with the available experimental data. The breakup cross sections at 62 MeV/nucleon and the momentum distributions of the fragments using a two cluster model of the 11 Li nucleus are obtained. An analysis of the single-particle density of 11Li is performed.

  19. Iron, copper, zinc and bromine mapping in cirrhotic liver slices from patients with hemochromatosis studied by microscopic synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in continuous scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterode, W.; Falkenberg, G.; Höftberger, R.; Wrba, F.

    2007-07-01

    Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are essential metals in physiological cell metabolism. While Fe is easy to determine biochemically in histological slices, Cu and zinc (Zn) distribution is frequently critical in confirming the presence of an overload in disturbed Fe/Cu metabolism. To analyze Fe, Cu and Zn in a near histological resolution, energy dispersive microscopic synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence was applied. In normal liver tissue, after fixation and imbedding in paraffin, mean Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were 152 ± 54, 20.1 ± 4.3 and 88.919.5 μg/g sample weight, respectively. No substantial, characteristic differences in their distribution were found in the two-dimensional scans. In slices from patients with hemochromatosis mean Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were 1102 ± 539, 35.9 ± 14.6 and 27.2 ± 6.7 μg/g sample weight, respectively. Additionally, a significant decrease in phosphorus and sulphur concentrations existed. An increased Cu around cirrhotic regenerations nodules is mostly associated with a lymphocytic infiltration in this region. Analyzing concentrations of Fe in different regions of the samples show a clear negative dependency between Fe and Cu, Cu and Zn, but a positive one between Fe and Zn. Conclusion: With a focal beam size of 15 μm in diameter a resolution of the elemental distribution was achieved which is widely comparable with stained histological slices (20× light microscope). The analysis of simultaneous determined elements reveals metabolic differences between Fe, Cu and Zn in liver tissue from patients with hemochromatosis.

  20. White light phase shifting interferometry and color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-03-01

    We report white light phase shifting interferometry in conjunction with color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water such as Escherichia coli (E.coli), Campylobacter coli and Bacillus cereus. The experimental setup is based on a common path interferometer using Mirau interferometric objective lens. White light interferograms are recorded using a 3-chip color CCD camera based on prism technology. The 3-chip color camera have lesser color cross talk and better spatial resolution in comparison to single chip CCD camera. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) phase shifter is fixed with the Mirau objective and they are attached with a conventional microscope. Five phase shifted white light interferograms are recorded by the 3-chip color CCD camera and each phase shifted interferogram is decomposed into the red, green and blue constituent colors, thus making three sets of five phase shifted intererograms for three different colors from a single set of white light interferogram. This makes the system less time consuming and have lesser effect due to surrounding environment. Initially 3D phase maps of the bacteria are reconstructed for red, green and blue wavelengths from these interferograms using MATLAB, from these phase maps we determines the refractive index (RI) of the bacteria. Experimental results of 3D shape measurement and RI at multiple wavelengths will be presented. These results might find applications for detection of contaminants in water without using any chemical processing and fluorescent dyes.

  1. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  2. Ultrastructural Analysis of Incinerated Teeth by Scanning Electron Microscope – A Short Study

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Sugunakar Raju Godishala; Muddana, Keerthi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In forensic context precise knowledge on physical and histological changes of teeth subjected to high temperatures is of great importance. Preserving fragile incinerated teeth for physical, histological and ultra structural examinations is essential in fire investigations involving the origin of fire, its cause as well as the identification of victims which relies on a thorough understanding of the structural changes in dental tissues subjected to heat. Aim The study was conducted to evaluate the physical and ultrastructural changes seen in freshly extracted teeth when subjected to gradual heating at different temperatures using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Settings and Design Freshly extracted teeth collected from subjects of different age groups were subjected to different temperatures using laboratory furnace and findings were correlated to the temperature. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 60 healthy freshly extracted teeth belonging to age group between 20-30 years. Group A comprised of control group which included teeth that were not subjected to heat whereas Group B, C and D comprised of teeth that were subjected to different temperatures i.e., 100oC, 300oC and 600oC respectively for a time of fifteen minutes in laboratory furnace, after which they were processed for SEM examination. Each group included 15 teeth; 5 anteriors, 5 premolars and 5 molars. Results Examination under SEM revealed definite ultra structural changes which were explicitly seen at particular temperatures (100oC, 300oC and 600oC). The samples showed cracks and charring of the tooth structure with ultra structural findings such as pebbles, granules, dots on enamel surface; and soap bubble pattern, honey comb pattern and snail track pattern on cementum surface. Conclusion Because of the consistency of morphological changes and the ultra structural patterns at various temperatures, evaluation of incinerated dental remains using SEM can provide additional

  3. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  4. Automatic vision system for analysis of microscopic behavior of flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Mehdi; Dehmeshki, Jamshid; Dickenson, Eric; Daemi, M. Farhang

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel automated and efficient vision system to obtain velocity and concentration measurement within a porous medium. An aqueous fluid lace with a fluorescent dye to microspheres flows through a transparent, refractive-index-matched column packed with transparent crystals. For illumination purposes, a planar sheet of laser passes through the column as a CCD camera records all the laser illuminated planes. Detailed microscopic velocity and concentration fields have been computed within a 3D volume of the column. For measuring velocities, while the aqueous fluid, laced with fluorescent microspheres, flows through the transparent medium, a CCD camera records the motions of the fluorescing particles by a video cassette recorder. The recorded images are acquired automatically frame by frame and transferred to the computer for processing, by using a frame grabber an written relevant algorithms through an RS-232 interface. Since the grabbed image is poor in this stage, some preprocessings are used to enhance particles within images. Finally, these enhanced particles are monitored to calculate velocity vectors in the plane of the beam. For concentration measurements, while the aqueous fluid, laced with a fluorescent organic dye, flows through the transparent medium, a CCD camera sweeps back and forth across the column and records concentration slices on the planes illuminated by the laser beam traveling simultaneously with the camera. Subsequently, these recorded images are transferred to the computer for processing in similar fashion to the velocity measurement. In order to have a fully automatic vision system, several detailed image processing techniques are developed to match exact images that have different intensities values but the same topological characteristics. This results in normalized interstitial chemical concentrations as a function of time within the porous column.

  5. Experimental Study of Membrane Fouling during Crossflow Microfiltration of Yeast and Bacteria Suspensions: Towards an Analysis at the Microscopic Level.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ines Ben; Ennouri, Monia; Lafforgue, Christine; Schmitz, Philippe; Ayadi, Abdelmoneim

    2013-05-10

    Microfiltration of model cell suspensions combining macroscopic and microscopic approaches was studied in order to better understand microbial membrane fouling mechanisms. The respective impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Escherichia coli bacteria on crossflow microfiltration performances was investigated using a multichannel ceramic 0.2 µm membrane. Pure yeast suspensions (5 µm ovoid cells) and mixtures of yeast and bacteria (1 to 2.5 µm rod shape cells) were considered in order to analyse the effect of interaction between these two microorganisms on fouling reversibility. The resistances varied significantly with the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms. Membrane fouling with pure yeast suspension was mainly reversible. For yeast and bacteria mixed suspensions (6 g L-1 yeast concentration) the increase in bacteria from 0.15 to 0.30 g L-1 increased the percentage of normalized reversible resistance. At 10 g L-1 yeast concentration, the addition of bacteria tends to increase the percentage of normalized irreversible resistance. For the objective of performing local analysis of fouling, an original filtration chamber allowing direct in situ observation of the cake by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was designed, developed and validated. This device will be used in future studies to characterize cake structure at the microscopic scale.

  6. Image Analysis Program for Measuring Particles with the Zeiss CSM 950 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    7 𔄁 . ,: 1& *U _’ ś TECHNICAL REPORT AD NATICK/TR-90/014 (V) N* IMAGE ANALYSIS PROGRAM FOR MEASURING PARTICLES < WITH THE ZEISS CSM 950 SCANNING... image analysis program for measuring particles using the Zeiss CSM 950/Kontron system is as follows: A>CSM calls the image analysis program. Press D to...27 vili LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1. Image Analysis Program for Measuring 29 Spherical Particles 14 2. Printout of Statistical Data Frcm Table 1 16 3

  7. Corneal endothelial cell analysis using two non-contact specular microscopes in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leon, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    To compare specular microscopy values obtained using the Perseus (CSO, Italy) and the Nidek CEM-530 (NIDEK Co., Ltd. Japan) specular microscopes. This prospective study used specular microscopy to examine sixty eyes from thirty healthy subjects (29.83 ± 9.41 years; range 18-79 years). This was done with both the Nidek CEM-530 and the Perseus on three occasions and results were evaluated by one independent observer. Measurement differences between instruments and agreement between devices were determined. The endothelial cell sample was larger with the Perseus than with the CEM-530 (235.92 ± 38.26 vs. 184.38 ± 43.88, respectively) with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Mean endothelial cell density (ECD) with the Perseus and CEM-530 was 2692.75 ± 306.66 and 2556.47 ± 257.38 cells/mm(2) (P = 0.001), respectively; mean coefficient of variation (CV) was 33.43 ± 4.29 and 28.70 ± 3.82 (P = 0.001), respectively, and hexagonality 56.66 ± 6.19 % and 68.50 ± 3.64 (P = 0.001), respectively. The mean of the differences (Perseus minus CEM-530) for ECD was 136.27 ± 106.16 cells/mm(2) (95 % CI 108.85-163.70 cells/mm(2)); 4.73 ± 2.70 % (95 % CI 4.03-5.41) in CV; and -11.83 ± 5.05 for percentage of hexagonal cells. Both instruments showed significant differences in the measurement of all cell forms, predominantly higher values were found with the Perseus vs the CEM-530, except 4-sided cells. Endothelial cell density, coefficient of variation, and percentage of hexagonal cells between the Perseus and CEM-530 differ statistically. This shows that these instruments should not be used interchangeably.

  8. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software - Light

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.

    2004-06-14

    GADRAS is used to analyze gamma-ray spectra, which may be augmented by neutron count rate information. The fundamental capabilities of GADRAS are imparted by physics-based detector response functions for a variety of gamma ray and neufron detectors. The software has provisions for characterizing detector response parameters so that specta can be computed accurately over the range 30keV key to II MeV. Associated neutron detector count rates can also be computed for characterized detectors. GADRAS incorporates a variety of analysis algorithms that utilize the computed spectra. The full version of GADRAS incorporates support for computation of radiation leakages from complex source models, but this capability is not supported by GADRAS-LT. GADRAS has been and will continue to be disseminated free of charge to government agencies and National Laboratories as OUO software. GADRAS-LT is a limited software version that was prepared for exclusive use of our Technology Transfer parnter Thermo Electron (TE). TE will use the software to characterize and test radiation detectors that are fabricated under the terms of our partnership. The development of these sensors has been defined as a National Security priority by our sponsor, NNSA/NA-20, by DHS/S&T, and by SNL president Paul Robinson. Although GADRAS-LT is OUO, features that are not essential to the detector development have been removed. TE will not be licensed to commercialize GADRAS-LT or to distribute it to third parties.

  9. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  10. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1995-07-04

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC. The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 18 figs.

  11. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  12. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  13. Molecular Structural Analysis of Spider's Capture Thread and Viscid Droplets Studied by Microscopic FT-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Hironobu; Katayama, Norihisa; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The molecular structural analysis of capture thread, including its viscid droplets of oriental golden orb-web spider Nephila clavata, has been performed by microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy. The obtained spectra of capture threads with and without viscid droplets indicate that the features in the region of 1400 - 1000 cm(-1) will be useful as marker bands for the degree of the dissolving of viscid droplet; further, the bands at 1395 and 1335 cm(-1) are attributable to the components of anchoring granules located at the inner side of viscid droplets. By recrystallization and its infrared measurements, the main chemical component of viscid droplets is assignable to glycosylated proline. It has also been demonstrated that the components of the anchoring granule of a viscid droplet are decomposed by UV irradiation, and that the molecular conformation of silk fiber protein of a capture thread is denatured at over 60°C, whereas the viscid droplets on a capture thread retain their structure.

  14. Identification of mongoose (genus: Herpestes) species from hair through band pattern studies using discriminate functional analysis (DFA) and microscopic examination.

    PubMed

    Sahajpal, Vivek; Goyal, S P; Raza, R; Jayapal, R

    2009-09-01

    India is home to seven species of mongoose (Herpestes sp). Mongooses are being poached primarily for their hair, which is used in the production of painting and shaving brushes. Prior to September 2002, mongooses were listed under Schedule-IV of the Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972 (India). Indiscriminate poaching of the mongoose created an immediate threat to their survival and hence mongooses have now been placed under Schedule-II of the Wildlife (Protection) Act-1972 (India). In order to convict a person under this legislation, species identification of case related samples is necessary. Four species of mongoose i.e. H. edwardsii, H. smithii, H. palustris and H. urva were characterised by performing discriminate functional analysis (DFA) on measurements of their dorsal guard hair banding pattern and by microscopic hair characteristics (Cuticular, medullar and cross section). It was possible to distinguish between the four species studied, based on both these methods.

  15. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckowiak, Anna; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Skibiński, PrzemysŁaw; GaweŁ, WiesŁaw; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  16. Morphology and chemical composition analysis of inorganic nanosheets by the field-emission scanning electron microscope system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghui; Ono, Yuki; Homma, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Izumi; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Nakayama, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanosheets can be used as building blocks to fabricate versatile nanostructured materials. In this paper, morphology of the Cs(4)W(11)O(36) and Nb(3)O(8) and TaO(3) sheets with different layers are analyzed by different field-emission scanning electron microscopes (FE-SEMs). Chemical composition of the single-layered Cs(4)W(11)O(36) with thickness of about 2 nm, and multilayered Nb(3)O(8) nanosheets with thickness of less than 14 nm are analyzed by both the Si(Li) solid-state detector and transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter, successfully. The effects of energy resolution, accelerating voltage and substrate on the quantitative analysis are discussed briefly.

  17. Diagnostics of hemangioma by the methods of correlation and fractal analysis of laser microscopic images of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Bodnar, B. M.; Vatamanesku, L. I.

    2011-09-01

    For the first time the complex correlation and fractal analysis was used for the investigation of microscopic images of both tissue images and hemangioma liquids. It was proposed a physical model of description of phase distributions formation of coherent radiation, which was transformed by optical anisotropic biological structures. The phase maps of laser radiation in the boundary diffraction zone were used as the main information parameter. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts in the points of laser images of histological sections of hemangioma, hemangioma blood smears and blood plasma with vascular system pathologies. The diagnostic criteria of hemangioma nascency are determined.

  18. Diagnostics of hemangioma by the methods of correlation and fractal analysis of laser microscopic images of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Bodnar, B. M.; Vatamanesku, L. I.

    2012-01-01

    For the first time the complex correlation and fractal analysis was used for the investigation of microscopic images of both tissue images and hemangioma liquids. It was proposed a physical model of description of phase distributions formation of coherent radiation, which was transformed by optical anisotropic biological structures. The phase maps of laser radiation in the boundary diffraction zone were used as the main information parameter. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts in the points of laser images of histological sections of hemangioma, hemangioma blood smears and blood plasma with vascular system pathologies. The diagnostic criteria of hemangioma nascency are determined.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids.

  20. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three of PEARL program during the period of October 2002 to April 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The products tested are 20 models of screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) of various types and various wattages made or marketed by 12 different manufacturers, and ten models of residential lighting fixtures from eight different manufacturers.

  1. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  2. A collaborative biomedical image mining framework: application on the image analysis of microscopic kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Goudas, T; Doukas, C; Chatziioannou, A; Maglogiannis, I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of biomedical image data is a complex procedure involving several processing phases, like data acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and classification. The proper combination and parameterization of the utilized methods are heavily relying on the given image data set and experiment type. They may thus necessitate advanced image processing and classification knowledge and skills from the side of the biomedical expert. In this work, an application, exploiting web services and applying ontological modeling, is presented, to enable the intelligent creation of image mining workflows. The described tool can be directly integrated to the RapidMiner, Taverna or similar workflow management platforms. A case study dealing with the creation of a sample workflow for the analysis of kidney biopsy microscopy images is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the proposed framework.

  3. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  4. Labor Economists Get Their Microscope: Big Data and Labor Market Analysis.

    PubMed

    Horton, John J; Tambe, Prasanna

    2015-09-01

    This article describes how the fine-grained data being collected by Internet labor market intermediaries, such as employment websites, online labor markets, and knowledge discussion boards, are providing new research opportunities and directions for the empirical analysis of labor market activity. After discussing these data sources, we examine some of the research opportunities they have created, highlight some examples of existing work that already use these new data sources, and enumerate the challenges associated with the use of these corporate data sources.

  5. Automated detection and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization spots depicted in digital microscopic images of Pap-smear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has been widely recognized as a promising molecular and biomedical optical imaging tool to screen and diagnose cervical cancer. However, manual FISH analysis is time-consuming and may introduce large inter-reader variability. In this study, a computerized scheme is developed and tested. It automatically detects and analyzes FISH spots depicted on microscopic fluorescence images. The scheme includes two stages: (1) a feature-based classification rule to detect useful interphase cells, and (2) a knowledge-based expert classifier to identify splitting FISH spots and improve the accuracy of counting independent FISH spots. The scheme then classifies detected analyzable cells as normal or abnormal. In this study, 150 FISH images were acquired from Pap-smear specimens and examined by both an experienced cytogeneticist and the scheme. The results showed that (1) the agreement between the cytogeneticist and the scheme was 96.9% in classifying between analyzable and unanalyzable cells (Kappa=0.917), and (2) agreements in detecting normal and abnormal cells based on FISH spots were 90.5% and 95.8% with Kappa=0.867. This study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH analysis, which may potentially improve detection efficiency and produce more accurate and consistent results than manual FISH analysis.

  6. Two-dimensional thermal analysis for freezing of plant and animal cells by high-speed microscopic IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Junko; Hashimoto, Toshimasa; Hayakawa, Eita; Uemura, Hideyuki

    2003-04-01

    Using a high speed IR camera for temperature sensor is a powerful new tool for thermal analysis in the cell scale biomaterials. In this study, we propose a new type of two-dimensional thermal analysis by means of a high speed IR camera with a microscopic lens, and applied it to the analysis of freezing of plant and animal cells. The latent heat on the freezing of super cooled onion epidermal cell was randomly observed by a unit cell size, one by one, under a cooling rate of 80degC/min with a spatial resolution of 7.5m. The freezing front of ice formation and the thermal diffusion behavior of generated latent heat were analyzed. As a result it was possible to determine simultaneously the intercellular/intracellular temperature distribution, the growing speed of freezing front in a single cell, and the thermal diffusion in the freezing process of living tissue. A new measuring system presented here will be significant in a transient process of biomaterials. A newly developed temperature wave methods for the measurement of in-plane thermal diffusivity was also applied to the cell systems.

  7. Evaluation of removal of model particulate and oily soils from poly(ethylene terephthalate) films by microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Keiko; Yu, Nagai; Tagawa, Yumiko

    2013-01-01

    The soil removal behavior from poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films was investigated using a microscopic image analysis system. Carbon black or stearic acid as a model soil was deposited onto a PET film. The PET film was cleaned in various aqueous and non-aqueous solutions by applying stirring or frequency-modulated ultrasound as a mechanical action of soil removal. The amounts of soil deposited on the PET film before and after cleaning were obtained via binary processing of microscopic images, from which the removal efficiency was calculated. Most of the carbon black was deposited on the PET film as submicron aggregates and ultrasound removed them efficiently in a short time, even for relatively smaller aggregates. The removal efficiencies with stirring were less than ca. 10% in all solutions, whereas the removal using ultrasound had high efficiencies that exceeded 80% in the surfactant-free systems. In the case of stearic acid, the removal efficiency with stirring was below 30% in the aqueous solutions, although stearic acid was removed completely in ethanol and n-decane. For ultrasonic cleaning, the removal efficiencies of stearic acid in aqueous solutions became 2-3 times as large as those with the stirring action. To improve soil release in aqueous solutions, the PET film was treated by the dry processing using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) equipment. The wettability and the surface free energy of the PET film were found to increase due to surface oxidation via the APPJ treatment, which resulted in enhanced removal of carbon black and stearic acid in any aqueous solutions.

  8. Characterizing primary refractory neuroblastoma: prediction of outcome by microscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Weiser, Daniel A.; Pawel, Bruce R.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2015-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that starts in very early forms of nerve cells found in an embryo or fetus. It is a highly lethal cancer of sympathetic nervous system that commonly affects children of age five or younger. It accounts for a disproportionate number of childhood cancer deaths and remains a difficult cancer to eradicate despite intensive treatment that includes chemotherapy, surgery, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and immunotherapy. A poorly characterized group of patients are the 15% with primary refractory neuroblastoma (PRN) which is uniformly lethal due to de novo chemotherapy resistance. The lack of response to therapy is currently assessed after multiple months of cytotoxic therapy, driving the critical need to develop pretreatment clinic-biological biomarkers that can guide precise and effective therapeutic strategies. Therefore, our guiding hypothesis is that PRN has distinct biological features present at diagnosis that can be identified for prediction modeling. During a visual analysis of PRN slides, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, we observed that patients who survived for less than three years contained large eosin-stained structures as compared to those who survived for greater than three years. So, our hypothesis is that the size of eosin stained structures can be used as a differentiating feature to characterize recurrence in neuroblastoma. To test this hypothesis, we developed an image analysis method that performs stain separation, followed by the detection of large structures stained with Eosin. On a set of 21 PRN slides, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, our image analysis method predicted the outcome with 85.7% accuracy.

  9. Scanning electron microscopical and cross-sectional analysis of extraterrestrial carbonaceous nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Baumgardner, Grant; Buseck, Peter R.

    2008-05-01

    Carbonaceous nanoglobules are ubiquitous in carbonaceous chondrite (CC) meteorites. The Tagish Lake (C2) meteorite is particularly intriguing in containing an abundance of nanoglobules, with a wider range of forms and sizes than encountered in other CC meteorites. Previous studies by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have provided a wealth of information on chemistry and structure. In this study low voltage scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the globule forms and external structures. The internal structure of the globules was investigated after sectioning by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The FIB-SEM analysis shows that the globules range from solid to hollow. Some hollow globules show a central open core, with adjoining smaller cores. The FIB with an SEM is a valuable tool for the analysis of extraterrestrial materials, even of sub-micron-sized "soft" carbonaceous particles. The rapid site-specific cross-sectioning capabilities of the FIB allow the preservation of the internal morphology of the nanoglobules, with minimal damage or alteration of the unsectioned areas.

  10. Analysis of a transmission mode scanning microwave microscope for subsurface imaging at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladipo, A. O.; Lucibello, A.; Kasper, M.; Lavdas, S.; Sardi, G. M.; Proietti, E.; Kienberger, F.; Marcelli, R.; Panoiu, N. C.

    2014-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the imaging characteristics of a scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) system operated in the transmission mode. In particular, we use rigorous three-dimensional finite-element simulations to investigate the effect of varying the permittivity and depth of sub-surface constituents of samples, on the scattering parameters of probes made of a metallic nano-tip attached to a cantilever. Our results prove that one can achieve enhanced imaging sensitivity in the transmission mode SMM (TM-SMM) configuration, from twofold to as much as 5× increase, as compared to that attainable in the widely used reflection mode SMM operation. In addition, we demonstrate that the phase of the S21-parameter is much more sensitive to changes of the system parameters as compared to its magnitude, the scattering parameters being affected the most by variations in the conductivity of the substrate. Our analysis is validated by a good qualitative agreement between our modeling results and experimental data. These results suggest that TM-SMM systems can be used as highly efficient imaging tools with new functionalities, findings which could have important implications to the development of improved experimental imaging techniques.

  11. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of ampullary segment of oviduct during estrous cycle in caprines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Singh, R; Bhardwaj, J K

    2015-01-01

    The ampullary segment of the mammalian oviduct provides suitable milieu for fertilization and development of zygote before implantation into uterus. It is, therefore, in the present study, the cyclic changes in the morphology of ampullary segment of goat oviduct were studied during follicular and luteal phases using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Topographical analysis revealed the presence of uniformly ciliated ampullary epithelia, concealing apical processes of non-ciliated cells along with bulbous secretory cells during follicular phase. The luteal phase was marked with decline in number of ciliated cells with increased occurrence of secretory cells. The ultrastructure analysis has demonstrated the presence of indented nuclear membrane, supranuclear cytoplasm, secretory granules, rough endoplasmic reticulum, large lipid droplets, apically located glycogen masses, oval shaped mitochondria in the secretory cells. The ciliated cells were characterized by the presence of elongated nuclei, abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum, oval or spherical shaped mitochondria with crecentric cristae during follicular phase. However, in the luteal phase, secretory cells were possessing highly indented nucleus with diffused electron dense chromatin, hyaline nucleosol, increased number of lipid droplets. The ciliated cells had numerous fibrous granules and basal bodies. The parallel use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques has enabled us to examine the cyclic and hormone dependent changes occurring in the topography and fine structure of epithelium of ampullary segment and its cells during different reproductive phases that will be great help in understanding major bottle neck that limits success rate in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer technology.

  12. Intercellular fluorescence background on microscope slides: some problems and solutions for automatic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Jim; Sudar, Damir; Peters, Don; Pinkel, Daniel

    1994-05-01

    Although high contrast between signal and the dark background is often claimed as a major advantage of fluorescence staining in cytology and cytogenetics, in practice this is not always the case and in some circumstances the inter-cellular or, in the case of metaphase preparations, the inter-chromosome background can be both brightly fluorescent and vary substantially across the slide or even across a single metaphase. Bright background results in low image contrast, making automatic detection of metaphase cells more difficult. The background correction strategy employed in automatic search must both cope with variable background and be computationally efficient. The method employed in a fluorescence metaphase finder is presented, and the compromises involved are discussed. A different set of problems arise when the analysis is aimed at accurate quantification of the fluorescence signal. Some insight into the nature of the background in the case of comparative genomic hybridization is obtained by image analysis of data obtained from experiments using cell lines with known abnormal copy numbers of particular chromosome types.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic and X-ray micro analysis on tooth enamel exposed to alkaline agents.

    PubMed

    Taubee, Fabian; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    The background of this study comprises two clinical cases, where patients exposed to aerosols of an alkaline and surface active cleaning agent developed loss of enamel substance on their teeth, further resulting in loss of teeth and partially destroyed soft tissues. The alkaline cleaning agent consisted of potassium hydroxide and various surfactants. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible changes in morphology and composition in human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions, by means of X-ray micro analysis (XRMA), FTIR-spectroscopic analyses and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extracted premolars, exposed to potassium hydroxide solutions and alkaline cleaning solution,were analyzed by means of XRMA and SEM. Enamel powder, exposed to cleaning solution, was analyzed by means of FTIR. The SEM analysis revealed an increased porosity of the enamel surface and partially loss of enamel substance after exposure to alkaline solutions. The XRMA analyses revealed a decrease in carbon concentration while phosphorous and calcium showed no marked changes. The FTIR analyses showed no significant changes in peak heights or peak positions for phosphate, carbonate or hydroxide. It was concluded that human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions showed loss of organic substance, marked pores in enamel surface and loss of substance in the enamel surface.

  14. Analysis of video-based microscopic particle trajectories using Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Hess, Henry; Khargonekar, Pramod P; Tseng, Yiider

    2010-06-16

    The fidelity of the trajectories obtained from video-based particle tracking determines the success of a variety of biophysical techniques, including in situ single cell particle tracking and in vitro motility assays. However, the image acquisition process is complicated by system noise, which causes positioning error in the trajectories derived from image analysis. Here, we explore the possibility of reducing the positioning error by the application of a Kalman filter, a powerful algorithm to estimate the state of a linear dynamic system from noisy measurements. We show that the optimal Kalman filter parameters can be determined in an appropriate experimental setting, and that the Kalman filter can markedly reduce the positioning error while retaining the intrinsic fluctuations of the dynamic process. We believe the Kalman filter can potentially serve as a powerful tool to infer a trajectory of ultra-high fidelity from noisy images, revealing the details of dynamic cellular processes.

  15. Microscopic analysis of nuclear quantum phase transitions in the N{approx_equal}90 region

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-05-15

    The analysis of shape transitions in Nd isotopes, based on the framework of relativistic energy-density functionals and restricted to axially symmetric shapes in T. Niksic, D. Vretenar, G. A. Lalazissis, and P. Ring [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 092502 (2007)], is extended to the region Z=60,62,64 with N{approx_equal}90 and includes both {beta} and {gamma} deformations. Collective excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N=90 that can be approximately characterized by the X(5) analytic solution at the critical point of the first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  16. Callogenesis and cell suspension establishment of tropical highland blackberry (Rubus adenotrichos Schltdl.) and its microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Durán, Alexander; Alvarado-Ulloa, Carlos; Chacón-Cerdas, Randall; Alvarado-Marchena, Luis Fernando; Flores-Mora, Dora

    2016-01-01

    Blackberries are fruits produced worldwide, with 25 % of their production centered in Mexico, Central and South America. Tropical highland blackberry is a fruit that can potentially enhance human health, due to their high content in phenolic compounds, which include anthocyanins, phenolic acids, tannins (gallotannins and elagitannins) and flavonoids. Therefore, the overall aim of this study is the development of a callus induction protocol, the establishment of blackberry cell suspensions (Rubus adenotrichos Schltdl.) and their cell analysis through optical microscopy and TEM, for the potential production of phenolic compounds. In order to produce callogenesis, segments of blackberry leaves were disinfected and placed in different concentrations of 2,4-D and the control media (0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5 and 3.0 mg/l of 2,4-D); obtaining the higher size of calli in the medium with 1.5 mg/l of 2,4-D. After this determination, and for this specific treatment, a growth curve was performed through the use of fresh and dry weight parameters, in order to identify each of the growth stages. Furthermore, the calli obtained from the 1.5 mg/l of 2,4-D treatment were placed in two different culture media (MS and MS supplemented with 1.5 mg/l of 2,4-D) in order to establish the cell suspensions and the growth curve. To the best treatment, the total polyphenols were also quantified. It was determined that the MS medium is ideal for the growth and disintegration of the cell suspensions, obtaining 0.0256 mg of gallic acid/g of fresh sample. Finally, a cell callus and cell suspension analysis was performed through OM and TEM, evidencing a higher hystological differentiation in the calli, as well as the observation of antioxidant storage in the plastids.

  17. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of October 2004 to April 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameters tested for CFL models in Cycle Six are 1000-hour Lumen Maintenance, Lumen Maintenance at 40% Rated Life, and Interim Life Test, along with a series of parameters verified, such as ballast electrical parameters and Energy Star label.

  18. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-05-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure of Cycle 7 of PEARL program during the period of October 2005 to March 2006, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC administered the purchasing of CFL samples to test in Cycle 7, performed 100-hour seasoning for most of the CFL samples received by March 2006, and performed sphere testing for some of the CFL samples at 100 hours of life (initial measurement).

  19. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle 6 and Reflector CFL In-situ Testing of PEARL program during the period of April 2005 to October 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC performed testing for the fixture samples in Cycle 6 against Energy Star residential fixture specifications during this period of time. LRC subcontracted the Reflector CFL In-situ Testing to Luminaire Testing Laboratories located at Allentown PA, and supervised this test.

  20. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Four and Cycle Five of PEARL program during the period of October 2003 to April 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Four is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Five are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  1. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Five and Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of April 2004 to October 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Five is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Six are Efficacy, CCT, CRI, Power Factor, Start Time, Warm-up Time, and Rapid Cycle Stress Test for CFLs.

  2. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three and Cycle Four of PEARL program during the period of April 2003 to October 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle three is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Four are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  3. Solid-state time-gated luminescence microscope with ultraviolet light-emitting diode excitation and electron-multiplying charge-coupled device detection.

    PubMed

    Connally, Russell; Piper, James

    2008-01-01

    Many naturally occurring materials are autofluorescent, a property that can reduce the discriminative ability of fluorescence methods, sometimes to the point where they cannot be usefully applied. Shifting from the spectral to the temporal domain, it is possible to discriminate fluorophores on the basis of their fluorescence decay lifetime. Luminophores with sufficiently long lifetimes can be discriminated from short-lived autofluorescence using time-gated luminescence (TGL). This technique relies upon the application of a brief excitation pulse followed by a resolving period to permit short-lived autofluorescence to decay, after which detection is enabled to capture persistent emission. In our studies, a high-power UV LED was mounted in the filter capsule of an Olympus BX51 microscope to serve as the excitation source. The microscope was fitted with an Andor DV885 electron-multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) camera with the trigger input synchronized to UV LED operation. Giardia lamblia cysts labeled with the europium chelate BHHST were analyzed against an autofluorescent background with the TGL microscope. The EM-CCD camera captured useful TGL images in real time with a single exposure cycle. With 4x frame averaging, images acquired in TGL mode showed a 30-fold improvement in SNR compared with conventional fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Solid state optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  5. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  6. Immunohistochemical and morphometric analysis of immunoglobulin light-chain immunoreactive amyloid in psammoma bodies of the human choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Ivan; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Vasović, Ljiljana; Stojanović, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this research was to establish the presence of amyloid and to quantify immunohistochemical reactions of kappa and lambda light chains of psammoma bodies of the choroid plexus. Choroid plexus tissue obtained from 14 right lateral ventricles postmortem was processed histologically and stained with Congo red, thioflavin T, and monoclonal antibodies for kappa and lambda light chains. Morphological analysis was performed with a light microscope at lens magnifications of 4×, 10×, 20×, 25×, and 40×. The morphometric characteristics of psammoma bodies that were kappa and lambda positive and negative were analyzed with ImageJ. Histological analysis showed that the psammoma bodies, stromal blood vessel walls, and some epithelial cells reacted positively with Congo red and thioflavin T. Psammoma bodies were predominantly positive for lambda light chains. Lambda positivity was detected inside some stromal blood vessels, which pointed to a probable systemic origin for these light chains. Morphometric analysis showed that the mean optical densities of lambda- and kappa-positive psammoma bodies were significantly higher than those that gave a negative reaction. The percentage of lambda-positive psammoma bodies was significantly higher than the percentage of lambda-negative psammoma bodies in 80% of the cases, while the reaction with kappa light chains was negative in the majority of the cases. Linear regression analysis showed a significant increase in the percentage of lambda-positive psammoma bodies and their mean optical density with age. Finally, it can be concluded that the positive reaction of psammoma bodies in the choroid plexus with respect to amyloid and lambda light chains may point to the presence of light-chain amyloid in their structures.

  7. Microscopic analysis and simulation of check-mark stain on the galvanized steel strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hongyun; Yoon, Hyun Gi; Chung, Myung Kyoon

    2010-11-01

    When galvanized steel strip is produced through a continuous hot-dip galvanizing process, the thickness of adhered zinc film is controlled by plane impinging air gas jet referred to as "air-knife system". In such a gas-jet wiping process, stain of check-mark or sag line shape frequently appears. The check-mark defect is caused by non-uniform zinc coating and the oblique patterns such as "W", "V" or "X" on the coated surface. The present paper presents a cause and analysis of the check-mark formation and a numerical simulation of sag lines by using the numerical data produced by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the three-dimensional compressible turbulent flow field around the air-knife system. It was found that there is alternating plane-wise vortices near the impinging stagnation region and such alternating vortices move almost periodically to the right and to the left sides on the stagnation line due to the jet flow instability. Meanwhile, in order to simulate the check-mark formation, a novel perturbation model has been developed to predict the variation of coating thickness along the transverse direction. Finally, the three-dimensional zinc coating surface was obtained by the present perturbation model. It was found that the sag line formation is determined by the combination of the instantaneous coating thickness distribution along the transverse direction near the stagnation line and the feed speed of the steel strip.

  8. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a root canal filling material in reimplanted teeth. Microscopic analysis in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Holland, Roberto; de Souza, Valdir; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Pedrini, Denise

    2007-10-01

    This study analyzed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root canal filling material for the immediate reimplantation of monkey teeth. Four adult capuchin monkeys Cebus apella were used, which had their maxillary and mandibular lateral incisors on both sides extracted and reimplanted after 15 min. During the extra-alveolar period, the teeth were kept in saline solution and after reimplantation retention was performed with a stainless steel wire and composite resin for 14 days. After 7 days, the reimplanted teeth were submitted to endodontic treatment with biomechanics up to file n. 30 and irrigation with a saturated solution of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)(2)], and then divided into two study groups: group I - root canal filled with a Ca(OH)(2) paste, and group II - root canal filled with MTA. Radiographic follow up was performed at 30, 60 and 90 days postoperatively, and after 180 days the animals were killed and specimens were processed for histomorphological analysis. The results revealed that most specimens of both groups presented organized periodontal ligament with no inflammation. The resorptions observed were surface resorptions and were repaired by cementum. Both MTA and Ca(OH)(2) were good root canal filling materials for immediately reimplanted teeth, providing good repair and also allowing biological sealing of some lateral canals. There was no significant difference between the study groups (alpha = 29.60%).

  9. Scanning Tranmission X-ray Microscopic Analysis of Purifed Melanosomes of the Mouse Iris

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson,M.; Haraszti, T.; Peterson, G.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.; John, S.; Grunze, M.

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes are specialized intracellular membrane bound organelles that produce and store melanin pigment. The composition of melanin and distribution of melanosomes determine the color of many mammalian tissues, including the hair, skin, and iris. However, the presence of melanosomes within a tissue carries potentially detrimental risks related to the cytotoxic indole-quinone intermediates produced during melanin synthesis. In order to study melanosomal molecules, including melanin and melanin-related intermediates, we have refined methods allowing spectromicroscopic analysis of purified melanosomes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Here, we present for the first time absorption data for melanosomes at the carbon absorption edge ranging from 284 to 290 eV. High-resolution images of melanosomes at discrete energies demonstrate that fully melanized mature melanosomes are internally non-homogeneous, suggesting the presence of an organized internal sub-structure. Spectra of purified melanosomes are complex, partially described by a predominating absorption band at 288.4 eV with additional contributions from several minor bands. Differences in these spectra were detectable between samples from two strains of inbred mice known to harbor genetically determined melanosomal differences, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, and are likely to represent signatures arising from biologically relevant and tractable phenomena.

  10. Microbialites on Mars: a fractal analysis of the Athena's microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianciardi, G.; Rizzo, V.; Cantasano, N.

    2015-10-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers investigated Martian plains where laminated sedimentary rocks are present. The Athena morphological investigation [1] showed microstructures organized in intertwined filaments of microspherules: a texture we have also found on samples of terrestrial (biogenic) stromatolites and other microbialites and not on pseudo-abiogenicstromatolites. We performed a quantitative image analysis in order to compare 50 microbialites images with 50 rovers (Opportunity and Spirit) ones (approximately 30,000/30,000 microstructures). Contours were extracted and morphometric indexes obtained: geometric and algorithmic complexities, entropy, tortuosity, minimum and maximum diameters. Terrestrial and Martian textures resulted multifractals. Mean values and confidence intervals from the Martian images overlapped perfectly with those from terrestrial samples. The probability of this occurring by chance was less than 1/28, p<0.004. Our work show the evidence of a widespread presence of microbialites in the Martian outcroppings: i.e., the presence of unicellular life on the ancient Mars, when without any doubt, liquid water flowed on the Red Planet.

  11. Computer aided detection and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell subtypes based on microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    MoradiAmin, Morteza; Memari, Ahmad; Samadzadehaghdam, Nasser; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow. It can spread to different parts of the body rapidly and if not treated, would probably be deadly within a couple of months. Leukemia cells are categorized into three types of L1, L2, and L3. The cancer is detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. But manual examination of blood samples is a time-consuming and boring procedure as well as limited by human error risks. So to overcome these limitations a computer-aided detection system, capable of discriminating cancer from noncancer cases and identifying the cancerous cell subtypes, seems to be necessary. In this article an automatic detection method is proposed; first cell nucleus is segmented by fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm. Then a rich set of features including geometric, first- and second-order statistical features are obtained from the nucleus. A principal component analysis is used to reduce feature matrix dimensionality. Finally, an ensemble of SVM classifiers with different kernels and parameters is applied to classify cells into four groups, that is noncancerous, L1, L2, and L3. Results show that the proposed method can be used as an assistive diagnostic tool in laboratories.

  12. Microfluidic Flow Injection Analysis with Thermal Lens Microscopic Detection for Determination of NGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanović, Tatjana; Liu, Mingqiang; Likar, Polona; Klemenc, Matjaž; Franko, Mladen

    2015-06-01

    A combined microfluidic flow injection analysis-thermal lens microscopy (FIA-TLM) system was applied for determination of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)—a biomarker of acute kidney injury. NGAL was determined following a commercial ELISA assay and transfer of the resulting solution into the FIA-TLM system with a 100 m deep microchannel. At an excitation power of 100 mW, the FIA-TLM provided about seven times lower limits of detection (1.5 pg as compared to a conventional ELISA test, and a sample throughput of six samples per minute, which compares favorably with sample throughput of the microtiter plate reader, which reads 96 wells in about 30 min. Comparison of results for NGAL in plasma samples from healthy individuals and for NGAL dynamics in patients undergoing coronary angiography measured with transmission mode spectrometry on a microtiter plate reader and with FIA-TLM showed good agreement. In addition to improved LOD, the high sensitivity of FIA-TLM offers possibilities of a further reduction of the total reaction time of the NGAL ELISA test by sacrificing some of the sensitivity while reducing the duration of individual incubation steps.

  13. Electron Microscopic Analysis of Silicate and Calcium Particles in Cigarette Smoke Tar

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, R. Steven; Halstead, Mary M.; Watson, Clifford H.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) supplies information that is complementary to those data traditionally obtained using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for analysis of inorganic tobacco and tobacco smoke constituents. The SEM-EDS approach was used to identify select inorganic constituents of mainstream cigarette smoke “tar.” The nature of SEM-EDS instrumentation makes it an ideal choice for microstructural analyses as it provides information relevant to inorganic constituents that could result from exposure to combusted tobacco products. Our analyses show that aluminum silicates, silica, and calcium compounds were common constituents of cigarette mainstream smoke “tar.” Identifying inorganic tobacco smoke constituents is important because inhalation of fine inorganic particles could lead to inflammatory responses in the lung and systemic inflammatory responses. As cigarette smoking causes chronic inflammation in the respiratory tract, information on inorganic particulate in mainstream smoke informs efforts to determine causative agents associated with increased morbidity and mortality from tobacco use. PMID:27158665

  14. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  15. Generalized classification modeling of activated sludge process based on microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Lo, Po Kim; Yap, Vooi Voon

    2017-02-24

    The state of activated sludge wastewater treatment process (AS WWTP) is conventionally identified by physico-chemical measurements which are costly, time-consuming and have associated environmental hazards. Image processing and analysis-based linear regression modeling has been used to monitor the AS WWTP. But it is plant- and state-specific in the sense that it cannot be generalized to multiple plants and states. Generalized classification modeling for state identification is the main objective of this work. By generalized classification, we mean that the identification model does not require any prior information about the state of the plant, and the resultant identification is valid for any plant in any state. In this paper, the generalized classification model for the AS process is proposed based on features extracted using morphological parameters of flocs. The images of the AS samples, collected from aeration tanks of nine plants, are acquired through bright-field microscopy. Feature-selection is performed in context of classification using sequential feature selection and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. A support vector machine (SVM)-based state identification strategy was proposed with a new agreement solver module for imbalanced data of the states of AS plants. The classification results were compared with state-of-the-art multiclass SVMs (one-vs.-one and one-vs.-all), and ensemble classifiers using the performance metrics: accuracy, recall, specificity, precision, F measure and kappa coefficient (κ). The proposed strategy exhibits better results by identification of different states of different plants with accuracy 0.9423, and κ 0.6681 for the minority class data of bulking.

  16. Fractal analysis for assessing tumour grade in microscopic images of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambasco, Mauro; Costello, Meghan; Newcomb, Chris; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, breast cancer is expected to continue as the leading form of cancer diagnosed in women, and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in this group. A method that has proven useful for guiding the choice of treatment strategy is the assessment of histological tumor grade. The grading is based upon the mitosis count, nuclear pleomorphism, and tubular formation, and is known to be subject to inter-observer variability. Since cancer grade is one of the most significant predictors of prognosis, errors in grading can affect patient management and outcome. Hence, there is a need to develop a breast cancer-grading tool that is minimally operator dependent to reduce variability associated with the current grading system, and thereby reduce uncertainty that may impact patient outcome. In this work, we explored the potential of a computer-based approach using fractal analysis as a quantitative measure of cancer grade for breast specimens. More specifically, we developed and optimized computational tools to compute the fractal dimension of low- versus high-grade breast sections and found them to be significantly different, 1.3+/-0.10 versus 1.49+/-0.10, respectively (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, p<0.001). These results indicate that fractal dimension (a measure of morphologic complexity) may be a useful tool for demarcating low- versus high-grade cancer specimens, and has potential as an objective measure of breast cancer grade. Such prognostic value could provide more sensitive and specific information that would reduce inter-observer variability by aiding the pathologist in grading cancers.

  17. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  18. Comparison of binary mask defect printability analysis using virtual stepper system and aerial image microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Khoi A.; Spence, Chris A.; Dakshina-Murthy, S.; Bala, Vidya; Williams, Alvina M.; Strener, Steve; Eandi, Richard D.; Li, Junling; Karklin, Linard

    1999-12-01

    As advanced process technologies in the wafer fabs push the patterning processes toward lower k1 factor for sub-wavelength resolution printing, reticles are required to use optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifted mask (PSM) for resolution enhancement. For OPC/PSM mask technology, defect printability is one of the major concerns. Current reticle inspection tools available on the market sometimes are not capable of consistently differentiating between an OPC feature and a true random defect. Due to the process complexity and high cost associated with the making of OPC/PSM reticles, it is important for both mask shops and lithography engineers to understand the impact of different defect types and sizes to the printability. Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS) has been used in the mask shops for a number of years for reticle applications such as aerial image simulation and transmission measurement of repaired defects. The Virtual Stepper System (VSS) provides an alternative method to do defect printability simulation and analysis using reticle images captured by an optical inspection or review system. In this paper, pre- programmed defects and repairs from a Defect Sensitivity Monitor (DSM) reticle with 200 nm minimum features (at 1x) will be studied for printability. The simulated resist lines by AIMS and VSS are both compared to SEM images of resist wafers qualitatively and quantitatively using CD verification.Process window comparison between unrepaired and repaired defects for both good and bad repair cases will be shown. The effect of mask repairs to resist pattern images for the binary mask case will be discussed. AIMS simulation was done at the International Sematech, Virtual stepper simulation at Zygo and resist wafers were processed at AMD-Submicron Development Center using a DUV lithographic process for 0.18 micrometer Logic process technology.

  19. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections.

  20. Authentication of the 31 species of toxic and potent Chinese materia medica by microscopic technique assisted by ICP-MS analysis, part 4: four kinds of toxic and potent mineral arsenical CMMs.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Chu, Chu; Wang, Ya-Qiong; Chen, Hu-Biao; Li, Ping; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Toxic and Potent Chinese Materia Medica (T/PCMM) is a special and very important category of Chinese medicines. They have long been used in traditional medical practice and are being used more and more widely throughout the world in recent years. As there may be many fatal toxic effects caused by misusing or confusion of T/PCMM, their quality and safety control arouse increasing attention internationally. Researches on the accurate identification to ensure the safe use of T/PCMM are acquired; however, there are few reports on authentication. We are carrying out a series of studies on 31 T/PCMM originating from plants, animals, minerals, and secreta. In our previous studies, we proved that modern microscopic authentication is a simple, fast, effective, low cost, and less toxic method for identifying animal, seed, and flower T/PCMM. In the present study, we focused on the authentication of four kinds of mineral arsenicals, including orpiment (mainly containing As₂S₃), realgar (mainly containing As₄S₄), arsenolite, and arsenic trioxide (mainly containing As₂O₃). We examined the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the above minerals and found that they all can be easily identified and authenticated by using light microscopy coupled with polarized microscopy. Moreover, the authentication results for arsenolite and arsenic trioxide are confirmed by ICP-MS analysis. We are sure that the morphological and microscopic characteristics indicated here are indispensable to establishing standards for these four mineral T/PCMMs.

  1. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  2. Brain-Wide Mapping of Axonal Connections: Workflow for Automated Detection and Spatial Analysis of Labeling in Microscopic Sections

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Eszter A.; Leergaard, Trygve B.; Csucs, Gergely; Bjaalie, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal tracing techniques are powerful tools for exploring the structural organization of neuronal connections. Tracers such as biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (Pha-L) allow brain-wide mapping of connections through analysis of large series of histological section images. We present a workflow for efficient collection and analysis of tract-tracing datasets with a focus on newly developed modules for image processing and assignment of anatomical location to tracing data. New functionality includes automatic detection of neuronal labeling in large image series, alignment of images to a volumetric brain atlas, and analytical tools for measuring the position and extent of labeling. To evaluate the workflow, we used high-resolution microscopic images from axonal tracing experiments in which different parts of the rat primary somatosensory cortex had been injected with BDA or Pha-L. Parameters from a set of representative images were used to automate detection of labeling in image series covering the entire brain, resulting in binary maps of the distribution of labeling. For high to medium labeling densities, automatic detection was found to provide reliable results when compared to manual analysis, whereas weak labeling required manual curation for optimal detection. To identify brain regions corresponding to labeled areas, section images were aligned to the Waxholm Space (WHS) atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain (v2) by custom-angle slicing of the MRI template to match individual sections. Based on the alignment, WHS coordinates were obtained for labeled elements and transformed to stereotaxic coordinates. The new workflow modules increase the efficiency and reliability of labeling detection in large series of images from histological sections, and enable anchoring to anatomical atlases for further spatial analysis and comparison with other data. PMID:27148038

  3. Thimble microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Rubinstein, Jaden; Watkins, Rachel; Cen, Zijian; Kong, Gary; Lee, W. M.

    2016-12-01

    Wearable computing devices, e.g. Google Glass, Smart watch, embodies the new human design frontier, where technology interfaces seamlessly with human gestures. During examination of any subject in the field (clinic, surgery, agriculture, field survey, water collection), our sensory peripherals (touch and vision) often go hand-in-hand. The sensitivity and maneuverability of the human fingers are guided with tight distribution of biological nerve cells, which perform fine motor manipulation over a range of complex surfaces that is often out of sight. Our sight (or naked vision), on the other hand, is generally restricted to line of sight that is ill-suited to view around corner. Hence, conventional imaging methods are often resort to complex light guide designs (periscope, endoscopes etc) to navigate over obstructed surfaces. Using modular design strategies, we constructed a prototype miniature microscope system that is incorporated onto a wearable fixture (thimble). This unique platform allows users to maneuver around a sample and take high resolution microscopic images. In this paper, we provide an exposition of methods to achieve a thimble microscopy; microscope lens fabrication, thimble design, integration of miniature camera and liquid crystal display.

  4. Testicular myxosporidiasis and ultrastructural characteristics of Myxobolus bufonis (Myxobolidae) infecting the Egyptian toad Bufo regularis (Bufonidae). A light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Kareem; Semmler, Margit; Al-Olayan, Ebtsam; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Myxozoa comprises more than 2180 species, almost all of which are considered to be obligate parasites of aquatic fishes and amphibians. They are dangerous pathogens responsible for severe economic losses. From March to September 2014, 40 adult male Bufo regularis (Bufonidae) captured from different areas at Giza province, Egypt, were surveyed for myxosporean parasitic infection. Of these, 22 (55%) were infected by histozoic plasmodia, which produced spores after rupture belonging to Myxosporidia. The present investigation introduced a new data for the recorded parasite observed by light and transmission electron microscopy. The infection was diagnosed as large clusters of macroscopic plasmodia embedded in the testicular tissue causing distortion at the site of infection. The host reaction was manifested by the encapsulation of the plasmodia with a thick layer of connective tissue. Plasmodia were whitish in color, elliptical to ovoid in shape measuring 0.54 ± 0.2 (0.34-0.63) mm in diameter. The spores were subspherical, reaching 7.1 ± 0.2 (6.2-8.4) μm in length and 6.3 ± 0.2 (5.8-7.0) μm in width with two equal-sized polar capsules regularly arranged at the anterior pole of each spore. They were 3.4 ± 0.2 (3.0-4.2) μm in length and 1.9 ± 0.2 (1.6-2.4) in width with 6-8 turns of polar filaments. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the plasmodia were surrounded by a plasma membrane with numerous projections and pinocytotic channels extended toward the host cell. The generative cells and the different developmental stages were arranged at the periphery of the plasmodia while immature and mature spores were centrally arranged. Sporogenesis, capsulogenesis, valvogenesis, and spore maturation of the present parasite were also described.

  5. Modeling of image formation of a low-cost white-light bench microscope with a linear CMOS image sensor: its application in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Milton P.; Barata, António J.; Fernandes, Ana G.; Correia, Carlos M.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microscopy techniques are essentially imaging methods but owing to its ability to get depth information they are widely used in optical metrology. Although the fact that there are numerous examples of applications of confocal microscopy for metrology systems those 3D techniques that more recently came up are very sparse in this field despite its similar optical sectioning ability. In particular there is no report in literature to our knowledge of metrology systems taking advantage of the low-cost, versatility and easy integration of CMOS linear image sensors. We have developed a bench-microscope prototype using LIS-1024 linear sensor (Panavision ©) and have built a model of microscope image formation using Matlab ((Mathworks ©) that is currently being tested in order to optimize sensor performance. The prototype comprises commercial and low-cost mechanical and optical components and a developed sensor readout board based on PIC16F876 microcontroller (Microchip Inc.) allowing its integration in the optical setup. This stage-scanning microscope builds the image through the movement of the specimen in one lateral, in opposition to confocal microscopy that demands scanning in both lateral directions, and in axial direction. Both the actuators control for positioning the object stage and the sensor readout for image acquisition are commanded from a Matlab application in a PC. This paper aims at showing the effectiveness of this model of image formation for the application of this low-cost prototype using a linear sensor also in metrology field. Results will be presented from tests that are being carried out with micromachined components.

  6. A light and electron microscopic study of the changes in the duodenal mucosa induced by sustained pentagastrin stimulation of gastic acid secretion in young rats.

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, W. J.; Denham, D.; Hawkins, W.; Forrest, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    The histological and electron microscopic changes in the duodenal mucosa have been studied over an 8-week experimental period in rats whose gastric acid secretion was stimulated by pentagastrin in a medium of beeswax and mineral oil, and in controls that received injections of beeswax and mineral oil only. The changes leading of final disintegration of the epithelium are described in detail. The main aim of the experiment--to induce mucous change in the duodenal mucosa--was not realized. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-6 Figs. 7-8 Fig. 9 PMID:1222117

  7. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation Analysis

    Phouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.
    <...

  8. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors.

    PubMed

    Do, Trong-Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-02-29

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulated. Finally, a simulation is conducted to verify the analysis.

  9. iSpectra: An Open Source Toolbox For The Analysis of Spectral Images Recorded on Scanning Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Liebske, Christian

    2015-08-01

    iSpectra is an open source and system-independent toolbox for the analysis of spectral images (SIs) recorded on energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) systems attached to scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). The aim of iSpectra is to assign pixels with similar spectral content to phases, accompanied by cumulative phase spectra with superior counting statistics for quantification. Pixel-to-phase assignment starts with a threshold-based pre-sorting of spectra to create groups of pixels with identical elemental budgets, similar to a method described by van Hoek (2014). Subsequent merging of groups and re-assignments of pixels using elemental or principle component histogram plots enables the user to generate chemically and texturally plausible phase maps. A variety of standard image processing algorithms can be applied to groups of pixels to optimize pixel-to-phase assignments, such as morphology operations to account for overlapping excitation volumes over pixels located at phase boundaries. iSpectra supports batch processing and allows pixel-to-phase assignments to be applied to an unlimited amount of SIs, thus enabling phase mapping of large area samples like petrographic thin sections.

  10. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanagi, Kouta Fujiwara, Yoshie; Miyata, Tomoko; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-11

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  11. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis of cells in the periodontal ligament using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Shingo; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Okayama, Satoko; Togo, Akinobu; Uchimura, Naohisa; Kusukawa, Jingo; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The accurate comprehension of normal tissue provides essential data to analyse abnormalities such as disease and regenerative processes. In addition, understanding the proper structure of the target tissue and its microenvironment may facilitate successful novel treatment strategies. Many studies have examined the nature and structure of periodontal ligaments (PDLs); however, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of cells in normal PDLs remains poorly understood. In this study, we used focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography to investigate the whole 3D ultrastructure of PDL cells along with quantitatively analysing their structural properties and ascertaining their orientation to the direction of the collagen fibre. PDL cells were shown to be in contact with each other, forming a widespread mesh-like network between the cementum and the alveolar bone. The volume of the cells in the horizontal fibre area was significantly larger than in other areas, whereas the anisotropy of these cells was lower than in other areas. Furthermore, the orientation of cells to the PDL fibres was not parallel to the PDL fibres in each area. As similar evaluations are recognized as being challenging using conventional two-dimensional methods, these novel 3D findings may contribute necessary knowledge for the comprehensive understanding and analysis of PDLs. PMID:27995978

  12. Global analysis of isospin dependent microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potentials in a Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruirui; Ma, Zhongyu; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yuan; van Dalen, E. N. E.; Müther, H.

    2016-09-01

    Background: For the study of exotic nuclei it is important to have an optical model potential that is reliable not only for stable nuclei but can also be extrapolated to nuclear systems with exotic numbers of protons and neutrons. An efficient way to obtain such a potential is to develop a microscopic optical potential (MOP) based on a fundamental theory with a minimal number of free parameters, which are adjusted to describe stable nuclei all over the nuclide chart. Purpose: The choice adopted in the present work is to develop the MOP within a relativistic scheme which provides a natural and consistent relation between the spin-orbit part and the central part of the potential. The Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach provides such a microscopic relativistic scheme, which is based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction and reproduces the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter without any adjustable parameter. Its solution using the projection technique within the subtracted T -matrix representation provides a reliable extension to asymmetric nuclear matter, which is important to describe the features of isospin asymmetric nuclei. The present work performs a global analysis of the isospin dependent nucleon-nucleus MOP based on the DBHF calculation in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. Methods: The DBHF approach is used to evaluate the relativistic structure of the nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter at various densities and asymmetries. The Schrödinger equivalent potentials of finite nuclei are derived from these Dirac components by a local density approximation (LDA). The density distributions of finite nuclei are taken from the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with Gogny D1S force. An improved LDA approach (ILDA) is employed to get a better prediction of the scattering observables. A χ2 assessment system based on the global simulated annealing algorithm is developed to optimize the very few free components in this study. Results

  13. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  14. Economic analysis of greenhouse lighting: light emitting diodes vs. high intensity discharge fixtures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jacob A; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400-700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture.

  15. Economic Analysis of Greenhouse Lighting: Light Emitting Diodes vs. High Intensity Discharge Fixtures

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jacob A.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400–700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture. PMID:24905835

  16. Learning a cost function for microscope image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nilufar, Sharmin; Perkins, Theodore J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of microscopy images is increasingly important in clinical researchers' efforts to unravel the cellular and molecular determinants of disease, and for pathological analysis of tissue samples. Yet, manual segmentation and measurement of cells or other features in images remains the norm in many fields. We report on a new system that aims for robust and accurate semi-automated analysis of microscope images. A user interactively outlines one or more examples of a target object in a training image. We then learn a cost function for detecting more objects of the same type, either in the same or different images. The cost function is incorporated into an active contour model, which can efficiently determine optimal boundaries by dynamic programming. We validate our approach and compare it to some standard alternatives on three different types of microscopic images: light microscopy of blood cells, light microscopy of muscle tissue sections, and electron microscopy cross-sections of axons and their myelin sheaths.

  17. Laser light scan analysis of the “anticonvulsant face”

    PubMed Central

    Orup, H. Ivan; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Holmes, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The “anticonvulsant face”, comprised of a short nose, low nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, and wide mouth, was suggested in the 1970s to indicate teratogenesis caused by the anticonvulsant drugs phenytoin and phenobarbital. However, these were based on subjective clinical observations. In the present study we have applied objective and reliable quantitative measures to the operational definitions of craniofacial features in anticonvulant-exposed cases. We have adopted anthropometric analysis based on image analysis of laser light scans. Using morphometric methods, we established the positions of physical features and objectively determined the changes in the size and shape of affected soft tissues of the faces of children exposed to those anticonvulsant drugs during pregnancy. METHODS Thirteen individuals, exposed throughout pregnancy to phenytoin as either monotherapy or polytherapy, were identified in a previous analysis as having significant changes in their craniofacial features based on measurements of cephalometric radiographs, changes associated with “the anticonvulsant face”.. The soft tissues of their faces were imaged by 3D laser (structured light) scanning. RESULTS The notable changes in soft tissues identified by laser light scans were a wide philtrum (between the left and right cristae philtri), narrow mouth (between the left and right cheilions), short nasal bridge (between nasale and pronasale), short nose height (between the nasale and subnasale), and flat orbits (based on the orbital protrusion index). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of phenytoin-exposed individuals is the first anthropometric analysis of the craniofacial surface, designed to render the identification of abnormal features both objective and realiable. These analyses demonstrated that there were several significant changes in the soft tissue of the face, corroborating earlier studies of alterations of the craniofacial skeleton in the anticonvulsant face. Two of the

  18. Carcinogenicity of 2,2'-dihydroxy-di-n-propylnitrosamine in the tree shrew (Tupaia glis): light and electron microscopic features of pulmonary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Rao, M S; Reddy, J K

    1980-10-01

    The carcinogenic effect of 2,2'-dihydroxy-di-n-propylnitrosamine (DHPN) was examined in the primitive primate, tree shrew (Tupaia glis). DHPN was administered at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight sc once a week for 80 weeks. Between 65 and 102 weeks, 8 of 9 males given DHPN (89%) and 11 of 14 females given DHPN (78%) developed pulmonary adenomas. In 2 DHPN-treated males, in addition to adenomas, bronchioalveolar carcinomas were observed. Transmission electron microscopic examination of pulmonary adenomas from 4 DHPN-treated animals showed that Clara cells were the main components of these tumors. In addition to pulmonary tumors, 9% of the DHPN-treated animals developed squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and hepatocellular carcinomas. None of the 6 controls, which received olive oil alone, developed any tumors.

  19. Thermal Variations of Operative Microscopes in Otology.

    PubMed

    Imbery, T Edward; Tampio, Alex J; Nicholas, Brian D

    2017-02-01

    Objectives (1) Measure temperature variations achieved by common otomicroscopes. (2) Raise awareness about possible thermal injury during otologic procedures with the advent of newer, high-powered otomicroscopes. (3) Describe optical technology that aims to reduce the potential for thermal injury. Methods A variety of otomicroscopes, with different light sources (ranging from 100W halogen to 300W xenon), were studied. Temperatures were recorded from human auricular skin with a noncontact infrared thermometer at various microscope light intensities and with use of irrigation. Multiple recordings were done at 5-minute intervals, and a working distance of 225 mm was maintained. Results Maximum skin temperatures were found to plateau relatively quickly, with higher-wattage xenon light sources reaching greater temperatures. One-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in temperatures with decreased light intensities. High-wattage xenon light sources reached significantly higher temperatures when compared with halogen models. Discussion There is substantial variation in maximal skin temperatures reached by otomicroscopes. Temperatures can be decreased to safe levels by reducing light intensity and with use of irrigation. The maximum temperature obtained in our study was 41.4°C. Second-degree skin burns have been described with prolonged exposures to temperatures >44°C. Implications for Practice Given the described potential for burns, surgeons performing procedures on the ear and temporal bone should take precautions to diminish temperature in the operative field.

  20. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent light: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Howey, Dylan J; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2013-07-25

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I((4)) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and new opportunities.

  1. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  2. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  3. In situ characterization and analysis of Salmonella biofilm formation under meat processing environments using a combined microscopic and spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-11-01

    Salmonella biofilm on food-contact surfaces present on food processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In our work, biofilm formation by multi-strains of meat-borne Salmonella incubated at 20 °C, as well as the composition and distribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were investigated in situ by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. A standard laboratory culture medium (tryptic soy broth, TSB) was used and compared with an actual meat substrate (meat thawing-loss broth, MTLB). The results indicated that Salmonella grown in both media were able to form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces via building a three-dimensional structure with multilayers of cells. Although the number of biofilm cells grown in MTLB was less than that in TSB, the cell numbers in MTLB was adequate to form a steady and mature biofilm. Salmonella grown in MTLB showed "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in TSB appeared "reticular-shaped". The ATR-FTIR and Raman analysis revealed a completely different chemical composition between biofilms and the corresponding planktonic cells, and some important differences in biofilms grown in MTLB and in TSB. Importantly, our findings suggested that the progress towards a mature Salmonella biofilm on stainless steel surfaces may be associated with the production of the EPS matrix, mainly consisting of polysaccharides and proteins, which may serve as useful markers of biofilm formation. Our work indicated that a combination of these non-destructive techniques provided new insights into the formation of Salmonella biofilm matrix.

  4. Gene Expression and Microscopic Analysis of Arabidopsis Exposed to Chloroacetanilide Herbicides and Explosive Compounds. A Phytoremediation Approach1

    PubMed Central

    Mezzari, Melissa P.; Walters, Katherine; Jelínkova, Marcela; Shih, Ming-Che; Just, Craig L.; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the function of detoxifying enzymes in plants toward xenobiotics is of major importance for phytoremediation applications. In this work, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; ecotype Columbia) seedlings were exposed to 0.6 mm acetochlor (AOC), 2 mm metolachlor (MOC), 0.6 mm 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 0.3 mm hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). In vivo glutathione (GSH) conjugation reactions of AOC, MOC, RDX, and TNT were studied in root cells using a multiphoton microscope. In situ labeling with monochlorobimane, used as a competitive compound for conjugation reactions with GSH, confirmed that AOC and MOC are conjugated in Arabidopsis cells. Reverse transcription-PCR established the expression profile of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and nitroreductases enzymes. Genes selected for this study were AtGSTF2, AtGSTU1, AtGSTU24, and two isoforms of 12-oxophytodienoate reductase (OPR1 and OPR2). The five transcripts tested were induced by all treatments, but RDX resulted in low induction. The mRNA level of AtGSTU24 showed substantial increase for all chemicals (23-fold induction for AOC, 18-fold for MOC, 5-fold for RDX, and 40-fold for TNT). It appears that GSTs are also involved in the conjugation reactions with metabolites of TNT, and to a lesser extent with RDX. Results indicate that OPR2 is involved in plant metabolism of TNT (11-fold induction), and in oxidative stress when exposed to AOC (7-fold), MOC (9-fold), and RDX (2-fold). This study comprises gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis exposed to RDX and AOC, which are considered significant environmental contaminants, and demonstrates the importance of microscopy methods for phytoremediation investigations. PMID:15923336

  5. Cell type classifiers for breast cancer microscopic images based on fractal dimension texture analysis of image color layers.

    PubMed

    Jitaree, Sirinapa; Phinyomark, Angkoon; Boonyaphiphat, Pleumjit; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    Having a classifier of cell types in a breast cancer microscopic image (BCMI), obtained with immunohistochemical staining, is required as part of a computer-aided system that counts the cancer cells in such BCMI. Such quantitation by cell counting is very useful in supporting decisions and planning of the medical treatment of breast cancer. This study proposes and evaluates features based on texture analysis by fractal dimension (FD), for the classification of histological structures in a BCMI into either cancer cells or non-cancer cells. The cancer cells include positive cells (PC) and negative cells (NC), while the normal cells comprise stromal cells (SC) and lymphocyte cells (LC). The FD feature values were calculated with the box-counting method from binarized images, obtained by automatic thresholding with Otsu's method of the grayscale images for various color channels. A total of 12 color channels from four color spaces (RGB, CIE-L*a*b*, HSV, and YCbCr) were investigated, and the FD feature values from them were used with decision tree classifiers. The BCMI data consisted of 1,400, 1,200, and 800 images with pixel resolutions 128 × 128, 192 × 192, and 256 × 256, respectively. The best cross-validated classification accuracy was 93.87%, for distinguishing between cancer and non-cancer cells, obtained using the Cr color channel with window size 256. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm, based on fractal dimension features extracted from a color channel, performs well in the automatic classification of the histology in a BCMI. This might support accurate automatic cell counting in a computer-assisted system for breast cancer diagnosis.

  6. Microscopical and chemical surface characterization of CAD/CAM zircona abutments after different cleaning procedures. A qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe and characterize the surface topography and cleanliness of CAD/CAM manufactured zirconia abutments after steaming and ultrasonic cleaning. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 12 ceramic CAD/CAM implant abutments of various manufacturers were produced and randomly divided into two groups of six samples each (control and test group). Four two-piece hybrid abutments and two one-piece abutments made of zirconium-dioxide were assessed per each group. In the control group, cleaning by steam was performed. The test group underwent an ultrasonic cleaning procedure with acetone, ethyl alcohol and antibacterial solution. Groups were subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to verify and characterize contaminant chemical characterization non-quantitatively. RESULTS All zirconia CAD/CAM abutments in the present study displayed production-induced wear particles, debris as well as organic and inorganic contaminants. The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure. However, an absolute removal of pollutants could not be achieved. CONCLUSION The presence of debris on the transmucosal surface of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments of various manufacturers was confirmed. Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing. Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented. PMID:25932314

  7. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S.

    2013-11-27

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  8. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation.

  9. Henneguya collaris sp. nov., (Myxosporidia), parasite of the Greenband Parrotfish Scarus collana Rüppell, 1835 (Actinopterygii, Scaridae) from the Red Sea, Egypt. A light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Kareem; Semmler, Margit; Al-Olayan, Ebtsam; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    The phylum Myxozoa comprises more than 2180 species, almost all of which are considered to be obligate parasites of aquatic fishes. In the present study, Henneguya collaris sp. nov. is the first described histozoic myxozoan species of the genus Henneguya infecting the kidney of the greenband parrotfish Scarus collana (Actinopterygii, Scaridae). One hundred and eighty specimens of fish were collected randomly during the period from September 2014 to October 2015 from boat landing sites and the market places at Hurghada City along the Red Sea in Egypt. Of these, 90 (50 %) specimens were infected. Light microscopic examination showed that the infection was detected as mature spores with two polar capsules regularly arranged at the anterior pole of each spore and extruded polar filaments free in the kidney tissue. The spore body was oval in shape, measured 7.1 ± 0.2 (6.2-8.4) μm in length and 6.3 ± 0.2 (5.8-7.0) μm in width, with a bifurcated caudal process of equal length, reaching 6.3 ± 0.2 (5.8-7.0) μm in length. Polar capsules were 3.4 ± 0.2 (3.0-4.2) μm in length and 1.9 ± 0.2 (1.6-2.4) μm in width with 6-8 (10) turns of polar filaments. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the spore development was asynchronous. Sporogenesis, capsulogensis, valvogenesis, and spore maturation of the present parasite were also described. The present species was compared morphologically with the spore characteristics of the most similar species of Henneguya spp. recorded previously from different geographical areas taking into account the stage and dimensions of the spore body, tails, and polar filament coils, including their number and the most important characteristic features that distinguish them from the present species. Considering the data obtained, the material described herein represents a new species and the name Henneguya collaris sp. nov. is proposed.

  10. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    PubMed

    Liżewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, Sławomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy.

  11. Light stable isotope analysis of meteorites by ion microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal was to develop the necessary secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) techniques to use a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe to measure light stable isotope ratios (H, C, O and S) in situ and in non-conducting mineral phases. The intended application of these techniques was the analysis of meteorite samples, although the techniques that have been developed are equally applicable to the investigation of terrestrial samples. The first year established techniques for the analysis of O isotope ratios (delta O-18 and delta O-17) in conducting mineral phases and the measurement of S isotope ratios (delta S-34) in a variety of sulphide phases. In addition, a technique was developed to measure delta S-34 values in sulphates, which are insulators. Other research undertaken in the first year resulted in SIMS techniques for the measurement of wide variety of trace elements in carbonate minerals, with the aim of understanding the nature of alteration fluids in carbonaceous chondrites. In the second year we developed techniques for analyzing O isotope ratios in nonconducting mineral phases. These methods are potentially applicable to the measurement of other light stable isotopes such as H, C and S in insulators. Also, we have further explored the analytical techniques used for the analysis of S isotopes in sulphides by analyzing troilite in a number of L and H ordinary chondrites. This was done to see if there was any systematic differences with petrological type.

  12. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film.

  13. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  14. Light Curve and Orbital Period Analysis of VX Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, M.; Nelson, R. H.; Şenavcı, H. V.; İzci, D.; Özavcı, İ.; Gümüş, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we performed simultaneously light curve and radial velocity, and also period analyses of the eclipsing binary system VX Lac. Four color (BVRI) light curves of the system were analysed using the W-D code. The results imply that VX Lac is a classic Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.27, of which the less massive secondary component fills its Roche lobe. The orbital period behaviour of the system was analysed by assuming the light time effect (LITE) from a third body. The O-C analysis yielded a mass transfer rate of dM/dt=1.86×10-8Mȯyr-1 and the minimal mass of the third body to be M3=0.31Mȯ. The residuals from mass transfer and the third body were also analysed because another cyclic variation is seen in O-C diagram. This periodic variation was examined under the hypotheses of stellar magnetic activity and fourth body.

  15. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: analysis of the behaviour under red light after pre-exposure to red light.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Möller, Andrea; Gesson, Marcus; Noll, Catrin; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2004-03-01

    In previous experiments, migratory birds had been disoriented under 635 nm red light, apparently unable to use their magnetic compass. The present study with European robins, Erithacus rubecula, confirms these findings for red light at the levels of 6 x 10(15) quanta s(-1) m(-2) and 43 x 10(15) quanta s(-1) m(-2), suggesting that the disorientation under red light was not caused by the test light being below the threshold for magnetoreception. However, pre-exposure to red light for 1 h immediately before the critical tests under red light of 6-7 x 10(15) quanta s(-1) m(-2) enabled robins to orient in their seasonally appropriate migratory direction in spring as well as in autumn. Pre-exposure to darkness, by contrast, failed to induce orientation under red light. Under green light of 7 x 10(15) quanta s(-1) m(-2), the birds were oriented in their migratory orientation after both types of pre-exposure. These findings suggest that the newly gained ability to orient under red light might be based on learning to interpret a novel pattern of activation of the magnetoreceptors and hence may represent a parallel to the previously described enlargement of the functional window to new magnetic intensities. Mechanisms involving two types of spectral mechanisms with different absorbance maxima and their possible interactions are discussed.

  16. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2007-12-31

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This final report summarizes the experimental procedure and results of all cycles (Cycles 1 through 8) of PEARL program from the beginning of year 2000 to the end of 2007, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. In each cycle of PEARL program, PEARL Board selects a list of Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) and Residential Lighting Fixture (RLF) models that are Energy Star qualified. In Cycle 5, Cycle 7, and Cycle 8, no fixture models were selected. After that PEARL sponsors procure product samples for each selected model from different stores and locations in the retail market and send them to LRC for testing. LRC then receive and select the samples, and test them against Energy Star specifications. After the testing LRC analyze and report the results to PEARL Board. Totally 185 models of CFL and 52 models of RLF were tested in PEARL program. Along with the evolution of the Energy Star specifications from year 2000 to 2003, parameters that were required by Energy Star changed during the eight years of PEARL program. The testing parameters and number of samples tested in PEARL program also changed during this time. For example, in Cycle 1, three samples of each models were tested

  17. Structural model of porcine factor VIII and factor VIIIa molecules based on scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images and STEM mass analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosesson, M W; Fass, D N; Lollar, P; DiOrio, J P; Parker, C G; Knutson, G J; Hainfeld, J F; Wall, J S

    1990-01-01

    Porcine plasma factor VIII (fVIII) molecules are heterodimers composed of a 76,000-mol wt light chain (-A3-C1-C2) and a heavy chain ranging in molecular weight from 82,000 (A1-A2) to 166,000 (A1-A2-B). Proteolytic activation of fVIII by thrombin results in fVIIIa heterotrimers lacking B domains (A1, A2, A3-C1-C2). In this study, immunoaffinity purified fVIII was further fractionated by mono S or mono Q chromatography to prepare heterodimers containing a light chain and an A1-A2-B heavy chain (fVIII 166/76) or an A1-A2 heavy chain (fVIII 82/76). Mass analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopic (STEM) images of fVIII 166/76 indicated that heterodimers (mass 237 +/- 20 kD) had irregularly globular core structures 10-12 nm across, and frequently displayed a diffuse, occasionally globular to ovoid satellite structure extending 5-14 nm from the core, and attached to it by a thin stalk. Factor VIII 82/76 molecules (mass 176 +/- 20 kD) had the same core structures as fVIII 166/76 molecules, but lacked the satellite structure. These findings indicate that A1-A2 domains of heavy chains and the light chains of the fVIII procofactor molecule are closely associated and constitute the globular core structure, whereas the B domainal portion of heavy chains comprises the peripheral satellite appendage. Factor VIII core structures commonly displayed a finger-like projection near the origin of the B domainal stalk that was also a consistent feature of the free heavy chains (mass 128-162 kD) found in fVIII 166/76 preparations. Factor VIII light chain monomers (mass, 76 +/- 16 kD) were globular to c-shaped particles 6-8 nm across. These chains commonly possessed a v-shaped projection originating from its middle region, that could also be observed at the periphery of fVIII core molecules. Factor VIIIa preparations contained heterotrimers (mass 162 +/- 13 kD) that had the same dimensions as fVIII core structures, lacked the B domainal appendage, and sometimes possessed the

  18. Mixing states of light-absorbing particles measured using a transmission electron microscope and a single-particle soot photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light absorbing carbonaceous particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2), as well as of iron oxide particles, in Tokyo, Japan. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC). A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and that the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high iron oxide particle periods. We conclude that although further quantitative comparison between TEM and SP2 data will be needed, the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques.

  19. Surface-Finish Measurement with Interference Microscopes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    illuminated with white light in the M2 -M’, Figure 4. THE TWYMAN -GREEN INTERFEROMETER . (This Instrument Uses a Point Source, the Light is...vertical specimens mounted on a machine spindle. The double-beam microscope is a Twyman -Green interferometer in which microscope objectives have...characteristics of each instrument: the double and multiple-beam interferometer , the FECO fringe interferometer , and the Nomarski polarization contrast

  20. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  1. Nondestructive three-dimensional observation of defects in semi-insulating 6H-SiC single-crystal wafers using a scanning laser microscope (SLM) and infrared light-scattering tomography (IR-LST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutimakun, Passapong; Buteprongjit, Chumpol; Morimoto, Jun

    2009-07-01

    Peripheral and central areas of a semi-insulating 6H-SiC single-crystal wafer were examined using a scanning laser microscope (SLM) and infrared light-scattering tomography (IR-LST). The form and density of the defects in each area were observed by SLM. We reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) IR-LST images of scatterers by stacking 2D layer-by-layer IR-LST images on different planes. Using these 3D IR-LST images, variations in the defect distribution with depth were observed for the first time. To study the defect distribution and defect form in detail, we observed the defect configuration in the same volume as for 3D IR-LST images by magnified SLM and merged the images from the two techniques. Information on defects obtained using this approach will be very important in the development of high-quality semi-insulating silicon carbide (SiC) substrates.

  2. The Interior Analysis and 3-D Reconstruction of Internally-Mixed Light-Absorbing Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Collins, S. M.; Anderson, I.; Herzing, A.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-containing atmospheric particles may either absorb solar or outgoing long-wave radiation or scatter solar radiation, and thus, affect Earth’s radiative balance in multiple ways. Light-absorbing carbon that is common in urban air particles such as industrial coke dust, road dust, and diesel soot, often exists in the same particle with other phases that contain, for example, aluminum, calcium, iron, and sulfur. While the optical properties of atmospheric particles in general depend on overall particle size and shape, the inhomogeneity of chemical phases within internally-mixed particles may also greatly affect particle optical properties. In this study, a series of microscopic approaches were used to identify individual light-absorbing coarse-mode particles and to assess their interior structure and composition. Particle samples were collected in 2004 from one of the U.S. EPA’s Los Angeles Particulate Matter Supersites, and were likely affected substantially by road dust and construction dust. First, bright-field and dark-field light microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to distinguish predominantly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles from other particle types such as mineral dust, sea salt, and brake wear. Second, high-resolution SEM-EDX elemental mapping of individual carbonaceous particles was used to select particles with additional elemental phases that exhibited spatial inhomogeneity. Third, focused ion-beam SEM (FIB-SEM) with EDX was used to slice through selected particles to expose interior surfaces and to determine the spatial distribution of element phases throughout the particles. Fourth, study of the interior phases of a particle was augmented by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a thin section of the particle prepared by FIB-SEM. Here, electron energy loss spectroscopy with TEM was used to study chemical bonding in the carbonaceous phase

  3. Foldscope: Origami-Based Paper Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, James S.; Clements, James; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education. PMID:24940755

  4. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Dagmar S; Zeiser, Tobias; Schultz, Holger; Stellmacher, Florian; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Zabel, Peter; Goldmann, Torsten

    2008-12-16

    Light emitting diodes (LED), which are available as small monochromatic light sources with characteristic features such as maximum illumination power combined with minimum energy consumption and extremely long lifespan have already proved as a highly potential low-cost alternative for specific diagnostic applications in clinical medicine such as tuberculosis fluorescence microscopy. Likewise, the most reliable evaluation of Her-2/neu (c-erbB2) gene amplification, which has been established in the last few years for routine diagnosis in clinical pathology as determinant towards Herceptin-based treatment of patients with breast cancer, is based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and corresponding high priced fluorescence equipment. In order to test the possibility to utilize the advantages of low-cost LED technology on FISH analysis of c-erbB2 gene expression for routine diagnostic purposes, the applicability of a standard bright field Carl Zeiss Axiostar Plus microscope equipped with a Fraen AFTER (Amplified Fluorescence by Transmitted Excitation of Radiation) LED Fluorescence Microscope Kit for the detection of Her-2/neu gene signals was compared to an advanced Nikon Eclipse 80i fluorescence microscope in combination with a conventional 100W mercury vapor lamp. Both microscopes were fitted with the same Quicam FAST CCD digital camera to unequivocally compare the quality of the captured images. C-erbB2 gene expression was analyzed in 30 different human tissue samples of primary invasive breast cancer, following formalin fixation and subsequent paraffin-embedding. The Her2/neu gene signals (green) were identifiable in the tumor cells in all cases and images of equal quality were captured under almost identical conditions by 480 nm (blue) LED module equipped standard Axiostar microscope as compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy. In this first attempt, these monochromatic LED elements proved in principle to be suitable for the detection of Her-2/neu

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis van Bénéden, 1864).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Juliana Plácido; Mari, Renata de Britto; Marigo, Juliana; Rosas, Fernando César Weber; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2011-08-01

    The importance of the tongue during feeding, and the limited information on the tongue of most aquatic mammals led us to investigate its morphological aspects in sexually immature and mature Sotalia guianensis. Six tongues were measured and photo-documented after their removal from the oral cavity. The samples were divided into rostral, middle, and caudal regions, and examined using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.). Sotalia guianensis tongue presented lateral grooves from the apex to the middle portion, while the anterolateral region presented marginal papillae. Histological characteristics revealed the presence of a keratinized stratified epithelium, salivary glands in the middle and caudal portions of the tongue, and filiform papillae in the caudal region. S.E.M. images revealed the presence of filiform papillae and ducts of salivary glands in the middle and caudal portions of the tongue. We can conclude that the characteristics found in this study may reflect an adaptation to changes in diet after weaning.

  6. 3D structure tensor analysis of light microscopy data for validating diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Cornea, Anda; Leigland, Lindsey A.; Kohama, Steven G.; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (d-MRI) is a powerful non-invasive and non-destructive technique for characterizing brain tissue on the microscopic scale. However, the lack of validation of d-MRI by independent experimental means poses an obstacle to accurate interpretation of data acquired using this method. Recently, structure tensor analysis has been applied to light microscopy images, and this technique holds promise to be a powerful validation strategy for d-MRI. Advantages of this approach include its similarity to d-MRI in terms of averaging the effects of a large number of cellular structures, and its simplicity, which enables it to be implemented in a high-throughput manner. However, a drawback of previous implementations of this technique arises from it being restricted to 2D. As a result, structure tensor analyses have been limited to tissue sectioned in a direction orthogonal to the direction of interest. Here we describe the analytical framework for extending structure tensor analysis to 3D, and utilize the results to analyze serial image “stacks” acquired with confocal microscopy of rhesus macaque hippocampal tissue. Implementation of 3D structure tensor procedures requires removal of sources of anisotropy introduced in tissue preparation and confocal imaging. This is accomplished with image processing steps to mitigate the effects of anisotropic tissue shrinkage, and the effects of anisotropy in the point spread function (PSF). In order to address the latter confound, we describe procedures for measuring the dependence of PSF anisotropy on distance from the microscope objective within tissue. Prior to microscopy, ex vivo d-MRI measurements performed on the hippocampal tissue revealed three regions of tissue with mutually orthogonal directions of least restricted diffusion that correspond to CA1, alveus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We demonstrate the ability of 3D structure tensor analysis to identify structure tensor orientations

  7. Compact Video Microscope Imaging System Implemented in Colloid Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Long description Photographs showing fiber-optic light source, microscope and charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera head connected to camera body, CCD camera body feeding data to image acquisition board in PC, and Cartesian robot controlled via PC board. The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system can scan, find areas of interest in, focus on, and acquire images automatically. Many multiple-cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is feasible only with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control. The software also has a user-friendly interface, which can be used independently of the hardware for further post-experiment analysis. CMIS has been successfully developed in the SML Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center and adapted for use for colloid studies and is available for telescience experiments. The main innovations this year are an improved interface, optimized algorithms, and the ability to control conventional full-sized microscopes in addition to compact microscopes. The CMIS software-hardware interface is being integrated into our SML Analysis package, which will be a robust general-purpose image-processing package that can handle over 100 space and industrial applications.

  8. Microscope use in clinical veterinary practice and potential implications for veterinary school curricula.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sherry M; Dowers, Kristy L; Cerda, Jacey R; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy (skill of using a microscope) and the concepts of cytology (study of cells) and histology (study of tissues) are most often taught in professional veterinary medicine programs through the traditional method of glass slides and light microscopes. Several limiting factors in veterinary training programs are encouraging educators to explore innovative options for teaching microscopy skills and the concepts of cytology and histology. An anonymous online survey was administered through the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association to Colorado veterinarians working in private practice. It was designed to assess their current usage of microscopes for cytological and histological evaluation of specimens and their perceptions of microscope use in their veterinary education. The first part of the survey was answered by 183 veterinarians, with 104 indicating they had an onsite diagnostic lab. Analysis pertaining to the use of the microscope in practice and in veterinary programs was conducted on this subset. Most respondents felt the amount of time spent in the curriculum using a microscope was just right for basic microscope use and using the microscope for viewing and learning about normal and abnormal histological sections and clinical cytology. Participants felt more emphasis could be placed on clinical and diagnostic cytology. Study results suggest that practicing veterinarians frequently use microscopes for a wide variety of cytological diagnostics. However, only two respondents indicated they prepared samples for histological evaluation. Veterinary schools should consider these results against the backdrop of pressure to implement innovative teaching techniques to meet the changing needs of the profession.

  9. WASP-14 b: transit timing analysis of 19 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Marka, C.; Fernández, M.; Güver, T.; Göğüş, E.; Nowak, G.; Vaňko, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Mugrauer, M.; Trepl, L.; Gelszinnis, J.

    2015-08-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light-curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis, we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years (2007-2013) allowed us to refine the transit ephemeris. We derived an orbital period 1.2 s longer and 10 times more precise than the one given in the discovery paper. We found no significant periodic signal in the timing-residuals and, hence, no evidence for TTV in the system.

  10. The system analysis of light field information collection based on the light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Li, Wenhua; Hao, Chenyang

    2016-10-01

    Augmented reality(AR) technology is becoming the study focus, and the AR effect of the light field imaging makes the research of light field camera attractive. The micro array structure was adopted in most light field information acquisition system(LFIAS) since emergence of light field camera, micro lens array(MLA) and micro pinhole array(MPA) system mainly included. It is reviewed in this paper the structure of the LFIAS that the Light field camera commonly used in recent years. LFIAS has been analyzed based on the theory of geometrical optics. Meanwhile, this paper presents a novel LFIAS, plane grating system, we call it "micro aperture array(MAA." And the LFIAS are analyzed based on the knowledge of information optics; This paper proves that there is a little difference in the multiple image produced by the plane grating system. And the plane grating system can collect and record the amplitude and phase information of the field light.

  11. Hymenoscyphus fraxineus vs. Hymenoscyphus albidus – A comparative light microscopic study on the causal agent of European ash dieback and related foliicolous, stroma-forming species

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Hans-Otto; Bemmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    in combination with molecular work. Hy. fraxineus was described from Europe as a cryptic species that differed from Hy. albidus by molecular data alone. However, the Hy. albidus/Hy. fraxineus species complex represents one of many examples within the ascomycetes in which subtle microscopic differences between closely related species, in this case the presence or absence of croziers at the ascus base, are strictly correlated with molecular characteristics. Two species that closely resemble Hy. albidus and Hy. fraxineus form pseudosclerotia in Aesculus leaves and again differ from each other mainly in the ascus base: Hymenoscyphus aesculi on Aesculus hippocastanum from Europe lacks croziers, whereas Hymenoscyphus honshuanus from Japan on Aesculus turbinata possesses croziers. Other taxa treated here include Hymenoscyphus vacini, a European species growing on stromatized net veins of skeletonized leaves of Acer, and Hymenoscyphus torquatus, a Chinese species on unidentified herbaceous stems. An equivalent stroma-forming North American species on leaves of Fraxinus, Rutstroemia longipes (Rutstroemiaceae), is discussed and compared. A key to the Hymenoscyphus species that form a dark stroma on leaves of Acer, Aesculus, Fraxinus, and Picrasma is provided. PMID:25544935

  12. Hymenoscyphus fraxineus vs. Hymenoscyphus albidus - A comparative light microscopic study on the causal agent of European ash dieback and related foliicolous, stroma-forming species.

    PubMed

    Baral, Hans-Otto; Bemmann, Martin

    2014-10-02

    in combination with molecular work. Hy. fraxineus was described from Europe as a cryptic species that differed from Hy. albidus by molecular data alone. However, the Hy. albidus/Hy. fraxineus species complex represents one of many examples within the ascomycetes in which subtle microscopic differences between closely related species, in this case the presence or absence of croziers at the ascus base, are strictly correlated with molecular characteristics. Two species that closely resemble Hy. albidus and Hy. fraxineus form pseudosclerotia in Aesculus leaves and again differ from each other mainly in the ascus base: Hymenoscyphus aesculi on Aesculus hippocastanum from Europe lacks croziers, whereas Hymenoscyphus honshuanus from Japan on Aesculus turbinata possesses croziers. Other taxa treated here include Hymenoscyphus vacini, a European species growing on stromatized net veins of skeletonized leaves of Acer, and Hymenoscyphus torquatus, a Chinese species on unidentified herbaceous stems. An equivalent stroma-forming North American species on leaves of Fraxinus, Rutstroemia longipes (Rutstroemiaceae), is discussed and compared. A key to the Hymenoscyphus species that form a dark stroma on leaves of Acer, Aesculus, Fraxinus, and Picrasma is provided.

  13. Production of otoconia in the endolymphatic sac in the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster: light and transmission electron microscopic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Hejl, R.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of otoconia in the endolymphatic sac (ES) of the larval newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, has been studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. Some of the epithelial cells of the ES contain an abundance of swollen vesicles, Golgi complexes, rough endoplasmic reticula and ribosomes at the late larval stages 50 and 51, approximately 26-30 days after eggs are laid. Five days later, at stage 52, crystals are present in the vacuoles between the epithelial cells. Serial sections indicate that these vacuoles actually form small canals which lie in the wall and join the lumen of the ES. Reconstruction of the ES shows that several canals are contained in the ES wall. At stage 56, about 72 days after eggs are laid, a large number of otoconia are present in the ES lumen, while the otoconia disappear from the canals. It appears that the otoconia are first produced in the canals and then released to the lumen. Some epithelial cells of the ES are thought to expel the organic and inorganic material to the canals to form the otoconia in situ. The process of formation of the otoconia in the ES is discussed.

  14. A scanning electron microscope study of the pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans): possible involvement of melanosomes in protecting the pecten against damage by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed Central

    Kiama, S G; Bhattacharjee, J; Maina, J N; Weyrauch, K D

    1994-01-01

    The pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans), a diurnally active bird of prey, has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. In this species the pecten consists of 12 highly vascularised pleats, held together apically by a heavily pigmented 'bridge' and projects freely into the vitreous body in the ventral part of the eye cup. Ascending and descending blood vessels of varying calibre, together with a profuse network of capillaries, essentially constitute the vascular framework of the pecten. A distinct distribution of melanosomes is discernible on the pecten, the concentration being highest at its apical end, moderate at the crest of the pleats and least at the basal and lateral margins. Overlying and within the vascular network, a close association between blood vessels and melanocytes is evident. It is conjectured that such an association may have evolved to augment the structural reinforcement of this nutritive organ in order to keep it firmly erectile within the gel-like vitreous. Such erectility may be an essential prerequisite for its optimal functioning, as well as in its overt use as a protective shield against the effects of ultraviolet light, which otherwise might lead to damage of the pectineal vessels. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:7649799

  15. Sarcocystis calchasi sp. nov. of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) and the Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis): light and electron microscopical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Gruber, Achim D; Hafez, Hafez M; Heydorn, Alfred O; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Lierz, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A novel highly pathogenic Sarcocystis species has been shown to cycle between the Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) as definitive host and the domestic pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) as intermediate host. However, genetically based characteristics are only available from very few bird-infecting Sarcocystis species. We therefore further characterised morphological properties of this protozoan in both hosts. Using light and electron microscopy, oocysts and sporocysts as well as schizonts and sarcocysts were characterised and compared with available morphological features of previously reported Sarcocystis species of Northern goshawks, Columbidae and genetically closely related species of other avian hosts. Sporocysts shed from day 6 on after experimental infection by the Northern goshawk were of ovoid appearance (11.9 x 7.9 microm). Ultrastructurally, schizonts of all developmental stages were found in the liver, spleen and next to or in endothelial cells of various organs of domestic pigeons 7 to 12 days after experimental infection. The cyst wall surface of slender sarcocysts (1 to 2 mm in length and 20 to 50 microm in width) was smooth and lacked protrusions. Cystozoites were lancet-shaped and measured 7.5 x 1.5 microm in Giemsa stain smears. The morphological findings, when combined with data of experimental infection and genetic studies, convergently indicate that the recently discovered Sarcocystis species represents a new species. We therefore propose to name this parasite Sarcocystis calchasi species nova.

  16. A simple white noise analysis of neuronal light responses.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J

    2001-05-01

    A white noise technique is presented for estimating the response properties of spiking visual system neurons. The technique is simple, robust, efficient and well suited to simultaneous recordings from multiple neurons. It provides a complete and easily interpretable model of light responses even for neurons that display a common form of response nonlinearity that precludes classical linear systems analysis. A theoretical justification of the technique is presented that relies only on elementary linear algebra and statistics. Implementation is described with examples. The technique and the underlying model of neural responses are validated using recordings from retinal ganglion cells, and in principle are applicable to other neurons. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique relative to classical approaches are discussed.

  17. Lineshape analysis of coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy using incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Ulness, Darin J.; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-06-07

    Coherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent (noisy) light, I{sup (4)} 2D ES, holds intriguing challenges and opportunities. One challenge is to determine how I{sup (4)} 2D ES compares to femtosecond 2D ES. Here, we merge the sophisticated energy-gap Hamiltonian formalism that is often used to model femtosecond 2D ES with the factorized time-correlation formalism that is needed to describe I{sup (4)} 2D ES. The analysis reveals that in certain cases the energy-gap Hamiltonian is insufficient to model the spectroscopic technique correctly. The results using a modified energy-gap Hamiltonian show that I{sup (4)} 2D ES can reveal detailed lineshape information, but, contrary to prior reports, does not reveal dynamics during the waiting time.

  18. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  19. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  20. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Supercritical Pressure Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Schulenberg, T.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Souyri, A.

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of the European project HPLWR, joined by European research institutions, industrial partners and the University of Tokyo, thermal-hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactors has been carried out. A thorough literature survey on heat transfer of supercritical fluids indicates a large deficiency in the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient and the onset of heat transfer deterioration under the reactor condition. A CFD code for analysing the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of supercritical fluids was developed. Numerical results show that the heat transfer coefficient, including the heat transfer deterioration region, can be well predicted using this CFD code, at least for circular tube geometries. Such a CFD code is well suitable for understanding the heat transfer mechanism. Based on the numerical results, a new heat transfer correlation has been proposed. For the thermal-hydraulic design of an HPLWR fuel assembly, the subchannel analysis code STAR-SC has been developed with a high numerical efficiency and a high applicability to different kinds of fuel assembly configurations. The results show clearly that design of a HPLWR fuel assembly is a highly challenging task. At the same time, sub-channel analysis provides some important guidelines for the design of a HPLWR fuel assembly. (authors)

  1. Analysis of light guiding property in light piped based solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Chuang, Chun-Hsien, Jr.; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Recently, many researchers have tried to design a system for indoor illumination because the benefits of solar systems. A simple parabolic reflector is often used to collect sunlight but the efficiency is poor when sunlight isn't incident normally. Therefore, an accurate machine to track sun has to be used. In order to get better tolerance, a light pipe based solar concentrator (LPBSC) which comprises a parabolic reflector and a hollow reflective light pipe is proposed. We develop a math model which combines the reflection times of sunlight in light pipe and the candela data of parabolic reflector to analyze the efficiency. And then, straight light pipe is replaced by tapered light pipe to improve the tolerance. Optical simulation software, TracePro, and mathematical software, MATLAB, are used to prove the model is correct and feasible. In the results, LPBSC can improve the tolerance to get good efficiency.

  2. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99 % similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanced anti-MRSA compound production. The pure bioactive compound was isolated using silica gel column chromatography and Semi-preparative High-performance liquid chromatography (Semi-preparative HPLC). The Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton NMR ((1)H NMR) analysis indicated the phenolic nature of the compound. The molecular mass of the purified compound was 507 Da as revealed by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The compound inhibited the growth of MRSA with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.5 µg mL(-1). MRSA bacteria exposed to 4× MIC of the compound and the cell viability was determined using flow cytometric analysis. Scanning electron microscope and Transmission electron microscope analysis was used to determine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria. This is the first report on isolation of anti-MRSA compound from halophilic B. amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and could act as a promising biocontrol agent.

  3. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  4. Structural analysis sheds light on APC/C-mediated ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yuu; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    In the December 22nd issue of Molecular Cell, two groups report refined cryo-electron microscopic structures of the APC/C at approximately 20 A resolution. They also reveal important new features including multiple copies of subunits, dimerization and structural flexibility of the APC/C, which give a hint to solve the mechanisms of the APC/C-dependent ubiquitylation.

  5. Evaluation of microscopic techniques (epifluorescence microscopy, CLSM, TPE-LSM) as a basis for the quantitative image analysis of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Pons, M N; Morgenroth, E

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic techniques ranging from epifluorescence microscopy to confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and two photon excitation laser scanning microscopy (TPE-LSM) combined with fluorescent stains can help to evaluate complex microbial aggregates such as activated sludge flocs. To determine the application limits of these microscopic techniques, activated sludge samples from three different sources were evaluated after staining with a fluorescent viability indicator (Baclight Bacterial Viability Kit, Molecular Probes). Image analysis routines were developed to quantify overall amounts of red and green stained cells, location of stained cells within the flocs, and the spatial organization in clusters and filaments. It was found that the selection of the appropriate microscopic technique depends strongly on the type of microbial aggregates being analyzed. For flocs with high cell density, the use of TPE-LSM is preferred, since it provides a clearer image of the internal structure of the aggregate. Epifluorescence microscopy did not allow to reliably quantify red stained cells in dense aggregates. CLSM did not adequately image the internal filamentous structure and the location of stained cells within dense flocs. However, for typical activated sludge flocs epifluorescence and CLSM proved adequate.

  6. Automated screening of 2D crystallization trials using transmission electron microscopy: a high-throughput tool-chain for sample preparation and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Hermann, Gilles; Caujolle-Bert, Daniel; Karathanou, Argyro; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Buessler, Jean-Luc; Daum, Pamela; Plitzko, Juergen M; Chami, Mohamed; Mueller, Urs; Kihl, Hubert; Urban, Jean-Philippe; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2011-02-01

    We have built and extensively tested a tool-chain to prepare and screen two-dimensional crystals of membrane proteins by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. This automated process is an extension of a new procedure described recently that allows membrane protein 2D crystallization in parallel (Iacovache et al., 2010). The system includes a gantry robot that transfers and prepares the crystalline solutions on grids suitable for TEM analysis and an entirely automated microscope that can analyze 96 grids at once without human interference. The operation of the system at the user level is solely controlled within the MATLAB environment: the commands to perform sample handling (loading/unloading in the microscope), microscope steering (magnification, focus, image acquisition, etc.) as well as automatic crystal detection have been implemented. Different types of thin samples can efficiently be screened provided that the particular detection algorithm is adapted to the specific task. Hence, operating time can be shared between multiple users. This is a major step towards the integration of transmission electron microscopy into a high throughput work-flow.

  7. Microscopic analysis of "iron spot" on blue-and-white porcelain from Jingdezhen imperial kiln in early Ming dynasty (14th-15th century).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxuan; Zhu, Jian; Jiang, Jianxin; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Shurong; Guan, Li; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Wu, Menglei; Du, Jingnan

    2016-11-01

    "Sumali," as an imported cobalt ore from overseas, was a sort of precious and valuable pigment used for imperial kilns only, which produces characteristic "iron spot" to blue-and-white porcelain in early Ming Dynasty (A.D. 14th-15th century). Although there were some old studies on it, the morphology and formation of iron spot has not been fully investigated and understood. Therefore, five selected samples with typical spot from Jingdezhen imperial kiln in Ming Yongle periods (A.D. 1403-1424) were analyzed by various microscopic analysis including 3D digital microscope, SEM-EDS and EPMA. According to SEM images, samples can be divided into three groups: un-reflected "iron spot" without crystals, un-reflected "iron spot" with crystals and reflected "iron spot" with crystals. Furthermore, 3D micro-images revealed that "iron spots" separate out dendritic or snow-shaped crystals of iron only on and parallel to the surface of glaze for which "iron spot" show strong metallic luster. Combining with microscopic observation and microanalysis on crystallization and non-crystallization areas, it indicates that firing oxygen concentration is the ultimate causation of forming reflective iron spot which has a shallower distribution below the surface and limits crystals growing down. More details about characters of "iron spot" used "Sumali" were found and provided new clues to coloration, formation mechanism and porcelain producing technology of imperial kiln from 14th to 15th centuries of China.

  8. Small round blue cell sarcoma of bone mimicking atypical Ewing's sarcoma with neuroectodermal features. An analysis of five cases with immunohistochemical and electron microscopic support.

    PubMed

    Llombart-Bosch, A; Lacombe, M J; Contesso, G; Peydro-Olaya, A

    1987-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) of bone may occasionally display rosette-like textures mimicking Homer-Wright ones, as seen in neuroectodermic neoplasms (neuroblastoma, peripheral neuroepithelioma). Of a group of 39 cases of ES, reviewed with electron microscopic study, the authors have isolated five atypical ES, which histologically also possessed neuroectodermic traces. These tumors were composed of small round blue cells with rosette-like figures and cytoplasmic glycogen. The immunohistochemical analysis showed positivity for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) as well as for HNK-1 (leu-7) monoclonal antibody. Electron microscopic examination confirmed the tumor cell as being of small round type, with a dense chromatine pattern and the presence of isolated dendritic processes, as well as synaptic-like buttons; intermediate filaments, neurotubuli, and dense-core neurosecretory granules also were seen. Moreover, in two cases basement-like condensations surrounded some cells. Scanning electron microscopic study in one case confirmed the presence of rosette-like figures and cell elongations with short dendritic projections of the cytoplasm. Clinically and radiologically these cases showed features similar to ES of bone; one case, located in the chest wall, had a local relapse after treatment, with the histologic features of a pleomorphic neuroblastoma. The authors conclude that these tumors resemble closely immature neuroepithelioma of soft tissue but, being primary to bone, are superimposable on those described as "neuroectodermal tumors of bone."

  9. In situ fabrication and optoelectronic analysis of axial CdS/p-Si nanowire heterojunctions in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi; Tian, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-04-17

    A high-precision technique was utilized to construct and characterize axial nanowire heterojunctions inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). By an in-tandem technique using an ultra-sharp tungsten probe as the nanomanipulator and an optical fiber as the optical waveguide the nanoscale CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions were fabricated, and in situ photocurrents from them were successfully measured. Compared to a single constituting nanowire, the CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions possess a photocurrent saturation effect, which protects them from damage under high voltages. Furthermore, a set of experiments reveals the clear relationship between the saturation photocurrent values and the incident light intensities. The applied technique is expected to be valuable for bottom-up nanodevice fabrications, and the regarded photocurrent saturation feature may solve the Joule heating-induced failure problem in nanowire optoelectronic devices caused by a fluctuating bias.

  10. In situ fabrication and optoelectronic analysis of axial CdS/p-Si nanowire heterojunctions in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi; Tian, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-04-01

    A high-precision technique was utilized to construct and characterize axial nanowire heterojunctions inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). By an in-tandem technique using an ultra-sharp tungsten probe as the nanomanipulator and an optical fiber as the optical waveguide the nanoscale CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions were fabricated, and in situ photocurrents from them were successfully measured. Compared to a single constituting nanowire, the CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions possess a photocurrent saturation effect, which protects them from damage under high voltages. Furthermore, a set of experiments reveals the clear relationship between the saturation photocurrent values and the incident light intensities. The applied technique is expected to be valuable for bottom-up nanodevice fabrications, and the regarded photocurrent saturation feature may solve the Joule heating-induced failure problem in nanowire optoelectronic devices caused by a fluctuating bias.

  11. Clinical microscopic analysis of ProTaper retreatment system efficacy considering root canal thirds using three endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; De Figueiredo, Jose Antônio Poli; Freitas Fachin, Elaine Vianna; Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antônio; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ProTaper Universal rotary retreatment system and the influence of sealer type on the presence of filling debris in the reinstrumented canals viewed in an operative clinical microscope. Forty-five palatal root canals of first molars were filled with gutta-percha and one of the following sealers: G1, EndoFill; G2, AH Plus; G3, Sealapex. The canals were then reinstrumented with ProTaper Universal rotary system. Roots were longitudinally sectioned and examined under an operative clinical microscope (10×), and the amount of filling debris on canal walls was analyzed using the AutoCAD 2004 software. A single operator used a specific software tool to outline the canal area and the filling debris area in each third (cervical, middle, and apical), as well as the total canal area. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Tukey test at P < 0.05. Sealapex demonstrated significant differences in the average of filling debris area/canal among the 3 thirds. This group revealed that apical third showed more debris than the both cervical and middle third (P < 0.0001). Endofill presented significantly more filling debris than Sealapex in the cervical third (P < 0.05). In the middle (P = 0.12) and apical third (P = 0.10), there were no differences amongst groups. Debris was left in all canal thirds, regardless of the retreatment technique. The greatest differences between techniques and sealers were found in the cervical third.

  12. Degranulation, density, and distribution of mast cells in the rat thalamus: a light and electron microscopic study in basal conditions and after intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F; Bentivoglio, M

    2000-09-04

    In the adult rat brain mast cells reside selectively in the thalamus. We investigated thalamic mast cells stained by acidic toluidine blue or pinacyanol, and with histamine immunocytochemistry, focusing on their state of activity revealed by degranulation. Mast cells exhibited perivascular prevalence and high quantitative variability, between cases and in different sections, with no asymmetry or topographical selectivity in thalamic nuclei. Pinacyanol, alone or with erythrosine, stained mast cells with higher sensitivity than toluidine blue. However, toluidine blue was highly predictive of pinacyanol staining and provided the best resolution of mast cell cytoplasmic features. Histamine immunocytochemistry labeled 61% of pinacyanol-stained mast cells. Intensely toluidine blue-stained granulated cells, as well as cells exhibiting different degrees of degranulation that paralleled lighter staining, were observed. The response of thalamic mast cells to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) and control cytochrome-c injections was evaluated after 2, 24, and 72 hours. No obvious changes in mast cell number or distribution were found after treatment, but massive degranulation was frequently observed after NGF administration. Significant decrease of staining intensity of mast cells, supporting enhanced degranulation, was documented in NGF-treated animals by quantitative image analysis. Ultrastructural features of mast cell degranulation, with granule coalescence and matrix dissolution, were detected in untreated and NGF-treated cases. The findings point out that mast cells are active in the thalamus in basal conditions and that NGF has the potential to elicit long-lasting degranulation of thalamic mast cells in vivo, exerting a direct effect and/or priming these cells to react to endogenous stimuli.

  13. Light and electron microscopic study of the eyelids, conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue and lacrimal gla