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Sample records for light quarks radiate

  1. Energy loss for heavy quarks in relation to light partons: is radiative energy loss for heavy quarks anomalous?

    PubMed

    Lacey, Roy A; Wei, R; Ajitanand, N N; Alexander, J M; Gong, X; Jia, J; Mawi, A; Mohapatra, S; Reynolds, D; Salnikov, S; Taranenko, A

    2009-10-01

    The scaling properties of jet-suppression measurements are compared for nonphotonic electrons (e+/-) and neutral pions (pi(0)) in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV. For a broad range of transverse momenta and collision centralities, the comparison is consistent with jet quenching dominated by radiative energy loss for both heavy and light partons. Less quenching is indicated for heavy quarks via e+/-; this gives an independent estimate of the transport coefficient q that agrees with its magnitude obtained from quenching of light partons via pi(0)'s.

  2. Differences between heavy and light quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    1997-11-10

    The quark Dyson-Schwinger equation shows that there are distinct differences between light and heavy quarks. The dynamical mass function of the light quarks is characterized by a sharp increase below 1 GeV, whereas the mass function of the heavy quarks is approximately constant in this infrared region. As a consequence, the heavy meson masses increase linearly with the current quark masses, whereas the light pseudoscalar meson masses are proportional to the square root of the current quark masses.

  3. Quark-antiquark states and their radiative transitions in terms of the spectral integral equation: Light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    We continue the investigation of mesons in terms of the spectral integral equation initiated before for the bbar b and cbar c systems; we consider the light-quark (u, d, s) mesons with masses M ≤ 3 GeV. The calculations have been performed for the mesons lying on linear trajectories in the (n, M 2) planes, where n is the radial quantum number. Our consideration relates to the qbar q states with one component in the flavor space, with the quark and antiquark masses equal to each other, such as π(0-+), ρ(1--), ω(1--), ϕ(1--), a 0(0++), a 1(1++), a 2(2++), b 1(1+-), f 2(2++), π 2(2-+), ρ 3(3--), ω 3(3--), ϕ 3(3--), π 4(4-+) at n ≤ 6. We obtained the wave functions and mass values of mesons lying on these trajectories. The corresponding trajectories are linear, in agreement with data. We have calculated the two-photon decays π, a 0(980), a 2(1320), f 2(1285), f 2(1525) and radiative transitions ρ, ω → γπ, which agree qualitatively with the experiment. On this basis, we extract the singular part of the interaction amplitude, which corresponds to the so-called “confinement interaction.” The description of the data requires the presence of the strong t-channel singularities for both scalar and vector exchanges.

  4. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  5. Light quarks and small X physics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1992-06-15

    The significance of the low k{perpendicular} part of the Lipatov equation for the QCD soft Pomeron is discussed. It is then argued that light quarks are essential for the emergence of confinement and a Pomeron with the right physical properties. The implications for small {times} parton distributions are considered.

  6. Physics of the light quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, H.

    2010-12-01

    These lecture notes concern recent developments in our understanding of the low energy properties of QCD. Significant progress has been made on the lattice and the beautiful experimental results on the Ke4 and K3π decays, as well as those on pionic atoms also confirm the results obtained on the basis of Chiral Perturbation Theory. There is an exception: one of the precision experiments on Kμ3 decay is in flat contradiction with the Callan-Treiman relation. If confirmed, this would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model: right-handed quark couplings of the W-boson, for instance. Furthermore, I discuss two examples where the estimates of the effective coupling constants based on saturation by resonances appear to fail. In the second part, the progress made in extending the range of validity of the effective theory with dispersive methods is reviewed. In particular, I draw attention to an exact formula, which expresses the mass and width of a resonance in terms of observable quantities. The formula removes the ambiguities inherent in the analytic continuation from the real axis into the complex plane, which plagued previous determinations of the pole positions associated with broad resonances. In particular, it can now be demonstrated that the lowest resonance of QCD carries the quantum numbers of the vacuum.

  7. Diquark and light four-quark states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ailin; Huang Tao; Steele, Tom G.

    2007-08-01

    Four-quark states with different internal clusters are discussed within the constituent quark model. It is pointed out that the diquark concept is not meaningful in the construction of a tetraquark interpolating current in the QCD sum-rule approach, and hence existing sum-rule studies of four-quark states are incomplete. An updated QCD sum-rule determination of the properties of diquark clusters is then used as input for the constituent quark model to obtain the masses of light 0{sup ++} tetraquark states (i.e. a bound state of two diquark clusters). The results support the identification of {sigma}(600), f{sub 0}(980), and a{sub 0}(980) as the 0{sup ++} light tetraquark states, and seem to be inconsistent with the tetraquark state interpretation of the new BES observations of the near-threshold pp enhancements, X(1835) and X(1812), with the possible exception that X(1576) may be an exotic first orbital excitation of f{sub 0}(980) or a{sub 0}(980)

  8. Diquark and light four-quark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ailin; Huang, Tao; Steele, Tom G.

    2007-08-01

    Four-quark states with different internal clusters are discussed within the constituent quark model. It is pointed out that the diquark concept is not meaningful in the construction of a tetraquark interpolating current in the QCD sum-rule approach, and hence existing sum-rule studies of four-quark states are incomplete. An updated QCD sum-rule determination of the properties of diquark clusters is then used as input for the constituent quark model to obtain the masses of light 0++ tetraquark states (i.e. a bound state of two diquark clusters). The results support the identification of σ(600), f0(980), and a0(980) as the 0++ light tetraquark states, and seem to be inconsistent with the tetraquark state interpretation of the new BES observations of the near-threshold pp¯ enhancements, X(1835) and X(1812), with the possible exception that X(1576) may be an exotic first orbital excitation of f0(980) or a0(980).

  9. Meson Spectroscopy in the Light Quark Sector

    SciTech Connect

    De Vita, R.; Lunardi, S.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bucci, C.; Chiari, M.; Dainese, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Menegazzo, R.; Nannini, A.; Signorini, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    . This intense effort is leading to a very rich phenomenology in this sector and, together with recent theoretical progress achieved with lattice QCD calculations, is providing crucial information to reach a deeper understanding of strong interaction. In these proceedings I will review the present status of meson spectroscopy in the light quark sector and the plans and perspectives for future experiments.

  10. Light Four-Quark States and New Observations by BES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Huang, T.; Steele, T.

    Four-quark states are discussed within the constituent quark model.Incompleteness of existed studies of four-quark state with QCD sum rule is analyzed. The masses of diquark cluster were determined by QCD sum rules, and light four-quark states masses were obtained in terms of the diquark. The four-quark state possibility of the newly observed near-threshold pbar p enhancement, X(1835), X(1812) and X(1576) by BES is discussed.

  11. Exploring the light-quark interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Cloet, I. C.; El-Bennich, B.; Klahn, T.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics; Univ. of Washington; Peking Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Two basic motivations for an upgraded JLab facility are the needs: to determine the essential nature of light-quark confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB); and to understand nucleon structure and spectroscopy in terms of QCD's elementary degrees of freedom. During the next ten years a programme of experiment and theory will be conducted that can address these questions. We present a Dyson-Schwinger equation perspective on this effort with numerous illustrations, amongst them: an interpretation of string-breaking; a symmetry-preserving truncation for mesons; the nucleon's strangeness {sigma}-term; and the neutron's charge distribution.

  12. Light quark simulations with FLIC fermions

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Zanotti; D.B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A.G. Williams; J.B. Zhang

    2002-06-01

    Hadron masses are calculated in quenched lattice QCD in order to probe the scaling behavior of a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators of the fermion action are constructed using APE-smeared links. Light quark masses corresponding to an m{sub pi}/m{sub p} ratio of 0.35 are considered to assess the exceptional configuration problem of clover-fermion actions. This Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action provides scaling which is superior to mean-field improvement and offers advantages over nonperturbative improvement, including reduced exceptional configurations.

  13. QCD thermodynamics with light quarks and glueball spectra with dynamical quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1989-11-01

    Simulations of Lattice QCD with 4 flavors of light staggered quarks (m = .025) were performed on a 12{sup 3} {times} 4 lattice, confirming the first order nature of the transition. Lattice QCD with a light isodoublet of staggered quarks (m = .0125), and a heavier singlet (m = .25) was studied, also on a 12{sup 3} {times} 4 lattice. The order of the transition was less clear. Improved glueball wavefunctions have been used to study glueball spectra in theories incorporating dynamical quarks. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Hadron structure with light dynamical quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-07-25

    Generalized parton distributions encompass a wealth of information concerning the three dimensional quark and gluon structure of the nucleon, and thus provide an ideal focus for the study of hadron structure using lattice QCD. The special limits corresponding to form factors and parton distributions are well explored experimentally, providing clear tests of lattice calculations, and the lack of experimental data for more general cases provides opportunities for genuine predictions and for guiding experiment. We present results from hybrid calculations with improved staggered (Asqtad) sea quarks and domain wall valence quarks at pion masses down to 350 MeV.

  15. Light Higgs and vector-like quarks without prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Mustać, Ivana

    2013-07-01

    Light vector-like quarks with non-renormalizable couplings to the Higgs are a common feature of models trying to address the electroweak (EW) hierarchy problem by treating the Higgs as a pseudo-goldstone boson of a global (approximate) symmetry. We systematically investigate the implications of the leading dimension five operators on Higgs phenomenology in presence of dynamical up- and down-type weak singlet as well as weak doublet vector-like quarks. After taking into account constraints from precision EW and flavour observables we show that contrary to the renormalizable models, significant modifications of Higgs properties are still possible and could shed light on the role of vector-like quarks in solutions to the EW hierarchy problem. We also briefly discuss implications of higher dimensional operators for direct vector-like quark searches at the LHC.

  16. Role of heavy quarks in light hadron fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epele, Manuel; García Canal, Carlos; Sassot, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the role of heavy quarks in the production of light flavored hadrons and in the determination of the corresponding nonperturbative hadronization probabilities. We define a general mass variable flavor number scheme for fragmentation functions that accounts for heavy quark mass effects, and perform a global QCD analysis to an up-to-date data set including very precise Belle and BABAR results. We show that the mass dependent picture provides a much more accurate and consistent description of the data.

  17. Long-distance behavior of the quark-antiquark static potential. Application to light-quark mesons and heavy quarkonia

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.

    2009-09-01

    Screening effects from sea pairs on the quark-antiquark static potential are analyzed phenomenologically from the light-quark to the heavy-quark meson spectra. From the high excited light-quark meson spectrum, a universal form for the screened static potential is proposed. This potential is then successfully applied to heavy quarkonia. Our results suggest the assignment of X(4260) to the 4s state of charmonium and the possible existence of a 5s bottomonium resonance around 10748 MeV.

  18. Hadron production in light and heavy, quark and antiquark jets

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The authors review four hadronization studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, involving separation of light (Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} u{anti u}, d{anti d}, s{anti s}), c, and b flavors using precision vertexing, and separation of q- and {anti q}-jets using the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They measured the differences between the average charged multiplicities in Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} light, {r_arrow} c{anti c}, and {r_arrow}b{anti b} events, and found that the results were consistent with predictions of perturbative QCD. Next, they measured {pi}/{Kappa}/p/{Kappa}{sup 0}/{Lambda}{sup 0} production in light events for the first time, and compared with production in c- and b-flavor events. They then examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. Lastly, they performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method.

  19. Light Higgs boson decaying to four charm quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, Brando; Csaki, Csaba; Falkowski, Adam; Weiler, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple supersymmetric model where the dominant decay mode of the lightest Higgs boson is h{yields}2{eta}{yields}4c, where {eta} is a light pseudoscalar and c is the charm quark. For such decays the Higgs mass can be smaller than 100 GeV without conflict with experiment. Together with the fact that both the Higgs and the pseudoscalar {eta} are pseudo-Goldstone bosons, this resolves the little hierarchy problem.

  20. Multiplicity Difference between Heavy and Light Quark Jets Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, Fabrizio

    2006-04-11

    A peculiar prediction of perturbative QCD, obtained within the Local Parton Hadron Duality (LPHD) framework, is that the multiplicity difference {delta}Ql between heavy and light quark jets produced in e+e- annihilation is energy independent. In the Modified Leading Logarithmic Approximation (MLLA) the corresponding constant is derived in terms of a few experimentally measurable quantities. While the energy independence of {delta}Ql has been successfully verified experimentally for b-quarks up to the highest LEP2 energy, its numerical prediction ({delta}{sub bl}{sup MLLA} = 5.5 {+-} 0.8) overestimates the experimental results. The work presented in this talk, done in collaboration with Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Valery A. Khoze and Wolfgang Ochs, shows that in the light of new experimental results and the improvement in the understanding of the experimental data, this prediction needs indeed a revision. We now find {delta}bl = 4.4 {+-} 0.4, in better agreement with experiment, and we shaw that the remaining difference can be attributed largely to next-to-MLLA contributions, an important subset of which are identified and evaluated. The situation with charmed quarks is also reviewed.

  1. Azimuthal spin asymmetries in light-cone constituent quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Boffi, S.; Pasquini, B.; Efremov, A. V.; Schweitzer, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present results for all leading-twist azimuthal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering due to T-even transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions on the basis of a light-cone constituent quark model. Attention is paid to discuss the range of applicability of the model, especially with regard to the scale dependence of the observables and the transverse-momentum dependence of the distributions. We find good agreement with available experimental data and present predictions to be further tested by future CLAS, COMPASS, and HERMES data.

  2. Up quark mass in lattice QCD with three light dynamical quarks and implications for strong CP invariance.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daniel R; Fleming, George T; Kilcup, Gregory W

    2003-01-17

    A standing mystery in the standard model is the unnatural smallness of the strong CP violating phase. A massless up quark has long been proposed as one potential solution. A lattice calculation of the constants of the chiral Lagrangian essential for the determination of the up quark mass, 2alpha(8)-alpha(5), is presented. We find 2alpha(8)-alpha(5)=0.29+/-0.18, which corresponds to m(u)/m(d)=0.410+/-0.036. This is the first such calculation using a physical number of dynamical light quarks, N(f)=3.

  3. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  4. Long-distance behavior of the quark-antiquark static potential. Application to light-quark mesons and heavy quarkonia

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.

    2010-08-05

    We study the applicability of a static potential, derived from an analysis of the high excited light-quark meson spectrum, to the description of heavy quarkonia. The assignment of X(4260) to the 4s state of charmonium and the possible existence of a 5s bottomonium resonance around 10748 MeV are suggested.

  5. Measuring polarization of light quarks at ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Yevgeny

    2015-10-01

    Polarization of strange quarks is preserved to a high degree when they hadronize into Λ baryons, as observed in Z decays at LEP. This opens up the possibility for ATLAS and CMS to use strange-quark polarization measurements as a characterization tool for new physics scenarios that produce such quarks. Measurements in t t ¯ samples would be useful for obtaining additional information about the polarization transfer from the strange quark to the Λ baryon. Already with 100 fb-1 in run 2, t t ¯ samples in ATLAS and CMS become competitive in sensitivity with the Z samples of the LEP experiments. Moreover, while the LEP measurements were done inclusively over all quark flavors, which makes their interpretation dependent on various modeling assumptions, t t ¯ events at the LHC offer multiple handles for disentangling the different contributions experimentally. We also discuss the possibility of measuring polarizations of up and down quarks.

  6. Neutral B-meson mixing from unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Albertus, C.; Flynn, J. M.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Aoki, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Wennekers, J.; Christ, N. H.; Dumitrescu, T. T.; Loktik, O.; Izubuchi, T.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a method for calculating the neutral B-meson decay constants and mixing matrix elements in unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks. Our computation is performed on the '2+1' flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice spacing of a{approx_equal}0.11 fm (a{sup -1}=1.729 GeV) and a lattice spatial volume of approximately (1.8 fm){sup 3}. We simulate at three different light sea quark masses with pion masses down to approximately 430 MeV, and extrapolate to the physical quark masses using a phenomenologically-motivated fit function based on next-to-leading order heavy-light meson SU(2) chiral perturbation theory. For the b-quarks, we use an improved formulation of the Eichten-Hill action with static link-smearing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We also improve the heavy-light axial current used to compute the B-meson decay constant to O({alpha}{sub s}pa) using one-loop lattice perturbation theory. We present initial results for the SU(3)-breaking ratios f{sub B{sub s}}/f{sub B{sub d}} and {xi}=f{sub B{sub s{radical}}}(B{sub B{sub s}})/f{sub B{sub d{radical}}}(B{sub B{sub d}}), thereby demonstrating the viability of the method. For the ratio of decay constants, we find f{sub B{sub s}}/f{sub B{sub d}}=1.15(12) and for the ratio of mixing matrix elements, we find {xi}=1.13(12), where in both cases the errors reflect the combined statistical and systematic uncertainties, including an estimate of the size of neglected O(1/m{sub b}) effects.

  7. Light hadron spectroscopy in two-flavor QCD with small sea quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Namekawa, Y.; Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Lesk, V. I.; Umeda, T.; Okawa, M.

    2004-10-01

    We extend the study of the light hadron spectrum and the quark mass in two-flavor QCD to smaller sea quark mass, corresponding to m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.60-0.35. Numerical simulations are carried out using the RG-improved gauge action and the meanfield-improved clover quark action at {beta}=1.8 (a=0.2 fm from {rho} meson mass). We observe that the light hadron spectrum for small sea quark mass does not follow the expectation from chiral extrapolations with quadratic functions made from the region of m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.80-0.55. Whereas fits with either polynomial or continuum chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) fail, the Wilson ChPT (WChPT) that includes a{sup 2} effects associated with explicit chiral symmetry breaking successfully fits the whole data: In particular, WChPT correctly predicts the light quark mass spectrum from simulations for medium heavy quark mass, such as m{sub PS}/m{sub V} > or approx. 0.5. Reanalyzing the previous data with the use of WChPT, we find the mean up and down quark mass being smaller than the previous result from quadratic chiral extrapolation by approximately 10%, m{sub ud}{sup MS-bar}({mu}=2 GeV)=3.11(17) [MeV] in the continuum limit.

  8. Photon distribution amplitudes and light-cone wave functions in chiral quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Dorokhov, Alexander E.; Broniowski, Wojciech; Ruiz Arriola, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    The leading- and higher-twist distribution amplitudes and light-cone wave functions of real and virtual photons are analyzed in chiral quark models. The calculations are performed in the nonlocal quark model based on the instanton picture of the QCD vacuum, as well as in the spectral quark model and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the Pauli-Villars regulator, which both treat interaction of quarks with external fields locally. We find that in all considered models the leading-twist distribution amplitudes of the real photon defined at the quark-model momentum scale are constant or remarkably close to the constant in the x variable, thus are far from the asymptotic limit form. The QCD evolution to higher momentum scales is necessary and we carry it out at the leading order of the perturbative theory for the leading-twist amplitudes. We provide estimates for the magnetic susceptibility of the quark condensate {chi}{sub m} and the coupling f{sub 3{gamma}}, which in the nonlocal model turn out to be close to the estimates from QCD sum rules. We find the higher-twist distribution amplitudes at the quark model scale and compare them to the Wandzura-Wilczek estimates. In addition, in the spectral model we evaluate the distribution amplitudes and light-cone wave functions of the {rho}-meson.

  9. Quark transversity distribution in perturbative QCD: light-front Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2001-05-01

    To resolve the current ambiguity in the splitting function corresponding to the quark transversity distribution h1(x), we calculate h1(x) for a dressed quark in light-front Hamiltonian perturbation theory. Our result agrees with the expected form of the splitting function found in the literature and disagrees with the recent calculation in M. Meyer-Hermann et al., hep-ph/0012226. We emphasize the importance of quark mass in h1(x) in perturbative QCD and show its connection with a part of gT.

  10. Pion pole light-by-light contribution to g-2 of the muon in a nonlocal chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Dorokhov, Alexander E.; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the pion-pole term of the light-by-light contribution to the g-2 of the muon in the framework of an effective chiral quark model with instantonlike nonlocal quark-quark interaction. The full kinematic dependence of the pion-photon transition form factors is taken into account. The dependence of form factors on the pion virtuality decreases the result by about 15% in comparison to the calculation where this dependence is neglected. Further, it is demonstrated that the QCD constraints suggested by Melnikov and Vainshtein are satisfied within the model. The corresponding contributions originate from the box diagram as well from the pion-pole term. Our chiral nonlocal model result for the pion-pole light-by-light contribution to (g-2)/2 of the muon is (6.3-6.7)x10{sup -10}, which is in the ball park of other effective-model calculations.

  11. Radiation of a circulating quark in strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-12-22

    The energy density and angular distribution of power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory is computed using gauge/gravity duality. The results are qualitatively similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: At large velocities the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma} and radial thickness scaling like {approx}1/{gamma}{sup 3}.

  12. Relativistic three-body quark model of light baryons based on hypercentral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have treated the light baryons as a relativistic three-body bound system. Inspired by lattice QCD calculations, we treated baryons as a spin-independent three-quark system within a relativistic three-quark model based on the three-particle Klein-Gordon equation. We presented the analytical solution of three-body Klein-Gordon equation with employing the constituent quark model based on a hypercentral approach through which two- and three-body forces are taken into account. Herewith the average energy values of the up, down and strange quarks containing multiplets are reproduced. To describe the hyperfine structure of the baryon, the splittings within the SU(6)-multiplets are produced by the generalized Gürsey Radicati mass formula. The considered SU(6)-invariant potential is popular "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential and the strange and non-strange baryons spectra are in general well reproduced.

  13. Lattice investigation of nucleon structure at light quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, James M.

    2010-07-27

    Lattice simulations of hadronic structure are now reaching a level where they are able to not only complement, but also provide guidance to current and forthcoming experimental programmes at, e.g. Jefferson Lab, COMPASS/CERN and FAIR/GSI. By considering new simulations at low quark masses and on large volumes, we review the recent progress that has been made in this exciting area by the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration. In particular, results obtained close to the physical point for several quantities, including electromagnetic form factors and moments of ordinary parton distribution functions, show some indication of approaching their phenomenological values.

  14. Radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant in the chiral soliton quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Duck, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Second-order radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant from gluon, pion, and sigma meson exchange are calculated in the chiral soliton quark model. Many apparent processes are found not to contribute. The soliton is elastically decoupled from meson radiative corrections which are dominated by a gluon exchange contribution equivalent to a gluonic hybrid component of the nucleon. A 30% radiative reduction of the axial coupling strength is indicated.

  15. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Flynn, Jonathan M.; Izubuchi, Taku; Kawanai, Taichi; Lehner, Christoph; Soni, Amarjit; Van de Water, Ruth S.; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-03-10

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(αsa). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain fB0 = 196.2(15.7) MeV, fB+ = 195.4(15.8) MeV, fBs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, fBs/fB0 = 1.193(59), and fBs/fB+ = 1.220(82), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. In addition, these results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of B-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  16. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantarians, Narbe

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  17. Isgur-Wise function within a modified heavy-light chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Eeg, Jan O.; Kumericki, Kresimir

    2010-04-01

    We consider the Isgur-Wise function {xi}({omega}) within a new modified version of a heavy-light chiral quark model. While early versions of such models gave an absolute value of the slope that was too small, namely {xi}{sup '}(1){approx_equal}-0.4 to -0.3, we show how extended version(s) may lead to values around -1, in better agreement with recent measurements. This is obtained by introducing a new mass parameter in the heavy-quark propagator. We also shortly comment on the consequences for the decay modes B{yields}DD.

  18. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  19. Perterbative O(asa) matching in static heavy and domain-wall light quark system

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa,T.

    2008-07-14

    We discuss the perturbative O(a{sub s}a) matching in the static heavy and domain-wall light quark system. The gluon action is the Iwasaki action and the link smearing is performed in the static heavy action. The chiral symmetry of the light quark realized by using the domain-wall fermion formulation does not prohibit the mixing of the operators at O(a). The application of O(a) improvement to the actual data shows that the B meson decay constant f{sub B}, the matrix elements M{sub B} and the B parameter B{sub B} have non-negligible effects, while the effect on the SU(3) breaking ratio {zeta} is small.

  20. Light-Quark Baryon Spectroscopy within ANL-Osaka Dynamical Coupled-Channels Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Recent results on the study of light-quark baryons with the ANL-Osaka dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) approach are presented, which contain the N^* and Δ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of π N and γ N reactions and the Λ ^* and Σ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of K^- p reactions. A recent application of our DCC approach to neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region is also presented.

  1. Some Possible Grand Unified Preon Models with Light Quarks and Leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Dongsheng; Lu, Gongru

    Three grand unified preon models with light quarks and leptons are presented. All these models have natural family structure at the composite level. One of them can give a very low metacolor scale, ΛMC~3×104 GeV. It is argued that the best choice for a metacolor group is SU(4) and that for a unification group it is SU(9).

  2. Exclusive Rare B ( s, c) Decays in Light-Front Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the exclusive rare {B_sto (K,η^{(')})(ν_{ell}bar{ν_{ell}}, ell^+ell^-)} and {B_cto D_{(s)}(ν_{ell}bar{ν_{ell}}, ell^+ell^-)} ( ℓ = e, μ, τ) decays within the standard model and the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD motivated effective Hamiltonian. The branching ratios and the longitudinal lepton polarization asymmetries are calculated and compared with other theoretical model predictions.

  3. Gluon radiation off hard quarks in a nuclear environment: opacity expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2000-11-01

    We study the relation between the Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peigné-Schiff (BDMPS) and Zakharov formalisms for medium-induced gluon radiation off hard quarks, and the radiation off very few scattering centers. Based on the non-abelian Furry approximation for the motion of hard partons in a spatially extended colour field, we derive a compact diagrammatic and explicitly colour trivial expression for the N th order term of the k⊥ -differential gluon radiation cross section in an expansion in the opacity of the medium. Resumming this quantity to all orders in opacity, we obtain Zakharov's path-integral expression (supplemented with a regularization prescription). This provides a new proof of the equivalence of the BDMPS and Zakharov formalisms which extends previous arguments to the k⊥ -differential cross section. We give explicit analytical results up to third order in opacity for both the gluon radiation cross section of free incoming and of in-medium produced quarks. The N th order term in the opacity expansion of the radiation cross section is found to be a convolution of the radiation associated to N -fold rescattering and a readjustment of the probabilities that rescattering occurs with less than N scattering centers. Both informations can be disentangled by factorizing out of the radiation cross section a term which depends only on the mean free path of the projectile. This allows to infer analytical expressions for the totally coherent and totally incoherent limits of the radiation cross section to arbitrary orders in opacity.

  4. Flavor SU(3) properties of beauty tetraquark states with three different light quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-10-01

    Beauty tetraquark states X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) composed of b bar su d bar , b bar ds u bar , and b bar ud s bar , are unique that all the four valence quarks are different. Although the claim of existence of the first two states by D0 was not confirmed by data from LHCb, the possibility of such states still generated a lot of interests and should be pursued further. Non-observation of X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) states by LHCb may be just due to a still lower production rate than the limit of LHCb or at some different mass ranges. In this work we use light quark SU (3) flavor symmetry as guideline to classify symmetry properties of beauty tetraquark states. The multiplets which contain states with three different light quarks must be one of 6 bar or 15 of SU (3) representations. We study possible decays of such a tetraquark state into a B meson and a light pseudoscalar octet meson by constructing a leading order chiral Lagrangian, and also provide search strategies to determine whether a given tetraquark state of this type belongs to 6 bar or 15. If X (b bar q‧q″ q bar) belongs to 15, there are new doubly charged tetraquark states b bar uu d bar and b bar uu s bar .

  5. On the light quark mass effects in Higgs boson production in gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Kirill; Penin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Production of Higgs bosons at the LHC is affected by the contribution of light quarks, that mediate the gg → Hg transition. Although their impact is suppressed by small Yukawa couplings, it is enhanced by large logarithms of the ratio of the Higgs boson mass or its transverse momentum to light quark masses. We study the origin of this enhancement, focusing on the abelian corrections to gg → Hg amplitudes of the form {({C}_F{α}_s{mathcal{L}}^2)}^n , where mathcal{L}in \\{ ln (s/{m}_b^2),kern0.5em ln ({p}_{perp}^2/{m}_b^2)\\} . We show how these non-Sudakov double logarithmic terms can be resummed to all orders in the strong coupling constant. Interestingly, we find that the transverse momentum dependence of these corrections is very weak due to a peculiar cancellation between different logarithmic terms. Although the abelian part of QCD corrections is not expected to be dominant, it can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections to light quark contributions to Higgs boson production at the LHC.

  6. Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in pp ¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Rao, K; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-05-25

    We present a search for a new heavy particle X produced in association with a top quark, pp[over ¯]→t(X→t[over ¯]q) or pp[over ¯]→t[over ¯](X[over ¯]→tq[over ¯]), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a t[over ¯]+j or t+j resonance in tt[over ¯]+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1) collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (pp[over ¯]→Xt or X[over ¯]t[over ¯]) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for X masses ranging from 200 GeV/c(2) to 800 GeV/c(2), respectively.

  7. CHIRAL LIMIT AND LIGHT QUARK MASSES IN 2+1 FLAVOR DOMAIN WALL QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,E.; LIN, M.

    2007-07-30

    We present results for meson masses and decay constants measured on 24{sup 3} x 64 lattices using the domain wall fermion formulation with an extension of the fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 16 for N{sub f} 2 + 1 dynamical quark flavors. The lightest dynamical meson mass in our set-up is around 331MeV. while partially quenched mesons reach masses as low as 250MeV. The applicability of SU(3) x SU(3) and SU(2) x SU(2) (partially quenched) chiral perturbation theory will be compared and we quote values for the low-energy constants from both approaches. We will extract the average light quark and strange quark masses and use a non-perturbative renormalization technique (RI/MOM) to quote their physical values. The pion and kaon decay constants are determined at those values from our chiral fits and their ratio is used to obtain the CKM-matrix element |V{sub us}|. The results presented here include statistical errors only.

  8. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16 sup 3 times 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A. . Dept. of Physics); Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D. . Supercomputer Computations Research Inst.); Kogut, J.B. . Dept. of Physics); Liu, W. ); Renken, R.L. (University of Central F

    1991-01-01

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical strange'' quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  9. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A.; Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D.; Kogut, J.B.; Liu, W.; Renken, R.L.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sugar, R.L.; Toussaint, D.; Wang, K.C.

    1991-12-31

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical ``strange`` quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  10. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  11. Electroweak properties of octet baryons in a light-cone quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    We study the electroweak properties of ground state octet baryons in a relativistic quark-spectator-diquark model, with a light-front formalism applied to take relativistic effects into account. Our model provides a consistent picture of the electroweak properties of the ground state octet baryons in the low momentum transfer region. The Melosh-Wigner rotation is applied as the transformation relation between spinors in the instant form and front form. Numerical results are presented for the magnetic moments, weak transition charges, and Sachs form factors. Our results are in good agreement with experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  12. Recent results in light-quark meson spectroscopy from Fermilab experiment E-760

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Church, M.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.; Marsh, W.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.

    1994-09-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 light-quark meson spectroscopy data for proton-antiproton annihilation to 3{pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}2{eta}, and 3{eta} in-flight have confirmed the 1500 MeV state at rest seen previously at CERN. Structures above this energy are complex, and preliminary results of amplitude analysis, in progress, for extracting spin quantum numbers show the possibility of nearly degenerate states for some of these structures. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Radiative origin of all quark and lepton masses through dark matter with flavor symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ernest

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental issue of the origin of mass for all quarks and leptons (including Majorana neutrinos) is linked to dark matter, odd under an exactly conserved Z2 symmetry which may or may not be derivable from an U(1)D gauge symmetry. The observable sector interacts with a proposed dark sector which consists of heavy neutral singlet Dirac fermions and suitably chosen new scalars. Flavor symmetry is implemented in a renormalizable context with just the one Higgs doublet (ϕ(+), ϕ(0)) of the standard model in such a way that all observed fermions obtain their masses radiatively through dark matter.

  14. Radiative origin of all quark and lepton masses through dark matter with flavor symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ernest

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental issue of the origin of mass for all quarks and leptons (including Majorana neutrinos) is linked to dark matter, odd under an exactly conserved Z2 symmetry which may or may not be derivable from an U(1)D gauge symmetry. The observable sector interacts with a proposed dark sector which consists of heavy neutral singlet Dirac fermions and suitably chosen new scalars. Flavor symmetry is implemented in a renormalizable context with just the one Higgs doublet (ϕ(+), ϕ(0)) of the standard model in such a way that all observed fermions obtain their masses radiatively through dark matter. PMID:24655241

  15. Extracting the Light Quark Mass Ratio m{sub u}/m{sub d} from Bottomonia Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fengkun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a new method to extract the light quark mass ratio m{sub u}/m{sub d} using the {Upsilon}(4S){yields}h{sub b{pi}}{sup 0}({eta}) bottomonia transitions. The decay amplitudes are dominated by the light quark mass differences, and the corrections from other effects are rather small, allowing for a precise extraction. We also discuss how to reduce the theoretical uncertainty with the help of future experiments. As a by-product, we show that the decay {Upsilon}(4S){yields}h{sub b{eta}} is expected to be a nice channel for searching for the h{sub b} state.

  16. Preliminary measurement of the charged multiplicities in b, c and light quark events from Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately in b, c and light quark (u, d, s) events from Z{sup 0} decays measured in the SLD experiment. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of b and light quark events, and reconstructed charmed mesons were used to select c quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: {anti n}{sub uds} = 20.21 {+-} 0.10 (stat.) {+-} 0.17 (syst.), {anti n}{sub c} = 21.28 {+-} 0.46 (stat.){sub -0.33}{sup +0.38} (syst.) and {anti n}{sub b} = 23.14 {+-} 0.10 (stat.){sub -0.34}{sup +0.35} (syst.), from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of c or b quark events and light quark events: {Delta}{anti n}{sub c} = 1.07 {+-} 0.47 (stat.){sub -0.30}{sup +0.36} (syst.) and {Delta}{anti n}{sub b} = 2.93 {+-} 0.14 (stat.){sub -0.29}{sup +0.30} (syst.). We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with perturbative QCD predictions. These combined results are in agreement with the QCD expectations and disfavor the hypothesis of flavor-independent fragmentation.

  17. Scalar K{pi} form factor and light-quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Jamin, Matthias; Oller, Jose Antonio; Pich, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Recent experimental improvements on K-decay data allow for a precise extraction of the strangeness-changing scalar K{pi} form factor and the related strange scalar spectral function. On the basis of this scalar as well as the corresponding pseudoscalar spectral function, the strange quark mass is determined to be m{sub s}(2 GeV)=92{+-}9 MeV. Further taking into account chiral perturbation theory mass ratios, the light up and down quark masses turn out to be m{sub u}(2 GeV)=2.7{+-}0.4 MeV as well as m{sub d}(2 GeV)=4.8{+-}0.5 MeV. As a by-product, we also find a value for the Cabibbo angle |V{sub us}|=0.2236(29) and the ratio of meson decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}=1.203(16). Performing a global average of the strange mass by including extractions from other channels as well as lattice QCD results yields m{sub s}(2 GeV)=94{+-}6 MeV.

  18. Viability of carbon-based life as a function of the light quark mass.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G

    2013-03-15

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars that have reached the red giant stage. The close proximity of this state to the triple-alpha threshold is needed for the production of carbon, oxygen, and other elements necessary for life. We investigate whether this life-essential condition is robust or delicately fine-tuned by measuring its dependence on the fundamental constants of nature, specifically the light quark mass and the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. We show that there exist strong correlations between the alpha-particle binding energy and the various energies relevant to the triple-alpha process. We derive limits on the variation of these fundamental parameters from the requirement that sufficient amounts of carbon and oxygen be generated in stars. We also discuss the implications of our results for an anthropic view of the Universe. PMID:25166526

  19. Cosmic ultraviolet background radiation and zodiacal light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Hartig, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the diffuse cosmic UV background in the 1700-2850-A range are presented. In agreement with previous results, the data have resulted in the detection at high Galactic latitude of an intensity of 300 + or - 100 photons/sq cm s sr A at 1800 A without correction for starlight or airglow, a similar intensity over the 1900-2500-A range after correction for measured airglow, and a similar intensity over the 2500-2800-A range after correction for zodiacal light. It is suggested that this radiation may originate partly in line radiation from a Galactic halo and partly from extragalactic sources, perhaps the integrated light of distant galaxies.

  20. Non-perturbative dynamics of the heavy-light quark system in the non-recoil limit

    SciTech Connect

    N. Brambilla; A. Vairo

    1997-03-01

    Starting from the relativistic gauge-invariant quark-antiquark Green function the authors obtain the relevant interaction in the one-body limit, which can be interpreted as the kernel of a non-perturbative Dirac equation. They study this kernel in different kinematic regions, reproducing, in particular, for heavy quark the potential case and sum rules results. They discuss the relevance of the result for heavy-light mesons and the relation with the phenomenological Dirac equations used up to now in the literature.

  1. Measurement of the charged multiplicities of b, c and light quark events from Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    The SLD Collaboration

    1995-06-01

    Average charged multiplicities have been measured separately for {ital b, c} and light quark ({ital u, d, s}) events from Z{sup 0} decays at SLD. Impact parameters of charged tracks were used to select enriched samples of {ital b} and light quark events. We measured the charged multiplicities: {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital uds}} = 19.80 {+-} 0.09 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.57 ({ital syst}), {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital c}} = 21.17 {+-} 0.44 ({ital stat}) {+-} 1.01 ({ital syst}) and {bar {ital n}}{sub {ital b}}{+-}23.14 {+-} 0.09 ({ital stat}) {+-} 1.03 ({ital syst}) (PRELIMINARY), from which we derived the differences between the total average charged multiplicities of {ital c} or {ital b} quark events and light quark events: {delta}{bar {ital n}}{sub {ital c}} = 1.37 {+-} 0.45 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.86 ({ital syst}) and {delta}{bar {ital n}}{sub {ital b}} = 3.34 {+-} 0. 13 ({ital stat}) {+-} 0.77 ({ital syst}) (PRELIMINARY). We compared these measurements with those at lower center-of-mass energies and with QCD predictions.

  2. Gauge U(1) dark symmetry and radiative light fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kownacki, Corey; Ma, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    A gauge U (1) family symmetry is proposed, spanning the quarks and leptons as well as particles of the dark sector. The breaking of U (1) to Z2 divides the two sectors and generates one-loop radiative masses for the first two families of quarks and leptons, as well as all three neutrinos. We study the phenomenological implications of this new connection between family symmetry and dark matter. In particular, a scalar or pseudoscalar particle associated with this U (1) breaking may be identified with the 750 GeV diphoton resonance recently observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  3. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)32+ and Δ(1600)32+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE PAGES

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    Here, the magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  4. Distribution amplitudes and decay constants for ({pi},K,{rho},K*) mesons in the light-front quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2007-02-01

    We present a calculation of the quark distribution amplitudes (DAs), the Gegenbauer moments, and decay constants for {pi}, {rho}, K, and K* mesons using the light-front quark model. While the quark DA for {pi} is somewhat broader than the asymptotic one, that for {rho} meson is very close to the asymptotic one. The quark DAs for K and K* show asymmetric form due to the flavor SU(3)-symmetry breaking effect. The decay constants for the transversely polarized {rho} and K* mesons (f{sub {rho}}{sup T} and f{sub K*}{sup T}) as well as the longitudinally polarized ones (f{sub {rho}} and f{sub K*}) are also obtained. Our averaged values for f{sub V}{sup T}/f{sub V}, i.e. (f{sub {rho}}{sup T}/f{sub {rho}}){sub av}=0.78 and (f{sub K*}{sup T}/f{sub K*}){sub av}=0.84, are found to be consistent with other model predictions. Especially, our results for the decay constants are in good agreement with the SU(6) symmetry relation, f{sub {rho}}{sub (K*)}{sup T}=(f{sub {pi}}{sub (K)}+f{sub {rho}}{sub (K*)})/2.

  5. Scalar correlator at [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4), Higgs boson decay into bottom quarks, and bounds on the light-quark masses.

    PubMed

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2006-01-13

    We compute, for the first time, the absorptive part of the massless correlator of two quark scalar currents in five loops. As physical applications, we consider the [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4) corrections to the decay rate of the standard model Higgs boson into quarks, as well as the constraints on the strange quark mass following from QCD sum rules.

  6. Quark-Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, R.; Dey, J.; Dey, M.

    2002-07-01

    We explore the scenario where the core of a neutron star (having experienced a transition to an up and down quark phase) shrinks into the equilibrated quark object after reaching strange quark matter saturation density (where a composition of up, down and strange quarks is the favored state of matter). The overlaying (envelope) material free-falls following the core contraction releasing upto 1053 ergs in energy as radiation, partly as a result of the conversion of envelope material to quarks. This phenomena, we named Quark-Nova, leads to a wide variety of ejectae ranging form the Newtonian, ``dirty" to the ultra-relativistic fireball. The mass range of the corresponding compact remnant (the quark star) ranges from less than 0.3 Msun up to a solar mass. We discuss the connection between Quark-Novae and Gamma ray bursts and suggest the recently studied GRB011211 event as a plausible Quark-Nova candidate.

  7. Direct Measurement of the Pion Valence-Quark Momentum Distribution, the Pion Light-Cone Wave Function Squared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Deval, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gerzon, S.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-05-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the pion valence-quark momentum distribution which is related to the square of the pion light-cone wave function. The measurements were carried out using data on diffractive dissociation of 500 GeV/c π- into dijets from a platinum target at Fermilab experiment E791. The results show that the \\|qq¯> light-cone asymptotic wave function describes the data well for Q2~10 \\(GeV/c\\)2 or more. We also measured the transverse momentum distribution of the diffractive dijets.

  8. Light colored scalar as messenger of up-quark flavor dynamics in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsner, Ilja; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Kosnik, Nejc

    2010-11-01

    The measured forward-backward asymmetry in the tt production at the Tevatron might be explained by the additional exchange of a colored weak singlet scalar. Such state appears in some of the grand unified theories, and its interactions with the up-quarks are purely antisymmetric in flavor space. We systematically investigate the resulting impact on charm and top quark physics. The constraints on the relevant Yukawa couplings come from the experimentally measured observables related to D{sup 0}-D{sup 0} oscillations, as well as dijet and single-top production measurements at the Tevatron. After fully constraining the relevant Yukawa couplings, we predict possible signatures of this model in rare top quark decays. In a class of grand unified models we demonstrate how the obtained information enables to constrain the Yukawa couplings of the up-quarks at very high energy scale.

  9. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  10. Charmed and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants from four-flavor lattice QCD with physical light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Komijani, J.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Foley, J.; Levkova, L.; Du, D.; Laiho, J.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kim, J.; Toussaint, D.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Simone, J. N.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.; Neil, E. T.; Sugar, R.

    2014-10-30

    We compute the leptonic decay constants fD+, fDs, and fK+ and the quark-mass ratios mc/ms and ms/ml in unquenched lattice QCD using the experimentally determined value of fπ+ for normalization. We use the MILC highly improved staggered quark ensembles with four dynamical quark flavors—up, down, strange, and charm—and with both physical and unphysical values of the light sea-quark masses. The use of physical pions removes the need for a chiral extrapolation, thereby eliminating a significant source of uncertainty in previous calculations. Four different lattice spacings ranging from a0.06 to 0.15 fm are included in the analysis to control the extrapolation to the

  11. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  12. Antenna subtraction at NNLO with hadronic initial states : double real radiation for initial-initial configurations with two quark flavours.

    SciTech Connect

    Boughezal, R.; Gehrmann-De Ridder, A.; Ritzmann, M.

    2011-02-01

    The antenna subtraction formalism allows to calculate QCD corrections to jet observables. Within this formalism, the subtraction terms are constructed using antenna functions describing all unresolved radiation between a pair of hard radiator partons. In this paper, we focus on the subtraction terms for double real radiation contributions to jet observables in hadron-hadron collisions evaluated at NNLO. An essential ingredient to these subtraction terms are the four-parton antenna functions with both radiators in the initial state. We outline the construction of the double real subtraction terms, classify all relevant antenna functions and describe their integration over the relevant antenna phase space. For the initial-initial antenna functions with two quark flavours, we derive the phase space master integrals and obtain the integrated antennae.

  13. Search for dimuon decays of a light scalar boson in radiative transitions Upsilon-->gammaA0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Petigura, E; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolku, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-08-21

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Upsilon(2S) and Upsilon(3S) resonances: Upsilon(2S,3S)-->gammaA0, A0-->mu+mu-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 < or = mA0 < or = 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10(6) Upsilon(2S) and 122 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the etab meson: B(etab-->mu+mu-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  14. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar Boson in Radiative Transitions Υ→γA0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Petigura, E.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolku, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-08-01

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Υ(2S) and Υ(3S) resonances: Υ(2S,3S)→γA0, A0→μ+μ-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212≤mA0≤9.3GeV in the samples of 99×106 Υ(2S) and 122×106 Υ(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the ηb meson: B(ηb→μ+μ-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  15. Determination of the b-quark Mass and Nonperturbative parameters in Semileptonic and Radiative Penguin Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Kerstin; collaboration, for the BABAR

    2008-01-23

    Knowing the mass of the b-quark is essential to the study of the structure and decays of B mesons as well as to future tests of the Higgs mechanism of mass generation. We present recent preliminary measurements of the b-quark mass and related nonperturbative parameters from moments of kinematic distributions in charmed and charmless semileptonic and radiative penguin B decays. Their determination from charmless semileptonic B decays is the first measurement in this mode. The data were collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center at a center-of-momentum energy of 10:58 GeV.

  16. Nucleon scalar and tensor charges from lattice QCD with light Wilson quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Negele, J. W.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.; Engelhardt, M.; Krieg, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present 2+1 flavor lattice QCD calculations of the nucleon scalar and tensor charges. Using the BMW clover-improved Wilson action with pion masses between 149 and 356 MeV and three source-sink separations between 0.9 and 1.4 fm, we achieve good control over excited-state contamination and extrapolation to the physical pion mass. As a consistency check, we also present results from calculations using unitary domain wall fermions with pion masses between 297 and 403 MeV, and using domain wall valence quarks and staggered sea quarks with pion masses between 293 and 597 MeV.

  17. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors and electroexcitation of low lying nucleon resonances in a light-front relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan Inna, Burkert Volker

    2012-05-01

    We utilize a light-front relativistic quark model (LF RQM) to predict the 3q core contribution to the electroexcitation amplitudes for the {Delta}(1232)P{sub 33}, N(1440)P{sub 11}, N(1520)D{sub 13}, and N(1535)S{sub 11} up to Q{sup 2} = 12 GeV{sup 2}. The parameters of the model have been specified via description of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the approach that combines 3q and pion-cloud contributions in the LF dynamics.

  18. Analytic semi-classical quantization of a QCD string with light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore J. Allen et al.

    2002-08-14

    We perform an analytic semi-classical quantization of the straight QCD string with one end fixed and a massless quark on the other, in the limits of orbital and radial dominant motion. Our results well approximate those of the exact numerical semi-classical quantization as well as our exact numerical canonical quantization.

  19. Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  20. Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop shop. View to east. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Nucleon Resonance Electrocouplings from Light-Front Quark Models at {\\varvec{Q}}^2 up to 12 GeV^2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhovsky, Igor T.; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-08-01

    A relativistic light-front quark model is used to describe both the elastic nucleon and nucleon-Roper transition form factors in a large Q^2 range, up to 35 GeV^2 for the elastic and up to 12 GeV^2 for the resonance case. Relativistic three-quark configurations satisfying the Pauli exclusion principle on the light-front are used for the derivation of the current matrix elements. The Roper resonance is considered as a mixed state of a three-quark core configuration and a molecular N+σ hadron component. Based on this ansatz we obtain a realistic description of both processes, elastic and inelastic, in the sector of positive parity and show that existing experimental data are indicative of a composite structure of the Roper resonance. A useful generalization of this technique is suggested for description of negative parity nucleon resonances 1/2^-, 3/2^-, 5/2^-.

  2. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A.L.; Oldfather, D.E.; Lindner, A.F.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 Gev synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 kev electron gun, 50 Mev linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. Figure 1. ALS floor plan. Pairs of neutron and gamma radiation monitors are shown as dots numbered from 1 to 12. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies.

  3. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  4. Heavy quark signals from radiative corrections to the Z{sup '} boson decay in 3-3-1 models

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2009-10-01

    One-loop corrections to the Z{sup '} decay width are derived and analyzed in the framework of the general form of the 3-3-1 models. We identify two important sources of corrections: oblique corrections associated to the Z{sup '} propagator through vacuum polarizations induced by virtual particle-antiparticle pairs of new heavy quarks J, and vertex corrections to the Z{sup '}qq vertex through virtual exchange of new K{sup Q{sub 1,2}} gauge bosons. Fixing a specific renormalization scheme, we obtain dominant oblique corrections that exhibit a quadratic dependence on the J quark mass, which are absorbed into two oblique parameters: a global parameter {rho}{sub f}{sup '} which modify the Z{sup '} decay width, and a parameter {kappa}{sub f}{sup '} that define effective Z{sup '} couplings. Numerical results in an specific 3-3-1 model gives a strong contribution of the oblique corrections from about 1.3% in the d(s) quark channel to 10.5% in the neutrino channel, for m{sub J}=2 TeV. The vertex corrections contribute to the oblique corrections up to 1.4% for the same channel and m{sub J} value. For pp collisions at the CERN LHC collider, we find that the corrections significantly modify the shape of the cross section distributions for e{sup +}e{sup -} and tt final states, where the distributions including the radiative corrections increases up to 1.23 times the tree-level distribution for the dielectron events and to 1.07 for the top events when m{sub J}=3 TeV.

  5. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  6. Flavor Changing Neutral Coupling Mediated Radiative Top Quark Decays at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Drobnak, Jure; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2010-06-25

    We compute the branching ratios for the rare top quark decays t{yields}c{gamma} and t{yields}cZ mediated by effective flavor changing neutral couplings at next-to-leading order in QCD, including the effects due to operator mixing. After resumming contributions of the order of [{alpha}{sub s}log({Lambda}/m{sub t})]{sup n}, where {Lambda} is the scale at which the effective operators are generated, using renormalization group methods, we compute finite matrix element corrections and study the effects of experimental kinematic cuts on the extracted branching ratios. We find that the t{yields}c{gamma} decay can also be used to probe the effective operators mediating t{yields}cg processes, since the latter can naturally contribute 10% or more to the radiative decay. Conversely, any experimental signal of t{yields}cg would indicate a natural lower bound on t{yields}cZ, {gamma}.

  7. Precise determination of BK and light quark masses in quenched domain-wall QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yousuke; Aoki, Sinya; Taniguchi, Yusuke; Yoshié, Tomoteru

    2008-08-01

    We calculate nonperturbative renormalization factors at hadronic scale for ΔS=2 four-quark operators in quenched domain-wall QCD using the Schrödinger functional method. Combining them with the nonperturbative renormalization group running by the Alpha Collaboration, our result yields the fully nonperturbative renormalization factor, which converts the lattice bare BK to the renormalization group invariant (RGI) B^K. Applying this to the bare BK previously obtained by the CP-PACS Collaboration at a-1≃2,3,4GeV, we obtain B^K=0.782(5)(7) [equivalent to BKM Smacr (NDR,2GeV)=0.565(4)(5) by two-loop running] in the continuum limit, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic due to the continuum extrapolation. Except the quenching error, the total error we have achieved is less than 2%, which is much smaller than the previous ones. Taking the same procedure, we obtain mu,dRGI=5.613(66)MeV and msRGI=147.1(17)MeV [equivalent to mu,dM Smacr (2GeV)=4.026(48)MeV and msM Smacr (2GeV)=105.6(12)MeV by four-loop running] in the continuum limit.

  8. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  9. Constraining the Higgs boson coupling to light quarks in the H →Z Z final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaofu

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the Higgs boson (Yukawa) coupling to quarks in the first two generations in the H →Z Z final states. Deviation of these couplings from the Standard Model values leads to changes in the Higgs boson width and in the cross sections of relevant processes. In the Higgs boson resonance region, an increased light Yukawa coupling leads to an increased Higgs boson width, which in turn leads to a decreased cross section. In the off-shell region, increased Yukawa couplings result in an enhancement of the Higgs boson signal through q q ¯ annihilation. With the assumption of scaling one Yukawa coupling at a time, this study is conceptually simple and yields results with the same order of magnitude as the tightest in the literature. The study is based on results published by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2014, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy √{s }=7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV.

  10. Effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on erythema and pigmentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Lindsay R; Almutawa, Fahad; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on cutaneous erythema, immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning are affected by a variety of factors. Some of these factors include the depth of cutaneous penetration of the specific wavelength, the individual skin type, and the absorption spectra of the different chromophores in the skin. UVB is an effective spectrum to induce erythema, which is followed by delayed tanning. UVA induces immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning. At high doses, UVA (primarily UVA2) can also induce erythema in individuals with skin types I-II. Visible light has been shown to induce erythema and a tanning response in dark skin, but not in fair skinned individuals. Infrared radiation produces erythema, which is probably a thermal effect. In this article we reviewed the available literature on the effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on the skin in regards to erythema and pigmentation. Much remains to be learned on the cutaneous effects of visible light and infrared radiation.

  11. Radiative contributions to quark and lepton masses in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, G.F.

    1982-12-15

    The mass perturbation and the evolution equation of fermion masses are studied in different gauge models on the basis of the Dyson-Schwinger equation. In theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking, we recover the results obtained using the renormalization-group method for momentum scales well above symmetry breaking and obtain new results for energies close to or well below, the symmetry-violating scale, where spontaneous symmetry breaking gives an important contribution to the self-mass of a fermion. We examine the contribution to self-masses in the SU(3) x U(1)/sub em/ gauge theory and in the SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model and discuss the relevance of embedding the standard component model in the structure of SU(5). For asymptotically free grand unified models, the self-masses are individually finite with no constraint on the number of quark or lepton flavors. Within this context we examine the possibility that the proton-neutron mass difference is determined by the very short distance scale associated with the unified theory of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions.

  12. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  13. DAFNE-Light INFN-LNF Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balerna, A.; Cestelli-Guidi, M.; Cimino, R.; Commisso, M.; Grilli, A.; Pietropaoli, M.; Raco, A.; Sciarra, V.; Tullio, V.; Viviani, G.; De Sio, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Hampai, D.; Pace, E.

    2010-06-23

    DAFNE-Light is the Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Rome, Italy). Three beamlines are operational, using in parasitic and dedicated mode the intense photon emission of DAFNE, a 0.51 GeV storage ring with a routinely circulating electron current higher than 1 Ampere. Two of these beamlines--the soft x-ray (DXR1) and UV (DXR2)--use one of the DAFNE wiggler magnets as synchrotron radiation source, while the third beamline SINBAD (Synchrotron Infrared Beamline At DAFNE) collects the radiation from a bending magnet. New XUV bending magnet beamlines are nowadays under construction and the low energy one (35-200 eV) will be ready for commissioning by the end of 2009. A presentation of the facility will be given together with some recent scientific results achieved at SINBAD and DXR1 beamlines.

  14. Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A.

    2011-10-15

    We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

  15. Search for dimuon decays of a light scalar boson in radiative transitions Upsilon-->gammaA0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Petigura, E; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolku, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-08-21

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Upsilon(2S) and Upsilon(3S) resonances: Upsilon(2S,3S)-->gammaA0, A0-->mu+mu-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 < or = mA0 < or = 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10(6) Upsilon(2S) and 122 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the etab meson: B(etab-->mu+mu-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level. PMID:19792717

  16. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  17. Radiative cooling of bulk silicon by incoherent light pump

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutenko, V. K. Bogatyrenko, V. V.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.

    2013-12-23

    In contrast to radiative cooling by light up conversion caused exclusively by a low-entropy laser pump and employing thermally assisted fluorescence/luminescence as a power out, we demonstrate light down conversion cooling by incoherent pumps, 0.47–0.94 μm light emitting diodes, and employing thermal emission (TE) as a power out. We demonstrate ≤3.5 K bulk cooling of Si at 450 K because overall energy of multiple below bandgap TE photons exceeds the energy of a single above bandgap pump photon. We show that using large entropy TE as power out helps avoid careful tuning of an incoherent pump wavelength and cool indirect-bandgap semiconductors.

  18. Effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in vector heavy-light mesons and theory average of the Bc* meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, M.; Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2016-04-01

    We extend earlier investigations of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons to the vector case, using a simple model in the context of the Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter approach. We investigate the effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in a systematic fashion and illustrate and attempt to quantify corrections beyond the phenomenologically very useful and successful rainbow-ladder truncation. In particular we investigate the dressed quark-photon vertex in such a setup and make a prediction for the experimentally as yet unknown mass of the Bc* , which we obtain at 6.334 GeV well in line with predictions from other approaches. Furthermore, we combine a comprehensive set of results from the theoretical literature. The theoretical average for the mass of the Bc* meson is 6.336 ±0.002 GeV .

  19. Determination of light quark masses from the electromagnetic splitting of pseudoscalar meson masses computed with two flavors of domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Thomas; Doi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Yamada, Norikazu

    2007-12-01

    We determine the light quark masses from lattice QCD simulations incorporating the electromagnetic interaction of valence quarks, using the splittings of charged and neutral pseudoscalar meson masses as inputs. The meson masses are calculated on lattice QCD configurations generated by the RBC Collaboration for two flavors of dynamical domain-wall fermions, which are combined with QED configurations generated via quenched noncompact lattice QED. The electromagnetic part of the pion mass splitting is found to be m{sub {pi}{sup +}}-m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}=4.12(21) MeV, where only the statistical error is quoted, and similarly for the kaon, 1.443(55) MeV. Our results for the light quark masses are m{sub u}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=3.02(27)(19) MeV, m{sub d}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=5.49(20)(34) MeV, and m{sub s}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=119.5(56)(74) MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second reflects the uncertainty in our nonperturbative renormalization procedure. By averaging over {+-}e to cancel O(e) noise exactly on each combined gauge field configuration, we are able to work at physical {alpha}=1/137 and obtain very small statistical errors. In our calculation, several sources of systematic error remain, including finite volume, nonzero lattice spacing, chiral extrapolation, quenched QED, and quenched strange quark, which may be more significant than the errors quoted above. We discuss these systematic errors and how to reduce or eliminate them.

  20. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Barta, D. J.; Ignatius, R. W.; Martin, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems.

  1. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants.

    PubMed

    Bula, R J; Morrow, R C; Tibbitts, T W; Barta, D J; Ignatius, R W; Martin, T S

    1991-02-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems.

  2. Instrumentation for remote sensing solar radiation from light aircraft.

    PubMed

    Howard, J A; Barton, I J

    1973-10-01

    The paper outlines the instrumentation needed to study, from a light aircraft, the solar radiation reflected by ground surfaces and the incoming solar radiation. A global shortwave radiometer was mounted on the roof of the aircraft and a specially designed mount was used to support a downward pointing 70-mm aerial camera, a downward pointing narrow-beam pyranometer, and, sometimes, a downward pointing global shortwave pyranometer. Calibration factors were determined for the three pyranometers by comparison with a standard Angstrom compensation pyrheliometer. Results have indicated trends in the albedos of major plant communities and have shown that the calculated albedo values vary according to whether the downward pointing instrument is narrow-beam or global. Comparisons were also made with albedos measured on the ground.

  3. Output squeezed radiation from dispersive ultrastrong light-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchenko, S.; Huppert, S.; Vasanelli, A.; Todorov, Y.; Sirtori, C.; Ciuti, C.; Keller, A.; Coudreau, T.; Milman, P.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the output generation of squeezed radiation of a cavity photon mode coupled to another off-resonant bosonic excitation. By modulating in time their linear interaction, we predict a high degree of output squeezing when the dispersive ultra-strong-coupling regime is achieved, i.e., when the interaction rate becomes comparable to the frequency of the lowest-energy mode. Our paper paves the way to squeezed light generation in frequency domains where the ultrastrong coupling is obtained, e.g., solid-state resonators in the GHz, THz, and mid-IR spectral ranges.

  4. Peregrinations through topics in light scattering and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    In this van de Hulst essay, I have taken the liberty to present a journey through some topics in light scattering and radiative transfer which I feel were major contributions to the field but the number of topics I would like to cover is far more numerous than I have the time or the space to present. I also wanted to share with the reader some heartwarming memories I have of my wonderful friend and truly distinguished colleague Hendrik Christoffel van de Hulst (affectionately known to his colleagues as "Henk") whom I consider to be one of the preeminent scientists of his era.

  5. Naive time-reversal odd phenomena in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from light-cone constituent quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara Pasquini, Peter Schweitzer

    2011-06-01

    We present results for leading-twist azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering due to naively time-reversal odd transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions from the light-cone constituent quark model. We carefully discuss the range of applicability of the model, especially with regard to positivity constraints and evolution effects. We find good agreement with available experimental data from COMPASS and HERMES, and present predictions to be tested in forthcoming experiments at Jefferson Lab.

  6. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  7. Transversity quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transversity quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. Particular attention is paid to comparing our results with the recent experimental extraction of the transversity distributions by Anselmino et al. We also compare our transversity results with earlier spin-independent and helicity quark distributions calculated in the same approach.

  8. Verification of light & radiation field coincidence quality assurance for radiation therapy by using a-Se based DR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Eun-Tae; Choi, Yun-Seon; Cho, Heung-Lae; Ahn, Ki-Jung; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Ji-Na; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Seon; Hong, Ju-Yeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kyo-Tae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hyunjung; Jo, Sun-Mi; Oh, Won-Yong; Jin, Seong-Jin; Cho, Woong

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) recommends measuring the surface field size once a week by using an analog film in order to verify light and radiation field coincidence in the Quality Assurance (QA) of radiotherapy. However, the use of the film does not allow for a quantitative method of evaluation, and measuring the light field with radiation field detectors in a 2D array is difficult. Therefore, we used an amorphous-Se (a-Se) digital radiation detection system to measure the light and radiation fields simultaneously for a quantitative QA system, and the feasibility of using such a system was confirmed by ensuring the coincidence of the light and the radiation field measurements. The characteristics of the analog film and the a-Se digital radiation detection system were compared by delivering to each doses of 100, 10 monitor units(MU) of radiation at a rate of 400 MU/min to a radiation field 100 × 100 mm2 in size from a 100 cm source-surface distance (SSD). A 0.5 mm to 0.6 mm difference was measured in the X-axis, and a 0.3 mm difference was measured in the Y-axis. The difference in the measurements of the coincidence of light and the radiation field was less than 0.3 mm, which is relatively insignificant. These results indicate that the use of an a-Se digital radiation detection system is adequate for quality assurance of radiotherapy using light and radiation field coincidence. In addition, the experiment is considered to have provided valuable results in that the a-Se based digital radiation detection system enables simple and accurate QA for clinical radiation therapy by assessing the coincidence in the alignment of the light and the radiation fields.

  9. Blue Light and Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure from Infant Phototherapy Equipment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Iole; Bogi, Andrea; Picciolo, Francesco; Stacchini, Nicola; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Bellieni, Carlo V

    2015-01-01

    Phototherapy is the use of light for reducing the concentration of bilirubin in the body of infants. Although it has become a mainstay since its introduction in 1958, a better understanding of the efficacy and safety of phototherapy applications seems to be necessary for improved clinical practices and outcomes. This study was initiated to evaluate workers' exposure to Optical Radiation from different types of phototherapy devices in clinical use in Italy. During infant phototherapy the staff monitors babies periodically for around 10 min every hour, and fixation of the phototherapy beam light frequently occurs: almost all operators work within 30 cm of the phototherapy source during monitoring procedures, with most of them commonly working at ≤25 cm from the direct or reflected radiation beam. The results of this study suggest that there is a great variability in the spectral emission of equipments investigated, depending on the types of lamps used and some phototherapy equipment exposes operators to blue light photochemical retinal hazard. Some of the equipment investigated presents relevant spectral emission also in the UVA region. Taking into account that the exposure to UV in childhood has been established as an important contributing factor for melanoma risk in adults and considering the high susceptibility to UV-induced skin damage of the newborn, related to his pigmentary traits, the UV exposure of the infant during phototherapy should be "as low as reasonably achievable," considering that it is unnecessary to the therapy. It is recommended that special safety training be provided for the affected employees: in particular, protective eyewear can be necessary during newborn assistance activities carried out in proximity of some sources. The engineering design of phototherapy equipment can be optimized. Specific requirements for photobiological safety of lamps used in the phototherapy equipment should be defined in the safety product standard for such

  10. On the radiative properties of ice clouds: Light scattering, remote sensing, and radiation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Bi, Lei; Liu, Chao; Yi, Bingqi; Baum, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Presented is a review of the radiative properties of ice clouds from three perspectives: light scattering simulations, remote sensing applications, and broadband radiation parameterizations appropriate for numerical models. On the subject of light scattering simulations, several classical computational approaches are reviewed, including the conventional geometric-optics method and its improved forms, the finite-difference time domain technique, the pseudo-spectral time domain technique, the discrete dipole approximation method, and the T-matrix method, with specific applications to the computation of the single-scattering properties of individual ice crystals. The strengths and weaknesses associated with each approach are discussed. With reference to remote sensing, operational retrieval algorithms are reviewed for retrieving cloud optical depth and effective particle size based on solar or thermal infrared (IR) bands. To illustrate the performance of the current solar- and IR-based retrievals, two case studies are presented based on spaceborne observations. The need for a more realistic ice cloud optical model to obtain spectrally consistent retrievals is demonstrated. Furthermore, to complement ice cloud property studies based on passive radiometric measurements, the advantage of incorporating lidar and/or polarimetric measurements is discussed. The performance of ice cloud models based on the use of different ice habits to represent ice particles is illustrated by comparing model results with satellite observations. A summary is provided of a number of parameterization schemes for ice cloud radiative properties that were developed for application to broadband radiative transfer submodels within general circulation models (GCMs). The availability of the single-scattering properties of complex ice habits has led to more accurate radiation parameterizations. In conclusion, the importance of using nonspherical ice particle models in GCM simulations for climate

  11. Effect of blue light radiation on curcumin-induced cell death of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X. B.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xia, X. S.; Yu, H. P.; Bai, D. Q.; Xiang, J. Y.; Jiang, Y.; Xu, C. S.

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, we have successfully set up a novel blue light source with the power density of 9 mW/cm2 and the wavelength of 435.8 nm and then the novel light source was used to investigate the effect of light radiation on curcumin-induced cell death. The cytotoxicity was investigated 24 h after the treatment of curcumin and blue light radiation together using MTT reduction assay. Nuclear chromatin was observed using a fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst33258 staining. The results showed blue light radiation could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of curcumin on the MCF-7 cells and apoptosis induction. These findings demonstrated that blue light radiation could enhance curcumin-induced cell death of breast cancer cells, suggesting light radiation may be an efficient enhancer of curcumin in the management of breast cancer.

  12. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  13. Search for doubly-heavy dibaryons in a quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Richard, J.-M.; Sorba, P.

    2016-08-01

    We study the stability of hexaquark systems containing two heavy quarks and four light quarks within a simple quark model. No bound or metastable state is found. The reason stems from a delicate interplay between chromoelectric and chromomagnetic effects. Our calculation also provides information about anticharmed pentaquarks that are seemingly unbound in simple quark models.

  14. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Anand, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators. Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size. Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm. Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed. PMID:24320415

  15. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  16. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  17. Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Hegde, P.; Velytsky, A.

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent N{sub t} = 4,6,8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass m{sub q} = 0.1 m{sub s} generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

  18. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S) -> gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2009-06-02

    The fundamental nature of mass is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. The Higgs mechanism is a theoretically appealing way to account for the different masses of elementary particles and implies the existence of a new, yet unseen particle, the Higgs boson. We search for evidence of a light scalar (e.g. a Higgs boson) in the radiative decays of the narrow {Upsilon}(3S) resonance: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such an object appears in extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction product {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) at (0.25 - 5.2) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV. We also set a limit on the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.8% at 90% C.L. The results are preliminary.

  19. Light-induced scattering in laser radiation nonlinear optical limiting based on fullerene-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, Inna M.; Grigor'ev, Vladimir A.; Danilov, Oleg B.; Kalintsev, Alexander G.; Kris'ko, A. V.; Mironova, N. G.; Yur'ev, Michail S.

    2001-03-01

    The contribution of light induced scattering to nonlinear optical limiting is theoretically and experimentally investigated. It is shown that light induced scattering is caused by fine-scale (1 divided by 10 micrometer) inhomogeneities formation, very low (comparable to spontaneous noise) laser beam inhomogeneities can evolve into light induced scattering. The numerical modeling of scattered radiation angular distribution and laser radiation attenuation in optical limiters was performed. The modeling results were compared with the experimental ones.

  20. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  1. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  2. Leptonic-decay-constant ratio f(K+)/f(π+) from lattice QCD with physical light quarks.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Foley, J; Freeman, W; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Kim, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Lightman, M; Osborn, J; Qiu, S; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2013-04-26

    A calculation of the ratio of leptonic decay constants f(K+)/f(π+) makes possible a precise determination of the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements |V(us)|/|V(ud)| in the standard model, and places a stringent constraint on the scale of new physics that would lead to deviations from unitarity in the first row of the CKM matrix. We compute f(K+)/f(π+) numerically in unquenched lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles recently generated that include four flavors of dynamical quarks: up, down, strange, and charm. We analyze data at four lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15 fm with simulated pion masses down to the physical value 135 MeV. We obtain f(K+)/f(π+) = 1.1947(26)(37), where the errors are statistical and total systematic, respectively. This is our first physics result from our N(f) = 2+1+1 ensembles, and the first calculation of f(K+)/f(π+) from lattice-QCD simulations at the physical point. Our result is the most precise lattice-QCD determination of f(K+)/f(π+), with an error comparable to the current world average. When combined with experimental measurements of the leptonic branching fractions, it leads to a precise determination of |V(us)|/|V(ud)| = 0.2309(9)(4) where the errors are theoretical and experimental, respectively.

  3. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  4. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  5. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  6. Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

  7. Properties of Doubly Heavy Baryons in the Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R.N.; Galkin, V.O.; Martynenko, A.P.

    2005-05-01

    Mass spectra and semileptonic decay rates of baryons consisting of two heavy (b or c) and one light quark are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model. The doubly heavy baryons are treated in the quark-diquark approximation. The ground and excited states of both the diquark and quark-diquark bound systems are considered. The quark-diquark potential is constructed. The light quark is treated completely relativistically, while the expansion in the inverse heavy-quark mass is used. The weak transition amplitudes of heavy diquarks bb and bc going, respectively, to bc and cc are explicitly expressed through the overlap integrals of the diquark wave functions in the whole accessible kinematic range. The relativistic baryon wave functions of the quark-diquark bound system are used for the calculation of the decay matrix elements, the Isgur-Wise function, and decay rates in the heavy-quark limit.

  8. Shining a gluon beam through quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Ho, Ying-Yu; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2012-06-01

    We compute the energy density radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. If it were in vacuum, this quark would radiate a beam of strongly coupled radiation whose angular distribution has been characterized and is very similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in electrodynamics. Here, we watch this beam of gluons getting quenched by the strongly coupled plasma. We find that a beam of gluons of momenta ˜q≫πT is attenuated rapidly, over a distance ˜q1/3(πT)-4/3 in a plasma with temperature T. As the beam propagates through the plasma at the speed of light, it sheds trailing sound waves with momenta ≲πT. Presumably these sound waves would thermalize in the plasma if they were not hit soon after their production by the next pulse of gluons from the lighthouselike rotating quark. At larger and larger q, the trailing sound wave becomes less and less prominent. The outward-going beam of gluon radiation itself shows no tendency to spread in angle or to shift toward larger wavelengths, even as it is completely attenuated. In this regard, the behavior of the beam of gluons which we analyze is reminiscent of the behavior of jets produced in heavy ion collisions at the LHC which lose a significant fraction of their energy without appreciable change in their angular distribution or their momentum distribution as they plow through the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions.

  9. Radiative Trasnfer Calculation Of Light Curves And Spectra For Type Ia Sne Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Soma; Baron, E.; Timmes, F.; Hauschildt, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the light curves and spectra from a suite of Type Ia supernovae models, ranging from standard single degenerate scenarios to double degenerate collisions. We use a fully relativistic and time dependent radiative transfer code PHOENIX for our calculations which is time dependent in both radiative transfer and rate equation. Simple hydrodynamic calculation is used to treat conservation of energy of the gas and the radiation together and also allow different time-scales for gas and radiation. Between two time steps for the calculation of the light curve, the correct distribution of total energy change among gas and radiation is obtained by iteratively solving for the radiative transfer equation and hence the new temperature in the new time step. In our work we explore systematic relationships between the mass of 56ni mass produced, the mass of silicon group elements produced, the white dwarf metallicity, and the mass of unburned material

  10. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-24

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  11. Common characteristics of synchrotron radiation and light leaking from a bent optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Ray, C.

    2016-07-01

    Light leaking from a bent optical fiber shares many properties with synchrotron radiation : in ray optics, both lights are emitted tangentially to a light cylinder; in wave optics, the emission mechanism involves a tunnel effect. The angular distributions of these two radiations are studied in parallel and found to be similar. The same is done for the impact parameter distributions. The latter show interference fringes of the Airy function type. The far field escaped from the fiber is calculated with the Volume Current Method. An optical system observing the impact parameter profile is proposed.

  12. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  13. On Einstein, Light Quanta, Radiation, and Relativity in 1905

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur I.

    1976-01-01

    Analyzes section 8 of Einstein's relativity paper of 1905, "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies," in its historical context. Relates this section to the rest of the relativity paper, to the genesis of relativity theory, and to contemporaneous work on radiation theory. (Author/MLH)

  14. Radiation monitoring policy at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.; Heinzelman, K.; Perdue, G.

    1998-02-04

    When the accelerator first began operation it was decided that, until we had the necessary dosimetry data to decide otherwise, we would badge the entire worker and experimental population. Each person was issued a dosimetry badge that contained 4 TLD elements. Badges were processed on a monthly basis. After three years of analyzing a total of 65,000 TLD elements, the decision was made to modify the radiation monitoring policy at the ALS. Only those individuals in the workforce that have any potential for exposure, no matter how small, would be badged. Subsequently, DOE conducted an independent review of the ALS radiation monitoring and dosimetry program. This review concluded that the ALS program, if expanded as proposed, would be adequate under the 10 CFR 835 Rule to establish radiation exposures to an acceptable level of confidence. The review team recommended the ALS provide more comprehensive documentation on the basis for its radiation protection and monitoring program. This document describes the technical justification for that program.

  15. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  16. Performance of light sources and radiation sensors under low gravity realized by parabolic airplane flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro

    A fundamental study was conducted to establish an experimental system for space farming. Since to ensure optimal light for plant cultivation in space is of grave importance, this study examined the performance of light sources and radiation sensors under microgravity conditions created during the parabolic airplane flight. Three kinds of light sources, a halogen bulb, a fluorescent tube, and blue and red LEDs, and ten models of radiation sensors available in the market were used for the experiment. Surface temperature of the light sources, output signals from the radiation sensors, spectroscopic characteristics were measured at the gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 1.8 G for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the performance of the halogen lamp was affected the most by the gravity level among the three light sources. Under the microgravity conditions which do not raise heat convection, the temperature of the halogen lamp rose and the output of the radiation sensors increased. Spectral distributions of the halogen lamp indicated that peak wavelength appeared the highest at the level of 0.01G, which contributed to the increase in light intensity. In the case of red and blue LEDs, which are promising light sources in space farming, the temperature of both LED chips rose but irradiance from red LED increased and that from blue LED decreased under microgravity conditions due to the different thermal characteristics.

  17. From light- to heavy-quark fragmentation in jets: current measurements in pp collisions with the ALICE detector and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchin, C.; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The goal of the ALICE experiment at the LHC is to investigate the properties of the high-density state of strongly-interacting matter produced in Pb-Pb collisions. Partons propagating in a coloured medium interact with it leading to a softening of the parton pT spectrum. The parton fragmentation function can be influenced by in-medium interactions leading to particle dependent modifications. Fragmentation function measurements in pp collisions are fundamental as reference for the Pb-Pb measurements and per se in order to constrain fragmentation models. The jet fragmentation into charged particles, pions, kaons, and protons measured by ALICE in pp collisions are presented. Different PYTHIA tunes are challenged in reproducing jet fragmentation into light particles. The measurement of the fragmentation of charm into heavier hadrons like the D mesons is being explored as well. The first studies and the perspectives for the LHC-Run2 are reported.

  18. Physic of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However, recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that overlineu < overlined in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  19. Physics of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-03-10

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However,recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that (bar u) < (bar d) in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  20. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear matter at extremely high

  1. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.

  2. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC. PMID:22989198

  3. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  4. Improved light extraction with nano-particles offering directional radiation diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanin, A.; Hugonin, J. P.; Besbes, M.; Lalanne, P.

    2014-01-13

    We propose a unique approach for light extraction, using engineered nano-particles to efficiently decouple the light guided in transverse-magnetic guided modes into free-space radiation modes that leak out normally to the thin-film stacks. The underlying mechanism takes advantage of a small electric field variation at the nano-particle scale and induces a “polarization conversion,” which renders the induced dipole moment perpendicular to the polarization of the incident light. Our analysis is supported by 2D fully vectorial computational results. Potential applications for light emitting or photovoltaic devices are outlined.

  5. Calcium quarks.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Bunch-Length Monitor using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. One of the most critical diagnostic devices is the bunch length monitor (BLM), which is to be installed right after each compressor utilizing coherent radiation from the last bending magnet. We describe the components and the optical layout of such a BLM. Based on the setup geometry, we discuss some issues about the coherent radiation signal.

  7. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with Respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Kashin, A.; Margarian, A.; Bartalini, O.; Bellini, V.; Castoldi, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Didelez, J.-P.; di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Giusa, A.; Guidal, M.; Hourany, E.; Knyazyan, S.; Kouznetsov, V.; Kunne, R.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lleres, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Moricciani, D.; Nedorezov, V.; Perrin, C.; Rebreyend, D.; Russo, G.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Sperduto, M.-L.; Sutera, M.-C.; Turinge, A.

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable one to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations Δc(θ)/c<3×10-12, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  8. Frequency of light-flashes induced by Cerenkov radiation from heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Mcnulty, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The expected frequency was calculated for light flashes induced in the dark-adapted eye by Cerenkov radiation from the flux of heavy nuclei that exists in space beyond the geomagnetic field. The expected frequency of light flashes depends on the threshold number of photons that must be absorbed in a rod cluster. The results of the calculation are presented as a curve of the mean frequency of light flashes versus the threshold number of absorbed photons. The results are not sensitive to variations in the path length from 5 to 15 grams per square centimeter of water-equivalent before the nucleus reaches the retina. Calculations were based on the fluxes and energy spectra of galactic cosmic ray nuclei of helium to iron, measured at a time of minimum solar modulation. The expected light flash frequencies induced by Cerenkov radiation are consistent with the frequencies reported by the astronauts on Apollo missions 11 through 14.

  9. Observation of strong radiation pressure forces from squeezed light on a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy B.; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José; Teufel, John D.

    2016-07-01

    In quantum-enhanced sensing, non-classical states are used to improve the sensitivity of a measurement. Squeezed light, in particular, has proved a useful resource in enhanced mechanical displacement sensing, although the fundamental limit to this enhancement due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle has not been encountered experimentally. Here we use a microwave cavity optomechanical system to observe the squeezing-dependent radiation pressure noise that necessarily accompanies any quantum enhancement of the measurement precision and ultimately limits the measurement noise performance. By increasing the measurement strength so that radiation pressure forces dominate the thermal motion of the mechanical oscillator, we exploit the optomechanical interaction to implement an efficient quantum nondemolition measurement of the squeezed light. Thus, our results show how the mechanical oscillator improves the measurement of non-classical light, just as non-classical light enhances the measurement of the motion.

  10. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-06-15

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma}. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  11. Gamma radiation and photospheric white-light flare continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recent gamma-ray observations of solar flares have provided a better means for estimating the heating of the solar atmosphere by energetic protons. This type of heating has been suggested as the explanation of the continuum emission of the white-light flare. The effects on the photosphere of high-energy particles capable of producing the intense gamma-ray emission observed in the flare of July 11, 1978, are analyzed. A simple energy-balance argument is used, and hydrogen ionization is taken into account. It is found that energy deposition increases with height for the inferred proton spectra and is not strongly dependent upon the assumed angle of incidence. At the top of the photosphere, the computed energy inputs fall in the range 10-100 ergs/cu cm-s.

  12. On the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current in semiconductor light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyeong Won; Shim, Jong-In; Shin, Dong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    While there have been many discussions on the standard Si pn-diodes, little attention has been paid and confusion still arises on the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current in semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this letter, we theoretically demonstrate and experimentally confirm by using blue and infrared semiconductor LEDs that the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current is unity especially for low-current-density ranges. We utilize the data of internal quantum efficiency measured by the temperature-dependent electroluminescence to separate the radiative current component from the total current.

  13. Study of the radiative pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-04-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of {pi}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F{sub V,A}) for the {pi}{yields}{gamma} transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  14. The role of coccoliths in protecting Emiliania huxleyi against stressful light and UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juntian; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai G.; Zhao, Wenyan; Gao, Kunshan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Coccolithophores are a group of phytoplankton species which cover themselves with small scales (coccoliths) made of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The reason why coccolithophores form these calcite platelets has been a matter of debate for decades but has remained elusive so far. One hypothesis is that they play a role in light or UV protection, especially in surface dwelling species like Emiliania huxleyi, which can tolerate exceptionally high levels of solar radiation. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by culturing a calcified and a naked strain under different light conditions with and without UV radiation. The coccoliths of E. huxleyi reduced the transmission of visible radiation (400-700 nm) by 7.5 %, that of UV-A (315-400 nm) by 14.1 % and that of UV-B (280-315 nm) by 18.4 %. Growth rates of the calcified strain (PML B92/11) were about 2 times higher than those of the naked strain (CCMP 2090) under indoor constant light levels in the absence of UV radiation. When exposed to outdoor conditions (fluctuating sunlight with UV radiation), growth rates of calcified cells were almost 3.5 times higher compared to naked cells. Furthermore, the relative electron transport rate was 114 % higher and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was 281 % higher in the calcified compared to the naked strain, implying higher energy transfer associated with higher NPQ in the presence of calcification. When exposed to natural solar radiation including UV radiation, the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II was only slightly reduced in the calcified strain but strongly reduced in the naked strain. Our results reveal an important role of coccoliths in mitigating light and UV stress in E. huxleyi.

  15. Light attraction in endangered procellariiform birds: Reduction by shielding upward radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.R.; Sincock, J.L.; Hailman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Autumnal attraction to man-made lighting causes heavy mortality in fledgling Hawaiian seabirds: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli), dark-rumped petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis), and band-rumpted storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro). These threatened, endangered and rare species (respectively) approach and circle lights on their first flight from mountain nesting colonies on the island of Kauai to the sea. Lights of the largest resort were shielded to prevent upward radiation on alternate nights during 2 fledgling seasons. Shielding decreased attraction by nearly 40%. Most attraction occurred 1-4 h after sunset. Full moon dramatically decreased attraction, a phenomenon that has both theoretical and management implications.

  16. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  17. Cloud shortwave radiative effect and cloud properties estimated from airborne measurements of transmitted and reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Samuel E.; Redemann, Jens; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Kacenelenbogen, Meloë; Shinozuka, Yohei; Flynn, Connor; Russell, Philip; Schmid, Beat; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; Song, Shi

    2015-04-01

    Surface cloud radiative effect, or the perturbation of sunlight by clouds, is often estimated by cloud properties retrieved from reflected sunlight, however transmission-based retrievals may lead to a more representative surface radiative effect than reflection-based counterparts. Transmitted light interacts with cloud particles throughout the vertical extent of the cloud, while reflected light, commonly used for satellite remote sensing of clouds, is more influenced by the top-most cloud particles. We showcase the difference in measurement-based estimates of cloud radiative effect at the surface when using transmitted light instead of reflected light for particular cases during recent field missions. Along with cloud radiative effect, we present the retrieved cloud properties based on light transmitted and reflected by clouds in the Gulf of Mexico, sampled during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), and in the Gulf of Maine, sampled during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). To quantify cloud properties from transmitted shortwave radiation, a new retrieval utilizing spectrally resolved measurements is employed. Spectral features in shortwave radiation transmitted through clouds are sensitive to changes in cloud properties including cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase. The absorption and scattering of light by liquid water and ice clouds result in shifts in spectral slopes, curvatures, maxima, and minima of cloud-transmitted radiance. A new framework is introduced to quantify these spectral features that are observed in measured and modeled transmittance. This new framework consists of 15 parameters that are independent of spectrally neutral variations in radiometric calibration quantifying spectral slopes, derivatives, spectral curvature calculations, and ratios. These parameters are used to retrieve cloud properties from measurements of zenith radiance

  18. B -meson decay constants from 2+1 -flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N. H.; Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ290MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the

  19. QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Datta, Saumen; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Sugar, Robert

    2001-09-01

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks -- two light and one strange -- and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a by-product we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0{sup ++} (a{sub 0}) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  20. On meson melting in the quark medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadafan, K. Bitaghsir; Azimfard, E.

    2012-10-01

    We consider a heavy quark-antiquark (qq¯) pair as a heavy meson in the medium composed of light quarks and gluons. By using the AdS/CFT correspondence, the properties of this system are investigated. In particular, we study the inter-quark distance and it is shown that the mechanism of melting in the quark-gluon plasma and in the hadronic phase is the same. It is found that by considering finite-coupling corrections, the inter-quark distance of a heavy meson decreases. As a result a heavy meson like J/ψ will melt at higher temperatures. By considering rotating heavy mesons, we discuss melting of exited states like χc and ψ'.

  1. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    PubMed

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  2. Radiation from relativistic electrons in "light" and in conventional undulators. Classical and quantum approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strokov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    A photon spectrum of undulator radiation (UR) is calculated in the semi-classical approach. The UR intensity spectrum is determined by an electron trajectory in the undulator neglecting by energy losses for radiation. Using the Planck's law, the UR photon spectrum can be calculated from the classical intensity spectrum both for linear and nonlinear regimes. The radiation of an electron in a field of strong electromagnetic wave (radiation in the "light" undulator) is considered in the quantum electromagnetic frame. Comparison of results obtained by both approaches has been shown that UR spectra in the whole cone coincide with high accuracy for the case x<<1. Characteristics of the collimated UR beam were simulated with taking into account the discrete process of photon emission along an electron trajectory in both kinds of undulators.

  3. Biological Effects of Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation and Vitamin D for Health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Humans evolved in sunlight and had depended on sunlight for its life giving properties that was appreciated by our early ancestors. However, for more than 40 years the lay press and various medical and dermatology associations have denounced sun exposure because of its association with increased risk for skin cancer. The goal of this review is to put into perspective the many health benefits that have been associated with exposure to sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB), visible and infrared radiation.

  4. Infrared light-emitting diode radiation causes gravitropic and morphological effects in dark-grown oat seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. F.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Chapman, D. K.; Deitzer, G. F.

    1996-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa cv Seger) seedlings were irradiated with IR light-emitting diode (LED) radiation passed through a visible-light-blocking filter. Infrared LED irradiated seedlings exhibited differences in growth and gravitropic response when compared to seedlings grown in darkness at the same temperature. Thus, the oat seedlings in this study were able to detect IR LED radiation. These findings call into question the use of IR LED as a safe-light for some photosensitive plant response experiments. These findings also expand the defined range of wavelengths involved in radiation-gravity (light-gravity) interactions to include wavelengths in the IR region of the spectrum.

  5. New mechanism for quark energy loss.

    PubMed

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Fernández, Daniel; Mateos, David

    2010-04-30

    We show that a heavy quark moving sufficiently fast through a quark-gluon plasma may lose energy by Cherenkov-radiating mesons. We demonstrate that this takes place in all strongly coupled, large-N{c} plasmas with a gravity dual. The energy loss is exactly calculable in these models despite being an O(1/N{c}) effect. We discuss implications for heavy-ion collision experiments. PMID:20482103

  6. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  7. Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media: 1. Theory of spectral Vector Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceolato, Romain; Riviere, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media has recently attracted growing interests for various applications due to the production of directional broadband light sources. Here the spectral polarimetric light-scattering signatures of particulate media are simulated using a numerical model based on the spectral Vector Radiative Transfer Equation (VRTE). A microphysical analysis is conducted to understand the dependence of the light-scattering signatures upon the microphysical parameters of particles. We reveal that depolarization from multiple scattering results in remarkable spectral and directional features, which are simulated by our model over a wide spectral range from visible to near-infrared. We propose to use these features to improve the inversion of the scattering problem in the fields of remote sensing, astrophysics, material science, or biomedical.

  8. Biological Effects of Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation and Vitamin D for Health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Humans evolved in sunlight and had depended on sunlight for its life giving properties that was appreciated by our early ancestors. However, for more than 40 years the lay press and various medical and dermatology associations have denounced sun exposure because of its association with increased risk for skin cancer. The goal of this review is to put into perspective the many health benefits that have been associated with exposure to sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB), visible and infrared radiation. PMID:26977036

  9. Measurement of angular parameters of divergent optical radiation by light diffraction on sound

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N

    2010-12-09

    A method is proposed to measure the scattering angle of optical radiation, the method employing two Bragg diffraction processes in which divergent optical radiation propagates close to the optical axis of a uniaxial crystal, while the acoustic wave - orthogonally to this axis. The method does not require additional angular tuning of the acousto-optic cell. We suggest using a mask to measure the light divergence that is larger than the angle of Bragg scattering. The method can be used to measure the size of the polished glass plate inhomogeneities. (laser applications and other aspects of quantum electronics)

  10. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  11. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  12. Estimation of effective day length at any light intensity using solar radiation data.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Masana; Shimizu, Hideyasu

    2011-11-01

    The influence of day length on living creatures differs with the photosensitivity of the creature; however, the possible sunshine duration (N(0)) might be an inadequate index of the photoperiod for creatures with low light sensitivity. To address this issue, the authors tried to estimate the effective day length, i.e., the duration of the photoperiod that exceeds a certain threshold of light intensity. Continual global solar radiation observation data were gathered from the baseline surface radiation network (BSRN) of 18 sites from 2004 to 2007 and were converted to illuminance data using a luminous efficiency model. The monthly average of daily photoperiods exceeding each defined intensity (1 lx, 300 lx, … 20,000 lx) were calculated [defined as Ne(() (lux) ())]. The relationships between the monthly average of global solar radiation (Rs), N(0), and Ne(() (lux) ()) were investigated. At low light intensity (<500 lx), Ne(() (lux) ()) were almost the same as N(0). At high light intensity (>10,000 lx), Ne(() (lux) ()) and Rs showed a logarithmic relationship. Using these relationships, empirical models were derived to estimate the effective day length at different light intensities. According to the validation of the model, the effective day length for any light intensity could be estimated with an accuracy of less than 11% of the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) in the estimation of the monthly base photoperiod. Recently, a number of studies have provided support for a link between day length and some diseases. Our results will be useful in further assessing the relationships between day length and these diseases.

  13. Photodegradation of bisphenol A polycarbonate under blue light radiation and its effect on optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.; van Driel, W. D.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Deeben, P.; Boutelje, M.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, the degradation mechanisms of Bisphenol A Polycarbonate (BPA-PC) plates under blue light radiation are studied. The BPA-PC plates are used both in light conversion carriers in LED modules and encapsulantes in LED packages. Optical degradation of the products is mainly due to the degradation of BPA-PC encapsulants under blue light radiation. In this study, BPA-PC plates are irradiated with blue light at elevated temperature of 140 °C for a period up to 1920 h. Optical and chemical properties of the photo-aged plates were studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FTIR-ATR spectrometer, integrated sphere, and Lambda 950 spectrophotometer. The results show that increasing the exposure time leads to the discoloration, loss of optical properties, decrease of light transmission, decrease in the relative radiant power value, and increase in the yellowing index (YI) of BPA-PC plates. The results also show that there are two stages in the yellowing of polycarbonate plates. The first stage is the so-called induction period in which there is no major change in the value of YI and the rate of yellowing is very slow. This stage takes until 500 h, followed by the second yellowing regime, where the yellowing is accelerated and the rate of yellowing is comparatively faster. Both photo-Fries and photo-oxidation products are identified as the mechanisms of photo-degradation, with photo-Fries predominating as ageing time increases.

  14. Direct measurement of the top quark charge at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Buice, M.; Orr, Lynne H.

    2001-11-01

    We consider photon radiation in t¯t events at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as a tool to measure the electric charge of the top quark. We analyze the contributions of t¯tγ production and radiative top quark decays to pp(-)-->γl+/-νb¯bjj, assuming that both b quarks are tagged. With 20 fb-1 at the Tevatron, the possibility that the ``top quark'' discovered in run I is actually an exotic charge -4/3 quark can be ruled out at the ~95% confidence level. At the CERN LHC, it will be possible to determine the charge of the top quark with an accuracy of about 10%.

  15. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  16. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use. PMID:26960126

  17. Multiple scattering of polarized light: comparison of Maxwell theory and radiative transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Voit, Florian; Hohmann, Ansgar; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2012-04-01

    For many research areas in biomedical optics, information about scattering of polarized light in turbid media is of increasing importance. Scattering simulations within this field are mainly performed on the basis of radiative transfer theory. In this study a polarization sensitive Monte Carlo solution of radiative transfer theory is compared to exact Maxwell solutions for all elements of the scattering Müller matrix. Different scatterer volume concentrations are modeled as a multitude of monodisperse nonabsorbing spheres randomly positioned in a cubic simulation volume which is irradiated with monochromatic incident light. For all Müller matrix elements effects due to dependent scattering and multiple scattering are analysed. The results are in overall good agreement between the two methods with deviations related to dependent scattering being prominent for high volume concentrations and high scattering angles.

  18. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 ..mu..m. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Effect of laser radiation on living systems: Role of light coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, S. S.; Ulianova, O. V.

    2010-08-01

    The influence of spatial and temporal coherence, as well as speckle dynamics, on animal organisms is studied in detail. Our theoretical and experimental studies reveal no biophysical evidence of the influence of light coherence on living systems at any level, as well as no specific effects caused by laser radiation. The effects of laser therapy used for treatment of a wide range of diseases of humans require further detailed investigation and possibly a revision of the existing concept.

  20. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  1. Quantum optomechanical correlations induced by radiation pressure between light and mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briant, T.; Verlot, P.; Tavernarakis, A.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Heidmann, A.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation pressure exerted by light in interferometric measurements is responsible for displacements of mirrors which appear as an additional back-action noise and limit the sensitivity of the measurement. We experimentally study these effects by monitoring in a very high-finesse optical cavity the displacements of a mirror with a sensitivity at the 10-20m/√Hz level. This unique sensitivity is a step towards the first observation of the fundamental quantum effects of radiation pressure and the resulting standard quantum limit in interferometric measurements. Our experiment may become a powerful facility to test quantum noise reduction schemes, and we already have demonstrated radiation-pressure induced correlations between two optical beams sent into the same moving mirror cavity. Our scheme can be extended down to the quantum level and has applications both in high-sensitivity measurements and in quantum optics.

  2. Radiation Protection Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Front End Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Vollaire, J.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; Leitner, M.Santana; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Front End Enclosure (FEE) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a shielding housing located between the electron dump area and the first experimental hutch. The upstream part of the FEE hosts the commissioning diagnostics for the FEL beam. In the downstream part of the FEE, two sets of grazing incidence mirror and several collimators are used to direct the beam to one of the experimental stations and reduce the bremsstrahlung background and the hard component of the spontaneous radiation spectrum. This paper addresses the beam loss assumptions and radiation sources entering the FEE used for the design of the FEE shielding using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The beam containment system prevents abnormal levels of radiations inside the FEE and ensures that the beam remains in its intended path is also described.

  3. A study of electric dipole radiation via scattering of polarized laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Natthi L.; Behringer, Ernest R.; Crombez, Rene C.

    2003-12-01

    We have developed an advanced undergraduate experiment to explore electric dipole radiation in the optical frequency domain. A polarized laser beam is used to illuminate an aqueous suspension of skim milk, and the light scattered from the suspension is measured in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam as a function of the angle θ with respect to the polarization direction and as a function of the perpendicular distance R from the laser beam. When the length of the scattering region, d, is much smaller than R, the measurements agree very well with the sin2 θ/R2 dependence of electric dipole radiation. Increasing the scatterer concentration increases the background of multiply scattered light and decreases the degree of polarization of the scattered light with no appreciable change in the observed sin2 θ/R2 dependence. We discuss variations of the experiment for different instructional needs and describe how an understanding of dipole radiation helps students to appreciate a number of optical phenomena.

  4. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  5. Heavy-quark physics in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Heavy quarks can expose new symmetries and novel phenomena in QCD not apparent in ordinary hadronic systems. In these lectures I discuss the use of effective-Lagrangian and light-cone Fock methods to analyze exclusive heavy hadron decays such as {Upsilon} {yields} p{bar p} and B {yields} {pi}{pi}, and also to derive effective Schroedinger and Dirac equations for heavy quark systems. Two contributions to the heavy quark structure functions of the proton and other light hadrons are identified: an extrinsic'' contribution associated with leading twist QCD evolution of the gluon distribution, and a higher twist intrinsic'' contribution due to the hardness of high-mass fluctuations of multi-gluon correlations in hadronic wavefunctions. A non-perturbative calculation of the heavy quark distribution of a meson in QCD in one space and one time is presented. The intrinsic higher twist contributions to the pion and proton structure functions can dominate the hadronic production of heavy quark systems at large longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and give anomalous contributions to the quark structure functions of ordinary hadrons at large x{sub bj}. I also discuss a number of ways in which heavy quark production in nuclear targets can test fundamental QCD phenomena and provide constraints on hadronic wavefunctions. The topics include color transparency, finite formation time, and predictions for charm production at threshold, including nuclear-bound quarkonium. I also discuss a number of QCD mechanisms for the suppression of J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions, including gluon shadowing, the peripheral excitation of intrinsic heavy quark components at large x{sub F}, and the coalescence of heavy quarks with co-moving spectators at low x{sub F}.

  6. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  7. Hadronic physics with domain-wall valence and improved staggered sea quarks

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Renner; W. Schroers; R. Edwards; G. T. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinski; D. Richards

    2004-06-01

    With the advent of chiral fermion formulations, the simulation of light valence quarks has finally become realistic for numerical simulations of lattice QCD. The simulation of light dynamical quarks, however, remains one of the major challenges and is still an obstacle to realistic simulations. We attempt to meet this challenge using a hybrid combination of Asqtad sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks. Initial results for the proton form factor and the nucleon axial coupling are presented.

  8. Quark Nova Signatures in Super-luminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, M.; Koning, N.; Leahy, D.; Ouyed, R.; Steffen, W.

    2014-10-01

    Recent observational surveys have uncovered the existence of super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). In this work we study the light curves of eight SLSNe in the context of dual-shock quark novae. We find that progenitor stars in the range of 25 - 35 M⊙ provide ample energy to power each light curve. An examination into the effects of varying the physical properties of a dual-shock quark nova on light curve composition is undertaken. We conclude that the wide variety of SLSN light curve morphologies can be explained predominantly by variations in the length of time between supernova and quark nova. Our analysis shows that a singular H alpha spectral profile found in three SLSNe can be naturally described in the dual-shock quark nova scenario. Predictions of spectral signatures unique to the dual-shock quark nova are presented.

  9. Spin-down Properties of Quark-Core Neutron Stars, Catastrophic Phase Transitions and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Feng; Luo, Shan

    1996-05-01

    We study properties of an isolated quark-core neutron star in its spin-down process. We find that the central density of the star increases with time, and more neutron matter is converted into quark matter via continuous quark-hadron phase transition. As a result, the whole star contracts while its quark core increases in size and mass. This has two observational signatures: first, the fractional moment of inertia of the neutral component of the star (I_n/I) decreases and results in a decrease of the proportional healing parameter (Q) of pulsar glitches; second, due to the contraction of the whole star, the total moment of inertia decreases and results in an increase in the braking index (n) of the pulsar spin-down process. This makes the spin-down behavior of a quark-core neutron star different from that of ``pure'' neutron stars. In comparison, most previous work about rotational properties of neutron and quark stars concentrated on rotation-induced mass ``increase'', which is related to star families and not directly observable. In the extreme case, catastrophic quark-hadron phase transition or pion condensation may happen to neutron stars at a rate of about 10(-6) yr(-1) per galaxy, with an energy release of about 10(52) ergs, and may be a good explanation of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at cosmological distances. If so, the detection of gravitational waves (GW) as counterparts of GRBs will be less likely than previously expected. We give an approximate light curve of GW for a catastrophic phase transition in a fast rotating star, and find it to be in sharp contrast to the predictions of neutron star merger models. We also discuss an extremely strong magnetic field that may be formed via the dynamo process during collapse; the effects of this field on electromagnetic and gravitational radiation; and an initial high energy neutrino burst due to the production of strange quarks.

  10. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  11. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  12. Electron, Atomic, and Radiation Kinetics in Plasma Discharge Lighting: Advanced Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, John L.

    2006-10-01

    Non-LTE discharges used in lighting sources provide an excellent testbed for understanding the interplay between plasma, atomic, and radiation physics. Standard models for the Hg fluorescent bulb include non-equilibrium kinetics for the species, but employ both a 0-D Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution function (EDF) and Holstein's probability-of-escape for radiation transport. These assumptions overlook some of the more interesting, and challenging, aspects of plasma lighting. The radial ambipolar potential requires the inclusion of the spatial gradient term in the inhomogeneous electron Boltzmann equation. The resulting EDF is found to depend on both electron energy and radial position [1]. Advanced radiation transport techniques account for non-local photo-pumping, line overlap within the Hg resonance lines, and partial frequency redistribution [2]. The results of our completely coupled model match the observed spatial distribution of Hg excited states and the line-of-sight intensity [3]. Due to environmental initiatives there is also recent interest in non-Hg discharges for high intensity lighting. One example is an RF electrodeless Mo-O-Ar plasma discharge bulb which operates by recycling the emitting Mo with an O catalyst. Based on atomic physics calculations for Mo [4], the kinetic pathways leading to visible emission can be identified [5] and explain the measured lighting efficiency of ˜40 lumens/watt of supplied power.[1] J. Appl. Phys., 94, p.62, 2003. [2] Plasma Sources Sci. Tech., 14, p.236, 2005. [3] J. Phys. D., 38, p.4180, 2005. [4] New J. Physics, 6, p.145, 2004. [5] J. Appl. Phys., 95, p.5284, 2004.

  13. Imaging spectroscopy of albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in mountain snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Seidel, Felix C.; Bryant, Ann C.; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Rittger, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies show that deposition of dust and black carbon to snow and ice accelerates snowmelt and perturbs regional climate and hydrologic cycles. Radiative forcing by aerosols is often neglected in climate and hydrological models in part due to scarcity of observations. Here we describe and validate an algorithm suite (Imaging Spectrometer-Snow Albedo and Radiative Forcing (IS-SnARF)) that provides quantitative retrievals of snow grain size, snow albedo, and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected on 15 June 2011 in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), SW Colorado, USA. Radiative forcing by LAISI is retrieved by the integral of the convolution of spectral irradiance with spectral differences between the spectral albedo (scaled from the observed hemispherical-directional reflectance factor (HDRF)) and modeled clean snow spectral albedo. The modeled surface irradiance at time of acquisition at test sites was 1052 W m-2 compared to 1048 W m-2 measured with the field spectroradiometer measurements, a relative difference of 0.4%. HDRF retrievals at snow and bare soil sites had mean errors relative to in situ measurements of -0.4 ± 0.1% reflectance averaged across the spectrum and root-mean-square errors of 1.5 ± 0.1%. Comparisons of snow albedo and radiative forcing retrievals from AVIRIS with in situ measurements in SBBSA showed errors of 0.001-0.004 and 2.1 ± 5.1 W m-2, respectively. A counterintuitive result was that, in the presence of light absorbing impurities, near-surface snow grain size increased with elevation, whereas we generally expect that at lower elevation the grain size would be larger.

  14. The Influence of Light Absorbing Aerosols on the Radiation Balance Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, B.; Bergin, M. H.; Sokolik, I. N.; Dibb, J. E.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic region has proven to be more responsive to recent changes in climate than other parts of the Earth. A key component of the Arctic climate is the Greenland Ice Sheet, which has the potential to dramatically influence both sea level, depending on the amount of melting that occurs, and climate, through shifts in the regional radiation balance. Light absorbing aerosols from biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and dust sources can potentially have a significant impact on the radiation balance of the ice sheet, although at this time we lack the key measurements needed to accurately quantify aerosol forcing over the ice sheet. For this reason a field study was conducted at Summit, Greenland, from May-July of 2012. Our efforts included real-time measurements of aerosol physical and optical properties including size distribution, multi-wavelength scattering (σsp) and backscattering (σbsp) coefficients, and multi-wavelength absorption coefficient (σap), as well as measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth and spectral snow albedo. The measurements serve as inputs to a radiative transfer model to estimate the direct aerosol radiative forcing at both the surface and top of the atmosphere. Preliminary results indicate that the direct aerosol radiative forcing is often several Wm-2 and is at times greater than 10 Wm-2. The aerosol chemical composition (major ions, elements, and organic and elemental carbon compounds) was also determined through filter sampling and will be discussed in terms of the sources of light absorbing aerosols over central Greenland.

  15. The effect of light radiation and temperature variability on the invasion of marine fouling species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Micheli, F.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change can alter the community structure as species which have adapted to the changed climate can compete better with other species. It can also influence the recruitment and invasion success of marine introduced species. Climate change involves not only global warming but also global dimming. However, it was not tested which of warming or dimming factors more significantly influence the invasion of marine species. To test this, we manipulated both temperature variability and light radiation by deploying different shading devices (black, white, transparent, and no treatment) for recruitment tiles in the warmer region where the species invasion rate is high. We compared the species frequency and coverage between shaded and non-shaded treatments. Interestingly, under opaque white plates where light radiation is lower than under transparent plates but the temperature is higher than under black plates, had the highest frequency and coverage of invasive fouling species. The recruitment tiles under black plates got second higher invasion of exotic species. We also deployed recruitment tiles in 14 different sites to determine if temperature influences the success of invasive species. The coverage of invasive species over native species increased significantly with increasing temperature. The results suggest that both low radiation and higher temperature facilitates the success of species invasion in the intertidal region.

  16. Radiation-induced gain degradation in lateral PNP BJTs with lightly and heavily doped emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1997-06-01

    Ionizing radiation may cause failures in ICs due to gain degradation of individual devices. The base current of irradiated bipolar devices increases with total dose, while the collector current remains relatively constant. This results in a decrease in the current gain. Lateral PNP (LPNP) transistors typically exhibit more degradation than vertical PNP devices at the same total dose, and have been blamed as the cause of early IC failures at low dose rates. It is important to understand the differences in total-dose response between devices with heavily- and lightly-doped emitters in order to compare different technologies and evaluate the applicability of proposed low-dose-rate hardness-assurance methods. This paper addresses these differences by comparing two different LPNP devices from the same process: one with a heavily-doped emitter and one with a lightly-doped emitter. Experimental results demonstrate that the lightly-doped devices are more sensitive to ionizing radiation and simulations illustrate that increased recombination on the emitter side of the junction is responsible for the higher sensitivity.

  17. Measurement of the top quark mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Protopopescu, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample of 93 lepton + 4 or more jets events collected with the D0 detector at the FNAL Tevatron collider. The authors find the top quark mass is 169 {+-} 8(stat.) {+-} 8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The analysis assumes that top quarks are produced as t{anti t} pairs that decay to W bosons and b quarks. The final states result when one W decays to e{nu} or {mu}{nu} and the other W to q{anti q}. More than four jets may be present because of final and initial state radiation.

  18. Radiation emission from ultra-relativistic plasma electrons in short-intense laser light interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R.; Boyd, TJM

    2016-05-01

    Intense femtosecond laser light incident on overcritical density plasmas has shown to emit a prolific number of high-order harmonics of the driver frequency, with spectra characterised by power-law decays. When the laser pulse is p-polarised, plasma effects do modify the harmonic spectrum, weakening the so-called universal decay index p = 8/3 to 5/3. In this work appeal is made to a single particle radiation model in support of the predictions from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Using these, we further show that the emission radiated by electrons -those that are relativistically accelerated inside the plasma, after being expelled into vacuum, the so-called Brunel electrons- is characterised not only by the plasma line but also by ultraviolet harmonic orders characterised by the 5/3 decay index.

  19. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-05-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7-22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20-94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5-21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h.

  20. Local changes in arterial oxygen saturation induced by visible and near-infrared light radiation.

    PubMed

    Yesman, S S; Mamilov, S O; Veligotsky, D V; Gisbrecht, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficiency of laser radiation on oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) rate in blood vessels and its wavelength dependence. The results of in vivo experimental measurements of the laser-induced photodissociation of HbO2 in cutaneous blood vessels in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range are presented. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was measured by a method of fingertip pulse oximetry, which is based on the measurement of the modulated pulse wave of the blood. The light irradiating the finger was provided by corresponding light-emitting diodes (LED) at 15 wavelengths in the 400-940 nm spectrum range. Statistical results with a value of p < 0.05 were viewed as being significant for all volunteers. The results show that there is a decrease in SpO2 in the blood under the influence of the transcutaneous laser irradiation. Three maxima in the spectral range (530, 600, and 850 nm) are revealed, wherein decrease in the relative concentration of SpO2 reaches 5 % ± 0.5 %. Near-IR radiation plays a dominant role in absorption of laser radiation by oxyhemoglobin in deeper layers of tissue blood vessels. The obtained data correlate with the processes of light propagation in biological tissue. The observed reduction in SpO2 indicates the process of photodissociation of HbO2 in vivo and may result in local increase in O2 in the tissue. Such laser-induced enrichment of tissue oxygenation can be used in phototherapy of pathologies, where the elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical. PMID:26637304

  1. Local changes in arterial oxygen saturation induced by visible and near-infrared light radiation.

    PubMed

    Yesman, S S; Mamilov, S O; Veligotsky, D V; Gisbrecht, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficiency of laser radiation on oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) rate in blood vessels and its wavelength dependence. The results of in vivo experimental measurements of the laser-induced photodissociation of HbO2 in cutaneous blood vessels in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range are presented. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was measured by a method of fingertip pulse oximetry, which is based on the measurement of the modulated pulse wave of the blood. The light irradiating the finger was provided by corresponding light-emitting diodes (LED) at 15 wavelengths in the 400-940 nm spectrum range. Statistical results with a value of p < 0.05 were viewed as being significant for all volunteers. The results show that there is a decrease in SpO2 in the blood under the influence of the transcutaneous laser irradiation. Three maxima in the spectral range (530, 600, and 850 nm) are revealed, wherein decrease in the relative concentration of SpO2 reaches 5 % ± 0.5 %. Near-IR radiation plays a dominant role in absorption of laser radiation by oxyhemoglobin in deeper layers of tissue blood vessels. The obtained data correlate with the processes of light propagation in biological tissue. The observed reduction in SpO2 indicates the process of photodissociation of HbO2 in vivo and may result in local increase in O2 in the tissue. Such laser-induced enrichment of tissue oxygenation can be used in phototherapy of pathologies, where the elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical.

  2. Light Penetration in Seawater Polluted by Dispersed Oil: Results of Radiative Transfer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haule, K.; Darecki, M.; Toczek, H.

    2015-11-01

    The downwelling light in seawater is shaped by natural seawater constituents as well as by some external substances which can occur locally and temporally. In this study we focused on dispersed oil droplets which can be found in seawater after an oil spill or in the consequence of intensive shipping, oil extraction and transportation. We applied our modified radiative transfer model based on Monte Carlo code to evaluate the magnitude of potential influence of dispersed oil droplets on the downwelling irradiance and the depth of the euphotic zone. Our model was validated on the basis of in situ measurements for natural (unpolluted) seawater in the Southern Baltic Sea, resulting in less than 5% uncertainty. The optical properties of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil were calculated on the basis of Mie theory and involved into radiative transfer model. We found that the changes in downwelling light caused by dispersed oil depend on several factors such as oil droplet concentration, size distribution, and the penetration depth (i.e. vertical range of oil droplets occurrence below sea surface). Petrobaltic oil droplets of submicron sizes and penetration depth of 5 m showed a potentially detectable reduction in the depth of the euphotic zone of 5.5% at the concentration of only 10 ppb. Micrometer-sized droplets needed 10 times higher concentration to give a similar effect. Our radiative transfer model provided data to analyse and discuss the influence of each factor separately. This study contributes to the understanding of the change in visible light penetration in seawater affected by dispersed oil.

  3. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  4. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  5. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter.

    PubMed

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  6. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter.

    PubMed

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  7. Search for a Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Top Quark Decays from pp-bar; Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-11

    We present the results of a search for a very light CP-odd Higgs boson a10 originating from top quark decays t→H±b → W±(*)a10b, and subsequently decaying into τ+τ-. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV, we perform a search for events containing a lepton, three or more jets, and an additional isolated track with transverse momentum in the range 3 to 20 GeV/c. Observed events are consistent with background sources, and 95% C.L. limits are set on the branching ratio of t→H±b formore » various masses of H± and a10.« less

  8. The Advanced Light Source: A third-generation Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2002-08-14

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the University of California is a ''third-generation'' synchrotron radiation source optimized for highest brightness at ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energies. It also provides world-class performance at hard x-ray photon energies. Berkeley Lab operates the ALS for the United States Department of Energy as a national user facility that is available 24 hours/day around the year for research by scientists from industrial, academic, and government laboratories primarily from the United States but also from abroad.

  9. Supernova Shock Breakout Light Curves and Spectra from CASTRO Multigroup Radiation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of supernova shock breakout with the new multigroup radiation transport version of the CASTRO simulation code. Shock breakout occurs when the outgoing shockwave of a supernova explosion reaches the surface of the progenitor star and produces a bright flash. The breakout flash's spectral temperature, duration, and luminosity carry information about the progenitor star that may otherwise be very difficult to recover. To aid in detection and understanding of this phenomenon, we present integrated light curves and spectra of breakouts from a range of progenitors and explosions, including very low energy supernovae and pair-instability supernovae.

  10. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  11. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  12. Lighting considerations in controlled environments for nonphotosynthetic plant responses to blue and ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    This essay will consider both physical and photobiological aspects of controlled environment lighting in the spectral region beginning in the blue and taken to the normal limit of the solar spectrum in the ultraviolet. The primary emphasis is directed to questions of plant response to sunlight. Measurement and computations used in radiation dosimetry in this part of the spectrum are also briefly treated. Because of interest in the ozone depletion problem, there has been some activity in plant UV-B research and there are several recent reviews available. Some aspects of growth chamber lighting as it relates to UV-B research were covered earlier. Apart from work related to the blue/UV-A receptor, less attention has been given to UV-A responses.

  13. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Quark matter and meson properties in a Nonlocal SU(3) chiral quark model at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Contrera, G. A.

    2012-06-15

    We study the finite temperature behavior of light scalar and pseudoscalar meson properties in the context of a three-flavor nonlocal chiral quark model. The model includes mixing with active strangeness degrees of freedom, and takes care of the effect of gauge interactions by coupling the quarks with a background color field. We analyze the chiral restoration and deconfinement transitions, as well as the temperature dependence of meson masses, mixing angles, and decay constants.

  15. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  16. Monitoring temperature and light exposure of biosamples exposed to ultraviolet and low energy radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Kai; Waite, Gabi Nindl; Miller, Penney L; Hughes, Ellen F; Waite, Lee R

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that T-lymphocytes produce catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a membrane-associated process when irradiated with narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) light. This form of phototherapy is thought to be highly effective for treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, but also includes the potential for severe burning and development of skin cancer. Consequently, information on the therapeutic mechanism of narrowband UVB phototherapy and its regulation is warranted. Our laboratory is researching the mechanistic involvement of T-cell H2O2 production and its potential regulation by low energy electromagnetic field (EMF) radiation, which has been shown to beneficially influence inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. To study photochemical H2O2 production in small samples such as suspensions of T-lymphocyte cell extracts, we use a reactor in which 12 microliter-sized samples are exposed to UVB. We simultaneously operate two identical systems, one for experimental, the other for control samples, within a walk-in environmental chamber maintained at 37 degrees C. The current paper addresses the control of UVB light exposure and temperature in our experimental setup. We quantified UVB light b y radiometric sp ot measurements and by chemical potassium ferrioxalate actinometry. We modified the actinometer so that UVB light of 5-hour experiments could be detected. Temperature was controlled by air convection and remained constant within 0.5 degrees C in air and liquid samples. Preliminary data of the effect of low energy EMF radiation on T-cell H2O2 production are presented.

  17. Energy loss and dynamical evolution of quark p{sub T} spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Pradip; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2006-04-15

    Average energy loss of light quarks has been calculated in a two stage equilibrium scenario where the quarks are executing Brownian motion in a gluonic heat bath. The evolution of the quark p{sub T} spectra is studied by solving Fokker-Planck equation in an expanding plasma. Results are finally compared with experimentally measured pion p{sub T} spectrum at RHIC.

  18. Hadronization time of heavy quarks in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza

    2016-09-01

    We study the hadronization time of heavy quark in nuclear matter by using the coalescence model and the spatial diffusion constant of a heavy quark from lattice quantum chromodynamic calculations, assuming that the main interaction of a heavy quark at the critical temperature is hadronization. It is found that the hadronization time of a heavy quark is about 3 fm /c for 2 π TcDs=6 , if a heavy quark is combined with the nearest light antiquark in coordinate space without any correlation between the momentum of a heavy quark and that of a light antiquark which forms a heavy meson. However, the hadronization time reduces to 0.6 - 1.2 fm /c for charm and 0.4 - 0.9 fm /c for bottom, depending on the heavy meson radius, in the presence of momentum correlation. Considering the interspace between quarks and antiquarks at the critical temperature, it seems that the hadronization of a heavy quark does not happen instantaneously but gradually for a considerable time, if started from the thermal distribution of quarks and antiquarks.

  19. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  20. The interplay between assumed morphology and the direct radiative effect of light-absorbing organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Rawad; Adams, Peter J.; Donahue, Neil M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-08-01

    Mie theory is widely employed in aerosol top-of-the-atmosphere direct radiative effect (DRE) calculations and to retrieve the absorptivity of light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) from measurements. However, when OA is internally mixed with black carbon, it may exhibit complex morphologies whose optical behavior is imperfectly predicted by Mie theory, introducing bias in the retrieved absorptivities. We performed numerical experiments and global radiative transfer modeling (RTM) to investigate the effect of this bias on the calculated absorption and thus the DRE. We show that using true OA absorptivity, retrieved with a realistic representation of the complex morphology, leads to significant errors in DRE when the RTM employs the simplified Mie theory. On the other hand, when Mie theory is consistently applied in both OA absorptivity retrieval and the RTM, the errors largely cancel out, yielding accurate DRE. As long as global RTMs use Mie theory, they should implement parametrizations of light-absorbing OA derived from retrievals based on Mie theory.

  1. Drag of heavy quarks in quark gluon plasma at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Payal

    2010-07-15

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of charm and bottom quarks propagating through quark gluon plasma (QGP) have been evaluated for conditions relevant to nuclear collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The dead cone and Landau-Pomeronchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects on radiative energy loss of heavy quarks have been considered. Both radiative and collisional processes of energy loss are included in the effective drag and diffusion coefficients. With these effective transport coefficients, we solve the Fokker-Plank (FP) equation for the heavy quarks executing Brownian motion in the QGP. The solution of the FP equation has been used to evaluate the nuclear suppression factor, R{sub AA}, for the nonphotonic single-electron spectra resulting from the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. The effects of mass on R{sub AA} have also been highlighted.

  2. Comparison of the Light Charged Particles on Scatter Radiation Dose in Thyroid Hadron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, M; Mowlavi, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hadron therapy is a novel technique of cancer radiation therapy which employs charged particles beams, 1H and light ions in particular. Due to their physical and radiobiological properties, they allow one to obtain a more conformal treatment, sparing better the healthy tissues located in proximity of the tumor and allowing a higher control of the disease. Objective: As it is well known, these light particles can interact with nuclei in the tissue, and produce the different secondary particles such as neutron and photon. These particles can damage specially the critical organs behind of thyroid gland. Methods: In this research, we simulated neck geometry by MCNPX code and calculated the light particles dose at distance of 2.14 cm in thyroid gland, for different particles beam: 1H, 2H, 3He, and 4He. Thyroid treatment is important because the spine and vertebrae is situated right behind to the thyroid gland on the posterior side. Results: The results show that 2H has the most total flux for photon and neutron, 1.944E-3 and 1.7666E-2, respectively. Whereas 1H and 3He have best conditions, 8.88609E-4 and 1.35431E-3 for photon, 4.90506E-4 and 4.34057E-3 for neutron, respectively. The same calculation has obtained for energy depositions for these particles. Conclusion: In this research, we investigated that which of these light particles can deliver the maximum dose to the normal tissues and the minimum dose to the tumor. By comparing these results for the mentioned light particles, we find out 1H and 3He is the best therapy choices for thyroid glands whereas 2H is the worst. PMID:25505774

  3. The influence of ionizing radiation, temperature, and light on eplerenone in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff, Katarzyna; Ogrodowczyk, Magdalena; Kycler, Witold; Dołhań, Agnieszka; Cwiertnia, Barbara; Garbacki, Piotr; Jelińska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Eplerenone was subjected to the influence of ionizing radiation in the form of a high-energy electron beam (25-400 kGy), high temperature (90°C RH 0% and 60°C RH 76.4%), and light (6 mln lux h). An HPLC method was used to determine the content of eplerenone and to establish the impurity profile of all samples. As eplerenone was found to be a compound of great resistance to the above stress factors with the exception of high doses of ionizing radiation (≥ 200 kGy) when its degradation was above 1%, it is possible to sterilize eplerenone by radiation method with the standard dose of 25 kGy. Based on the analysis of impurities and degradation products, the mechanism of radiodegradation was demonstrated to differ from the mechanisms of photo- and thermodegradation. The observation that the DSC curves for the nondegraded and degraded samples of eplerenone were significantly different only under exposure to the electron beam confirmed the applicability of DSC for studies of radiolytic degradation of eplerenone.

  4. Prediction of acoustic radiation from functionally graded shells of revolution in light and heavy fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Meng, Guang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method for the vibro-acoustic analysis of a functionally graded shell of revolution immersed in an infinite light or heavy fluid. The structural model of the shell is formulated on the basis of a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid field. The material properties of the shell are estimated by using the Voigt's rule of mixture and the Mori-Tanaka's homogenization scheme. Displacement and sound pressure variables of each segment are expanded in the form of a mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. A set of collocation nodes distributed over the roots of Chebyshev polynomials are employed to establish the algebraic system of the acoustic integral equations, and the non-uniqueness solution is eliminated using a combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation. Loosely and strongly coupled schemes are implemented for the structure-acoustic interaction problem of a functionally graded shell immersed in a light and heavy fluid, respectively. The present method provides a flexible way to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of functionally graded shells of revolution in an analytical manner. Numerical tests are presented for sound radiation problems of spherical, cylindrical, conical and coupled shells. The individual contributions of the circumferential modes to the radiated sound pressure and sound power of functionally graded shells are observed. Effects of the material profile on the sound radiation of the shells are also investigated.

  5. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  6. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-09-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find numerous applications for personal thermal management and for buildings energy efficiency improvement.

  7. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  8. Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Model of the Diffuse Galactic Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-02-01

    Monte-Carlo radiative models of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) in our Galaxy are calcu-lated using the dust radiative transfer code MoCafe, which is three-dimensional and takes full account of multiple scattering. The code is recently updated to use a fast voxel traversal algorithm, which has dramatically increased the computing speed. The radiative transfer models are calculated with the gen-erally accepted dust scale-height of 0.1 kpc. The stellar scale-heights are assumed to be 0.1 or 0.35 kpc, appropriate for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical wavelengths, respectively. The face-on optical depth, measured perpendicular to the Galactic plane, is also varied from 0.2 to 0.6, suitable to the optical to FUV wavelengths, respectively. We find that the DGL at high Galactic latitudes is mostly due to backward or large-angle scattering of starlight originating from the local stars within a radial distance of r < 0.5 kpc from the Earth. On the other hand, the DGL measured in the Galactic plane is mostly due to stars at a distance range that corresponds to an optical depth of -1 measured from the Earth. Therefore, the low-latitude DGL at the FUV wavelength band would be mostly caused by the stars located at a distance of r . 0.5 kpc and the optical DGL near the Galactic plane mainly originates from stars within a distance range of 1 . r . 2 kpc. We also calculate the radiative transfer models in a clumpy two-phase medium. The clumpy two-phase models provide lower intensities at high Galactic latitudes compared to the uniform density models, because of the lower effective optical depth in clumpy media. However, no significant difference in the intensity at the Galactic plane is found.

  9. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  10. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  11. Heavy-Quark Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * FIXED-TARGET PRODUCTION * Total cross sections * Single-inclusive distributions * Double-differential distributions * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION AT HERA * Photoproduction cross sections * Charm photoproduction * Bottom photoproduction * Deep-inelastic production * Future physics * Determination of f^{(p)}_{g} * Polarization asymmetries * HERA-B * HEAVY-QUARK PRODUCTION AT HADRON COLLIDERS * Inclusive bottom production * Preliminaries * The effect of higher-order corrections * Comparison with experimental results * boverline{b} correlations * Heavy-quark jets in perturbative QCD * Preliminaries * The structure of heavy-quark jets at the Tevatron * Associated production of heavy quarks with W or γ * Photon plus heavy quarks * W bosons plus heavy quarks * Production of top quarks * Total toverline{t} production cross sections * Top kinematical distributions * HIGHER ORDERS AND RESUMMATION * What are soft-gluon effects * Problems with the x-space resummation formula * Phenomenological applications * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION IN e+e- COLLISIONS * Preliminaries * Fragmentation function * Heavy-quark production via gluon splitting * Correlations * CONCLUSIONS AND OUTLOOK * Acknowledgements * REFERENCES

  12. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Dyer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-quark partner that is always produced from strong-coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top-quark production has been searched for in ever larger data sets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} data set that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top-quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and tt events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix-element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top-quark production of {sigma}(pp{yields}tb+X,tqb+X)=4.7{+-}1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top-quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}|=1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68<|V{sub tb}|{<=}1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  13. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  14. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F. R.; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars (‘Pink Champion’ and ‘Royal Champion’) were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (gs) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in ‘Royal Champion,’ whereas it remained relatively constant in ‘Pink Champion.’ Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (Pn) in both cultivars approached steady state Pn in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in ‘Pink Champion.’ These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in ‘Royal Champion’ in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in ‘Pink Champion.’ We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent. PMID:26870071

  15. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F R; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars ('Pink Champion' and 'Royal Champion') were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (g s) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in 'Royal Champion,' whereas it remained relatively constant in 'Pink Champion.' Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (P n) in both cultivars approached steady state P n in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in 'Pink Champion.' These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in 'Royal Champion' in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in 'Pink Champion.' We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent.

  16. The decays {h}^0to boverline{b} and {h}^0to coverline{c} in the light of the MSSM with quark flavour violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberl, H.; Ginina, E.; Bartl, A.; Hidaka, K.; Majerotto, W.

    2016-06-01

    We calculate the decay width of {h}^0to boverline{b} in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with quark flavour violation (QFV) at full one-loop level. We study the effect of tilde{c}-tilde{t} mixing and tilde{s}-tilde{b} mixing taking into account the constraints from the B meson data. We discuss and compare in detail the decays {h}^0to coverline{c} and {h}^0to boverline{b} within the framework of the perturbative mass insertion technique using the Flavour Expansion Theorem. The deviation of both decay widths from the Standard Model values can be quite large. Whereas in {h}^0to coverline{c} it is almost entirely due to the flavour violating part of the MSSM, in {h}^0to boverline{b} it is mainly due to the flavour conserving part. Nevertheless, the QFV contribution to \\varGamma ({h}^0to boverline{b}) due to tilde{c}-tilde{t} mixing and chargino exchange can go up to ˜ 7%.

  17. Dibaryons with two strange quarks and one heavy flavor in a constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Aaron; Park, Woosung; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the symmetry property and the stability of dibaryons containing two strange quarks and one heavy flavor with isospin I =1/2 . We construct the wave function of the dibaryon in two ways. First, we directly construct the color and spin state of the dibaryon starting from the four possible S U (3 ) flavor states. Second, we consider the states composed of five light quarks and then construct the wave function of the dibaryon by adding one heavy quark. The stability of the dibaryon against the strong decay into two baryons is discussed by using the variational method in a constituent quark model with a confining and hyperfine potential. We find that, for all configurations with spin S =0 , 1, 2, the ground states of the dibaryons are the sum of two baryons, and there is no compact bound state that is stable against the strong decay.

  18. Ultraviolet radiation and blue light from photofloods in television studios and theaters.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, M T; Hoikkala, M J

    1990-08-01

    The intensities and spectra of ultraviolet and visible radiation were determined for different types of photofloods (575 to 5000 W) commonly used in television studios and theaters. The measurements were taken with a spectroradiometer at distances of 2.25, 4.5, or 10 m from the lamps. The measured spectral irradiance was weighted against biological hazard functions to determine the potential hazards. The results indicate that in television work, direct viewing of the light source should be limited to a few minutes per day to avoid potential photochemical injury to the retina. In addition, the luminances of the photofloods were calculated. Because the luminance of most of the tested photofloods was several orders of magnitude above the luminance level considered comfortable to the eyes, they can cause discomfort glare.

  19. Applications of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (Lasers) for Restorative Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ajlal, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) has been used widely in a range of biomedical and dental applications in recent years. In the field of restorative dentistry, various kinds of lasers have been developed for diagnostic (e.g. caries detection) and operative applications (e.g. tooth ablation, cavity preparation, restorations, bleaching). The main benefits for laser applications are patient comfort, pain relief and better results for specific applications. Major concerns for using dental lasers frequently are high cost, need for specialized training and sensitivity of the technique, thereby compromising its usefulness particularly in developing countries. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and summarize the applications of lasers in restorative dentistry, including a comparison of the applications of lasers for major restorative dental procedures and conventional clinical approaches. A remarkable increase in the use of lasers for dental application is expected in the near future. PMID:26642047

  20. Reception of modulated optical radiation using radio heterodyning in a photomultiplier tube and double light modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianova, V. A.; Mustel', E. R.; Rudnykh, S. I.

    1987-11-01

    Two systems for the reception of modulated optical radiation which are based on modulation-frequency conversion are investigated experimentally in the 10-150 MHz range: (1) radio heterodyning in a photomultiplier tube and (2) double light modulation (DLM). The radio-heterodyning technique can produce frequency conversion using low control voltages of 1-3 V. The maximum frequency that can be received through the use of the radio heterodyning technique exceeds 100 MHz; this band is significantly higher than the amplitude-frequency response band of a standard photomultiplier tube. The DLM system requires considerably higher control voltages but is characterized by a greater noise immunity than the radio heterodyning system.

  1. Effects of electromagnetic radiation (bright light, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, infrared radiation) on the circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Griefahn, Barbara; Künemund, Christa; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lerchl, Alexander; Degen, Gisela H

    2002-10-01

    Electromagnetic spectra reduce melatonin production and delay the nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate. Seven healthy men (16-22 yrs) completed 4 permuted sessions. The control session consisted of a 24-hours bedrest at < 30 lux, 18 degrees C, and < 50 dBA. In the experimental sessions, either light (1500 lux), magnetic field (16.7 Hz, 0.2 mT), or infrared radiation (65 degrees C) was applied from 5 pm to 1 am. Salivary melatonin level was determined hourly, rectal temperature and heart rate were continuously recorded. Melatonin synthesis was completely suppressed by light but resumed thereafter. The nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate were delayed. The magnetic field had no effect. Infrared radiation elevated rectal temperature and heart rate. Only bright light affected the circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate, however, differently thus causing a dissociation, which might enhance the adverse effects of shiftwork in the long run.

  2. Exoplanet Atmospheres: From Light-Curve Analyses to Radiative-Transfer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Foster, Andrew S.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-wavelength transit and secondary-eclipse light-curve observations are some of the most powerful techniques to probe the thermo-chemical properties of exoplanets. Although the small planet-to-star constrast ratios demand a meticulous data analysis, and the limited available spectral bands can further restrain constraints, a Bayesian approach can robustly reveal what constraints can we set, given the data.We review the main aspects considered during the analysis of Spitzer time-series data by our group with an aplication to WASP-8b and TrES-1. We discuss the applicability and limitations of the most commonly used correlated-noise estimators. We describe our open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. BART calculates the planetary emission or transmission spectrum by solving a 1D line-by-line radiative-transfer equation. The generated spectra are integrated over determined bandpasses for comparison to the data. Coupled to our Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MC3) statistical package, BART constrains the temperature profile and chemical abundances in the planet's atmosphere. We apply the BART retrieval code to the HD 209458b data set to estimate the planet's temperature profile and molecular abundances.This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  3. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption. PMID:25811601

  4. Radiative forcing impacts of boreal forest biofuels: a scenario study for Norway in light of albedo.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Peters, Glen P

    2011-09-01

    Radiative forcing impacts due to increased harvesting of boreal forests for use as transportation biofuel in Norway are quantified using simple climate models together with life cycle emission data, MODIS surface albedo data, and a dynamic land use model tracking carbon flux and clear-cut area changes within productive forests over a 100-year management period. We approximate the magnitude of radiative forcing due to albedo changes and compare it to the forcing due to changes in the carbon cycle for purposes of attributing the net result, along with changes in fossil fuel emissions, to the combined anthropogenic land use plus transport fuel system. Depending on albedo uncertainty and uncertainty about the geographic distribution of future logging activity, we report a range of results, thus only general conclusions about the magnitude of the carbon offset potential due to changes in surface albedo can be drawn. Nevertheless, our results have important implications for how forests might be managed for mitigating climate change in light of this additional biophysical criterion, and in particular, on future biofuel policies throughout the region. Future research efforts should be directed at understanding the relationships between the physical properties of managed forests and albedo, and how albedo changes in time as a result of specific management interventions. PMID:21797227

  5. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption.

  6. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  7. Nanoantenna enhanced emission of light-harvesting complex 2: the role of resonance, polarization, and radiative and non-radiative rates.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-12-01

    Nanoantennae show potential for photosynthesis research for two reasons; first by spatially confining light for experiments which require high spatial resolution, and second by enhancing the photon emission of single light-harvesting complexes. For effective use of nanoantennae a detailed understanding of the interaction between the nanoantenna and the light-harvesting complex is required. Here we report how the excitation and emission of multiple purple bacterial LH2s (light-harvesting complex 2) are controlled by single gold nanorod antennae. LH2 complexes were chemically attached to such antennae, and the antenna length was systematically varied to tune the resonance with respect to the LH2 absorption and emission. There are three main findings. (i) The polarization of the LH2 emission is fully controlled by the resonant nanoantenna. (ii) The largest fluorescence enhancement, of 23 times, is reached for excitation with light at λ = 850 nm, polarized along the long antenna-axis of the resonant antenna. The excitation enhancement is found to be 6 times, while the emission efficiency is increased 3.6 times. (iii) The fluorescence lifetime of LH2 depends strongly on the antenna length, with shortest lifetimes of ∼40 ps for the resonant antenna. The lifetime shortening arises from an 11 times resonant enhancement of the radiative rate, together with a 2-3 times increase of the non-radiative rate, compared to the off-resonant antenna. The observed length dependence of radiative and non-radiative rate enhancement is in good agreement with simulations. Overall this work gives a complete picture of how the excitation and emission of multi-pigment light-harvesting complexes are influenced by a dipole nanoantenna.

  8. Factors affecting sperm motility. III. Influence of visible light and other electromagnetic radiations on human sperm velocity and survival.

    PubMed

    Makler, A; Tatcher, M; Vilensky, A; Brandes, J M

    1980-04-01

    Specimens of semen from fertile and infertile patients were exposed to different electromagnetic radiations, including visible light, ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, and high-frequency radio waves. Sperm motility was analyzed before, during, and after irradiation by the multiple exposure photography (MEP) method. No significant difference was found between controls and specimens exposed to various doses of visible and UV light and x-rays either immediately or several hours after exposure. In contrast to spermatozoa of other species that were reported to be adversely affected by visible and UV light and x-rays, human spermatozoa seem to be highly resistant to similar doses of these radiations. A deleterious influence was observed when high-frequency radio waves were applied to human spermatozoa. This may be attributed to an intracellular diathermic effect. The informative value of this study in relation to routine semen analyses and experimental studies in the physiology and comparative anatomy of spermatozoa is discussed.

  9. Analytical solution of beam spread function for ocean light radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zao; Yue, Dick K P

    2015-07-13

    We develop a new method to analytically obtain the beam spread function (BSF) for light radiative transfer in oceanic environments. The BSF, which is defined as the lateral distribution of the (scalar) irradiance with increasing depth in response to a uni-directional beam emanating from a point source in an infinite ocean, must in general be obtained by solving the three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer equation (RTE). By taking advantage of the highly forward-peaked scattering property of the ocean particles, we assume, for a narrow beam source, the dependence of radiance on polar angle and azimuthal angle is deliberately separated; only single scattering takes place in the azimuthal direction while multiple scattering still occurs in the polar direction. This assumption enables us to reduce the five-variable 3D RTE to a three-variable two-dimensional (2D) RTE. With this simplification, we apply Fourier spectral method to both spatial and angular variables so that we are able to analytically solve the 2D RTE and obtain the 2D BSF accordingly. Using the relations between 2D and 3D solutions acquired during the process of simplification, we are able to obtain the 3D BSF in explicit form. The 2D and 3D analytical solutions are validated by comparing with Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. The 2D analytical BSF agrees excellently with the Monte Carlo result. Despite assumptions of axial symmetry and spike-like azimuthal profile of the radiance in deriving the 3D BSF, the comparisons to numerical simulations are very satisfactory especially for limited optical depths (< O(5)) for single scattering albedo values typical in the ocean. The explicit form of the analytical BSF and the significant gain in computational efficiency (several orders higher) relative to RTE simulations make many forward and inverse problems in ocean optics practical for routine applications.

  10. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  11. Analysis of light scattering by two-dimensional inhomogeneities in paper using general radiative transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nukala, Madhuri; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-12-10

    Lateral light scattering simulations of printed dots are analyzed using general radiative transfer theory. We investigated the appearance of a printed paper in relation to the medium parameters like thickness of the paper sample, its optical properties, and the asymmetry factor. It was found that the appearance of a print greatly depends on these factors making it either brighter or darker. A thicker substrate with higher single scattering albedo backed with an absorbing surface makes the dots brighter due to increased number of scattering events. Additionally, it is shown that the optical effects of print also depend on illuminating and viewing angles along with the depth of ink penetration. A larger single scattering angle implies less intensity and the dots appear much blurred due to the shadowing effect prominent when viewed from sides. A fully penetrated dot of the same extinction coefficient as a partial penetrated one is darker due to increased absorption. These results can be used in applications dealing with lateral light scattering.

  12. Control of electric field in CdZnTe radiation detectors by above-bandgap light

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Zázvorka, J.; Praus, P.; Touš, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-04-28

    We have studied the possibility of above bandgap light induced depolarization of CdZnTe planar radiation detector operating under high flux of X-rays by Pockels effect measurements. In this contribution, we show a similar influence of X-rays at 80 kVp and LED with a wavelength of 910 nm irradiating the cathode on polarization of the detector due to an accumulation of a positive space charge of trapped photo-generated holes. We have observed the depolarization of the detector under simultaneous cathode-site illumination with excitation LED at 910 nm and depolarization above bandgap LED at 640 nm caused by trapping of drifting photo-generated electrons. Although the detector current is quite high during this depolarization, we have observed that it decreases relatively fast to its initial value after switching off the depolarizing light. In order to get detailed information about physical processes present during polarization and depolarization and, moreover, about associated deep levels, we have performed the Pockels effect infrared spectral scanning measurements of the detector without illumination and under illumination in polarized and optically depolarized states.

  13. Radiative transfer within seagrass canopies: impact on carbon budgets and light requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Richard C.; Mobley, Curtis D.

    1997-02-01

    Seagrasses are ecologically important but extremely vulnerable to anthropogenic modifications of the coastal zone that affect light availability within these unique ecosystems. Strongly pigmented seagrass leaves can extend for more than 1 m above the substrate and biomass is distributed unevenly throughout the canopy. in this study, light attenuation in a 7 m water column that contained a seagrass canopy extending 1.5 m above the bottom was calculated by the radiative transfer model Hydrolight using the spectral absorbance of eelgrass leaves and a non-uniform vertical distribution of biomass. Runs were performed in clear and turbid water columns, over san d and mud substrates, and with shoot densities ranging from 25 to 200 m-2 using solar angles for both winter and summer solstices. The flux of photosynthetically active irradiance (EPAR) reaching the top of the seagrass canopy was twice as high in summer compared to winter, and in clear water compared to turbid water. Sediment type had a measurable effect on EPAR only within the bottom third of the canopy. Light penetration within the canopy was inversely proportional to shoot density. Introduction of daylength and a sinusoidal distribution of EPAR throughout the day greatly increased the importance of solar elevation on daily integrated production relative to water column turbidity and sediment type. Shoot-specific productivity decreased and the position of maximum shoot productivity within the canopy shallowed as shoot density increased. Positive net photosynthesis for entire shoots was possible only when plant density was lower than 100 shoots m-2 in winter; values consistent with field observations. Although very simplistic with regard to inherent optical properties of real seagrass leaves, this model was able to generate estimates of maximum sustainable shoot density that were fully testable by, and wholly consistent with, field observations.

  14. Search for Invisible Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S)->gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-11-05

    We search for a light scalar particle produced in single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) resonance through the process {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} + A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} invisible. Such an object appears in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. If, in addition, there exists a light, stable neutralino, decays of A{sup 0} could be preferentially to an invisible final state. We search for events with a single high-energy photon and a large missing mass, consistent with a 2-body decay of {Upsilon}(3S). We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} invisible) at (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range m{sub A{sup 0}} {le} 7.8 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  15. Universality of Quark-Lepton Mass Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    The recently observed lepton mixing angle θ13 of the MNS mixing matrix is well incorporated in a universal mixing hypothesis between quark and lepton sectors. This hypothesis asserts that, in the charged lepton diagonal base, all other mass matrices for up- and down-type quarks and light neutrinos are diagonalized by the same unitary matrix except for the phase elements. It is expressed as VCKM = UMNS(δ‧)†PUMNS(δ) for quark mixing matrix VCKM and lepton mixing matrix UMNS(δ) in the phenomenological level. Here P is a diagonal phase mass matrix. δ‧ is a slightly different phase parameter from the Dirac CP-violating phase δ = 1.1π (best fit) in the MNS lepton mixing matrix.

  16. High-throughput estimation of incident light, light interception and radiation-use efficiency of thousands of plants in a phenotyping platform.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Fournier, Christian; Brichet, Nicolas; Welcker, Claude; Suard, Benoît; Tardieu, François

    2016-10-01

    Light interception and radiation-use efficiency (RUE) are essential components of plant performance. Their genetic dissections require novel high-throughput phenotyping methods. We have developed a suite of methods to evaluate the spatial distribution of incident light, as experienced by hundreds of plants in a glasshouse, by simulating sunbeam trajectories through glasshouse structures every day of the year; the amount of light intercepted by maize (Zea mays) plants via a functional-structural model using three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of each plant placed in a virtual scene reproducing the canopy in the glasshouse; and RUE, as the ratio of plant biomass to intercepted light. The spatial variation of direct and diffuse incident light in the glasshouse (up to 24%) was correctly predicted at the single-plant scale. Light interception largely varied between maize lines that differed in leaf angles (nearly stable between experiments) and area (highly variable between experiments). Estimated RUEs varied between maize lines, but were similar in two experiments with contrasting incident light. They closely correlated with measured gas exchanges. The methods proposed here identified reproducible traits that might be used in further field studies, thereby opening up the way for large-scale genetic analyses of the components of plant performance.

  17. High-throughput estimation of incident light, light interception and radiation-use efficiency of thousands of plants in a phenotyping platform.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Fournier, Christian; Brichet, Nicolas; Welcker, Claude; Suard, Benoît; Tardieu, François

    2016-10-01

    Light interception and radiation-use efficiency (RUE) are essential components of plant performance. Their genetic dissections require novel high-throughput phenotyping methods. We have developed a suite of methods to evaluate the spatial distribution of incident light, as experienced by hundreds of plants in a glasshouse, by simulating sunbeam trajectories through glasshouse structures every day of the year; the amount of light intercepted by maize (Zea mays) plants via a functional-structural model using three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of each plant placed in a virtual scene reproducing the canopy in the glasshouse; and RUE, as the ratio of plant biomass to intercepted light. The spatial variation of direct and diffuse incident light in the glasshouse (up to 24%) was correctly predicted at the single-plant scale. Light interception largely varied between maize lines that differed in leaf angles (nearly stable between experiments) and area (highly variable between experiments). Estimated RUEs varied between maize lines, but were similar in two experiments with contrasting incident light. They closely correlated with measured gas exchanges. The methods proposed here identified reproducible traits that might be used in further field studies, thereby opening up the way for large-scale genetic analyses of the components of plant performance. PMID:27258481

  18. Measurement of jet shapes in top-quark pair events at using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haefner, P.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. 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B.; Quilty, D.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-12-01

    A measurement of jet shapes in top-quark pair events using 1.8 fb-1 of pp collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. Samples of top-quark pair events are selected in both the single-lepton and dilepton final states. The differential and integrated shapes of the jets initiated by bottom-quarks from the top-quark decays are compared with those of the jets originated by light-quarks from the hadronic W-boson decays in the single-lepton channel. The light-quark jets are found to have a narrower distribution of the momentum flow inside the jet area than b-quark jets.

  19. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  20. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  1. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  2. Search for a Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Top Quark Decays from pp-bar; Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-11

    We present the results of a search for a very light CP-odd Higgs boson a10 originating from top quark decays t→H±b → W±(*)a10b, and subsequently decaying into τ+τ-. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV, we perform a search for events containing a lepton, three or more jets, and an additional isolated track with transverse momentum in the range 3 to 20 GeV/c. Observed events are consistent with background sources, and 95% C.L. limits are set on the branching ratio of t→H±b for various masses of H± and a10.

  3. The artefacts of radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners and their causation by light scattering from radiation-induced polymers.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Doerner, Karl-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern

    2014-07-01

    Optical experiments and theoretical considerations have been undertaken in order to understand the causes of the 'orientation effect' and the 'parabola effect', the artefacts impairing the desired light absorption measurement on radiochromic EBT3 films with flatbed scanners. EBT3 films exposed to doses up to 20.9 Gy were scanned with an Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner in landscape and portrait orientation. The horizontally and vertically polarized light components of the scanner were determined, and another Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was disassembled to examine its optical components. The optical properties of exposed and unexposed EBT3 films were studied with incident polarized and unpolarized white light, and the transmitted red light was investigated for its polarization and scattering properties including the distribution of the scattering angles. Neutral density filters were studied for comparison. Guidance was sought from the theory of light scattering from rod-like macromolecular structures. The drastic dose-dependent variation of the transmitted total light current as function of the orientation of front and rear polarizers, interpreted by light scattering theory, shows that the radiation-induced polymerization of the monomers of EBT3 films produces light scattering oscillators preferably polarized at right angles with the coating direction of the film. The directional distribution of the scattered light is partly anisotropic, with a preferred scattering plane at right angles with the coating direction, indicating light scattering from stacks of coherently vibrating oscillators piled up along the monomer crystals. The polyester carrier film also participates in these effects. The 'orientation' and 'parabola' artefacts due to flatbed scanning of radiochromic films can be explained by the interaction of the polarization-dependent and anisotropic light scattering from exposed and unexposed EBT3 films with the quantitative difference

  4. Is photocleavage of DNA by YOYO-1 using a synchrotron radiation light source sequence dependent?

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Emma L; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C; Rodger, Alison

    2011-10-01

    The photocleavage of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA by the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 was investigated in real time by using the synchrotron radiation light source ASTRID (ISA, Denmark) both to initiate the reaction and to monitor its progress using Couette flow linear dichroism (LD) throughout the irradiation period. The dependence of LD signals on DNA sequences and on time in the intense light beam was explored and quantified for single-stranded poly(dA), poly[(dA-dT)(2)], calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and Micrococcus luteus DNA (mlDNA). The DNA and ligand regions of the spectrum showed different LD kinetic behaviors, and there was significant sequence dependence of the kinetics. However, in contrast to expectations from the literature, we found that poly(dA), mlDNA, low salt ctDNA and low salt poly[(dA-dT)(2)] all had significant populations of groove-bound YOYO. It seems that this mode was predominantly responsible for the catalysis of DNA cleavage. In homopolymeric DNAs, intercalated YOYO was unable to cleave DNA. In mixed-sequence DNAs the data suggest that YOYO in some but not all intercalated binding sites can cause cleavage. It is also likely that cleavage occurs at transient single-stranded regions. The reaction rates for a 100 mA beam current of 0.5-μW power varied from 0.6 h(-1) for single-stranded poly(dA) to essentially zero for low salt poly[(dG-dC)(2)] and high salt poly[(dA-dT)(2)]. At the conclusion of the experiments with each kind of DNA, uncleaved DNA with intercalated YOYO remained. PMID:21931957

  5. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  6. Detection of Higgs bosons decaying to bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.; Price, L.E.

    1986-11-01

    Several developments affecting the possibility of Higgs detection are discussed. These include the level of certainty about the t quark mass, Monte Carlo programs to generate both signal and background events, and separation and/or enhancement of heavy quark jets from jets due to light quarks or gluons, and the possibility that the neutral Higgs decay into bottom quarks might be the decay mode of choice for detecting the intermediate mass Higgs. Possible means of detection of an intermediate mass Higgs at the SSC, particularly if a prominent decay mode is to bottom quarks, are examined, using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo program to generate both signal and background events. For the signal, events were generated in which Higgs bosons are created in proton-proton collisions, with the Higgs decaying into bottom quarks. The presence of W or Z bosons, created in the same proton-proton collision, is used to enhance the likelihood of Higgs production and to reduce the potentially enormous background. It is found that the Higgs decay to bottom quarks, if important, would be more favorable for detection of the Higgs than decay to top quarks was found to be because of the smaller background. 3 refs., 4 figs. (LEW)

  7. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress. PMID:26841503

  8. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress.

  9. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  10. Search for Hadronic Decays of a Light Higgs Boson in the Radiative Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.

    2012-02-16

    The authors search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) produced in radiative decays of an {Upsilon}(2S) or {Upsilon}(3S) meson, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}. The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) center of mass energies, and include (121.3 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and (98.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions {beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) {center_dot} {beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) (n = 2 or 3) that range from 1 x 10{sup -6} for an A{sup 0} mass of 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} to 8 x 10{sup -5} at 7 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Melatonin in Glycyrrhiza uralensis: response of plant roots to spectral quality of light and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Afreen, F; Zobayed, S M A; Kozai, T

    2006-09-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is known to be synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland in vertebrates. Evidence for the occurrence of melatonin in the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plants and the response of this plant to the spectral quality of light including red, blue and white light (control) and UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) for the synthesis of melatonin were investigated. Melatonin was extracted and quantified in seed, root, leaf and stem tissues and results revealed that the root tissues contained the highest concentration of melatonin; melatonin concentrations also increased with plant development. After 3 months of growth under red, blue and white fluorescent lamps, the melatonin concentrations were highest in red light exposed plants and varied depending on the wavelength of light spectrum in the following order red > blue > or = white light. Interestingly, in a more mature plant (6 months) melatonin concentration was increased considerably; the increments in concentration were X4, X5 and X3 in 6-month-old red, blue and white light exposed (control) plants, respectively. The difference in melatonin concentrations between blue and white light exposed (control) plants was not significant. The concentration of melatonin quantified in the root tissues was highest in the plants exposed to high intensity UV-B radiation for 3 days followed by low intensity UV-B radiation for 15 days. The reduction of melatonin under longer periods of UV-B exposure indicates that melatonin synthesis may be related to the integrated (intensity and duration) value of UV-B irradiation. Melatonin in G. uralensis plant is presumably for protection against oxidative damage caused as a response to UV irradiation.

  12. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  13. Quark-mass dependence of two-nucleon observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Lee, Tze-Kei; Liu, C.-P.; Liu, Yu-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    We study the potential implications of lattice QCD determinations of the S-wave nucleon-nucleon scattering lengths with unphysical light quark masses. If the light quark masses are small enough such that nuclear effective field theory (NEFT) can be used to perform quark-mass extrapolations, then the leading quark-mass dependence of not only the effective range and the two-body current, but also all the low-energy deuteron matrix elements up to next-to-leading-order in NEFT can be obtained. As a proof of principle, we compute the quark-mass dependence of the deuteron charge radius, magnetic moment, polarizability, and the deuteron photodisintegration cross section using the lattice calculation of the scattering lengths at 354 MeV pion mass by the ``Nuclear Physics with Lattice QCD'' (NPLQCD) collaboration and the NEFT power counting scheme of Beane, Kaplan, and Vuorinen (BKV), even though it is not yet established that the 354 MeV pion mass is within the radius of convergence of the BKV scheme. Once the lattice result with quark mass within the NEFT radius of convergence is obtained, our observation can be used to constrain the time variation of isoscalar combination of u and d quark mass mq, to help the anthropic principle study to find the mq range that allows the existence of life, and to provide a weak test of the multiverse conjecture.

  14. Fermion masses and neutrino mixing in an U(1){sub H} flavor symmetry model with hierarchical radiative generation for light charged fermion masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Galeana, Albino

    2007-11-01

    I report the analysis performed on fermion masses and mixing, including neutrino mixing, within the context of a model with hierarchical radiative mass generation mechanism for light charged fermions, mediated by exotic scalar particles at one and two loops, respectively, meanwhile the neutrinos get Majorana mass terms at tree level through the Yukawa couplings with two SU(2){sub L} Higgs triplets. All the resulting mass matrices in the model, for the u, d, and e fermion charged sectors, the neutrinos and the exotic scalar particles, are diagonalized in exact analytical form. Quantitative analysis shows that this model is successful to accommodate the hierarchical spectrum of masses and mixing in the quark sector as well as the charged lepton masses. The lepton mixing matrix, V{sub PMNS}, is written completely in terms of the neutrino masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, and m{sub 3}. Large lepton mixing for {theta}{sub 12} and {theta}{sub 23} is predicted in the range of values 0.7 < or approx. sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 12} < or approx. 0.7772 and 0.87 < or approx. sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 23} < or approx. 0.9023 by using 0.033 < or approx. s{sub 13}{sup 2} < or approx. 0.04. These values for lepton mixing are consistent with 3{sigma} allowed ranges provided by recent global analysis of neutrino data oscillation. From {delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2} bounds, neutrino masses are predicted in the range of values m{sub 1}{approx_equal}(1.706-2.494)x10{sup -3} eV, m{sub 2}{approx_equal}(6.675-12.56)x10{sup -3} eV, and m{sub 3}{approx_equal}(1.215-2.188)x10{sup -2} eV, respectively. The above allowed lepton mixing leads to the quark-lepton complementary relations {theta}{sub 12}{sup CKM}+{theta}{sub 12}{sup PMNS}{approx_equal}41.543 deg. -44.066 deg. and {theta}{sub 23}{sup CKM}+{theta}{sub 23}{sup PMNS}{approx_equal}36.835 deg. -38.295 deg. The new exotic scalar particles induce flavor changing neutral currents and contribute to lepton flavor violating processes such as E{yields}e{sub 1}e

  15. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  16. 8th Conference Quark Confinement and the Hadron Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QCHS 2008, the 8th International Conferencee on Quark Cofinement and the Hadron Spectrum was held from 1 - 6 September 2008 in Mainz at the Johannes-Gutenberg University. This conference was the eighth in a series whose aim it is to bring together people working in QCD and strong-interaction dynamics. This year 206 scientists from 24 countries met in Mainz, for the first time in Germany. The scientific program of the Confinement Conference consisted of 33 plenary talks and parallel sessions covering the following topics: - Vaccuum Structure and Confinement - Light Quarks - Heavy Quarks - Deconfinement - QCD and New Physics - Nuclear and Astroparticle Physics

  17. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  18. Development of a liquid-crystal-based real-time radiation dosimeter based on electro optical light modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ye Ji; Kim, Kyo Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee; Park, Sung-Kwang; Noh, Si Cheul; Kang, Sang Sick; Park, Ji-Koon

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of a radiation dosimeter that can monitor radiation exposure in real time based on the electro optical modulation of a liquid crystal (LC) cell and the photoconductor cadmium sulfide (CdS). Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is often used in photosensors because of its high reproducibility and sensitivity to light and radiation. As basic research, the electro optical features of a LC cell and a novel CdS photosensor were analyzed from the viewpoint of fabricating a radiation dosimeter. Based on the results, the feasibility of such a detection device was studied by analyzing the efficiency of its electro optical light modulation. The measurement results suggested that the detection system had high resolution and very good reproducibility, with CdS showing excellent X-ray detection efficiency. The results suggest that noise reduction can be achieved by incorporating an LC, given its static electric features. The results of this study could help realize real-time portable radiation dosimeter systems based on optical modulation and using a CdS photosensor.

  19. An enhancing effect of visible light and UV radiation on phenolic compounds and various antioxidants in broad bean seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Hasaneen, Mohammed Naguib Abdel-Ghany; Abdel-Aziz, Heba Mahmoud Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of dark- or ambient visible light-grown broad bean seedlings to low (LL) and high (HL) visible light intensities, UV-A or UV-C, either alone or in combination, induced significant increases in total phenolic compounds as well as in anthocyanins content, throughout the germination period, as compared with the respective levels in control seedlings. In general, as compared with control levels, exposure of both dark- or light-grown broad bean seedlings to LL, HL, UV-A or UV-C, induced significant increases in the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants (total ascorbate; ASA-DASA and total glutathione; GSSG-GSH) and enzymatic antioxidant activities (superoxide dismutase; SOD, catalase; CAT, ascorbate peroxidase; APO and glutathione reductase; GR). The obtained results are discussed in relation to induced mechanisms of protection and repair from the inevitable exposure to damaging visible light and UV radiation. PMID:20505357

  20. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ρDA~10/μt‧ and tDA~20/vμt‧ where μt‧ and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  1. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  2. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  3. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  4. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  5. Radiation Force Caused by Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    General formulas for computing the radiation force exerted on arbitrarily oriented and arbitrarily shaped nonspherical particles due to scattering, absorption, and emission of electromagnetic radiation are derived. For randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry, the formula for the average radiation force caused by the particle response to external illumination reduces to the standard Debye formula derived from the Lorenz-Mie theory, whereas the average radiation force caused by emission vanishes.

  6. Quark and Gluon Tagging at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallicchio, Jason; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2011-10-01

    Being able to distinguish light-quark jets from gluon jets on an event-by-event basis could significantly enhance the reach for many new physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider. Through an exhaustive search of existing and novel jet substructure observables, we find that a multivariate approach can filter out over 95% of the gluon jets while keeping more than half of the light-quark jets. Moreover, a combination of two simple variables, the charge track multiplicity and the pT-weighted linear radial moment (girth), can achieve similar results. Our study is only Monte Carlo based, so other observables constructed using different jet sizes and parameters are used to highlight areas that deserve further theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Additional information, including distributions of around 10 000 variables, can be found at http://jets.physics.harvard.edu/qvg/.

  7. Clustering in a quark gas

    SciTech Connect

    Welke, G.M.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    In an infinite one-dimensional quark gas it is shown that a static color force, which increases at large distance, leads to a density fluctuation in the ground state. A self-consistent mean field can only be found for an effectively attractive quark-quark interaction that increases less than linearly at large distances. For a fixed coupling constant, the clustering disappears at high quark density.

  8. Bound States of (Anti-)Scalar-Quarks in SU(3)c Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, H.; Takahashi, T. T.; Suganuma, H.

    2007-06-13

    Light scalar-quarks {phi} (colored scalar particles or idealized diquarks) and their color-singlet hadronic states are studied with quenched SU(3)c lattice QCD in terms of mass generation. We investigate 'scalar-quark mesons' {phi}{dagger}{phi} and 'scalar-quark baryons' {phi}{phi}{phi} as the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi}. We also investigate the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi} and quarks {psi}, i.e., {phi}{dagger}{psi}, {psi}{psi}{phi} and {phi}{phi}{psi}, which we name 'chimera hadrons'. All the new-type hadrons including {phi} are found to have a large mass due to large quantum corrections by gluons, even for zero bare scalar-quark mass m{phi} = 0 at a-1 {approx} 1GeV. We conjecture that all colored particles generally acquire a large effective mass due to dressed gluon effects.

  9. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  10. The heavy quark parton oxymoron: A mini-review of heavy quark production theory in PQCD

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, W.-K.

    1997-04-20

    Conventional perturbative QCD calculations on the production of a heavy quark 'H' consist of two contrasting approaches: the usual QCD parton formalism uses the zero-mass approximation (m{sub H}=0) once above threshold, and treats H just like the other light partons; on the other hand, most recent 'NLO' heavy quark calculations treat m{sub H} as a large parameter and always consider H as a heavy particle, never as a parton, irrespective of the energy scale of the physical process. By their very nature, both these approaches are limited in their regions of applicability. This dichotomy can be resolved in a unified general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, which retains the m{sub H} dependence at all energies, and which naturally reduces to the two conventional approaches in their respective region of validity. Recent applications to lepto- and hadro-production of heavy quarks are briefly summarized.

  11. [Study on the stability variation mechanism of humic acid water solution after radiated by the UV light].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Zhou, Li-chuan; Ding, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Ping; Sun, Xue-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Humic acid widely presents in various surface waters. Molecular structure has significant impacts on its physical and chemical properties. To explore the stability variation of humic acid before and after the UV light radiation, spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis were applied in this paper. Structural parameters selected in the experiments include reactive sites, such as phenolic hydroxyl and carboxyl contents, Zeta potential, and colloidal size. It was found that there was little humic acid being removed in the solution without UV radiation pretreatment; while its remove ratio increased notably with radiation time. After 3 h pretreatment, humic acid removal ratio was above 80% in coagulation. Spectroscopy analysis results showed that partial of the groups with fluorescent effects might be shed or rearranged after the radiation; while its aromatic structure was not destroyed. Both the Zeta potential and average colloidal size decreased with the radiation time, which was not conducive to the aggregation of humic acid. However, -OH content decreased slightly after the UV radiation, and new carboxyl and carbonyl groups formed simultaneously. The increasing of the reactive sites and the improvement of the reaction effectiveness were the major reasons leading to humic acid stability decrease in PAC! coagulation. PMID:24364311

  12. [Study on the stability variation mechanism of humic acid water solution after radiated by the UV light].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Zhou, Li-chuan; Ding, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Ping; Sun, Xue-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Humic acid widely presents in various surface waters. Molecular structure has significant impacts on its physical and chemical properties. To explore the stability variation of humic acid before and after the UV light radiation, spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis were applied in this paper. Structural parameters selected in the experiments include reactive sites, such as phenolic hydroxyl and carboxyl contents, Zeta potential, and colloidal size. It was found that there was little humic acid being removed in the solution without UV radiation pretreatment; while its remove ratio increased notably with radiation time. After 3 h pretreatment, humic acid removal ratio was above 80% in coagulation. Spectroscopy analysis results showed that partial of the groups with fluorescent effects might be shed or rearranged after the radiation; while its aromatic structure was not destroyed. Both the Zeta potential and average colloidal size decreased with the radiation time, which was not conducive to the aggregation of humic acid. However, -OH content decreased slightly after the UV radiation, and new carboxyl and carbonyl groups formed simultaneously. The increasing of the reactive sites and the improvement of the reaction effectiveness were the major reasons leading to humic acid stability decrease in PAC! coagulation.

  13. Implications of using transmitted vs. reflected light for determining cloud properties, cloud radiative effects and aerosol-cloud-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Redemann, J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Flynn, C. J.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.; Woods, S.; Lawson, P.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Light transmitted through clouds is sensitive to a different cloud volume than reflected light at cloud top. This difference in sampling volumes has implications when calculating the radiative effects of clouds (CRE) and aerosol-cloud-interactions (ACI). We present a comparison of retrieved cloud properties and the corresponding CRE and ACI based on transmitted and reflected light for a cloud sampled during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, 2013) field campaign. Measurements of zenith radiances were obtained from the NASA DC-8 aircraft using the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument. 4STAR was deployed on an airborne platform during SEAC4RS alongside the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR). To retrieve cloud properties from transmitted shortwave radiation, we use a retrieval utilizing spectrally resolved measurements. Spectral features in shortwave radiation transmitted through clouds are sensitive to changes in cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase. The spectral features due to absorption and scattering processes by liquid water and ice cloud particles include shifts in spectral slopes, curvatures, maxima, and minima of cloud-transmitted radiance. These spectral features have been quantified by 15 parameters used to retrieve cloud properties from the 4STAR zenith radiances. Retrieved cloud optical thicknesses and effective radii based on transmitted shortwave radiation are compared to their counterparts obtained from reflected shortwave radiation measured above cloud with MODIS and with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), and SSFR operating aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Remotely sensed cloud particle effective radius are combined with in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol particles from the NASA Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) CCN Counter

  14. Top quark pair production at NNLO in the quark-antiquark channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelof, Gabriel; Ridder, Aude Gehrmann-De; Majer, Imre

    2015-12-01

    We present the derivation of the NNLO two-parton final state contributions to top pair production in the quark-antiquark channel proportionnal to the leading colour factor N c 2 . Together with the three and four-parton NNLO contributions presented in a previous publication, this enables us to complete the phenomenologically most important NNLO corrections to top pair hadro-production in this channel. We derive this two-parton contribution using the massive extension of the NNLO antenna subtraction formalism and implement those corrections in a parton-level event generator providing full kinematical information on all final state particles. In addition, we also derive the heavy quark contributions proportional to N h . Combining the new leading-colour and heavy quark contributions together with the light quark contributions derived previously, we present NNLO differential distributions for LHC and Tevatron. We also compute the differential top quark forward-backward asymmetry at Tevatron and find that our results are in good agreement with the measurements by the D0 collaboration.

  15. Flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea and the five-quark components of the nucleons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chen; Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2011-06-24

    The existence of the five-quark Fock states for the intrinsic charm quark in the nucleons was suggested some time ago, but conclusive evidence is still lacking. We generalize the previous theoretical approach to the light-quark sector and study possible experimental signatures for such five-quark states. In particular, we compare the d-ū and ū + d-s-s data with the calculations based on the five-quark Fock states. The qualitative agreement between the data and the calculations is interpreted as evidence for the existence of the intrinsic light-quark sea in the nucleons. The probabilities for the |uuduū and |uuddd Fock states are also extracted.

  16. Top Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I will discuss the status of those techniques and their results, and present a brief outlook of further improvements in the experimental determination of the top quark mass to be expected at the LHC and beyond.

  17. Effects of UV-B radiation on tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta), and effects of red and blue light on repair of UV-B-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of red and blue light on the repair of UV-B radiation-induced damage in tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm. Tetraspores of C. ocellatus were treated with different UV-B radiation levels (0, 36, 72, 108, 144 and 180 J/m2), and thereafter subjected to PAR, darkness, or red or blue light during a 2-h repair stage, each day for 48 days. The diameters and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPDs), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporinelike amino acids (MAAs) contents of the tetraspores were determined. Our results show that low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) promoted the growth of C. ocellatus; however, increased UV-B radiation gradually reduced the C. ocellatus growth (greater than 72 J/m2). The MAAs (palythine and asterina-330) in C. ocellatus were detected and analyzed by LC/MS. Our results suggest that moderate red light could induce the growth of this alga in aquaculture. In addition, photorepair was inhibited by red light, so there may be some other DNA repair mechanism activated by red light. Blue light promoted the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency. Red and blue lights were found to reduce the capacity of C. ocellatus to form MAAs. Therefore, PAR, red light, and blue light play different roles during the repair processes for damage induced by UV-B radiation.

  18. Effect of 16 and 24 hours daily radiation (light) on lettuce growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    A 50% increase in total radiation by extending the photoperiod from 16 to 24 hr doubled the weight of all cultivars of loose-leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) 'Grand Rapids Forcing', 'Waldmanns Green', 'Salad Bowl', and 'RubyConn', but not a Butterhead cultivar, 'Salina'. When total daily radiation (moles of photons) was the same, plants under continuous radiation weighed 30% to 50% more than plants under a 16 hr photoperiod. By using continuous radiation on loose-leaf lettuce, fewer lamp fixtures were required and yield was increased.

  19. Characterization of Damage of Al2O3/Ge Gate Stack Structure Induced with Light Radiation during Plasma Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumandari; Takeuchi, Wakana; Kato, Kimihiko; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of light radiation during plasma nitridation on the electrical properties of an Al2O3/Ge gate stack structure using the pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE) technique. From the capacitance-voltage characteristics, the flatband voltage shift due to fixed oxide charges significantly increases after light exposure with an energy higher than 7.5 eV. In addition, the density of trapped charges near the interface and the interface state density (Dit) also significantly increase after light exposure with an energy over 11.3 eV. The net density of positive fixed oxide charges, the density of trapped charges near the interface, and Dit can be reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) in N2 ambient at 300 °C.

  20. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  1. Using the human eye to image space radiation or the history and status of the light flash phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuglesang, C.

    2007-10-01

    About 80% of people who travel in space experience sudden phosphenes, commonly called light flashes (LF). Although the detailed physiological process is still not known, the LFs are caused by particles in the cosmic radiation field. Indeed, by counting LFs one can even make a crude image of the radiation environment around the Earth. Studies on the space station Mir with the SilEye experiment correlated LFs with charged particles traversing the eye. It was found that a nucleus in the radiation environment has roughly a 1% probability of causing a light flash, whereas the proton's probability is almost three orders of magnitude less. As a function of linear energy transfer (LET), the probability increased with ionization above 10 keV/μm, reaching about 5% at 50 keV/μm. The investigations are continuing on the International Space Station (ISS) with the Alteino/SileEye-3 detector, which is also a precursor to the large Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) facility. These detectors are also measuring—imaging—the radiation environment inside the ISS, which will be compared to Geant4 simulations from the DESIRE project. To further the understanding of the LF phenomena, a survey among current NASA and ESA astronauts was recently conducted. The LFs are predominantly noticed before sleep and some respondents even thought it disturbed their sleep. The LFs appear white, have elongated shapes, and most interestingly, often come with a sense of motion. Comparing the shapes quoted from space observations with ground experiments done by researchers in the 1970s, it seems likely that some 5-10% of the LFs in space are due to Cherenkov light in the eye. However, the majority is most likely caused by some direct interaction in the retina.

  2. D{O} top quark mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on (44-48 pb{sup -1}) of lepton + jets data, we review D0`s initial analysis of the top quark mass. The result, M{sub top} = 199 {+-} 19/21 (stat.) {+-} 22 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, is insensitive to background normalization. The errors are based on ISAJET top Monte Carlo, with its more severe gluon radiation, and allow for ISAJET/HERWIG differences. Good progress is being made in reducing the systematic error. We present a new study based on two-dimensional distributions of reconstructed top quark vs. dijet mass. With 98.7% confidence we observe a peak in the top mass - dijet mass plane. The peak and its projections are similar both in shape and magnitude to expectations based on the decay sequence 1 {yields} bW, W {yields} jj.

  3. Effects of heavy sea quarks at low energies.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mattia; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Leder, Björn; Sommer, Rainer

    2015-03-13

    We present a factorization formula for the dependence of light hadron masses and low energy hadronic scales on the mass M of a heavy quark: apart from an overall mass-independent factor Q, ratios such as r_{0}(M)/r_{0}(0) are computable in perturbation theory at large M. The perturbation theory part is stable concerning different loop orders. Our nonperturbative Monte Carlo results obtained in a model calculation, where a doublet of heavy quarks is decoupled, match quantitatively to the perturbative prediction. Upon taking ratios of different hadronic scales at the same mass, the perturbative function drops out and the ratios are given by the decoupled theory up to M^{-2} corrections. We verify-in the continuum limit-that the sea quark effects of quarks with masses around the charm mass are very small in such ratios.

  4. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Christ, N. H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R. J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R. D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R. D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D. J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-04-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities (fπ , fK, BK, mu d, ms, t01 /2, w0) obtained from simulations of 2 +1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O (3 )%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum "global fit" with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of mπ, mK and mΩ to determine the two quark masses and the scale—all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with subpercent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including fπ=130.2 (9 ) MeV ; fK=155.5 (8 ) MeV ; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK, in the renormalization group invariant scheme, 0.750(15) and the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  5. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF QUARKS IN THE QUARK-GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.; KITAZAWA, M.

    2007-07-30

    We analyze the spectral properties of the quark propagator above the critical temperature for the deconfinement phase transition in quenched lattice QCD using clover improved Wilson fermions. The bare quark mass dependence of the quark spectral function is analyzed by varying the hopping parameter {kappa} in Landau gauge. We assume a two-pole structure for the quark spectral function, which is numerically found to work quite well for any value of {kappa}. It is shown that in the chiral limit the quark spectral function has two collective modes that correspond to the normal and plasmino excitations, while it is dominated by a single-pole structure when the bare quark mass becomes large.

  6. My Life with Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glashow, Sheldon Lee

    2015-03-01

    This is a personal, anecdotal and autobiographical account of my early endeavors in particle physics, emphasizing how they interwove with the conception and eventual acceptance of the quark hypothesis. I focus on the years from 1958, when my doctoral work at Harvard was completed, to 1970, when John Iliopoulos, Luciano Maiani and I introduced the GIM mechanism, thereby extending the electroweak model to include all known particles, and some that were not then known. I have not described the profound advances in quantum field theory and the many difficult and ingenious experimental efforts that undergird my story which is not intended to be an inclusive record of this exciting decade of my discipline. My tale begins almost two years before I met Murray and over five years before the invention of quarks...

  7. SHEDDING LIGHT ON CORALS HEALTH: INTERACTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SOLAR RADIATION WITH BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral bleaching and declines in coral reef health in recent years have been attributed in part to processes driven by UV and/or visible light. For coral assemblages, exposure to UV light is often an unavoidable consequence of having access to visible (photosynthetically active) ...

  8. Pion valence-quark parton distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lei; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2015-10-01

    Within the Dyson-Schwinger equation formulation of QCD, a rainbow ladder truncation is used to calculate the pion valence-quark distribution function (PDF). The gap equation is renormalized at a typical hadronic scale, of order 0.5 GeV, which is also set as the default initial scale for the pion PDF. We implement a corrected leading-order expression for the PDF which ensures that the valence-quarks carry all of the pion's light-front momentum at the initial scale. The scaling behavior of the pion PDF at a typical partonic scale of order 5.2 GeV is found to be (1 - x) ν, with ν ≃ 1.6, as x approaches one.

  9. The discovery of quarks.

    PubMed

    Riordan, M

    1992-05-29

    Quarks are widely recognized today as being among the elementary particles of which matter is composed. The key evidence for their existence came from a series of inelastic electron-nucleon scattering experiments conducted between 1967 and 1973 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Other theoretical and experimental advances of the 1970s confirmed this discovery, leading to the present standard model of elementary particle physics.

  10. Two-dimensional HID light source radiative transfer using discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrib, Basma; Bouaoun, Mohamed; Elloumi, Hatem

    2016-08-01

    This paper shows the implementation of the Discrete Ordinates Method for handling radiation problems in High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Therefore, we start with presenting this rigorous method for treatment of radiation transfer in a two-dimensional, axisymmetric HID lamp. Furthermore, the finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the Radiative Transfer Equation. The atom and electron densities were calculated using temperature profiles established by a 2D semi-implicit finite-element scheme for the solution of conservation equations relative to energy, momentum, and mass. Spectral intensities as a function of position and direction are first calculated, and then axial and radial radiative fluxes are evaluated as well as the net emission coefficient. The results are given for a HID mercury lamp on a line-by-line basis. A particular attention is paid on the 253.7 nm resonance and 546.1 nm green lines.

  11. High Conductivity Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipes for Light Weight Space Power System Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on prior successful fabrication and demonstration testing of a carbon-carbon heat pipe radiator element with integral fins this paper examines the hypothetical extension of the technology via substitution of high thermal conductivity composites which would permit increasing fin length while still maintaining high fin effectiveness. As a result the specific radiator mass could approach an ultimate asymptotic minimum value near 1.0 kg/m2, which is less than one fourth the value of present day satellite radiators. The implied mass savings would be even greater for high capacity space and planetary surface power systems, which may require radiator areas ranging from hundreds to thousands of square meters, depending on system power level.

  12. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  13. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  14. Sneaky light stop

    DOE PAGES

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore » to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  15. Heavy Quark Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2010-07-09

    Heavy hadrons containing heavy quarks (for example, {Upsilon} mesons) feature a scale separation between the heavy-quark mass and the QCD scale that controls the effective masses of lighter constituents. As in ordinary molecules, the deexcitation of the lighter, faster degrees of freedom leaves the velocity distribution of the heavy quarks unchanged, populating the available decay channels in qualitatively predictable ways. Automatically an application of the Franck-Condon principle of molecular physics explains several puzzling results of {Upsilon}(5S) decays as measured by the Belle Collaboration, such as the high rate of B{sub s}*B{sub s}* versus B{sub s}*B{sub s} production, the strength of three-body B{sup *}B{pi} decays, or the dip in B momentum shown in these decays. We argue that the data show the first Sturm-Liouville zero of the {Upsilon}(5S) quantum-mechanical squared wave function and provide evidence for a largely bb composition of this meson.

  16. Light, literacy and the absence of ultraviolet radiation in the development of myopia.

    PubMed

    Prepas, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    As the prevalence of myopia steadily increases, reaching as high as 90% in some populations, investigators continue to look for causative factors other than family history. Most current research suggests an association of axial myopia with reading or either the presence or absence of light. Even though these studies are frequently inconsistent, non-reproducible or contradictory, many clinicians utilize them in recommending treatments for children, such as bifocals or atropine. By reviewing the biologic effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields, we may gain insight into these discrepancies as well as unify the combined role of literacy and light in the pathogenesis of myopia. These biologic effects are wavelength specific. The wavelength of artificial (either incandescent or fluorescent) light is primarily 700-400 nm, while the wavelength of natural light is 700-200 nm, inclusive of the ultraviolet spectrum. So the opposite findings of myopia resulting from either accommodation under continuous light or under darkness (form deprivation) can be reconciled by restating it: Close focusing in the absence of UV light may provoke axial myopia. Experimental evidence exhibiting both scleral remodeling under accommodation as well as the inhibition of scleral remodeling by the hardening of collagen under ultraviolet exposure may support this concept. Perhaps new research can look into the role of the presence or absence of UV light in animal models of myopia.

  17. Impacts of diffuse radiation on light use efficiency across terrestrial ecosystems based on Eddy covariance observation in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R(2) = 0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction.

  18. Lattice simulations with Nf=2 +1 improved Wilson fermions at a fixed strange quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Scholz, Enno E.; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang; RQCD Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The explicit breaking of chiral symmetry of the Wilson fermion action results in additive quark mass renormalization. Moreover, flavor singlet and nonsinglet scalar currents acquire different renormalization constants with respect to continuum regularization schemes. This complicates keeping the renormalized strange quark mass fixed when varying the light quark mass in simulations with Nf=2 +1 sea quark flavors. Here we present and validate our strategy within the CLS (coordinated lattice simulations) effort to achieve this in simulations with nonperturbatively order-a improved Wilson fermions. We also determine various combinations of renormalization constants and improvement coefficients.

  19. Quark Contributions to Nucleon Momentum and Spin from Domain Wall fermion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    S. N. Syritsyn, J. R. Green, J. W. Negele, A. V. Pochinsky, M. Engelhardt, Ph. Hagler, B. Musch, W. Schroers

    2011-12-01

    We report contributions to the nucleon spin and momentum from light quarks calculated using dynamical domain wall fermions with pion masses down to 300 MeV and fine lattice spacing a=0.084 fm. Albeit without disconnected diagrams, we observe that spin and orbital angular momenta of both u and d quarks are opposite, almost canceling in the case of the d quark, which agrees with previous calculations using a mixed quark action. We also present the full momentum dependence of n=2 generalized form factors showing little variation with the pion mass.

  20. Determining the molecular origin of radiation damage/enhancement in electro-optic polymeric materials through polarized light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Moreno, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies on the radiation effects upon polymer and polymer-based photonic materials suggest that the radiation resistance of the material is heavily dependent on the choice of polymer-host and guest-chromophore. The best results to date have been achieved with electro optic polymeric materials based on CLD1 doped in APC, which has resulted in improved performance at the device level upon gamma-ray irradiation at moderate doses. Still, our understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the enhancement of the performance is unclear. In this paper, we discuss how polarized light microscopy could be used as a means to quantify the effect of the different physical parameters that influence the optical response of electro-optic polymeric thin film samples.

  1. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  2. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  3. Excitation rates of heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, C. A.; Santangelo, E. M.; Ducati, M. B.

    1985-06-01

    We obtain the production rates for c, b, and t quarks in deep-inelastic neutrino- (antineutrino-) nucleon interactions, in the standard six-quark model with left-handed couplings. The results are obtained with the most recent mixing parameters and we include a comparison between quark parametrizations. The excitations are calculated separately for each flavor, allowing the understanding of the role of threshold effects when considered through different rescaling variables.

  4. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  5. Effects of Kaolin Application on Light Absorption and Distribution, Radiation Use Efficiency and Photosynthesis of Almond and Walnut Canopies

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Adolfo; Metcalf, Samuel G.; Buchner, Richard P.; Fulton, Allan E.; Lampinen, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Kaolin applied as a suspension to plant canopies forms a film on leaves that increases reflection and reduces absorption of light. Photosynthesis of individual leaves is decreased while the photosynthesis of the whole canopy remains unaffected or even increases. This may result from a better distribution of light within the canopy following kaolin application, but this explanation has not been tested. The objective of this work was to study the effects of kaolin application on light distribution and absorption within tree canopies and, ultimately, on canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency. Methods Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on individual leaves within the canopy of almond (Prunus dulcis) and walnut (Juglans regia) trees was measured before and after kaolin application in order to study PAR distribution within the canopy. The PAR incident on, and reflected and transmitted by, the canopy was measured on the same day for kaolin-sprayed and control trees in order to calculate canopy PAR absorption. These data were then used to model canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency by a simple method proposed in previous work, based on the photosynthetic response to incident PAR of a top-canopy leaf. Key Results Kaolin increased incident PAR on surfaces of inner-canopy leaves, although there was an estimated 20 % loss in PAR reaching the photosynthetic apparatus, due to increased reflection. Assuming a 20 % loss of PAR, modelled photosynthesis and photosynthetic radiation use efficiency (PRUE) of kaolin-coated leaves decreased by only 6·3 %. This was due to (1) more beneficial PAR distribution within the kaolin-sprayed canopy, and (2) with decreasing PAR, leaf photosynthesis decreases less than proportionally, due to the curvature of the photosynthesis response-curve to PAR. The relatively small loss in canopy PRUE (per unit of incident PAR), coupled with the increased incident PAR on the leaf surface on

  6. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  7. Mechanical effects of light on material media: radiation pressure and the linear and angular momenta of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2014-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves carry energy as well as linear and angular momenta. Interactions between light and material media typically involve the exchange of all three entities. In all such interactions energy and momentum (both linear and angular) are conserved. Johannes Kepler seems to have been the first person to notice that the pressure of sunlight is responsible for the tails of the comets pointing away from the Sun. Modern applications of radiation pressure and photon momentum include solar sails, optical tweezers for optical trapping and micro-manipulation, and optically-driven micro-motors and actuators. This paper briefly describes certain fundamental aspects underlying the mechanical properties of light, and examines several interesting phenomena involving the linear and angular momenta of photons.

  8. Far-field self-focusing and -defocusing radiation behaviors of the electroluminescent light sources due to negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu-Feng; Lin, Yen-Chen; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Shen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jianjang

    2013-01-15

    In recent years, researchers have demonstrated negative refraction theoretically and experimentally by pumping optical power into photonic crystal (PhC) or waveguide structures. The concept of negative refraction can be used to create a perfect lens that focuses an object smaller than the wavelength. By inserting two-dimensional PhCs into the peripheral of a semiconductor light emitting structure, this study presents an electroluminescent device with negative refraction in the visible wavelength range. This approach produces polarization dependent collimation behavior in far-field radiation patterns. The modal dispersion of negative refraction results in strong group velocity modulation, and self-focusing and -defocusing behaviors are apparent from light extraction. This study further verifies experimental results by using theoretic calculations based on equifrequency contours. PMID:23454956

  9. Exposure of Metarhizium acridum mycelium to light induces tolerance to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Brancini, Guilherme T P; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto Ú L

    2016-03-01

    Metarhizium acridum is an entomopathogenic fungus commonly used as a bioinsecticide. The conidium is the fungal stage normally employed as field inoculum in biological control programs and must survive under field conditions such as high ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure. Light, which is an important stimulus for many fungi, has been shown to induce the production of M. robertsii conidia with increased stress tolerance. Here we show that a two-hour exposure to white or blue/UV-A light of fast-growing mycelium induces tolerance to subsequent UV-B irradiation. Red light, however, does not have the same effect. In addition, we established that this induction can take place with as little as 1 min of white-light exposure. This brief illumination scheme could be relevant in future studies of M. acridum photobiology and for the production of UV-B resistant mycelium used in mycelium-based formulations for biological control.

  10. Visible supercontinuum radiation of light bullets in the femtosecond filamentation of IR pulses in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekalin, S. V.; Kompanets, V. O.; Dokukina, A. E.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Smetanina, E. O.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of visible supercontinuum generation in the formation of light bullets in a filament produced by IR pulses. In the filamentation of a 1700 - 2200 nm pulse in fused silica, bright tracks are recorded resulting from the recombination glow of carriers in the laser plasma produced by a sequence of light bullets and from the scattering in silica of the visible supercontinuum generated by the light bullets. It is found that the formation of a light bullet is attended with an outburst of a certain portion of supercontinuum energy in the visible range. The energy outburst is the same for all bullets in the sequence and becomes smaller with increasing pulse wavelength.

  11. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  12. [Effect of UV Light Radiation on the Coagulation of Chlorella and Its Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hong-bin; Liu, Guo-qi

    2016-01-15

    Considering algae were difficult to be effectively removed in conventional water treatment process, UV radiation was used to enhance the coagulation of algae in this study. The results showed that with the increase of radiation time, the removal rates of both algae and turbidity experienced a decrease after an increase, and reached their maximum values at 50 min. When the dosage of PAC was 5 mg x L(-1), the removal rates of algae and turbidity of the radiated sample were 20.1% and 18% higher than the blank sample, respectively. When pH ranged from 6 to 9, the coagulation efficiency varied little. At pH 8 and with a radiation time of 50 min, the removal rates of algae and turbidity reached 93.5% and 90.6%, respectively. Meanwhile, the Zeta potential reached the maximum, and the algae generated extracellular organic matter, which favored the subsequent coagulation. After radiated for 60 min, the algal cells was destroyed, leading to a release of intracellular organic matter into the solution. Accordingly, the Zeta potential decreased, which had a negative effect on the subsequent coagulation process. PMID:27078957

  13. Searches for new physics in the top quark samples at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scodellaro, Luca; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    Twelve years after the discovery of the top quark at Fermilab's Tevatron, they are now finally beginning to shed light on this peculiarily massive quark. With 1-1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector, they are able to probe the knowledge of the top quark physics, and to search for signals of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, they present results of measurements of top quark properties, as well as tests for the production mechanism of the top quark. They also describe CDF latest searches for beyond Standard Model couplings of the top quark. Finally, they present the most recent searches for direct production of new particles in the collected data samples.

  14. Interaction of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and ionizing radiation in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Kostron, H.; Swartz, M.R.; Miller, D.C.; Martuza, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and cobalt 60 (/sup 60/Co) irradiation were studied in a rat glioma model using an in vivo and an in vitro clonogenic assay. There was no effect on tumor growth by visible light or by a single dose of /sup 60/Co irradiation at 4 Gy or 8 Gy, whereas 16 Gy inhibited tumor growth to 40% versus the control. Hematoporphyrin derivative alone slightly stimulated growth (P less than 0.1). Light in the presence of 10 mg hematoporphyrin derivative/kg inhibited tumor growth to 32%. /sup 60/Co irradiation in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a significant tumor growth inhibition (P less than 0.02). This growth inhibition was directly related to the concentration of hematoporphyrin derivative. The addition of /sup 60/Co to light in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a greater growth inhibition than light or /sup 60/Co irradiation alone. This effect was most pronounced when light was applied 30 minutes before /sup 60/Co irradiation. Our experiments in a subcutaneous rat glioma model suggest a radiosensitizing effect of hematoporphyrin derivative. Furthermore, the photodynamic inactivation is enhanced by the addition of /sup 60/Co irradiation. These findings may be of importance in planning new treatment modalities in malignant brain tumors.

  15. Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe).

    PubMed

    Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2006-08-01

    Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis. PMID:16916290

  16. Astronaut Exposures to Ionizing Radiation in a Lightly-Shielded Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Simonsen, L. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Atwell, W.

    1999-01-01

    The normal working and living areas of the astronauts are designed to provide an acceptable level of protection against the hazards of ionizing radiation of the space environment. Still there are occasions when they must don a spacesuit designed mainly for environmental control and mobility and leave the confines of their better-protected domain. This is especially true for deep space exploration. The impact of spacesuit construction on the exposure of critical astronaut organs will be examined in the ionizing radiation environments of free space, the lunar surface and the Martian surface. The computerized anatomical male model is used to evaluate astronaut self-shielding factors and to determine space radiation exposures to critical radiosensitive human organs.

  17. Radiation Safety Analysis for the Experimental Hutches at the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.S.; Rokni, S.H.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    The LCLS, the world's first x-ray free electron laser, will be constructed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and is expected to be completed in 2009. A two-mirror system will be used in order to reduce background radiation in near and far experimental hutches. This paper describes the layout of the two-mirror system and also reports on the shielding requirements for the experimental hutches. Two beam loss scenarios for radiation sources are discussed: losses from the high energy electron beam hitting beam components and x-rays produced in the 130 m long undulator and scattered on x-ray mirrors. The FLUKA Monte-Carlo particle transport code was used for the shielding design and for the determination of the radiation levels around the experimental hutches.

  18. Role of Light-Induced Scattering in the Optical Limitation of Laser Radiation on the Basis of Fullerene-Containing Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, I. M.; Grigor'ev, V. A.; Danilov, O. B.; Kalintsev, A. G.; Kris'ko, A. V.; Mironova, N. G.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2001-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the contribution of light-induced scattering to nonlinear optical limitation is made. It is shown that light-induced scattering makes a considerable contribution to the optical limitation of radiation by fullerene-containing solutions. Radiation is scattered by small-scale (1 10 μm) inhomogeneities of density, and the corresponding increments are rather large. Because of this, scattering can be initiated by small-scale inhomogeneities of the input beam. Numerical simulation of nonlinear scattering is made, and the angular distribution and limitation of radiation in optical limiters are calculated. The calculation results are compared with the experiment.

  19. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  20. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  1. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  2. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  3. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  4. Search of anomalous $Wtb$ couplins in single top quark prodution at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Jyoti; Beri, Suman; /Panjab U.

    2011-12-01

    The large mass of the top quark, close to the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale, makes it a good candidate for probing physics beyond the Standard Model, including possible anomalous couplings. D0 has made measurements of single top quark production using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We examine the data to study the Lorentz structure of the Wtb coupling. We find that the data prefer the left-handed vector coupling and set upper limits on the anomalous couplings. In 2009, the electroweak single top quark production was observed by the D0 and CDF collaborations. Electroweak production of top quarks at the Tevatron proceeds mainly via the decay of a time-like virtual W boson accompanied by a bottom quark in the s-channel (tb = t{bar b} + {bar t}b), or via the exchange of a space-like virtual W boson between a light quark and a bottom quark in the t-channel (tqb = tq{bar b} + {bar t}qb, where q refers to the light quark). For a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV, The Standard Model (SM) prediction of single top production rate at next-to-leading order with soft-gluon contributions at next-to-next-to-leading order are 1.04 {+-} 0.04 pb (s-channel) and 2.26 {+-} 0.12 pb (t-channel). The large mass of the top quark implies that it has large couplings to the electroweak symmetry breaking sector of the SM and may have non-standard interactions with the weak gauge bosons. Single top quark production provides a unique probe to study the interactions of the top quark with the W boson.

  5. Investigation of Cherenkov Light in an Oil Drum with Cosmic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedel, Zachary; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Castro, Juan; Zavala, Favian; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) have been around for decades and have become well understood in their use as cosmic ray detectors. Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs), on the other hand, are still being explored as more viable, cost-effective light detector for counting cosmic rays. To detect cosmic rays by the Cherenkov effect, we placed an acrylic cylinder, with wavelength-shifting fibers coiled around it and filled with distilled water, inside a light-tight box that was able to detect the weak light signals with PMTs (1 and 3 inch), an MPPC (3 mm × 3 mm), and with coincidence between different detectors. Additionally, we utilized an oil drum with approximate volume of 30 gallons as a light-tight vessel to conduct coincidence counts for detecting cosmic rays using the PMTs and MPPCs (3 mm × 3 mm and 1 mm × 1 mm). In this poster presentation, we would present our findings as a comparative analysis between the two different vessels and the efficiency thereof of the same to determine whether or not the MPPC is a viable instrument for detecting cosmic rays that produce Cherenkov light. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  6. Interactions of Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate with Light Induced Chemical Reactions in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet radiation that reach the surface of North American aquatic environments. Concurrent changes in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in changes in stratification and precipitation that ar...

  7. Light Absorption Properties and Radiative Effects of Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic aerosols (OA) in the atmosphere affect Earth’s energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called “brown carbon” (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OA are not or poorly represented in current climate m...

  8. Peach ( Prunus persica L. Batsch) allergen-encoding genes are developmentally regulated and affected by fruit load and light radiation.

    PubMed

    Botton, Alessandro; Andreotti, Carlo; Costa, Guglielmo; Ramina, Angelo

    2009-01-28

    The fruits of Rosaceae species may frequently induce allergic reactions in both adults and children, especially in the Mediterranean area. In peach, true allergens and cross-reactive proteins may cause hypersensitive reactions involving a wide diversity of symptoms. Three known classes of allergenic proteins, namely, Pru p 1, Pru p 3, and Pru p 4, have been reported to be mostly involved, but an exhaustive survey of the proteins determining the overall allergenic potential, their biological functions, and the factors affecting the expression of the related genes is still missing. In the present study, the expression profiles of some selected genes encoding peach allergen isoforms were studied during fruit growth and development and upon different fruit load and light radiation regimens. The results indicate that the majority of allergen-encoding genes are expressed at their maximum during the ripening stage, therefore representing a potential risk for peach consumers. Nevertheless, enhancing the light radiation and decreasing the fruit load achieved a reduction of the transcription rate of most genes and a possible decrease of the overall allergenic potential at harvest. According to these data, new growing practices could be set up to obtain hypoallergenic peach fruits and eventually combined with the cultivation of hypoallergenic genotypes to obtain a significant reduction of the allergenic potential.

  9. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  11. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium. PMID:27494468

  12. Quark Gluon Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  13. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  14. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm‑3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (˜ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  15. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm‑3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (∼ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  16. Dual Higgs Mechanism for Quarks in Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Sasaki, S.; Toki, H.; Ichie, H.

    We study nonperturbative features of QCD using the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory, where the color confinement is realized through the dual Higgs mechanism brought by QCD-monopole condensation. The linear confinement potential appears in the QCD-monopole condensed vacuum. We study the infrared screening effect to the confinement potential by the light-quark pair creation, and derive a compact formula for the screened quark potential. We study the dynamical chiral-symmetry breaking (DχSB) in the DGL theory by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation. QCD-monopole condensation plays an essential role to DχSB. The QCD phase transition at finite temperature is studied using the effective potential formalism in the DGL theory. We find the reduction of QCD-monopole condensation and the string tension at high temperatures. The surface tension is calculated using the effective potential at the critical temperature T_c. The DGL theory predicts a large mass reduction of glueballs near T_c. We apply the DGL theory to the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP) physics in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We propose a new scenario of the QGP formation via the annihilation of color-electric flux tubes based on the attractive force between them.

  17. The PEP Quark Search Proportional Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. I.; Harris, F.; Karliner, I.; Yount, D.; Ely, R.; Hamilton, R.; Pun, T.; Guryn, W.; Miller, D.; Fries, R.

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (λi) and is followed in both arms (each with 45° <= θ <= 135°. Δphi = 90°) by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 λi thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 λi thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH4 gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be > 98% for q = 1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q = 1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  18. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  19. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  20. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  1. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  2. Light fermions in composite models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, S. Yu.; Peccei, R. D.

    1993-07-01

    In preon models based on chiral gauge theories, we show that light composite fermions can ensue as a result of gauging a subset of preons in a vectorlike manner. After demonstrating how this mechanism works in a toy example, we construct a one-generation model of quarks which admits a hierarchy between the up and down quark masses as well as between these masses and the compositeness scale. In simple extensions of this model to more generations we discuss the challenges of obtaining any quark mixing. Some possible phenomenological implications of scenarios where quarks and leptons which are heavier are also less pointlike are also considered.

  3. A measurement of quark and gluon jet differences at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Yoshihito

    1994-08-01

    The authors have studied differences between quark and gluon jets using 3-jet events in hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC. Gluon jets were identified in symmetric 3-jet events containing one jet tagged as a heavy quark jet and compared with a mixed sample of quark and gluon jets and also with a mixed sample of light quark (u, d and s) and gluon jets. Their preliminary results show that the particle multiplicity in gluon jets is higher than that in light quark jets. These results are in qualitative agreement with QCD expectations. Differences are also observed in particle energy spectra and the jet widths, consistent with QCD expectations.

  4. Light Scattering by Aerosols Over the Remote Ocean: Clear-Sky Point and Column Radiative Closure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2001-12-01

    Field data gathered by ship and aircraft during leg 2 of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) were used to study clear-sky radiative closure over the remote Southern Ocean. Closure was evaluated by comparing observations with modeled values of: (i) aerosol light scattering coefficients in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere, (ii) total aerosol optical depth, and (iii) total solar radiation at the ocean surface. Point modeling using the ship data benefited from an existing study of closure on the ship, expanding the number of data points considered in that study from 22 to 887. Point and column modeling using the aircraft data provide the first such studies to date. Aerosol light scattering coefficients were calculated from size-distributed measurements of aerosol chemical composition and number concentration, and were compared with observations at three wavelengths (450, 550, and 700 nm) on both ship and aircraft. Point closure on the ship could be achieved at all wavelengths for both total and hemispheric backscattering coefficients if the model accounted for experimental uncertainties in aerosol chemistry, nephelometer nonidealities, and the likely nonsphericity of dried sea salt aerosols. Point closure on the aircraft could be achieved at most wavelengths for total scattering coefficients, but could not be achieved at any wavelengths for hemispheric backscattering coefficients. Deviations between predicted and observed backscattering coefficients on the aircraft were widely scattered rather than biased, indicating that a low signal to noise ratio in observed backscattering coefficients was the likely cause for lack of closure. Aerosol optical depth and solar radiation at the ocean surface were calculated for the two days with clear-sky periods when the aircraft measured aerosol profiles near the ship. Input gas and meteorological data were the observed profiles of ozone, water vapor, temperature, and pressure from the surface to

  5. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  6. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  7. UV Radiation and Visible Light Induce hsp70 Gene Expression in the Antarctic Psychrophilic Ciliate Euplotes focardii.

    PubMed

    Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Passini, Valerio; Colombetti, Giuliano; Miceli, Cristina; La Terza, Antonietta; Marangoni, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The psychrophilic ciliate Euplotes focardii inhabits the shallow marine coastal sediments of Antarctica, where, over millions of years of evolution, it has reached a strict molecular adaptation to such a constant-temperature environment (about -2 °C). This long evolution at sub-zero temperatures has made E. focardii unable to respond to heat stress with the activation of its heat shock protein (hsp) 70 genes. These genes can, however, be expressed in response to other stresses, like the oxidative one, thus indicating that the molecular adaptation has exclusively altered the heat stress signaling pathways, while it has preserved hsp70 gene activation in response to other environmental stressors. Since radiative stress has proved to be affine to oxidative stress in several organisms, we investigated the capability of UV radiation to induce hsp70 transcription. E. focardii cell cultures were exposed to several different irradiation regimes, ranging from visible only to a mixture of visible, UV-A and UV-B. The irradiation values of each spectral band have been set to be comparable with those recorded in a typical Antarctic spring. Using Northern blot analysis, we measured the expression level of hsp70 immediately after irradiation (0-h-labeled samples), 1 h, and 2 h from the end of the irradiation. Surprisingly, our results showed that besides UV radiation, the visible light was also able to induce hsp70 expression in E. focardii. Moreover, spectrophotometric measurements have revealed no detectable endogenous pigments in E. focardii, making it difficult to propose a possible explanation for the visible light induction of its hsp70 genes. Further research is needed to conclusively clarify this point.

  8. UTILITY OF A WIDE SPECTRUM LIGHT METER AS AN UNDERWATER SENSOR OF PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY ACTIVE RADIATION (PAR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The strong attenuation of infra red wavelengths (>700 nm) in coastal waters is suggestive that some instruments with broad spectral responses might be useful, inexpensive substitutes for PAR sensors in studies of estuarine plant dynamics. Wide spectrum (350-1100 nm) light intensi...

  9. Generalized collisional radiative model for light elements: C: Data for the B isonuclear sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Pindzola, M. S.; Griffin, D. C.; Colgan, J. P.; Badnell, N. R.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A first stage collision database is assembled which contains electron-impact excitation, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients for B, B+, B2+, B3+, and B4+. The first stage database is constructed using the R-matrix with pseudostates, time-dependent close-coupling, and perturbative distorted-wave methods. A second stage collision database is then assembled which contains generalized collisional-radiative ionization, recombination, and power loss rate coefficients as a function of both temperature and density. The second stage database is constructed by solution of the collisional-radiative equations in the quasi-static equilibrium approximation using the first stage database. Both collision database stages reside in electronic form at the IAEA Labeled Atomic Data Interface (ALADDIN) database and the Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS) open database.

  10. Engineering non-radiative anapole modes for broadband absorption enhancement of light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Dal Negro, Luca

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we propose a novel, frequency- and angularly- broadband approach to achieve absorption rate enhancement in high-index dielectric nanostructures through the engineering of non-radiative anapole modes. We employ multipolar decomposition of numerically computed current distributions and analyze the far-field scattering power of multipole moments. By leveraging the destructive interference of electric dipole and toroidal dipole moments, we design non-radiating anapole modes and demonstrate significantly enhanced absorbed power in silicon and germanium nanostructures. We demonstrate wide wavelength tunability of the anapole-driven peak absorption enhancement for nano-disks and square nano-pixel geometries, which can be conveniently fabricated with current lithography. Finally, by combining nano-disks and nano-pixels of different sizes into functional surface units, we design nanostructured arrays with enhanced bandwidth and absorption rates that can be useful for the engineering of broadband semiconductor photodetectors driven by controllable anapole responses. PMID:27557185

  11. Engineering non-radiative anapole modes for broadband absorption enhancement of light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Dal Negro, Luca

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we propose a novel, frequency- and angularly- broadband approach to achieve absorption rate enhancement in high-index dielectric nanostructures through the engineering of non-radiative anapole modes. We employ multipolar decomposition of numerically computed current distributions and analyze the far-field scattering power of multipole moments. By leveraging the destructive interference of electric dipole and toroidal dipole moments, we design non-radiating anapole modes and demonstrate significantly enhanced absorbed power in silicon and germanium nanostructures. We demonstrate wide wavelength tunability of the anapole-driven peak absorption enhancement for nano-disks and square nano-pixel geometries, which can be conveniently fabricated with current lithography. Finally, by combining nano-disks and nano-pixels of different sizes into functional surface units, we design nanostructured arrays with enhanced bandwidth and absorption rates that can be useful for the engineering of broadband semiconductor photodetectors driven by controllable anapole responses.

  12. Linear perturbation theory of reionization in position space: Cosmological radiative transfer along the light cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; D'Aloisio, Anson; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Jun; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2015-04-01

    The linear perturbation theory of inhomogeneous reionization (LPTR) has been developed as an analytical tool for predicting the global ionized fraction and large-scale power spectrum of ionized density fluctuations during reionization. In the original formulation of the LPTR, the ionization balance and radiative transfer equations are linearized and solved in Fourier space. However, the LPTR's approximation to the full solution of the radiative transfer equation is not straightforward to interpret, since the latter is most intuitively conceptualized in position space. To bridge the gap between the LPTR and the language of numerical radiative transfer, we present a new, equivalent, position-space formulation of the LPTR that clarifies the approximations it makes and facilitates its interpretation. We offer a comparison between the LPTR and the excursion-set model of reionization (ESMR), and demonstrate the built-in capability of the LPTR to explore a wide range of reionization scenarios, and to go beyond the ESMR in exploring scenarios involving X-rays.

  13. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  14. STRANGE GOINGS ON IN QUARK MATTER.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    2001-06-05

    We review recent work on how the superfluid state of three flavor quark matter is affected by non-zero quark masses and chemical potentials. The study of hadronic matter at high baryon density has recently attracted a lot of interest. At zero baryon density chiral symmetry is broken by a quark-anti-quark condensate. At high density condensation in the quark-anti-quark channel is suppressed. Instead, attractive interactions in the color anti-symmetric quark-quark channel favor the formation of diquark condensates. As a consequence, cold dense quark matter is expected to be a color superconductor. The symmetry breaking pattern depends on the density, the number of quark flavors, and their masses. A particularly symmetric phase is the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of three flavor quark matter. This phase is believed to be the true ground state of ordinary matter at very large density.

  15. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Quark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. |; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin.

  17. Measurement of [ital b] quark fragmentation fractions in the production of strange and light [ital B] mesons in p[bar p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L. ); Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P. ); Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirk, M.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Niu, H. ); Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M. ); Ashmanskas, W.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Nakaya, T. ); Benjamin, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H. ); Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bu

    1999-11-01

    A new technique to measure the ratio of [ital b] quark fragmentation fractions in p[bar p] collisions is described. Using a 70-pb[sup [minus]1] sample of low-mass dimuon trigger data recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab, we identify [ital B] mesons by observing the double semileptonic decays b[r arrow]c[mu]X with c[r arrow]s[mu]X. By counting the numbers of K[sup [asterisk

  18. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  19. Superresolution light microscopy shows nanostructure of carbon ion radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair foci.

    PubMed

    Lopez Perez, Ramon; Best, Gerrit; Nicolay, Nils H; Greubel, Christoph; Rossberger, Sabrina; Reindl, Judith; Dollinger, Günther; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Cremer, Christoph; Huber, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    Carbon ion radiation is a promising new form of radiotherapy for cancer, but the central question about the biologic effects of charged particle radiation is yet incompletely understood. Key to this question is the understanding of the interaction of ions with DNA in the cell's nucleus. Induction and repair of DNA lesions including double-strand breaks (DSBs) are decisive for the cell. Several DSB repair markers have been used to investigate these processes microscopically, but the limited resolution of conventional microscopy is insufficient to provide structural insights. We have applied superresolution microscopy to overcome these limitations and analyze the fine structure of DSB repair foci. We found that the conventionally detected foci of the widely used DSB marker γH2AX (Ø 700-1000 nm) were composed of elongated subfoci with a size of ∼100 nm consisting of even smaller subfocus elements (Ø 40-60 nm). The structural organization of the subfoci suggests that they could represent the local chromatin structure of elementary DSB repair units at the DSB damage sites. Subfocus clusters may indicate induction of densely spaced DSBs, which are thought to be associated with the high biologic effectiveness of carbon ions. Superresolution microscopy might emerge as a powerful tool to improve our knowledge of interactions of ionizing radiation with cells.-Lopez Perez, R., Best, G., Nicolay, N. H., Greubel, C., Rossberger, S., Reindl, J., Dollinger, G., Weber, K.-J., Cremer, C., Huber, P. E. Superresolution light microscopy shows nanostructure of carbon ion radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair foci. PMID:27166088

  20. Relationship between UV-B radiation of the sun and the light trapping of the European Corn Borer (Ostrinia Nubilalis Hbn.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, Janos; Nowinszky, Laszlo; Karossy, Csaba; Toth, Zoltan; Nemeth, Peter; Nagy, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Biological systems are extremely sensitive to changes in ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Atmospheric ozone absorbs considerable part of the UV radiation coming from the sun and harmful for biosphere so only a very small part of it can reach the Earth's surface; thus, organisms adapted to that intensity. The light-trap success of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn.) was examined at those nights when during the previous day the UVB radiation had different intensity. UVB data used for examination come from measurements in the Keszthely observatory of the Hungarian Meteorological Service by Robertson-Berger UV-Biometers. The light-trap catch data of European corn borer originated from the national light-trap network between 1994-1998. Relative catch (RC) values were calculated from the daily data of UVB radiation relating to the summer half-year. The daily data were divided with the weighted average values of previous, actual and following ten days. We calculated RC values from daily light-trap results of European corn borer for all observing stations and swarming times. Our results prove light-trap catch is low if the values of UVB radiation are significantly lower considering the average.

  1. Improvement of color conversion and efficiency droop in hybrid light-emitting diodes utilizing an efficient non-radiative resonant energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, Jiangping; Liu, Bin; Guo, Xu; Li, Yi; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Xie, Zili; Ge, Haixiong; Shi, Yi; Zheng, Youdou; Zhang, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Blue InGaN/GaN nanohole light-emitting diodes have been fabricated by soft UV-curing nanoimprint lithography, filling with CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (NCs) as color conversion mediums. The excitonic recombination dynamics of hybrid nanohole light-emitting diodes were investigated by time-resolved photoluminescence, observing a significant reduction in the decay lifetime of excitons as a result of an efficient non-radiative resonant energy transfer, which leads to the improvement of color conversion and efficiency droop in these hybrid nanohole light-emitting diodes compared to hybrid nanocrystals/standard planar light-emitting diodes. The color-conversion efficiency and effective quantum yield of hybrid nanohole light-emitting diodes were nearly twice as much as those of hybrid standard light-emitting diodes. A model on the excitonic recombination process was proposed to explore this situation, explaining the advantages of non-radiative resonant energy transfer that avoiding energy loss associated with the intermediate light emission and conversion steps and transferring energy non-radiatively and resonantly to NCs with a higher quantum yield. The efficiency droop of hybrid nanohole light-emitting diodes was validly suppressed compared to the bare ones, even better than that of hybrid standard light-emitting diodes. It mainly results from the extraction of excess carrier concentrations in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells via the rapid non-radiative resonant energy transfer process under the higher injection condition, revealing a great potential to realize efficient white light emitters in the future.

  2. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  3. Nonthermal WIMPs as ``dark radiation'' in light of ATACAMA, SPT, WMAP9, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Chris; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2013-07-01

    The Planck and WMAP9 satellites, as well as the ATACAMA and South Pole telescopes, have recently presented results on the angular power spectrum of the comic microwave background. Data tentatively point to the existence of an extra radiation component in the early Universe. Here, we show that this extra component can be mimicked by ordinary weakly interacting massive particle dark matter particles whose majority is cold, but with a small fraction being nonthermally produced in a relativistic state. We present a few example theories where this scenario is explicitly realized and explore the relevant parameter space consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background, and structure formation bounds.

  4. Search for Di-Muon Decays of a Light Scalar Higgs Boson in Radiative Upsilon(1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini

    2013-08-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) in the fully reconstructed decay chain of Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ), Υ(1S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ+. The A0 is predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model (SM), including the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). NMSSM introduces a CP-odd light Higgs boson whose mass could be less than 10 GeV/c2. The data samples used in this analysis contain 92.8 × 106 Υ(2S ) and 116.8 × 106 Υ(3S ) events collected by the BABAR detector. The Υ(1S ) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ) transitions. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S ) → γA0) × B(A0 → μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28 - 9.7) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.20 GeV/c2. We also combine our results with previous BABAR results of Υ(2S, 3S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling ( fΥ) of the b-quark to the A0, f 2 Υ × B(A0 → μ+μ-), at the level of (0.29- 40) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.2 GeV/c2.

  5. Hidden GeV-scale interactions of quarks.

    PubMed

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3-50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z(') bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z(') boson coupled to baryon number and then construct a Z(') model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark couplings as large as 0.2 for a mass of a few GeV.

  6. Running of the bottom quark mass within the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, L.

    2008-11-23

    We compute the exact two-loop matching coefficient for the bottom-quark mass m{sub b}, within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), taking into account O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) contributions from the Supersymmetric Quantum Chromodynamics (SQCD). We find that the three-loop order corrections to the running bottom-quark mass exceed the uncertainty due to the current experimental accuracy. They can reach up to 30% from the tree-level m{sub b}, for models with large values of tan {beta} and relatively light SUSY mass scale.

  7. Hidden GeV-Scale Interactions of Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-08-05

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3 – 50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z' bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z' boson coupled to baryon number, and then construct a Z' model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark couplings as large as 0.2 for a mass of a few GeV.

  8. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  9. Linearized Boltzmann transport model for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Heavy quark evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-07-01

    A linearized Boltzmann transport (LBT) model coupled with hydrodynamical background is established to describe the evolution of jet shower partons and medium excitations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We extend the LBT model to include both elastic and inelastic processes for light and heavy partons in the quark-gluon plasma. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is developed for the hadronization of heavy quarks. Within this framework, we investigate how heavy flavor observables depend on various ingredients, such as different energy loss and hadronization mechanisms, the momentum and temperature dependences of the transport coefficients, and the radial flow of the expanding fireball. Our model calculations show good descriptions of the D meson suppression and elliptic flow observed at the Larege Hadron Collider and the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The prediction for the Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV is provided.

  10. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  11. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up to the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.

  12. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up tomore » the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.« less

  13. What Becomes of Nuclear Risk Assessment in Light of Radiation Hormesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear probabilistic risk or safety assessment (PRA or PSA) is a scientific calculation that uses assumptions and models to determine the likelihood of plant or fuel repository failures and the corresponding releases of radioactivity. Estimated radiation doses to the surrounding population are linked inappropriately to risks of cancer death and congenital malformations. Even though PRAs use very pessimistic assumptions, they demonstrate that nuclear power plants and fuel repositories are very safe compared with the health risks of other generating options or other risks that people readily accept. Because of the frightening negative images and the exaggerated safety and health concerns that are communicated, many people judge nuclear risks to be unacceptable and do not favour nuclear plants. Large-scale tests and experience with nuclear accidents demonstrate that even severe accidents expose the public to only low doses of radiation, and a century of research has demonstrated that such exposures are beneficial to health. A scientific basis for this phenomenon now exists. PRAs are valuable tools for improving plant designs, but if nuclear power is to play a significant role in meeting future energy needs, we must communicate its many real benefits and dispel the negative images formed by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects at high doses. PMID:18648610

  14. System Responses to Equal Doses of Photosynthetically Usable Radiation of Blue, Green, and Red Light in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  15. Apollo-Soyuz light-flash observations. [ionizing radiation effects measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.; Tobias, C. A.; Huesman, R. H.; Upham, F. T.; Wieskamp, T. F.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    While dark adapted, two Apollo-Soyuz astronauts saw eighty-two light flash events during a complete 51 deg orbit which passed near the north magnetic pole and through the South Atlantic Anomaly. The frequency of events at the polar parts of the orbit is 25 times that noted in equatorial latitudes and no increased frequency was noted in the South Atlantic Anomaly at the 225-km altitude. The expected flux of heavy particles at the northern and southern points is 1-2/min per eye, and the efficiency for seeing high Z-high energy (HZE) particles which were below the Cerenkov threshold is 50%.

  16. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung-Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. This NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited to InGaN-based light emitting devices. PMID:27075818

  17. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Grabarek, A.; Moroń, L.; Wałecki, M.; Kryla, P.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before.

  18. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung -Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-04-14

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. As a result, this NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited tomore » InGaN-based light emitting devices.« less

  19. Search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson in the radiative decay Υ→γA0.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2011-11-25

    We search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A(0)) produced in radiative decays of an Υ(2S) or Υ(3S) meson, Υ→γA(0). The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the Υ(3S) and Υ(2S) center-of-mass energies and include (121.3±1.2)×10(6) Υ(3S) and (98.3±0.9)×10(6) Υ(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions B(Υ(nS)→γA(0))B(A(0)→hadrons) (n=2 or 3) that range from 1×10(-6) for an A(0) mass of 0.3 GeV/c(2) to 8×10(-5) at 7 GeV/c(2). PMID:22182022

  20. Evaluation of Er:YAG laser radiation cavity preparation under transmitted and polarized light and by electron microanalyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Rokytova, Kveta; Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel

    1993-12-01

    The results of evaluation of Er:YAG radiation cavity preparation under transmitted and polarized light and by the electron microanalyzer are presented. We examined the longitudinal sections of intact teeth, teeth with early dental caries, teeth with laser preparation in enamel and teeth with Er:YAG laser preparation in enamel and dentine class I and V. We examined intact teeth and laser prepared teeth for the variation of mineralization. Phosphorus and calcium were regularly distributed. The margins of cavities had no necrosis zones. The defects of mineralization in caries depend on demineralization of hard tissues. In the structures was irregular loss of calcium and phosphorus. Thus, Er:YAG laser irradiation with water cooling has been found to be a non-invasive preparation technique.

  1. Efficiency of GaInAs thermophotovoltaic cells: the effects of incident radiation, light trapping and recombinations.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, Pamela; Onno, Arthur; Sablon, Kimberly; Liu, Huiyun

    2015-09-21

    The radiative limit model, based on the black body theory extended to semiconductors and the flow equilibrium in the cell, has been adapted for Ga(x)In(1-x)As thermophotovoltaic devices. The impact of the thermal emitter temperature and the incident power density on the performance of cells for different Ga/In ratios has been investigated. The effects of the thickness of the cell and of light trapping have been investigated as well. A theoretical maximum efficiency of 24.2% has been calculated for a dislocation-free 5-μm-thick cell with a 0.43 eV bandgap illuminated by a source at 1800 K. The model also takes into account Auger recombinations and threading dislocations-related Shockley-Read-Hall recombinations. PMID:26406750

  2. Measurements and modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation and its impact on the Linac Coherent Light Source electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, K. L. F.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Stupakov, G.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-03-01

    In order to reach the high peak current required for an x-ray free electron laser, two separate magnetic dipole chicanes are used in the Linac Coherent Light Source accelerator to compress the electron bunch length in stages. In these bunch compressors, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can be emitted either by a short electron bunch or by any longitudinal density modulation that may be on the bunch. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of the CSR-induced energy loss and transverse emittance growth in these compressors. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and multiparticle tracking studies. We also describe direct observations of CSR at optical wavelengths and compare with analytical models based on beam microbunching.

  3. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag {ital b} quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D{null} collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  4. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  5. Top quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit; /Harvard U.

    2010-01-01

    The large data samples of top quark candidate events collected at the Tevatron CDF II experiment allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the production of the top quark. This article discusses recent results of top quark production at CDF presented at the SUSY09 conference, including updates to the top pair production cross section, forward-backward asymmetry in t{bar t} production, single top search, search for top resonances and a search for heavy top. The discussed measurements utilize up to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at CDF.

  6. Ideal quarks and mesons in the relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K. )

    1994-05-01

    We propose a microscopic theory for interacting mesons and ideal quarks in the relativistic quark model using the time-dependent mean-field theory technique. For simplicity we examined the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The dynamical chiral-symmetry breaking leads to a zero-frequency mode (pion) due to the restoration of chiral symmetry. The ideal quarks are represented as dressed particles independent of mean fields, and do not have the conventional properties of fermions. This is due to the constraints of eliminating the double counting of degrees of freedom between the mean fields and quarks. The small fluctuation around the static solution is then investigated. The pseudoscalar and scalar mesons are represented as the collective modes of the mean fields.

  7. Gravitational radiation in black-hole collisions at the speed of light. I. Perturbation treatment of the axisymmetric collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'eath, P. D.; Payne, P. N.

    1992-07-01

    In this and the two following papers II and III we study the axisymmetric collision of two black holes at the speed of light, with a view to understanding the more realistic collision of two black holes with a large but finite incoming Lorentz factor γ. The curved radiative region of the space-time, produced after the two incoming impulsive plane-fronted shock waves have collided, is treated using perturbation theory, following earlier work by Curtis and Chapman. The collision is viewed in a frame to which a large Lorentz boost has been applied, giving a strong shock with energy ν off which a weak shock with energy λ<<ν scatters. This yields a singular perturbation problem, in which the Einstein field equations are solved by expanding in powers of λ/ν around flat space-time. When viewed back in the center-of-mass frame, this gives a good description of the regions of the space-time in which gravitational radiation propagates at small angles θ^ but a large distance from the symmetry axis, near each shock as it continues to propagate, having been distorted and deflected in the initial collision. The news function c0(τ^,θ^) describing the gravitational radiation is expected to have a convergent series expansion c0(τ^,θ^) =tsum∞n=0a2n(τ^)sin2nθ^, where τ^ is a retarded time coordinate. First-order perturbation theory gives an expression for a0(τ^) in agreement with that found previously by studying the finite-γ collisions. Second-order perturbation theory gives a2(τ^) as a complicated integral expression. A new mass-loss formula is derived, which shows that if the end result of the collision is a single Schwarzschild black hole at rest, plus gravitational radiation which is (in a certain precise sense) accurately described by the above series for c0(τ^,θ^), then the final mass can be determined from knowledge only of a0(τ^) and a2(τ^). This leads to an interesting test of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. The numerical calculation of a2(τ^) is

  8. A unified model of island biogeography sheds light on the zone of radiation.

    PubMed

    Rosindell, James; Phillimore, Albert B

    2011-06-01

    Islands acquire species through immigration and speciation. Models of island biogeography should capture both processes; however quantitative island biogeography theory has either neglected speciation or treated it unrealistically. We introduce a model where the dominance of immigration on small and near islands gives way to an increasing role for speciation as island area and isolation increase. We examine the contribution of immigration and speciation to the avifauna of 35 archipelagoes and find, consistent with our model, that the zone of radiation comprises two regions: endemic species diverged from mainland sister-species at intermediate isolation and from insular sister-species at higher levels of isolation. Our model also predicts species-area curves in accord with existing research and makes new predictions about species ages and abundances. We argue that a paucity of data and theory on species abundances on isolated islands highlights the need for island biogeography to be reconnected with mainstream ecology. PMID:21481125

  9. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  10. A unified model of island biogeography sheds light on the zone of radiation.

    PubMed

    Rosindell, James; Phillimore, Albert B

    2011-06-01

    Islands acquire species through immigration and speciation. Models of island biogeography should capture both processes; however quantitative island biogeography theory has either neglected speciation or treated it unrealistically. We introduce a model where the dominance of immigration on small and near islands gives way to an increasing role for speciation as island area and isolation increase. We examine the contribution of immigration and speciation to the avifauna of 35 archipelagoes and find, consistent with our model, that the zone of radiation comprises two regions: endemic species diverged from mainland sister-species at intermediate isolation and from insular sister-species at higher levels of isolation. Our model also predicts species-area curves in accord with existing research and makes new predictions about species ages and abundances. We argue that a paucity of data and theory on species abundances on isolated islands highlights the need for island biogeography to be reconnected with mainstream ecology.

  11. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  12. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2009-06-20

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  13. Ultraweak photon emission induced by visible light and ultraviolet A radiation via photoactivated skin chromophores: in vivo charge coupled device imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ankush; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    Solar radiation that reaches Earth's surface can have severe negative consequences for organisms. Both visible light and ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation are known to initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human skin by photosensitization reactions (types I and II). In the present study, we investigated the role of visible light and UVA radiation in the generation of ROS on the dorsal and the palmar side of a hand. The ROS are known to oxidize biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids to form electronically excited species, finally leading to ultraweak photon emission. We have employed a highly sensitive charge coupled device camera and a low-noise photomultiplier tube for detection of two-dimensional and one-dimensional ultraweak photon emission, respectively. Our experimental results show that oxidative stress is generated by the exposure of human skin to visible light and UVA radiation. The oxidative stress generated by UVA radiation is claimed to be significantly higher than that by visible light. Two-dimensional photon imaging can serve as a potential tool for monitoring the oxidative stress in the human skin induced by various stress factors irrespective of its physical or chemical nature.

  14. Ixodid ticks: physiological and behavioral responses to gamma radiation, light and humidity. [Amblyomma americanum; Haemaphysalis leporispalustris; Dermacentor variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    In Part I, Effects of ''Gamma Radiation on Cytogenetics and Reproduction of Male Amblyomma americanum,'' male lone star ticks were exposed to 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 16 krads prior to feeding. Testicular squashes were made, and chromosomal aberrations were described. Timing of spermatogenesis was not affected; however, frequency of abnormal spermatocytes and rounded and elongated spermatids increased as radiation dosage increased. Untreated females mated to irradiated males remained attached to their hosts longer than control females did. Few of the females paired with treated males oviposited. Length of preoviposition period and numbers of eggs produced by individual females were not influenced by dosage levels of males. Percent hatch of eggs was decreased by irradiation of male parent. No hatch occurred at 2 krads or above. Weights of individual larvae appeared to increase with increasing dosage of male parents. Most eggs weighed 60-80 ..mu..g; larvae weighed 40-60..mu..g. Irradiation of ticks as a potential biological control measure was discussed. Part II, ''Orientation to Light and Humidity in Haemaphysalis leporispalustris and Dermacentor variabilis,'' compared behavioral preferences of a host-specific and a broad-host-species.

  15. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, P; Luu, T; Platter, L

    2010-12-13

    We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created of a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way we use lattice QCD data and an hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured {sup 4}He abundances put a bound of {delta}-1% {approx}< m{sub q}/m{sub 1} {approx}< 0.7%. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Including the bounds on the variation of {eta} coming from WMAP results and some additional assumptions narrows the range of allowed values of {delta}m{sub q}/m{sub q} somewhat.

  16. Penguins with charm and quark-hadron duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Buchalla, G.; Neubert, M.; Sachrajda, C. T.

    2009-06-01

    The integrated branching fraction of the process B→ X s l + l - is dominated by resonance background from narrow charmonium states, such as B→ X s ψ→ X s l + l -, which exceeds the non-resonant charm-loop contribution by two orders of magnitude. The origin of this fact is discussed in view of the general expectation of quark-hadron duality. The situation in B→ X s l + l - is contrasted with charm-penguin amplitudes in two-body hadronic B decays of the type B→ π π, for which it is demonstrated that resonance effects and the potentially non-perturbative cbar{c} threshold region do not invalidate the standard picture of QCD factorization. This holds irrespective of whether the charm quark is treated as a light or a heavy quark.

  17. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Heavy quarks and CP: Moriond 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The presentations at the Fifth Moriond Workshop on Heavy Quarks, Flavor Mixing, and CP Violation (La Plagne, France, January 13-19, 1985) are summarized. The following topics are reviewed. What's New (beyond the top, top quarks, bottom quarks, charm quarks, strange quarks, and others); why is all this being done (strong interactions and hadron structure, and electroweak properties); and what next (facilities and can one see CP violation in the B-anti B system). 64 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  20. Observation of chicJ radiative decays to light vector mesons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J V; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2008-10-10

    Using a total of 2.74 x 10(7) decays of the psi(2S) collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present a study of chi(cJ)-->gammaV, where V=rho(0), omega, phi. The transitions chi(c1)-->gammarho(0 and chi(c1)-->gammaomega are observed with B(chi(c1)-->gammarho(0))=(2.43+/-0.19+/-0.22) x 10(-4) and B(chi(c1)-->gammaomega)=(8.3+/-1.5+/-1.2) x 10(-5). In the chi(c1)-->gammarho(0) transition, the final state meson is dominantly longitudinally polarized. Upper limits on the branching fractions of other chi(cJ) states to light vector mesons are presented. PMID:18999588

  1. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  2. In vitro evaluation of low-intensity light radiation on murine melanoma (B16F10) cells.

    PubMed

    Peidaee, P; Almansour, N M; Pirogova, E

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the energy state of biomolecules induced by electromagnetic radiation lead to changes in biological functions of irradiated biomolecules. Using the RRM approach, it was computationally predicted that far-infrared light irradiation in the range of 3500-6000 nm affects biological activity of proto-oncogene proteins. This in vitro study evaluates quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of selected far-infrared exposures in the computationally determined wavelengths on mouse melanoma B16F10 cells and Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells by MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation assay and confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). This paper also presents the findings obtained from irradiating B16F10 and CHO cells by the selected wavelengths in visible and near-infrared range. The MTT results show that far-infrared wavelength irradiation induces detrimental effect on cellular viability of B16F10 cells, while that of normal CHO cells is not affected considerably. Moreover, CLSM images demonstrate visible cellular detachment of cancer cells. The observed effects support the hypothesis that far-infrared light irradiation within the computationally determined wavelength range induces biological effect on cancer cells. From irradiation of selected visible and near-infrared wavelengths, no visible changes were detected in cellular viability of either normal or cancer cells.

  3. Silicon based light emitters utilizing radiation from dislocations; electric field induced shift of the dislocation-related luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguirov, T.; Mchedlidze, T.; Kittler, M.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2009-05-01

    Dislocation rich regions can be controllably formed at a certain location inside a silicon wafer. We studied the light emission properties of such regions located in an electric field of a p-n junction under different excitation conditions. It was found that the luminescence spectra of the dislocations are significantly influenced by the presence of the junction. The dislocation-related luminescence peak position appears red-shifted due to the built-in electric field. A suppression of that field by photo-generation of carriers or by applying a forward bias voltage at the junction leads to a gradual decrease in the energy position of the peaks. The dependence of the peak position on the electric field was found to be a quadratic function, similar to that observed for semiconductor nanostructures. We show that the shift of the peak position is due to the Stark effect on dislocation-related excitonic states. The characteristic constant of the shift, obtained by fitting the data with the quadratic Stark effect equation, was 0.0186 meV/(kV/cm) 2. The observed effect opens new possibilities for integration of a silicon based light emitter, combining the radiation from dislocations with a Stark effect based modulator.

  4. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, S. L.; Carlsson, M.; Allred, J. C.; Uitenbroek, H.; Osten, R. A.; Holman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The heating mechanism at high densities during M-dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M-dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T≈104 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at λ≤3 646 Å, and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines between λ=3 646 Å and λ≈3 900 Å. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level of ≤ 10^{11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological three-component interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M-dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a high energy flux of 10^{13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The simulation produces bright near-ultraviolet and optical continuum emission from a dense (n>10^{15} cm^{-3}), hot (T ≈12 000 - 13 500 K) chromospheric condensation. For the first time, the observed color temperature and Balmer jump ratio are produced self-consistently in a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model. We find that a T≈104 K blackbody-like continuum component and a low Balmer jump ratio result from optically thick Balmer (∞→ n=2) and Paschen recombination (∞→ n=3) radiation, and thus the properties of the flux spectrum are caused by blue (λ≈4 300 Å) light escaping over a larger physical depth range than by red (λ≈6 700 Å) and near-ultraviolet (λ≈3 500 Å) light. To model the near-ultraviolet pseudo-continuum previously attributed to overlapping Balmer lines, we include the extra Balmer continuum opacity from Landau-Zener transitions that result from merged, high-order energy levels of hydrogen in a dense, partially ionized atmosphere. This reveals a new diagnostic of

  5. Non-leptonic decays in an extended chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Eeg, J. O.

    2012-10-23

    We consider the color suppressed (nonfactorizable) amplitude for the decay mode B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. We treat the b-quark in the heavy quark limit and the energetic light (u,d,s) quarks within a variant of Large Energy Effective Theory combined with an extension of chiral quark models. Our calculated amplitude for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed by a factor of order {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b} with respect to the factorized amplitude, as it should according to QCD-factorization. Further, for reasonable values of the (model dependent) gluon condensate and the constituent quark mass, the calculated nonfactorizable amplitude for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can easily accomodate the experimental value. Unfortunately, the color suppressed amplitude is very sensitive to the values of these model dependent parameters. Therefore fine-tuning is necessary in order to obtain an amplitude compatible with the experimental result for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  6. Jet substructures of boosted polarized hadronic top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2016-03-01

    We study jet substructures of a boosted polarized top quark, which undergoes the hadronic decay t →b u d ¯, in the perturbative QCD framework, focusing on the energy profile and the differential energy profile. These substructures are factorized into the convolution of a hard top-quark decay kernel with a bottom-quark jet function and a W -boson jet function, where the latter is further factorized into the convolution of a hard W -boson decay kernel with two light-quark jet functions. Computing the hard kernels to leading order in QCD and including the resummation effect in the jet functions, we show that the differential jet energy profile is a useful observable for differentiating the helicity of a boosted hadronic top quark: a right-handed top jet exhibits quick descent of the differential energy profile with the inner test cone radius r , which is attributed to the V -A structure of weak interaction and the dead-cone effect associated with the W -boson jet. The above helicity differentiation may help reveal the chiral structure of physics beyond the standard model at high energies.

  7. Instabilities of Coulomb phases and quark confinement in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, Manuel; Santagata, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    The Gribov picture to quark confinement is based on the Coulomb phase instability due to the very large values that the effective α{sub s} coupling constant can reach in the infrared regime. The Gribov instability is driven by a vacuum decay into light quarks beyond a critical value of the coupling constant α{sub s}3π(1-√(2/3))/4 (for SU(3) gauge group). From first principles it has been shown the existence of an instability of the Coulomb phase in pure gauge theories for α≥√(2), much beyond the Gribov critical value. In this paper we analyze the effect of dynamical quarks in the instability of the Coulomb phase. We find a critical value of the coupling α=√(3) where a quark-antiquark pair creation mechanism leads to vacuum instability. However, the new critical value turns out to be larger than the pure gauge critical value α=√(2), unlike it is expected in the standard Gribov scenario. The result is analytically derived from first principles and provides further consistency to the picture where quark confinement is mainly driven by gluonic fluctuation instabilities.

  8. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excess of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.

  9. Spin Measurement in Top Quark Events at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of polarisation and spin correlations are presented in events with top quarks produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of $5 fb^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and 20 $fb^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected with the ATLAS and CMS detectors. The top quark polarization is measured in both single top quark production in the t-channel and $t\\bar{t}$ pair-production, from the angular distributions of charged leptons in the rest frame of their parent top quark. The spin correlations are measured in $t\\bar{t}$ events using various angular distributions of the decay products. The measurements are made using both template fitting methods and by unfolding the distributions to the parton-level, where differential measurements with respect to the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the $t\\bar{t}$ system are also made. The spin correlation measurements are used to search for new physics in the form of a light top squark or an anomalous top quark chromo-magnetic dipole moment. All measurements are found to be in agreement with predictions of the standard model.

  10. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excessmore » of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.« less

  11. Tests of quark mass textures

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-21

    The classic hints on the structure of the quark mass matrices are shortly reviewed and the possibility of obtaining further information through precise texture analysis is discussed with the aid of a specific example.

  12. Role of light and heavy minerals on natural radioactivity level of high background radiation area, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, V; Sundarrajan, M; Suresh, G; Paramasivam, K; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2014-02-01

    Natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) concentrations and eight different radiological parameters have been analyzed for the beach sediments of Kerala with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazards. Activity concentrations ((238)U and (232)Th) and all the radiological parameters in most of the sites have higher values than recommended values. The Kerala beach sediments pose significant radiological threat to the people living in the area and tourists going to the beaches for recreation or to the sailors and fishermen involved in their activities in the study area. In order to know the light mineral characterization of the present sediments, mineralogical analysis has been carried out using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The eight different minerals are identified and they are characterized. Among the various observed minerals, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, kaolinite and calcite are major minerals. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction co-efficient and the values show that the amount of quartz is higher than calcite and much higher than microcline feldspar. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz present in the sediments. Heavy mineral separation analysis has been carried out to know the total heavy mineral (THM) percentage. This analysis revealed the presence of nine heavy minerals. The minerals such as monazite, zircon, magnetite and illmenite are predominant. Due to the rapid and extreme changes occur in highly dynamic environments of sandy beaches, quantities of major light and heavy minerals are widely varied from site to site. Granulometric analysis shows that the sand is major content. Multivariate statistical (Pearson correlation, cluster and factor) analysis has been carried out to know the effect of mineralogy on radionuclide concentrations. The present study concluded that heavy minerals induce the (238)U and (232)Th

  13. A GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation of radiation-induced light transport in biological media.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Kanick, Stephen C; Zhang, Rongxiao; Arce, Pedro; Pogue, Brian W

    2013-05-01

    We describe a tissue optics plug-in that interfaces with the GEANT4/GAMOS Monte Carlo (MC) architecture, providing a means of simulating radiation-induced light transport in biological media for the first time. Specifically, we focus on the simulation of light transport due to the Čerenkov effect (light emission from charged particle's traveling faster than the local speed of light in a given medium), a phenomenon which requires accurate modeling of both the high energy particle and subsequent optical photon transport, a dynamic coupled process that is not well-described by any current MC framework. The results of validation simulations show excellent agreement with currently employed biomedical optics MC codes, [i.e., Monte Carlo for Multi-Layered media (MCML), Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC), and diffusion theory], and examples relevant to recent studies into detection of Čerenkov light from an external radiation beam or radionuclide are presented. While the work presented within this paper focuses on radiation-induced light transport, the core features and robust flexibility of the plug-in modified package make it also extensible to more conventional biomedical optics simulations. The plug-in, user guide, example files, as well as the necessary files to reproduce the validation simulations described within this paper are available online at http://www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/research-projects/monte-carlo-software.

  14. Scalar-quark systems and chimera hadrons in SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, H.; Takahashi, T. T.; Suganuma, H.

    2007-06-01

    In terms of mass generation in the strong interaction without chiral symmetry breaking, we perform the first study for light scalar-quarks {phi} (colored scalar particles with 3{sub c} or idealized diquarks) and their color-singlet hadronic states using quenched SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD with {beta}=5.70 (i.e., a{approx_equal}0.18 fm) and lattice size 16{sup 3}x32. We investigate ''scalar-quark mesons'' {phi}{sup {dagger}}{phi} and ''scalar-quark baryons'' {phi}{phi}{phi} as the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi}. We also investigate the color-singlet bound states of scalar-quarks {phi} and quarks {psi}, i.e., {phi}{sup {dagger}}{psi}, {psi}{psi}{phi}, and {phi}{phi}{psi}, which we name ''chimera hadrons.'' All the new-type hadrons including {phi} are found to have a large mass even for zero bare scalar-quark mass m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV. We find a ''constituent scalar-quark/quark picture'' for both scalar-quark hadrons and chimera hadrons. Namely, the mass of the new-type hadron composed of m {phi}'s and n {psi}'s, M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}, approximately satisfies M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}{approx_equal}mM{sub {phi}}+nM{sub {psi}}, where M{sub {phi}} and M{sub {psi}} are the constituent scalar-quark and quark masses, respectively. We estimate the constituent scalar-quark mass M{sub {phi}} for m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV as M{sub {phi}}{approx_equal}1.5-1.6 GeV, which is much larger than the constituent quark mass M{sub {psi}}{approx_equal}400 MeV in the chiral limit. Thus, scalar quarks acquire a large mass due to large quantum corrections by gluons in the systems including scalar quarks. Together with other evidences of mass generation of glueballs and charmonia, we conjecture that all colored particles generally acquire a large effective mass due to dressed gluon effects. In addition, the large mass generation of pointlike colored scalar particles indicates that plausible diquarks used in effective hadron models cannot

  15. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  16. Stability of Quark Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of quark stars with four different types of inner matter configurations; isotropic, charged isotropic, anisotropic and charged anisotropic by using the concept of cracking. For this purpose, we have applied local density perturbations technique to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation as well as on physical parameters involved in the model. We conclude that quark stars become potentially unstable when inner matter configuration is changed and electromagnetic field is applied.

  17. Defect-reduction mechanism for improving radiative efficiency in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes using InGaN underlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x ˜ 0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode (LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than the LED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resulted from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.

  18. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resultedmore » from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.« less

  19. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resulted from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.

  20. Defect-reduction mechanism for improving radiative efficiency in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes using InGaN underlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M. Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jonathan J.

    2015-04-07

    The influence of a dilute In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x ∼ 0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In{sub 0.16}Ga{sub 0.84}N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode (LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than the LED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resulted from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.

  1. Initial conditions dependency in heavy-quarks suppression in ultra-relativistic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Alarcon do Passo Suaide, Alexandre

    2013-05-06

    Heavy quark suppression in central Au+Au collisions is expected to be smaller than that of light quarks. However experimental data suggest that they are evenly suppressed. We propose considering fluctuations in the medium as they may lead to high-density regions which in turn can cause a considerable quark suppression at the early stages of the collision evolution. To analyse the overall effect of these fluctuations we perform computer simulations of charm and bottom propagating through the quark-gluon plasma and obtain estimates of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}. This quantity gives us information about the heavy quark suppression that can be compared to published experimental data from the STAR experiment.

  2. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  3. Hadron bubble evolution into the quark sea

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K. ); Adams, F.C. )

    1990-04-15

    A solution is presented for the evolution of hadron bubbles which nucleate in the quark sea if there is a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at a temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} on the order of 100 MeV. We make three assumptions: (1) the dominant mechanism for transport of latent heat is radiative, e.g., neutrinos; (2) the distance between nucleation sites is greater than the neutrino mean free path; and (3) the effects of hydrodynamic flow can be neglected. Bubbles nucleate with a characteristic radius 1 fm/{Delta}, where {Delta} is a dimensionless parameter for the undercooling (we take {Delta}{ge}10{sup {minus}4}, so that the expansion of the Universe can be neglected). We argue that bubbles grow stably and remain spherical until the radius becomes as large as the neutrino mean free path, {ital l}{congruent}10 cm. The growth then becomes diffusion limited and the bubbles become unstable to formation of dendrites, or fingerlike structures, because latent heat can diffuse away more easily from long fingers than from spheres. We study the nonlinear evolution of structure with a geometrical model'' and argue that the hadron bubbles ultimately look like stringy seaweed. The percolation of seaweed-shaped bubbles can leave behind regions of quark phase that are quite small. In fact, one might expect the typical scale to be {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}={ital l}{congruent}10 cm. Protons can easily diffuse out of such small regions (and neutrons back in). Thus, these instabilities can lead to important modifications of inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis, which requires {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}{approx gt}1 m.

  4. Radiation damage in KTiOPO 4 by ion implantation of light elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfermann, Thomas; Höche, Thomas; Wesch, Werner

    2000-05-01

    The radiation damage in KTiOPO4 (KTP) single crystals caused by He+, Li+ and B+ ion implantation was investigated by means of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Z-cut flux grown KTP crystals were implanted with ion fluences between 5×1013 and 2×1016 cm-2 at 300 and 100 K using implantation energies between 1 and 3 MeV. For high ion fluences, XTEM investigations of the He+ and Li+ implantations revealed buried amorphous layers in the region where nuclear energy deposition dominates. For samples prepared at room temperature, the critical number of displacements per atom (dpa), which is necessary for amorphisation amounts ∼0.5 dpa for He+ implantation and ∼0.22 dpa for Li+ implantation. At 100 K, the thickness of the amorphous layer is increased and the critical number of dpa for achieving amorphisation is considerably lower (0.27 dpa (He+) and 0.15 dpa (Li+), respectively). For both implantation regimes buried amorphous layers are covered by an almost perfect crystalline KTP layer. Between these two regions, the crystalline structure is gradually decomposing with depth due to the presence of amorphous clusters of increasing size. In the superficial crystalline layer, where the nuclear energy deposition is small in comparison to the region of maximum nuclear energy deposition, no defects were found by means of XTEM. Nevertheless, RBS investigations showed a higher dechanelling in this surface layer compared to the virgin crystal thus indicating the presence of point defects. For He+ and Li+ implantation, the electronic excitation does not seem to be connected with the formation of higher-dimensional defects. However, RBS spectra of a B+-implanted sample show a significant damaging in the depth of dominating electronic excitation even at an ion fluence of 5×1013 cm-2. The results confirm the existence of a threshold value of the electronic energy deposition of about 100 eV per ion and Å (W

  5. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors.

  6. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors. PMID:25040832

  7. Inactivation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in ground chicken meat using high pressure processing and gamma radiation, and in purge and chicken meat surfaces by ultraviolet light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common contaminants in meat and poultry. Nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve safety and shelf-life of both human and pet foods can include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV...

  8. Spin-orbit inversion of excited heavy quark mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-06-01

    The mesonic heavy quark spin multiplets with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup +} and (3/2){sup +} are expected to be the lowest-lying excitations about the pseudoscalar and vector ground states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup {minus}}. The author shows that for charm and bottom these multiplets are probably inverted, with the 2{sup +} and 1{sup +} states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sup l}}=(3/2){sup +} about 150 MeV below the 1{sup +} and 0{sup +} states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup +}. If verified, such an inversion would both support the expectation that confinement has no dynamical spin-dependence and indicate that heavy and light quark systems may be characterized by the same effective low-energy degrees of freedom. As an important byproduct, this work establishes the dynamics of the strange quark as a critical link between heavy- and light-quark hadrons, justifying efforts toward a much more complete experimental and theoretical understanding of strange mesons and baryons and of strangeonia.

  9. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE PAGES

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  10. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho-Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-01

    We compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥ , in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B , respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs . We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αse B ≪T2≪e B , so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κ⊥LO∝αs2T e B in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1 +1 )-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets no contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κ∥LO come from the two separate effects: (1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and (2) a finite light-quark mass mq . The former leads to κ∥LO ,gluon∝αs2T3 and the latter to κ∥LO ,massive∝αs(αse B )1 /2mq2 . Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥≫κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.

  11. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  12. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  13. Accompanying of parameters of color, gloss and hardness on polymeric films coated with pigmented inks cured by different radiation doses of ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardi, Marcelo Augusto Gonçalves; Machado, Luci Diva Brocardo

    2012-09-01

    In the search for alternatives to traditional paint systems solvent-based, the curing process of polymer coatings by ultraviolet light (UV) has been widely studied and discussed, especially because of their high content of solids and null emission of VOC. In UV-curing technology, organic solvents are replaced by reactive diluents, such as monomers. This paper aims to investigate variations on color, gloss and hardness of print inks cured by different UV radiation doses. The ratio pigment/clear coating was kept constant. The clear coating presented higher average values for König hardness than pigmented ones, indicating that UV-light absorption has been reduced by the presence of pigments. Besides, they have indicated a slight variation in function of cure degree for the studied radiation doses range. The gloss loss related to UV light exposition allows inferring that some degradation occurred at the surface of print ink films.

  14. B ---> pi and B ---> K transitions from QCD sum rules on the light cone

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, P.

    1998-09-01

    I calculate the form factors describing semileptonic and penguin-induced decays of B mesons into light pseudoscalar mesons. The form factors are calculated from QCD sum rules on the light-cone including contributions up to twist 4, radiative corrections to the leading twist contribution and SU(3)-breaking effects. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be \\sim 15%. The heavy-quark-limit relations between semileptonic and penguin form factors are found to be valid in the full accessible range of momentum transfer.

  15. Ultraviolet-B Radiation (UV-B) Relieves Chilling-Light-Induced PSI Photoinhibition And Accelerates The Recovery Of CO2 Assimilation In Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Jin, Li-Qiao; Li, Yu-Ting; Tikkanen, Mikko; Li, Qing-Ming; Ai, Xi-Zhen; Gao, Hui-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) is generally considered to negatively impact the photosynthetic apparatus and plant growth. UV-B damages PSII but does not directly influence PSI. However, PSI and PSII successively drive photosynthetic electron transfer, therefore, the interaction between these systems is unavoidable. So we speculated that UV-B could indirectly affect PSI under chilling-light conditions. To test this hypothesis, the cucumber leaves were illuminated by UV-B prior or during the chilling-light treatment, and the leaves were then transferred to 25 °C and low-light conditions for recovery. The results showed that UV-B decreased the electron transfer to PSI by inactivating the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), thereby protecting PSI from chilling-light-induced photoinhibition. This effect advantages the recoveries of PSI and CO2 assimilation after chilling-light stress, therefore should minimize the yield loss caused by chilling-light stress. Because sunlight consists of both UV-B and visible light, we suggest that UV-B-induced OEC inactivation is critical for chilling-light-induced PSI photoinhibition in field. Moreover, additional UV-B irradiation is an effective strategy to relieve PSI photoinhibition and yield loss in protected cultivation during winter. This study also demonstrates that minimizing the photoinhibition of PSI rather than that of PSII is essential for the chilling-light tolerance of the plant photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:27686324

  16. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  17. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces. PMID:25541769

  18. Top tagging: a method for identifying boosted hadronically decaying top quarks.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E; Rehermann, Keith; Schwartz, Matthew D; Tweedie, Brock

    2008-10-01

    A method is introduced for distinguishing top jets (boosted, hadronically decaying top quarks) from light-quark and gluon jets using jet substructure. The procedure involves parsing the jet cluster to resolve its subjets and then imposing kinematic constraints. With this method, light-quark or gluon jets with p{T} approximately 1 TeV can be rejected with an efficiency of around 99% while retaining up to 40% of top jets. This reduces the dijet background to heavy tt[over ] resonances by a factor of approximately 10 000, thereby allowing resonance searches in tt[over ] to be extended into the all-hadronic channel. In addition, top tagging can be used in tt[over ] events when one of the top quarks decays semileptonically, in events with missing energy, and in studies of b-tagging efficiency at high p{T}.

  19. Volume behavior of quark condensate, pion mass, and decay constant from Dyson-Schwinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Luecker, Jan; Williams, Richard; Fischer, Christian S.

    2010-05-01

    We solve the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations for the quark propagator and the pion Bethe-Salpeter amplitude on a finite volume. To this end we use a truncation scheme that includes pion cloud effects in the quark propagator and light mesons. We study volume effects in the quark condensate, the pion mass, and the pion decay constant and compare to corresponding results in other approaches. In general we find large effects for volumes below V=(1.8 fm){sup 4}.

  20. A novel quark-field creation operator construction for hadronic physics in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Peardon, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Huey-Wen Lin, David Richards, John Bulava, Colin Morningstar, Keisuke Juge

    2009-09-01

    A new quark-field smearing algorithm is defined which enables efficient calculations of a broad range of hadron correlation functions. The technique applies a low-rank operator to define smooth fields, that are to be used in hadron creation operators. The resulting space of smooth fields is small enough that all elements of the reduced quark propagator can be computed exactly at reasonable computational cost. Correlations between arbitrary sources, including multi-hadron operators can be computed {\\em a posteriori} without requiring new lattice Dirac operator inversions. The method is tested on realistic lattice sizes with light dynamical quarks.

  1. Radiation synthesis of CdS/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Youwei; Cao, Pengfei; Ma, Huiling; Liu, Pinggui; He, Lihua; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-06-01

    CdS/reduced graphene oxide (CdS/RGO) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a one-step gamma-ray radiation-induced reduction method. The composition and structure of the prepared nanocomposites were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, micro FTIR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that increasing dose could improve the degree of reduction of graphite oxide (GO), and the feed ratio of GO to CdCl2·2.5H2O significantly influenced the size and dispersion of the CdS nanoparticles. The nanocomposites prepared under dose of 300 kGy and the feed ratio of GO to CdCl2·2.5H2O 1.0 wt% exhibited high visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of Rhodamine B with degradation efficiency of 93%. This work provides a novel and facile method to produce the nanocomposites as efficient photocatalysts for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution.

  2. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Rühm, Werner; Woloschak, Gayle E; Shore, Roy E; Azizova, Tamara V; Grosche, Bernd; Niwa, Ohtsura; Akiba, Suminori; Ono, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki; Clement, Christopher H; Bouffler, Simon; Toma, Hideki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. PMID:26343037

  3. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Rühm, Werner; Woloschak, Gayle E; Shore, Roy E; Azizova, Tamara V; Grosche, Bernd; Niwa, Ohtsura; Akiba, Suminori; Ono, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki; Clement, Christopher H; Bouffler, Simon; Toma, Hideki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection.

  4. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of light scattering intensities of the crystalline lens for radiation related minimal change in interventional radiologists: a cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toshi; Furui, Shigeru; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Terasaki, Kinuyo; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Norbash, Alexander M.; Behrman, Richard H.; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate low-dose X-ray radiation effects on the eye by measuring the amount of light scattering in specific regions of the lens, we compared exposed subjects (interventional radiologists) with unexposed subjects (employees of medical service companies), as a pilot study. According to numerous exclusionary rules, subjects with confounding variables contributing to cataract formation were excluded. Left eye examinations were performed on 68 exposed subjects and 171 unexposed subjects. The eye examinations consisted of an initial screening examination, followed by Scheimpflug imaging of the lens using an anterior eye segment analysis system. The subjects were assessed for the quantity of light scattering intensities found in each of the six layers of the lens. Multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed with the stepwise regression for six variables: age, radiation exposure, smoking, drinking, wearing glasses and workplace. In addition, an age-matched comparison between exposed and unexposed subjects was performed. Minimal increased light scattering intensity in the posterior subcapsular region showed statistical significance. Our results indicate that occupational radiation exposure in interventional radiologists may affect the posterior subcapsular region of the lens. Since by its very nature this retrospective study had many limitations, further well-designed studies concerning minimal radiation-related lens changes should be carried out in a low-dose exposure group. PMID:23143743

  7. Acclimation to UV-B radiation and visible light in Lactuca sativa involves up-regulation of photosynthetic performance and orchestration of metabolome-wide responses.

    PubMed

    Wargent, J J; Nelson, B C W; McGhie, T K; Barnes, P W

    2015-05-01

    UV-B radiation is often viewed as a source of stress for higher plants. In particular, photosynthetic function has been described as a common target for UV-B impairment; yet as our understanding of UV-B photomorphogenesis increases, there are opportunities to expand the emerging paradigm of regulatory UV response. Lactuca sativa is an important dietary crop species and is often subjected to rapid sunlight exposure at field transfer. Acclimation to UV-B and visible light conditions in L. sativa was dissected using gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, in addition to non-destructive assessments of UV epidermal shielding (SUV ). After UV-B treatment, seedlings were subjected to wide-range metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-HRMS). During the acclimation period, net photosynthetic rate increased in UV-treated plants, epidermal UV shielding increased in both subsets of plants transferred to the acclimatory conditions (UV+/UV- plants) and Fv /Fm declined slightly in UV+/UV- plants. Metabolomic analysis revealed that a key group of secondary compounds was up-regulated by higher light conditions, yet several of these compounds were elevated further by UV-B radiation. In conclusion, acclimation to UV-B radiation involves co-protection from the effects of visible light, and responses to UV-B radiation at a photosynthetic level may not be consistently viewed as damaging to plant development.

  8. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  9. Photodynamic tumor therapy and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy after ALA administration using 633-nm light as therapeutic and fluorescence excitation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Kienle, Alwin; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Rueck, Angelika C.; Meier, Thomas H.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy were carried out on human tumors after 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration using 633-nm light of a dye laser as therapeutic radiation and as fluorescence excitation radiation. This has the advantages of (1) enabling use of one laser for PDT and fluorescence diagnosis only, (2) enabling the possibility of on-line fluorescence measurements, and (3) exciting protoporphyrin molecules in deep tissue layers. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine excitation and fluorescence phonon distribution in case of red and violet excitation radiation. The results show the possibility of depth-resolved measurements on the fluorophore distribution by variation of excitation wavelength. The high penetration depth of 633-nm radiation results in a higher ratio of the 700-nm protoporphyrin fluorescence of the xenotransplanted tumor It to Is compared with 407-nm excitation. No values greater than 1 for the ratio I/Is were found, however, in case of intravenous ALA injection even for red excitation. Therefore, a large amount of ALA will be metabolized in the skin and can cause photosensitivity of the patient when applied systematically. In contrast, protoporphyrin fluorescence limited to the pretreated skin area was detected in case of topically applied ALA to patients with mycosis funcoides and erythroplasy of Queyrat. The influence of remitted excitation light and of the spontaneous radiation from the laser as well as the possible excitation of foodbased degradation products of chlorophyll has to be considered in high-sensitivity fluorescence measurements.

  10. Searches for monopoles and quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, H.S.

    1986-07-01

    Within the last year, several sensitive searches for monopoles and quarks have been done. Recent experiments at the Tevatron and at the CERN p anti p collider have detected no evidence for free fractional charge. An experiment in a iron refinery, which searched for GUT monopoles trapped in iron ore with two SQUID detectors, found no monopole candidate. However, an experiment looking for monopoles in cosmic rays has measured an interesting event which could be interpreted as a monopole. Several detectors are being built to achieve significant improvements in sensitivity for detection of quarks and monopoles. 21 refs.

  11. How Do We Know Protons, Electrons, and Quarks Really Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Scientific explanations often make use of things that cannot be seen or felt, such as protons, electrons, and quarks. Do these things really exist? If so, how do is it known that they exist? Imagine being enclosed in a completely dark room with no light at all and not being able to see a thing. Being chained to a chair somewhere in the room, and…

  12. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry from the 3-3-1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, E. Ramirez; Coutinho, Y. A.; Sá Borges, J.

    2011-03-01

    The forward-backward asymmetry AFB in top quark pair production, measured at the Tevatron, is probably related to the contribution of new particles. The Tevatron result is more than a 2σ deviation from the standard model prediction and motivates the application of alternative models introducing new states. However, as the standard model predictions for the total cross section σtt and invariant mass distribution Mtt for this process are in good agreement with experiments, any alternative model must reproduce these predictions. These models can be placed into two categories: One introduces the s-channel exchange of new vector bosons with chiral couplings to the light quarks and to the top quark, and another relies on the t-channel exchange of particles with large flavor-violating couplings in the quark sector. In this work, we employ a model which introduces both s- and t-channel nonstandard contributions for the top quark pair production in proton-antiproton collisions. We use the minimal version of the SU(3)C⊗SU(3)L⊗U(1)X model (3-3-1 model) that predicts the existence of a new neutral gauge boson, called Z'. This gauge boson has both flavor-changing couplings to up and top quarks and chiral coupling to the light quarks and to the top quark. This very peculiar model coupling can correct the AFB for top quark pair production for two ranges of Z' mass while leading to a cross section and invariant mass distribution quite similar to the standard model ones. This result reinforces the role of the 3-3-1 model for any new physics effect.

  13. Why quarks cannot be fundamental particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, C. S.

    2005-05-01

    Many reasons why quarks should be considered composite particles are found in the book Preons by D'Souza and Kalman. One reason not found in the book is that all the quarks except for the u quark decay. The electron and the electron neutrino do not decay. A model of fundamental particles based upon the weak charge is presented.

  14. The Unquenching of the Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, Elena; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-05-24

    We present an unquenched quark model for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pair creation (uu-bar, dd and ss-bar) are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. As an application we discuss the flavor content of octet baryons.

  15. Gamma-radiation of heart valves at 4° C; a comparative study using techniques of histochemistry and electron and light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, R. J.; Aparicio, S. R.; Dexter, F.; Deverall, P. B.; Watson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    The optimal method of valve sterilization and storage is still not known. Pig aortic valve cusps have been studied using techniques of histochemistry, light microscopy, and electron microscopy, and the effects of gamma-radiation at 4° C have been determined. The effects of freezing, β-propriolactone, and freeze-drying were also studied. Gamma-radiation at 4° C and storage at this temperature in a polyionic environment for up to six weeks appears to have minimal adverse effects. This technique of sterilization and storage has now been used in our clinical valve programme for over two years with encouraging results. Images PMID:4265421

  16. Measurement of power spectral density of broad-spectrum visible light with heterodyne near field scattering and its scalability to betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Siano, M; Paroli, B; Chiadroni, E; Ferrario, M; Potenza, M A C

    2015-12-28

    We exploit the speckle field generated by scattering from a colloidal suspension to access both spatial and temporal coherence properties of broadband radiation. By applying the Wiener-Khinchine theorem to the retrieved temporal coherence function, information about the emission spectrum of the source is obtained in good agreement with the results of a grating spectrometer. Experiments have been performed with visible light. We prove more generally that our approach can be considered as a tool for modeling a variety of cases. Here we discuss how to apply such diagnostics to broad-spectrum betatron radiation produced in the laser-driven wakefield accelerator under development at SPARC LAB facility in Frascati.

  17. Tagging the pion quark structure in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulev, A.P.; Mikhailov, S.V.; Stefanis, N.G.

    2006-03-01

    We combine the constraints on the pion quark structure available from perturbative QCD, nonperturbative QCD (nonlocal QCD sum rules and light-cone sum rules) with the analysis of current data on F{sub {pi}}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}{sub *}(Q{sup 2}), including recent high-precision lattice calculations of the second moment of the pion's distribution amplitude. We supplement these constraints with those extracted from the renormalon approach by means of the twist-four contributions to the pion distribution amplitude in order to further increase stability with respect to related theoretical uncertainties. We show which regions in the space of the first two nontrivial Gegenbauer coefficients a{sub 2} and a{sub 4} of all these constraints overlap, tagging this way the pion structure to the highest degree possible at present.

  18. Hidden-beauty charged tetraquarks and heavy quark spin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Maiani, L.; Polosa, A. D.; Riquer, V.

    2015-01-01

    Assuming the dominance of the spin-spin interaction in a diquark, we point out that the mass difference in the beauty sector M (Zb')±-M (Zb)± scales with quark masses as expected in QCD, with respect to the corresponding mass difference M (Zc')±-M (Zc)± . Notably, we show that the decays ϒ (10890 )→ϒ (n S )π+π- and ϒ (10890 )→(hb(1 P ),hb(2 P ))π+π- are compatible with heavy quark spin conservation if the contributions of Zb,Zb' intermediate states are taken into account, ϒ (10890 ) being either a ϒ (5 S ) or the beauty analog of Yc(4260 ). Belle results on these decays support the quark spin wave function of the Z states as tetraquarks. We also consider the role of light quark spin nonconservaton in Zb,Zb' decays into B B* and B*B*. Indications of possible signatures of the still missing Xb resonance are proposed.

  19. Inferring supernova IIb/Ib/Ic ejecta properties from light curves and spectra: correlations from radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses Me of 1.7-5.2 M⊙, kinetic energies Ekin of 0.6-5.0 × 1051 erg, and 56Ni masses of 0.05-0.30 M⊙. We find a strong correlation between the 56Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in (V - R) at 10 d past R-band maximum. The quantity V_m ≡ √{2E_kin/M_e} is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from He I 5875 Å at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The O I 7772 Å line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the ˜1.05 μm feature in all models. The reversal is due to He I alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionization, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.

  20. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs.

  1. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  2. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  3. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  4. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  5. Triminimal parametrization of quark mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2008-12-01

    Starting from a new zeroth order basis for quark mixing (CKM) matrix based on the quark-lepton complementarity and the tribimaximal pattern of lepton mixing, we derive a triminimal parametrization of a CKM matrix with three small angles and a CP-violating phase as its parameters. This new triminimal parametrization has the merits of fast convergence and simplicity in application. With the quark-lepton complementary relations, we derive relations between the two unified triminimal parametrizations for quark mixing obtained in this work and for lepton mixing obtained by Pakvasa-Rodejohann-Weiler. Parametrization deviating from quark-lepton complementarity is also discussed.

  6. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  7. Confining quark condensate model of the nucleon.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Michael; Tandy, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We obtain a mean-field solution for the nucleon as a quark-meson soliton obtained from the action of the global color-symmetry model of QCD. All dynamics is generated from an effective interaction of quark currents. At the quark-meson level there are two novel features: (1) absolute confinement is produced from the space-time structure of the dynamical self-energy in the vacuum quark propagator; and (2) the related scalar meson field is an extended q-barq composite that couples nonlocally to quarks. The influence of these features upon the nucleon mass contributions and other nucleon properties is presented.

  8. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  9. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Deliot, Frederic; Glenzinski, Douglas A.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    The authors review the field of top-quark physics with an emphasis on experimental techniques. The role of the top quark in the Standard Model of particle physics is summarized and the basic phenomenology of top-quark production and decay is introduced. They discuss how contributions from physics beyond the Standard model could affect the top-quark properties or event samples. The many measurements made at the Fermilab Tevatron, which test the Standard model predictions or probe for direct evidence of new physics using the top-quark event samples, are reviewed here.

  10. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  11. The Sileye-3/Alteino experiment for the study of light flashes, radiation environment and astronaut brain activity on board the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Bidoli, Vittorio; Casolino, Marco; De Pascale, Maria Pia; Furano, Gianluca; Minori, Mario; Morselli, Aldo; Narici, Livio; Picozza, Piergiorigio; Reali, Enzo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Fuglesang, Christer; Sannita, Walter; Carlson, Per; Castellini, Guido; Galper, Arkady; Korotkov, Mikhail; Popov, Alexander; Navilov, Nikita; Avdeev, Sergei; Benghin, Victor; Salnitskii, Victor; Shevchenko, Olga; Boezio, Mirko; Bonvicini, Walter; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Mazzenga, Giuseppe; Ricci, Marco; Spillantini, Piero; Vittori, Roberto

    2002-12-01

    In this work we describe the instrument Sileye-3/Alteino, placed on board the International Space Station in April 2002. The instrument is constituted by an Electroencephalograph and a cosmic ray silicon detector. The scientific aims include the investigation of the Light Flash phenomenon, the measurement of the radiation environment and the nuclear abundance inside the ISS and the study of astronaut brain activity in space when subject to cosmic rays. PMID:12793729

  12. Characterization of distinctive features of oceanic light fields associated with inelastic radiative processes in the near-surface, euphotic, and mesopelagic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhai

    A thorough understanding of the oceanic light fields is required to support studies of various biological, chemical, and physical processes and phenomena in the ocean. The interaction of light with seawater and its constituents involves absorption (change of radiant energy into another form of energy), elastic scattering (change in light propagation direction but not wavelength), and inelastic radiative processes (change in light wavelength and propagation direction). The absorption and elastic scattering have been the primary research focus for decades. The inelastic processes have been less investigated and often ignored in oceanographic studies or applications. The inelastic processes, including Raman scattering and fluorescence, have been demonstrated to significantly affect the oceanic light fields. However, a systematic examination of these influences within different ocean layers is lacking. I studied the effects of inelastic processes on oceanic light fields in the near-surface (0-10 m), euphotic (0-200 m), and mesopelagic (200-1000 m) layers. I modeled the upwelling radiance within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer. The inelastic processes dramatically affect the upwelling radiance and its attenuation coefficient in the red and near-infrared spectral regions, indicating that common approaches for estimating water-leaving radiance from extrapolating measurements of upwelling radiance are inadequate. A new strategy is proposed for more accurate in-situ determinations of water-leaving radiance, which is critical for ocean color applications. Using both a unique field dataset and radiative transfer modeling I examined the effects of inelastic processes in the euphotic layer. I demonstrate distinctive features caused by inelastic processes in the irradiance and radiance fields as well as apparent optical properties for realistic scenarios of optically non-uniform water column. I also demonstrate the role of inelastic processes in photosynthetically

  13. Landau levels of cold dense quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The occupied Landau levels of strange quark matter are investigated in the framework of the SU(3) NJL model with a conventional coupling and a magnetic-field dependent coupling respectively. At lower density, the Landau levels are mainly dominated by u and d quarks. Threshold values of the chemical potential for the s quark onset are shown in the μ -B plane. The magnetic-field-dependent running coupling can broaden the region of three-flavor matter by decreasing the dynamical masses of s quarks. Before the onset of s quarks, the Landau level number of light quarks is directly dependent on the magnetic field strength B by a simple inverse proportional relation ki ,max≈Bi0/B with Bd0=5 ×1 019 G , which is approximately 2 times Bu0 of u quarks at a common chemical potential. When the magnetic field increases up to Bd0, almost all three flavors are lying in the lowest Landau level.

  14. Nucleon structure functions and longitudinal spin asymmetries in the chiral quark constituent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the phenomenological dependence of the spin independent (F1p ,n and F2p ,n) and the spin dependent (g1p ,n) structure functions of the nucleon on the Bjorken scaling variable x using the unpolarized distribution functions of the quarks q (x ) and the polarized distribution functions of the quarks Δ q (x ) respectively. The chiral constituent quark model, which is known to provide a satisfactory explanation of the proton spin crisis and related issues in the nonperturbative regime, has been used to compute explicitly the valence and sea quark flavor distribution functions of p and n . In light of the improved precision of the world data, the p and n longitudinal spin asymmetries [A1p(x ) and A1n(x )] have been calculated. The implication of the presence of the sea quarks has been discussed for the ratio of polarized to unpolarized quark distribution functions for up and down quarks in the p and n Δ/up(x ) up(x ) , Δ/dp(x ) dp(x ) , Δ/un(x ) un(x ) , and Δ/dn(x ) dn(x ) . The ratio of the n and p structure functions Rn p(x )=F/2n(x ) F2p(x ) has also been presented. The results have been compared with the recent available experimental observations. The results on the spin sum rule have also been included and compared with data and other recent approaches.

  15. Reduction of UV-B radiation causes an enhancement of photoinhibition in high light stressed aquatic plants from New Zealand lakes.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, Dieter; Hawes, Ian; Rae, Rowena

    2006-08-01

    Anthropogenic stratospheric ozone depletion causes an increase of UV-B radiation impinging on the earth surface, which is a threat to plants not adapted to higher UV-B irradiances. Investigations were undertaken with aquatic plants from New Zealand, where UV-irradiances are naturally higher due to the southern latitude, to compare with former results of polar species. The experiments reported in this study were undertaken with plants collected from different lakes of the South Island, with different UV transparencies. Photoinhibition was induced under controlled conditions using a sun simulator, which mimicked the natural underwater radiation spectrum. Photosynthetic activity during high light stress, and during recovery in dim light, was determined in vivo by measuring fluorescence changes, using a PAM fluorometer device. A comparison of different species showed that the extent to which UV causes an additional decrease of photosynthetic performance during high light stress varies according to the depth of growth and UV transparency of the water body. This observation fits with previous studies. However, a new finding was that some species were even more strongly inhibited when UV-B was filtered out of the simulated sun spectrum, indicating a supporting effect of the short UVR wavelength range against photoinhibition. These results were also confirmed by field experiments under natural radiation conditions. Thus, UV-B does not solely cause negative effects on photosynthesis, but it may even support recovery processes in aquatic plants adapted to a high UV-radiation environment. The latter is in contrast to earlier studies, in which UV-B radiation was considered causing only harmful effects on photosynthesis of aquatic plants.

  16. Characterization of the deep levels responsible for non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, M. La Grassa, M.; Vaccari, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-03-17

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of the deep levels related to non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The study is based on combined optical and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, carried out on LEDs with identical structure and with different values of the non-radiative recombination coefficient. Experimental data lead to the following, relevant, results: (i) LEDs with a high non-radiative recombination coefficient have a higher concentration of a trap (labeled as “e{sub 2}”) with an activation energy of 0.7 eV, which is supposed to be located close to/within the active region; (ii) measurements carried out with varying filling pulse duration suggest that this deep level behaves as a point-defect/dislocation complex. The Arrhenius plot of this deep level is critically compared with the previous literature reports, to identify its physical origin.

  17. Energy change of a heavy quark in a viscous quark-gluon plasma with fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-09-01

    When a heavy quark travels through the quark-gluon plasma, the polarization and fluctuating chromoelectric fields will be produced simultaneously in the plasma. The drag force due to those fields exerting in return on the moving heavy quark will cause energy change to it. Based on the dielectric functions derived from the viscous chromohydrodynamics, we have studied the collisional energy change of a heavy quark traversing the viscous quark-gluon plasma including fluctuations of chromoelectric field. Numerical results indicate that the chromoelectric field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the moving heavy quark. Shear viscosity suppresses the fluctuation-induced energy gain and the viscous suppression effect for the charm quark is much more remarkable than that for the bottom quark. While, the fluctuation energy gain is much smaller than the polarization energy loss in magnitude and the net energy change for the heavy quark is at loss.

  18. Single Spin Asymmetry in Strongly Correlated Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Musulmanbekov, G.

    2007-06-13

    The Single Transverse - Spin Asymmetry (SSA) is analysed in the framework of the Strongly Correlated Quark Model proposed by author, where the proton spin emerges from the orbital momenta of quark and qluon condensates circulating around the valence quarks. It is shown that dominating factors of appearance of SSA are the orbiting around the valence quarks sea quark and qluon condensates and spin dependent quark-quark cross sections.

  19. Hadronic-to-Quark-Matter Phase Transition: Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebergal, Brian

    There are three Parts to this Thesis; the first gives an introduction to the search for quark-gluon plasmas, both in theory and experiment, and provides motivation for using astrophysics to complement this search. The second explores the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma in an astrophysical setting, through the conversion of u,d - to u,d,s-quarks via weak reactions. This transition is formulated in terms of a reactive-diffusive-hydrodynamical problem with the effects of neutrino cooling included, as well as the entropy change due to heat released in forming the stable quark phase. These equations are solved numerically with my newly developed, freely-available, numerical code (the BURN-UD CODE) - which is then applied to the problem of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star burning into stable u,d,s-quark matter. Analytic solutions to the equation set are found and used to verify the BURN-UD code and its findings. The most important findings are as follows; (i) the laminar speed of the combustion interface is 0.002 - 0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived without hydrodynamic considerations, (ii) neutrino cooling (deleptonization) is essential as it results in the unexpected destabilization of the combustion interface, which causes it to halt at lower densities (≈ 2 times nuclear saturation density). Also, (iii) by appealing to this newly discovered deleptonization instability it is shown for the first time exactly why the transition from a neutron star to a u,d,s-quark star must be explosive; these results validate the Quark-Nova model. Instructions are then given on how the BURN-UD code may be used to model relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as well as the reverse transition, which is expected to have occurred in the first few moments following the Big-Bang. The last Part of this Thesis concerns the phenomenology of color-superconductivity in compact stars, which occurs much later than

  20. Direct Evaluation of the Quark Content of Nucleons from Lattice QCD at the Physical Point.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, A; Alexandrou, C; Constantinou, M; Hadjiyiannakou, K; Jansen, K; Kallidonis, Ch; Koutsou, G; Avilés-Casco, A Vaquero

    2016-06-24

    We evaluate the light, strange, and charm scalar content of the nucleon using one lattice QCD ensemble generated with two degenerate light quarks with mass fixed to their physical value. We use improved techniques to evaluate the disconnected quark loops to sufficient accuracy to determine the strange and charm nucleon σ terms in addition to the light quark content σ_{πN}. We find σ_{πN}=37.2(2.6)(4.7/2.9)  MeV, σ_{s}=41.1(8.2)(7.8/5.8)  MeV, and σ_{c}=79(21)(12/8)  MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is the systematic error due to the determination of the lattice spacing, the assessment of finite volume, and residual excited state effects.