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Sample records for light quarks radiate

  1. Decay constants and radiative decays of heavy mesons in light-front quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the magnetic dipole decays V{yields}P{gamma} of various heavy-flavored mesons such as (D,D*,D{sub s},D{sub s}*,{eta}{sub c},J/{psi}) and (B,B*,B{sub s},B{sub s}*,{eta}{sub b},{upsilon}) using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian. The momentum dependent form factors F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}) for V{yields}P{gamma}* decays are obtained in the q{sup +}=0 frame and then analytically continued to the timelike region by changing q{sub perpendicular} to iq{sub perpendicular} in the form factors. The coupling constant g{sub VP{gamma}} for real photon case is then obtained in the limit as q{sup 2}{yields}0, i.e. g{sub VP{gamma}}=F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}=0). The weak decay constants of heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons are also calculated. Our numerical results for the decay constants and radiative decay widths for the heavy-flavored mesons are overall in good agreement with the available experimental data as well as other theoretical model calculations.

  2. Exclusive radiative Higgs decays as probes of light-quark Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the rare exclusive Higgs boson decays into a single vector meson and a photon and investigate the possibility of using these processes to probe the light-quark Yukawa couplings. We work with an effective Lagrangian with modified Higgs couplings to account for possible new-physics effects in a model-independent way. The h → Vγ decay rate is governed by the destructive interference of two amplitudes, one of which involves the Higgs coupling to the quark anti-quark pair inside the vector meson. We derive this amplitude at next-to-leading order in α s using QCD factorization, including the resummation of large logarithmic corrections and accounting for the effects of flavor mixing. The high factorization scale μ ˜ m h ensures that our results are rather insensitive to the hadronic parameters characterizing the light-cone distribution amplitude of the vector meson. The second amplitude arises from the loop-induced effective hγγ * and hγZ * couplings, where the off-shell gauge boson converts into the vector meson. We devise a strategy to eliminate theoretical uncertainties related to this amplitude to almost arbitrary precision. This opens up the possibility to probe for modifications of the c- and b-quark Yukawa couplings and modifications of the s-quark Yukawa coupling in the high-luminosity LHC run. In particular, we show that measurements of the ratios Br( h → Υ( nS) γ)/Br( h → γγ) and can provide complementary information on the real and imaginary parts of the b-quark Yukawa coupling. More accurate measurements would be possible at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.

  3. Quark-antiquark states and their radiative transitions in terms of the spectral integral equation: Light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    We continue the investigation of mesons in terms of the spectral integral equation initiated before for the bbar b and cbar c systems; we consider the light-quark (u, d, s) mesons with masses M ≤ 3 GeV. The calculations have been performed for the mesons lying on linear trajectories in the (n, M 2) planes, where n is the radial quantum number. Our consideration relates to the qbar q states with one component in the flavor space, with the quark and antiquark masses equal to each other, such as π(0-+), ρ(1--), ω(1--), ϕ(1--), a 0(0++), a 1(1++), a 2(2++), b 1(1+-), f 2(2++), π 2(2-+), ρ 3(3--), ω 3(3--), ϕ 3(3--), π 4(4-+) at n ≤ 6. We obtained the wave functions and mass values of mesons lying on these trajectories. The corresponding trajectories are linear, in agreement with data. We have calculated the two-photon decays π, a 0(980), a 2(1320), f 2(1285), f 2(1525) and radiative transitions ρ, ω → γπ, which agree qualitatively with the experiment. On this basis, we extract the singular part of the interaction amplitude, which corresponds to the so-called “confinement interaction.” The description of the data requires the presence of the strong t-channel singularities for both scalar and vector exchanges.

  4. Differences between heavy and light quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    1997-11-10

    The quark Dyson-Schwinger equation shows that there are distinct differences between light and heavy quarks. The dynamical mass function of the light quarks is characterized by a sharp increase below 1 GeV, whereas the mass function of the heavy quarks is approximately constant in this infrared region. As a consequence, the heavy meson masses increase linearly with the current quark masses, whereas the light pseudoscalar meson masses are proportional to the square root of the current quark masses.

  5. Spectroscopy of light and heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.

    1986-11-01

    New results on various controversial light mesons are reviewed, including the glueball candidates f/sub 2/(1720) and eta(1460), the 1/sup + +/-0/sup - +/ mass ''coincidences'' f/sub 1/(1285)-eta(1275) and f/sub 1/(1420)-eta(1420), as well as evidence for the X(3100)..--> lambda..anti p+n..pi.. and the rho(1480)..-->..phi ..pi.., which have quantum numbers not allowed for q anti q. The ..gamma gamma -->..VV effects move out of the threshold region with data on ..gamma gamma --> omega..rho. Statistically weak data on GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../eta/sub c/ and the search for heavy quark P/sub 1/ states are presented. GAMMA/sub ee/, B/sub ..mu mu../, and GAMMA/sub tot/ for the UPSILON(1S), UPSILON(2S), and UPSILON(3S) are updated using new data and a consistent treatment of the radiative corrections for GAMMA/sub ee/. New data on the mass splittings of the chi/sub b/(2P) compare favorably with the scalar confinement model, which may however have new trouble. 150 refs., 43 figs.

  6. Radiatively generated hierarchy of lepton and quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    We propose a model for radiatively generating the hierarchy of the Standard Model (SM) fermion masses: tree-level top quark mass; 1-loop bottom, charm, tau and muon masses; 2-loop masses for the light up, down and strange quarks as well as for the electron; and 4-loop masses for the light active neutrinos. Our model is based on a softlybroken S 3 × Z 2 discrete symmetry. Its scalar sector consists only of one SM Higgs doublet and three electrically neutral SM-singlet scalars. We do not need to invoke either electrically charged scalar fields, or an extra SU2 L scalar doublet, or the spontaneous breaking of the discrete group, which are typical for other radiative models in the literature. The model features a viable scalar dark matter candidate.

  7. Addendum to Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral baryons with light or charm quarks''

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Tun, D.M.; Garcia, A.; Sanchez-Colon, G. Coordinacion de Dinamica Orbital, Telecomunicaciones de Mexico, Av. de las Telecomunicaciones s/n, C.P. 09300, Mexico, Distrito Federal Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, C.P. 07000, Mexico, Distrito Federal )

    1994-08-01

    We show that the radiative corrections containing terms up to order [alpha][ital q]/[pi][ital M][sub 1] for unpolarized semileptonic decays of baryons with positron emission can be obtained by simply reversing the sign of the axial-vector form factors in the corresponding final expressions of such decays with electron emission. This rule is valid regardless of the final kinematical variables chosen and of the particular Lorentz frame in which the final results are required.

  8. Diquark and light four-quark states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ailin; Huang Tao; Steele, Tom G.

    2007-08-01

    Four-quark states with different internal clusters are discussed within the constituent quark model. It is pointed out that the diquark concept is not meaningful in the construction of a tetraquark interpolating current in the QCD sum-rule approach, and hence existing sum-rule studies of four-quark states are incomplete. An updated QCD sum-rule determination of the properties of diquark clusters is then used as input for the constituent quark model to obtain the masses of light 0{sup ++} tetraquark states (i.e. a bound state of two diquark clusters). The results support the identification of {sigma}(600), f{sub 0}(980), and a{sub 0}(980) as the 0{sup ++} light tetraquark states, and seem to be inconsistent with the tetraquark state interpretation of the new BES observations of the near-threshold pp enhancements, X(1835) and X(1812), with the possible exception that X(1576) may be an exotic first orbital excitation of f{sub 0}(980) or a{sub 0}(980)

  9. Diquark and light four-quark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ailin; Huang, Tao; Steele, Tom G.

    2007-08-01

    Four-quark states with different internal clusters are discussed within the constituent quark model. It is pointed out that the diquark concept is not meaningful in the construction of a tetraquark interpolating current in the QCD sum-rule approach, and hence existing sum-rule studies of four-quark states are incomplete. An updated QCD sum-rule determination of the properties of diquark clusters is then used as input for the constituent quark model to obtain the masses of light 0++ tetraquark states (i.e. a bound state of two diquark clusters). The results support the identification of σ(600), f0(980), and a0(980) as the 0++ light tetraquark states, and seem to be inconsistent with the tetraquark state interpretation of the new BES observations of the near-threshold pp¯ enhancements, X(1835) and X(1812), with the possible exception that X(1576) may be an exotic first orbital excitation of f0(980) or a0(980).

  10. Light Four-Quark States and New Observations by BES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Huang, T.; Steele, T.

    Four-quark states are discussed within the constituent quark model.Incompleteness of existed studies of four-quark state with QCD sum rule is analyzed. The masses of diquark cluster were determined by QCD sum rules, and light four-quark states masses were obtained in terms of the diquark. The four-quark state possibility of the newly observed near-threshold pbar p enhancement, X(1835), X(1812) and X(1576) by BES is discussed.

  11. D(S) spectrum and leptonic decays with Fermilab heavy quarks and improved staggered light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro et al.

    2004-03-12

    We present preliminary results for the D{sub s} meson spectrum and decay constants in unquenched lattice QCD. Simulations are carried out with 2 + 1 dynamical quarks using gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration. We use the ''asqtad'' a{sup 2} improved staggered action for the light quarks, and the clover heavy quark action with the Fermilab interpretation. We compare our spectrum results with the newly discovered 0{sup +} and 1{sup +} states in the D{sub s} system.

  12. Radiative corrections to top-quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilam, G.; Mendel, R. R.; Migneron, R.; Soni, A.

    1991-06-01

    We calculate all radiative corrections to one-loop order for the main decay of the top quark, t-->b+W, in the standard model, retaining exact dependence on all masses. For mt=150 GeV and MH=100 GeV we find a -2.9% (-6.9%) correction with a very weak dependence on the Higgs-boson mass, in renormalization schemes that use α, GF, and MZ (GF, MW, and MZ) as input parameters. Out of the above results, -8.5% is due to QCD. The mt and MH dependence is given up to 300 and 1000 GeV, respectively. The inadequacy of a leading mt calculation is pointed out.

  13. QCD thermodynamics with light quarks and glueball spectra with dynamical quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1989-11-01

    Simulations of Lattice QCD with 4 flavors of light staggered quarks (m = .025) were performed on a 12{sup 3} {times} 4 lattice, confirming the first order nature of the transition. Lattice QCD with a light isodoublet of staggered quarks (m = .0125), and a heavier singlet (m = .25) was studied, also on a 12{sup 3} {times} 4 lattice. The order of the transition was less clear. Improved glueball wavefunctions have been used to study glueball spectra in theories incorporating dynamical quarks. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A radiative model of quark masses with binary tetrahedral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A radiative model of quark and lepton masses utilizing the binary tetrahedral (T‧) flavor symmetry, or horizontal symmetry, is proposed which produces the first two generation of quark masses through their interactions with vector-like quarks that carry charges under an additional U (1). By softly-breaking the T‧ to a residual Z4 through the vector-like quark masses, a CKM mixing angle close to the Cabibbo angle is produced. In order to generate the cobimaximal neutrino oscillation pattern (θ13 ≠ 0 ,θ23 = π / 4 ,δCP = ± π / 2) and protect the horizontal symmetry from arbitrary corrections in the lepton sector, there are automatically two stabilizing symmetries in the dark sector. Several benchmark cases where the correct relic density is achieved in a multi-component DM scenario, as well as the potential collider signatures of the vector-like quarks are discussed.

  15. Light Higgs and vector-like quarks without prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Mustać, Ivana

    2013-07-01

    Light vector-like quarks with non-renormalizable couplings to the Higgs are a common feature of models trying to address the electroweak (EW) hierarchy problem by treating the Higgs as a pseudo-goldstone boson of a global (approximate) symmetry. We systematically investigate the implications of the leading dimension five operators on Higgs phenomenology in presence of dynamical up- and down-type weak singlet as well as weak doublet vector-like quarks. After taking into account constraints from precision EW and flavour observables we show that contrary to the renormalizable models, significant modifications of Higgs properties are still possible and could shed light on the role of vector-like quarks in solutions to the EW hierarchy problem. We also briefly discuss implications of higher dimensional operators for direct vector-like quark searches at the LHC.

  16. Role of heavy quarks in light hadron fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epele, Manuel; García Canal, Carlos; Sassot, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the role of heavy quarks in the production of light flavored hadrons and in the determination of the corresponding nonperturbative hadronization probabilities. We define a general mass variable flavor number scheme for fragmentation functions that accounts for heavy quark mass effects, and perform a global QCD analysis to an up-to-date data set including very precise Belle and BABAR results. We show that the mass dependent picture provides a much more accurate and consistent description of the data.

  17. Light-quark masses from unquenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Tsutsui, N.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate the light meson spectrum and the light quark masses by lattice QCD simulation, treating all light quarks dynamically and employing the Iwasaki gluon action and the nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quark action. The calculations are made at the squared lattice spacings at an equal distance a{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.005, 0.01, and 0.015 fm{sup 2}, and the continuum limit is taken assuming an O(a{sup 2}) discretization error. The light meson spectrum is consistent with experiment. The up, down, and strange quark masses in the MS scheme at 2 GeV are m=(m{sub u}+m{sub d})/2=3.55{sub -0.28}{sup +0.65} MeV and m{sub s}=90.1{sub -6.1}{sup +17.2} MeV where the error includes statistical and all systematic errors added in quadrature. These values contain the previous estimates obtained with the dynamical u and d quarks within the error.

  18. Multiplicity difference between heavy- and light-quark jets revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokshitzer, Yu L.; Fabbri, F.; Khoze, V. A.; Ochs, W.

    2006-02-01

    The perturbative QCD approach to multiparticle production predicts a characteristic suppression of particle multiplicity in a heavy-quark jet as compared to a light-quark jet. In the modified leading logarithmic approximation (MLLA) the multiplicity difference δ_{Qell} between heavy- and light-quark jets is derived in terms of a few other experimentally measured quantities. The earlier prediction for b-quarks needs revision in the light of new experimental results and the improvement in the understanding of the experimental data. We now find δ_{bell} = 4.4±0.4. The updated MLLA results on δ_{bell} and δ_{cell} are compared with the present data from e + e - annihilation. Their expected energy independence is confirmed within the energy range between 29 and 200 GeV; the absolute values are now in better agreement with experiment than in the previous analysis, and the remaining difference can be attributed largely to next-to-MLLA contributions, an important subset of which are identified and evaluated.

  19. Hadron production in light and heavy, quark and antiquark jets

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The authors review four hadronization studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, involving separation of light (Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} u{anti u}, d{anti d}, s{anti s}), c, and b flavors using precision vertexing, and separation of q- and {anti q}-jets using the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They measured the differences between the average charged multiplicities in Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} light, {r_arrow} c{anti c}, and {r_arrow}b{anti b} events, and found that the results were consistent with predictions of perturbative QCD. Next, they measured {pi}/{Kappa}/p/{Kappa}{sup 0}/{Lambda}{sup 0} production in light events for the first time, and compared with production in c- and b-flavor events. They then examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. Lastly, they performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method.

  20. Multiplicity Difference Between Heavy and Light Quark Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Fabrizio

    2007-11-01

    A peculiar prediction of perturbative QCD, with the assumption of Local Parton Hadron Duality, is that the difference in mean hadron multiplicity between heavy and light quark initiated events in e+e- annihilation, δQℓ, is energy independent. In the Modified Leading Logarithmic Approximation (MLLA), the numerical value of the constant is derived in terms of a few experimentally measurable quantities. While the energy independence of δQℓ has been succesfully verified experimentally for b-quarks up to the highest LEP2 energy, the numerical prediction originally published in 1992, δ MLLAbl = 5.5 ± 0.8, clearly overestimates the experimental results. In this work, done in collaboration with Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Valery A. Khoze and Wolfgang Ochs, we show that the original MLLA prediction needs a revision, in the light of new experimental results and the improvement in the understanding of the experimental data. We now find δ MLLAbl = 4.4 ± 0.4, in better agreement with experiment, and we show that the remaining difference can be attributed largely to next-to-MLLA contributions, an important subset of which are identified and evaluated. The situation for charmed quarks is also reviewed.

  1. Multiplicity Difference between Heavy and Light Quark Jets Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Fabrizio

    2006-04-01

    A peculiar prediction of perturbative QCD, obtained within the Local Parton Hadron Duality (LPHD) framework, is that the multiplicity difference δQl between heavy and light quark jets produced in e+e- annihilation is energy independent. In the Modified Leading Logarithmic Approximation (MLLA) the corresponding constant is derived in terms of a few experimentally measurable quantities. While the energy independence of δQl has been succesfully verified experimentally for b-quarks up to the highest LEP2 energy, its numerical prediction (δblMLLA = 5.5 ± 0.8) overestimates the experimental results. The work presented in this talk, done in collaboration with Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Valery A. Khoze and Wolfgang Ochs, shows that in the light of new experimental results and the improvement in the understanding of the experimental data, this prediction needs indeed a revision. We now find δbl = 4.4 ± 0.4, in better agreement with experiment, and we shaw that the remaining difference can be attributed largely to next-to-MLLA contributions, an important subset of which are identified and evaluated. The situation with charmed quarks is also reviewed.

  2. Radiative leptonic Bc decay in the relativistic independent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2008-12-01

    The radiative leptonic decay Bc-→μ-ν¯μγ is analyzed in its leading order in a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratio for this decay in the vanishing lepton mass limit is obtained as Br(Bc→μνμγ)=6.83×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure-dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. The contributions of the bremsstrahlung and the structure-dependent diagrams, as well as their additive interference parts, are compared and found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, the predicted photon energy spectrum is observed here to be almost symmetrical about the peak value of the photon energy at Ẽγ≃(MBc)/(4), which may be quite accessible experimentally at LHC in near future.

  3. Light-cone distribution amplitudes for heavy-quark hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Guido; Feldmann, Thorsten; Wang, Yu-Ming; Yip, Matthew W. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We construct parametrizations of light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) for B-mesons and Λ b -baryons that obey various theoretical constraints, and which are simple to use in factorization theorems relevant for phenomenological applications in heavy-flavour physics. In particular, we find the eigenfunctions of the Lange-Neubert renormalization kernel, which allow for a systematic implementation of renormalization-group evolution effects for both B-meson and Λ b -baryon decays. We also present a new strategy to construct LCDA models from momentum-space projectors, which can be used to implement Wandzura-Wilczek-like relations, and which allow for a comparison with theoretical approaches that go beyond the collinear limit for the light-quark momenta in energetic heavy-hadron decays.

  4. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ ˜ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q_v(x) and δ q_v(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN).

  5. Parton distribution in pseudoscalar mesons with a light-front constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Ahmed, Isthiaq; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    We compute the distribution amplitudes of the pion and kaon in the light-front constituent quark model with the symmetric quark-bound state vertex function [1, 2, 3]. In the calculation we explicitly include the flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking effect in terms of the constituent quark masses of the up (down) and strange quarks. To calculate the kaon parton distribution functions (PDFs), we use both the conditions in the light-cone wave function, i.e., when s ¯ quark is on-shell, and when u quark is on-shell, and make a comparison between them. The kaon PDFs calculated in the two different conditions clearly show asymmetric behaviour due to the flavor SU(3)-symmetry breaking implemented by the quark masses [4, 5].

  6. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  7. Three-quark light-cone amplitudes of the proton and quark orbital-motion-dependent observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong; Ma, Jian-Ping; Yuan, Feng

    2003-03-01

    We study the three-quark light-cone amplitudes of the proton including quarks' transverse momenta. We classify these amplitudes using a newly-developed method in which light-cone wave functions are constructed from a class of light-cone matrix elements. We derive the constraints on the amplitudes from parity and time-reversal symmetries. We use the amplitudes to calculate the physical observables which vanish when the quark orbital angular momentum is absent. These include transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions Δ qT( x, k⊥), qT( x, k⊥), δq( x, k⊥), and δqL( x, k⊥), twist-three parton distributions gT( x) and hL( x), helicity-flip generalized parton distributions E( x, ξ=0, Q2) and its associates, and the Pauli form factor F2( Q2).

  8. Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    In these lectures I want to speak about at least two interpretations of the concept of quarks for hadrons and the possible relations between them. First I want to talk about quarks as "constituent quarks". These were used especially by G. Zweig (1964) who referred to them as aces. One has a sort of a simple model by which one gets elementary results about the low-lying bound and resonant states of mesons and baryons, and certain crude symmetry properties of these states, by saying that the hadrons act as if they were made up of subunits, the constituent quarks q. These quarks are arranged in an isotopic spin doublet u, d and an isotopic spin singlet s, which has the same charge as d and acts as if it had a slightly higher mass…

  9. Light-light and heavy-light mesons in the model of QCD string with quarks at the ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefediev, A. V.

    2002-06-01

    The variational einbein field method is applied to the model of the QCD string with quarks at the ends for the case of light-light and heavy-light mesons. Special attention is payed to the proper string dynamics. The correct string slope of the Regge trajectories is reproduced for light-light states which comes out from the picture of rotating string. Masses of several low-lying orbitally and radially excited states in the D, Ds, B, and Bs meson spectra are calculated and a good agreement with the experimental data as well as with recent lattice calculations is found. The role of the string correction to the interquark interaction is discussed at the example of the identification of D*' (2637) state recently claimed by DELPHI Collaboration. For the heavy-light mesons the standard constants used in Heavy Quark Effective Theory are extracted and compared to the results of other approaches.

  10. Light-by-Light Hadronic Corrections to the Muon G-2 Problem Within the Nonlocal Chiral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, A. E.; Radzhabov, A. E.; Zhevlakov, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    Results of calculation of the light-by-light contribution from the lightest neutral pseudoscalar and scalar mesons and the dynamical quark loop to the muon anomalous magnetic moment are discussed in the framework of the nonlocal SU(3) × SU(3) chiral quark model. The model is based on four-quark interaction of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type and Kobayashi-Maskawa-`t Hooft six-quark interaction. The full kinematic dependence of vertices with off-shell mesons and photons in intermediate states in the light-by-light scattering amplitude is taken into account. All calculations are elaborated in explicitly gauge-invariant manner. These results complete calculations of all hadronic light-by-light scattering contributions to aμ in the leading order in the 1/Nc expansion. The final result does not allow the discrepancy between the experiment and the Standard Model to be explained.

  11. Four-quark and hybrid mixing in the light-quark vector sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnachie, A.; Kalashnikova, Yu. S.

    1993-12-01

    The data on e + e - annihilation are shown to be incompatible with an interpretation of the observed vector mesons asqbar q excitations. It is necessary to consider mixing with somenon - qbar q system. Two specific models are considered: either four-quark states or hybrid states mixing with the conventional quark-antiquark excitations. Both models are compatible with the present e + e - annihilation data. It is possible to incorporate the 1.3 GeV J PC =1-- state seen by LASS in the ππ channel in the four-quark model, but this is not possible with the hybrid model.

  12. Light colored scalars and the up quarks phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Doršner, Ilja; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Košnik, Nejc

    2010-12-01

    A colored weak singlet scalar can accommodate the 2 σ disagreement of the measured forward-backward asymmetry from the Standard model prediction in the tt¯ production at the Tevatron. Such colored scalars appear in a class of grand unified theories. Their couplings to up quarks can be fully constrained using D-D oscillation observables, as well as di-jet and single top production measurements at the Tevatron. After making predictions for the flavour changing neutral current transitions in the charm and top quark sectors, we discuss the impact of these constraints on the texture of the up-quark mass matrix within a class of grand unified models.

  13. Light hadron spectroscopy in two-flavor QCD with small sea quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Namekawa, Y.; Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Lesk, V. I.; Umeda, T.; Okawa, M.

    2004-10-01

    We extend the study of the light hadron spectrum and the quark mass in two-flavor QCD to smaller sea quark mass, corresponding to m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.60-0.35. Numerical simulations are carried out using the RG-improved gauge action and the meanfield-improved clover quark action at {beta}=1.8 (a=0.2 fm from {rho} meson mass). We observe that the light hadron spectrum for small sea quark mass does not follow the expectation from chiral extrapolations with quadratic functions made from the region of m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.80-0.55. Whereas fits with either polynomial or continuum chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) fail, the Wilson ChPT (WChPT) that includes a{sup 2} effects associated with explicit chiral symmetry breaking successfully fits the whole data: In particular, WChPT correctly predicts the light quark mass spectrum from simulations for medium heavy quark mass, such as m{sub PS}/m{sub V} > or approx. 0.5. Reanalyzing the previous data with the use of WChPT, we find the mean up and down quark mass being smaller than the previous result from quadratic chiral extrapolation by approximately 10%, m{sub ud}{sup MS-bar}({mu}=2 GeV)=3.11(17) [MeV] in the continuum limit.

  14. Light bending in radiation background

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Taekoon E-mail: tlee@kunsan.ac.kr

    2014-01-01

    We consider the velocity shift of light in presence of radiation emitted by a black body. Within geometric optics formalism we calculate the bending angle of a light ray when there is a gradient in the energy density. We model the bending for two simplified cases. The bending angle is proportional to the inverse square power of the impact parameter (∝1/b{sup 2}) when the dilution of energy density is spherically symmetric. The bending angle is inversely proportional to the impact parameter (∝1/b) when the energy density dilutes cylindrically. Assuming that a neutron star is an isothermal black body, we estimate the order of magnitude for such bending angle and compare it with the bending angle by magnetic field.

  15. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Fady; Haisch, Ulrich; Monni, Pier Francesco; Re, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavor tagging. Compared to other proposals, it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated with quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  16. Some aspects of quark fragmentation: comparison of heavy (c) and light quarks (u,d,s)

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1984-01-01

    The data that the author presents come from the first two years of operation of the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at PEP, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 106 +- 5 pb/sup -1/ (20 pb/sup -1/ from the first year and 86 pb/sup -1/ from the second year's running). Since the quark-meson transitions may have a particularly simple form at the values of the momentum fraction Z = 2p/sub meson//..sqrt..s, we emphasize this aspect of the data, and show how a sample of e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. (u anti u, d anti d, s anti s) events can be selected. The characteristics of these events are compared to e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. c anti c selected by a D* tag.

  17. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Flynn, Jonathan M.; Izubuchi, Taku; Kawanai, Taichi; Lehner, Christoph; Soni, Amarjit; Van de Water, Ruth S.; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-03-10

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(αsa). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain fB0 = 196.2(15.7) MeV, fB+ = 195.4(15.8) MeV, fBs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, fBs/fB0 = 1.193(59), and fBs/fB+ = 1.220(82), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. In addition, these results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of B-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  18. Energy density of light quark jet using AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, R.; Horowitz, W. A.

    2017-01-01

    We study the energy loss rate of light quarks via the AdS/CFT correspondence in both a static and an expanding plasma. Unlike heavy quarks, light quark energy loss in AdS/CFT is surprisingly dependent on both the string initial conditions and the very definition of the jet itself in the gravity theory. We aim to more closely match the string initial conditions to those expected from perturbative quantum chromodyanics (pQCD)-the theory known to describe the physics of high-momentum particles at early times in heavy ion collisions-by computing the energy-momentum tensor associated with the propagation of the classical string solution. The jet energy-momentum tensor in a strongly-coupled calculation can be found by a superposition of contributions from a collection of point particles whose paths approximate the evolution of the string world-sheet. My results show that some times after creation the pair of quark-anti quark, the energy density is not time dependent. This means that the corresponding jet does not lose energy and the associated nuclear modification factor would be one as expected. Also, the results reveal the virtuality dependency of energy density distribution over space. As expected, the energy of a more virtual jet is spread over wider angles.

  19. Phenomenology of enhanced light quark Yukawa couplings and the W±h charge asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Felix

    2017-02-01

    I propose the measurement of the W ± h charge asymmetry as a consistency test for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs, which is sensitive to enhanced Yukawa couplings of the first and second generation quarks. I present a collider analysis for the charge asymmetry in the same-sign lepton final state, pp → W ± h → ( ℓ ± ν) ( ℓ ± νjj), aimed at discovery significance for the SM W ± h production mode in each charge channel with 300 fb-1 of 14 TeV LHC data. Using this decay mode, I estimate the statistical precision on the charge asymmetry should reach 0.4% with 3 ab-1 luminosity, enabling a strong consistency test of the SM Higgs hypothesis. I also discuss direct and indirect constraints on light quark Yukawa couplings from direct and indirect probes of the Higgs width as well as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider Higgs data. While the main effect from enhanced light quark Yukawa couplings is a rapid increase in the total Higgs width, such effects could be mitigated in a global fit to Higgs couplings, leaving the W ± h charge asymmetry as a novel signature to test directly the Higgs couplings to light quarks.

  20. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  1. Boosted event topologies from TeV scale light quark composite partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backović, Mihailo; Flacke, Thomas; Kim, Jeong Han; Lee, Seung J.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new search strategy for quark partners which decay into a boosted Higgs and a light quark. As an example, we consider phenomenologically viable right handed up-type quark partners of mass ˜ 1 TeV in composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone-boson Higgs models within the context of flavorful naturalness. Our results show that S/B > 1 and signal significance of ˜ 7σ is achievable at TeV LHC with 35 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, sufficient to claim discovery of a new particle. A combination of a multi-dimensional boosted Higgs tagging technique, kinematics of pair produced heavy objects and b-tagging serves to efficiently diminish the large QCD backgrounds while maintaining adequate levels of signal efficiency. We present the analysis in the context of effective field theory, such that our results can be applied to any future search for pair produced vector-like quarks with decay modes to Higgs and a light jet.

  2. Enhanced Higgs associated production with a top quark pair in the NMSSM with light singlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2017-02-01

    Precision measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs resonance recently discovered at the LHC have determined that its properties are similar to the ones of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. However, the current uncertainties in the determination of the Higgs boson couplings leave room for significant deviations from the SM expectations. In fact, if one assumes no correlation between the top-quark and gluon couplings to the Higgs, the current global fit to the Higgs data lead to central values of the Higgs couplings to the bottom-quark and the top-quark that are about 2 σ away from the SM predictions. In a previous work, we showed that such a scenario could be realized in the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the SM (NMSSM), for heavy singlets and light MSSM-like Higgs bosons and scalar top quarks, but for couplings that ruined the perturbative consistency of the theory up to the GUT scale. In this work we show that a perturbative consistent scenario, for somewhat heavier stops, may be obtained in the presence of light singlets. An interesting bonus of this scenario is the possibility of explaining an excess of events observed in CP-even Higgs searches at LEP2.

  3. Flavor SU(3) properties of beauty tetraquark states with three different light quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-10-01

    Beauty tetraquark states X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) composed of b bar su d bar , b bar ds u bar , and b bar ud s bar , are unique that all the four valence quarks are different. Although the claim of existence of the first two states by D0 was not confirmed by data from LHCb, the possibility of such states still generated a lot of interests and should be pursued further. Non-observation of X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) states by LHCb may be just due to a still lower production rate than the limit of LHCb or at some different mass ranges. In this work we use light quark SU (3) flavor symmetry as guideline to classify symmetry properties of beauty tetraquark states. The multiplets which contain states with three different light quarks must be one of 6 bar or 15 of SU (3) representations. We study possible decays of such a tetraquark state into a B meson and a light pseudoscalar octet meson by constructing a leading order chiral Lagrangian, and also provide search strategies to determine whether a given tetraquark state of this type belongs to 6 bar or 15. If X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) belongs to 15, there are new doubly charged tetraquark states b bar uu d bar and b bar uu s bar .

  4. Investigation of light baryons in a three-body quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a three-body quark model based on hypercentral approach for investigating the internal structure of light baryons. The analytically obtained energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the three-body problem have been used in the calculations of the mass spectrum of light baryons and electromagnetic elastic form factors of nucleon. The magnetic moments and charge radii of nucleon have also been calculated. We have compared the evaluated observables with experimental data and it has been shown that the present model provides a good description of the observed resonances.

  5. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  6. Search for heavy vector-like quarks coupling to light quarks in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Böser, S.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.

    2012-05-01

    This Letter presents a search for singly produced vector-like quarks, Q, coupling to light quarks, q. The search is sensitive to both charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) processes, pp → Qq → Wqq‧ and pp → Qq → Zqq‧ with a leptonic decay of the vector gauge boson. In 1.04 fb-1 of data taken in 2011 by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy √{ s} = 7 TeV, no evidence of such heavy vector-like quarks is observed above the expected Standard Model background. Limits on the heavy vector-like quark production cross section times branching ratio as a function of mass mQ are obtained. For a coupling κqQ = v /mQ, where v is the Higgs vacuum expectation value, 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of a vector-like quark are set at 900 GeV and 760 GeV from CC and NC processes, respectively.

  7. Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in pp ¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Rao, K; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-05-25

    We present a search for a new heavy particle X produced in association with a top quark, pp[over ¯]→t(X→t[over ¯]q) or pp[over ¯]→t[over ¯](X[over ¯]→tq[over ¯]), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a t[over ¯]+j or t+j resonance in tt[over ¯]+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1) collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (pp[over ¯]→Xt or X[over ¯]t[over ¯]) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for X masses ranging from 200 GeV/c(2) to 800 GeV/c(2), respectively.

  8. On quark-antiquark approximation in light front QCD with zero gluon modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, Roman; Prokhvatilov, Evgeni

    2016-01-22

    We consider a transition to the light front Hamiltonian from theories quantized on spacelike planes approaching to the light front. In this approach we preserve the dynamics of zero mode present in the theories near the light front. We make the limit transition differently for zero and nonzero modes. This leads to the appearance of some phenomenological parameter which can be used to describe vacuum effects. Also we use a lattice gauge invariant regularization in transverse coordinate space. As an illustration of our scheme we consider the quark-antiquark bound states problem in 2+1 dimensions. We construct basis states in the light front Fock space and provide detailed computations of the Hamiltonian matrix in this basis. These steps allow us to construct the matrix eigenvalue equation. In conclusion we discuss the nuances of obtained results.

  9. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16 sup 3 times 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A. . Dept. of Physics); Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D. . Supercomputer Computations Research Inst.); Kogut, J.B. . Dept. of Physics); Liu, W. ); Renken, R.L. (University of Central F

    1991-01-01

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical strange'' quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  10. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A.; Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D.; Kogut, J.B.; Liu, W.; Renken, R.L.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sugar, R.L.; Toussaint, D.; Wang, K.C.

    1991-12-31

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical ``strange`` quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  11. K-->pipi amplitudes from lattice QCD with a light charm quark.

    PubMed

    Giusti, L; Hernández, P; Laine, M; Pena, C; Wennekers, J; Wittig, H

    2007-02-23

    We compute the leading-order low-energy constants of the DeltaS=1 effective weak Hamiltonian in the quenched approximation of QCD with up, down, strange, and charm quarks degenerate and light. They are extracted by comparing the predictions of finite-volume chiral perturbation theory with lattice QCD computations of suitable correlation functions carried out with quark masses ranging from a few MeV up to half of the physical strange mass. We observe a DeltaI=1/2 enhancement in this corner of the parameter space of the theory. Although matching with the experimental result is not observed for the DeltaI=1/2 amplitude, our computation suggests large QCD contributions to the physical DeltaI=1/2 rule in the GIM limit, and represents the first step to quantify the role of the charm-quark mass in K-->pipi amplitudes. The use of fermions with an exact chiral symmetry is an essential ingredient in our computation.

  12. CHIRAL LIMIT AND LIGHT QUARK MASSES IN 2+1 FLAVOR DOMAIN WALL QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,E.; LIN, M.

    2007-07-30

    We present results for meson masses and decay constants measured on 24{sup 3} x 64 lattices using the domain wall fermion formulation with an extension of the fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 16 for N{sub f} 2 + 1 dynamical quark flavors. The lightest dynamical meson mass in our set-up is around 331MeV. while partially quenched mesons reach masses as low as 250MeV. The applicability of SU(3) x SU(3) and SU(2) x SU(2) (partially quenched) chiral perturbation theory will be compared and we quote values for the low-energy constants from both approaches. We will extract the average light quark and strange quark masses and use a non-perturbative renormalization technique (RI/MOM) to quote their physical values. The pion and kaon decay constants are determined at those values from our chiral fits and their ratio is used to obtain the CKM-matrix element |V{sub us}|. The results presented here include statistical errors only.

  13. Recent results in light-quark meson spectroscopy from Fermilab experiment E-760

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Church, M.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.; Marsh, W.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.

    1994-09-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 light-quark meson spectroscopy data for proton-antiproton annihilation to 3{pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}2{eta}, and 3{eta} in-flight have confirmed the 1500 MeV state at rest seen previously at CERN. Structures above this energy are complex, and preliminary results of amplitude analysis, in progress, for extracting spin quantum numbers show the possibility of nearly degenerate states for some of these structures. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Dependence on the quark masses of elastic phase shifts and light resonances within standard and unitarized ChPT

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Pelaez, J. R.

    2011-10-24

    We study the dependence of the {pi}{pi} scattering phase shifts on the light quark mass in both standard and unitarized SU(2) Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) to one and two loops. We then use unitarized SU(3) ChPT to study the elastic f{sub 0}(600),{kappa}(800), {rho}(770) and K{sup *}(892) resonances. The quark masses are varied up to values of interest for lattice studies. We find a very soft dependence on the light quark mass of the {pi}{pi} phase shifts at one loop and lightly stronger at two loops and a good agreement with lattice results. The SU(3) analysis shows that the properties of the {rho}(770) and K{sup *}(892) depend smoothly on the quark mass whereas the scalar resonances present a non-analyticity at high quark masses. We also confirm the lattice assumption of quark mass independence of the vector two-meson coupling that, however, is violated for scalars.

  15. Searching the inclusive ℓγE̸T+b-quark signature for radiative top quark decay and non-standard-model processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-07-01

    We compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton (ℓ), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E̸T), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV corresponding to 1.9fb-1 of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector. We find 28 ℓγbE̸T events versus an expectation of 31.0-3.5+4.1 events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, the largest SM source is radiative top-quark pair production, t tmacr +γ. In the data we observe 16 t tmacr γ candidate events versus an expectation from SM sources of 11.2-2.1+2.3. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total of 6.8-2.0+2.2 is due to SM top-quark production, we estimate the t tmacr γ cross section to be 0.15±0.08pb.

  16. QCD analysis of light charged Higgs production through polarized top quark decay in two different frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Abbaspour, S.

    2017-03-01

    Light and heavy charged Higgs bosons are predicted by many models with an extended Higgs sector such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM). Searches for the charged Higgs bosons have been done by the ATLAS and the CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collision. However, a definitive search of charged Higgs bosons still has to be carried out by the LHC experiments. The experimental observation of charged Higgs bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work we study the O({α}_s) correction to the energy spectrum of the inclusive bottom-flavored mesons ( X b ) in polarized top quark decays into a light charged Higgs boson ( m H+ < m t ) and a massless bottom quark followed by the hadronization process b → X b in the type-I 2HDM, i.e. t(↑) → H + b → H + X b + Jet. This spin-dependent energy distribution is studied in two different helicity coordinate systems. This study could be considered as a new channel to indirect search for the charged Higgs bosons. To present our phenomenological predictions, we restrict ourselves to the constraints on the m H+ - tan β parameter space determined by the recent results of the CMS and the ATLAS collaborations.

  17. Preliminary measurement of the charged multiplicities in b, c and light quark events from Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately in b, c and light quark (u, d, s) events from Z{sup 0} decays measured in the SLD experiment. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of b and light quark events, and reconstructed charmed mesons were used to select c quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: {anti n}{sub uds} = 20.21 {+-} 0.10 (stat.) {+-} 0.17 (syst.), {anti n}{sub c} = 21.28 {+-} 0.46 (stat.){sub -0.33}{sup +0.38} (syst.) and {anti n}{sub b} = 23.14 {+-} 0.10 (stat.){sub -0.34}{sup +0.35} (syst.), from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of c or b quark events and light quark events: {Delta}{anti n}{sub c} = 1.07 {+-} 0.47 (stat.){sub -0.30}{sup +0.36} (syst.) and {Delta}{anti n}{sub b} = 2.93 {+-} 0.14 (stat.){sub -0.29}{sup +0.30} (syst.). We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with perturbative QCD predictions. These combined results are in agreement with the QCD expectations and disfavor the hypothesis of flavor-independent fragmentation.

  18. Scalar K{pi} form factor and light-quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Jamin, Matthias; Oller, Jose Antonio; Pich, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Recent experimental improvements on K-decay data allow for a precise extraction of the strangeness-changing scalar K{pi} form factor and the related strange scalar spectral function. On the basis of this scalar as well as the corresponding pseudoscalar spectral function, the strange quark mass is determined to be m{sub s}(2 GeV)=92{+-}9 MeV. Further taking into account chiral perturbation theory mass ratios, the light up and down quark masses turn out to be m{sub u}(2 GeV)=2.7{+-}0.4 MeV as well as m{sub d}(2 GeV)=4.8{+-}0.5 MeV. As a by-product, we also find a value for the Cabibbo angle |V{sub us}|=0.2236(29) and the ratio of meson decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}=1.203(16). Performing a global average of the strange mass by including extractions from other channels as well as lattice QCD results yields m{sub s}(2 GeV)=94{+-}6 MeV.

  19. Cosmic ultraviolet background radiation and zodiacal light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Hartig, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the diffuse cosmic UV background in the 1700-2850-A range are presented. In agreement with previous results, the data have resulted in the detection at high Galactic latitude of an intensity of 300 + or - 100 photons/sq cm s sr A at 1800 A without correction for starlight or airglow, a similar intensity over the 1900-2500-A range after correction for measured airglow, and a similar intensity over the 2500-2800-A range after correction for zodiacal light. It is suggested that this radiation may originate partly in line radiation from a Galactic halo and partly from extragalactic sources, perhaps the integrated light of distant galaxies.

  20. Hadron spectrum, quark masses, and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R.; Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.

    2007-04-01

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3}48 and for pion masses down to {approx_equal}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho, and nucleon masses; the light and strange quark masses; and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a{approx_equal}0.1 fm and {approx_equal}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well.

  1. The light stop quark with small stop-neutralino difference in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Carena, Marcela S.; Freitas, A.; Finch, A.; Sopczak, A.; Kluge, Hannelies

    2005-12-01

    The MSSM can explain electro-weak symmetry breaking if one scalar top quark (stop) is light. In addition, in this framework, the neutralino is a good dark matter candidate and for small stop-neutralino mass differences dm{sub i} = 30 GeV, co-annihilation plays an important role to match the results from WMAP and SDSS for the relic density in the universe. In this scenario, the stops mainly decays into charm and neutralino, making its discovery difficult at hadron colliders due to background and trigger limitations. They present results for the discovery reach of the ILC for a DM candidate as low as 0(5 GeV) based on a realistic experimental simulation. Moreover, the stop parameters could be measured with high precision.

  2. Non-degenerate light quark masses from 2+1f lattice QCD+QED

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Shane; Blum, Thomas; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Sachrajda, Chris; Zhou, Ran

    2014-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the effects of isospin breaking in Lattice QCD+QED. This involves using Chiral Perturbation Theory with Electromagnetic corrections to find the renormalized, non-degenerate, light quark masses. The calculations are carried out on QCD ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using Domain Wall Fermions and the Iwasaki and Iwasaki+DSDR Gauge Actions with unitary pion masses down to 170 MeV. Non-compact QED is treated in the quenched approximation. The simulations use a $32^3$ lattice size with $a^{-1}=2.28(3)$ GeV (Iwasaki) and 1.37(1) (Iwasaki+DSDR). This builds on previous work from the RBC/UKQCD collaboration with lattice spacing $a^{-1}=1.78(4)$ GeV.

  3. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmoser, M.; Gossiaux, P.-B.; Gousset, T.; Aichelin, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  4. Light-quark and gluon jet discrimination in [Formula: see text] collisions at [Formula: see text] with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scott, W G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Sellers, G; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Sherwood, P; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Short, D; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simoniello, R; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sircar, A; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skottowe, H P; Skovpen, K Yu; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; Denis, R D St; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Stavina, P; Steele, G; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramania, Hs; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tamsett, M C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thong, W M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tran, H L; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urquijo, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wright, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    A likelihood-based discriminant for the identification of quark- and gluon-initiated jets is built and validated using 4.7 fb[Formula: see text] of proton-proton collision data at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data samples with enriched quark or gluon content are used in the construction and validation of templates of jet properties that are the input to the likelihood-based discriminant. The discriminating power of the jet tagger is established in both data and Monte Carlo samples within a systematic uncertainty of [Formula: see text] 10-20 %. In data, light-quark jets can be tagged with an efficiency of [Formula: see text] while achieving a gluon-jet mis-tag rate of [Formula: see text] in a [Formula: see text] range between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for jets in the acceptance of the tracker. The rejection of gluon-jets found in the data is significantly below what is attainable using a Pythia 6 Monte Carlo simulation, where gluon-jet mis-tag rates of 10 % can be reached for a 50 % selection efficiency of light-quark jets using the same jet properties.

  5. Excited and exotic charmonium, D s and D meson spectra for two light quark masses from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Gavin K. C.; O'Hara, Cian; Moir, Graham; Peardon, Michael; Ryan, Sinéad M.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Tims, David

    2016-12-01

    We present highly-excited charmonium, D s and D meson spectra from dynamical lattice QCD calculations with light quarks corresponding to M π ˜ 240 MeV and compare these to previous results with M π ˜ 400 MeV. Utilising the distillation framework, large bases of carefully constructed interpolating operators and a variational procedure, we extract and reliably identify the continuum spin of an extensive set of excited mesons. These include states with exotic quantum numbers which, along with a number with non-exotic quantum numbers, we identify as having excited gluonic degrees of freedom and interpret as hybrid mesons. Comparing the spectra at the two different M π , we find only a mild light-quark mass dependence and no change in the overall pattern of states.

  6. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)32+ and Δ(1600)32+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE PAGES

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    Here, the magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  7. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  8. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  9. QUARK-NOVAE OCCURRING IN MASSIVE BINARIES: A UNIVERSAL ENERGY SOURCE IN SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-10

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 10{sup 52} erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  10. Determination of the b-quark Mass and Nonperturbative parameters in Semileptonic and Radiative Penguin Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Kerstin; collaboration, for the BABAR

    2008-01-23

    Knowing the mass of the b-quark is essential to the study of the structure and decays of B mesons as well as to future tests of the Higgs mechanism of mass generation. We present recent preliminary measurements of the b-quark mass and related nonperturbative parameters from moments of kinematic distributions in charmed and charmless semileptonic and radiative penguin B decays. Their determination from charmless semileptonic B decays is the first measurement in this mode. The data were collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center at a center-of-momentum energy of 10:58 GeV.

  11. Charmed and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants from four-flavor lattice QCD with physical light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Komijani, J.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Foley, J.; Levkova, L.; Du, D.; Laiho, J.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kim, J.; Toussaint, D.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Simone, J. N.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.; Neil, E. T.; Sugar, R.

    2014-10-30

    We compute the leptonic decay constants fD+, fDs, and fK+ and the quark-mass ratios mc/ms and ms/ml in unquenched lattice QCD using the experimentally determined value of fπ+ for normalization. We use the MILC highly improved staggered quark ensembles with four dynamical quark flavors—up, down, strange, and charm—and with both physical and unphysical values of the light sea-quark masses. The use of physical pions removes the need for a chiral extrapolation, thereby eliminating a significant source of uncertainty in previous calculations. Four different lattice spacings ranging from a0.06 to 0.15 fm are included in the analysis to control the extrapolation to the

  12. Strong decays of heavy-light mesons in a chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xian-Hui; Zhao, Qiang

    2008-07-01

    We carry out a systematic study of the heavy-light meson strong decays in a chiral quark model. For the S-wave vectors [D*(2007), D*±(2010)], P-wave scalars [D0*(2400), B0*(5730)], and tensors [D2*(2460), Ds2*(2573)], we obtain results in good agreement with the experimental data. For the axial vectors D1(2420) and D1'(2430), a state mixing scheme between 1P11 and 1P13 is favored with a mixing angle ϕ≃-(55±5)°, which is consistent with previous theoretical predictions. The same mixing scheme also applies to Ds1(2460) and Ds1(2536) that accounts for the narrow width of the Ds1(2536) and its dominant decay into D*K. For B1(5725) and B1'(5732), such a mixing explains well the decay width of the former but leads to an even broader B1'(5732). Predictions for the strange-bottom axial vectors are also made. For the undetermined meson D*(2640), we find that they fit well in the radially excited state 2S13 according to its decay mode. The newly observed DsJ*(2860) strongly favors the D-wave excited state 1D33. For DsJ*(2632) and DsJ*(2690), we find they are difficult to fit in any Ds excitations in that mass region, if the experimental data are accurate. Theoretical predictions for decay modes of those unobserved states as multiplets of 2S and 1D waves are also presented, which should be useful for the further experimental search for those states.

  13. Nucleon scalar and tensor charges from lattice QCD with light Wilson quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Negele, J. W.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.; Engelhardt, M.; Krieg, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present 2+1 flavor lattice QCD calculations of the nucleon scalar and tensor charges. Using the BMW clover-improved Wilson action with pion masses between 149 and 356 MeV and three source-sink separations between 0.9 and 1.4 fm, we achieve good control over excited-state contamination and extrapolation to the physical pion mass. As a consistency check, we also present results from calculations using unitary domain wall fermions with pion masses between 297 and 403 MeV, and using domain wall valence quarks and staggered sea quarks with pion masses between 293 and 597 MeV.

  14. Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop shop. View to east. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Flashes of light-radiation therapy to the brain.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Shtraus, Natan

    2015-08-01

    We present a series of three patients who received therapeutic external beam radiation to the brain and experienced a phenomenon of the sensation of flashes of bright or blue light, simultaneous with radiation delivery. We relate this benign phenomenon to low-dose exposure to the eye fields and postulate that the occurrence is underreported in this treated population.

  16. Heavy quark signals from radiative corrections to the Z{sup '} boson decay in 3-3-1 models

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2009-10-01

    One-loop corrections to the Z{sup '} decay width are derived and analyzed in the framework of the general form of the 3-3-1 models. We identify two important sources of corrections: oblique corrections associated to the Z{sup '} propagator through vacuum polarizations induced by virtual particle-antiparticle pairs of new heavy quarks J, and vertex corrections to the Z{sup '}qq vertex through virtual exchange of new K{sup Q{sub 1,2}} gauge bosons. Fixing a specific renormalization scheme, we obtain dominant oblique corrections that exhibit a quadratic dependence on the J quark mass, which are absorbed into two oblique parameters: a global parameter {rho}{sub f}{sup '} which modify the Z{sup '} decay width, and a parameter {kappa}{sub f}{sup '} that define effective Z{sup '} couplings. Numerical results in an specific 3-3-1 model gives a strong contribution of the oblique corrections from about 1.3% in the d(s) quark channel to 10.5% in the neutrino channel, for m{sub J}=2 TeV. The vertex corrections contribute to the oblique corrections up to 1.4% for the same channel and m{sub J} value. For pp collisions at the CERN LHC collider, we find that the corrections significantly modify the shape of the cross section distributions for e{sup +}e{sup -} and tt final states, where the distributions including the radiative corrections increases up to 1.23 times the tree-level distribution for the dielectron events and to 1.07 for the top events when m{sub J}=3 TeV.

  17. Radiation properties of Turkish light source facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Zafer

    2015-09-01

    The synchrotron light source TURKAY, which is one of the sub-project of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC), has been supported by Ministry of Development of Turkey since 2006. The facility is designed to generate synchrotron radiation (SR) in range 0.01-60 keV from a 3 GeV storage ring with a beam emittance of 0.51 nm rad. Synchrotron radiation will be produced from the bending magnets and insertion devices in the storage ring. In this paper design studies for possible devices to produce synchrotron radiation and radiation properties of these devices with TURKAY storage ring parameters are presented.

  18. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  19. Precise MS light-quark masses from lattice QCD in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Jaeger, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    We compute the conversion factors needed to obtain the MS and renormalization-group-invariant (RGI) up, down, and strange quark masses at next-to-next-to-leading order from the corresponding parameters renormalized in the recently proposed RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }renormalization schemes. This is important for obtaining the MS masses with the best possible precision from numerical lattice QCD simulations, because the customary RI{sup (')}/MOM scheme is afflicted with large irreducible uncertainties both on the lattice and in perturbation theory. We find that the smallness of the known one-loop matching coefficients is accompanied by even smaller two-loop contributions. From a study of residual scale dependences, we estimate the resulting perturbative uncertainty on the light-quark masses to be about 2% in the RI/SMOM scheme and about 3% in the RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }scheme. Our conversion factors are given in fully analytic form, for general covariant gauge and renormalization point. We provide expressions for the associated anomalous dimensions.

  20. Nucleon Resonance Electrocouplings from Light-Front Quark Models at {\\varvec{Q}}^2 up to 12 GeV^2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhovsky, Igor T.; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-11-01

    A relativistic light-front quark model is used to describe both the elastic nucleon and nucleon-Roper transition form factors in a large Q^2 range, up to 35 GeV^2 for the elastic and up to 12 GeV^2 for the resonance case. Relativistic three-quark configurations satisfying the Pauli exclusion principle on the light-front are used for the derivation of the current matrix elements. The Roper resonance is considered as a mixed state of a three-quark core configuration and a molecular N+σ hadron component. Based on this ansatz we obtain a realistic description of both processes, elastic and inelastic, in the sector of positive parity and show that existing experimental data are indicative of a composite structure of the Roper resonance. A useful generalization of this technique is suggested for description of negative parity nucleon resonances 1/2^-, 3/2^-, 5/2^-.

  1. Flavor Changing Neutral Coupling Mediated Radiative Top Quark Decays at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Drobnak, Jure; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2010-06-25

    We compute the branching ratios for the rare top quark decays t{yields}c{gamma} and t{yields}cZ mediated by effective flavor changing neutral couplings at next-to-leading order in QCD, including the effects due to operator mixing. After resumming contributions of the order of [{alpha}{sub s}log({Lambda}/m{sub t})]{sup n}, where {Lambda} is the scale at which the effective operators are generated, using renormalization group methods, we compute finite matrix element corrections and study the effects of experimental kinematic cuts on the extracted branching ratios. We find that the t{yields}c{gamma} decay can also be used to probe the effective operators mediating t{yields}cg processes, since the latter can naturally contribute 10% or more to the radiative decay. Conversely, any experimental signal of t{yields}cg would indicate a natural lower bound on t{yields}cZ, {gamma}.

  2. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  3. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the RI/SMOM schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, C.; Almeida, L.

    2010-04-26

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the {ovr MS} scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{mu}} schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f} = 3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  4. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Leandro G.; Sturm, Christian

    2010-09-01

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the MS scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f}=3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  5. Two-particle twist-3 distribution amplitudes of the pion and kaon in the light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the two-particle twist-3 distribution amplitudes (DAs) of the pseudoscalar mesons, in particular pseudoscalar [ϕ3;M P(x ) ] and pseudotensor [ϕ3;M σ(x ) ] DAs of the pion and kaon, in the light-front quark model based on the variational principle. We find that the behavior of the conformal symmetry in each meson distribution amplitude depends on the chiral-limit characteristics of the light-front trial wave function taken in the variational principle. We specifically take the two different light-front trial wave functions, Gaussian vs power-law type, and discuss their characteristics of the conformal symmetry in the chiral symmetry limit as well as their resulting degree of the conformal symmetry breaking in ϕ3;M P(x ) and ϕ3;M σ(x ) depending on the trial wave function taken in the computation. We present numerical results of transverse moments, Gegenbauer moments and ξ -moments and compare them with other available model estimates. The SU(3) flavor-symmetry breaking effect is also quantified with the numerical computation.

  6. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  7. Revisiting scalar quark hidden sector in light of 750-GeV diphoton resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the model of a CP -even singlet scalar resonance proposed in arXiv:1507.02483 , where the resonance appears as the lightest composite state made of scalar quarks participating in hidden strong dynamics. We show that the model can consistently explain the excess of diphoton events with an invariant mass around 750 GeV reported by both the ATLAS and CMS experiments. We also discuss the nature of the charged composite states in the TeV range which accompany to the neutral scalar. Due to inseparability of the dynamical scale and the mass of the resonance, the model also predicts signatures associated with the hidden dynamics such as leptons, jets along with multiple photons at future collider experiments. We also associate the TeV-scale dynamics behind the resonance with an explanation of dark matter.

  8. Wigner Distributions of Quarks for Different Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Jai; Mukherjee, Asmita; Nair, Sreeraj

    2017-03-01

    We calculate quark Wigner distributions using the light-front wave functions in a dressed quark model. In this model, a proton target is replaced by a simplified spin-1/2 state, namely a quark dressed with a gluon. We calculate the Wigner distributions for different polarization configuration of quark and the target state in this model.

  9. Effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on erythema and pigmentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Lindsay R; Almutawa, Fahad; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on cutaneous erythema, immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning are affected by a variety of factors. Some of these factors include the depth of cutaneous penetration of the specific wavelength, the individual skin type, and the absorption spectra of the different chromophores in the skin. UVB is an effective spectrum to induce erythema, which is followed by delayed tanning. UVA induces immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning. At high doses, UVA (primarily UVA2) can also induce erythema in individuals with skin types I-II. Visible light has been shown to induce erythema and a tanning response in dark skin, but not in fair skinned individuals. Infrared radiation produces erythema, which is probably a thermal effect. In this article we reviewed the available literature on the effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on the skin in regards to erythema and pigmentation. Much remains to be learned on the cutaneous effects of visible light and infrared radiation.

  10. Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A.

    2011-10-15

    We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

  11. Lighting system with optical fibers based on enery of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajkowski, Maciej

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents concepts of lighting systems using artifial light and natural solar radiation in illuminating rooms; it shortly exhibits systems for obtaining energy of solar radiation with the use of concentrators and heliostats following the Sun in its movement.

  12. Decays of heavy vector mesons in the quark confinement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Valit, Yu. M.

    1995-12-01

    We analyze the radiative and hadronic decays of vector heavy mesons within the relativistic quark model with confined light quarks. The only adjustable parameters in this approach are the values of constituent masses of heavy quarks ( M c and M b). We adjust them using the available experimental data from CLEO and ARGUS-collaborations for the D *→ Dγ and D *→ Dπ branching ratios. It is found that the value of M c varies approximately in the interval 1.3 GeV< M c<1.65 GeV. We give the predictions for the absolute values of decay widths and compare our results with those obtained in other approaches. Also we consider the heavy quark limit M Q→∞ with E=M H-MQ=const for the decay amplitudes.

  13. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  14. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  15. Measurement of Radiation - Light Field Congruence using a Photodiode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderson, Michael J.

    Improved treatment techniques in radiation therapy provide incentive to reduce treatment margins, thereby increasing the necessity for more accurate geometrical setup of the linear accelerator and accompanying components. In this thesis, we describe the development of a novel device that enables precise and automated measurement of radiation-light field congruence of medical linear accelerators for the purpose of improving setup accuracy, and standardizing repeated quality control activities. The device consists of a silicon photodiode array, an evaluation board, a data acquisition card, and a laptop. Using the device, we show that the radiation-light field congruence for both 6 and 15 MV beams is within 2 mm on a Varian Clinac 21 EX medical linear accelerator. Because measurements are automated, ambiguities resulting from observer variability are removed, greatly improving the reproducibility of measurements over time and across observers. We expect the device to be useful in providing consistent measurements on linear accelerators used for stereotactic radiosurgery, during the commissioning of new linear accelerators, and as an alternative to film or other commercially available devices for performing monthly or annual quality control checks.

  16. Runaway quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gurarie, V.

    1995-08-01

    When heavy nuclei collide, a quark-gluon plasma is formed. The plasma is subject to a strong electric field due to the charge of the colliding nuclei. The electric field can influence the behavior of the quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we might observe an increased number of quarks moving in the direction of that field, as we do in the standard electron-ion plasma. In this paper we show that this phenomenon, called the runaway quarks, does not exist.

  17. Effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in vector heavy-light mesons and theory average of the Bc* meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, M.; Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2016-04-01

    We extend earlier investigations of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons to the vector case, using a simple model in the context of the Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter approach. We investigate the effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in a systematic fashion and illustrate and attempt to quantify corrections beyond the phenomenologically very useful and successful rainbow-ladder truncation. In particular we investigate the dressed quark-photon vertex in such a setup and make a prediction for the experimentally as yet unknown mass of the Bc* , which we obtain at 6.334 GeV well in line with predictions from other approaches. Furthermore, we combine a comprehensive set of results from the theoretical literature. The theoretical average for the mass of the Bc* meson is 6.336 ±0.002 GeV .

  18. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Barta, D. J.; Ignatius, R. W.; Martin, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems.

  19. Instrumentation for remote sensing solar radiation from light aircraft.

    PubMed

    Howard, J A; Barton, I J

    1973-10-01

    The paper outlines the instrumentation needed to study, from a light aircraft, the solar radiation reflected by ground surfaces and the incoming solar radiation. A global shortwave radiometer was mounted on the roof of the aircraft and a specially designed mount was used to support a downward pointing 70-mm aerial camera, a downward pointing narrow-beam pyranometer, and, sometimes, a downward pointing global shortwave pyranometer. Calibration factors were determined for the three pyranometers by comparison with a standard Angstrom compensation pyrheliometer. Results have indicated trends in the albedos of major plant communities and have shown that the calculated albedo values vary according to whether the downward pointing instrument is narrow-beam or global. Comparisons were also made with albedos measured on the ground.

  20. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; W. Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquarks channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  1. Material selection for acoustic radiators that are light and stiff.

    PubMed

    Porter, S P; Markley, D C; Van Tol, D J; Meyer, R J

    2011-01-01

    The headmass is a key element in tonpilz transducer design. As an acoustic radiator, a successful headmass must be built from a material that is both light and stiff. To assess the suitability of ceramics for this application, the authors used the mechanical properties of candidate materials to perform a theoretical comparison based on the flexural behavior of square plates. Although not a comprehensive metric for identifying the best headmass materials, the headmass flexure may be usefully employed as a first-level selection criteria. A software routine based on thin plate and thick plate theory was created to evaluate the flexural behavior in candidate materials.

  2. Reconfigurable Array of Radiating Elements (RARE) controlled by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadovnik, Lev

    1994-01-01

    The parameters of a silicon - dielectric - metal microstrip line were compared with those of a metal - dielectric - metal microstrip line from an actual FLAPS antenna. The proposed structure has higher losses; this is caused by the electrical conductivity of the illuminated silicon electrode being lower than is the case with a line using a copper top electrode. However, the value of these conductive losses is on the same order as the radiative losses in the microstrip line used in FLAPS antenna. These results point to the feasibility of using the proposed type of a microstrip line in a light-controlled reconfigurable MMW antenna with reasonable energy losses and with a reasonable light flux.

  3. Surface reconstruction from structured-light images for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Olesya; Anand, Christopher K.; Terlaky, Tamás

    2005-09-01

    To design and deliver proper radiation treatment for cancer patients, knowledge of the body's surface in the affected area is required. Currently, surface information is obtained by using a manually operated tracer. The drawbacks of this contact method include slow operation, and errors in repositioning the patient in an x-ray machine. Utilization of MRI or CT is also possible but expensive. We propose a non-contact, quick, inexpensive method to reconstruct the surface. In our non-contact method, a mask with transparent circular coloured spots and a black background, and an incoherent light source are used to create structured-light images. Colour coding is necessary to establish the correspondence between the projected and the observed patterns, which is essential for surface reconstruction. The deformed light pattern is photographed by an offset camera and analyzed. First, noise reduction is performed because images are noisy due to the low-light conditions and low sensitivity of an off-the-shelf camera. Then, pattern elements (light elliptical spots) are found in the image. We use an inverse polynomial to model the intensity of a light spot, which results in a non-convex, least-squares optimization problem. Next, spots are assigned to a grid according to their colours and location, and errors are corrected using the relative position of the spots. Finally, spatial coordinates of the surface points are computed and surface reconstruction is performed. The described algorithms are implemented as a MATLAB package, which converts the acquired images into a three-dimensional surface. The developed system is inexpensive, and it can easily be mounted on an x-ray machine. The software package can run on any standard PC.

  4. Blue Light and Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure from Infant Phototherapy Equipment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Iole; Bogi, Andrea; Picciolo, Francesco; Stacchini, Nicola; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Bellieni, Carlo V

    2015-01-01

    Phototherapy is the use of light for reducing the concentration of bilirubin in the body of infants. Although it has become a mainstay since its introduction in 1958, a better understanding of the efficacy and safety of phototherapy applications seems to be necessary for improved clinical practices and outcomes. This study was initiated to evaluate workers' exposure to Optical Radiation from different types of phototherapy devices in clinical use in Italy. During infant phototherapy the staff monitors babies periodically for around 10 min every hour, and fixation of the phototherapy beam light frequently occurs: almost all operators work within 30 cm of the phototherapy source during monitoring procedures, with most of them commonly working at ≤25 cm from the direct or reflected radiation beam. The results of this study suggest that there is a great variability in the spectral emission of equipments investigated, depending on the types of lamps used and some phototherapy equipment exposes operators to blue light photochemical retinal hazard. Some of the equipment investigated presents relevant spectral emission also in the UVA region. Taking into account that the exposure to UV in childhood has been established as an important contributing factor for melanoma risk in adults and considering the high susceptibility to UV-induced skin damage of the newborn, related to his pigmentary traits, the UV exposure of the infant during phototherapy should be "as low as reasonably achievable," considering that it is unnecessary to the therapy. It is recommended that special safety training be provided for the affected employees: in particular, protective eyewear can be necessary during newborn assistance activities carried out in proximity of some sources. The engineering design of phototherapy equipment can be optimized. Specific requirements for photobiological safety of lamps used in the phototherapy equipment should be defined in the safety product standard for such

  5. LIGHT SCATTERING: Observation of multiple scattering of laser radiation from a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'ev, Andrei V.

    2004-06-01

    Variation in the correlation function of light multiply scattered by a random medium was observed with increasing the incident beam power. The light-induced motion of microparticles in suspension, caused by a high-power laser radiation, serves as an additional factor in the decorrelation of the scattered light. The experimental data are in good agreement with the results of theoretical analysis.

  6. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  7. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, James R.; Anand, Aman

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators.Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size.Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm.Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed.

  8. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  9. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  10. Hydrogen and helium excitation by EUV radiation for the production of white-light flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Milkey, R. W.; Thompson, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    Non-LTE radiative transfer calculations for hydrogen and helium in a simple model atmosphere are used to demonstrate that EUV radiation cannot be the main energy source for white-light flares. The opacities in the Lyman continuum and the helium I and II continua are found to be much larger than the enhanced opacity in the visible hydrogen continuum. It is shown that the EUV radiation is absorbed before it can have a significant effect on the visible light continuum.

  11. Radial Correlations Between Two Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Koponen, J.; Pennanen, P.; Michael, C.

    2002-04-01

    In nuclear many-body problems the short-range correlation between two nucleons is well described by the corresponding correlation in the two-body problem. Therefore, as a first step in any attempt at an analogous description of many-quark systems, it is necessary to know the two-quark correlation. With this in mind, we study the light quark distribution in a heavy-light meson with a static heavy quark. The charge and matter radial distributions of these heavy-light mesons are measured on a lattice with a light quark mass about that of the strange quark. Both distributions can be well fitted upto r ≈ 0.7 fm with the exponential form wi2 (r), where Wi(r) = A exp(-r/ri). For the charge(c) and matter(m) distributions rc ≈ 0.32(2)fm and rm ≈ 0.24(2)fm. We also discuss the normalisation of the total charge (defined to be unity in the continuum limit) and matter integrated over all space, finding 1.30(5) and 0.4(1) respectively for a lattice spacing ≈ 0.17 fm.

  12. Search for pair production of a new heavy quark that decays into a W boson and a light quark in pp collisions at s=8TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. 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K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. 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J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. 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C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-22

    We present a search for pair production of a new heavy quark ( Q ) that decays into a W boson and a light quark (q) in the final state where one W boson decays leptonically (to an electron or muon plus a neutrino) and the other W boson decays hadronically. The analysis is performed using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No evidence of $Q\\overline{Q}$ production is observed. New chiral quarks with masses below 690 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level, assuming BR ( Q → W q ) = 1 . Results are also interpreted in the context of vectorlike quark models, resulting in the limits on the mass of a vectorlike quark in the two-dimensional plane of BR ( Q → W q ) versus BR ( Q → H q ) .

  13. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  14. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  15. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  16. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  17. Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

  18. A study on computation optimization method for three-dimension scene light field radiation simulation in visible light band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ligang; Ni, Wei; Ma, Xiaoshan; Yang, Zhen; Meng, Xin; Shen, Feifei

    2016-10-01

    The simulation of high accuracy three-dimension (3D) scene optical field radiation distribution can provide the input for camera design, optimization of key parameters and testing of various imaging models. It can benefit for reducing the strong coupling between the imaging models and scene simulation. However, the simulation computation is extremely large and the non-optimization computing method can't performed efficiently. Therefore, a study was carried out from the algorithm optimization and using high-performance platform to accelerate the operation speed. On the one hand, the visibility of scene was pre-computed which include the visibility from the light source to each facet in scene and the visibility between facets. The bounding box accelerate algorithm was adopted which can avoid a lot of time-consuming computation of occlusion in the light field radiation simulation process. On the other hand, since the 3D scene light field radiation simulation was obtained by a large number of light approximation, the algorithms can be divided blocks and processed parallelly. The GPU parallel framework was adopted to realize the simulation model of light field radiation in visible band. Finally, experiments were performed. The result shown the proposed method was more efficient and effective compared with the non-optimization method.

  19. Leptonic-decay-constant ratio f(K+)/f(π+) from lattice QCD with physical light quarks.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Foley, J; Freeman, W; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Kim, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Lightman, M; Osborn, J; Qiu, S; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2013-04-26

    A calculation of the ratio of leptonic decay constants f(K+)/f(π+) makes possible a precise determination of the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements |V(us)|/|V(ud)| in the standard model, and places a stringent constraint on the scale of new physics that would lead to deviations from unitarity in the first row of the CKM matrix. We compute f(K+)/f(π+) numerically in unquenched lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles recently generated that include four flavors of dynamical quarks: up, down, strange, and charm. We analyze data at four lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15 fm with simulated pion masses down to the physical value 135 MeV. We obtain f(K+)/f(π+) = 1.1947(26)(37), where the errors are statistical and total systematic, respectively. This is our first physics result from our N(f) = 2+1+1 ensembles, and the first calculation of f(K+)/f(π+) from lattice-QCD simulations at the physical point. Our result is the most precise lattice-QCD determination of f(K+)/f(π+), with an error comparable to the current world average. When combined with experimental measurements of the leptonic branching fractions, it leads to a precise determination of |V(us)|/|V(ud)| = 0.2309(9)(4) where the errors are theoretical and experimental, respectively.

  20. Properties of Doubly Heavy Baryons in the Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R.N.; Galkin, V.O.; Martynenko, A.P.

    2005-05-01

    Mass spectra and semileptonic decay rates of baryons consisting of two heavy (b or c) and one light quark are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model. The doubly heavy baryons are treated in the quark-diquark approximation. The ground and excited states of both the diquark and quark-diquark bound systems are considered. The quark-diquark potential is constructed. The light quark is treated completely relativistically, while the expansion in the inverse heavy-quark mass is used. The weak transition amplitudes of heavy diquarks bb and bc going, respectively, to bc and cc are explicitly expressed through the overlap integrals of the diquark wave functions in the whole accessible kinematic range. The relativistic baryon wave functions of the quark-diquark bound system are used for the calculation of the decay matrix elements, the Isgur-Wise function, and decay rates in the heavy-quark limit.

  1. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-24

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  2. Theory of light emission in sonoluminescence as thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Leung, P. T.

    2006-05-01

    Based on the model proposed by Hilgenfeldt [Nature (London) 398, 401 (1999)], we present here a comprehensive theory of thermal radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). We first invoke the generalized Kirchhoff’s law to obtain the thermal emissivity from the absorption cross section of a multilayered sphere (MLS). A sonoluminescing bubble, whose internal structure is determined from hydrodynamic simulations, is then modeled as a MLS and in turn the thermal radiation is evaluated. Numerical results obtained from simulations for argon bubbles show that our theory successfully captures the major features observed in SBSL experiments.

  3. Theory of light emission in sonoluminescence as thermal radiation.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Leung, P T

    2006-05-01

    Based on the model proposed by Hilgenfeldt [Nature (London) 398, 401 (1999)], we present here a comprehensive theory of thermal radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). We first invoke the generalized Kirchhoff's law to obtain the thermal emissivity from the absorption cross section of a multilayered sphere (MLS). A sonoluminescing bubble, whose internal structure is determined from hydrodynamic simulations, is then modeled as a MLS and in turn the thermal radiation is evaluated. Numerical results obtained from simulations for argon bubbles show that our theory successfully captures the major features observed in SBSL experiments.

  4. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  5. On Einstein, Light Quanta, Radiation, and Relativity in 1905

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur I.

    1976-01-01

    Analyzes section 8 of Einstein's relativity paper of 1905, "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies," in its historical context. Relates this section to the rest of the relativity paper, to the genesis of relativity theory, and to contemporaneous work on radiation theory. (Author/MLH)

  6. Radiation monitoring policy at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.; Heinzelman, K.; Perdue, G.

    1998-02-04

    When the accelerator first began operation it was decided that, until we had the necessary dosimetry data to decide otherwise, we would badge the entire worker and experimental population. Each person was issued a dosimetry badge that contained 4 TLD elements. Badges were processed on a monthly basis. After three years of analyzing a total of 65,000 TLD elements, the decision was made to modify the radiation monitoring policy at the ALS. Only those individuals in the workforce that have any potential for exposure, no matter how small, would be badged. Subsequently, DOE conducted an independent review of the ALS radiation monitoring and dosimetry program. This review concluded that the ALS program, if expanded as proposed, would be adequate under the 10 CFR 835 Rule to establish radiation exposures to an acceptable level of confidence. The review team recommended the ALS provide more comprehensive documentation on the basis for its radiation protection and monitoring program. This document describes the technical justification for that program.

  7. Performance of light sources and radiation sensors under low gravity realized by parabolic airplane flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro

    A fundamental study was conducted to establish an experimental system for space farming. Since to ensure optimal light for plant cultivation in space is of grave importance, this study examined the performance of light sources and radiation sensors under microgravity conditions created during the parabolic airplane flight. Three kinds of light sources, a halogen bulb, a fluorescent tube, and blue and red LEDs, and ten models of radiation sensors available in the market were used for the experiment. Surface temperature of the light sources, output signals from the radiation sensors, spectroscopic characteristics were measured at the gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 1.8 G for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the performance of the halogen lamp was affected the most by the gravity level among the three light sources. Under the microgravity conditions which do not raise heat convection, the temperature of the halogen lamp rose and the output of the radiation sensors increased. Spectral distributions of the halogen lamp indicated that peak wavelength appeared the highest at the level of 0.01G, which contributed to the increase in light intensity. In the case of red and blue LEDs, which are promising light sources in space farming, the temperature of both LED chips rose but irradiance from red LED increased and that from blue LED decreased under microgravity conditions due to the different thermal characteristics.

  8. Responses of Crepis japonica induced by supplemental blue light and UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Constantino, L F da S; Nascimento, L B Dos S; Casanova, L M; Moreira, N Dos S; Menezes, E A; Esteves, R L; Costa, S S; Tavares, E S

    2017-02-15

    Crepis japonica (L.) D.C. (Asteraceae), a weed with antioxidant, antiallergenic, antiviral and antitumor properties displays both medicinal properties and nutritional value. This study aims to assess the effects of a supplementation of blue light and UV-A radiation on the growth, leaf anatomical structure and phenolic profile of the aerial parts of Crepis japonica. Plants were grown under two light treatments: W (control - white light), W + B (white light supplemented with blue light) and W + UV-A (white light supplemented with UV-A radiation). We recorded the length, width, and weight of fresh and dry leaves, the thickness of the epidermis and mesophyll, and stomata density. The phenolic profiles of the aqueous extracts of the aerial parts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD. There was an increase in the leaf size, stomatal density, and phenolic production, and a thickening of the mesophyll and epidermis. UV-A radiation increased the phenolic production more than blue light. Blue light and UV-A radiation both improved the production of caffeic acid by about 6 and 3 times, respectively, in comparison to control. This compound was first reported as a constituent of the extract from the aerial parts together with caftaric acid. UV-A also promoted the production of chlorogenic acid (about 1.5 times in comparison to the control). We observed that the morphological and chemical parameters of C. japonica are modified in response to blue light and UV-A radiation, which can be used as tools in the cultivation of this species in order to improve its medicinal properties and nutritional value.

  9. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  10. Quantitative estimation of UV light dose concomitant to irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Vladislav G.; Morozov, Ivan I.; Kim, Jin Kyu; Semkina, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for biological estimation of UV light dose concomitant to ionizing radiation was suggested. This approach was applied to determine the dependency of equivalent UV light dose accompanied by 100 Gy of ionizing radiation on energy of sparsely ionizing radiation and on volume of the exposed cell suspension. It was revealed that the relative excitation contribution to the total lethal effect and the value of UV dose was greatly increased with an increase in energy of ionizing radiation and volume of irradiated suspensions. It is concluded that these observations are in agreement with the supposition that Čerenkov emission is responsible for the production of UV light damage and the phenomenon of photoreactivation observed after ionizing exposure of bacterial and yeast cells hypersensitive to UV light. A possible synergistic interaction of the damages produced by ionizations and excitations as well as a probable participation of UV component of ionizing radiation in the mechanism of hormesis and adaptive response observed after ionizing radiation exposure is discussed.

  11. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.

  12. SU-E-T-361: Energy Dependent Radiation/light-Field Misalignment On Truebeam Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, N; Tanny, S; Parsai, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying the co-incidence of the radiation and light field is recommended by TG-142 for monthly and annual checks. On a digital accelerator, it is simple to verify that beam steering settings are consistent with accepted and commissioned values. This fact should allow for physicists to verify radiation-light-field co-incidence for a single energy and accept that Result for all energies. We present a case where the radiation isocenter deviated for a single energy without any apparent modification to the beam steering parameters. Methods: The radiation isocenter was determined using multiple Methods: Gafchromic film, a BB test, and radiation profiles measured with a diode. Light-field borders were marked on Gafchromic film and then irradiated for all photon energies. Images of acceptance films were compared with films taken four months later. A phantom with a radio-opaque BB was aligned to isocenter using the light-field and imaged using the EPID for all photon energies. An unshielded diode was aligned using the crosshairs and then beam profiles of multiple field sizes were obtained. Field centers were determined using Omni-Pro v7.4 software, and compared to similar scans taken during commissioning. Beam steering parameter files were checked against backups to determine that the steering parameters were unchanged. Results: There were no differences between the configuration files from acceptance. All three tests demonstrated that a single energy had deviated from accepted values by 0.8 mm in the inline direction. The other two energies remained consistent with previous measurements. The deviated energy was re-steered to be within our clinical tolerance. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that radiation-light-field coincidence is an energy dependent effect for modern linacs. We recommend that radiation-light-field coincidence be verified for all energies on a monthly basis, particularly for modes used to treat small fields, as these may drift without

  13. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear matter at extremely high

  14. Masses of constituent quarks confined in open bottom hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Jovanović, P.; Milošević, J.; Ignjatović, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We apply color-spin and flavor-spin quark-quark interactions to the meson and baryon constituent quarks, and calculate constituent quark masses, as well as the coupling constants of these interactions. The main goal of this paper was to determine constituent quark masses from light and open bottom hadron masses, using the fitting method we have developed and clustering of hadron groups. We use color-spin Fermi-Breit (FB) and flavor-spin Glozman-Riska (GR) hyperfine interaction (HFI) to determine constituent quark masses (especially b quark mass). Another aim was to discern between the FB and GR HFI because our previous findings had indicated that both interactions were satisfactory. Our improved fitting procedure of constituent quark masses showed that on average color-spin (FB) HFI yields better fits. The method also shows the way how the constituent quark masses and the strength of the interaction constants appear in different hadron environments.

  15. Electromagnetic recombination spectra at the quark-hadron phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clint; Pratt, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Because quarks carry electric charge, they can radiate light when they change energy levels, which is exactly what happens when they hadronize. This is true not only in jets but also in heavy-ion collisions, where a thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons cools into a gas of hadrons. First, direct emission of photons from two quarks coalescing from the continuum into pions is calculated using the quark-meson model. The yield of final-state photons to pions is found to be about e2/gπq q 2 , which is on the order of a percent. Second, the yield of photons from the decay of highly excited color singlets, which may exist ephemerally during hadronizaton, is estimated. Because these contributions occur late in the reaction, they should carry significant elliptic flow, which may help explain the large observed flow of direct photons by the PHENIX Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The enhanced emission also helps explain the PHENIX Collaboration's surprisingly large observed γ /π ratio.

  16. Physics of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-03-10

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However,recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that (bar u) < (bar d) in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  17. Improved light extraction with nano-particles offering directional radiation diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanin, A.; Hugonin, J. P.; Besbes, M.; Lalanne, P.

    2014-01-13

    We propose a unique approach for light extraction, using engineered nano-particles to efficiently decouple the light guided in transverse-magnetic guided modes into free-space radiation modes that leak out normally to the thin-film stacks. The underlying mechanism takes advantage of a small electric field variation at the nano-particle scale and induces a “polarization conversion,” which renders the induced dipole moment perpendicular to the polarization of the incident light. Our analysis is supported by 2D fully vectorial computational results. Potential applications for light emitting or photovoltaic devices are outlined.

  18. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-06-15

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma}. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  19. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  20. Effect of laser-radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in nanodiamond suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr', A. P.; Bondar', V. S.; Svirko, Yu. P.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of laser radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) in a regime of optical power limiting (OPL) has been studied. It is established that the nonlinear transmission coefficient of DND suspension in the OPL regime in a field of nanosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm is independent of the polarization of incident radiation. The nonlinear scattering of light observed at an angle of 90° in the plane perpendicular to the plane of polarization of the incident radiation depends on the polarization angle in accordance with a trigonometric law. It is shown that the ratio of the signals of scattered radiation for the vertical and horizontal polarizations exhibits nonmonotonic dependence on the laser-beam power density. The results are explained by the Rayleigh-Mie scattering and a change in the size of scattering centers as a result of the effect of a laser upon the DND suspension.

  1. Effect of radiation light characteristics on surface hardness of paint-on resin for shade modification.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation light characteristics--of different types of clinical light-curing unit--on polymerization efficiency, as determined by the surface hardness of light-cured paint-on resins. Four shades of paint-on resin for shade modification of restorative resins were used. Materials were cured using one laboratory and three clinical light-curing units with different light sources, namely tungsten-halogen, LED, plasma arc, and xenon flash lamps. Knoop hardness measurements were taken at both the top and bottom surfaces of the specimens to assess the mechanical properties and degree of polymerization. Both LED and plasma arc light units caused significantly poorer surface hardness than the halogen and laboratory xenon lights. In addition, the transparent shade was more sensitive to surface hardness than other chromatic shades. Our results indicated that the polymerization efficiency of paint-on resin was significantly influenced by the radiation light characteristics of clinical light-curing units.

  2. Visible light neutralizes the effect produced by ultraviolet radiation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, J Horacio; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2017-02-01

    The damage produced by UV-C radiation (100-280nm) in organisms and cells is a well known fact. The main reactions of proteins to UV-C radiation consist in the alteration of their secondary structures, exposure of hydrophobic residues, unfolding and aggregation. Furthermore, it has been found that electromagnetic radiation of lower energy (visible light, where wavelengths are between 400 and 750nm) also induces different disturbances in biomolecules. For instance, it has been observed that blue visible light from emitting diodes (LEDs) produces severe damage in murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells, and it can be even more harmful for some organisms than UV radiation. Recently, it has been found that the exposure of proteins to green and red light produces conformational changes, considerably increasing their cohesion enthalpies. This is presumably due to the strengthening of the hydrogen bonds and the formation of new ones. Therefore, it seems that visible light acts contrary to what it is observed for UV-C: instead of unfolding the proteins it folds them further, halting the damage produced by UV-C. This can be understood if we consider the modification of the folding energy-landscape; visible light induces the descent of the proteins into deeper states impeding the unfolding produced by UV-C.

  3. Frequency of light-flashes induced by Cerenkov radiation from heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Mcnulty, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The expected frequency was calculated for light flashes induced in the dark-adapted eye by Cerenkov radiation from the flux of heavy nuclei that exists in space beyond the geomagnetic field. The expected frequency of light flashes depends on the threshold number of photons that must be absorbed in a rod cluster. The results of the calculation are presented as a curve of the mean frequency of light flashes versus the threshold number of absorbed photons. The results are not sensitive to variations in the path length from 5 to 15 grams per square centimeter of water-equivalent before the nucleus reaches the retina. Calculations were based on the fluxes and energy spectra of galactic cosmic ray nuclei of helium to iron, measured at a time of minimum solar modulation. The expected light flash frequencies induced by Cerenkov radiation are consistent with the frequencies reported by the astronauts on Apollo missions 11 through 14.

  4. Observation of strong radiation pressure forces from squeezed light on a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy B.; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José; Teufel, John D.

    2016-07-01

    In quantum-enhanced sensing, non-classical states are used to improve the sensitivity of a measurement. Squeezed light, in particular, has proved a useful resource in enhanced mechanical displacement sensing, although the fundamental limit to this enhancement due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle has not been encountered experimentally. Here we use a microwave cavity optomechanical system to observe the squeezing-dependent radiation pressure noise that necessarily accompanies any quantum enhancement of the measurement precision and ultimately limits the measurement noise performance. By increasing the measurement strength so that radiation pressure forces dominate the thermal motion of the mechanical oscillator, we exploit the optomechanical interaction to implement an efficient quantum nondemolition measurement of the squeezed light. Thus, our results show how the mechanical oscillator improves the measurement of non-classical light, just as non-classical light enhances the measurement of the motion.

  5. Study of the radiative pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-04-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of {pi}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F{sub V,A}) for the {pi}{yields}{gamma} transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  6. Inversion of the radiative transfer equation for polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Toro Iniesta, Jose Carlos; Ruiz Cobo, Basilio

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1970s, inversion techniques have become the most useful tool for inferring the magnetic, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of the solar atmosphere. Inversions have been proposed in the literature with a sequential increase in model complexity: astrophysical inferences depend not only on measurements but also on the physics assumed to prevail both on the formation of the spectral line Stokes profiles and on their detection with the instrument. Such an intrinsic model dependence makes it necessary to formulate specific means that include the physics in a properly quantitative way. The core of this physics lies in the radiative transfer equation (RTE), where the properties of the atmosphere are assumed to be known while the unknowns are the four Stokes profiles. The solution of the (differential) RTE is known as the direct or forward problem. From an observational point of view, the problem is rather the opposite: the data are made up of the observed Stokes profiles and the unknowns are the solar physical quantities. Inverting the RTE is therefore mandatory. Indeed, the formal solution of this equation can be considered an integral equation. The solution of such an integral equation is called the inverse problem. Inversion techniques are automated codes aimed at solving the inverse problem. The foundations of inversion techniques are critically revisited with an emphasis on making explicit the many assumptions underlying each of them.

  7. The role of coccoliths in protecting Emiliania huxleyi against stressful light and UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juntian; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai G.; Zhao, Wenyan; Gao, Kunshan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Coccolithophores are a group of phytoplankton species which cover themselves with small scales (coccoliths) made of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The reason why coccolithophores form these calcite platelets has been a matter of debate for decades but has remained elusive so far. One hypothesis is that they play a role in light or UV protection, especially in surface dwelling species like Emiliania huxleyi, which can tolerate exceptionally high levels of solar radiation. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by culturing a calcified and a naked strain under different light conditions with and without UV radiation. The coccoliths of E. huxleyi reduced the transmission of visible radiation (400-700 nm) by 7.5 %, that of UV-A (315-400 nm) by 14.1 % and that of UV-B (280-315 nm) by 18.4 %. Growth rates of the calcified strain (PML B92/11) were about 2 times higher than those of the naked strain (CCMP 2090) under indoor constant light levels in the absence of UV radiation. When exposed to outdoor conditions (fluctuating sunlight with UV radiation), growth rates of calcified cells were almost 3.5 times higher compared to naked cells. Furthermore, the relative electron transport rate was 114 % higher and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was 281 % higher in the calcified compared to the naked strain, implying higher energy transfer associated with higher NPQ in the presence of calcification. When exposed to natural solar radiation including UV radiation, the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II was only slightly reduced in the calcified strain but strongly reduced in the naked strain. Our results reveal an important role of coccoliths in mitigating light and UV stress in E. huxleyi.

  8. Light attraction in endangered procellariiform birds: Reduction by shielding upward radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.R.; Sincock, J.L.; Hailman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Autumnal attraction to man-made lighting causes heavy mortality in fledgling Hawaiian seabirds: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli), dark-rumped petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis), and band-rumpted storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro). These threatened, endangered and rare species (respectively) approach and circle lights on their first flight from mountain nesting colonies on the island of Kauai to the sea. Lights of the largest resort were shielded to prevent upward radiation on alternate nights during 2 fledgling seasons. Shielding decreased attraction by nearly 40%. Most attraction occurred 1-4 h after sunset. Full moon dramatically decreased attraction, a phenomenon that has both theoretical and management implications.

  9. Biological Effects of Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation and Vitamin D for Health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Humans evolved in sunlight and had depended on sunlight for its life giving properties that was appreciated by our early ancestors. However, for more than 40 years the lay press and various medical and dermatology associations have denounced sun exposure because of its association with increased risk for skin cancer. The goal of this review is to put into perspective the many health benefits that have been associated with exposure to sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB), visible and infrared radiation.

  10. Measurement of the Radiation Incident on NbFeB Insertion Devices at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Gary; Holmes, Michael

    1997-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories Advanced Light Source is a third generation light source containing NdFeB permanent magnet insertion devices.The lifetime of the permanent magnets in a radiation environment is of paramount importance. Measurements of the radiation incident on the insertion device magnets under various operating conditions are presented.

  11. A VMD Based, Nonet and SU(3) Symmetry Broken Model for Radiative Decays of Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.

    2005-04-06

    We present a VMD based model aiming to describe all radiative decays of light mesons. We show that the SU(3) breaking mechanism proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki (BKY), supplemented by nonet symmetry breaking in the pseudoscalar sector are sufficient to provide a nice description of all data, except the K*{sup {+-}} radiative width. It is also shown that nonet symmetry breaking has effects which cannot be disentangled from those produced by coupling of glue to the {eta}{prime} meson. Coupling of glue to {eta} is not found to be required by the data. Assuming the K*{sup {+-}} radiative width is indeed at its presently accepted value necessitates to supplement the BKY breaking in a way which finally preserves an equivalence statement between the VMD approach to radiative decays and the Wess-Zumino-Witten Lagrangian.

  12. Radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2012-09-01

    The episodic deposition of dust and carbonaceous particles to snow decreases snow surface albedo and enhances absorption of solar radiation, leading to accelerated snowmelt, negative glacier mass balance, and the snow-albedo feedback. Until now, no remote sensing retrieval has captured the spatial and temporal variability of this forcing. Here we present the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) model that retrieves surface radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. Validation of MODDRFS with a 7-year record of in situ measurements indicates the radiative forcing retrieval has positive bias at lower values and slight negative bias above 200 W m-2, subject to mixed pixel uncertainties. With bias-correction, MODDRFS has a root mean squared error of 32 W m-2 and mean absolute error of 25 W m-2. We demonstrate MODDRFS in the Upper Colorado River Basin and Hindu Kush-Himalaya.

  13. B -meson decay constants from 2+1 -flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N. H.; Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ290MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the

  14. Infrared light-emitting diode radiation causes gravitropic and morphological effects in dark-grown oat seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. F.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Chapman, D. K.; Deitzer, G. F.

    1996-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa cv Seger) seedlings were irradiated with IR light-emitting diode (LED) radiation passed through a visible-light-blocking filter. Infrared LED irradiated seedlings exhibited differences in growth and gravitropic response when compared to seedlings grown in darkness at the same temperature. Thus, the oat seedlings in this study were able to detect IR LED radiation. These findings call into question the use of IR LED as a safe-light for some photosensitive plant response experiments. These findings also expand the defined range of wavelengths involved in radiation-gravity (light-gravity) interactions to include wavelengths in the IR region of the spectrum.

  15. A mechanism for the production of light and dark contrasts in radiatively controlled lines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebbie, K. B.; Steinitz, R.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that light and dark contrasts observed in the radiation of strong lines may arise from lateral differences in the local value of the scattering term alone, independently of the local values of temperature and pressure. Mechanisms for the production of such differences are suggested, and regions are pointed out in which they occur as 'features.' From numerical examples presented, it is seen that the effect of such features on the emergent radiation field is determined by their position with respect to the shape of the source function.

  16. SCATTERING AND REFLECTION OF LASER RADIATION: Multiple dynamic scettering of laser radiation on a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Chesnokov, S. S.; Zakharov, S. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Korotkov, N. P.; Shcheglov, V. A.

    1998-05-01

    A self-consistent theoretical analysis is made of the multiple scattering of coherent laser radiation in a random medium under conditions of formation of a light-induced jet of scatterers. It is shown, that the laser particle acceleration leads to a qualitative change of the temporal auto-correlation function of scattered light as compared to the case of scattering on chaotically moving Brownian particles. The effect of radiation absorption on the temporal coherence of the multiple-scattered light under conditions of light-induced particle motion in the scattering medium is studied.

  17. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  18. Image gently, step lightly: increasing radiation dose awareness in pediatric interventions through an international social marketing campaign.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Manrita K; Goske, Marilyn J; Coley, Brian J; Connolly, Bairbre; Racadio, John; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Utley, Tara; Strauss, Keith J

    2009-09-01

    In the past several decades, advances in imaging and interventional techniques have been accompanied by an increase in medical radiation dose to the public. Radiation exposure is even more important in children, who are more sensitive to radiation and have a longer lifespan during which effects may manifest. To address radiation safety in pediatric computed tomography, in 2008 the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging launched an international social marketing campaign entitled Image Gently. This article describes the next phase of the Image Gently campaign, entitled Step Lightly, which focuses on radiation safety in pediatric interventional radiology.

  19. Coherent and tunable light radiation from nanoscale surface plasmons array via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate that surface plasmons on a nanoscale metallic array can be transformed into radiation waves via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect. Although the radiation frequency and direction satisfy the Smith-Purcell relation, it is coherent radiation with directions specified, which is essentially different from the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Its radiation spectral density is an order of magnitude higher. By adjusting the material and structure of the array, the radiation frequency can be tuned from an infrared to ultraviolet region. Its remarkable advantages in intensity, coherence, tunability, and miniature size indicate new prospects in developing nanoscale light sources and related techniques.

  20. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  1. Process for applying light- or radiation-curable resin composition to polyolefin moldings

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Y.; Kitadono, K.; Kondo, T.; Shinonaga, H.

    1984-08-28

    A process for applying a light- or radiation-curable resin composition onto a polyolefin molding comprising surface treating a molding of polyolefin composition composed of 99.99 to 0 wt % of a polyolefin and 0.01 to 100 wt % of an olefinic polymeric compound, having polar groups represented by the formula, COOR, -OR-, -COO-CO-, -N(-R)-R', OR -C(-R)<(-O-CH(-R')-) wherein R and R' are each a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 8 carbon atoms, by at least one pretreatment method selected from the group consisting of a treatment with a halogenated hydrocarbon solvent, a low temperature plasma treatment, a corona discharge treatment, a flame treatment and an alkali degreasing treatment, and applying onto the thus treated molding surface a light- or radiation-curable resin composition, is disclosed.

  2. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  3. Radiation Protection Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Front End Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Vollaire, J.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; Leitner, M.Santana; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Front End Enclosure (FEE) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a shielding housing located between the electron dump area and the first experimental hutch. The upstream part of the FEE hosts the commissioning diagnostics for the FEL beam. In the downstream part of the FEE, two sets of grazing incidence mirror and several collimators are used to direct the beam to one of the experimental stations and reduce the bremsstrahlung background and the hard component of the spontaneous radiation spectrum. This paper addresses the beam loss assumptions and radiation sources entering the FEE used for the design of the FEE shielding using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The beam containment system prevents abnormal levels of radiations inside the FEE and ensures that the beam remains in its intended path is also described.

  4. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  5. Heavy-quark physics in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Heavy quarks can expose new symmetries and novel phenomena in QCD not apparent in ordinary hadronic systems. In these lectures I discuss the use of effective-Lagrangian and light-cone Fock methods to analyze exclusive heavy hadron decays such as {Upsilon} {yields} p{bar p} and B {yields} {pi}{pi}, and also to derive effective Schroedinger and Dirac equations for heavy quark systems. Two contributions to the heavy quark structure functions of the proton and other light hadrons are identified: an extrinsic'' contribution associated with leading twist QCD evolution of the gluon distribution, and a higher twist intrinsic'' contribution due to the hardness of high-mass fluctuations of multi-gluon correlations in hadronic wavefunctions. A non-perturbative calculation of the heavy quark distribution of a meson in QCD in one space and one time is presented. The intrinsic higher twist contributions to the pion and proton structure functions can dominate the hadronic production of heavy quark systems at large longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and give anomalous contributions to the quark structure functions of ordinary hadrons at large x{sub bj}. I also discuss a number of ways in which heavy quark production in nuclear targets can test fundamental QCD phenomena and provide constraints on hadronic wavefunctions. The topics include color transparency, finite formation time, and predictions for charm production at threshold, including nuclear-bound quarkonium. I also discuss a number of QCD mechanisms for the suppression of J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions, including gluon shadowing, the peripheral excitation of intrinsic heavy quark components at large x{sub F}, and the coalescence of heavy quarks with co-moving spectators at low x{sub F}.

  6. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  7. The effect of light radiation and temperature variability on the invasion of marine fouling species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Micheli, F.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change can alter the community structure as species which have adapted to the changed climate can compete better with other species. It can also influence the recruitment and invasion success of marine introduced species. Climate change involves not only global warming but also global dimming. However, it was not tested which of warming or dimming factors more significantly influence the invasion of marine species. To test this, we manipulated both temperature variability and light radiation by deploying different shading devices (black, white, transparent, and no treatment) for recruitment tiles in the warmer region where the species invasion rate is high. We compared the species frequency and coverage between shaded and non-shaded treatments. Interestingly, under opaque white plates where light radiation is lower than under transparent plates but the temperature is higher than under black plates, had the highest frequency and coverage of invasive fouling species. The recruitment tiles under black plates got second higher invasion of exotic species. We also deployed recruitment tiles in 14 different sites to determine if temperature influences the success of invasive species. The coverage of invasive species over native species increased significantly with increasing temperature. The results suggest that both low radiation and higher temperature facilitates the success of species invasion in the intertidal region.

  8. Jitter radiation images, spectra and light curves from a relativistic spherical blastwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.; Lazzati, Davide; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2009-02-01

    We consider radiation emitted by the jitter mechanism in a Blandford-McKee self-similar blastwave. We assume the magnetic field configuration throughout the whole blastwave meets the condition for the emission of jitter radiation and we compute the ensuing images, light curves and spectra. The calculations are performed for both a uniform and a wind environment. We compare our jitter results to synchrotron results. We show that jitter radiation produces slightly different spectra than synchrotron, in particular between the self-absorption and the peak frequency, where the jitter spectrum is flat, while the synchrotron spectrum grows as ν1/3. The spectral difference is reflected in the early decay slope of the light curves. We conclude that jitter and synchrotron afterglows can be distinguished from each other with good quality observations. However, it is unlikely that the difference can explain the peculiar behaviour of several recent observations, such as flat X-ray slopes and uncorrelated optical and X-ray behaviour.

  9. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  10. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  11. Quark fragmentation in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Oddone, P.

    1984-12-01

    This brief review of new results in quark and gluon fragmentation observed in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions concentrates mostly on PEP results and, within PEP, mostly on TPC results. The new PETRA results have been reported at this conference by M. Davier. It is restricted to results on light quark fragmentation since the results on heavy quark fragmentation have been reported by J. Chapman.

  12. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  13. Shining light on skin pigmentation: the darker and the brighter side of effects of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Maddodi, Nityanand; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    The term barrier function as applied to human skin often connotes the physical properties of this organ that provides protection from its surrounding environment. This term does not generally include skin pigmentation. However, skin pigmentation, which is the result of melanin produced in melanocytes residing in the basal layer of the skin and exported to the keratinocytes in the upper layers, serves equally important protective function. Indeed, changes in skin pigmentation are often the most readily recognized indicators of exposure of skin to damaging agents, especially to natural and artificial radiation in the environment. Several recent studies have shed new light on (1) the mechanisms involved in selective effects of subcomponents of UV radiation on human skin pigmentation and (2) the interactive influences between keratinocytes and melanocytes, acting as "epidermal melanin unit," that manifest as changes in skin pigmentation in response to exposure to various forms of radiation. This article provides a concise review of our current understanding of the effects of the nonionizing solar radiation, at cellular and molecular levels, on human skin pigmentation.

  14. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-05-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7-22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20-94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5-21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h.

  15. Radiation emission from ultra-relativistic plasma electrons in short-intense laser light interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R.; Boyd, TJM

    2016-05-01

    Intense femtosecond laser light incident on overcritical density plasmas has shown to emit a prolific number of high-order harmonics of the driver frequency, with spectra characterised by power-law decays. When the laser pulse is p-polarised, plasma effects do modify the harmonic spectrum, weakening the so-called universal decay index p = 8/3 to 5/3. In this work appeal is made to a single particle radiation model in support of the predictions from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Using these, we further show that the emission radiated by electrons -those that are relativistically accelerated inside the plasma, after being expelled into vacuum, the so-called Brunel electrons- is characterised not only by the plasma line but also by ultraviolet harmonic orders characterised by the 5/3 decay index.

  16. Local changes in arterial oxygen saturation induced by visible and near-infrared light radiation.

    PubMed

    Yesman, S S; Mamilov, S O; Veligotsky, D V; Gisbrecht, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficiency of laser radiation on oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) rate in blood vessels and its wavelength dependence. The results of in vivo experimental measurements of the laser-induced photodissociation of HbO2 in cutaneous blood vessels in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range are presented. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was measured by a method of fingertip pulse oximetry, which is based on the measurement of the modulated pulse wave of the blood. The light irradiating the finger was provided by corresponding light-emitting diodes (LED) at 15 wavelengths in the 400-940 nm spectrum range. Statistical results with a value of p < 0.05 were viewed as being significant for all volunteers. The results show that there is a decrease in SpO2 in the blood under the influence of the transcutaneous laser irradiation. Three maxima in the spectral range (530, 600, and 850 nm) are revealed, wherein decrease in the relative concentration of SpO2 reaches 5 % ± 0.5 %. Near-IR radiation plays a dominant role in absorption of laser radiation by oxyhemoglobin in deeper layers of tissue blood vessels. The obtained data correlate with the processes of light propagation in biological tissue. The observed reduction in SpO2 indicates the process of photodissociation of HbO2 in vivo and may result in local increase in O2 in the tissue. Such laser-induced enrichment of tissue oxygenation can be used in phototherapy of pathologies, where the elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical.

  17. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter.

    PubMed

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  18. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  19. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  20. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  1. Supernova Shock Breakout Light Curves and Spectra from CASTRO Multigroup Radiation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of supernova shock breakout with the new multigroup radiation transport version of the CASTRO simulation code. Shock breakout occurs when the outgoing shockwave of a supernova explosion reaches the surface of the progenitor star and produces a bright flash. The breakout flash's spectral temperature, duration, and luminosity carry information about the progenitor star that may otherwise be very difficult to recover. To aid in detection and understanding of this phenomenon, we present integrated light curves and spectra of breakouts from a range of progenitors and explosions, including very low energy supernovae and pair-instability supernovae.

  2. The Advanced Light Source: A third-generation Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2002-08-14

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the University of California is a ''third-generation'' synchrotron radiation source optimized for highest brightness at ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energies. It also provides world-class performance at hard x-ray photon energies. Berkeley Lab operates the ALS for the United States Department of Energy as a national user facility that is available 24 hours/day around the year for research by scientists from industrial, academic, and government laboratories primarily from the United States but also from abroad.

  3. Light dark photon and fermionic dark radiation for the Hubble constant and the structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the tensions in the Hubble constant H0 and the structure growth σ8 between Planck results and other low redshift measurements, we discuss some cosmological effects of a dark sector model in which dark matter (DM) interacts with fermionic dark radiation (DR) through a light gauge boson (dark photon). Such kind of models are very generic in particle physics with a dark sector with dark gauge symmetries. The effective number of neutrinos is increased by δNeff ∼ 0.5 due to light dark photon and fermionic DR, thereby resolving the conflicts in H0. The elastic scattering between DM and DR induces suppression for DM's density perturbation, but without acoustic oscillations. For weakly-interacting DM around 100 GeV, the new gauge coupling should be ∼10-4 to have sizable effect on matter power spectrum in order to relax the tension in σ8.

  4. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  5. Lighting considerations in controlled environments for nonphotosynthetic plant responses to blue and ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    This essay will consider both physical and photobiological aspects of controlled environment lighting in the spectral region beginning in the blue and taken to the normal limit of the solar spectrum in the ultraviolet. The primary emphasis is directed to questions of plant response to sunlight. Measurement and computations used in radiation dosimetry in this part of the spectrum are also briefly treated. Because of interest in the ozone depletion problem, there has been some activity in plant UV-B research and there are several recent reviews available. Some aspects of growth chamber lighting as it relates to UV-B research were covered earlier. Apart from work related to the blue/UV-A receptor, less attention has been given to UV-A responses.

  6. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams from nanofoil targets: the leaky light-sail regime.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Dromey, B; Geissler, M; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the "leaky light sail," is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10¹⁹  W/cm². 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2 × 10²⁰  W/cm².

  8. Monitoring temperature and light exposure of biosamples exposed to ultraviolet and low energy radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Kai; Waite, Gabi Nindl; Miller, Penney L; Hughes, Ellen F; Waite, Lee R

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that T-lymphocytes produce catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a membrane-associated process when irradiated with narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) light. This form of phototherapy is thought to be highly effective for treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, but also includes the potential for severe burning and development of skin cancer. Consequently, information on the therapeutic mechanism of narrowband UVB phototherapy and its regulation is warranted. Our laboratory is researching the mechanistic involvement of T-cell H2O2 production and its potential regulation by low energy electromagnetic field (EMF) radiation, which has been shown to beneficially influence inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. To study photochemical H2O2 production in small samples such as suspensions of T-lymphocyte cell extracts, we use a reactor in which 12 microliter-sized samples are exposed to UVB. We simultaneously operate two identical systems, one for experimental, the other for control samples, within a walk-in environmental chamber maintained at 37 degrees C. The current paper addresses the control of UVB light exposure and temperature in our experimental setup. We quantified UVB light b y radiometric sp ot measurements and by chemical potassium ferrioxalate actinometry. We modified the actinometer so that UVB light of 5-hour experiments could be detected. Temperature was controlled by air convection and remained constant within 0.5 degrees C in air and liquid samples. Preliminary data of the effect of low energy EMF radiation on T-cell H2O2 production are presented.

  9. Isolation of uvh1, an Arabidopsis mutant hypersensitive to ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, G R; Jenkins, M E; Pittalwala, T S; Mount, D W

    1994-01-01

    A genetic screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are hypersensitive to UV light was developed and used to isolate a new mutant designated uvh1. UV hypersensitivity in uvh1 was due to a single recessive trait that is probably located on chromosome 3. Although isolated as hypersensitive to an acute exposure to UV-C light, uvh1 was also hypersensitive to UV-B wavelengths, which are present in sunlight that reaches the earth's surface. UV-B damage to both wild-type and uvh1 plants could be significantly reduced by subsequent exposure of UV-irradiated plants to photoreactivating light, showing that photoreactivation of UV-B damage is important for plant viability and that uvh1 plants are not defective in photoreactivation. A new assay for DNA damage, the Dral assay, was developed and used to show that exposure of wild-type and uvh1 plants to a given dose of UV light induces the same amount of damage in chloroplast and nuclear DNA. Thus, uvh1 is not defective in a UV protective mechanism. uvh1 plants were also found to be hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that uvh1 is defective in a repair or tolerance mechanism that normally provides plants with resistance to several types of DNA damage. PMID:8148646

  10. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  11. Radiatively corrected lepton energy distributions in top quark decays t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) and t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) and single-charged prong energy distributions from subsequent τ + decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Kuraev, Eduard A.; Bystritskiy, Yury M.

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the QED and QCD radiative corrections to the charged lepton energy distributions in the dominant semileptonic decays of the top quark t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) ( ℓ= e, μ, τ) in the standard model (SM), and for the decay t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) in an extension of the SM having a charged Higgs boson H ± with m_{H^{±}}quark decays. As the τ + leptons arising from the decays W +→ τ + ν τ and H +→ τ + ν τ are predominantly left- and right-polarised, respectively, influencing the energy distributions of the decay products in the subsequent decays of the τ +, we work out the effect of the radiative corrections on such distributions in the dominant (one-charged prong) decay channels tau+toπ+bar{ν}_{tau},ρ+bar{ν}_{tau},a1+bar{ν}_{tau} and ell+ν_{ell}bar{ν}_{tau}. The inclusive π + energy spectra in the decay chains tto b(W+,H+)to b(tau+ν_{tau})to b(π+bar{ν}_{tau}ν_{tau}+X) are calculated, which can help in searching for the induced H ± effects at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  12. The interplay between assumed morphology and the direct radiative effect of light-absorbing organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Rawad; Adams, Peter J.; Donahue, Neil M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-08-01

    Mie theory is widely employed in aerosol top-of-the-atmosphere direct radiative effect (DRE) calculations and to retrieve the absorptivity of light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) from measurements. However, when OA is internally mixed with black carbon, it may exhibit complex morphologies whose optical behavior is imperfectly predicted by Mie theory, introducing bias in the retrieved absorptivities. We performed numerical experiments and global radiative transfer modeling (RTM) to investigate the effect of this bias on the calculated absorption and thus the DRE. We show that using true OA absorptivity, retrieved with a realistic representation of the complex morphology, leads to significant errors in DRE when the RTM employs the simplified Mie theory. On the other hand, when Mie theory is consistently applied in both OA absorptivity retrieval and the RTM, the errors largely cancel out, yielding accurate DRE. As long as global RTMs use Mie theory, they should implement parametrizations of light-absorbing OA derived from retrievals based on Mie theory.

  13. Search for a Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Top Quark Decays from pp-bar; Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-11

    We present the results of a search for a very light CP-odd Higgs boson a10 originating from top quark decays t→H±b → W±(*)a10b, and subsequently decaying into τ+τ-. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV, we perform a search for events containing a lepton, three or more jets, and an additional isolated track with transverse momentum in the range 3 to 20 GeV/c. Observed events are consistent with background sources, and 95% C.L. limits are set on the branching ratio of t→H±b formore » various masses of H± and a10.« less

  14. Prediction of acoustic radiation from functionally graded shells of revolution in light and heavy fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Meng, Guang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method for the vibro-acoustic analysis of a functionally graded shell of revolution immersed in an infinite light or heavy fluid. The structural model of the shell is formulated on the basis of a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid field. The material properties of the shell are estimated by using the Voigt's rule of mixture and the Mori-Tanaka's homogenization scheme. Displacement and sound pressure variables of each segment are expanded in the form of a mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. A set of collocation nodes distributed over the roots of Chebyshev polynomials are employed to establish the algebraic system of the acoustic integral equations, and the non-uniqueness solution is eliminated using a combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation. Loosely and strongly coupled schemes are implemented for the structure-acoustic interaction problem of a functionally graded shell immersed in a light and heavy fluid, respectively. The present method provides a flexible way to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of functionally graded shells of revolution in an analytical manner. Numerical tests are presented for sound radiation problems of spherical, cylindrical, conical and coupled shells. The individual contributions of the circumferential modes to the radiated sound pressure and sound power of functionally graded shells are observed. Effects of the material profile on the sound radiation of the shells are also investigated.

  15. Drag of heavy quarks in quark gluon plasma at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Payal

    2010-07-15

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of charm and bottom quarks propagating through quark gluon plasma (QGP) have been evaluated for conditions relevant to nuclear collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The dead cone and Landau-Pomeronchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects on radiative energy loss of heavy quarks have been considered. Both radiative and collisional processes of energy loss are included in the effective drag and diffusion coefficients. With these effective transport coefficients, we solve the Fokker-Plank (FP) equation for the heavy quarks executing Brownian motion in the QGP. The solution of the FP equation has been used to evaluate the nuclear suppression factor, R{sub AA}, for the nonphotonic single-electron spectra resulting from the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. The effects of mass on R{sub AA} have also been highlighted.

  16. Comparison of the Light Charged Particles on Scatter Radiation Dose in Thyroid Hadron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, M; Mowlavi, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hadron therapy is a novel technique of cancer radiation therapy which employs charged particles beams, 1H and light ions in particular. Due to their physical and radiobiological properties, they allow one to obtain a more conformal treatment, sparing better the healthy tissues located in proximity of the tumor and allowing a higher control of the disease. Objective: As it is well known, these light particles can interact with nuclei in the tissue, and produce the different secondary particles such as neutron and photon. These particles can damage specially the critical organs behind of thyroid gland. Methods: In this research, we simulated neck geometry by MCNPX code and calculated the light particles dose at distance of 2.14 cm in thyroid gland, for different particles beam: 1H, 2H, 3He, and 4He. Thyroid treatment is important because the spine and vertebrae is situated right behind to the thyroid gland on the posterior side. Results: The results show that 2H has the most total flux for photon and neutron, 1.944E-3 and 1.7666E-2, respectively. Whereas 1H and 3He have best conditions, 8.88609E-4 and 1.35431E-3 for photon, 4.90506E-4 and 4.34057E-3 for neutron, respectively. The same calculation has obtained for energy depositions for these particles. Conclusion: In this research, we investigated that which of these light particles can deliver the maximum dose to the normal tissues and the minimum dose to the tumor. By comparing these results for the mentioned light particles, we find out 1H and 3He is the best therapy choices for thyroid glands whereas 2H is the worst. PMID:25505774

  17. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  18. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  19. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-09-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find numerous applications for personal thermal management and for buildings energy efficiency improvement.

  20. Effects of morphology on the radiative properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols with different aging status.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianhai; Wu, Yu; Chen, Hao

    2014-06-30

    Light absorbing carbon aerosols play a substantial role in climate change through radiative forcing, which is the dominant absorber of solar radiation. Radiative properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols are strongly dependent on the morphological factors and the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components. This study focuses on the morphological effects on the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. Three types aerosols with different aging status such as freshly emitted BC particles, thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols, heavily coated light absorbing carbon aerosols are studied. Our study showed that morphological factors change with the aging of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols to result in a dramatic change in their optical properties. The absorption properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols can be enhanced approximately a factor of 2 at 0.67 um, and these enhancements depend on the morphological factors. A larger shell/core diameter ratio of volume-equivalent shell-core spheres (S/C), which indicates the degree of coating, leads to stronger absorption. The enhancement of absorption properties accompanies a greater enhancement of scattering properties, which is reflected in an increase in single scattering albedo (SSA). The enhancement of single scattering albedo due to the morphological effects can reach a factor of 3.75 at 0.67 μm. The asymmetry parameter has a similar yet smaller enhancement. Moreover, the corresponding optical properties of shell-and-core model determined by using Lorenz -Mie solutions are presented for comparison. We found that the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosol can differ fundamentally from those calculated for the Mie theory shell-and-core model, particularly for thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols. Our studies indicate that the complex morphology

  1. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  2. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Dyer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-quark partner that is always produced from strong-coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top-quark production has been searched for in ever larger data sets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} data set that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top-quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and tt events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix-element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top-quark production of {sigma}(pp{yields}tb+X,tqb+X)=4.7{+-}1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top-quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}|=1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68<|V{sub tb}|{<=}1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  3. Effects of electromagnetic radiation (bright light, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, infrared radiation) on the circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Griefahn, Barbara; Künemund, Christa; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lerchl, Alexander; Degen, Gisela H

    2002-10-01

    Electromagnetic spectra reduce melatonin production and delay the nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate. Seven healthy men (16-22 yrs) completed 4 permuted sessions. The control session consisted of a 24-hours bedrest at < 30 lux, 18 degrees C, and < 50 dBA. In the experimental sessions, either light (1500 lux), magnetic field (16.7 Hz, 0.2 mT), or infrared radiation (65 degrees C) was applied from 5 pm to 1 am. Salivary melatonin level was determined hourly, rectal temperature and heart rate were continuously recorded. Melatonin synthesis was completely suppressed by light but resumed thereafter. The nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate were delayed. The magnetic field had no effect. Infrared radiation elevated rectal temperature and heart rate. Only bright light affected the circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate, however, differently thus causing a dissociation, which might enhance the adverse effects of shiftwork in the long run.

  4. Measurement of Photon Statistics of Wiggler Radiation from AN Electron Storage Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Toshiya

    1990-01-01

    The photon statistics of wiggler light from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been measured using an analog photon-counting technique. The linear wiggler produces fundamental wavelength light and the third harmonic light at 532 nm for ring energies ~650 MeV and 375 MeV, respectively. The average ring current was ~50 mA for one-electron-bunch operation. The bunch was ~480 psec long and the wiggler light was emitted every 170.2 nsec. The number of photons emitted by an electron bunch was repetitively measured for a given coherence volume. The photon counting distribution, which is the probability of finding n photons versus n, was obtained. The experimental results show that the wiggler radiation is consistent with multi-mode thermal radiation, whereas the bending magnet light gives rise to a distribution consistent with a Neyman Type-A distribution instead of Poisson when the light of large bandwith through a Pyrex window is collected. Near field and electron beam emittance effects have proven to have an important influence on the transverse coherence of the emitted radiation.

  5. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F. R.; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars (‘Pink Champion’ and ‘Royal Champion’) were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (gs) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in ‘Royal Champion,’ whereas it remained relatively constant in ‘Pink Champion.’ Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (Pn) in both cultivars approached steady state Pn in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in ‘Pink Champion.’ These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in ‘Royal Champion’ in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in ‘Pink Champion.’ We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent. PMID:26870071

  6. Advances in the determination of quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, T.; Gupta, R.

    1998-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the determination of the light quark masses, using both lattice QCD and sum rule methods, in the last year. The authors discuss the different methods and review the status of current results. Finally, they review the calculation of bottom and charm masses.

  7. The generation of short-wave UV light in cells under the action of ultrashort pulses of intense visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovarsky, V. A.; Philipp, B. S.; Kovarsky, E. V.

    1997-02-01

    The action of intense laser pulses ( λ = 0.53 μm) on E.coli cells is considered (the cells are transparent in this range). The transformation of laser radiation into UV light due to the high-harmonics generation on the protein molecules (the dipole moment is 100-1000 D) leads to the appearance of thymine dimers in bacterial DNA and results in a lethal effect for strains of E.coli which are highly sensitive to UV radiation.

  8. Radiative decays of negative parity heavy baryons in the framework of the light cone QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agamaliev, A. K.; Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2017-02-01

    The transition form factors responsible for the radiative ΣQ →ΛQ γ and ΞQ‧ →ΞQ γ decays of the negative parity baryons are examined within light cone QCD sum rules. The decay widths of the radiative transitions are calculated using the obtained results of the form factors. A comparison of our predictions on decay widths with the corresponding widths of positive parity baryons is given.

  9. Nonperturbative heavy-quark diffusion in the quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H; Mannarelli, M; Greco, V; Rapp, R

    2008-05-16

    We evaluate heavy-quark (HQ) transport properties in a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) within a Brueckner many-body scheme employing interaction potentials extracted from thermal lattice QCD. The in-medium T matrices for elastic charm- and bottom-quark scattering off light quarks in the QGP are dominated by attractive meson and diquark channels which support resonance states up to temperatures of ~1.5T(c). The resulting drag coefficient increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to expectations based on perturbative QCD scattering. Employing relativistic Langevin simulations we compute HQ spectra and elliptic flow in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. A good agreement with electron decay data supports our nonperturbative computation of HQ diffusion, indicative for a strongly coupled QGP.

  10. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption.

  11. Radiative forcing impacts of boreal forest biofuels: a scenario study for Norway in light of albedo.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Peters, Glen P

    2011-09-01

    Radiative forcing impacts due to increased harvesting of boreal forests for use as transportation biofuel in Norway are quantified using simple climate models together with life cycle emission data, MODIS surface albedo data, and a dynamic land use model tracking carbon flux and clear-cut area changes within productive forests over a 100-year management period. We approximate the magnitude of radiative forcing due to albedo changes and compare it to the forcing due to changes in the carbon cycle for purposes of attributing the net result, along with changes in fossil fuel emissions, to the combined anthropogenic land use plus transport fuel system. Depending on albedo uncertainty and uncertainty about the geographic distribution of future logging activity, we report a range of results, thus only general conclusions about the magnitude of the carbon offset potential due to changes in surface albedo can be drawn. Nevertheless, our results have important implications for how forests might be managed for mitigating climate change in light of this additional biophysical criterion, and in particular, on future biofuel policies throughout the region. Future research efforts should be directed at understanding the relationships between the physical properties of managed forests and albedo, and how albedo changes in time as a result of specific management interventions.

  12. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  13. Chiral extrapolations on the lattice with strange sea quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, Sébastien

    2005-06-01

    The (light but not-so-light) strange quark may play a special role in the low-energy dynamics of QCD. Strange sea-quark pairs may induce significant differences in the pattern of chiral symmetry breaking in the chiral limits of two and three massless flavours, in relation with the violation of the Zweig rule in the scalar sector. This effect could affect chiral extrapolations of unquenched lattice simulations with three dynamical flavours, and it could be detected through the quark-mass dependence of hadron observables [S. Descotes-Genon, hep-ph/0410233].

  14. Effects of radiation upon the light-sensing elements of the retina as characterized by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malachowski, M. J.; Tobias, C. A.; Leith, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    A model system using Necturus maculosus, the common mudpuppy, was established for evaluating effects of radiation upon the light-sensing elements of the retina. Accelerated heavy ions of helium and neon from the Berkeley Bevalac were used. A number of criteria were chosen to characterize radiation damage by observing morphological changes with the scanning electron microscope. The studies indicated retina sensitivity to high-LET (neon) particles at radiation levels below 10 rads (7 particles per visual element) whereas no significant effects were seen from fast helium ions below 50 rads.

  15. Control of electric field in CdZnTe radiation detectors by above-bandgap light

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Zázvorka, J.; Praus, P.; Touš, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-04-28

    We have studied the possibility of above bandgap light induced depolarization of CdZnTe planar radiation detector operating under high flux of X-rays by Pockels effect measurements. In this contribution, we show a similar influence of X-rays at 80 kVp and LED with a wavelength of 910 nm irradiating the cathode on polarization of the detector due to an accumulation of a positive space charge of trapped photo-generated holes. We have observed the depolarization of the detector under simultaneous cathode-site illumination with excitation LED at 910 nm and depolarization above bandgap LED at 640 nm caused by trapping of drifting photo-generated electrons. Although the detector current is quite high during this depolarization, we have observed that it decreases relatively fast to its initial value after switching off the depolarizing light. In order to get detailed information about physical processes present during polarization and depolarization and, moreover, about associated deep levels, we have performed the Pockels effect infrared spectral scanning measurements of the detector without illumination and under illumination in polarized and optically depolarized states.

  16. Analysis of light scattering by two-dimensional inhomogeneities in paper using general radiative transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nukala, Madhuri; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-12-10

    Lateral light scattering simulations of printed dots are analyzed using general radiative transfer theory. We investigated the appearance of a printed paper in relation to the medium parameters like thickness of the paper sample, its optical properties, and the asymmetry factor. It was found that the appearance of a print greatly depends on these factors making it either brighter or darker. A thicker substrate with higher single scattering albedo backed with an absorbing surface makes the dots brighter due to increased number of scattering events. Additionally, it is shown that the optical effects of print also depend on illuminating and viewing angles along with the depth of ink penetration. A larger single scattering angle implies less intensity and the dots appear much blurred due to the shadowing effect prominent when viewed from sides. A fully penetrated dot of the same extinction coefficient as a partial penetrated one is darker due to increased absorption. These results can be used in applications dealing with lateral light scattering.

  17. Search for Invisible Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S)->gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-11-05

    We search for a light scalar particle produced in single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) resonance through the process {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} + A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} invisible. Such an object appears in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. If, in addition, there exists a light, stable neutralino, decays of A{sup 0} could be preferentially to an invisible final state. We search for events with a single high-energy photon and a large missing mass, consistent with a 2-body decay of {Upsilon}(3S). We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} invisible) at (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range m{sub A{sup 0}} {le} 7.8 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  18. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  19. Inactivation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus in chicken meat and exudate using high pressure processing, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stapylococcus saprophyticus is a common contaminant in foods and causes urinary tract infections in humans. Three nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve the safety foods include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV-C). A...

  20. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  1. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  2. Light extraction enhancement with radiation pattern shaping of LEDs by waveguiding nanorods with impedance-matching tips.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Li-Chuan; Lin, Guan-Jhong; Lien, Der-Hsien; Huang, Jian-Jang; He, Jr-Hau

    2014-03-07

    Syringe-like ZnO nanorods (NRs) were fabricated on InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) by a hydrothermal method. Without sacrificing the electrical performances of LEDs, syringe-like NRs can enhance light extraction capability by 10.5% at 20 mA and shape the radiation profile with a view angle collimated from 136° to 121°. By performing optical experiments and simulation, it is found that the superior light extraction efficiency with a more collimated radiation pattern is attributed to the waveguiding effect of NRs and the mitigation of abrupt index change by the tapered ends of syringe-like ZnO NRs. This work demonstrates the importance of the nanostructure morphology in LED performances and provides the architecture design guidelines of nanostructures to a variety of optical devices.

  3. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction-the "intrinsic" quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ / Z / W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  4. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2016-12-18

    Here, we present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction—the “intrinsic” quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ/Z/W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  5. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; ...

    2016-12-18

    Here, we present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction—the “intrinsic” quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ/Z/W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsicmore » heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.« less

  6. The artefacts of radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners and their causation by light scattering from radiation-induced polymers.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Doerner, Karl-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern

    2014-07-07

    Optical experiments and theoretical considerations have been undertaken in order to understand the causes of the 'orientation effect' and the 'parabola effect', the artefacts impairing the desired light absorption measurement on radiochromic EBT3 films with flatbed scanners. EBT3 films exposed to doses up to 20.9 Gy were scanned with an Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner in landscape and portrait orientation. The horizontally and vertically polarized light components of the scanner were determined, and another Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was disassembled to examine its optical components. The optical properties of exposed and unexposed EBT3 films were studied with incident polarized and unpolarized white light, and the transmitted red light was investigated for its polarization and scattering properties including the distribution of the scattering angles. Neutral density filters were studied for comparison. Guidance was sought from the theory of light scattering from rod-like macromolecular structures. The drastic dose-dependent variation of the transmitted total light current as function of the orientation of front and rear polarizers, interpreted by light scattering theory, shows that the radiation-induced polymerization of the monomers of EBT3 films produces light scattering oscillators preferably polarized at right angles with the coating direction of the film. The directional distribution of the scattered light is partly anisotropic, with a preferred scattering plane at right angles with the coating direction, indicating light scattering from stacks of coherently vibrating oscillators piled up along the monomer crystals. The polyester carrier film also participates in these effects. The 'orientation' and 'parabola' artefacts due to flatbed scanning of radiochromic films can be explained by the interaction of the polarization-dependent and anisotropic light scattering from exposed and unexposed EBT3 films with the quantitative difference

  7. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  8. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress.

  9. Search for Hadronic Decays of a Light Higgs Boson in the Radiative Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.

    2012-02-16

    The authors search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) produced in radiative decays of an {Upsilon}(2S) or {Upsilon}(3S) meson, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}. The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) center of mass energies, and include (121.3 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and (98.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions {beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) {center_dot} {beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) (n = 2 or 3) that range from 1 x 10{sup -6} for an A{sup 0} mass of 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} to 8 x 10{sup -5} at 7 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Precambrian palaeontology in the light of molecular phylogeny - an example: the radiation of the green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssèdre, B.

    2007-09-01

    The problem of the antiquity of the radiation of the green algae (phylum Viridiplantae) has been hotly debated and is still controversial today. A method combining Precambrian paleontology and molecular phylogeny is applied to shed light on this topic. As a critical method, molecular phylogeny is essential for avoiding taxonomic mistakes. As a heuristic method, it helps us to discern to what extent the presence of such and such clade is likely at such and such time, and it may even suggest the attribution of some fossil to a clade whose taxonomic position will be distinctly defined even though it has no previously known representative. Some well characterized Precambrian fossils of green algae are Palaeastrum and Proterocladus at Svanbergfjellet (ca. 750 Ma), Tasmanites and Pterospermella at Thule (ca. 1200 Ma), Spiromorpha at Ruyang (ca. 1200 Ma) and Leiosphaeridia crassa at Roper (ca. 1450 Ma). The position of these fossils in the taxonomy and the phylogeny of the Viriplantae is discussed. The conclusions are that the Chlorophyceae and the Ulvophyceae were separated long before 750 Ma, that the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta were separated long before 1200 Ma and that the last common ancestor of the Viridiplantae and the Rhodophyta was possibly two billion years old.

  11. Fermion masses and neutrino mixing in an U(1){sub H} flavor symmetry model with hierarchical radiative generation for light charged fermion masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Galeana, Albino

    2007-11-01

    I report the analysis performed on fermion masses and mixing, including neutrino mixing, within the context of a model with hierarchical radiative mass generation mechanism for light charged fermions, mediated by exotic scalar particles at one and two loops, respectively, meanwhile the neutrinos get Majorana mass terms at tree level through the Yukawa couplings with two SU(2){sub L} Higgs triplets. All the resulting mass matrices in the model, for the u, d, and e fermion charged sectors, the neutrinos and the exotic scalar particles, are diagonalized in exact analytical form. Quantitative analysis shows that this model is successful to accommodate the hierarchical spectrum of masses and mixing in the quark sector as well as the charged lepton masses. The lepton mixing matrix, V{sub PMNS}, is written completely in terms of the neutrino masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, and m{sub 3}. Large lepton mixing for {theta}{sub 12} and {theta}{sub 23} is predicted in the range of values 0.7 < or approx. sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 12} < or approx. 0.7772 and 0.87 < or approx. sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 23} < or approx. 0.9023 by using 0.033 < or approx. s{sub 13}{sup 2} < or approx. 0.04. These values for lepton mixing are consistent with 3{sigma} allowed ranges provided by recent global analysis of neutrino data oscillation. From {delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2} bounds, neutrino masses are predicted in the range of values m{sub 1}{approx_equal}(1.706-2.494)x10{sup -3} eV, m{sub 2}{approx_equal}(6.675-12.56)x10{sup -3} eV, and m{sub 3}{approx_equal}(1.215-2.188)x10{sup -2} eV, respectively. The above allowed lepton mixing leads to the quark-lepton complementary relations {theta}{sub 12}{sup CKM}+{theta}{sub 12}{sup PMNS}{approx_equal}41.543 deg. -44.066 deg. and {theta}{sub 23}{sup CKM}+{theta}{sub 23}{sup PMNS}{approx_equal}36.835 deg. -38.295 deg. The new exotic scalar particles induce flavor changing neutral currents and contribute to lepton flavor violating processes such as E{yields}e{sub 1}e

  12. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  13. Radiation Force Caused by Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    General formulas for computing the radiation force exerted on arbitrarily oriented and arbitrarily shaped nonspherical particles due to scattering, absorption, and emission of electromagnetic radiation are derived. For randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry, the formula for the average radiation force caused by the particle response to external illumination reduces to the standard Debye formula derived from the Lorenz-Mie theory, whereas the average radiation force caused by emission vanishes.

  14. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  15. Quark-mass dependence of two-nucleon observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Lee, Tze-Kei; Liu, C.-P.; Liu, Yu-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    We study the potential implications of lattice QCD determinations of the S-wave nucleon-nucleon scattering lengths with unphysical light quark masses. If the light quark masses are small enough such that nuclear effective field theory (NEFT) can be used to perform quark-mass extrapolations, then the leading quark-mass dependence of not only the effective range and the two-body current, but also all the low-energy deuteron matrix elements up to next-to-leading-order in NEFT can be obtained. As a proof of principle, we compute the quark-mass dependence of the deuteron charge radius, magnetic moment, polarizability, and the deuteron photodisintegration cross section using the lattice calculation of the scattering lengths at 354 MeV pion mass by the ``Nuclear Physics with Lattice QCD'' (NPLQCD) collaboration and the NEFT power counting scheme of Beane, Kaplan, and Vuorinen (BKV), even though it is not yet established that the 354 MeV pion mass is within the radius of convergence of the BKV scheme. Once the lattice result with quark mass within the NEFT radius of convergence is obtained, our observation can be used to constrain the time variation of isoscalar combination of u and d quark mass mq, to help the anthropic principle study to find the mq range that allows the existence of life, and to provide a weak test of the multiverse conjecture.

  16. A simple quality assurance test tool for the visual verification of light and radiation field congruent using electronic portal images device and computed radiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The radiation field on most megavoltage radiation therapy units are shown by a light field projected through the collimator by a light source mounted inside the collimator. The light field is traditionally used for patient alignment. Hence it is imperative that the light field is congruent with the radiation field. Method A simple quality assurance tool has been designed for rapid and simple test of the light field and radiation field using electronic portal images device (EPID) or computed radiography (CR). We tested this QA tool using Varian PortalVision and Elekta iViewGT EPID systems and Kodak CR system. Results Both the single and double exposure techniques were evaluated, with double exposure technique providing a better visualization of the light-radiation field markers. The light and radiation congruency could be detected within 1 mm. This will satisfy the American Association of Physicists in Medicine task group report number 142 recommendation of 2 mm tolerance. Conclusion The QA tool can be used with either an EPID or CR to provide a simple and rapid method to verify light and radiation field congruence. PMID:22452821

  17. Time-resolved synchrotron radiation excited optical luminescence: light-emission properties of silicon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sham, Tsun-Kong; Rosenberg, Richard A

    2007-12-21

    The recent advances in the study of light emission from matter induced by synchrotron radiation: X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) in the energy domain and time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) are described. The development of these element (absorption edge) selective, synchrotron X-ray photons in, optical photons out techniques with time gating coincide with advances in third-generation, insertion device based, synchrotron light sources. Electron bunches circulating in a storage ring emit very bright, widely energy tunable, short light pulses (<100 ps), which are used as the excitation source for investigation of light-emitting materials. Luminescence from silicon nanostructures (porous silicon, silicon nanowires, and Si-CdSe heterostructures) is used to illustrate the applicability of these techniques and their great potential in future applications.

  18. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ρDA 10 / μt‧ and tDA 20 / v μt‧ where μt‧ and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  19. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  20. [Study on the stability variation mechanism of humic acid water solution after radiated by the UV light].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Zhou, Li-chuan; Ding, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Ping; Sun, Xue-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Humic acid widely presents in various surface waters. Molecular structure has significant impacts on its physical and chemical properties. To explore the stability variation of humic acid before and after the UV light radiation, spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis were applied in this paper. Structural parameters selected in the experiments include reactive sites, such as phenolic hydroxyl and carboxyl contents, Zeta potential, and colloidal size. It was found that there was little humic acid being removed in the solution without UV radiation pretreatment; while its remove ratio increased notably with radiation time. After 3 h pretreatment, humic acid removal ratio was above 80% in coagulation. Spectroscopy analysis results showed that partial of the groups with fluorescent effects might be shed or rearranged after the radiation; while its aromatic structure was not destroyed. Both the Zeta potential and average colloidal size decreased with the radiation time, which was not conducive to the aggregation of humic acid. However, -OH content decreased slightly after the UV radiation, and new carboxyl and carbonyl groups formed simultaneously. The increasing of the reactive sites and the improvement of the reaction effectiveness were the major reasons leading to humic acid stability decrease in PAC! coagulation.

  1. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-05-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ''chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ''soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  2. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  3. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  4. Implications of using transmitted vs. reflected light for determining cloud properties, cloud radiative effects and aerosol-cloud-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Redemann, J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Flynn, C. J.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.; Woods, S.; Lawson, P.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Light transmitted through clouds is sensitive to a different cloud volume than reflected light at cloud top. This difference in sampling volumes has implications when calculating the radiative effects of clouds (CRE) and aerosol-cloud-interactions (ACI). We present a comparison of retrieved cloud properties and the corresponding CRE and ACI based on transmitted and reflected light for a cloud sampled during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, 2013) field campaign. Measurements of zenith radiances were obtained from the NASA DC-8 aircraft using the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument. 4STAR was deployed on an airborne platform during SEAC4RS alongside the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR). To retrieve cloud properties from transmitted shortwave radiation, we use a retrieval utilizing spectrally resolved measurements. Spectral features in shortwave radiation transmitted through clouds are sensitive to changes in cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase. The spectral features due to absorption and scattering processes by liquid water and ice cloud particles include shifts in spectral slopes, curvatures, maxima, and minima of cloud-transmitted radiance. These spectral features have been quantified by 15 parameters used to retrieve cloud properties from the 4STAR zenith radiances. Retrieved cloud optical thicknesses and effective radii based on transmitted shortwave radiation are compared to their counterparts obtained from reflected shortwave radiation measured above cloud with MODIS and with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), and SSFR operating aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Remotely sensed cloud particle effective radius are combined with in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol particles from the NASA Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) CCN Counter

  5. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Bound States of (Anti-)Scalar-Quarks in SU(3)c Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, H.; Takahashi, T. T.; Suganuma, H.

    2007-06-13

    Light scalar-quarks {phi} (colored scalar particles or idealized diquarks) and their color-singlet hadronic states are studied with quenched SU(3)c lattice QCD in terms of mass generation. We investigate 'scalar-quark mesons' {phi}{dagger}{phi} and 'scalar-quark baryons' {phi}{phi}{phi} as the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi}. We also investigate the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi} and quarks {psi}, i.e., {phi}{dagger}{psi}, {psi}{psi}{phi} and {phi}{phi}{psi}, which we name 'chimera hadrons'. All the new-type hadrons including {phi} are found to have a large mass due to large quantum corrections by gluons, even for zero bare scalar-quark mass m{phi} = 0 at a-1 {approx} 1GeV. We conjecture that all colored particles generally acquire a large effective mass due to dressed gluon effects.

  7. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  8. A Calculation and Measurement of Radiative Moller Scattering at 100 MeV with DarkLight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Charles; DarkLight Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A number of current experiments rely on precise knowledge of electron-electron (Moller) and positron-electron (Bhabha) scattering. Many of these experiments, which have lepton beams on atomic targets, use these QED processes as normalization. In other cases, such as DarkLight (at the Jefferson Lab ERL), with electron beams at relatively low energy (100 MeV) and very high power (1 Megawatt), Moller scattering and radiative Moller scattering have such enormous cross-sections that they produce extensive amounts of noise that must be understood. In this low-energy regime, the electron mass can also not be neglected. As a result, we have developed a new Monte Carlo event generator for the radiative Moller and Bhabha processes, extending existing soft-photon radiative corrections with new, exact single-photon bremsstrahlung calculations, and including the electron mass:. DarkLight provides us a unique opportunity to study this process experimentally and compare it with our work. As a result, we are preparing a dedicated apparatus consisting of two magnetic spectrometers as part of the first phase of DarkLight in order to directly measure this process. An overview of the calculation and the status of the experiment's construction will be presented.

  9. Radiation burden from secondary doses to patients undergoing radiation therapy with photons and light ions and radiation doses from imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, I; Ardenfors, O; Toma-Dasu, I; Dasu, A

    2014-10-01

    Ionising radiation is increasingly used for the treatment of cancer, being the source of a considerable fraction of the medical irradiation to patients. With the increasing success rate of cancer treatments and longer life expectancy of the treated patients, the issue of secondary cancer incidence is of growing concern, especially for paediatric patients who may live long after the treatment and be more susceptible to carcinogenesis. Also, additional imaging procedures like computed tomography, kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging and positron emission tomography, alone or in conjunction with radiation therapy, may add to the radiation burden associated with the risk of occurrence of secondary cancers. This work has been based on literature studies and is focussed on the assessment of secondary doses to healthy tissues that are delivered by the use of modern radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging modalities in the clinical environment.

  10. Effect of 16 and 24 hours daily radiation (light) on lettuce growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    A 50% increase in total radiation by extending the photoperiod from 16 to 24 hr doubled the weight of all cultivars of loose-leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) 'Grand Rapids Forcing', 'Waldmanns Green', 'Salad Bowl', and 'RubyConn', but not a Butterhead cultivar, 'Salina'. When total daily radiation (moles of photons) was the same, plants under continuous radiation weighed 30% to 50% more than plants under a 16 hr photoperiod. By using continuous radiation on loose-leaf lettuce, fewer lamp fixtures were required and yield was increased.

  11. Effect of 16 and 24 hours daily radiation (light) on lettuce growth.

    PubMed

    Koontz, H V; Prince, R P

    1986-02-01

    A 50% increase in total radiation by extending the photoperiod from 16 to 24 hr doubled the weight of all cultivars of loose-leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) 'Grand Rapids Forcing', 'Waldmanns Green', 'Salad Bowl', and 'RubyConn', but not a Butterhead cultivar, 'Salina'. When total daily radiation (moles of photons) was the same, plants under continuous radiation weighed 30% to 50% more than plants under a 16 hr photoperiod. By using continuous radiation on loose-leaf lettuce, fewer lamp fixtures were required and yield was increased.

  12. Effects of UV-B radiation on tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta), and effects of red and blue light on repair of UV-B-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of red and blue light on the repair of UV-B radiation-induced damage in tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm. Tetraspores of C. ocellatus were treated with different UV-B radiation levels (0, 36, 72, 108, 144 and 180 J/m2), and thereafter subjected to PAR, darkness, or red or blue light during a 2-h repair stage, each day for 48 days. The diameters and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPDs), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporinelike amino acids (MAAs) contents of the tetraspores were determined. Our results show that low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) promoted the growth of C. ocellatus; however, increased UV-B radiation gradually reduced the C. ocellatus growth (greater than 72 J/m2). The MAAs (palythine and asterina-330) in C. ocellatus were detected and analyzed by LC/MS. Our results suggest that moderate red light could induce the growth of this alga in aquaculture. In addition, photorepair was inhibited by red light, so there may be some other DNA repair mechanism activated by red light. Blue light promoted the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency. Red and blue lights were found to reduce the capacity of C. ocellatus to form MAAs. Therefore, PAR, red light, and blue light play different roles during the repair processes for damage induced by UV-B radiation.

  13. Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe).

    PubMed

    Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2006-08-01

    Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.

  14. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  15. Flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea and the five-quark components of the nucleons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chen; Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2011-06-24

    The existence of the five-quark Fock states for the intrinsic charm quark in the nucleons was suggested some time ago, but conclusive evidence is still lacking. We generalize the previous theoretical approach to the light-quark sector and study possible experimental signatures for such five-quark states. In particular, we compare the d-ū and ū + d-s-s data with the calculations based on the five-quark Fock states. The qualitative agreement between the data and the calculations is interpreted as evidence for the existence of the intrinsic light-quark sea in the nucleons. The probabilities for the |uuduū and |uuddd Fock states are also extracted.

  16. Top quark mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  17. Light Absorbing Impurities in Snow in the Western US: Partitioning Radiative Impacts from Mineral Dust and Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt of annual mountain snow cover dominates water resources in the western United States. Recent studies in the Upper Colorado River Basin have shown that radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities (LAIs) in mountain snow cover has accelerated snowmelt, impacted runoff timing and magnitude, and reduced annual flow. However, these studies have assumed that LAIs are primarily mineral dust, and have not quantified the radiative contribution by carbonaceous particles from bio and fossil fuel (industrial and urban) sources. Here we quantify both dust and black carbon (BC) content and assess the unique BC radiative forcing contribution in this dust dominated impurity regime using a suite of advanced field, lab, and modeling techniques. Daily measurements of surface spectral albedo and optical grain radius were collected with a field spectrometer over the 2013 spring melt season in Senator Beck Basin Study Area in the San Juan Mountains, CO, Southwestern US. Coincident snow samples were collected daily and processed for; (1) dust and BC content (2) impurity particle size, and (3) impurity optical properties. Measured snow and impurity properties were then used to drive the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model. Partitioning the unique radiative contribution from each constituents is achieved through unique model runs for clean snow, dust only, and BC only.

  18. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2004-04-30

    The existence of the top quark, discovered by CDF and D0 in 1995, has been re-established in the burgeoning dataset being collected in Run 2 of the Tevatron at Fermilab. Results from CDF on the top quark production cross section and top quark mass are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The well-characterized top data samples will make it possible in the future to probe further for new physics in the top quark sector. This report summarizes recent CDF top quark physics results.

  19. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  20. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedaque, Paulo F.; Luu, Thomas; Platter, Lucas

    2011-04-01

    We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created by a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way, we use lattice QCD data and a hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured He4 abundances put a bound of -1%≲δmq/mq≲0.7% on a possible variation of quark masses. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio η. Including bounds on the variation of η coming from WMAP results and adding some additional assumptions further narrows the range of allowed values of δmq/mq.

  1. Gas sensing based on detection of light radiation from a region of modified cladding (nanocrystalline ZnO) of an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendiran, S.; Sastikumar, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new type of fiber optic gas sensor is proposed by detecting a light radiated from a region of cladding modified with metal oxide (nanocrystalline ZnO). The intensity of radiated light is found to vary with different gasses and concentrations. Sensing characteristics are studied for ammonia, methanol, ethanol and acetone gasses. Gas sensitivity of the proposed sensor is compared with clad-modified fiber optic gas sensor. The new sensor exhibits enhanced sensitivity. Time response characteristics of the sensor are reported.

  2. High Conductivity Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipes for Light Weight Space Power System Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on prior successful fabrication and demonstration testing of a carbon-carbon heat pipe radiator element with integral fins this paper examines the hypothetical extension of the technology via substitution of high thermal conductivity composites which would permit increasing fin length while still maintaining high fin effectiveness. As a result the specific radiator mass could approach an ultimate asymptotic minimum value near 1.0 kg/m2, which is less than one fourth the value of present day satellite radiators. The implied mass savings would be even greater for high capacity space and planetary surface power systems, which may require radiator areas ranging from hundreds to thousands of square meters, depending on system power level.

  3. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-18

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson’s momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as ( 1 - x ) 2 when Bjorken- x → 1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U ( 3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion’s light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  4. Measurement of jet shapes in top-quark pair events at [Formula: see text] using the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; 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Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Tuna, A N; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urquijo, P; Usai, G; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M S; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    A measurement of jet shapes in top-quark pair events using 1.8 fb(-1) of [Formula: see text]pp collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. Samples of top-quark pair events are selected in both the single-lepton and dilepton final states. The differential and integrated shapes of the jets initiated by bottom-quarks from the top-quark decays are compared with those of the jets originated by light-quarks from the hadronic W-boson decays [Formula: see text] in the single-lepton channel. The light-quark jets are found to have a narrower distribution of the momentum flow inside the jet area than b-quark jets.

  5. SHEDDING LIGHT ON CORALS HEALTH: INTERACTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SOLAR RADIATION WITH BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral bleaching and declines in coral reef health in recent years have been attributed in part to processes driven by UV and/or visible light. For coral assemblages, exposure to UV light is often an unavoidable consequence of having access to visible (photosynthetically active) ...

  6. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Christ, N. H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R. J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R. D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R. D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D. J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-04-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities (fπ , fK, BK, mu d, ms, t01 /2, w0) obtained from simulations of 2 +1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O (3 )%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum "global fit" with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of mπ, mK and mΩ to determine the two quark masses and the scale—all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with subpercent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including fπ=130.2 (9 ) MeV ; fK=155.5 (8 ) MeV ; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK, in the renormalization group invariant scheme, 0.750(15) and the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  7. Numerical investigation of the propagation of light-induced detonation waves during the absorption of high-power laser radiation in air at elevated density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, S. Yu.; Belyanin, D. G.; Yur'ev, A. S.; Tipaev, V. V.; Filatov, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    Spatiotemporal gasdynamic plasma structures formed in quiescent air of elevated density by high-power unfocused laser radiation absorbed in the light-induced detonation (LID) wave regime have been numerically studied using a model of inviscid, equilibrium emitting air. Laser radiation intensity and air density serve as parameters of the model. Dependences of the velocity of LID wave on the laser radiation intensity at elevated air densities are presented.

  8. Visible supercontinuum radiation of light bullets in the femtosecond filamentation of IR pulses in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Chekalin, S V; Kompanets, V O; Dokukina, A E; Dormidonov, A E; Smetanina, E O; Kandidov, V P

    2015-05-31

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of visible supercontinuum generation in the formation of light bullets in a filament produced by IR pulses. In the filamentation of a 1700 – 2200 nm pulse in fused silica, bright tracks are recorded resulting from the recombination glow of carriers in the laser plasma produced by a sequence of light bullets and from the scattering in silica of the visible supercontinuum generated by the light bullets. It is found that the formation of a light bullet is attended with an outburst of a certain portion of supercontinuum energy in the visible range. The energy outburst is the same for all bullets in the sequence and becomes smaller with increasing pulse wavelength. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Impacts of Diffuse Radiation on Light Use Efficiency across Terrestrial Ecosystems Based on Eddy Covariance Observation in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24≤R2≤0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R2 = 0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction. PMID:25393629

  10. Impacts of diffuse radiation on light use efficiency across terrestrial ecosystems based on Eddy covariance observation in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R(2) = 0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction.

  11. Radiative hc /b decays to η or η '

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Dai, Jian-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of the radiative decay rates of the P -wave spin singlet charmonium hc to the light meson η or η' by the BESIII Collaboration, we investigate the decay rates of these channels at order α αs4. The photon is radiated mainly from charm quark pairs in the lowest-order Feynman diagrams, because the diagrams where a photon radiated from light quarks are suppressed by αs or the relative charm quark velocity v , due to charge-parity conservation. The form factors of two gluons to η or η', which are the major mechanism for η and η' production, are employed. η (η') is treated as a light-cone object when we consider that the parent charmonium mass is much heavier than that of the final light meson. We obtain the branching ratio B (hc→γ η')=(1.9 4-0.51+0.70)×10-3 in the nonrelativistic QCD approach, which is in agreement with the BESIII measurement. The prediction of the branching ratio of hc→γ η is also within the range of experimental error after including the larger uncertainty of the total decay width Γh c. The applications of these formulas to the radiative decays to η (η') of the P -wave spin singlet bottomonium hb(n P ) are presented. These studies will shed some light on the η -η' mixing effects, the flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking, and the nonperturbative dynamics of charmonium and bottomonium.

  12. Light, literacy and the absence of ultraviolet radiation in the development of myopia.

    PubMed

    Prepas, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    As the prevalence of myopia steadily increases, reaching as high as 90% in some populations, investigators continue to look for causative factors other than family history. Most current research suggests an association of axial myopia with reading or either the presence or absence of light. Even though these studies are frequently inconsistent, non-reproducible or contradictory, many clinicians utilize them in recommending treatments for children, such as bifocals or atropine. By reviewing the biologic effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields, we may gain insight into these discrepancies as well as unify the combined role of literacy and light in the pathogenesis of myopia. These biologic effects are wavelength specific. The wavelength of artificial (either incandescent or fluorescent) light is primarily 700-400 nm, while the wavelength of natural light is 700-200 nm, inclusive of the ultraviolet spectrum. So the opposite findings of myopia resulting from either accommodation under continuous light or under darkness (form deprivation) can be reconciled by restating it: Close focusing in the absence of UV light may provoke axial myopia. Experimental evidence exhibiting both scleral remodeling under accommodation as well as the inhibition of scleral remodeling by the hardening of collagen under ultraviolet exposure may support this concept. Perhaps new research can look into the role of the presence or absence of UV light in animal models of myopia.

  13. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  14. Properties of charmonium in lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of improved staggered sea quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro et al.

    2004-03-16

    We use the dynamical gluon configurations provided by the MILC collaboration in a study of the charmonium spectrum and {psi} leptonic width. We examine sea quark effects on mass splitting and on the leptonic decay matrix element for light masses as low as m{sub s}/5, while keeping the strange quark mass fixed and the lattice spacing nearly constant.

  15. Mechanical effects of light on material media: radiation pressure and the linear and angular momenta of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2014-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves carry energy as well as linear and angular momenta. Interactions between light and material media typically involve the exchange of all three entities. In all such interactions energy and momentum (both linear and angular) are conserved. Johannes Kepler seems to have been the first person to notice that the pressure of sunlight is responsible for the tails of the comets pointing away from the Sun. Modern applications of radiation pressure and photon momentum include solar sails, optical tweezers for optical trapping and micro-manipulation, and optically-driven micro-motors and actuators. This paper briefly describes certain fundamental aspects underlying the mechanical properties of light, and examines several interesting phenomena involving the linear and angular momenta of photons.

  16. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  17. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  18. Astronaut Exposures to Ionizing Radiation in a Lightly-Shielded Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Simonsen, L. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Atwell, W.

    1999-01-01

    The normal working and living areas of the astronauts are designed to provide an acceptable level of protection against the hazards of ionizing radiation of the space environment. Still there are occasions when they must don a spacesuit designed mainly for environmental control and mobility and leave the confines of their better-protected domain. This is especially true for deep space exploration. The impact of spacesuit construction on the exposure of critical astronaut organs will be examined in the ionizing radiation environments of free space, the lunar surface and the Martian surface. The computerized anatomical male model is used to evaluate astronaut self-shielding factors and to determine space radiation exposures to critical radiosensitive human organs.

  19. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  20. Quark Contributions to Nucleon Momentum and Spin from Domain Wall fermion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    S. N. Syritsyn, J. R. Green, J. W. Negele, A. V. Pochinsky, M. Engelhardt, Ph. Hagler, B. Musch, W. Schroers

    2011-12-01

    We report contributions to the nucleon spin and momentum from light quarks calculated using dynamical domain wall fermions with pion masses down to 300 MeV and fine lattice spacing a=0.084 fm. Albeit without disconnected diagrams, we observe that spin and orbital angular momenta of both u and d quarks are opposite, almost canceling in the case of the d quark, which agrees with previous calculations using a mixed quark action. We also present the full momentum dependence of n=2 generalized form factors showing little variation with the pion mass.

  1. Exposure of Metarhizium acridum mycelium to light induces tolerance to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Brancini, Guilherme T P; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto Ú L

    2016-03-01

    Metarhizium acridum is an entomopathogenic fungus commonly used as a bioinsecticide. The conidium is the fungal stage normally employed as field inoculum in biological control programs and must survive under field conditions such as high ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure. Light, which is an important stimulus for many fungi, has been shown to induce the production of M. robertsii conidia with increased stress tolerance. Here we show that a two-hour exposure to white or blue/UV-A light of fast-growing mycelium induces tolerance to subsequent UV-B irradiation. Red light, however, does not have the same effect. In addition, we established that this induction can take place with as little as 1 min of white-light exposure. This brief illumination scheme could be relevant in future studies of M. acridum photobiology and for the production of UV-B resistant mycelium used in mycelium-based formulations for biological control.

  2. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  3. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  4. Exotic Signals of Vectorlike Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Yu, Felix

    2016-12-06

    Vectorlike fermions are an important target for hadron collider searches. We show that the vectorlike quarks may predominantly decay via higher-dimensional operators into a quark plus a couple of other Standard Model fermions. Pair production of vectorlike quarks of charge 2/3 at the LHC would then lead to a variety of possible final states, including $t\\bar t + 4\\tau$, $t\\bar b\

  5. Preliminary evidence on photoreactivation of Frankia spores with visible light after exposure to UV-C radiation.

    PubMed

    Sayed, W F

    2011-06-01

    Spores of four Frankia strains, the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete, were exposed to short wavelength UV-C radiation of 254 nm at 1 lux cm(2) (0.24 mw cm2 of energy) for 10 min. The used strains were HFP020203, UGL020604, UGL020602q and ORS021001. Exposure to UV was followed by reactivation with visible white light at 327.4 lux cm(2) for the same period of time. Spore germination percentage, spore protein content, and cell growth were damaged by this treatment. The lower and higher percentages of reduction in spore germination were 32 and 63% and, for the same strains, the recovery by white light was 7.2 and 37%. The lower percentages of UV damage and subsequent low recovery were recorded for strain ORS021001 that is considered more resistant to UV than the other strains. The higher percentages were recorded for strain HFP020203 that is more sensitive to UV but having more efficient repairing mechanisms. All the tested strains showed repairing activity induced by white light as indicated from the increase in their spore germination, protein content and almost restoring the normal shape of Frankia hyphae, after being damaged, as revealed by scanning electron microscope. This is the first evidence that photo-repairing systems are present in Frankia strains although there are variations in their response to both UV-C and photoreactivation by white light.

  6. The radiation hardness and temperature stability of Planar Light-wave Circuit splitters for the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, N. C.; Hamilton, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Teng, P. K.; Weidberg, A. R.; Issever, C.

    2011-10-01

    High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) Inner Tracker designs may include the sharing of Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signals between several tracker modules. This is possible because the highest frequency signals are common to all modules. Such designs are an attractive option because they reduce the number of optical links required and hence the cost. These designs will require optical signal splitters that are radiation hard up to high doses and capable of operating in cold temperatures. Optical splitters are available as either fused-fibre splitters or Planar Light-wave Circuit (PLC) splitters. PLC splitters are preferable because they are smaller than fused-fibre splitters. A selection of PLC splitters from different manufacturers and of two different technologies (silica and glass based) have been tested for radiation hardness up to a dose of 500 kGy(Si) and for temperature stability. All the tested splitters displayed small increases in insertion losses ( < 0.1 dB) in reducing the operating temperature from 25°C to -25°C. The silica based splitters from all manufacturers did not exhibit significant radiation induced insertion losses, despite the high dose they were exposed to. The glass based sample, however, had a per channel radiation induced insertion loss of up to 1.16 dB. Whilst the silica based splitters can be considered as qualified for HL-LHC use with regards to radiation hardness, the glass technology would require further testing at a lower, more realistic, dose to also be considered as a potential component for HL-LHC upgrade designs.

  7. Development and applications of radiative transfer models for unpolarized and polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenyi

    Radiative transfer models play an important role in satellite remote sensing of the atmosphere and the underlying surface including the ocean as well as for studying the energy budget of the Earth. Proper analysis of radiance and polarized radiation measurements rely on accurate and reliable radiative transfer models. Among the various numerical approaches developed to solve the radiative transfer equation, the ones based on the discrete-ordinate method, DISORT, as well as its polarized (vector) version VDISORT, have led to quite successful radiative transfer models that have been widely applied as forward models for the simulation of radiative transfer in coupled atmosphere-ocean media. In this dissertation, we first discuss new developments of DISORT and VDISORT, and review the relevant radiative transfer theory behind the upgraded algorithms. We then proceed to discuss applications of radiative transfer simulations that make use of each model. The upgrade of DISORT discussed in this thesis includes in the following improvements: (1) enhanced computational efficiency, accuracy and stability; (2) implementation new lower boundary conditions to simulate reflection from realistic (rough) land and ocean surfaces; (3) a revised treatment of the single-scattering correction. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate and quantify the improvements in accuracy and efficiency by comparing previous and upgraded versions of the numerical codes. One challenging problem in remote sensing applications is the simulation of ocean glint reflectance, which is reflected solar radiation from a wind-roughened ocean surface. For geometries close to specular reflection the glint signal is sufficiently strong that it may saturate the sensor, and even when saturation does not occur correct simulation of this signal is a difficult problem. In an exciting new application, we show for the first time that glint radiances in the near infrared spectral range simulated with the upgraded

  8. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  9. Quark forces from hadronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-04-17

    We consider the implications of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction Hamiltonian for the spin-flavor structure of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark interaction Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states, which constrain the mixing angles, and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark interactions. We find that the pure gluon-exchange model is disfavored by data, independently of any assumptions about hadronic wave functions.

  10. Valence quark spin distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-09-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the constituent quark model provide a natural explanation for many nucleon properties, including the {Delta} - N splitting, the charge radius of the neutron, and the observation that the proton's quark distribution function ratio d(x)/u(x) {r_arrow} 0 as x {r_arrow} 1. The hyperfine-perturbed quark model also makes predictions for the nucleon spin-dependent distribution functions. Precision measurements of the resulting asymmetries A{sub 1}{sup p}(x) and A{sub 1}{sup n}(x) in the valence region can test this model and thereby the hypothesis that the valence quark spin distributions are ''normal''.

  11. Distribution of radiation from organic light-emitting diode structures with wavelength-scale gratings as a function of azimuth and polar angles.

    PubMed

    Tutt, Lee; Revelli, Joseph F

    2008-03-01

    The angular distribution of radiation emitted from organic electroluminescent diodes fabricated on substrates with wavelength-scale gratings was measured using an optical Fourier transform instrument. A simple geometrical model is derived that specifies the polar angle of the exiting photon as a function of the azimuth angle, the grating pitch, the wavelength of light, and the effective index of the refraction of the light emitted by the fluorescing excitons. The radiation pattern of the extracted light is shown to fit that predicted by the model if one assumes that it comes from surface plasmon polaritons and bound TE waveguide modes.

  12. Sneaky light stop

    DOE PAGES

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore » to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  13. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  14. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  15. Light Absorption Properties and Radiative Effects of Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic aerosols (OA) in the atmosphere affect Earth’s energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called “brown carbon” (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OA are not or poorly represented in current climate m...

  16. Asymmetric lateral coherence of betatron radiation emitted in laser-driven light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paroli, B.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Petrillo, V.; Potenza, M. A. C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Shpakov, V.

    2015-08-01

    We show that the radiation emitted by betatron oscillations of a high-energy electron beam undergoing wake-field acceleration is endowed with peculiar coherence properties which deliver quantitative information about the electron trajectories. Such results are achieved by means of accurate numerical simulations and a simple geometrical model gives a clear physical interpretation.

  17. Interactions of Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate with Light Induced Chemical Reactions in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet radiation that reach the surface of North American aquatic environments. Concurrent changes in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in changes in stratification and precipitation that ar...

  18. Searches for new physics in the top quark samples at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scodellaro, Luca; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    Twelve years after the discovery of the top quark at Fermilab's Tevatron, they are now finally beginning to shed light on this peculiarily massive quark. With 1-1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector, they are able to probe the knowledge of the top quark physics, and to search for signals of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, they present results of measurements of top quark properties, as well as tests for the production mechanism of the top quark. They also describe CDF latest searches for beyond Standard Model couplings of the top quark. Finally, they present the most recent searches for direct production of new particles in the collected data samples.

  19. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  20. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  1. Peach ( Prunus persica L. Batsch) allergen-encoding genes are developmentally regulated and affected by fruit load and light radiation.

    PubMed

    Botton, Alessandro; Andreotti, Carlo; Costa, Guglielmo; Ramina, Angelo

    2009-01-28

    The fruits of Rosaceae species may frequently induce allergic reactions in both adults and children, especially in the Mediterranean area. In peach, true allergens and cross-reactive proteins may cause hypersensitive reactions involving a wide diversity of symptoms. Three known classes of allergenic proteins, namely, Pru p 1, Pru p 3, and Pru p 4, have been reported to be mostly involved, but an exhaustive survey of the proteins determining the overall allergenic potential, their biological functions, and the factors affecting the expression of the related genes is still missing. In the present study, the expression profiles of some selected genes encoding peach allergen isoforms were studied during fruit growth and development and upon different fruit load and light radiation regimens. The results indicate that the majority of allergen-encoding genes are expressed at their maximum during the ripening stage, therefore representing a potential risk for peach consumers. Nevertheless, enhancing the light radiation and decreasing the fruit load achieved a reduction of the transcription rate of most genes and a possible decrease of the overall allergenic potential at harvest. According to these data, new growing practices could be set up to obtain hypoallergenic peach fruits and eventually combined with the cultivation of hypoallergenic genotypes to obtain a significant reduction of the allergenic potential.

  2. Investigation of Cherenkov Light in an Oil Drum with Cosmic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedel, Zachary; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Castro, Juan; Zavala, Favian; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) have been around for decades and have become well understood in their use as cosmic ray detectors. Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs), on the other hand, are still being explored as more viable, cost-effective light detector for counting cosmic rays. To detect cosmic rays by the Cherenkov effect, we placed an acrylic cylinder, with wavelength-shifting fibers coiled around it and filled with distilled water, inside a light-tight box that was able to detect the weak light signals with PMTs (1 and 3 inch), an MPPC (3 mm × 3 mm), and with coincidence between different detectors. Additionally, we utilized an oil drum with approximate volume of 30 gallons as a light-tight vessel to conduct coincidence counts for detecting cosmic rays using the PMTs and MPPCs (3 mm × 3 mm and 1 mm × 1 mm). In this poster presentation, we would present our findings as a comparative analysis between the two different vessels and the efficiency thereof of the same to determine whether or not the MPPC is a viable instrument for detecting cosmic rays that produce Cherenkov light. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  3. SPICAM-light on Mars-Express as a monitor of surface UV radiation and atmospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.; Moreau, D.; Fonteyn, D.; Bertaux, J. L.; Korablev, O.

    2001-02-01

    The SPICAM-light optical package on the ESA Mars-Express mission includes a UV radiation channel to perform nadir and limb observation between 118 and 320 nm as well as an infrared channel extending between 1 and 1.7 μm. The UV resolution will be 0.5 nm per pixel. This spectral range was chosen for the observation of the total column and vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols and other gases; it is also aimed at the Martian upper atmosphere where the obtained data will help to constrain the escape problem. The associated infrared channel specialises in water vapour. The UV range corresponds exactly to the UV-B and UV-C spectral domains and will be used to determine the solar mid-UV radiation received at the surface and to establish its climatology. Signal simulations are performed using the results of a 2-D Martian model as input (Moreau, Thesis, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium 1995; Moreau, Fonteyn, Two-dimensional study of the atmospheric and surface oxidants on Mars, Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Mars, Lunar and Planetary Institute Contribution, Vol. 972, 1999, p. 6093) in order to show the influence of ozone and aerosol distributions on this radiation. Possibility of a UV shield exists during extreme polar ozone maxima as well as during dust storms, due to the UV absorption of Martian dust. In the other more normal cases, the daytime mid-UV radiation between 200 and 320 nm penetrates in sufficient amount to prevent the development of surface micro-organisms. Other life science conclusions could be drawn from the SPICAM-light observations: the direct mapping of water vapour will constrain the possible occurrences of subsurface liquid water that could be a favourable environment for the survival of life. SPICAM-light by its mapping of ozone and water vapour will also allow determining the amount of oxidants and especially OH. These could also affect the survival of Martian or contaminating bacteria. It is also intended

  4. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  5. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  6. Inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Sebum Production after Exposure of Cultured Human Sebocytes to Ultraviolet A Radiation and Light at Wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Soo Yuhl; Ryu, Hyo Sub; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, visible light, or infrared light therapy for the treatment of acne is the subject of ongoing scientific debate. Objective This study was conducted to investigate changes in sebum production and the expression of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), following exposure of cultured human sebocytes to UVA radiation and light at wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm. Methods Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to measure the gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α), MMPs (MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-9), and AMPs (psoriasin, hBD-2, hBD-3, and LL-37) in cultured sebocytes after exposure to UVA radiation (2 J/cm2, 3 J/cm2, and 5 J/cm2) and light at wavelengths of 650 nm (14 J/cm2, 29 J/cm2, and 87 J/cm2) and 830 nm (5 J/cm2, 10 J/cm2, and 30 J/cm2). Expression of inflammatory cytokine proteins and sebum production were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays and a lipid analysis kit, respectively. Results Exposure of cultured sebocytes to UVA radiation and light at wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm did not show a significant increase in the expression of inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, or AMPs. Sebum production was not significantly decreased after exposure to UVA radiation and light at both wavelengths. Conclusion We propose that UVA radiation, visible light, and infrared light can be used to target Propionibacterium acnes for the treatment of acne, without an increase in the expression of inflammatory biomarkers and sebum production. PMID:25834355

  7. UV Radiation and Visible Light Induce hsp70 Gene Expression in the Antarctic Psychrophilic Ciliate Euplotes focardii.

    PubMed

    Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Passini, Valerio; Colombetti, Giuliano; Miceli, Cristina; La Terza, Antonietta; Marangoni, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The psychrophilic ciliate Euplotes focardii inhabits the shallow marine coastal sediments of Antarctica, where, over millions of years of evolution, it has reached a strict molecular adaptation to such a constant-temperature environment (about -2 °C). This long evolution at sub-zero temperatures has made E. focardii unable to respond to heat stress with the activation of its heat shock protein (hsp) 70 genes. These genes can, however, be expressed in response to other stresses, like the oxidative one, thus indicating that the molecular adaptation has exclusively altered the heat stress signaling pathways, while it has preserved hsp70 gene activation in response to other environmental stressors. Since radiative stress has proved to be affine to oxidative stress in several organisms, we investigated the capability of UV radiation to induce hsp70 transcription. E. focardii cell cultures were exposed to several different irradiation regimes, ranging from visible only to a mixture of visible, UV-A and UV-B. The irradiation values of each spectral band have been set to be comparable with those recorded in a typical Antarctic spring. Using Northern blot analysis, we measured the expression level of hsp70 immediately after irradiation (0-h-labeled samples), 1 h, and 2 h from the end of the irradiation. Surprisingly, our results showed that besides UV radiation, the visible light was also able to induce hsp70 expression in E. focardii. Moreover, spectrophotometric measurements have revealed no detectable endogenous pigments in E. focardii, making it difficult to propose a possible explanation for the visible light induction of its hsp70 genes. Further research is needed to conclusively clarify this point.

  8. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-14

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  9. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  10. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  11. Generalized collisional radiative model for light elements: C: Data for the B isonuclear sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Pindzola, M. S.; Griffin, D. C.; Colgan, J. P.; Badnell, N. R.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A first stage collision database is assembled which contains electron-impact excitation, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients for B, B+, B2+, B3+, and B4+. The first stage database is constructed using the R-matrix with pseudostates, time-dependent close-coupling, and perturbative distorted-wave methods. A second stage collision database is then assembled which contains generalized collisional-radiative ionization, recombination, and power loss rate coefficients as a function of both temperature and density. The second stage database is constructed by solution of the collisional-radiative equations in the quasi-static equilibrium approximation using the first stage database. Both collision database stages reside in electronic form at the IAEA Labeled Atomic Data Interface (ALADDIN) database and the Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS) open database.

  12. Radiative effects in scattering of polarized leptons by polarized nucleons and light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Akushevich; A. Ilyichev; N. Shumeiko

    2001-07-01

    Recent developments in the field of radiative effects in polarized lepton-nuclear scattering are reviewed. The processes of inclusive, semi-inclusive, diffractive and elastic scattering are considered. The explicit formulae obtained within the covariant approach are discussed. FORTRAN codes POLRAD, RADGEN, HAPRAD, DIFFRAD and MASCARAD created on the basis of the formulae are briefly described. Applications for data analysis of the current experiments on lepton-nuclear scattering at CERN, DESY, SLAC and TJNAF are illustrated by numerical results.

  13. Ultra-Violet Light Emission from HPV-G Cells Irradiated with Low Let Radiation From (90)Y; Consequences for Radiation Induced Bystander Effects.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E; Byun, Soo Hyun; Prestwich, William V; Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin; Armstrong, Andrea; Fernandez, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to establish the emission of UV photons when HPV-G cells and associated materials (such as the cell substrate and cell growth media) are exposed to low LET radiation. The potential role of UV photons in the secondary triggering of biological processes led us to hypothesize that the emission and absorption of photons at this wavelength explain some radiation induced "bystander effects" that have previously been thought to be chemically mediated. Cells were plated in Petri-dishes of two different sizes, having different thicknesses of polystyrene (PS) substrate, and were exposed to β-radiation from (90)Y produced by the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. UV measurements were performed using a single photon counting system employing an interference-type filter for selection of a narrow wavelength range, 340±5 nm, of photons. Exposure of the cell substrates (which were made of polystyrene) determined that UV photons were being emitted as a consequence of β particle irradiation of the Petri-dishes. For a tightly collimated β-particle beam exposure, we observed 167 photons in the detector per unit μCi in the shielded source for a 1.76 mm thick substrate and 158 photons/μCi for a 0.878 mm thick substrate. A unit μCi source activity was equivalent to an exposure to the substrate of 18 β-particles/cm(2) in this case. The presence of cells and medium in a Petri-dish was found to significantly increase (up to a maximum of 250%) the measured number of photons in a narrow band of wavelengths of 340±5 nm (i.e. UVA) as compared to the signal from an empty control Petri-dish. When coloured growth medium was added to the cells, it reduced the measured count rate, while the addition of transparent medium in equal volume increased the count rate, compared to cells alone. We attribute this to the fact that emission, scattering and absorption of light by cells and media are all variables in the experiment. Under collimated irradiation conditions, it was observed

  14. Ultra-Violet Light Emission from HPV-G Cells Irradiated with Low Let Radiation From 90Y; Consequences for Radiation Induced Bystander Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Prestwich, William V.; Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin; Armstrong, Andrea; Fernandez, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to establish the emission of UV photons when HPV-G cells and associated materials (such as the cell substrate and cell growth media) are exposed to low LET radiation. The potential role of UV photons in the secondary triggering of biological processes led us to hypothesize that the emission and absorption of photons at this wavelength explain some radiation induced “bystander effects” that have previously been thought to be chemically mediated. Cells were plated in Petri-dishes of two different sizes, having different thicknesses of polystyrene (PS) substrate, and were exposed to β-radiation from 90Y produced by the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. UV measurements were performed using a single photon counting system employing an interference-type filter for selection of a narrow wavelength range, 340±5 nm, of photons. Exposure of the cell substrates (which were made of polystyrene) determined that UV photons were being emitted as a consequence of β particle irradiation of the Petri-dishes. For a tightly collimated β-particle beam exposure, we observed 167 photons in the detector per unit μCi in the shielded source for a 1.76 mm thick substrate and 158 photons/μCi for a 0.878 mm thick substrate. A unit μCi source activity was equivalent to an exposure to the substrate of 18 β-particles/cm2 in this case. The presence of cells and medium in a Petri-dish was found to significantly increase (up to a maximum of 250%) the measured number of photons in a narrow band of wavelengths of 340±5 nm (i.e. UVA) as compared to the signal from an empty control Petri-dish. When coloured growth medium was added to the cells, it reduced the measured count rate, while the addition of transparent medium in equal volume increased the count rate, compared to cells alone. We attribute this to the fact that emission, scattering and absorption of light by cells and media are all variables in the experiment. Under collimated irradiation conditions, it was observed

  15. Linear perturbation theory of reionization in position space: Cosmological radiative transfer along the light cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; D'Aloisio, Anson; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Jun; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2015-04-01

    The linear perturbation theory of inhomogeneous reionization (LPTR) has been developed as an analytical tool for predicting the global ionized fraction and large-scale power spectrum of ionized density fluctuations during reionization. In the original formulation of the LPTR, the ionization balance and radiative transfer equations are linearized and solved in Fourier space. However, the LPTR's approximation to the full solution of the radiative transfer equation is not straightforward to interpret, since the latter is most intuitively conceptualized in position space. To bridge the gap between the LPTR and the language of numerical radiative transfer, we present a new, equivalent, position-space formulation of the LPTR that clarifies the approximations it makes and facilitates its interpretation. We offer a comparison between the LPTR and the excursion-set model of reionization (ESMR), and demonstrate the built-in capability of the LPTR to explore a wide range of reionization scenarios, and to go beyond the ESMR in exploring scenarios involving X-rays.

  16. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  17. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  18. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  19. Quark Gluon Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  20. UTILITY OF A WIDE SPECTRUM LIGHT METER AS AN UNDERWATER SENSOR OF PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY ACTIVE RADIATION (PAR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The strong attenuation of infra red wavelengths (>700 nm) in coastal waters is suggestive that some instruments with broad spectral responses might be useful, inexpensive substitutes for PAR sensors in studies of estuarine plant dynamics. Wide spectrum (350-1100 nm) light intensi...

  1. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  2. Measurement of radiated electromagnetic field levels before and after a changeover to energy-efficient lighting.

    PubMed

    Kerr, L N; Boivin, W S; Boyd, S M; Coletta, J N

    2001-01-01

    An energy-efficient lighting retrofit at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center (WEAC) presented the opportunity to measure the electromagnetic (EM) environments in several rooms before and after changing the fluorescent lighting systems and to compare the changes in EM fields with the proposed standard EM immunity levels. Three rooms, representing the types of work areas in the laboratory, were selected and measured before and after the lighting changeover. Electric and magnetic field measurements were taken in the extremely low frequency (ELF), very low frequency (VLF), and radio frequency (RF) ranges of the EM spectrum. In 2 rooms, ELF electric fields were reduced and VLF and RF electric fields were increased as a result of the changeover to high-frequency fixtures. A third room received low-frequency, energy-efficient fixtures during this changeover, and this change resulted in only a slight increase of the ELF electric fields. The ELF magnetic fields were greatly reduced in 2 but only slightly reduced in the third room. No significant change was seen in VLF or RF magnetic fields for any of these rooms. Some field-strength measurements exceeded the proposed immunity levels recommended in the draft International Electrotechnical Commission standard IEC 60601-1-2 (rev. 2). The data show that increasing the separation distance from the fluorescent light fixtures greatly reduces the field-strength levels, limiting the potential for EM interference.

  3. Behavior of self-confined spherical layer of light radiation in the air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2004-07-01

    Behavior of thin spherical layer of intensive light in an inhomogeneous atmosphere is considered. It is shown that the behavior is similar to puzzling and mysterious behavior of ball lightnings. Under assumption that ball lightning moves along the gradient of atmosphere air density process of ball lightning penetration in a salon of a flying airplane is analyzed.

  4. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm-3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (˜ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  5. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  6. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  7. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Déliot, Frédéric; Hadley, Nicholas; Parke, Stephen; Schwarz, Tom

    2014-10-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, and it is often seen as a window to search for new physics processes in particle physics. A large program to study the top-quark properties has been performed both at the Tevatron and LHC colliders by the D0, CDF, ATLAS and CMS experiments. The most recent results are discussed in this article.

  8. Ultrasoft Quark Damping in High-T QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, Abdessamad; Daira-Aifa, Nacera; Bouakaz, Karima

    2007-02-27

    We determine the ultrasoft quark damping rates in the context of next-to-leading order hard-thermal-loop summed perturbation of high-temperature QCD. Three types of divergences are encountered: infrared, light-cone and at specific points determined by the gluon energies. The infrared divergence persists and is logarithmic whereas the two others are circumvented.

  9. Quark Confinement and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    QCD was proposed as a theory for the strong interactions long before we had any idea as to how it could be that its fundamental constituents, the quarks, are never seen as physical particles. Massless gluons also do not exist as free particles. How can this be explained? The first indication that this question had to be considered in connection with the topological structure of a gauge theory came when Nielsen and Olesen observed the occurrence of stable magnetic vortex structures [1] in the Abelian Higgs model. Expanding on such ideas, the magnetic monopole solution was found [2]. Other roundabout attempts to understand confinement involve instantons. Today, we have better interpretations of these topological structures, including a general picture of the way they do lead to unbound potentials confining quarks. It is clear that these unbound potentials can be ascribed to a string-like structure of the vortices formed by the QCD field lines. Can string theory be used to analyze QCD? Many researchers think so. The leading expert on this is Sacha Polyakov. In his instructive account he adds how he experienced the course of events in Gauge Theory, emphasizing the fact that quite a few discoveries often ascribed to researchers from the West, actually were made independently by scientists from the Soviet Union…

  10. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Personal Active Dosimeter for Space: the Light Observer for Radiation Environment (LORE) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    Long permanence in space outside the protections of the Earth magnetic shield and atmosphere (during long journeys, and on the Moon or/and Mars) requires a careful monitoring of absorbed doses by each astronaut. This is of paramount importance for transient and cumulative effects mostly due to Solar Particle Events. Alarming features and the possibility of monitoring absorbed dose also discriminating the kind of incoming radiation will be needed. Stemming from our large experience in detector building, in modelling, in designing of the supporting electronic, from our payloads flown on satellites, MIR Station and ISS (Nina, Mita, SilEye, SilEye2, Alteino, Pamela, ALTEA) we are developping a personal active dosimeter with alarming and wireless features. The goal is a small object able to measure charged and neutral ionizing radiation (the possibility to insert a miniaturized gamma detector will be investigated) The device will feature portability (cigarette-box dimensions, rechargeable batteries), sensitivity to ions (H to above Fe), to hard X-rays, and possibly to gamma with the ability to detect and count neutrons. Flash memories should contain pre loaded tables and the real Time code to perform the real time operations and risk thresholds so to activate an alarm if/when needed. Whenever in range, the device will connect wirelessly to the main computer and send there the raw and pre-analyzed data for a complete monitoring and possible more sophisticated analyses. The two major novelties and challenges in this project are the miniaturization of the device, including the firmware, and the definition of the transfer function and of its uncertainties, linking measured data with real flux data. This will require the proper balancing among size, radiation discrimination ability and uncertainty minimization.

  12. LIGHT SOURCE: Design of a new compact THz source based on Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dong-Dong; Bei, Hua; Dai, Zhi-Min

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, people are dedicated to the research work of finding compact THz sources with high emission power. Smith-Purcell radiation is qualified for the possibility of coherent enhancement due to the effect of FEL mechanism. The compact experiment device is expected to produce hundreds mW level THz ray. The electron beam with good quality is provided under the optimized design of the electron gun. Besides, the grating is designed as an oscillator without any external feedbacks. While the beam passes through the grating surface, the beam bunching will be strong and the second harmonics enhancement will be evident, as is seen from the simulation results.

  13. Search for very light CP-odd Higgs Boson in radiative decays of Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M

    2008-10-10

    We search for a non-SM-like CP-odd Higgs boson (a(1)(0)) decaying to tau(+)tau(-) or mu(+)mu(-) in radiative decays of the Upsilon(1S). No significant signal is found, and upper limits on the product branching ratios are set. Our tau(+)tau(-) results are almost 2 orders of magnitude more stringent than previous upper limits. Our data provide no evidence for a Higgs state with a mass of 214 MeV decaying to mu(+)mu(-), previously proposed as an explanation for 3 Sigma(+)-->pmu(+)mu(-) events observed by the HyperCP experiment. Our results constrain NMSSM models.

  14. Nonthermal WIMPs as ``dark radiation'' in light of ATACAMA, SPT, WMAP9, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Chris; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2013-07-01

    The Planck and WMAP9 satellites, as well as the ATACAMA and South Pole telescopes, have recently presented results on the angular power spectrum of the comic microwave background. Data tentatively point to the existence of an extra radiation component in the early Universe. Here, we show that this extra component can be mimicked by ordinary weakly interacting massive particle dark matter particles whose majority is cold, but with a small fraction being nonthermally produced in a relativistic state. We present a few example theories where this scenario is explicitly realized and explore the relevant parameter space consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background, and structure formation bounds.

  15. Hadron Production in Quark and Antiquark Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, David

    1999-09-27

    We present a number of jet fragmentation measurements e{sup +}e{sup -} --> hadrons. The ALEPH collaboration measures inclusive rho{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) production rates, improving the world averages. The SLD collaboration measures pi{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/anti-p production in light-, c- and b-flavor Z{sup 0} decays, as well as leading hadrons in light-quark jets, precisely. The DELPHI collaboration measures the average charged multiplicity in light- and b-flavor events at 183 and 189 GeV, verifying a precise prediction of QCD and excluding flavor-independent fragmentation.

  16. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  17. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  18. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; ...

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up tomore » the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.« less

  19. What Becomes of Nuclear Risk Assessment in Light of Radiation Hormesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear probabilistic risk or safety assessment (PRA or PSA) is a scientific calculation that uses assumptions and models to determine the likelihood of plant or fuel repository failures and the corresponding releases of radioactivity. Estimated radiation doses to the surrounding population are linked inappropriately to risks of cancer death and congenital malformations. Even though PRAs use very pessimistic assumptions, they demonstrate that nuclear power plants and fuel repositories are very safe compared with the health risks of other generating options or other risks that people readily accept. Because of the frightening negative images and the exaggerated safety and health concerns that are communicated, many people judge nuclear risks to be unacceptable and do not favour nuclear plants. Large-scale tests and experience with nuclear accidents demonstrate that even severe accidents expose the public to only low doses of radiation, and a century of research has demonstrated that such exposures are beneficial to health. A scientific basis for this phenomenon now exists. PRAs are valuable tools for improving plant designs, but if nuclear power is to play a significant role in meeting future energy needs, we must communicate its many real benefits and dispel the negative images formed by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects at high doses. PMID:18648610

  20. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up to the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.

  1. Search for Di-Muon Decays of a Light Scalar Higgs Boson in Radiative Upsilon(1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini

    2013-08-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) in the fully reconstructed decay chain of Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ), Υ(1S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ+. The A0 is predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model (SM), including the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). NMSSM introduces a CP-odd light Higgs boson whose mass could be less than 10 GeV/c2. The data samples used in this analysis contain 92.8 × 106 Υ(2S ) and 116.8 × 106 Υ(3S ) events collected by the BABAR detector. The Υ(1S ) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ) transitions. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S ) → γA0) × B(A0 → μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28 - 9.7) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.20 GeV/c2. We also combine our results with previous BABAR results of Υ(2S, 3S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling ( fΥ) of the b-quark to the A0, f 2 Υ × B(A0 → μ+μ-), at the level of (0.29- 40) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.2 GeV/c2.

  2. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  3. Measurement of [ital b] quark fragmentation fractions in the production of strange and light [ital B] mesons in p[bar p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L. ); Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P. ); Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirk, M.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Niu, H. ); Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M. ); Ashmanskas, W.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Nakaya, T. ); Benjamin, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H. ); Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bu

    1999-11-01

    A new technique to measure the ratio of [ital b] quark fragmentation fractions in p[bar p] collisions is described. Using a 70-pb[sup [minus]1] sample of low-mass dimuon trigger data recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab, we identify [ital B] mesons by observing the double semileptonic decays b[r arrow]c[mu]X with c[r arrow]s[mu]X. By counting the numbers of K[sup [asterisk

  4. Sizes and couplings of composite leptons, quarks and W bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F. M.

    1984-08-01

    We assume that leptons and quarks are much smaller objects than W bosons (Λl, q≅3.6 TeV; ΛW≅MW). This expl ains the weakness of W couplings to leptons and quarks (as opposed to strong couplings required by radiative Z0 decays), the strength of sin2θW and the present absence of direct lepton and quark substructure effects. We also define a relativistic description of W substructure which should replace the usual non-relativistic wave function and allow better estimates of several processes. Physique Mathématique et Théorique, Equipe de Recherche Associée au CNRS.

  5. Dimer formation in radiation-irradiated aqueous solution of lysozyme studied by light-scattering-intensity measurement.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Seki, H; Masuda, T; Imamura, M; Kondo, M

    1981-07-01

    The reaction of lysozyme with OH., Br.-2 and e-aq, produced in an aqueous solution by pulsed electrons and gamma-rays, were investigated. Irradiated enzymes showed an increase in the light scattering intensity (LSI) which is proportional to the absorbed dose. Results obtained from SDS gel electrophoresis confirm dimerization of lysozyme, which is considered to be responsible for the increase in LSI. It was found that the rate constant of the dimerization of protein radicals produced in the reaction with OH. is 2K=(1.0 +/- 0.3) X 10(6)M-1 s-1 and the yield of the dimerization is 0.6 in G. The enzymatic activity of the dimer is shown to be reduced to about 30 per cent of that of the intact enzyme. It is concluded that the radiation-induced inactivation of lysozyme is largely due to dimerization.

  6. Measuring circular dichroism in a capillary cell using the b23 synchrotron radiation CD beamline at diamond light source.

    PubMed

    Jávorfi, Tamás; Hussain, Rohanah; Myatt, Daniel; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) is a well-established method in structural biology. The first UV-VIS beamline dedicated to circular dichroism at Diamond Light Source, a third generation synchrotron facility in South Oxfordshire, has recently become operational and it is now available for the user community. Herein we present an important application of SRCD: the CD measurement of protein solutions in fused silica rectangular capillary cells. This was achieved without the use of any lens between the photoelastic modulator and the photomultiplier tube detectors by exploiting the high photon flux of the collimated beam that can be as little as half a millimeter squared. Measures to minimize or eliminate vacuum-UV protein denaturation effects are discussed. The CD spectra measured in capillaries is a proof of principle to address CD measurements in microdevice systems using the new B23 SRCD beamline.

  7. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Grabarek, A.; Moroń, L.; Wałecki, M.; Kryla, P.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before.

  8. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung-Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. This NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited to InGaN-based light emitting devices. PMID:27075818

  9. Evaluation of Er:YAG laser radiation cavity preparation under transmitted and polarized light and by electron microanalyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Rokytova, Kveta; Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel

    1993-12-01

    The results of evaluation of Er:YAG radiation cavity preparation under transmitted and polarized light and by the electron microanalyzer are presented. We examined the longitudinal sections of intact teeth, teeth with early dental caries, teeth with laser preparation in enamel and teeth with Er:YAG laser preparation in enamel and dentine class I and V. We examined intact teeth and laser prepared teeth for the variation of mineralization. Phosphorus and calcium were regularly distributed. The margins of cavities had no necrosis zones. The defects of mineralization in caries depend on demineralization of hard tissues. In the structures was irregular loss of calcium and phosphorus. Thus, Er:YAG laser irradiation with water cooling has been found to be a non-invasive preparation technique.

  10. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung -Hoon; ...

    2016-04-14

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. As a result, this NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited tomore » InGaN-based light emitting devices.« less

  11. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung -Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-04-14

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. As a result, this NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited to InGaN-based light emitting devices.

  12. Apollo-Soyuz light-flash observations. [ionizing radiation effects measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.; Tobias, C. A.; Huesman, R. H.; Upham, F. T.; Wieskamp, T. F.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    While dark adapted, two Apollo-Soyuz astronauts saw eighty-two light flash events during a complete 51 deg orbit which passed near the north magnetic pole and through the South Atlantic Anomaly. The frequency of events at the polar parts of the orbit is 25 times that noted in equatorial latitudes and no increased frequency was noted in the South Atlantic Anomaly at the 225-km altitude. The expected flux of heavy particles at the northern and southern points is 1-2/min per eye, and the efficiency for seeing high Z-high energy (HZE) particles which were below the Cerenkov threshold is 50%.

  13. Temperature alterations of infrared light absorption by cartilage and cornea under free-electron laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Kitai, Moishe S.; Edwards, Glenn S.

    2003-05-01

    Like pure water, the water incorporated into cartilage and cornea tissue shows a pronounced dependence of the absorption coefficient on temperature. Alteration of the temperature by radiation with an IR free-electron laser was studied by use of a pulsed photothermal radiometric technique. A computation algorithm was modified to take into account the real IR absorption spectra of the tissue and the spectral sensitivity of the IR detector used. The absorption coefficients for several wavelengths within the 2.9- and 6.1- μm water absorption bands have been determined for various laser pulse energies. It is shown that the absorption coefficient for cartilage decreases at temperatures higher than 50 °C owing to thermal alterations of water-water and water-biopolymer interactions.

  14. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  15. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2009-06-20

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  16. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  17. Effect of residual monomer on radiochemical and light radiation processes in polymethyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Khamidova, L.G.; Zhdanov, G.S.; Milinchuk, V.K.

    1988-03-01

    The radiochemical yield of paramagnetic centers at 77 K varies from 1.2 in a polymer with a 0.2% weight concentration of MMA to 2.35 in a polymer containing 6.3% MMA. At 273 K, the radiochemical yield of macroradicals varies from 1.7 (0.2% MMA) to 3.2 (2.4% MMA). The high radiochemical yield of binding of residual monomer (G/sub MMA/ = 5.6 x 10/sup 2/ and 2.4 x 10/sup 2/ at 300 and 77 K) indicates the existence of associates of molecules of the monomer. It was hypothesized that radiation damage initially develops in defective regions of the polymer where the molecules of the monomer are primarily concentrated.

  18. Mass spectra and decays of ground and orbitally excited cb¯ states in nonrelativistic quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Antony Prakash; Bhat, Manjunath; Vijaya Kumar, K. B.

    2017-02-01

    The complete spectrum of cb¯ states is obtained in a phenomenological nonrelativistic quark model (NRQM), which consists of a confinement potential and one gluon exchange potential (OGEP) as effective quark-antiquark potential. We make predictions for the radiative decay (E1 and M1) widths and weak decay widths of cb¯ states in the framework of NRQM formalism.

  19. Bottomonia suppression in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2017-03-01

    A brief review of recent studies on suppression of bottomonia in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC is presented. A reasonable agreement between the model predictions for the inclusive RAA suppression factor and the preliminary CMS experimental data is found. The values of the shear viscosity to the entropy density ratio extracted from the comparison with the data lie between one and two times the gauge/gravity duality lower bound. These values agree very well with the fluid dynamical fits to the light hadron correlation data and confirm that the quark-gluon plasma is a nearly-perfect fluid.

  20. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  1. Linearized Boltzmann transport model for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Heavy quark evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-07-01

    A linearized Boltzmann transport (LBT) model coupled with hydrodynamical background is established to describe the evolution of jet shower partons and medium excitations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We extend the LBT model to include both elastic and inelastic processes for light and heavy partons in the quark-gluon plasma. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is developed for the hadronization of heavy quarks. Within this framework, we investigate how heavy flavor observables depend on various ingredients, such as different energy loss and hadronization mechanisms, the momentum and temperature dependences of the transport coefficients, and the radial flow of the expanding fireball. Our model calculations show good descriptions of the D meson suppression and elliptic flow observed at the Larege Hadron Collider and the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The prediction for the Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV is provided.

  2. Search for a light C P -odd Higgs boson in radiative decays of J /ψ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. Y.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the fully reconstructed decay chain of J /ψ →γ A0 , A0→μ+μ- using (225.0 ±2.8 )×106 J /ψ events collected by the BESIII experiment. The A0 is a hypothetical C P -odd light Higgs boson predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model including two spin-0 doublets plus an extra singlet. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B (J /ψ →γ A0)×B (A0→μ+μ-) in the range of (2.8 - 495.3 )×10-8 for 0.212 ≤mA0≤3.0 GeV /c2 . The new limits are five times below our previous results, and the nature of the A0 is constrained to be mostly singlet.

  3. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  5. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menzione, A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t{bar t} decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity.

  6. Decays of the b quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  7. In vitro evaluation of low-intensity light radiation on murine melanoma (B16F10) cells.

    PubMed

    Peidaee, P; Almansour, N M; Pirogova, E

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the energy state of biomolecules induced by electromagnetic radiation lead to changes in biological functions of irradiated biomolecules. Using the RRM approach, it was computationally predicted that far-infrared light irradiation in the range of 3500-6000 nm affects biological activity of proto-oncogene proteins. This in vitro study evaluates quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of selected far-infrared exposures in the computationally determined wavelengths on mouse melanoma B16F10 cells and Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells by MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation assay and confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). This paper also presents the findings obtained from irradiating B16F10 and CHO cells by the selected wavelengths in visible and near-infrared range. The MTT results show that far-infrared wavelength irradiation induces detrimental effect on cellular viability of B16F10 cells, while that of normal CHO cells is not affected considerably. Moreover, CLSM images demonstrate visible cellular detachment of cancer cells. The observed effects support the hypothesis that far-infrared light irradiation within the computationally determined wavelength range induces biological effect on cancer cells. From irradiation of selected visible and near-infrared wavelengths, no visible changes were detected in cellular viability of either normal or cancer cells.

  8. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, S. L.; Carlsson, M.; Allred, J. C.; Uitenbroek, H.; Osten, R. A.; Holman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The heating mechanism at high densities during M-dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M-dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T≈104 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at λ≤3 646 Å, and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines between λ=3 646 Å and λ≈3 900 Å. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level of ≤ 10^{11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological three-component interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M-dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a high energy flux of 10^{13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The simulation produces bright near-ultraviolet and optical continuum emission from a dense (n>10^{15} cm^{-3}), hot (T ≈12 000 - 13 500 K) chromospheric condensation. For the first time, the observed color temperature and Balmer jump ratio are produced self-consistently in a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model. We find that a T≈104 K blackbody-like continuum component and a low Balmer jump ratio result from optically thick Balmer (∞→ n=2) and Paschen recombination (∞→ n=3) radiation, and thus the properties of the flux spectrum are caused by blue (λ≈4 300 Å) light escaping over a larger physical depth range than by red (λ≈6 700 Å) and near-ultraviolet (λ≈3 500 Å) light. To model the near-ultraviolet pseudo-continuum previously attributed to overlapping Balmer lines, we include the extra Balmer continuum opacity from Landau-Zener transitions that result from merged, high-order energy levels of hydrogen in a dense, partially ionized atmosphere. This reveals a new diagnostic of

  9. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  10. Observation of chicJ radiative decays to light vector mesons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J V; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2008-10-10

    Using a total of 2.74 x 10(7) decays of the psi(2S) collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present a study of chi(cJ)-->gammaV, where V=rho(0), omega, phi. The transitions chi(c1)-->gammarho(0 and chi(c1)-->gammaomega are observed with B(chi(c1)-->gammarho(0))=(2.43+/-0.19+/-0.22) x 10(-4) and B(chi(c1)-->gammaomega)=(8.3+/-1.5+/-1.2) x 10(-5). In the chi(c1)-->gammarho(0) transition, the final state meson is dominantly longitudinally polarized. Upper limits on the branching fractions of other chi(cJ) states to light vector mesons are presented.

  11. Off-forward quark-quark correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2006-09-01

    The properties of the nonforward quark-quark correlation function are examined. We derive constraints on the correlation function from the transformation properties of the fundamental fields of QCD occurring in its definition. We further develop a method to construct an Ansatz for this correlator. We present the complete leading order set of generalized parton distributions in terms of the amplitudes of the Ansatz. Finally we conclude that the number of independent generalized parton helicity changing distributions is four.

  12. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ and quark masses $m_b$ and $m_c$ from HISQ simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Komijani, J.; et al.

    2016-11-22

    We present a progress report on our calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from lattice-QCD simulations with highly-improved staggered quarks. Simulations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on $(2+1+1)$-flavor ensembles that include charm sea quarks. We include data at six lattice spacings and several light sea-quark masses, including an approximately physical-mass ensemble at all but the smallest lattice spacing, 0.03 fm. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum extrapolation to zero lattice spacing and of heavy-quark discretization errors. Finally, using the heavy-quark effective theory expansion we present a method of extracting from the same correlation functions the charm- and bottom-quark masses as well as some low-energy constants appearing in the heavy-quark expansion.

  13. Defect-reduction mechanism for improving radiative efficiency in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes using InGaN underlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M. Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jonathan J.

    2015-04-07

    The influence of a dilute In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x ∼ 0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In{sub 0.16}Ga{sub 0.84}N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode (LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than the LED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resulted from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.

  14. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resulted from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.

  15. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; ...

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resultedmore » from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.« less

  16. Euclidean bridge to the relativistic constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald A.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Knowledge of nucleon structure is today ever more of a precision science, with heightened theoretical and experimental activity expected in coming years. At the same time, a persistent gap lingers between theoretical approaches grounded in Euclidean methods (e.g., lattice QCD, Dyson-Schwinger equations [DSEs]) as opposed to traditional Minkowski field theories (such as light-front constituent quark models). Purpose: Seeking to bridge these complementary world views, we explore the potential of a Euclidean constituent quark model (ECQM). This formalism enables us to study the gluonic dressing of the quark-level axial-vector vertex, which we undertake as a test of the framework. Method: To access its indispensable elements with a minimum of inessential detail, we develop our ECQM using the simplified quark + scalar diquark picture of the nucleon. We construct a hyperspherical formalism involving polynomial expansions of diquark propagators to marry our ECQM with the results of Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) analyses, and constrain model parameters by fitting electromagnetic form factor data. Results: From this formalism, we define and compute a new quantity—the Euclidean density function (EDF)—an object that characterizes the nucleon's various charge distributions as functions of the quark's Euclidean momentum. Applying this technology and incorporating information from BSE analyses, we find the quenched dressing effect on the proton's axial-singlet charge to be small in magnitude and consistent with zero, while use of recent determinations of unquenched BSEs results in a large suppression. Conclusions: The quark + scalar diquark ECQM is a step toward a realistic quark model in Euclidean space, and needs additional refinements. The substantial effect we obtain for the impact on the axial-singlet charge of the unquenched dressed vertex compared to the quenched demands further investigation.

  17. Hadron formation from interaction among quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z. G.; Yang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the hadronization process of quark system. A phenomenological potential is introduced to describe the interaction between a quark pair. The potential depends on the color charge of those quarks and their relative distances. Those quarks move according to classical equations of motion. Due to the color interaction, coloring quarks are separated to form color neutral clusters which are supposed to be the hadrons.

  18. Rotating compact star with superconducting quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P.K.; Nataraj, H.S.

    2006-02-15

    A compact star with a superconducting quark core, a hadron crust, and a mixed phase between the two is considered. The quark-meson coupling model for hadron matter and the color-flavor-locked quark model for quark matter is used to construct the equation of state for the compact star. The effect of pairing of quarks in the color-flavor-locked phase and the mixed phase on the mass, radius, and period of the rotating star is studied.

  19. Role of light and heavy minerals on natural radioactivity level of high background radiation area, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, V; Sundarrajan, M; Suresh, G; Paramasivam, K; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2014-02-01

    Natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) concentrations and eight different radiological parameters have been analyzed for the beach sediments of Kerala with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazards. Activity concentrations ((238)U and (232)Th) and all the radiological parameters in most of the sites have higher values than recommended values. The Kerala beach sediments pose significant radiological threat to the people living in the area and tourists going to the beaches for recreation or to the sailors and fishermen involved in their activities in the study area. In order to know the light mineral characterization of the present sediments, mineralogical analysis has been carried out using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The eight different minerals are identified and they are characterized. Among the various observed minerals, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, kaolinite and calcite are major minerals. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction co-efficient and the values show that the amount of quartz is higher than calcite and much higher than microcline feldspar. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz present in the sediments. Heavy mineral separation analysis has been carried out to know the total heavy mineral (THM) percentage. This analysis revealed the presence of nine heavy minerals. The minerals such as monazite, zircon, magnetite and illmenite are predominant. Due to the rapid and extreme changes occur in highly dynamic environments of sandy beaches, quantities of major light and heavy minerals are widely varied from site to site. Granulometric analysis shows that the sand is major content. Multivariate statistical (Pearson correlation, cluster and factor) analysis has been carried out to know the effect of mineralogy on radionuclide concentrations. The present study concluded that heavy minerals induce the (238)U and (232)Th

  20. Synchrotron radiation and high pressure: new light on materials under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang; Struzhkin, Viktor V

    2005-03-01

    With the steady development of static high-pressure techniques in recent years, it is now possible to probe in increasing detail the novel behavior of materials subjected to extreme conditions of multimegabar pressures (>300 GPa) and temperatures from cryogenic states to thousands of degrees. By and large, the growth in this area has been made possible by accelerating developments in diamond-anvil cell methods coupled with new synchrotron radiation techniques. Significant advances have occurred in high-pressure powder and single-crystal diffraction, spectroscopy, inelastic scattering, radiography, and infrared spectroscopy. A brief overview of selected highlights in each of these classes of experiments is presented that illustrate both the state-of-the-art as well as current technical and scientific challenges. The experiments have been made possible by the development of a spectrum of new techniques at both third- and second-generation high-energy sources together with key advances in high-pressure technology. The results have implications for a variety of problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, geoscience, planetary science, and biology.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation and High Pressure: New Light on Materials Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemley, Russell

    2005-03-01

    Current technological advances now make it possible to perform experiments on materials subjected to static or sustained conditions up to multimegabar pressures (>300 GPa) and from cryogenic temperatures to several thousand degrees (˜0.5 eV range). With these techniques, densities of condensed matter can be increased over an order of magnitude, causing numerous transformations and new physical and chemical phenomena to occur. Growth in this area largely been made possible by accelerating developments in diamond-anvil cell methods coupled with new synchrotron radiation techniques. Significant advances have occurred in x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, inelastic scattering, radiography, and infrared spectroscopy. With recent developments, structure refinements based on polycrystalline data up to multimegabar pressures have been possible. Single-crystal methods have been extended to megabar pressure, with the prospect of full crystallographic refinements. `Three- dimensional' diffraction data can be collected for determining strength, deformation, and elastic tensors at high P-T conditions. Studies carried out during the past three years provide numerous breakthroughs in high-pressure x-ray spectroscopy and a broad range of inelastic scattering methods. Other experiments have exploited the use of x-ray radiography over a range of pressures. Finally, synchrotron infrared measurements have revealed a wealth of high-pressure phenomena, particularly for molecular systems. Examples to be discussed include investigations of dense hydrogen; transformations in molecular materials; novel ceramics; new types of superconductors, electronic, and magnetic materials; and liquids and amorphous materials.

  2. Penguins with charm and quark-hadron duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Buchalla, G.; Neubert, M.; Sachrajda, C. T.

    2009-06-01

    The integrated branching fraction of the process B→ X s l + l - is dominated by resonance background from narrow charmonium states, such as B→ X s ψ→ X s l + l -, which exceeds the non-resonant charm-loop contribution by two orders of magnitude. The origin of this fact is discussed in view of the general expectation of quark-hadron duality. The situation in B→ X s l + l - is contrasted with charm-penguin amplitudes in two-body hadronic B decays of the type B→ π π, for which it is demonstrated that resonance effects and the potentially non-perturbative cbar{c} threshold region do not invalidate the standard picture of QCD factorization. This holds irrespective of whether the charm quark is treated as a light or a heavy quark.

  3. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, P; Luu, T; Platter, L

    2010-12-13

    We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created of a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way we use lattice QCD data and an hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured {sup 4}He abundances put a bound of {delta}-1% {approx}< m{sub q}/m{sub 1} {approx}< 0.7%. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Including the bounds on the variation of {eta} coming from WMAP results and some additional assumptions narrows the range of allowed values of {delta}m{sub q}/m{sub q} somewhat.

  4. Spin Measurement in Top Quark Events at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of polarisation and spin correlations are presented in events with top quarks produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of $5 fb^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and 20 $fb^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected with the ATLAS and CMS detectors. The top quark polarization is measured in both single top quark production in the t-channel and $t\\bar{t}$ pair-production, from the angular distributions of charged leptons in the rest frame of their parent top quark. The spin correlations are measured in $t\\bar{t}$ events using various angular distributions of the decay products. The measurements are made using both template fitting methods and by unfolding the distributions to the parton-level, where differential measurements with respect to the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the $t\\bar{t}$ system are also made. The spin correlation measurements are used to search for new physics in the form of a light top squark or an anomalous top quark chromo-magnetic dipole moment. All measurements are found to be in agreement with predictions of the standard model.

  5. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excess of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.

  6. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excessmore » of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.« less

  7. Instabilities of Coulomb phases and quark confinement in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, Manuel; Santagata, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    The Gribov picture to quark confinement is based on the Coulomb phase instability due to the very large values that the effective α{sub s} coupling constant can reach in the infrared regime. The Gribov instability is driven by a vacuum decay into light quarks beyond a critical value of the coupling constant α{sub s}3π(1-√(2/3))/4 (for SU(3) gauge group). From first principles it has been shown the existence of an instability of the Coulomb phase in pure gauge theories for α≥√(2), much beyond the Gribov critical value. In this paper we analyze the effect of dynamical quarks in the instability of the Coulomb phase. We find a critical value of the coupling α=√(3) where a quark-antiquark pair creation mechanism leads to vacuum instability. However, the new critical value turns out to be larger than the pure gauge critical value α=√(2), unlike it is expected in the standard Gribov scenario. The result is analytically derived from first principles and provides further consistency to the picture where quark confinement is mainly driven by gluonic fluctuation instabilities.

  8. Scalar-quark systems and chimera hadrons in SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, H.; Takahashi, T. T.; Suganuma, H.

    2007-06-01

    In terms of mass generation in the strong interaction without chiral symmetry breaking, we perform the first study for light scalar-quarks {phi} (colored scalar particles with 3{sub c} or idealized diquarks) and their color-singlet hadronic states using quenched SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD with {beta}=5.70 (i.e., a{approx_equal}0.18 fm) and lattice size 16{sup 3}x32. We investigate ''scalar-quark mesons'' {phi}{sup {dagger}}{phi} and ''scalar-quark baryons'' {phi}{phi}{phi} as the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi}. We also investigate the color-singlet bound states of scalar-quarks {phi} and quarks {psi}, i.e., {phi}{sup {dagger}}{psi}, {psi}{psi}{phi}, and {phi}{phi}{psi}, which we name ''chimera hadrons.'' All the new-type hadrons including {phi} are found to have a large mass even for zero bare scalar-quark mass m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV. We find a ''constituent scalar-quark/quark picture'' for both scalar-quark hadrons and chimera hadrons. Namely, the mass of the new-type hadron composed of m {phi}'s and n {psi}'s, M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}, approximately satisfies M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}{approx_equal}mM{sub {phi}}+nM{sub {psi}}, where M{sub {phi}} and M{sub {psi}} are the constituent scalar-quark and quark masses, respectively. We estimate the constituent scalar-quark mass M{sub {phi}} for m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV as M{sub {phi}}{approx_equal}1.5-1.6 GeV, which is much larger than the constituent quark mass M{sub {psi}}{approx_equal}400 MeV in the chiral limit. Thus, scalar quarks acquire a large mass due to large quantum corrections by gluons in the systems including scalar quarks. Together with other evidences of mass generation of glueballs and charmonia, we conjecture that all colored particles generally acquire a large effective mass due to dressed gluon effects. In addition, the large mass generation of pointlike colored scalar particles indicates that plausible diquarks used in effective hadron models cannot

  9. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  10. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing thismore » dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  11. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  12. QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH NF=2+1 NEAR THE CONTINUUM LIMIT AT REALISTIC QUARK MASSES.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.

    2006-07-23

    We report on our study of QCD thermodynamics with 2 + 1 flavors of dynamical quarks. In this proceeding we present several thermodynamic quantities and our recent calculation of the critical temperature. In order to investigate the thermodynamic properties of QCD near the continuum limit we adopt improved staggered (p4) quarks coupled with tree-level Symanzik improved glue on N{sub t} = 4 and 6 lattices. The simulations are performed with a physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark masses which are in the range of m{sub q}/m{sub s} = 0.05 - 0.4. The lightest quark mass corresponds to a pion mass of about 150 MeV.

  13. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  14. Inactivation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in ground chicken meat using high pressure processing and gamma radiation, and in purge and chicken meat surfaces by ultraviolet light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common contaminants in meat and poultry. Nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve safety and shelf-life of both human and pet foods can include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV...

  15. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors.

  16. Hadron bubble evolution into the quark sea

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K. ); Adams, F.C. )

    1990-04-15

    A solution is presented for the evolution of hadron bubbles which nucleate in the quark sea if there is a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at a temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} on the order of 100 MeV. We make three assumptions: (1) the dominant mechanism for transport of latent heat is radiative, e.g., neutrinos; (2) the distance between nucleation sites is greater than the neutrino mean free path; and (3) the effects of hydrodynamic flow can be neglected. Bubbles nucleate with a characteristic radius 1 fm/{Delta}, where {Delta} is a dimensionless parameter for the undercooling (we take {Delta}{ge}10{sup {minus}4}, so that the expansion of the Universe can be neglected). We argue that bubbles grow stably and remain spherical until the radius becomes as large as the neutrino mean free path, {ital l}{congruent}10 cm. The growth then becomes diffusion limited and the bubbles become unstable to formation of dendrites, or fingerlike structures, because latent heat can diffuse away more easily from long fingers than from spheres. We study the nonlinear evolution of structure with a geometrical model'' and argue that the hadron bubbles ultimately look like stringy seaweed. The percolation of seaweed-shaped bubbles can leave behind regions of quark phase that are quite small. In fact, one might expect the typical scale to be {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}={ital l}{congruent}10 cm. Protons can easily diffuse out of such small regions (and neutrons back in). Thus, these instabilities can lead to important modifications of inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis, which requires {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}{approx gt}1 m.

  17. Nuclear equation of state in a relativistic independent quark model with chiral symmetry and dependence on quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Mishra, R. N.; Mohanty, D. K.; Panda, P. K.; Frederico, T.

    2013-07-01

    We have calculated the properties of nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner with a quark-meson coupling mechanism incorporating the structure of nucleons in vacuum through a relativistic potential model; where the dominant confining interaction for the free independent quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically average potential in equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. Corrections due to spurious center of mass motion as well as those due to other residual interactions, such as the one gluon exchange at short distances and quark-pion coupling arising out of chiral symmetry restoration, have been considered in a perturbative manner to obtain the nucleon mass in vacuum. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ and ω mesons through mean field approximations. The relevant parameters of the interaction are obtained self-consistently while realizing the saturation properties such as the binding energy, pressure, and compressibility of the nuclear matter. We also discuss some implications of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter along with the nucleon and nuclear σ term and the sensitivity of nuclear matter binding energy with variations in the light quark mass.

  18. Effects of Repeated Exposure to Filtered and Unfiltered Broadband Light Radiation on Escherichia coli Growth and Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    probability biological organisms will become inactive after exposure to non -ionizing radiation. Although continuous wave, low-pressure Hg lamps that...The objective of the experiments conducted during this study was to measure the inactivation efficiency of pulsed non -ionizing radiation on...Broadband spectrum UV radiation Decontamination Escherichia coli Non -ionizing radiation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  19. Light Absorption of Black Carbon Aerosol and Its Radiative Forcing Effect in an Megacity Atmosphere in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zijuan

    2013-04-01

    The effects of black carbon (BC) aerosol on climate warming have been the study focus in the recent decade, the regional effect of BC light absorption is more significant. The reduction of BC is now expected to have significant near-term climate change mitigation. Mass absorption efficient (MAE) was one of the important optical properties of BC aerosol for evaluating the BC on its radiative forcing effect, while BC mixing state is one main influencing factor for MAE. Models have estimated that BC radiative forcing can be increased by a factor of ~2 for internally versus externally mixed BC. On the other hand, some organic carbon had been found to significantly absorb light at UV or shorter wavelengths in the most recent studies, with strong spectral dependence. But large uncertainties still remain in determining the positive forcing effect of BC on global clime change due to the technical limitations. In this study, advanced instrumentation (a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and a single particle soot photometer (SP2)) were used to measure black carbon aerosol and analyze its optical properties in a megacity in South China, Shenzhen, during the summer of 2011. It is in the southeast corner of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, neighboring Hong Kong to the south. During the campaign, the average BC mass concentration was 4.0±3.1 μg m-3, accounting for about 11% of PM2.5 mass concentration, which mainly came from fossil fuel combustion rather than biomass burning. The MAE of BC ranged from 5.0 to 8.5 m2 g-1, with an average value of 6.5±0.5 m2 g-1. The percentage of internally mixed BC was averagely 24.3±7.9% and positively correlated with the MAE. It is estimated that the internally mixed BC amplified MAE by about 7% during the campaign, suggesting that the BC absorption enhancement due to internal mixing in the real atmosphere is relatively low in comparison with the predictions by theoretical models, which stands in accordance with

  20. Influence of the dark/light rhythm on the effects of UV radiation in the eyestalk of the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Marcelo Alves; Geish, Marcio Alberto; Maciel, Fabio Everton; Cruz, Bruno Pinto; Filgueira, Daza de Moraes Vaz Batista; Ferreira, Gabrielle de Jesus; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia; Allodi, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Crustaceans are interesting models to study the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and many species may be used as biomarkers for aquatic contamination of UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Here, we investigated cell damage in the visual system of crabs Neohelice granulata that were acclimated to either 12L:12D, constant light, or constant dark, and were exposed to UVA or UVB at 12:00h (noon). The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), lipid peroxidation (LPO) damage, catalase activity, and pigment dispersion in the eye were evaluated. No significant differences from the three groups of controls (animals acclimated to 12L:12D, or in constant light, or not exposed to UV radiation) were observed in animals acclimated to 12L:12D, however, crabs acclimated to constant light and exposed to UV radiation for 30min showed a significant increase in ROS concentration, catalase activity, and LPO damage, but a decrease in ACAP compared with the controls. Crabs acclimated to constant darkness and exposed to UV for 30min showed a significantly increased ROS concentration and LPO damage, but the ACAP and catalase activity did not differ from the controls (animals kept in the dark while the experimental group was being exposed to UV radiation). Pigment dispersion in the pigment cells of eyes of animals acclimated to constant light was also observed. The results indicate that UVA and UVB alter specific oxidative parameters; however, the cell damage is more evident in animals deviated from the normal dark/light rhythm.

  1. Optimizing spectral compositions of multichannel LED light sources by IES color fidelity index and luminous efficacy of radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuzheng; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Zhehong

    2017-03-01

    The trade-off between the color fidelity index (Rf) released recently by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) and luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) was investigated by adjusting the peak wavelengths, spectral widths, and intensities of four-channel LEDs utilizing a multiobjective optimization algorithm based on differential evolution in the correlated color temperature (CCT) ranging from 2800 to 6500 K for general lighting. The results indicate that Rf at a specific LER value decreases with the increasing CCT, and vice versa, and that Rf has significant improvements over the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color rendering index (CRI) in avoiding spectral gaming and evaluating the light sources even with negative CIE general CRI (Ra). Further, the optimal peak wavelengths with regard to Rf were identified as 629 nm, 568 nm, 504 nm, and 447 nm, yielding high color rendering in terms of Rf(93∼94) and Ra(95∼97) and relatively excellent LER (299  lm/W∼339  lm/W) over a wide range of CCTs from 2800 to 6500 K. This suggests that Rf can be compatible with Ra, making it possible to obtain a common set of optimal peak wavelengths for Rf and Ra. Besides, the IES method could assess saturated red and skin tones more fairly than the CIE CRI. With a practical 17-channel LED array covering the resulted four optimal peak wavelengths, the improvements of the IES method over the CIE CRI were validated further.

  2. The QCD equation of state with charm quarks from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michael

    Recently, there have been several calculations of the QCD equation of state (EoS) on the lattice. These calculations take into account the two light quarks and the strange quark, but have ignored the effects of the charm quark, assuming that the charm mass (mc ≈ 1300 MeV) is exponentially suppressed at the temperatures which are explored. However, future heavy ion collisions, such as those planned at the LHC, may well probe temperature regimes where the charm quarks play an important role in the dynamics of the QGP. We present a calculation of the charm quark contribution to the QCD EoS using p4-improved staggered fermions at Nt = 4, 6, 8. This calculation is done with a quenched charm quark, i.e. the relevant operators are measured using a valence charm quark mass on a 2+1 flavor gauge field background. The charm quark masses are determined by calculating charmonium masses (metac and mJ/Psi) and fixing these mesons to their physical masses. The interaction measure, pressure, energy density, and entropy density are calculated. We find that the charm contribution makes a significant contribution, even down to temperatures as low as the pseudo-critical temperature, Tc. However, there are significant scaling corrections at the lattice spacings that we use, preventing a reliable continuum extrapolation.

  3. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic

    2005-12-23

    In 1995 the heaviest elementary particle, top quark, was discovered at the Tevatron collider in top-antitop quark pair production. Since the top quark mass is of the same order as the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, measurements of the properties of the top quark like mass, charge, spin or the production mechanism, offer a good opportunity to test the Standard Model at such high energies. Top quarks at the Tevatron are predominantly pair-produced through light quark-antiquark annihilation. Higher order perturbative QCD calculations predict a sizeable asymmetry between the number of top quarks and antitop quarks produced in forward direction. This asymmetry is induced through radiative corrections. A measurement of the asymmetry can check the perturbative QCD predictions. Due to the high mass of the top quark, nearly the mass of a gold nucleus, the life time of the top quark is much shorter than the hadronization time-scale. This means that the top quark decays before it has a chance to form a bound state. The Standard Model predicts that the top quark decays in nearly 100% of the cases into a W boson and a b quark via a charge-current weak interaction. The measurement of the W boson helicity probes the V-A structure of the weak interaction and differences to the expectation would give evidence for new physics. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron is the only experiment where top quarks can be directly produced and their properties be measured. The Tevatron reaches a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton antiproton collisions. The data used in this analysis were taken in Run II of the Tevatron with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in the years 2001-2004 and represent an integrated luminosity of 319 pb{sup -1}. The thesis is organized in the following way: In the first chapter a short overview of the Standard Model is given. The theoretical aspects of the top quark decay are described with particular emphasis on the

  4. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  5. Ultraviolet-B Radiation (UV-B) Relieves Chilling-Light-Induced PSI Photoinhibition And Accelerates The Recovery Of CO2 Assimilation In Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Jin, Li-Qiao; Li, Yu-Ting; Tikkanen, Mikko; Li, Qing-Ming; Ai, Xi-Zhen; Gao, Hui-Yuan

    2016-09-30

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) is generally considered to negatively impact the photosynthetic apparatus and plant growth. UV-B damages PSII but does not directly influence PSI. However, PSI and PSII successively drive photosynthetic electron transfer, therefore, the interaction between these systems is unavoidable. So we speculated that UV-B could indirectly affect PSI under chilling-light conditions. To test this hypothesis, the cucumber leaves were illuminated by UV-B prior or during the chilling-light treatment, and the leaves were then transferred to 25 °C and low-light conditions for recovery. The results showed that UV-B decreased the electron transfer to PSI by inactivating the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), thereby protecting PSI from chilling-light-induced photoinhibition. This effect advantages the recoveries of PSI and CO2 assimilation after chilling-light stress, therefore should minimize the yield loss caused by chilling-light stress. Because sunlight consists of both UV-B and visible light, we suggest that UV-B-induced OEC inactivation is critical for chilling-light-induced PSI photoinhibition in field. Moreover, additional UV-B irradiation is an effective strategy to relieve PSI photoinhibition and yield loss in protected cultivation during winter. This study also demonstrates that minimizing the photoinhibition of PSI rather than that of PSII is essential for the chilling-light tolerance of the plant photosynthetic apparatus.

  6. Ultraviolet-B Radiation (UV-B) Relieves Chilling-Light-Induced PSI Photoinhibition And Accelerates The Recovery Of CO2 Assimilation In Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Jin, Li-Qiao; Li, Yu-Ting; Tikkanen, Mikko; Li, Qing-Ming; Ai, Xi-Zhen; Gao, Hui-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) is generally considered to negatively impact the photosynthetic apparatus and plant growth. UV-B damages PSII but does not directly influence PSI. However, PSI and PSII successively drive photosynthetic electron transfer, therefore, the interaction between these systems is unavoidable. So we speculated that UV-B could indirectly affect PSI under chilling-light conditions. To test this hypothesis, the cucumber leaves were illuminated by UV-B prior or during the chilling-light treatment, and the leaves were then transferred to 25 °C and low-light conditions for recovery. The results showed that UV-B decreased the electron transfer to PSI by inactivating the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), thereby protecting PSI from chilling-light-induced photoinhibition. This effect advantages the recoveries of PSI and CO2 assimilation after chilling-light stress, therefore should minimize the yield loss caused by chilling-light stress. Because sunlight consists of both UV-B and visible light, we suggest that UV-B-induced OEC inactivation is critical for chilling-light-induced PSI photoinhibition in field. Moreover, additional UV-B irradiation is an effective strategy to relieve PSI photoinhibition and yield loss in protected cultivation during winter. This study also demonstrates that minimizing the photoinhibition of PSI rather than that of PSII is essential for the chilling-light tolerance of the plant photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:27686324

  7. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE PAGES

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; ...

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  8. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Yu-Chiu Chao; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks; Michele Joyce; Jean-Claude Denard

    2004-05-01

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size (sigma {approx} 100 {micro}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of delta E / E < 3 x 10{sup -}5. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are noninvasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1.6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {micro}A down to few {micro}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  9. Radiation hardness of AlxGa1-xN photodetectors exposed to Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Pawel E.; John, Joachim; Barkusky, Frank; Duboz, Jean Yves; Lorenz, Anne; Cheng, Kai; Derluyn, Joff; Germain, Marianne; De Moor, Piet; Minoglou, Kyriaki; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus; Hochedez, Jean-Francois; Giordanengo, Boris; Borghs, Gustaaf; Mertens, Robert

    2009-05-01

    We report on the results of fabrication and optoelectrical characterization of Gallium Nitride (GaN) based Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) photodetectors. Our devices were Schottky photodiodes with a finger-shaped rectifying contact, allowing better penetration of light into the active region. GaN layers were epitaxially grown on Silicon (111) by Metal- Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Spectral responsivity measurements in the Near UltraViolet (NUV) wavelength range (200-400 nm) were performed to verify the solar blindness of the photodetectors. After that the devices were exposed to the EUV focused beam of 13.5 nm wavelength using table-top EUV setup. Radiation hardness was tested up to a dose of 3.3Â.1019 photons/cm2. Stability of the quantum efficiency was compared to the one measured in the same way for a commercially available silicon based photodiode. Superior behavior of GaN devices was observed at the wavelength of 13.5 nm.

  10. Implementation of the equation of radiative transfer on block-structured grids for modeling light propagation in tissue.

    PubMed

    Montejo, Ludguier D; Klose, Alexander D; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2010-09-14

    We present the first algorithm for solving the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) in the frequency domain (FD) on three-dimensional block-structured Cartesian grids (BSG). This algorithm allows for accurate modeling of light propagation in media of arbitrary shape with air-tissue refractive index mismatch at the boundary at increased speed compared to currently available structured grid algorithms. To accurately model arbitrarily shaped geometries the algorithm generates BSGs that are finely discretized only near physical boundaries and therefore less dense than fine grids. We discretize the FD-ERT using a combination of the upwind-step method and the discrete ordinates (S(N)) approximation. The source iteration technique is used to obtain the solution. We implement a first order interpolation scheme when traversing between coarse and fine grid regions. Effects of geometry and optical parameters on algorithm performance are evaluated using numerical phantoms (circular, cylindrical, and arbitrary shape) and varying the absorption and scattering coefficients, modulation frequency, and refractive index. The solution on a 3-level BSG is obtained up to 4.2 times faster than the solution on a single fine grid, with minimal increase in numerical error (less than 5%).

  11. B ---> pi and B ---> K transitions from QCD sum rules on the light cone

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, P.

    1998-09-01

    I calculate the form factors describing semileptonic and penguin-induced decays of B mesons into light pseudoscalar mesons. The form factors are calculated from QCD sum rules on the light-cone including contributions up to twist 4, radiative corrections to the leading twist contribution and SU(3)-breaking effects. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be \\sim 15%. The heavy-quark-limit relations between semileptonic and penguin form factors are found to be valid in the full accessible range of momentum transfer.

  12. Nuclear Matter from Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Fukukawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  13. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  14. Nanosecond-time-response temperature measurements using radiation thermometry during 193-nm and 247-nm pulsed light irradiation: comparison of corneal surface temperature histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Arai, Tsunenori; Sato, Shunichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Obara, Minoru; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2001-07-01

    We have developed the fast time-response measurement of thermal radiation with 15ns rise time to monitor the corneal surface temperature during ArF excimer laser ablation. In this study, e aim to investigate the influence of the relation between the corneal penetration depth and sampling depth of the measurement system on the measured temperature using 193 nm and 247 nm pulsed lights which have different penetration depths of cornea. When the sampling depth was defined as the penetration depth of cornea at the thermal radiation wavelength, we obtained about 3 micrometers of the sampling depth by pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR). In the case of the 247 nm light irradiation, where the corneal absorption coefficient at 247 nm was approximately equal to that for the thermal radiation, we found that the measured temperature rises were same as the estimated temperature rises based on the photothermal process. In contrast, in the case of the 193 nm light irradiation, where the absorption coefficient at 193 nm was larger than that for the thermal radiation, we found that the measured temperature rises were lower than the estimated temperature rises.

  15. Acclimation to UV-B radiation and visible light in Lactuca sativa involves up-regulation of photosynthetic performance and orchestration of metabolome-wide responses.

    PubMed

    Wargent, J J; Nelson, B C W; McGhie, T K; Barnes, P W

    2015-05-01

    UV-B radiation is often viewed as a source of stress for higher plants. In particular, photosynthetic function has been described as a common target for UV-B impairment; yet as our understanding of UV-B photomorphogenesis increases, there are opportunities to expand the emerging paradigm of regulatory UV response. Lactuca sativa is an important dietary crop species and is often subjected to rapid sunlight exposure at field transfer. Acclimation to UV-B and visible light conditions in L. sativa was dissected using gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, in addition to non-destructive assessments of UV epidermal shielding (SUV ). After UV-B treatment, seedlings were subjected to wide-range metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-HRMS). During the acclimation period, net photosynthetic rate increased in UV-treated plants, epidermal UV shielding increased in both subsets of plants transferred to the acclimatory conditions (UV+/UV- plants) and Fv /Fm declined slightly in UV+/UV- plants. Metabolomic analysis revealed that a key group of secondary compounds was up-regulated by higher light conditions, yet several of these compounds were elevated further by UV-B radiation. In conclusion, acclimation to UV-B radiation involves co-protection from the effects of visible light, and responses to UV-B radiation at a photosynthetic level may not be consistently viewed as damaging to plant development.

  16. A survey of the optical hazards associated with hospital light sources with reference to the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A; Fedele, F; Khazova, M; Freeman, P; Sarkany, R

    2010-09-01

    Workplace exposure to coherent and incoherent optical radiation from artificial sources is regulated under the Artificial Optical Radiation Directive (AORD) 2006/25/EC, now implemented in the UK under the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations (AOR) 2010. These regulations set out exposure limit values. Implementing the AOR (2010 Health and Safety Statutory Instrument No 1140 www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1140/pdf/uksi_20101140_en.pdf) requirements in a hospital environment is a potentially complex problem because of the wide variety of sources used for illumination, diagnosis and therapy. A survey of sources of incoherent optical radiation in a large hospital is reported here. The survey covers examples of office lighting, operating theatre lighting, examination lamps, and sources for ultraviolet phototherapy and visible phototherapies, including photodynamic therapy and neonatal blue-light therapy. The results of the survey are used to inform consideration of the strategy that a hospital might reasonably adopt both to demonstrate compliance with the AOR (2010) and to direct implementation effort.

  17. A novel quark-field creation operator construction for hadronic physics in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Peardon, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Huey-Wen Lin, David Richards, John Bulava, Colin Morningstar, Keisuke Juge

    2009-09-01

    A new quark-field smearing algorithm is defined which enables efficient calculations of a broad range of hadron correlation functions. The technique applies a low-rank operator to define smooth fields, that are to be used in hadron creation operators. The resulting space of smooth fields is small enough that all elements of the reduced quark propagator can be computed exactly at reasonable computational cost. Correlations between arbitrary sources, including multi-hadron operators can be computed {\\em a posteriori} without requiring new lattice Dirac operator inversions. The method is tested on realistic lattice sizes with light dynamical quarks.

  18. Comment on "Reevaluation of the parton distribution of strange quarks in the nucleon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, M.

    2015-11-01

    The HERMES collaboration in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) extracted information about the strange quark density in the nucleon. One of the main results is an observation that the shape of the extracted density is very different from the shapes of the strange quark density from global QCD fits and also from that of the light antiquarks. In this paper systematic studies on the HERMES published multiplicity of pion and kaon data are presented. It is shown that the conclusions concerning the strange quark distribution in the nucleon reached in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) are at the moment premature.

  19. W-Z-top-quark bags

    SciTech Connect

    Crichigno, Marcos P.; Shuryak, Edward; Flambaum, Victor V.; Kuchiev, Michael Yu.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss a new family of multiquanta-bound states in the standard model which exist due to the mutual Higgs-based attraction of the heaviest members of the standard model, namely, gauge quanta W, Z, and (anti)top quarks, t, t. We use a self-consistent mean-field approximation, up to a rather large particle number N. In this paper we do not focus on weakly bound, nonrelativistic bound states, but rather on 'bags' in which the Higgs vacuum expectation value is significantly modified or depleted. The minimal number N above which such states appear strongly depends on the ratio of the Higgs mass to the masses of W, Z, t, t: For a light Higgs mass, m{sub H{approx}}50 GeV, bound states start from N{approx}O(10), but for a ''realistic'' Higgs mass, m{sub H{approx}}100 GeV, one finds metastable/bound W, Z bags only for N{approx}O(1000). We also found that in the latter case pure top bags disappear for all N, although top quarks can still be well bound to the W bags. Anticipating the cosmological applications (discussed in the following Article [Phys. Rev. D 82, 073019]) of these bags as 'doorway states' for baryosynthesis, we also consider here the existence of such metastable bags at finite temperatures, when standard-model parameters such as Higgs, gauge, and top masses are significantly modified.

  20. Photodynamic tumor therapy and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy after ALA administration using 633-nm light as therapeutic and fluorescence excitation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Kienle, Alwin; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Rueck, Angelika C.; Meier, Thomas H.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy were carried out on human tumors after 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration using 633-nm light of a dye laser as therapeutic radiation and as fluorescence excitation radiation. This has the advantages of (1) enabling use of one laser for PDT and fluorescence diagnosis only, (2) enabling the possibility of on-line fluorescence measurements, and (3) exciting protoporphyrin molecules in deep tissue layers. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine excitation and fluorescence phonon distribution in case of red and violet excitation radiation. The results show the possibility of depth-resolved measurements on the fluorophore distribution by variation of excitation wavelength. The high penetration depth of 633-nm radiation results in a higher ratio of the 700-nm protoporphyrin fluorescence of the xenotransplanted tumor It to Is compared with 407-nm excitation. No values greater than 1 for the ratio I/Is were found, however, in case of intravenous ALA injection even for red excitation. Therefore, a large amount of ALA will be metabolized in the skin and can cause photosensitivity of the patient when applied systematically. In contrast, protoporphyrin fluorescence limited to the pretreated skin area was detected in case of topically applied ALA to patients with mycosis funcoides and erythroplasy of Queyrat. The influence of remitted excitation light and of the spontaneous radiation from the laser as well as the possible excitation of foodbased degradation products of chlorophyll has to be considered in high-sensitivity fluorescence measurements.

  1. V+jets Background and Systematic Uncertainties in Top Quark Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Adomeit, Stefanie; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Vector boson production in association with jets is an important process to test perturbative quantum chromodynamics and also a background process in top quark analyses. Measurements on vector boson production in association with light and heavy flavour jets are presented, performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron as well as the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC. Techniques applied in top quark analyses to estimate the vector boson+jets background are also discussed.

  2. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. An Analysis of the Far-Field Radiation Pattern of the Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Engin LZ4-00UA00 Diode with and without Beam Shaping Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory An Analysis of the Far-Field Radiation Pattern of the Ultraviolet Light - Emitting Diode (LED) Engin...Radiation Pattern of the Ultraviolet Light - Emitting Diode (LED) Engin LZ4-00UA00 Diode with and without Beam Shaping Optics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... light - emitting diode (LED), with and without beam shaping optics. This LED has 4 emitters arranged in a square pattern that are off-center from the

  4. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  5. Application of Fixed Scale Approach to Static Quark Free Energies in Quenched and 2+1 Flavor Lattice QCD with Improved Wilson Quark Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Y.; Umeda, T.; Aoki, S.; Ejiri, S.; Hatsuda, T.; Kanaya, K.; Ohno, H.; WHOT-QCD Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The free energies of static quarks and the Debye screening masses in the quark gluon plasma are studied using Polyakov-line correlation functions in lattice QCD adopting the fixed-scale approach in which temperature is varied without changing the spatial volume and the renormalization factors. We calculate static-quark free energies in various color channels in the high temperature phase up to about 3.5 times the (pseudo-)critical temperature, performing lattice simulations both in quenched and 2 + 1 flavor QCD. For the quenched simulations, we adopt the plaquette gauge action on anisotropic 20^3 × N_t lattices with N_t = 8-26 at the renormalized anisotropy a_s / a_t ≃ 4. For 2 + 1 flavor QCD, we adopt the renormalization-group improved Iwasaki gluon action and the non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quark action on isotropic 32^3 × N_t lattices with N_t = 4-12 at m_{PS}/m_{V} = 0.63 (0.74) for the light (strange) flavors. We find that the color-singlet free energies at high temperatures converge to the zero-temperature static-quark potential evaluated from the Wilson-loop at short distances. This is in accordance with the theoretical expectation that the short distance physics is insensitive to the temperature. At long distances, the free energies approach twice the single-quark free energies, implying that the interaction between static quarks is fully screened. We find that the static-quark free energies for various color channels turn out to be well described by the screened Coulomb form, and the color-channel dependence of the inter-quark interaction can be described by the kinetic Casimir factor inspired from the lowest order perturbation theory. We also discuss comparison with a prediction of the thermal perturbation theory and flavor dependence of the screening masses.

  6. Quark mass variations of nuclear forces, BBN, and all that

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I discuss the modifications of the nuclear forces due to variations of the light quark masses and of the fine structure constant. This is based on the chiral nuclear effective field theory, that successfully describes a large body of data. The generation of the light elements in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis provides important constraints on these modifications. In addition, I discuss the role of the anthropic principle in the triple-alpha process that underlies carbon and oxygen generation in hot stars. It appears that a fine-tuning of the quark masses and the fine structure constant within 2 to 3 per cent is required to make life on Earth viable. Supported in part by DFG, HGF and the BMBF.

  7. Equilibration in quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Alam, J.; Mohanty, P.

    2011-07-01

    The hydrodynamic expansion rate of quark gluon plasma (QGP) is evaluated and compared with the scattering rate of quarks and gluons within the system. Partonic scattering rates evaluated within the ambit of perturbative Quantum Choromodynamics (pQCD) are found to be smaller than the expansion rate evaluated with ideal equation of state (EoS) for the QGP. This indicate that during the space-time evolution the system remains out of equilibrium. Enhancement of pQCD cross sections and a more realistic EoS keep the partons closer to the equilibrium.

  8. SPONTANEOUS CP VIOLATION AND QUARK MASS AMBIGUITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-09-21

    I explore the regions of quark masses where CP will be spontaneously broken in the strong interactions. The boundaries of these regions are controlled by the chiral anomaly, which manifests itself in ambiguities in the definition of non-degenerate quark masses. In particular, the concept of a single massless quark is ill defined.

  9. LATTICE QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH WILSON QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    EJIRI,S.

    2007-11-20

    We review studies of QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson quarks. After explaining the basic properties of QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature including the phase structure and the scaling properties around the chiral phase transition, we discuss the critical temperature, the equation of state and heavy-quark free energies.

  10. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry from the 3-3-1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, E. Ramirez; Coutinho, Y. A.; Sá Borges, J.

    2011-03-01

    The forward-backward asymmetry AFB in top quark pair production, measured at the Tevatron, is probably related to the contribution of new particles. The Tevatron result is more than a 2σ deviation from the standard model prediction and motivates the application of alternative models introducing new states. However, as the standard model predictions for the total cross section σtt and invariant mass distribution Mtt for this process are in good agreement with experiments, any alternative model must reproduce these predictions. These models can be placed into two categories: One introduces the s-channel exchange of new vector bosons with chiral couplings to the light quarks and to the top quark, and another relies on the t-channel exchange of particles with large flavor-violating couplings in the quark sector. In this work, we employ a model which introduces both s- and t-channel nonstandard contributions for the top quark pair production in proton-antiproton collisions. We use the minimal version of the SU(3)C⊗SU(3)L⊗U(1)X model (3-3-1 model) that predicts the existence of a new neutral gauge boson, called Z'. This gauge boson has both flavor-changing couplings to up and top quarks and chiral coupling to the light quarks and to the top quark. This very peculiar model coupling can correct the AFB for top quark pair production for two ranges of Z' mass while leading to a cross section and invariant mass distribution quite similar to the standard model ones. This result reinforces the role of the 3-3-1 model for any new physics effect.

  11. How Do We Know Protons, Electrons, and Quarks Really Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Scientific explanations often make use of things that cannot be seen or felt, such as protons, electrons, and quarks. Do these things really exist? If so, how do is it known that they exist? Imagine being enclosed in a completely dark room with no light at all and not being able to see a thing. Being chained to a chair somewhere in the room, and…

  12. Hybrid simulations with dynamical quarks: Spectra, screening and thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1987-11-18

    We summarize simulations made by the Argonne/University of Illinois group using the Hybrid algorithm to include dynamical staggered fermions. Recent work on the mass spectrum and screening effects due to the inclusion of four light flavors of dynamical quarks is presented. We also present a brief overview of what we have learned about the finite temperature chiral phase transition. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Inferring supernova IIb/Ib/Ic ejecta properties from light curves and spectra: correlations from radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses Me of 1.7-5.2 M⊙, kinetic energies Ekin of 0.6-5.0 × 1051 erg, and 56Ni masses of 0.05-0.30 M⊙. We find a strong correlation between the 56Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in (V - R) at 10 d past R-band maximum. The quantity V_m ≡ √{2E_kin/M_e} is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from He I 5875 Å at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The O I 7772 Å line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the ˜1.05 μm feature in all models. The reversal is due to He I alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionization, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.

  14. Photodegradation of the herbicide azimsulfuron using nanocrystalline titania films as photocatalyst and low intensity Black Light radiation or simulated solar radiation as excitation source.

    PubMed

    Pelentridou, Katerina; Stathatos, Elias; Karasali, Helen; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2009-04-30

    Aqueous solutions of the herbicide azimsulfuron have been treated by a photocatalytic process employing titania nanocrystalline films as photocatalyst. Results showed that solutions of this herbicide at maximum possible concentration can be photodegraded in a time of a few hours by using low intensity UVA radiation comparable with that of the UVA of solar noon. Similar results have also been obtained with simulated solar radiation. Thus heterogeneous photocatalysis can be employed for the treatment of waters polluted by this herbicide.

  15. Hidden-beauty charged tetraquarks and heavy quark spin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Maiani, L.; Polosa, A. D.; Riquer, V.

    2015-01-01

    Assuming the dominance of the spin-spin interaction in a diquark, we point out that the mass difference in the beauty sector M (Zb')±-M (Zb)± scales with quark masses as expected in QCD, with respect to the corresponding mass difference M (Zc')±-M (Zc)± . Notably, we show that the decays ϒ (10890 )→ϒ (n S )π+π- and ϒ (10890 )→(hb(1 P ),hb(2 P ))π+π- are compatible with heavy quark spin conservation if the contributions of Zb,Zb' intermediate states are taken into account, ϒ (10890 ) being either a ϒ (5 S ) or the beauty analog of Yc(4260 ). Belle results on these decays support the quark spin wave function of the Z states as tetraquarks. We also consider the role of light quark spin nonconservaton in Zb,Zb' decays into B B* and B*B*. Indications of possible signatures of the still missing Xb resonance are proposed.

  16. Characterization of the deep levels responsible for non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, M. La Grassa, M.; Vaccari, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-03-17

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of the deep levels related to non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The study is based on combined optical and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, carried out on LEDs with identical structure and with different values of the non-radiative recombination coefficient. Experimental data lead to the following, relevant, results: (i) LEDs with a high non-radiative recombination coefficient have a higher concentration of a trap (labeled as “e{sub 2}”) with an activation energy of 0.7 eV, which is supposed to be located close to/within the active region; (ii) measurements carried out with varying filling pulse duration suggest that this deep level behaves as a point-defect/dislocation complex. The Arrhenius plot of this deep level is critically compared with the previous literature reports, to identify its physical origin.

  17. Characterization of distinctive features of oceanic light fields associated with inelastic radiative processes in the near-surface, euphotic, and mesopelagic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhai

    A thorough understanding of the oceanic light fields is required to support studies of various biological, chemical, and physical processes and phenomena in the ocean. The interaction of light with seawater and its constituents involves absorption (change of radiant energy into another form of energy), elastic scattering (change in light propagation direction but not wavelength), and inelastic radiative processes (change in light wavelength and propagation direction). The absorption and elastic scattering have been the primary research focus for decades. The inelastic processes have been less investigated and often ignored in oceanographic studies or applications. The inelastic processes, including Raman scattering and fluorescence, have been demonstrated to significantly affect the oceanic light fields. However, a systematic examination of these influences within different ocean layers is lacking. I studied the effects of inelastic processes on oceanic light fields in the near-surface (0-10 m), euphotic (0-200 m), and mesopelagic (200-1000 m) layers. I modeled the upwelling radiance within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer. The inelastic processes dramatically affect the upwelling radiance and its attenuation coefficient in the red and near-infrared spectral regions, indicating that common approaches for estimating water-leaving radiance from extrapolating measurements of upwelling radiance are inadequate. A new strategy is proposed for more accurate in-situ determinations of water-leaving radiance, which is critical for ocean color applications. Using both a unique field dataset and radiative transfer modeling I examined the effects of inelastic processes in the euphotic layer. I demonstrate distinctive features caused by inelastic processes in the irradiance and radiance fields as well as apparent optical properties for realistic scenarios of optically non-uniform water column. I also demonstrate the role of inelastic processes in photosynthetically

  18. Heavy-quark QCD exotica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, Richard F.; Mitchell, Ryan E.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2017-03-01

    This review presents an overview of the remarkable progress in the field of heavy-quark exotic hadrons over the past 15 years. It seeks to be pedagogical rather than exhaustive, summarizing both the progress and specific results of experimental discoveries, and the variety of theoretical approaches designed to explain these new states.

  19. Observation of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G.A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Aronson, S.H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R.E.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S.R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M.K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A.N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T.L.; Genik, R.J. II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutnikov, Y.E.

    1995-04-03

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in {ital p{bar p}} collisions at {radical}{ital s}=1.8TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50pb{sup {minus}1}. We have searched for {ital t{bar t}} production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of {ital b}-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8{plus_minus}0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2{times}10{sup {minus}6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199{sub {minus}21}{sup +19} (stat) {plus_minus}22 (syst) GeV/{ital c}{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4{plus_minus}2.2pb.

  20. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  1. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs.

  2. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  3. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-01

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  4. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  5. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  6. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  7. Polymerization as a limiting factor for light product yields in radiation cracking of heavy oil and bitumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, Yuriy A.; Zaikina, Raissa F.

    2013-03-01

    The kinetic model of radiation-thermal and low-temperature radiation cracking is developed subject to the specificity of radiation-induced processes and the effect of structure in extremely heavy hydrocarbon feedstock. Theoretical calculations are compared with the available experimental data. The dependences of the cracking product yields on temperature, dose and dose rate of ionizing irradiation are analyzed on the base of the developed model subject to the structural state of the feedstock. Radiation-induced polymerization and chemical adsorption are considered as the important factors limiting heavy oil conversion.

  8. Landau levels of cold dense quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The occupied Landau levels of strange quark matter are investigated in the framework of the SU(3) NJL model with a conventional coupling and a magnetic-field dependent coupling respectively. At lower density, the Landau levels are mainly dominated by u and d quarks. Threshold values of the chemical potential for the s quark onset are shown in the μ -B plane. The magnetic-field-dependent running coupling can broaden the region of three-flavor matter by decreasing the dynamical masses of s quarks. Before the onset of s quarks, the Landau level number of light quarks is directly dependent on the magnetic field strength B by a simple inverse proportional relation ki ,max≈Bi0/B with Bd0=5 ×1 019 G , which is approximately 2 times Bu0 of u quarks at a common chemical potential. When the magnetic field increases up to Bd0, almost all three flavors are lying in the lowest Landau level.

  9. Calculation of the cross section for top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Contopanagos, H.

    1996-06-21

    The authors summarize calculations of the cross section for top quark production at hadron colliders within the context of perturbative quantum chromodynamics, including resummation of the effects of initial-state soft gluon radiation to all orders in the strong coupling strength. In their approach they resume the universal leading-logarithm contributions, and they restrict the calculation to the region of phase space that is demonstrably perturbative. They compare the approach with other methods. They present predictions of the physical cross section as a function of the top quark mass in proton-antiproton reactions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 and 2.0 TeV, and they discuss estimated uncertainties.

  10. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  11. Hadronic-to-Quark-Matter Phase Transition: Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebergal, Brian

    There are three Parts to this Thesis; the first gives an introduction to the search for quark-gluon plasmas, both in theory and experiment, and provides motivation for using astrophysics to complement this search. The second explores the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma in an astrophysical setting, through the conversion of u,d - to u,d,s-quarks via weak reactions. This transition is formulated in terms of a reactive-diffusive-hydrodynamical problem with the effects of neutrino cooling included, as well as the entropy change due to heat released in forming the stable quark phase. These equations are solved numerically with my newly developed, freely-available, numerical code (the BURN-UD CODE) - which is then applied to the problem of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star burning into stable u,d,s-quark matter. Analytic solutions to the equation set are found and used to verify the BURN-UD code and its findings. The most important findings are as follows; (i) the laminar speed of the combustion interface is 0.002 - 0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived without hydrodynamic considerations, (ii) neutrino cooling (deleptonization) is essential as it results in the unexpected destabilization of the combustion interface, which causes it to halt at lower densities (≈ 2 times nuclear saturation density). Also, (iii) by appealing to this newly discovered deleptonization instability it is shown for the first time exactly why the transition from a neutron star to a u,d,s-quark star must be explosive; these results validate the Quark-Nova model. Instructions are then given on how the BURN-UD code may be used to model relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as well as the reverse transition, which is expected to have occurred in the first few moments following the Big-Bang. The last Part of this Thesis concerns the phenomenology of color-superconductivity in compact stars, which occurs much later than

  12. TOPOS: A new topometric patient positioning and tracking system for radiation therapy based on structured white light

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, Bastian L.; Mueller, Reinhold G.; Lang, Stephanie; Herraiz Lablanca, Maria D.; Kloeck, Stephan

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A patient positioning system for radiation therapy based on structured white light and using off-the-shelf hardware components for flexibility and cost-effectiveness has been developed in house. Increased accuracy, patient comfort, abandonment of any skin marks, accelerated workflow, objective reading/recording, better usability and robust sensor design, compared to other positioning approaches, were the main goals of this work. Another aim was the application of a 6 degrees of freedom tracking system working without dose deposition. Methods: Two optical sensors are the main parts of the TOPOS Registered-Sign system (Topometrical Positioning, cyberTECHNOLOGIES, Germany). The components: cameras, projectors, and computers are commercial off-the-shelf products, allowing for low production costs. The black/white cameras of the prototype are capable of taking up to 240 frames per second (resolution: 640 Multiplication-Sign 488 pixels). The projector has a resolution of 1024 Multiplication-Sign 768 and a refresh rate of 120 Hz. The patient's body surface is measured continuously and registered to a reference surface, providing a transformation to superimpose the patient's surface to the reference (planning CT) surface as best as possible. The execution of the calculated transformation provides the correct patient position before the treatment starts. Due to the high-speed acquisition of the surfaces, a surveillance of the patient's (respiration) motion during treatment is also accomplished. The accuracy of the system was determined using a male mannequin. Two treatment sites were evaluated: one simulating a head and neck treatment and the other simulating a thoracic wall treatment. The mannequin was moved to predefined positions, and shift vectors given by the surface registration were evaluated. Additionally manual positioning using a color-coding system was evaluated. Results: Two prototypes have been developed, each allowing a continuous high density scan of

  13. Top Quark Properties in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Perelstein, M.; Petriello, F.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-12-08

    Identifying the mechanism which breaks electroweak symmetry and generates fermion masses is one of the main physics goals for both the LHC and the ILC. Studies of the top quark have the potential to illuminate this issue; since it is the heaviest of the Standard Model (SM) fermions, the top is expected to couple strongly to the symmetry-breaking sector. Consequently, the structure of that sector can have significant, potentially observable effects on the properties of the top. for example, it is well known that the vector and axial t{bar t}Z form factors receive large corrections (of order 5-10%) in certain models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking [1]. At future colliders such as the LHC and the ILC, we will be able to pursue a program of precision top physics, similar to the program studying the Z at LEP and SLC. In this manuscript, they study the corrections to the top quark properties in ''Little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking [2], and compare the expected deviations from the SM predictions with expected sensitivities of experiments at the LHC and the ILC. In the Little Higgs models, electroweak symmetry is driven by the radiative effects from the top sector, including the SM-like top and its heavy counterpart, a TeV-scale ''heavy top'' T. Probing this structure experimentally is quite difficult. While the LHC should be able to discover the T quark, its potential for studying its couplings is limited [3,4]. Direct production of the T will likely be beyond the kinematic reach of the ILC. However, we will show below that the corrections to the gauge couplings of the SM top, induced by its mixing with the T, will be observable at the ILC throughout the parameter range consistent with naturalness. Measuring these corrections will provide a unique window on the top sector of the Little Higgs. Many Little Higgs models have been proposed in the literature. We will consider two examples in this study, the ''Littlest Higgs'' model [5], and its

  14. Study of b-quark mass effects in multijet topologies with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of the heavy b-quark mass on the two, three and four-jet rates is studied using LEP data collected by the DELPHI experiment at the Z peak in 1994 and 1995. The rates of b-quark jets and light quark jets (ℓ=uds) in events with n=2, 3, and 4 jets, together with the ratio of two and four-jet rates of b-quarks with respect to light-quarks, Rn bℓ, have been measured with a double-tag technique using the CAMBRIDGE jet-clustering algorithm. A comparison between experimental results and theory (matrix element or Monte Carlo event generators such as PYTHIA, HERWIG and ARIADNE) is done after the hadronisation phase. Using the four-jet observable R4 bℓ, a measurement of the b-quark mass using massive leading-order calculations gives:m_b(M_Z) = 3.76 ±0.32 ({text{stat}}) ±0.17 ({text{syst}}) ±0.22 ({text{had}}) ±0.90 ({text{theo}}) text{GeV}/c^2 . This result is compatible with previous three-jet determinations at the MZ energy scale and with low energy mass measurements evolved to the MZ scale using QCD renormalisation group equations.

  15. Direct Evaluation of the Quark Content of Nucleons from Lattice QCD at the Physical Point.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, A; Alexandrou, C; Constantinou, M; Hadjiyiannakou, K; Jansen, K; Kallidonis, Ch; Koutsou, G; Avilés-Casco, A Vaquero

    2016-06-24

    We evaluate the light, strange, and charm scalar content of the nucleon using one lattice QCD ensemble generated with two degenerate light quarks with mass fixed to their physical value. We use improved techniques to evaluate the disconnected quark loops to sufficient accuracy to determine the strange and charm nucleon σ terms in addition to the light quark content σ_{πN}. We find σ_{πN}=37.2(2.6)(4.7/2.9)  MeV, σ_{s}=41.1(8.2)(7.8/5.8)  MeV, and σ_{c}=79(21)(12/8)  MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is the systematic error due to the determination of the lattice spacing, the assessment of finite volume, and residual excited state effects.

  16. Light Exotic Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, Paul

    2016-03-01

    tudies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as hybrids, exotics, multi-quarks, and glueballs. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of light quark exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV . Recent Lattice QCD calculations of the light-quark meson spectrum indicate a constituent gluon-like excitation contributing an additional JPC =1+- and mass 1 - 1 . 5 GeV resulting in the lightest hybrid nonets with masses near 2 . 0 GeV . High statistical yields from recent experiments along with new advances in analysis techniques have shed a new light towards the understanding the latest experimental exotic candidates. Recent results from hadro-production and photo-production will be presented followed by an overview of ongoing and future efforts to search for light exotic mesons.

  17. Bethe-Salpeter dynamics and the constituent mass concept for heavy quark mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Souchlas, N.; Stratakis, D.

    2010-06-01

    The definition of a quark as heavy requires a comparison of its mass with the nonperturbative chiral symmetry breaking scale which is about 1 GeV ({Lambda}{sub {chi}{approx}1} GeV) or with the scale {Lambda}{sub QCD{approx}}0.2 GeV that characterizes the distinction between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For quark masses significantly larger than these scales, nonperturbative dressing effects, or equivalently nonperturbative self-energy contributions, and relativistic effects are believed to be less important for physical observables. We explore the concept of a constituent mass for heavy quarks in the Dyson-Schwinger equations formalism, for light-heavy and heavy-heavy quark mesons by studying their masses and electroweak decay constants.

  18. Spontaneous magnetization of solid quark-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Pulsar-like compact stars usually have strong magnetic fields, with strengths from ˜ 108 to ˜ 1012 G on the surface. How such strong magnetic fields can be generated and maintained is still an unsolved problem, which is, in principle, related to the interior structure of compact stars, i.e., the equation of state of cold matter at supra-nuclear density. In this paper we are trying to solve the problem in the regime of solid quark-cluster stars. Inside quark-cluster stars, the extremely low ratio of number density of electrons to that of baryons ne/nb and the screening effect from quark-clusters could reduce the long-range Coulomb interaction between electrons to short-range interaction. In this case, Stoner’s model could apply, and we find that the condition for ferromagnetism is consistent with that for the validity of Stoner’s model. Under the screened Coulomb repulsion, the electrons inside the stars could be spontaneously magnetized and become ferromagnetic, and hence would contribute non-zero net magnetic momentum to the whole star. We conclude that, for most cases in solid quark-cluster stars, the amount of net magnetic momentum, which is proportional to the amount of unbalanced spins ξ = (n+ - n-)/ne and depends on the number density of electrons ne = n+ + n-, could be significant with non-zero ξ. The net magnetic moments of electron system in solid quark-cluster stars could be large enough to induce the observed magnetic fields for pulsars with B ˜ 1011 to ˜ 1013 G. Supported by 973 Program (2012CB821801), West Light Foundation (XBBS-2014-23), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11203018, 11225314, 11365022), Science Project of Universities in Xinjiang (XJEDU2012S02) and Doctoral Science Foundation of Xinjiang University (BS120107)

  19. Final Report for Project. Quark matter under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian; Ferrer, Efrain

    2015-12-31

    The results obtained in the two years of the grant have served to shine new light on several important questions about the phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under extreme conditions that include quark matter at high density, as well quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures, both in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The interest in including an external magnetic field on these studies is motivated by the generation of large magnetic fields in off-central heavy-ion collisions and by their common presence in astrophysical compact objects, the two scenarios where the physics of quark matter becomes relevant. The tasks carried out in this DOE project led us, among other things, to discover the first connection between the physics of very dense quark matter and novel materials as for instance topological insulators and Weyl semimetals; they allowed us to find a physical explanation for and a solution to a standing puzzle in the apparent effect of a magnetic field on the critical temperature of the QCD chiral transition; and they led us to establish by the first time that the core of the observed two-solar-mass neutron stars could be made up of quark matter in certain inhomogeneous chiral phases in a magnetic field and that this was consistent with current astrophysical observations. A major goal established by the Nuclear Science Advisory committee in its most recent report “Reaching for the Horizon” has been “to truly understand how nuclei and strongly interacting matter in all its forms behave and can predict their behavior in new settings.” The results found in this DOE project have all contributed to address this goal, and thus they are important for advancing fundamental knowledge in the area of nuclear physics and for enhancing our understanding of the role of strong magnetic fields in the two settings where they are most relevant, neutron stars and heavy-ion collisions.

  20. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of three and six-quark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Mark Wayne

    2001-06-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo techniques are applied to quark descriptions of single baryon and nuclear systems using a non-relativistic constituent quark model Hamiltonian. The assumed interaction includes a three-body term arising due to flux-tube confinement, and two-body interactions arising from one-gluon and one-pion exchange. It is strongly dependent on the spin and isospin of the quarks. We solve for single baryon S and P-wave spectra by solving the Schrödinger equation variationally for the ground state of three interacting light-flavored valence quarks. The variational Monte Carlo method is then used to find the ground state of six quarks confined to a cavity of diameter Rc. The variational wave function is written as a product of three-quark nucleon states with correlations between quarks in different nucleons. We study the role of quark exchange effects by allowing flux-tube configuration mixing. An accurate six-body variational wave function is obtained. It has only ~13% rms fluctuation in the total energy and yields a standard deviation of <=.1% small enough to be useful in discerning nuclear interaction effects from the large rest mass of the two nucleons. Results are presented for three values of the cavity diameter, R c = 2, 4, and 6 fm. They indicate that the flux-tube model Hamiltonian with gluon and pion exchange requires revisions in order to obtain agreement with the energies estimated from realistic two- nucleon interactions. We calculate the two-quark density, spin, isospin, and color distribution functions and show how they may be used to study and adjust the model Hamiltonian.

  2. B-meson decay constants from improved lattice nonrelativistic QCD with physical u, d, s, and c quarks.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, R J; Davies, C T H; Horgan, R R; Monahan, C J; Shigemitsu, J

    2013-05-31

    We present the first lattice QCD calculation of the decay constants f(B) and f(B(s)) with physical light quark masses. We use configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration including the effect of u, d, s, and c highly improved staggered quarks in the sea at three lattice spacings and with three u/d quark mass values going down to the physical value. We use improved nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) for the valence b quarks. Our results are f(B)=0.186(4) GeV, f(B(s))=0.224(4) GeV, f(B(s))/f(B)=1.205(7), and M(B(s))-M(B)=85(2) MeV, superseding earlier results with NRQCD b quarks. We discuss the implications of our results for the standard model rates for B((s))→μ(+)μ(-) and B→τν.

  3. Connecting Fermion Masses and Mixings to BSM Physics - Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Terrence; Stephenson, Gerard J., Jr.

    2015-10-01

    The ``democratic'' mass matrix with BSM physics assumptions has been studied without success. We invert the process and use the ``democratic'' mass matrix plus a parametrization of all possible BSM corrections to analyze the implications of the observed masses and CKM weak interaction current mixing for the BSM parameter values for the up-quarks and down-quarks. We observe that the small mixing of the so-called ``third generation'' is directly related to the large mass gap from the two lighter generations. Conversely, the relatively large value of the Cabibbo angle arises because the mass matrices in the light sub-sector (block diagonalized from the full three channel problem) are neither diagonal nor degenerate and differ significantly between the up and down cases. Alt email:t.goldman@gmail.com

  4. Linear radial Regge trajectories for mesons with any quark flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, Sergey; Pusenkov, Ilya

    2016-10-01

    In the Regge phenomenology, the radial spectrum of light mesons is given by a linear relation M2n = a(n + b), where a is a universal slope, the dimensionless intercept b depends on quantum numbers, and n enumerates the excited states in radial recurrences. The usual extensions of this relation to heavy quarkonia in the framework of hadron string models typically lead to strong nonlinearities which seem to be at variance with the available experimental data. Introducing a radially static string picture of mesons, we put forward a linear generalization (Mn - m1 - m2)2 = a(n + b), where m1,2 are quark masses. The vector channel contains enough experimental states to check this new relation and a good agreement is observed. It is shown that this generalization leads to a simple estimate of current quark masses from the radial spectra.

  5. Identification of beauty and charm quark jets at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Identification of jets originating from beauty and charm quarks is important for measuring Standard Model processes and for searching for new physics. The performance of algorithms developed to select b- and c-quark jets is measured using data recorded by LHCb from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV in 2011 and at √s = 8 TeV in 2012. The efficiency for identifying a b(c) jet is about 65%(25%) with a probability for misidentifying a light-parton jet of 0.3% for jets with transverse momentum pT > 20GeV and pseudorapidity 2.2 < η < 4.2. The dependence of the performance on the pT and η of the jet is also measured.

  6. Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance in the relativistic quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan

    2007-08-01

    The amplitudes of the transition gamma* N -> P11(1440) are calculated within light-front relativistic quark model assuming that the P11(1440) is the first radial excitation of the 3q nucleon state. The results are compared with those obtained in close approaches by other authors and with standard nonrelativistic results. One of the reasons for this study was to present all these results within unified definition of helicity amplitudes consistent with the definition used in the extraction of the helicity amplitudes from experimental data in one-pion electroproduction. The results of relativistic quark models are qualitatively in good agreement with each other and differ strongly from nonrelativistic calculations. At small Q2 , these results for the transverse amplitude A12 are consistent, but fail to reproduce experimental data. The most probable explanation of this discrepancy is the absence of pion cloud contribution in the approaches under consideration.

  7. The quark-hadron transition in cosmology and astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Olive, K A

    1991-03-08

    A transition from normal hadronic matter (such as protons and neutrons) to quark-gluon matter is expected at both high temperatures and densities. In physical situations, this transition may occur in heavy ion collisions, the early universe, and in the cores of neutron stars. Astrophysics and cosmology can be greatly affected by such a phase transition. With regard to the early universe, big bang nucleosynthesis, the theory describing the primordial origin of the light elements, can be affected by inhomogeneities produced during the transition. A transition to quark matter in the interior by neutron stars further enhances our uncertainties regarding the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and neutron star properties such as the maximum mass and rotation frequencies.

  8. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  9. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    C. Paus

    2002-11-13

    The contribution summarizes the latest results from CDF on heavy quark production. Results from top, bottom and charm production are included. Some new analysis using Run I (1991-1994) data have become available. More importantly there are a number of results using Run II data which began in April 2001. The data indicate the potential of CDF for bottom and charm production physics in the near future.

  10. Growth under visible light increases conidia and mucilage production and tolerance to UV-B radiation in the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Henrique D; Massola, Nelson S; Flint, Stephan D; Silva, Geraldo J; Bachmann, Luciano; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2015-01-01

    Light conditions can influence fungal development. Some spectral wavebands can induce conidial production, whereas others can kill the conidia, reducing the population size and limiting dispersal. The plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum causes anthracnose in several crops. During the asexual stage on the host plant, Colletototrichum produces acervuli with abundant mucilage-embedded conidia. These conidia are responsible for fungal dispersal and host infection. This study examined the effect of visible light during C. acutatum growth on the production of conidia and mucilage and also on the UV tolerance of these conidia. Conidial tolerance to an environmentally realistic UV irradiance was determined both in conidia surrounded by mucilage on sporulating colonies and in conidial suspension. Exposures to visible light during fungal growth increased production of conidia and mucilage as well as conidial tolerance to UV. Colonies exposed to light produced 1.7 times more conidia than colonies grown in continuous darkness. The UV tolerances of conidia produced under light were at least two times higher than conidia produced in the dark. Conidia embedded in the mucilage on sporulating colonies were more tolerant of UV than conidia in suspension that were washed free of mucilage. Conidial tolerance to UV radiation varied among five selected isolates.

  11. Special symmetric quark mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Marcos, J. I.

    1998-12-01

    We give a procedure to construct a special class of symmetric quark mass matrices near the democratic limit of equal Yukawa couplings for each sector. It is shown that within appropriate weak-bases, the requirements of symmetry and arg[det(M)]=0 are very strong conditions, that necessarily lead to a Cabibbo angle given by Vus=sqrt(md/ms), and to Vcb~ms/mb, in first order. In addition, we prove that the recently classified ansätze, which also reproduce these mixing matrix relations, and which were based on the hypothesis of the Universal Strength for Yukawa couplings, where all Yukawa couplings have equal moduli while the flavour dependence is only in their phases, are, in fact, particular cases of the generalized symmetric quark mass matrix ansätze we construct here. In an excellent numerical example, the experimental values on all quark mixings and masses are accommodated, and the CP violation phase parameter is shown to be crucially dependent on the values of mu and Vus.

  12. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis Juschkin, Larissa; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M.; Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Bergmann, Klaus; Grützmacher, Detlev

    2014-10-15

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  13. Superconducting quark matter in the Chromodielectric Model

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, L.; Malheiro, M.; Fiolhais, M.; Taurines, A.R.

    2004-12-02

    In this work we study the strange quark matter in an extended version of the Chromodielectric Model (CDM) with a BCS quark pairing implemented, and analyze the superconducting color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We compare the equation of state and the stability of the strange quark matter from QCD in the CFL phase with the superconducting version of the CDM. In the CDM there is a confining potential which originates a dynamical bag constant in the sense that its value depends on the density. Our results indicate that the inclusion in the energy density of the pairing quark interaction allows for an absolutely stable quark matter state even for large potential energies, preventing the metastability of quark matter found in the CDM at high densities.

  14. Effect of exposure to radio frequency radiation emitted by cell phone on the developing dorsal root ganglion of chick embryo: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ingole, I V; Ghosh, S K

    2012-12-01

    With an ever increasing number of cell phone users since late twentieth [corrected] century, magnitude of the problem of exposure to radiation emitted by cell phone is self evident. Extensive research had been devoted to incriminate or absolve it as a health hazard. Radiofrequency radiation emitted by cell phone had been stated to be a potent carcinogen, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and neurobehavioral teratogen. Its effect on the brain had been a subject of extensive research evidently due to its proximity to the user's brain. While considering the biological effects of radiofrequency radiation, its intensity, frequency and the duration of exposure are important determinants. Nevertheless the results of these different studies have not been unequivocal. Considering the contradictory reports, the present work was undertaken to study the effect of such an exposure on the developing neural tissue of chick embryo. The processes of cell division and differentiation are fundamental to the development of any living being and are a sensitive index of any insult sustained at this stage. Neurons of dorsal root ganglion were selected for the present study as these ganglia were fully differentiated as early as fourth day of embryonic life. By varying duration of exposure, the embryos were exposed to different doses of radiation, sacrificed at different periods of incubation and subjected to histological processing. On light microscopic study it was observed that developing neurons of dorsal root ganglion suffered a damage which was dose dependent and persisted in spite of giving the exposure-free period between two exposures.

  15. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, S.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Freeland, E.; Foley, J.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Li, R.; Osborn, J.; Sugar, R. L.; Torok, A.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.

    2015-09-28

    Calculations studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons are reported. The calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in χPT; that is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. The non-compact formalism is used for photons. New results are obtained with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. The success of chiral perturbation theory in describing these results and the implications for light quark masses are considered.

  16. Top quark mass: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    The top quark is the most massive elementary particle discovered thus far. Its large mass may help explain the mechanism by which fundamental particles gain mass - the Standard Model's greatest standing mystery. Today the top quark mass, together with the W boson mass, plays an important role in constraining the Higgs boson mass. The current status of the top quark mass measurement and a brief outline of the expectation at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider will be covered.

  17. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Low energy supergravity: R-parity breaking and the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela S.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    1987-03-01

    We study the process of spontaneous R-parity breaking in minimal low ener