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Sample records for light regulate delta

  1. Low temperature and light regulate delta 12 fatty acid desaturases (FAD2) at a transcriptional level in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Kargiotidou, Anastasia; Deli, Dimitra; Galanopoulou, Dia; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Farmaki, Theodora

    2008-01-01

    Lipid modifying enzymes play a key role in the development of cold stress tolerance in cold-resistant plants such as cereals. However, little is known about the role of the endogenous enzymes in cold-sensitive species such as cotton. Delta 12 fatty acid desaturases (FAD2), known to participate in adaptation to low temperatures through acyl chain modifications were used in gene expression studies in order to identify parameters of plant response to low temperatures. The induction of microsomal delta 12 fatty acid desaturases at an mRNA level under cold stress in plants is shown here for first time. Quantitative PCR showed that though both delta 12 omega 6 fatty acid desaturase genes FAD2-3 and FAD2-4 identified in cotton are induced under cold stress, FAD2-4 induction is significantly higher than FAD2-3. The induction of both isoforms was light regulated, in contrast a third isoform FAD2-2 was not affected by cold or light. Stress tolerance and light regulatory elements were identified in the predicted promoters of both FAD2-3 and FAD2-4 genes. Di-unsaturated fatty acid species rapidly increased in the microsomal fraction isolated from cotton leaves, following cold stress. Expression analysis patterns were correlated with the observed increase in both total and microsomal fatty acid unsaturation levels suggesting the direct role of the FAD2 genes in membrane adaptation to cold stress.

  2. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  3. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  4. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  5. Dual regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity by {delta}Np63 in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.-K.; Lee, K.-C.; Chow, S.-E.; Chen, J.-K. . E-mail: jkc508@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-04-21

    p63 splicing variants lacking NH{sub 2}-terminal transactivating domain, known as {delta}Np63, are thought to antagonize p53 and p63 functions and are suggested to play roles in keratinocyte differentiation. Here, we show that {delta}Np63 has a dual-regulatory effect on the activity of its own promoter in NPC-076 cell. Down-regulation of the transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is present in low levels. In contrast, up-regulation of {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is expressed at higher levels. The down-regulation effect is abolished when the p53-binding site of the {delta}Np63 promoter is mutated. In sharp contrast, similar mutation does not affect the up-regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity under the same experimental conditions. Further study shows that the up-regulation is correlated with the activation of the STAT3, as the blockade of STAT3 nuclear translocation abolishes the up-regulation by {delta}Np63. Thus, {delta}Np63 exerts a bidirectional regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity in NPC-076 cell.

  6. Regulated proteolysis in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Ute

    2005-10-01

    Photoreceptors regulate many aspects of development throughout the life cycle of a plant. Recent advances have demonstrated the importance of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in the control of development by light. Both some of the photoreceptors themselves and, in particular, transcription factors that are involved in transducing the light signal are subject to regulated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

  7. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  8. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  9. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin; McDonald, Fiona J.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  10. Light curves and Fourier coefficients for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; McNamara, B.

    1998-07-01

    We have compiled a sample of Delta Scuti candidates from the MACHO catalog of variable stars in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, and a detailed spectral analysis of this time series data is in progress. The MACHO project (see Alcock et al. 1997) has collected a massive amount of photometry on millions of stars in the directions of the Galactic Bulge and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Many thousands of variable stars have been detected, among them Delta Scuti stars (towards the Galactic Bulge only; Delta Scuti stars in the LMC and SMC are below the detection limits of MACHO). See the discovery paper of Minniti et al. (1997) for more background and sample light curves. Of our initial sample of 136 stars showing variability on timescales less than 0.3d and with (V-R) colors similar to those of Delta Scuti stars, we find that sim 90 are likely Delta Scuti stars, with the remainder being either eclipsing binaries of W Ursa Majoris type ``A'' or which require more detailed observations for classification. The ultimate goal of our study is to determine as accurately as possible the pulsation spectra and pulsation mode types of the candidate Delta Scuti stars. In the present paper, we discuss the general light curve shapes of these objects by analyzing the Fourier harmonics of observed pulsation modes. This technique has been explored in some detail for Cepheids (Simon & Lee 1981) and for Delta Scuti stars (Antonello et al. 1987; Poretti et al. 1990). Recent non-linear modeling work by Bono et al. (1997) suggests that the light curve shape is a strong indicator of the radial overtone number for radially pulsating Delta Scuti stars. Therefore, Fourier analysis of pulsation frequencies and their Fourier harmonics may indicate which overtone a given star is pulsating in. Here, we present the initial results for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars.

  11. Porous FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08: highly efficient photocatalysts for the degradation of methylene blue under visible-light illumination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenxuan; Dai, Hongxing; Deng, Jiguang; Liu, Yuxi; Wang, Yuan; Li, Xinwei; Bai, Guangmei; Gao, Baozu; Au, Chak Tong

    2013-10-01

    Porous S-doped bismuth vanadate with an olive-like morphology and its supported iron oxide (y wt.% FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08, y = 0.06, 0.76, and 1.40) photocatalysts were fabricated using the dodecylamine-assisted alcohol-hydrothermal and incipient wetness impregnation methods, respectively. It is shown that the y wt.% FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08 photocatalysts contained a monoclinic scheetlite BiVO4 phase with a porous olive-like morphology, a surface area of 8.8-9.2 m2/g, and a bandgap energy of 2.38-2.42 eV. There was co-presence of surface Bi5+, Bi3+, V5+, V3+, Fe3+, and Fe2+ species in y wt.% FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08. The 1.40 wt.% FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08 sample performed the best for Methylene Blue degradation under visible-light illumination. The photocatalytic mechanism was also discussed. We believe that the sulfur and FeOx co-doping, higher oxygen adspecies concentration, and lower bandgap energy were responsible for the excellent visible-light-driven catalytic activity of 1.40 wt.% FeOx/BiVO4-deltaS0.08.

  12. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  13. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. ); Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  14. Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Charlie

    2000-08-20

    The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

  15. Delta DNMT3B variants regulate DNA methylation in a promoter-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Bhutani, Manisha; Pathak, Ashutosh K; Lang, Wenhua; Ren, Hening; Jelinek, Jaroslav; He, Rong; Shen, Lanlan; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Mao, Li

    2007-11-15

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) is critical in de novo DNA methylation during development and tumorigenesis. We recently reported the identification of a DNMT3B subfamily, DeltaDNMT3B, which contains at least seven variants, resulting from alternative pre-mRNA splicing. DeltaDNMT3Bs are the predominant expression forms of DNMT3B in human lung cancer. A strong correlation was observed between the promoter methylation of RASSF1A gene but not p16 gene (both frequently inactivated by promoter methylation in lung cancer) and expression of DeltaDNMT3B4 in primary lung cancer, suggesting a role of DeltaDNMT3B in regulating promoter-specific methylation of common tumor suppressor genes in tumorigenesis. In this report, we provide first experimental evidence showing a direct involvement of DeltaDNMT3B4 in regulating RASSF1A promoter methylation in human lung cancer cells. Knockdown of DeltaDNMT3B4 expression by small interfering RNA resulted in a rapid demethylation of RASSF1A promoter and reexpression of RASSF1A mRNA but had no effect on p16 promoter in the lung cancer cells. Conversely, normal bronchial epithelial cells with stably transfected DeltaDNMT3B4 gained an increased DNA methylation in RASSF1A promoter but not p16 promoter. We conclude that promoter DNA methylation can be differentially regulated and DeltaDNMT3Bs are involved in regulation of such promoter-specific de novo DNA methylation.

  16. Are the C delta light nitrogen and noble gases located in the same carrier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Shukolyukov, Yuri A.

    1993-01-01

    Light nitrogen and the HL family noble gas components of C(sub delta) appear to be separable by high resolution pyrolysis experiments. Thus C(sub delta) is not a homogeneous material and probably consists of debris of many stars. The question of whether the N and Xe(HL) actually reside in different carriers continues to be addressed. It is well known that C(sub delta) which was identified as nanometer sized diamonds contains isotopically anamalous elements, in particular noble gases including Xe(HL) and its family and light nitrogen (delta(N-15) down to -350 percent). Before the true nature of C(sub delta) was recognized, it was easy to suppose that the Xe(HL) and light nitrogen were located in the same carrier. However, recognition that light nitrogen in diamond from different samples varies by greater than a factor of six compared to Xe(HL) fluctuations of ca. 20 percent makes such an assumption questionable. On the basis of simple arithmetic logic, the Xe and nitrogen cannot be absolutely co-located. The average diamond grain consists of only about 1000-2000 atoms of carbon; one grain among a few x 10(exp 6) contains an atom of Xe(HL) while 5-30 atoms of light nitrogen are the typical number which need to be in every diamond grain to account for observed concentrations. If some grains are devoid of N, the others have to have a higher N concentration. Even if we were able to analyze an individual grain of the diamond for noble gases and nitrogen, we would be faced with the monumental task of locating the one amongst 10(exp 6) identical grains containing the Xe atom to examine its nitrogen content. The problem can be simplified to some extent if instead of Xe, He which is 10(exp 4) times more abundant is assumed to be a member of the HL family. Attempts to fractionate the separate carriers might be attempted using He and N as guiding indicators but even experiments of this nature are for the future. Faced with apparently insoluble problems, we have returned to an

  17. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  18. Light regulation of metabolic pathways in fungi.

    PubMed

    Tisch, Doris; Schmoll, Monika

    2010-02-01

    Light represents a major carrier of information in nature. The molecular machineries translating its electromagnetic energy (photons) into the chemical language of cells transmit vital signals for adjustment of virtually every living organism to its habitat. Fungi react to illumination in various ways, and we found that they initiate considerable adaptations in their metabolic pathways upon growth in light or after perception of a light pulse. Alterations in response to light have predominantly been observed in carotenoid metabolism, polysaccharide and carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, nucleotide and nucleoside metabolism, and in regulation of production of secondary metabolites. Transcription of genes is initiated within minutes, abundance and activity of metabolic enzymes are adjusted, and subsequently, levels of metabolites are altered to cope with the harmful effects of light or to prepare for reproduction, which is dependent on light in many cases. This review aims to give an overview on metabolic pathways impacted by light and to illustrate the physiological significance of light for fungi. We provide a basis for assessment whether a given metabolic pathway might be subject to regulation by light and how these properties can be exploited for improvement of biotechnological processes.

  19. A PTEN-regulated checkpoint regulates surface delivery of delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiwarski, Daniel J; Tipton, Alycia; Giraldo, Melissa D; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Gold, Michael S; Pradhan, Amynah A; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2017-03-06

    The delta opioid receptor (δR) is a promising alternate target for pain management, because δR agonists show decreased abuse potential compared to current opioid analgesics that target the mu opioid receptor. A critical limitation in developing δR as an analgesic target, however, is that δR agonists show relatively low efficacy in vivo, requiring the use of high doses that often cause adverse effects such as convulsions. Here we tested whether intracellular retention of δR in sensory neurons contributes to this low δR agonist efficacy in vivo by limiting surface δR expression. Using direct visualization of δR trafficking and localization, we define a phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-regulated checkpoint that retains δR in the Golgi and decreases surface delivery in rat and mice sensory neurons. PTEN inhibition releases δR from this checkpoint and stimulates delivery of exogenous and endogenous δR to the neuronal surface both in vitro and in vivo PTEN inhibition in vivo increases the percentage of TG neurons expressing δR on the surface, and allows efficient δR-mediated antihyperalgesia in mice. Together, we define a critical role for PTEN in regulating the surface delivery and bioavailability of the δR, explain the low efficacy of δR agonists in vivo, and provide evidence that active δR relocation is a viable strategy to increase δR antinociception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTOpioid analgesics like morphine, which target the mu opioid receptor (μR), have been the mainstay of pain management, but their use is highly limited by adverse effects and their variable efficacy in chronic pain. Identifying alternate analgesic targets is therefore of great significance. While the delta opioid receptor (δR) is an attractive option, a critical limiting factor in developing δR as a target has been the low efficacy of δR agonists. Why δR agonists show low efficacy is still under debate. This study provides mechanistic and functional data that intracellular

  20. Food web implications of delta13C and delta15N variability over 370 km of the regulated Colorado River USA.

    PubMed

    Shannon, J P; Blinn, D W; Haden, G A; Benenati, E P; Wilson, K P

    2001-01-01

    Dual stable isotope analysis in the regulated Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park, USA, revealed a food web that varied spatially through this arid biome. Down-river enrichment of delta13C data was detected across three trophic levels resulting in shifted food webs. Humpack chub delta13C and delta15N values from muscle plugs and fin clips did not differ significantly. Humpback chub and rainbow trout trophic position is positively correlated with standard length indicating an increase in piscivory by larger fishes. Recovery of the aquatic community from impoundment by Glen Canyon Dam and collecting refinements for stable isotope analysis within large rivers are discussed.

  1. Light Cone Sum Rules for gamma*N ->Delta Transition Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    V.M. Braun; A. Lenz; G. Peters; A. Radyushkin

    2006-02-01

    A theoretical framework is suggested for the calculation of {gamma}* N {yields} {Delta} transition form factors using the light-cone sum rule approach. Leading-order sum rules are derived and compared with the existing experimental data. We find that the transition form factors in a several GeV region are dominated by the ''soft'' contributions that can be thought of as overlap integrals of the valence components of the hadron wave functions. The ''minus'' components of the quark fields contribute significantly to the result, which can be reinterpreted as large contributions of the quark orbital angular momentum.

  2. Regulation of Traffic Lights at Road Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, Alfredo; Manzo, Rosanna; Rarità, Luigi

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we aim to investigate the effects of traffic lights regulation at road junctions, modelled by a fluid dynamic approach. Numerical simulations prove that it is possible to plan some optimization strategies for green and red phases for networks consisting of more nodes.

  3. The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

    2000-06-19

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

  4. LIGHT regulates inflamed draining lymph node hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhao; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongnan; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) hypertrophy, the increased cellularity of LNs, is the major indication of the initiation and expansion of the immune response against infection, vaccination, cancer or autoimmunity. The mechanisms underlying LN hypertrophy remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that LIGHT (TNFSF14) is a novel factor essential for LN hypertrophy after CFA immunization. Mechanistically, LIGHT is required for the influx of lymphocytes into but not egress out of LNs. In addition, LIGHT is required for DC migration from the skin to draining LNs. Compared with WT mice, LIGHT−/− mice express lower levels of chemokines in skin and addressins in LN vascular endothelial cells after CFA immunization. We unexpectedly observed that LIGHT from radioresistant rather than radiosensitive cells, likely Langerhans cells, is required for LN hypertrophy. Importantly, antigen-specific T cell responses were impaired in DLN of LIGHT−/− mice, suggesting the importance of LIGHT regulation of LN hypertrophy in the generation of an adaptive immune response. Collectively, our data reveal a novel cellular and molecular mechanism for the regulation of LN hypertrophy and its potential impact on the generation of an optimal adaptive immune response. PMID:21572030

  5. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  7. An Integrated Multilevel Converter with Sigma Delta Control for LED Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel L.

    High brightness LEDs have become a mainstream lighting technology due to their efficiency, life span, and environmental benefits. As such, the lighting industry values LED drivers with low cost, small form factor, and long life span. Additional specifications that define a high quality LED driver are high efficiency, high power factor, wide-range dimming, minimal flicker, and a galvanically isolated output. The flyback LED driver is a popular topology that satisfies all these specifications, but it requires a bulky and costly flyback transformer. In addition, its passive methods for cancelling AC power ripple require electrolytic capacitors, which have been known to have life span issues. This dissertation details the design, construction, and verification of a novel LED driver that satisfies all the specifications. In addition, it does not require a flyback transformer or electrolytic capacitors, thus marking an improvement over the flyback driver on size, cost, and life span. This dissertation presents an integrated circuit (IC) LED driver, which features a pair of generalized multilevel converters that are controlled via sigma-delta modulation. The first is a multilevel rectifier responsible for power factor correction (PFC) and dimming. The PFC rectifier employs a second order sigma-delta loop to precisely control the input current harmonics and amplitude. The second is a bidirectional multilevel inverter used to cancel AC power ripple from the DC bus. This ripple-cancellation module transfers energy to and from a storage capacitor. It uses a first order sigma-delta loop with a preprogrammed waveform to swing the storage capacitor voltage. The system also contains an output stage that powers the LEDs with DC and provides for galvanic isolation. The output stage consists of an H-bridge stack that connects to the output through a small toroid transformer. The IC LED driver was simulated and prototyped on an ABCD silicon test chip. Testing and verification

  8. Effect of a delta-doping green emitting layer in white organic light-emitting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Yu, Junsheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2012-10-01

    White organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) based on a double-emitting layer (EML) structure were fabricated, while phosphorescent blue and yellow emitters were employed. An ultra-thin layer of non-doped green tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3], which was considered as delta-doping layer, was inserted between the two EMLs for optimization. Furthermore, effect of adjusting thickness of this thin layer on device performance was studied. The results showed that the optimized WOLED consisting of 1-nm Ir(ppy)3 EML achieved a maximum luminance of 29,100 cd/m2, maximum external quantum efficiency of 7%, maximum current efficiency of 25.3 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 7.8 lm/W, together with low efficiency roll-off over a wide luminance range. Meanwhile, the white emission with Commission Internationale del'Eclariage (CIE) coordinates of (0.382,0.446) at a driving voltage of 10 V were observed. The performance enhancement is ascribed to improved charge carrier balance through introduction the highly efficient Ir(ppy)3 as the thin delta-doping layer.

  9. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  10. Differential regulation of. mu. , delta, kappa opioid receptors by Mn/sup + +/

    SciTech Connect

    Szuecs, M.; Oetting, G.M.; Coscia, C.J.

    1986-03-05

    Differential effects of Mn/sup + +/ on three opioid receptor subtypes of rat brain membranes were evaluated. Concentration dependency studies performed with 0.05-20 mM Mn/sup + +/ revealed that only the delta receptors are stimulated at any concentration. The binding of 1 nM /sup 3/H-DAGO was not stimulated by low concentrations (< 1mM) of Mn/sup + +/, and was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (40% at 20 mM). 1 nM /sup 3/H-EKC (+100nM DAGO and 100nM DADLE) binding was inhibited by Mn/sup + +/ in the entire concentration range. While regulation of ..mu.. receptor binding did not change during postnatal development, delta and kappa binding displayed a pronounced developmental time-dependency. Kappa sites were hardly affected by Mn/sup + +/ at day 5, and adult levels of inhibition were reached only after the third week postnatal. In contrast, 1 nM /sup 3/H-DADLE (+10nM DAGO) binding was most sensitive to Mn/sup + +/ on day 5 after birth (100% stimulation with 5-20 mM). The ED/sub 50/ of Mn/sup + +/ stimulation was unchanged during maturation. These immature delta sites displayed a similar extent of Mn/sup + +/ reversal of Gpp(NH)p inhibition as seen in microsomes, which represent a good model of N/sub i/-uncoupled receptors. These data suggest that ..mu.., delta and kappa receptors are differently coupled to N/sub i/. Moreover, a second divalent cation binding site, in addition to that on N/sub i/ might exist for delta receptors.

  11. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.

  12. DeltaA/DeltaD regulate multiple and temporally distinct phases of notch signaling during dopaminergic neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Julia; Filippi, Alida; Driever, Wolfgang

    2010-12-08

    Dopaminergic neurons develop at distinct anatomical sites to form some of the major neuromodulatory systems in the vertebrate brain. Despite their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases and the interests in reconstitutive therapies from stem cells, mechanisms of the neurogenic switch from precursor populations to dopaminergic neurons are not well understood. Here, we investigated neurogenesis of different dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuron populations in the zebrafish embryo. Birth-dating analysis by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation revealed temporal dynamics of catecholaminergic neurogenesis. Analysis of Notch signaling mutants and stage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Notch processing revealed that dopaminergic neurons form by temporally distinct mechanisms: dopaminergic neurons of the posterior tuberculum derive directly from neural plate cells during primary neurogenesis, whereas other dopaminergic groups form in continuous or wavelike neurogenesis phases from proliferating precursor pools. Systematic analysis of Notch ligands revealed that the two zebrafish co-orthologs of mammalian Delta1, DeltaA and DeltaD, control the neurogenic switch of all early developing dopaminergic neurons in a partially redundant manner. DeltaA/D may also be involved in maintenance of dopaminergic precursor pools, as olig2 expression in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic precursors is affected in dla/dld mutants. DeltaA/D act upstream of sim1a and otpa during dopaminergic specification. However, despite the fact that both dopaminergic and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons derive from sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursors, DeltaA/D does not act as a lineage switch between these two neuronal types. Rather, DeltaA/D limits the size of the sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursor pool from which dopaminergic neurons differentiate.

  13. Light-dependent delta pH and membrane potential changes in halobacterial vesicles coupled to sodium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kamo, N.; Racanelli, T.; Packer, L.

    1982-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin and Halorhodopsin present in Halobacterium halobium strains have been investigated in relation to Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange in isolated cell envelope vesicles. Upon illumination, these retinal proteins result in extrusion of sodium ions by either an electrogenic Na/sup +//Ha/sup +/ antiporter and/or a direct sodium pump. Since a molecular characterization of these mechanism(s) of sodium extrusion has not yet been realized, it was of interest to measure directly the light- and sodium-dependent changes in delta pH and membrane potential under nearly identical conditions in S9 and R1mR cell membrane vesicles to gain information on the relation of these retinal proteins to sodium extrusion. These activities were evaluated in terms of their dependence on light intensity, and on the inhibitory effect of chemical modifiers of carboxyl groups (carbodiimides); electroneutral exchanges (monensin and triphenyltin); digitoxin and some analogues; and phloretin. Under most of the conditions and treatments employed, light- and sodium-dependent delta pH led to similar effects in both membrane vesicle types. Hence, it is concluded that the delta pH and delta psi which arise from sodium transport occur by either a single mechanism or by one which shares common features.

  14. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  15. Light-regulated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2015-01-01

    In addition to exposure to passive diurnal cycles of sunlight, humans are also subjected to intentional acute exposure to other types of electromagnetic radiation (EM). Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the physiological, pathological and therapeutic responses to exposure to radiation is an active area of research. With the advent of methods to readily catalog and identify patterns of changes in gene expression, many studies have reported changes in gene expression upon exposure of various human and mouse cells in vitro, whole experimental organisms such as mice and parts of human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these broad ranging changes in gene expression are not yet fully understood. MicroRNAs, which are short, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting many messenger RNAs, are also emerging as important mediators of radiation-induced changes in gene expression and hence critical for the manifestation of light-induced cellular phenotypes and physiological responses. In this article, we review available knowledge on microRNAs implicated in responses to various forms of solar and other EM radiation. Based on this knowledge, we elaborate some unifying themes in the regulation and functions of some of these miRNAs.

  16. Regulation of Conidiation by Light in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Fernández-Barranco, Raul; Olmedo, María; Fischer, Reinhard; Corrochano, Luis M.; Canovas, David

    2011-01-01

    Light regulates several aspects of the biology of many organisms, including the balance between asexual and sexual development in some fungi. To understand how light regulates fungal development at the molecular level we have used Aspergillus nidulans as a model. We have performed a genome-wide expression analysis that has allowed us to identify >400 genes upregulated and >100 genes downregulated by light in developmentally competent mycelium. Among the upregulated genes were genes required for the regulation of asexual development, one of the major biological responses to light in A. nidulans, which is a pathway controlled by the master regulatory gene brlA. The expression of brlA, like conidiation, is induced by light. A detailed analysis of brlA light regulation revealed increased expression after short exposures with a maximum after 60 min of light followed by photoadaptation with longer light exposures. In addition to brlA, genes flbA–C and fluG are also light regulated, and flbA–C are required for the correct light-dependent regulation of the upstream regulator fluG. We have found that light induction of brlA required the photoreceptor complex composed of a phytochrome FphA, and the white-collar homologs LreA and LreB, and the fluffy genes flbA–C. We propose that the activation of regulatory genes by light is the key event in the activation of asexual development by light in A. nidulans. PMID:21624998

  17. Hypoxia-Regulated Delta-like 1 Homologue Enhances Cancer Cell Stemness and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Zelterman, Daniel; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, inhibits differentiation and facilitates stem cell maintenance. Hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors and promotes malignant progression. Hypoxic tumors are aggressive and exhibit stem cell–like characteristics. It remains unclear, however, whether and how hypoxia regulates cancer cell differentiation and maintains cancer cell stemness. Here, we show that hypoxia increases the expression of the stem cell gene DLK1, or delta-like 1 homologue (Drosophila), in neuronal tumor cells. Inhibition of DLK1 enhances spontaneous differentiation, decreases clonogenicity, and reduces in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of DLK1 inhibits differentiation and enhances tumorigenic potentials. We further show that the DLK1 cytoplasmic domain, especially Tyrosine339 and Serine355, is required for maintaining both clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Because elevated DLK1 expression is found in many tumor types, our observations suggest that hypoxia and DLK1 may constitute an important stem cell pathway for the regulation of cancer stem cell–like functionality and tumorigenicity. PMID:19934310

  18. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments.

  19. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  20. Physics and polarization characteristics of 298 nm AlN-delta-GaN quantum well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Ooi, Yu Kee; Islam, S. M.; Verma, Jai; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Zhang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    This work investigates the physics and polarization characteristics of 298 nm AlN-delta-GaN quantum well (QW) ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The physics analysis shows that the use of the AlN-delta-GaN QW structure can ensure dominant conduction band (C) to heavy-hole (HH) subband transition and significantly improve the electron and top HH subband wave function overlap. As a result, up to 30-times enhancement in the transverse-electric (TE)-polarized spontaneous emission rate of the proposed structure can be obtained as compared to a conventional AlGaN QW structure. The polarization properties of molecular beam epitaxy-grown AlN/GaN QW-like UV LEDs, which consist of 3-4 monolayer (QW-like) delta-GaN layers sandwiched by 2.5-nm AlN sub-QW layers, are investigated in this study. The polarization-dependent electroluminescence measurement results are consistent with the theoretical analysis. Specifically, the TE-polarized emission intensity is measured to be much larger than the transverse-magnetic emission, indicating significant potential for our proposed QW structure for high-efficiency TE-polarized mid-UV LEDs.

  1. Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Li Wenqi; Cheng Senping; Yao Hua; Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan; Ke Zunji; Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok; Luo Jia; Shi Xianglin

    2011-06-15

    Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

  2. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  3. A novel natural product compound enhances cAMP-regulated chloride conductance of cells expressing CFTR[delta]F508.

    PubMed Central

    deCarvalho, Ana C. V.; Ndi, Chi P.; Tsopmo, Apollinaire; Tane, Pierre; Ayafor, Johnson; Connolly, Joseph D.; Teem, John L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a chloride channel localized at the plasma membrane of diverse epithelia. The most common mutation leading to CF, Delta F508, occurs in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR. The Delta F508 mutation disrupts protein processing, leading to a decreased level of mutant channels at the plasma membrane and reduced transepithelial chloride permeability. Partial correction of the Delta F508 molecular defect in vitro is achieved by incubation of cells with several classes of chemical chaperones, indicating that further investigation of novel small molecules is warranted as a means for producing new therapies for CF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to study the effect of CF-causing mutations on the ability of NBD1 to self-associate and form dimers. A yeast strain demonstrating defective growth as a result of impaired NBD1 dimerization due to Delta F508 was used as a drug discovery bioassay for the identification of plant natural product compounds restoring mutant NBD1 interaction. Active compounds were purified and the chemical structures determined. The purified compounds were tested in epithelial cells expressing CFTR Delta F508 and the resulting effect on transepithelial chloride permeability was assessed using short-circuit chloride current measurements. RESULTS: Wild-type NBD1 of CFTR forms homodimers in a yeast two-hybrid assay. CF-causing mutations within NBD1 that result in defective processing of CFTR (Delta F508, Delta I507, and S549R) disrupted NBD1 interaction in yeast. In contrast, a CF-causing mutation that does not impair CFTR processing (G551D) had no effect on NBD1 dimerization. Using the yeast-based assay, we identified a novel limonoid compound (TS3) that corrected the Delta F508 NBD1 dimerization defect in yeast and also increased the chloride permeability of Fisher Rat

  4. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of phospholipase D2 by protein kinase C delta in rat Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Yong; Jung, Yon Woo; Lee, Sukmook; Cho, Wonhwa; Ohba, Motoi; Kuroki, Toshio; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2002-03-08

    Many studies have shown that protein kinase C (PKC) is an important physiological regulator of phospholipase D (PLD). However, the role of PKC in agonist-induced PLD activation has been mainly investigated with a focus on the PLD1, which is one of the two PLD isoenzymes (PLD1 and PLD2) cloned to date. Since the expression of PLD2 significantly enhanced phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- or bradykinin-induced PLD activity in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of PLD2 in PC12 cells. Two different PKC inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-31-8220, completely blocked PMA-induced PLD2 activation. In addition, specific inhibition of PKC delta by rottlerin prevented PLD2 activation in PMA-stimulated PC12 cells. Concomitant with PLD2 activation, PLD2 became phosphorylated upon PMA or bradykinin treatment of PC12 cells. Moreover, rottlerin blocked PMA- or bradykinin-induced PLD2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells. Expression of a kinase-deficient mutant of PKC delta using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of PLD2 induced by PMA in PC12 cells, suggesting the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of PLD2 mediated by PKC delta kinase activity in PC12 cells. PKC delta co-immunoprecipitated with PLD2 from PC12 cell extracts, and associated with PLD2 in vitro in a PMA-dependent manner. Phospho-PLD2 immunoprecipitated from PMA-treated PC12 cells and PLD2 phosphorylated in vitro by PKC delta were resolved by two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping and compared. At least seven phosphopeptides co-migrated, indicating the direct phosphorylation of PLD2 by PKC delta inside the cells. Immunocytochemical studies of PC12 cells revealed that after treatment with PMA, PKC delta was translocated from the cytosol to the plasma membrane where PLD2 is mainly localized. These results suggest that PKC delta-dependent direct phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of PLD2 activity in PC12 cells.

  5. Aniline exposure associated with up-regulated transcriptional responses of three glutathione S-transferase Delta genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Chiao; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2015-03-01

    Complex transcriptional profile of glutathione S-transferase Delta cluster genes occurred in the developmental process of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this project was to quantify the expression levels of Gst Delta class genes altered by aniline exposure and to understand the relationship between aniline dosages and the variation of Gst Delta genes expressed in D. melanogaster. Using RT-PCR expression assays, the expression patterns of the transcript mRNAs of the glutathione S-transferase Delta genes were revealed and their expression levels were measured at eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. The adult stage was selected for further dose-response assays. After analysis, the results indicated that three Gst Delta genes (Gst D2, Gst D5 and Gst D6) were found to show a peak of up-regulated transcriptional response at 6-8h of exposure of aniline. Furthermore, the dose-response relationship of their induction levels within the dose regiments (from 1.2 to 2.0 μl/tube) had been measured. The expression patterns and annotations of these genes were discussed in the context.

  6. First light curve analysis of the high-amplitude Delta Scuti star GSC 4552-1498

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, S. J.; Poro, A.

    2017-07-01

    We carried out observation of the HADS (High-Amplitude Delta Scuti) variable GSC 4552-1498 through three filters. Our goal was to consider its periodic behavior using our photometry data in addition to previous observations. A new ephemeris and determination of oscillation modes of the star based on Fourier analysis are presented. The Two color diagram of the star as a function of its phase is shown. Finally, some of the star's physical parameters including mass, radius and luminosity are calculated.

  7. Characterization of the transport properties of channel delta-doped structures by light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Young, P. G.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The transport properties of channel delta-doped quantum well structures were characterized by conventional Hall effect and light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements. The large number of carriers that become available due to the delta-doping of the channel, leads to an apparent degeneracy in the well. As a result of this degeneracy, the carrier mobility remains constant as a function of temperature from 300 K down to 1.4 K. The large amount of impurity scattering, associated with the overlap of the charge carriers and the dopants, resulted in low carrier mobilities and restricted the observation of the oscillatory magneto-resistance used to characterize the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by conventional SdH measurements. By light-modulating the carriers, we were able to observe the SdH oscillation at low magnetic fields, below 1.4 tesla, and derive a value for the quantum scattering time. Our results for the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times are lower than those previously measured for similar structures using much higher magnetic fields.

  8. The p53 isoform delta133p53ß regulates cancer cell apoptosis in a RhoB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Nikola; Ho-Pun-Cheung, Alexandre; Evelyne, Crapez; Assenat, Eric; Jarlier, Marta; Anguille, Christelle; Colard, Manon; Pezet, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    The TP53 gene plays essential roles in cancer. Conventionally, wild type (WT) p53 is thought to prevent cancer development and metastasis formation, while mutant p53 has transforming abilities. However, clinical studies failed to establish p53 mutation status as an unequivocal predictive or prognostic factor of cancer progression. The recent discovery of p53 isoforms that can differentially regulate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis suggests that their expression, rather than p53 mutations, could be a more clinically relevant biomarker in patients with cancer. In this study, we show that the p53 isoform delta133p53ß is involved in regulating the apoptotic response in colorectal cancer cell lines. We first demonstrate delta133p53ß association with the small GTPase RhoB, a well-described anti-apoptotic protein. We then show that, by inhibiting RhoB activity, delta133p53ß protects cells from camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that high delta133p53 mRNA expression levels are correlated with higher risk of recurrence in a series of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (n = 36). Our findings describe how a WT TP53 isoform can act as an oncogene and add a new layer to the already complex p53 signaling network. PMID:28212429

  9. CaM kinase II delta2-dependent regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell polarization and migration.

    PubMed

    Mercure, Melissa Z; Ginnan, Roman; Singer, Harold A

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies indicate involvement of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration. In the present study, molecular loss-of-function studies were used specifically to assess the role of the predominant CaMKII delta2 isoform on VSM cell migration using a scratch wound healing assay. Targeted CaMKII delta2 knockdown using siRNA or inhibition of activity by overexpressing a kinase-negative mutant resulted in attenuation of VSM cell migration. Temporal and spatial assessments of kinase autophosphorylation indicated rapid and transient activation in response to wounding, in addition to a sustained activation in the leading edge of migrating and spreading cells. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated suppression of CaMKII delta2 resulted in the inhibition of wound-induced Rac activation and Golgi reorganization, and disruption of leading edge morphology, indicating an important function for CaMKII delta2 in regulating VSM cell polarization. Numerous previous reports link activation of CaMKII to ERK1/2 signaling in VSM. Wound-induced ERK1/2 activation was also found to be dependent on CaMKII; however, ERK activity did not account for effects of CaMKII in regulating Golgi polarization, indicating alternative mechanisms by which CaMKII affects the complex events involved in cell migration. Wounding a VSM cell monolayer results in CaMKII delta2 activation, which positively regulates VSM cell polarization and downstream signaling, including Rac and ERK1/2 activation, leading to cell migration.

  10. Delta-Like Ligand 4 Modulates Liver Damage by Down-Regulating Chemokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Dewidar, Bedair; Hu, Junhao; Park, Ogyi; Feng, Teng; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Qi; Meyer, Christoph; Ilkavets, Iryna; Müller, Alexandra; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Munker, Stefan; Liebe, Roman; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Mertens, Peter R; Li, Hai; Ten Dijke, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G; Li, Jun; Gao, Bin; Ebert, Matthias P; Dooley, Steven; Li, Youming; Weng, Hong-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Disrupting Notch signaling ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis. However, the role of individual Notch ligands in liver damage is unknown. We investigated the effects of Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) in liver disease. DLL4 expression was measured in 31 human liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. Dll4 function was examined in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-challenged mouse models in vivo and evaluated in hepatic stellate cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in vitro. DLL4 was expressed in patients' Kupffer and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Recombinant Dll4 protein (rDll4) ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice after carbon tetrachloride challenge. In vitro, rDll4 significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide-dependent chemokine expression in both Kupffer and hepatic stellate cells. In bile duct ligation mice, rDll4 induced massive hepatic necrosis, resulting in the death of all animals within 1 week. Inflammatory cell infiltration and chemokine ligand 2 (Ccl2) expression were significantly reduced in rDll4-receiving bile duct ligation mice. Recombinant Ccl2 rescued bile duct ligation mice from rDll4-mediated death. In patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, DLL4 expression was inversely associated with CCL2 abundance. Mechanistically, Dll4 regulated Ccl2 expression via NF-κB. Taken together, Dll4 modulates liver inflammatory response by down-regulating chemokine expression. rDll4 application results in opposing outcomes in two models of liver damage. Loss of DLL4 may be associated with CCL2-mediated cytokine storm in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  11. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  12. Induction of delta opioid receptor function by up-regulation of membrane receptors in mouse primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, Wendy; Maidment, Nigel T; Sanders, Matthew; Evans, Christopher J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Hales, Tim G

    2005-12-01

    It is not clear whether primary afferent neurons express functional cell-surface opioid receptors. We examined delta receptor coupling to Ca2+ channels in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons under basal conditions and after receptor up-regulation. [D-Ala2,Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]-enkephalin (DADLE), trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]cyclohexyl) benzene-acetamide methanesulfonate (U-50,488H; 1 microM), and baclofen (50 microM) inhibited Ca2+ currents, whereas the -selective ligands [D-Pen2,Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE) and deltorphin II (1 microM) did not. The effect of DADLE (1 microM) was blocked by the mu-antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP; 300 nM) but not by the -antagonist Tyr-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-Phe-Phe-OH (300 nM), implicating mu receptors. Despite a lack of functional delta receptors, flow cytometry revealed cell-surface receptors. We used this approach to identify conditions that up-regulate receptors, including mu receptor gene deletion in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mu-/- mice and 18-h incubation of mu+/+ neurons with CTAP followed by brief (10-min) DPDPE exposure. Under these conditions, the expression of cell-surface delta receptors was up-regulated to 149 +/- 9 and 139 +/- 5%, respectively; furthermore, DPDPE and deltorphin II (1 microM) inhibited Ca2+ currents in both cases. Viral replacement of mu receptors in mu-/- neurons reduced delta receptor expression to mu+/+ levels, restored the inhibition of Ca2+ currents by DAMGO, and abolished receptor coupling. Our observations suggest that receptor-Ca2+ channel coupling in primary afferent fibers may have little functional significance under basal conditions in which mu receptors predominate. However, up-regulation of cell-surface delta receptors induces their coupling to Ca2+ channels. Pharmacological approaches that increase functional delta receptor expression may reveal a novel target for analgesic therapy.

  13. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. Copyright © 2014

  14. Circadian and light-driven regulation of rod dark adaptation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q; Corbo, Joseph C; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2015-12-02

    Continuous visual perception and the dark adaptation of vertebrate photoreceptors after bright light exposure require recycling of their visual chromophore through a series of reactions in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE visual cycle). Light-driven chromophore consumption by photoreceptors is greater in daytime vs. nighttime, suggesting that correspondingly higher activity of the visual cycle may be required. However, as rod photoreceptors are saturated in bright light, the continuous turnover of their chromophore by the visual cycle throughout the day would not contribute to vision. Whether the recycling of chromophore that drives rod dark adaptation is regulated by the circadian clock and light exposure is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that mouse rod dark adaptation is slower during the day or after light pre-exposure. This surprising daytime suppression of the RPE visual cycle was accompanied by light-driven reduction in expression of Rpe65, a key enzyme of the RPE visual cycle. Notably, only rods in melatonin-proficient mice were affected by this daily visual cycle modulation. Our results demonstrate that the circadian clock and light exposure regulate the recycling of chromophore in the RPE visual cycle. This daily melatonin-driven modulation of rod dark adaptation could potentially protect the retina from light-induced damage during the day.

  15. Circadian and light-driven regulation of rod dark adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous visual perception and the dark adaptation of vertebrate photoreceptors after bright light exposure require recycling of their visual chromophore through a series of reactions in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE visual cycle). Light-driven chromophore consumption by photoreceptors is greater in daytime vs. nighttime, suggesting that correspondingly higher activity of the visual cycle may be required. However, as rod photoreceptors are saturated in bright light, the continuous turnover of their chromophore by the visual cycle throughout the day would not contribute to vision. Whether the recycling of chromophore that drives rod dark adaptation is regulated by the circadian clock and light exposure is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that mouse rod dark adaptation is slower during the day or after light pre-exposure. This surprising daytime suppression of the RPE visual cycle was accompanied by light-driven reduction in expression of Rpe65, a key enzyme of the RPE visual cycle. Notably, only rods in melatonin-proficient mice were affected by this daily visual cycle modulation. Our results demonstrate that the circadian clock and light exposure regulate the recycling of chromophore in the RPE visual cycle. This daily melatonin-driven modulation of rod dark adaptation could potentially protect the retina from light-induced damage during the day. PMID:26626567

  16. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  17. Let there be light: Regulation of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation relies on a variety of molecular mechanisms affecting different steps of a messenger RNA (mRNA) life: transcription, processing, splicing, alternative splicing, transport, translation, storage and decay. Light induces massive reprogramming of gene expression in plants. Differences in alternative splicing patterns in response to environmental stimuli suggest that alternative splicing plays an important role in plant adaptation to changing life conditions. In a recent publication, our laboratories showed that light regulates alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes encoding proteins involved in RNA processing by chloroplast retrograde signals. The light effect on alternative splicing is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. These results point at alternative splicing regulation by retrograde signals as an important mechanism for plant adaptation to their environment. PMID:25590224

  18. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Wiltbank, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. PMID:26861023

  19. Impact of river regulation on a Mediterranean delta: Assessment of managed versus unmanaged scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergillos, Rafael J.; Rodríguez-Delgado, Cristóbal; Millares, Agustín.; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel; Losada, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the effects of the construction of a reservoir 19 km from the mouth on the dynamics of the Guadalfeo delta (southern Spain), a Mediterranean delta in a semiarid and high-mountain basin. The sediment volume transported as bed load and accumulated in the delta was estimated under two scenarios by means of a calibrated hydrological model: a managed scenario, considering the flows drained by the dam, and an unmanaged scenario, considering the absence of such infrastructure. Bathymetric and topographic measurements were analyzed and correlated with the fluvial and maritime forcing agents. Results indicate that the reservoir has significantly modified the dynamics downstream: the coast has lost almost 0.3 hm3 of sediments since the entry into operation of the dam, generating a 1.4 km coastline retreat around the mouth, with a maximum retreat of 87 m (92% of the initial). The beach profile decreased by up to 820 m2, whereas the average decrease around the mouth was equal to 214 m2. Under unmanaged conditions, more than 2 hm3 of bed load would have reached the coast. Based on the results, three new management scenarios of flows drained by the dam, in combination with bypassed sediment from the reservoir, were proposed to prevent more severe consequences in the delta and the silting of the reservoir. The proposed methodology for new management scenarios can be extended to other worldwide deltas, especially to those in semiarid and Mediterranean basins, and it represents an advanced tool for decision making.

  20. Carotenoid cation formation and the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nancy E; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Li, Xiao-Ping; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2005-01-21

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in excess light is regulated by a process known as feedback deexcitation. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements on thylakoid membranes show selective formation of a carotenoid radical cation upon excitation of chlorophyll under conditions of maximum, steady-state feedback deexcitation. Studies on transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants confirmed that this carotenoid radical cation formation is correlated with feedback deexcitation and requires the presence of zeaxanthin, the specific carotenoid synthesized during high light exposure. These results indicate that energy transfer from chlorophyll molecules to a chlorophyllzeaxanthin heterodimer, which then undergoes charge separation, is the mechanism for excess energy dissipation during feedback deexcitation.

  1. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  2. Light regulation of pigment and photosystem biosynthesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Soulier, Nathan T; Canniffe, Daniel P; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-04-06

    Most cyanobacteria are obligate oxygenic photoautotrophs, and thus their growth and survival is highly dependent on effective utilization of incident light. Cyanobacteria have evolved a diverse set of phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that allow cells to respond to light in the range from ∼300nm to ∼750nm. Together with associated response regulators, these photosensory proteins control many aspects of cyanobacterial physiology and metabolism. These include far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA), low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), photosystem content and stoichiometry (long-term adaptation), short-term acclimation (state transitions), circadian rhythm, phototaxis, photomorphogenesis/development, and cellular aggregation. This minireview highlights some discoveries concerning phytochromes and CBCRs as well as two acclimation processes that improve light harvesting and energy conversion under specific irradiance conditions: FaRLiP and CCA.

  3. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  4. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  5. Allosteric regulation of the light-harvesting system of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Horton, P; Ruban, A V; Wentworth, M

    2000-10-29

    Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) is symptomatic of the regulation of energy dissipation by the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PS II). The kinetics of NPQ in both leaves and isolated chloroplasts are determined by the transthylakoid delta pH and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle. In order to understand the mechanism and regulation of NPQ we have adopted the approaches commonly used in the study of enzyme-catalysed reactions. Steady-state measurements suggest allosteric regulation of NPQ, involving control by the xanthophyll cycle carotenoids of a protonation-dependent conformational change that transforms the PS II antenna from an unquenched to a quenched state. The features of this model were confirmed using isolated light-harvesting proteins. Analysis of the rate of induction of quenching both in vitro and in vivo indicated a bimolecular second-order reaction; it is suggested that quenching arises from the reaction between two fluorescent domains, possibly within a single protein subunit. A universal model for this transition is presented based on simple thermodynamic principles governing reaction kinetics.

  6. Light quality and quantity regulate aerobic methane emissions from plants.

    PubMed

    Martel, Ashley B; Qaderi, Mirwais M

    2017-03-01

    Studies have been mounting in support of the finding that plants release aerobic methane (CH4 ), and that these emissions are increased by both short-term and long-term environmental stress. It remains unknown whether or not they are affected by variation in light quantity and quality, whether emissions change over time, and whether they are influenced by physiological parameters. Light is the primary energy source of plants, and therefore an important regulator of plant growth and development. Both shade-intolerant sunflower and shade-tolerant chrysanthemum were investigated for the release of aerobic CH4 emissions, using either low or high light intensity, and varying light quality, including control, low or normal red:far-red ratio (R:FR), and low or high levels of blue, to discern the relationship between light and CH4 emissions. It was found that low levels of light act as an environmental stress, facilitating CH4 release from both species. R:FR and blue lights increased emissions under low light, but the results varied with species, providing evidence that both light quantity and quality regulate CH4 emissions. Emission rates of 6.79-41.13 ng g(-1) DW h(-1) and 18.53-180.25 ng g(-1) DW h(-1) were observed for sunflower and chrysanthemum, respectively. Moreover, emissions decreased with age as plants acclimated to environmental conditions. Since effects were similar in both species, there may be a common trend among a number of shade-tolerant and shade-intolerant species. Light quantity and quality are influenced by factors including cloud covering, so it is important to know how plants will be affected in the context of aerobic CH4 emissions. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light.

    PubMed

    Wiltbank, Lisa B; Kehoe, David M

    2016-02-09

    The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. The large number of cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors encoded by cyanobacterial genomes suggests that these organisms are capable of extremely complex light color sensing and responsiveness, yet little is known about their functions and interactions. Our work uncovers previously undescribed cooperation between two photoreceptors with very different light

  8. Adolescent Changes in Homeostatic Regulation of EEG Activity in the Delta and Theta Frequency Bands during NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian G.; Darchia, Nato; Higgins, Lisa M.; Dykan, Igor V.; Davis, Nicole M.; de Bie, Evan; Feinberg, Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave EEG activity in NREM sleep decreases by more than 60% between ages 10 and 20 years. Slow wave EEG activity also declines across NREM periods (NREMPs) within a night, and this decline is thought to represent the dynamics of sleep homeostasis. We used longitudinal data to determine whether these homeostatic dynamics change across adolescence. Design: All-night sleep EEG was recorded semiannually for 6 years. Setting: EEG was recorded with ambulatory recorders in the subjects' homes. Participants: Sixty-seven subjects in 2 cohorts, one starting at age 9 and one starting at age 12 years. Measurements and Results: For NREM delta (1-4 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) EEG, we tested whether the proportion of spectral energy contained in the first NREMP changes with age. We also tested for age changes in the parameters of the process S exponential decline. For both delta and theta, the proportion of energy in the first NREMP declined significantly across ages 9 to 18 years. Process S parameters SWA0 and TWA0, respectively, represent slow wave (delta) activity and theta wave activity at the beginning of the night. SWA0 and TWA0 declined significantly (P < 0.0001) across ages 9 to 18. Conclusions: These declines indicate that the intensity of the homeostatic or restorative processes at the beginning of sleep diminished across adolescence. We propose that this change in sleep regulation is caused by the synaptic pruning that occurs during adolescent brain maturation. Citation: Campbell IG; Darchia N; Higgins LM; Dykan IV; Davis NM; de Bie E; Feinberg I. Adolescent changes in homeostatic regulation of EEG activity in the delta and theta frequency bands during NREM sleep. SLEEP 2011;34(1):83-91. PMID:21203377

  9. An Enhanced Light-Load Efficiency Step Down Regulator with Fine Step Frequency Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a switching DC-DC Buck converter with enhanced light-load efficiency for use in noise-sensitive applications. Low noise, spur free operation is achieved by using a sigma-delta-modulator (ΣΔ) based controller, while light load efficiency is realized through the introduction of fine step frequency scaling (FSFS) which continuously adjusts the switching frequency of the converter with load conditions. Regulation efficiency is further improved by adoption of mode hopping (continuous conduction mode (CCM)/discontinuous conduction mode (DCM)) and utilization of a fully digital implementation. Furthermore, the presented converter maintains low output voltage ripple across its entire load range by reconfiguring the ΣΔ modulator’s quantization step and introducing dither to the loop filter. The proposed modulator was implemented in 14nm bulk CMOS process and validated with post layout simulations. It attains a peak efficiency of 95% at heavy load conditions and 79% at light loads with a maximum voltage ripple of 15mV at light loads. PMID:28919659

  10. Photoactivation Mechanism of a Bacterial Light-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Winkler, Andreas; Frey, Daniel; Reinstein, Jochen; Meinhart, Anton; Schlichting, Ilme

    2017-03-21

    Light-regulated enzymes enable organisms to quickly respond to changing light conditions. We characterize a photoactivatable adenylyl cyclase (AC) from Beggiatoa sp. (bPAC) that translates a blue light signal into the production of the second messenger cyclic AMP. bPAC contains a BLUF photoreceptor domain that senses blue light using a flavin chromophore, linked to an AC domain. We present a dark state crystal structure of bPAC that closely resembles the recently published structure of the homologous OaPAC from Oscillatoria acuminata. To elucidate the structural mechanism of light-dependent AC activation by the BLUF domain, we determined the crystal structures of illuminated bPAC and of a pseudo-lit state variant. We use hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements of secondary structure dynamics and hypothesis-driven point mutations to trace the activation pathway from the chromophore in the BLUF domain to the active site of the cyclase. The structural changes are relayed from the residues interacting with the excited chromophore through a conserved kink of the BLUF β-sheet to a tongue-like extrusion of the AC domain that regulates active site opening and repositions catalytic residues. Our findings not only show the specific molecular pathway of photoactivation in BLUF-regulated ACs but also have implications for the general understanding of signaling in BLUF domains and of the activation of ACs.

  11. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  12. Light regulation of cadmium-induced cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J; Wang, Yun; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant with deleterious effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the effects of cadmium toxicity are concentration dependent; lower doses destabilize many physiological processes and inhibit cell growth and multiplication, while higher doses evoke a more severe response that triggers activation of cell death. We recently investigated the effects of light on cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis using a cell suspension culture system. Although not affecting the inhibitory effects on cell multiplication, we found that light is a powerful regulator of Cd-induced cell death. A very specific proteomic response, which was clearly controlled by light, preceded cell death. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and highlight similarities between the regulation of cell death triggered by Cd and fumonisin B1. We consider how both compounds could be useful tools in dissecting plant cell death signaling. PMID:24398567

  13. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  14. Effects of light-emitting diode supplementary lighting on the winter growth of greenhouse plants in the Yangtze River Delta of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Lu, Wei; Hu, Guyue; Wang, Xiao Chan; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Guo Xiang; Fang, Zhichao

    2016-12-01

    The winter in the Yangtze River Delta area of China involves more than 1 month of continuous low temperature and poor light (CLTL) weather conditions, which impacts horticultural production in an unheated greenhouse; however, few greenhouses in this area are currently equipped with a heating device. The low-cost and long-living light-emitting diode (LED) was used as an artificial light source to explore the effects of supplementary lighting during the dark period in CLTL winter on the vegetative characteristics, early yield, and physiology of flowering for pepper plants grown in a greenhouse without heating. Two LED lighting sets were employed with different light source to provide 65 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at night: (1) LED-A: red LEDs (R, peak wavelength 660 nm) and blue LEDs (B, peak wavelength 460 nm) with an R:B ratio of 6:3; and (2) LED-B: R and B LEDs at an R:B ratio of 8:1. Plants growth parameters and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics were compared between lighting treatments and the control group. Plants' yield and photosynthesis ability were improved by LED-A. Pepper grown under the LED-A1 strategy showed a 303.3 % greater fresh weight of fruits and a 501.3 % greater dry mass compared with the control group. Plant leaves under LED-A1 showed maximum efficiency of the light quantum yield of PSII, electron transfer rate, and the proportion of the open fraction of PSII centers, with values 113.70, 114.34, and 211.65 % higher than those of the control group, respectively, and showed the lowest rate constant of thermal energy dissipation of all groups. LED-B was beneficial to the plant height and stems diameter of the pepper plants more than LED-A. These results can serve as a guide for environment control and for realizing low energy consumption for products grown in a greenhouse in the winter in Southern China.

  15. Effect of two yellow delta-emitting layers on device performance of phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Yu, Junsheng; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) with a structure of ITO/TAPC/δ-EML1/mCP:FIrpic/δ-EML2/Bphen/Mg:Ag were fabricated, wherein two ultrathin and host-free emitting layers (EMLs) were formed by using yellow bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C2'] iridium (acetylacetonate) [(tbt)2Ir(acac)] and referred to as delta-EMLs (δ-EML1 and δ-EML2). By adjusting the thicknesses of δ-EMLs, a maximum current efficiency of 27.6 cd/A, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10%, together with low efficiency roll-off at high luminance were achieved. The results showed that δ-EML1 played a dominant role on charge carrier trapping, while δ-EML2 had major impact on yellow light emission, which were highly sensitive to the location of δ-EMLs. Furthermore, by introducing 5-nm Au as anode modifying layer, high device efficiency was maintained along with excellent color stability of warm white emission, displaying color coordinates of (0.38, 0.42) and color temperature of 4348 K at a luminance of 7000 cd/m2. Importantly, explanation and analysis for the influence of both ultrathin δ-EMLs and anode modifying layer on device performance were proposed.

  16. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  17. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol regulates the p53 post-translational modifiers Murine double minute 2 and the Small Ubiquitin MOdifier protein in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gowran, Aoife; Murphy, Carrie E; Campbell, Veronica A

    2009-11-03

    The phytocannabinoid Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis, activates a number of signalling cascades including p53. This study examines the role of Delta(9)-THC in regulating the p53 post-translational modifier proteins, Murine double minute (Mdm2) and Small Ubquitin-like MOdifier protein 1 (SUMO-1) in cortical neurons. Delta(9)-THC increased both Mdm2 and SUMO-1 protein expression and induced the deSUMOylation of p53 in a cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1))-receptor dependent manner. We demonstrate that Delta(9)-THC decreased the SUMOylation of the CB(1) receptor. The data reveal a novel role for cannabinoid receptor activation in modulating the SUMO regulatory system.

  18. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I.

  19. Two distinct light regulated G-proteins in octopus photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Tsuda, T

    1990-04-09

    Two distinct light-regulated G-proteins were found in octopus photoreceptors. Gip, a 41 kDa protein from washed microvilli, was ADP ribosylated by pertussis toxin in the presence of GDP in the dark. Light and GTP analogues were inhibitory as with transducin (Gt; G-protein in vertebrate photoreceptors). G34, a 34 kDa protein from fresh octopus retina, was ADP ribosylated by both cholera and pertussis toxin in the dark. Light inhibited labeling of the 34 kDa protein by both toxins. Unlike Gip, G34 is soluble and is very labile to heat, freezing and thawing. Prolonged incubation of octopus retina with cholera toxin and labeled NAD produced an additional radioactive band at 46 kDa. Labeling of the 46 kDa protein, Gsp, was greatly enhanced by GTP analogues, but inhibited by a GDP analogue as with Gs in hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase. In contrast to Gip and G34, labeling of the 46 kDa protein (Gsp) was not influenced by light. The two distinct light-regulated G-proteins, Gip and G34, found in octopus photoreceptors might be involved in either phototransduction or photoadaptation. The function of Gsp is not known.

  20. Factors regulating benthic food chains in tropical river deltas and adjacent shelf areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, D. M.; Robertson, A. I.

    1995-09-01

    Benthic food chains of the Amazon (Brazil) and Fly (Papua New Guinea) river deltas and adjacent shelves are compared. Abundance patterns of the major trophic groups (bacteria, meiofauna, and macroinfauna) are similar between regions, with very low densities, or the absence of benthos, within and near the deltas. For muds in the more quiescent areas, benthic abundance and productivity are highest, commonly coinciding with maximum pelagic primary production. Episodes of physical disturbance, erratic food supply, and dilution of river-derived, particulate organic matter foster the development of opportunistic benthic communities of variable diversity and low biomass, dominated by bacteria. These pioneering assemblages are the main food of penaeid shrimp, which dominate the demersal trawl fisheries of both fluvial-dominated regions.

  1. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  2. Identification of DeltaEF1 as a novel target that is negatively regulated by LMO2 in T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Shuang; Shen, Wenwen; Li, Huihui; Gao, Yang; Zhu, Tian-Hui

    2010-12-01

    The lmo2 gene is a specific oncogene in T-cell leukemia, for its ectopic expression causes both increased pro-T-cell proliferation and differentiation arrest, leading to the onset of leukemia. Notably, DeltaEF1 (also known as ZEB1), a member of zinc finger-homeodomain family transcription factor, also exhibits crucial function in promoting T-cell differentiation. In this study, we found that DeltaEF1 was positively regulated by T-lineage-specific transcriptional regulator GATA3, while ectopically expressed LMO2 targeted to DeltaEF1 promoter by interaction with GATA3 and inhibited DeltaEF1 expression in transcriptional level. Moreover, LMO2 interacted with the N-terminal zinc finger domain of DeltaEF1 protein and inhibited its positive transcriptional regulatory function by this interaction. Taken together, our findings revealed that ectopically expressed LMO2 impaired the function of DeltaEF1 in both transcriptional and protein levels and identified DeltaEF1 as a novel pathogenic target of LMO2 in T-cell leukemia.

  3. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta agonist, GW501516, regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid catabolism and energy uncoupling in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Uwe; Allen, Tamara L; Pippal, Jyotsna B; Rohde, Paul R; Lau, Patrick; Muscat, George E O

    2003-12-01

    Lipid homeostasis is controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARalpha, -beta/delta, and -gamma) that function as fatty acid-dependent DNA-binding proteins that regulate lipid metabolism. In vitro and in vivo genetic and pharmacological studies have demonstrated PPARalpha regulates lipid catabolism. In contrast, PPARgamma regulates the conflicting process of lipid storage. However, relatively little is known about PPARbeta/delta in the context of target tissues, target genes, lipid homeostasis, and functional overlap with PPARalpha and -gamma. PPARbeta/delta, a very low-density lipoprotein sensor, is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle, a major mass peripheral tissue that accounts for approximately 40% of total body weight. Skeletal muscle is a metabolically active tissue, and a primary site of glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and cholesterol efflux. Consequently, it has a significant role in insulin sensitivity, the blood-lipid profile, and lipid homeostasis. Surprisingly, the role of PPARbeta/delta in skeletal muscle has not been investigated. We utilize selective PPARalpha, -beta/delta, -gamma, and liver X receptor agonists in skeletal muscle cells to understand the functional role of PPARbeta/delta, and the complementary and/or contrasting roles of PPARs in this major mass peripheral tissue. Activation of PPARbeta/delta by GW501516 in skeletal muscle cells induces the expression of genes involved in preferential lipid utilization, beta-oxidation, cholesterol efflux, and energy uncoupling. Furthermore, we show that treatment of muscle cells with GW501516 increases apolipoprotein-A1 specific efflux of intracellular cholesterol, thus identifying this tissue as an important target of PPARbeta/delta agonists. Interestingly, fenofibrate induces genes involved in fructose uptake, and glycogen formation. In contrast, rosiglitazone-mediated activation of PPARgamma induces gene expression associated with glucose uptake, fatty acid

  4. Role of Ions in the Regulation of Light-Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Kaňa, Radek; Govindjee

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting in the thylakoids is one of the major key factors affecting the efficiency of photosynthesis. Thylakoid membrane is negatively charged and influences both the structure and the function of the primarily photosynthetic reactions through its electrical double layer (EDL). Further, there is a heterogeneous organization of soluble ions (K+, Mg2+, Cl−) attached to the thylakoid membrane that, together with fixed charges (negatively charged amino acids, lipids), provides an electrical field. The EDL is affected by the valence of the ions and interferes with the regulation of “state transitions,” protein interactions, and excitation energy “spillover” from Photosystem II to Photosystem I. These effects are reflected in changes in the intensity of chlorophyll a fluorescence, which is also a measure of photoprotective non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of the excited state of chlorophyll a. A triggering of NPQ proceeds via lumen acidification that is coupled to the export of positive counter-ions (Mg2+, K+) to the stroma or/and negative ions (e.g., Cl−) into the lumen. The effect of protons and anions in the lumen and of the cations (Mg2+, K+) in the stroma are, thus, functionally tightly interconnected. In this review, we discuss the consequences of the model of EDL, proposed by Barber (1980b) Biochim Biophys Acta 594:253–308) in light of light-harvesting regulation. Further, we explain differences between electrostatic screening and neutralization, and we emphasize the opposite effect of monovalent (K+) and divalent (Mg2+) ions on light-harvesting and on “screening” of the negative charges on the thylakoid membrane; this effect needs to be incorporated in all future models of photosynthetic regulation by ion channels and transporters. PMID:28018387

  5. Illuminating colors: regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation by light.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Stange, Claudia; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Light stimulates the biosynthesis of carotenoids and regulates the development of plastid structures to accommodate these photoprotective pigments. Work with Arabidopsis revealed molecular factors coordinating carotenoid biosynthesis and storage with photosynthetic development during deetiolation, when underground seedlings emerge to the light. Some of these factors also adjust carotenoid biosynthesis in response to plant proximity (i.e., shade), a mechanism that was readapted in tomato to monitor fruit ripening progression. While light positively impacts carotenoid production and accumulation in most cases, total carotenoid levels decrease in roots of colored carrot cultivars when illuminated. The recent discovery that such cultivars might be photomorphogenic mutants provides an explanation for this striking phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Light regulates alternative splicing of hydroxypyruvate reductase in pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Mano, S; Hayashi, M; Nishimura, M

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) is a leaf peroxisomal enzyme that functions in the glycolate pathway of photorespiration in plants. We have obtained two highly similar cDNAs for pumpkin HPR (HPR1 and HPR2). It has been revealed that two HPR mRNAs might be produced by alternative splicing from a single type of pre-mRNA. The HPR1 protein, but not the HPR2 protein, was found to have a targeting sequence into leaf peroxisomes at the C-terminus, suggesting that alternative splicing controls the subcellular localization of the two HPR proteins. Immunoblot analysis and subcellular fractionation experiments showed that HPR1 and HPR2 proteins are localized in leaf peroxisomes and the cytosol, respectively. Moreover, indirect fluorescence microscopy and analyses of transgenic tobacco cultured cells and Arabidopsis thaliana expressing fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed the different subcellular localizations of the two HPR proteins. Both mRNAs were induced developmentally and by light, but with quantitative differences. Almost equal amounts of the mRNAs were detected in pumpkin cotyledons grown in darkness, but treatment with light greatly enhanced the production of HPR2 mRNA. These findings indicate that light regulates alternative splicing of HPR mRNA, suggesting the presence of a novel mechanism of mRNA maturation, namely light-regulated alternative splicing, in higher plants.

  7. Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase: Phylogeny, Regulation, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michal; Mysliwa-Kurdziel, Beata

    2015-09-01

    This Current Topic focuses on light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR, EC 1.3.1.33). POR catalyzes the penultimate reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, i.e., the light-triggered reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. In this reaction, the chlorin ring of the chlorophyll molecule is formed, which is crucial for photosynthesis. POR is one of very few enzymes that are driven by light; however, it is unique in the need for its substrate to absorb photons to induce the conformational changes in the enzyme, which are required for its catalytic activation. Moreover, the enzyme is also involved in the negative feedback of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway and controls chlorophyll content via its light-dependent activity. Even though it has been almost 70 years since the first isolation of active POR complexes, our knowledge of them has markedly advanced in recent years. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of POR, including the phylogenetic roots of POR, the mechanisms of the regulation of POR genes expression, the regulation of POR activity, the import of POR into plastids, the role of POR in PLB formation, and the molecular mechanism of protochlorophyllide reduction by POR. To the best of our knowledge, no previous review has compiled such a broad set of recent findings about POR.

  8. Role of gamma delta T cells in immunity to infectious diseases and the regulation of hematolymphoid cell development.

    PubMed

    Carding, S R

    1998-01-01

    My research interests are twofold. The first is to define the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic cell development. In particular, the role that the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL2) plays in regulating the development and selection of lymphocyte progenitor cells, and in myelopoiesis are primary areas of research. The second is to understand the role that gamma delta T cells play in pathogen-induced immune responses and autoimmunity. Their involvement in the immune response to the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in mice and Mycobacteria tuberculosis (Mtb) in humans, in T cell-mediated inflammatory bowel disease in humans, and the nature of the antigens they recognize during these responses are major areas of interest. Research material includes patient-derived tissues as well as both conventional and genetically engineered (transgenic) strains of mice.

  9. Autophosphorylation of p110delta phosphoinositide 3-kinase: a new paradigm for the regulation of lipid kinases in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaesebroeck, B; Higashi, K; Raven, C; Welham, M; Anderson, S; Brennan, P; Ward, S G; Waterfield, M D

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are lipid kinases which also possess an in vitro protein kinase activity towards themselves or their adaptor proteins. The physiological relevance of these phosphorylations is unclear at present. Here, the protein kinase activity of the tyrosine kinase-linked PI3K, p110delta, is characterized and its functional impact assessed. In vitro autophosphorylation of p110delta completely down-regulates its lipid kinase activity. The single site of autophosphorylation was mapped to Ser1039 at the C-terminus of p110delta. Antisera specific for phospho-Ser1039 revealed a very low level of phosphorylation of this residue in cell lines. However, p110delta that is recruited to activated receptors (such as CD28 in T cells) shows a time-dependent increase in Ser1039 phosphorylation and a concomitant decrease in associated lipid kinase activity. Treatment of cells with okadaic acid, an inhibitor of Ser/Thr phosphatases, also dramatically increases the level of Ser1039-phosphorylated p110delta. LY294002 and wortmannin blocked these in vivo increases in Ser1039 phosphorylation, consistent with the notion that PI3Ks, and possibly p110delta itself, are involved in the in vivo phosphorylation of p110delta. In summary, we show that PI3Ks are subject to regulatory phosphorylations in vivo similar to those identified under in vitro conditions, identifying a new level of control of these signalling molecules. PMID:10064595

  10. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  11. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  12. Regulation of photosystem I light harvesting by zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Ballottari, Matteo; Alcocer, Marcelo J P; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Viola, Daniele; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Petrozza, Annamaria; Polli, Dario; Fleming, Graham R; Cerullo, Giulio; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-06-10

    In oxygenic photosynthetic eukaryotes, the hydroxylated carotenoid zeaxanthin is produced from preexisting violaxanthin upon exposure to excess light conditions. Zeaxanthin binding to components of the photosystem II (PSII) antenna system has been investigated thoroughly and shown to help in the dissipation of excess chlorophyll-excited states and scavenging of oxygen radicals. However, the functional consequences of the accumulation of the light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) proteins in the photosystem I (PSI) antenna have remained unclarified so far. In this work we investigated the effect of zeaxanthin binding on photoprotection of PSI-LHCI by comparing preparations isolated from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (i.e., with violaxanthin) and those isolated from the A. thaliana nonphotochemical quenching 2 mutant, in which violaxanthin is replaced by zeaxanthin. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements showed that zeaxanthin binding leads to a previously unrecognized quenching effect on PSI-LHCI fluorescence. The efficiency of energy transfer from the LHCI moiety of the complex to the PSI reaction center was down-regulated, and an enhanced PSI resistance to photoinhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, zeaxanthin was shown to be effective in inducing dissipative states in PSI, similar to its well-known effect on PSII. We propose that, upon acclimation to high light, PSI-LHCI changes its light-harvesting efficiency by a zeaxanthin-dependent quenching of the absorbed excitation energy, whereas in PSII the stoichiometry of LHC antenna proteins per reaction center is reduced directly.

  13. Regulation of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle by light and dark

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    By growing cells in alternating periods of light and darkness, we have found that the synchronization of phototrophically grown Chlamydomonas populations is regulated at two specific points in the cell cycle: the primary arrest (A) point, located in early G1, and the transition (T) point, located in mid-G1. At the A point, cell cycle progression becomes light dependent. At the T point, completion of the cycle becomes independent of light. Cells transferred from light to dark at cell cycle position between the two regulatory points enter a reversible resting state in which they remain viable and metabolically active, but do not progress through their cycles. The photosystem II inhibitor dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU) mimics the A point block induced by darkness. This finding indicates that the A point block is mediated by a signal that operates through photosynthetic electron transport. Cells short of the T point will arrest in darkness although they contain considerable carbohydrate reserves. After the T point, a sharp increase occurs in starch degradation and in the endogenous respiration rate, indicating that some internal block to the availability of stored energy reserves has now been released, permitting cell cycle progression. PMID:6767730

  14. Regulation of photosystem I light harvesting by zeaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Ballottari, Matteo; Alcocer, Marcelo J. P.; D’Andrea, Cosimo; Viola, Daniele; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Petrozza, Annamaria; Polli, Dario; Fleming, Graham R.; Cerullo, Giulio; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In oxygenic photosynthetic eukaryotes, the hydroxylated carotenoid zeaxanthin is produced from preexisting violaxanthin upon exposure to excess light conditions. Zeaxanthin binding to components of the photosystem II (PSII) antenna system has been investigated thoroughly and shown to help in the dissipation of excess chlorophyll-excited states and scavenging of oxygen radicals. However, the functional consequences of the accumulation of the light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) proteins in the photosystem I (PSI) antenna have remained unclarified so far. In this work we investigated the effect of zeaxanthin binding on photoprotection of PSI–LHCI by comparing preparations isolated from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (i.e., with violaxanthin) and those isolated from the A. thaliana nonphotochemical quenching 2 mutant, in which violaxanthin is replaced by zeaxanthin. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements showed that zeaxanthin binding leads to a previously unrecognized quenching effect on PSI–LHCI fluorescence. The efficiency of energy transfer from the LHCI moiety of the complex to the PSI reaction center was down-regulated, and an enhanced PSI resistance to photoinhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, zeaxanthin was shown to be effective in inducing dissipative states in PSI, similar to its well-known effect on PSII. We propose that, upon acclimation to high light, PSI–LHCI changes its light-harvesting efficiency by a zeaxanthin-dependent quenching of the absorbed excitation energy, whereas in PSII the stoichiometry of LHC antenna proteins per reaction center is reduced directly. PMID:24872450

  15. Ethylene Signaling Influences Light-Regulated Development in Pea.

    PubMed

    Weller, James L; Foo, Eloise M; Hecht, Valérie; Ridge, Stephen; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Reid, James B

    2015-09-01

    Plant responses to light involve a complex network of interactions among multiple plant hormones. In a screen for mutants showing altered photomorphogenesis under red light, we identified a mutant with dramatically enhanced leaf expansion and delayed petal senescence. We show that this mutant exhibits reduced sensitivity to ethylene and carries a nonsense mutation in the single pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of the ethylene signaling gene ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). Consistent with this observation, the ein2 mutation rescues the previously described effects of ethylene overproduction in mature phytochrome-deficient plants. In seedlings, ein2 confers a marked increase in leaf expansion under monochromatic red, far-red, or blue light, and interaction with phytochromeA, phytochromeB, and long1 mutants confirms that ein2 enhances both phytochrome- and cryptochrome-dependent responses in a LONG1-dependent manner. In contrast, minimal effects of ein2 on seedling development in darkness or high-irradiance white light show that ethylene is not limiting for development under these conditions. These results indicate that ethylene signaling constrains leaf expansion during deetiolation in pea and provide further evidence that down-regulation of ethylene production may be an important component mechanism in the broader control of photomorphogenic development by phytochrome and cryptochrome.

  16. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  17. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-06-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells co-ordinating a group behaviour. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this autoinduction behaviour. The Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes forms a natural symbiosis with V. fischeri, and utilizes the symbiont-derived bioluminescence for certain nocturnal behaviours, such as counterillumination. Recent work suggests that the tissue with which V. fischeri associates not only can detect bioluminescence but may also use this light to monitor the V. fischeri population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  19. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  20. Reservoir impacts downstream in highly regulated river basins: the Ebro delta and the Guadalquivir estuary in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, María J.; Rovira, Albert; García-Contreras, Darío; Contreras, Eva; Millares, Agustín; Aguilar, Cristina; Losada, Miguel A.

    2016-05-01

    Regulation by reservoirs affects both the freshwater regime and the sediment delivery at the area downstream, and may have a significant impact on water quality in the final transitional water bodies. Spain is one the countries with more water storage capacity by reservoirs in the world. Dense reservoir networks can be found in most of the hydrographic basins, especially in the central and southern regions. The spatial redistribution of the seasonal and annual water storage in reservoirs for irrigation and urban supply, mainly, has resulted in significant changes of water flow and sediment load regimes, together with a fostered development of soil and water uses, with environmental impacts downstream and higher vulnerability of these areas to the sea level rise and drought occurrence. This work shows these effects in the Guadalquivir and the Ebro River basins, two of the largest regulated areas in Spain. The results show a 71 % decrease of the annual freshwater input to the Guadalquivir River estuary during 1930-2014, an increase of 420 % of the irrigated area upstream the estuary, and suspended sediment loads up to 1000 % the initial levels. In the Ebro River delta, the annual water yield has decreased over a 30 % but, on the contrary, the big reservoirs are located in the main stream, and the sediment load has decreased a 99 %, resulting in a delta coastal regression up to 10 m per year and the massive presence of macrophytes in the lower river. Adaptive actions proposed to face these impacts in a sea level rise scenario are also analyzed.

  1. Blood stem cell fate regulation by Delta-1–mediated rewiring of IL-6 paracrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Csaszar, Elizabeth; Wang, Weijia; Usenko, Tatiana; Qiao, Wenlian; Delaney, Colleen; Bernstein, Irwin D.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the importance of cell extrinsic regulation in stem cell fate control. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsive to local signals from their niche and to systemic feedback from progenitors and mature cells. The Notch ligand Delta-1 (DL1), a key component of the stem cell niche, regulates human hematopoietic lineage development in a dose-dependent manner and has been used clinically for primitive progenitor expansion. How DL1 acts to regulate HSC fate and whether these actions are related to its lineage skewing effects are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that, although DL1 activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling similarly to the gp130-activating cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), it has opposite effects on myeloid cell production. Mechanistically, these different outcomes are attributable to a DL1-mediated reduction in membrane (m)-bound IL-6 receptor (R) expression, converting progenitor cells from being directly IL-6 responsive to requiring both IL-6 and soluble (s) IL-6R for activation. Concomitant reduction of both mIL-6R (by DL1 supplementation) and sIL-6R (using dynamically fed cultures) reduced myeloid cell production and led to enhanced outputs of human HSCs. This work describes a new mode of cytokine action in which DL1 changes cytokine receptor distributions on hematopoietic cells, altering feedback networks and their impact on stem cell fate. PMID:24243972

  2. Conformation switching of clathrin light chain regulates clathrin lattice assembly.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Jeremy D; Hwang, Peter K; Ybe, Joel A; Lane, Michael; Sellers, Benjamin D; Jacobson, Matthew P; Fletterick, Robert J; Brodsky, Frances M

    2010-05-18

    Clathrin-coated vesicle formation is responsible for membrane traffic to and from the endocytic pathway during receptor-mediated endocytosis and organelle biogenesis, influencing how cells relate to their environment. Generating these vesicles involves self-assembly of clathrin molecules into a latticed coat on membranes that recruits receptors and organizes protein machinery necessary for budding. Here we define a molecular mechanism regulating clathrin lattice formation by obtaining structural information from co-crystals of clathrin subunits. Low resolution X-ray diffraction data (7.9-9.0 A) was analyzed using a combination of molecular replacement with an energy-minimized model and noncrystallographic symmetry averaging. Resulting topological information revealed two conformations of the regulatory clathrin light chain bound to clathrin heavy chain. Based on protein domain positions, mutagenesis, and biochemical assays, we identify an electrostatic interaction between the clathrin subunits that allows the observed conformational variation in clathrin light chains to alter the conformation of the clathrin heavy chain and thereby regulates assembly. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Tong, Nanwei

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  4. Developmental regulation of elongation factor-1 delta in sea urchin suggests appearance of a mechanism for alternative poly(A) site selection in gastrulae.

    PubMed

    Delalande, C; Monnier, A; Minella, O; Genevière, A M; Mulner-Lorillon, O; Bellé, R; Cormier, P

    1998-07-10

    Elongation factor-1 delta gene expression was analyzed during sea urchin development. EF-1 delta mRNA is present as a single 2.7-kb transcript in unfertilized eggs and in rapidly dividing cleavage stage embryos. It decreases rapidly 6 h after fertilization and then reappears at the gastrula stage as two transcripts of 2.7 and 2.0 kb. cDNA clones encoding the 2.7- and 2.0-kb transcripts were isolated from a sea urchin embryos library. The two cDNAs originate from alternative poly(A) site selection from a unique precursor. Both cDNAs are terminated by a poly(A) tail and were shown to encode for the same protein identified as EF-1 delta. Thus, EF-1 delta gene expression undergoes developmental regulation in early embryos leading to the presence of two poly(A) forms of the transcript. Since the 2.0-kb polyadenylated form of the EF-1 delta transcript appears at gastrula stage, our results suggest that a mechanism for alternative poly(A) site selection of the EF-1 delta transcript appears during embryonic development.

  5. Delta-like 1 regulates Bergmann glial monolayer formation during cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bergmann glia (BG) are unipolar cerebellar astrocytes. The somata of mature BG reside in the Purkinje cell layer and extend radially arranged processes to the pial surface. BG have multiple branched processes, which enwrap the synapses of Purkinje cell dendrites. They migrate from the ventricular zone and align next to the Purkinje cell layer during development. Previously, we reported that Notch1, Notch2, and RBPj genes in the BG play crucial roles in the monolayer formation and morphogenesis of BG. However, it remains to be determined which ligand activates Nocth1 and Notch 2 on BG. Delta-like 1 (Dll1) is a major ligand of Notch receptors that is expressed in the developing cerebellum. Results In this study, we used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP) promoter-driven Cre-mediated recombination to delete Dll1 in BG. Dll1-conditional mutant mice showed disorganization of Bergmann fibers, ectopic localization of BG in the molecular layer and a reduction in the number of BG. Conclusion These results suggest that Dll1 is required for the formation of the BG layer and its morphological maturation, apparently through a Notch1/2-RBPj dependent signaling pathway. PMID:23688253

  6. A Chloroplast Light-Regulated Oxidative Sensor for Moderate Light Intensity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dangoor, Inbal; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Wittenberg, Gal; Danon, Avihai

    2012-01-01

    The transition from dark to light involves marked changes in the redox reactions of photosynthetic electron transport and in chloroplast stromal enzyme activity even under mild light and growth conditions. Thus, it is not surprising that redox regulation is used to dynamically adjust and coordinate the stromal and thylakoid compartments. While oxidation of regulatory proteins is necessary for the regulation, the identity and the mechanism of action of the oxidizing pathway are still unresolved. Here, we studied the oxidation of a thylakoid-associated atypical thioredoxin-type protein, ACHT1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast. We found that after a brief period of net reduction in plants illuminated with moderate light intensity, a significant oxidation reaction of ACHT1 arises and counterbalances its reduction. Interestingly, ACHT1 oxidation is driven by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx), which in turn eliminates peroxides. The ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx reaction characteristics in plants further indicated that ACHT1 oxidation is linked with changes in the photosynthetic production of peroxides. Our findings that plants with altered redox poise of the ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx pathway show higher nonphotochemical quenching and lower photosynthetic electron transport infer a feedback regulatory role for this pathway. PMID:22570442

  7. Human p38{delta} MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki; Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa; Kubota, Eiro; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro

    2010-06-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38{alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta}. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38{alpha} and {beta}, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38{gamma} and/or {delta} was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38{delta} attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38{delta} with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38{delta} isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38{alpha} and/or {beta} isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  8. Dominant transverse-electric polarized emission from 298 nm MBE-grown AlN-delta-GaN quantum well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Ooi, Yu Kee; Islam, S. M.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Zhang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    III-nitride based ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) are of considerable interest in replacing gas lasers and mercury lamps for numerous applications. Specifically, AlGaN quantum well (QW) based LEDs have been developed extensively but the external quantum efficiencies of which remain less than 10% for wavelengths <300 nm due to high dislocation density, difficult p-type doping and most importantly, the physics and band structure from the three degeneration valence subbands. One solution to address this issue at deep UV wavelengths is by the use of the AlGaN-delta-GaN QW where the insertion of the delta-GaN layer can ensure the dominant conduction band (C) - heavyhole (HH) transition, leading to large transverse-electric (TE) optical output. Here, we proposed and investigated the physics and polarization-dependent optical characterizations of AlN-delta- GaN QW UV LED at 300 nm. The LED structure is grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) where the delta-GaN layer is 3-4 monolayer (QW-like) sandwiched by 2.5-nm AlN sub-QW layers. The physics analysis shows that the use of AlN-delta-GaN QW ensures a larger separation between the top HH subband and lower-energy bands, and strongly localizes the electron and HH wave functions toward the QW center and hence resulting in 30-time enhancement in TEpolarized spontaneous emission rate, compared to that of a conventional Al0.35Ga0.65N QW. The polarization-dependent electroluminescence measurements confirm our theoretical analysis; a dominant TE-polarized emission was obtained at 298 nm with a minimum transverse-magnetic (TM) polarized emission, indicating the feasibility of high-efficiency TEpolarized UV emitters based on our proposed QW structure.

  9. Regulation of the Two Delta Crystallin Genes during Lens Development in the Chicken Embryo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-22

    research . He read and corrected this thesis very carefully and showed me there is a lot to learn in English writing. His comments significantly...I sincerely thank my parents and my brother. My father Chujie Li, has always had high standards for research . His scientific attitude motivated... Quatitation of autoradiograms 38 Northern Blot 38 Density labelling of RNA 39 Separation of density-labelled and light RNA by equilibrium density

  10. Sediment dispersal and accumulation off the present Huanghe (Yellow River) delta as impacted by the Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao; Bi, Naishuang; Yuan, Ping; Li, Song; Wang, Houjie

    2015-12-01

    Surface sediment samples from 15 stations around the present Huanghe (Yellow River) river mouth were collected before, during and after the Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme (WSRS) in 2010 for grain size analysis. Hydrographic surveys conducted simultaneously at stations along three transects off the river mouth during the WSRS in 2013 were used to investigate the dispersal and accumulation of the Huanghe sediment off the present Huanghe subaqueous delta. During the WSRS period, the diluted water from the river covered all over the study area within the surface layer, whereas high-concentrated sediment was found in the bottom layers and to be limited in nearshore area shallower than 12 m, indicating that the buoyant river plume was the main sediment dispersal pattern during the WSRS. At the early stage of the WSRS when large amount of clear water was released from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir, sediment eroded from the downstream riverbed in the lower reaches increased the median grain size of surface sediment at the river mouth. During the second stage when water discharge was reduced but sediment discharge was dramatically increased, the fine-grained sediment derived from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir mixed with the previously deposited coarser surface sediment, leading to the decreasing median grain size of surface sediment that approached to be poorly sorted. After the physical sorting from winter storms, the surface sediment was redistributed and varied regularly with water depth. As the median grain size of suspended sediment discharge to the sea has been significantly increased due to the WSRS, the river-delivered sediment mostly accumulated in the nearshore area, which effectively extended the subaerial delta and steepened the subaqueous slope off the present river mouth.

  11. Regulation of senescence in bean leaf discs by light and chemical growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Goldthwaite, J J; Laetsch, W M

    1967-12-01

    The senescence of excised discs of primary leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris, L., var. Red Kidney was followed by measuring the net breakdown of protein and chlorophyll. The chemical growth regulators indoleacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, and 6-benzylaminopurine were relatively ineffective in retarding senescence in this tissue. White light, on the other hand, was very effective in senescence retardation. The response to light did not have the characteristics of a low energy (phytochrome) response and was blocked by concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea which inhibited photosynthesis in the leaf discs. The light-induced retardation of senescence was concluded to be dependent on photosynthesis.

  12. Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) is induced by VEGF as a negative regulator of angiogenic sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Lobov, I. B.; Renard, R. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Gale, N. W.; Thurston, G.; Yancopoulos, G. D.; Wiegand, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic deletion studies have shown that haploinsufficiency of Delta-like ligand (Dll) 4, a transmembrane ligand for the Notch family of receptors, results in major vascular defects and embryonic lethality. To better define the role of Dll4 during vascular growth and differentiation, we selected the postnatal retina as a model because its vasculature develops shortly after birth in a highly stereotypic manner, during which time it is accessible to experimental manipulation. We report that Dll4 expression is dynamically regulated by VEGF in the retinal vasculature, where it is most prominently expressed at the leading front of actively growing vessels. Deletion of a single Dll4 allele or pharmacologic inhibition of Dll4/Notch signaling by intraocular administration of either soluble Dll4-Fc or a blocking antibody against Dll4 all produced the same set of characteristic abnormalities in the developing retinal vasculature, most notably enhanced angiogenic sprouting and increased endothelial cell proliferation, resulting in the formation of a denser and more highly interconnected superficial capillary plexus. In a model of ischemic retinopathy, Dll4 blockade also enhanced angiogenic sprouting and regrowth of lost retinal vessels while suppressing ectopic pathological neovascularization. Our data demonstrate that Dll4 is induced by VEGF as a negative feedback regulator and acts to prevent overexuberant angiogenic sprouting, promoting the timely formation of a well differentiated vascular network. PMID:17296940

  13. New (but old) molecules regulating synapse integrity and plasticity: Cbln1 and the delta2 glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuzaki, M

    2009-09-01

    The delta2 glutamate receptor (GluRdelta2) is predominantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays crucial roles in cerebellar functions: GluRdelta2-null mice display ataxia and impaired motor learning. Interestingly, the contact state of synapses between parallel fibers (PFs) and Purkinje cells is specifically and severely affected, and the number of normal PF synapses is markedly reduced in GluRdelta2-null Purkinje cells. Furthermore, long-term depression at PF-Purkinje cell synapses is abrogated. Cbln1, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, is predominantly expressed and released from cerebellar granule cells. Unexpectedly, the behavioral, physiological and anatomical phenotypes of cbln1-null mice precisely mimic those of GluRdelta2-null mice. Thus, we propose that Cbln1, which is released from granule cells, and GluRdelta2, which is predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells, are involved in a common signaling pathway crucial for synapse formation/maintenance and plasticity in the cerebellum. Since molecules related to Cbln1 are expressed in various brain regions other than the cerebellum, other C1q/TNF superfamily proteins may also regulate various aspects of synapses in the CNS. Therefore, an understanding of the signaling mechanisms underlying Cbln1 and GluRdelta2 in the cerebellum will provide new insights into the roles of C1q/TNF superfamily proteins as new cytokines that regulate normal and abnormal brain functions.

  14. Oscillatory control of Delta-like1 in cell interactions regulates dynamic gene expression and tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Hiromi; Isomura, Akihiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kori, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates tissue morphogenesis through cell–cell interactions. The Notch effectors Hes1 and Hes7 are expressed in an oscillatory manner and regulate developmental processes such as neurogenesis and somitogenesis, respectively. Expression of the mRNA for the mouse Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) is also oscillatory. However, the dynamics of Dll1 protein expression are controversial, and their functional significance is unknown. Here, we developed a live-imaging system and found that Dll1 protein expression oscillated in neural progenitors and presomitic mesoderm cells. Notably, when Dll1 expression was accelerated or delayed by shortening or elongating the Dll1 gene, Dll1 oscillations became severely dampened or quenched at intermediate levels, as modeled mathematically. Under this condition, Hes1 and Hes7 oscillations were also dampened. In the presomitic mesoderm, steady Dll1 expression led to severe fusion of somites and their derivatives, such as vertebrae and ribs. In the developing brain, steady Dll1 expression inhibited proliferation of neural progenitors and accelerated neurogenesis, whereas optogenetic induction of Dll1 oscillation efficiently maintained neural progenitors. These results indicate that the appropriate timing of Dll1 expression is critical for the oscillatory networks and suggest the functional significance of oscillatory cell–cell interactions in tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26728556

  15. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  16. Light-induced regulation of ligand-gated channel activity.

    PubMed

    Bregestovski, Piotr; Maleeva, Galyna; Gorostiza, Pau

    2017-08-31

    The control of ligand-gated receptors with light using photochromic compounds has evolved from the first handcrafted examples to accurate, engineered receptors, whose development is supported by rational design, high-resolution protein structures, comparative pharmacology and molecular biology manipulations. Photoswitchable regulators have been designed and characterized for a large number of ligand-gated receptors in the mammalian nervous system, including nicotinic acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA receptors. They provide a well-equipped toolbox to investigate synaptic and neuronal circuits in all-optical experiments. This focused review discusses the design and properties of these photoswitches, their applications and shortcomings and future perspectives in the field. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Gamma Delta T-Cells Regulate Wound Myeloid Cell Activity After Burn

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    14). No analgesics were used postburn because they can impact the immune response to burn injury and other forms of trauma (15). The mice were then...Shock 22(1):11 15, 2004. 13. Schwacha MG, Daniel T: Up-regulation of cell surface Toll-like receptors on cir- culating gammadelta T-cells following...macrophage hyperactivity and immuno- suppression? Shock 14(6):623 628, 2000. 15. Alexander M, Daniel T, Chaudry IH, Schwacha MG: Opiate analgesics con

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-delta isoform regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    House, Suzanne J; Ginnan, Roman G; Armstrong, Shayn E; Singer, Harold A

    2007-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence that Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways regulate proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells, contributing to the intimal accumulation of VSM that is a hallmark of many vascular diseases. In this study we investigated the role of the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase, calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), as a mediator of Ca(2+) signals regulating VSM cell proliferation. Differentiated VSM cells acutely isolated from rat aortic media express primarily CaMKIIgamma gene products, whereas passaged primary cultures of de-differentiated VSM cells express primarily CaMKIIdelta(2), a splice variant of the delta gene. Experiments examining the time course of CaMKII isoform modulation revealed the process was rapid in onset following initial dispersion and primary culture of aortic VSM with a significant increase in CaMKIIdelta(2) protein and a significant decrease in CaMKIIgamma protein within 30 h, coinciding with the onset of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Attenuating the initial upregulation of CaMKIIdelta(2) in primary cultured cells using small-interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in decreased serum-stimulated DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in primary culture. In passaged VSM cells, suppression of CaMKIIdelta(2) activity by overexpression of a kinase-negative mutant, or suppression of endogenous CaMKII content using multiple siRNAs, significantly attenuated serum-stimulated DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis following either inhibitory approach indicated decreased proportion of cells in G1, an increase in proportion of cells in G2/M, and an increase in polyploidy, corresponding with accumulation of multinucleated cells. These results indicate that CaMKIIdelta(2) is specifically induced during modulation of VSM cells to the synthetic phenotypic and is a positive regulator of serum-stimulated proliferation.

  19. The Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 Regulates Multiple Stages of Early Hemato-Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Hélia; Gomes, Andreia C.; Saavedra, Pedro; Carvalho, Catarina C.; Duarte, António; Cidadão, António; Parreira, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    Background In mouse embryos, homozygous or heterozygous deletions of the gene encoding the Notch ligand Dll4 result in early embryonic death due to major defects in endothelial remodeling in the yolk sac and embryo. Considering the close developmental relationship between endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages, which share a common mesoderm-derived precursor, the hemangioblast, and many key regulatory molecules, we investigated whether Dll4 is also involved in the regulation of early embryonic hematopoiesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Embryoid Bodies (EBs) derived from embryonic stem cells harboring hetero- or homozygous Dll4 deletions, we observed that EBs from both genotypes exhibit an abnormal endothelial remodeling in the vascular sprouts that arise late during EB differentiation, indicating that this in vitro system recapitulates the angiogenic phenotype of Dll4 mutant embryos. However, analysis of EB development at early time points revealed that the absence of Dll4 delays the emergence of mesoderm and severely reduces the number of blast-colony forming cells (BL-CFCs), the in vitro counterpart of the hemangioblast, and of endothelial cells. Analysis of colony forming units (CFU) in EBs and yolk sacs from Dll4+/− and Dll4−/− embryos, showed that primitive erythropoiesis is specifically affected by Dll4 insufficiency. In Dll4 mutant EBs, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seemingly unaffected and cardiomyocyte differentiation was increased, indicating that SMC specification is Dll4-independent while a normal dose of this Notch ligand is essential for the quantitative regulation of cardiomyogenesis. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights a previously unnoticed role for Dll4 in the quantitative regulation of early hemato-vascular precursors, further indicating that it is also involved on the timely emergence of mesoderm in early embryogenesis. PMID:22514637

  20. Plant dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase optimizes light-regulated growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chen; Pu, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Ying; Jang, Geng-Jen; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2017-09-01

    Light controls vegetative and reproductive development of plants. For a plant, sensing the light input properly ensures coordination with the ever-changing environment. Previously, we found that LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) and LWD2 regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. Here, we identified Arabidopsis YET ANOTHER KINASE1 (AtYAK1), an evolutionarily conserved protein and a member of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs), as an interacting protein of LWDs. Our study revealed that AtYAK1 is an important regulator for various light responses, including the circadian clock, photomorphogenesis and reproductive development. AtYAK1 could antagonize the function of LWDs in regulating the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. By examining phenotypes of atyak1, we found that AtYAK1 regulated light-induced period-length shortening and photomorphogenic development. Moreover, AtYAK1 mediated plant fertility especially under inferior light conditions including low light and short-day length. This study discloses a new regulator connecting environmental light to plant growth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} is an essential transcriptional regulator for mitochondrial protection and biogenesis in adult heart.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peiyong; Liu, Jian; Li, Yuquan; Wu, Sijie; Luo, Jinwen; Yang, Huan; Subbiah, Ramasamy; Chatham, John; Zhelyabovska, Olga; Yang, Qinglin

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) (alpha, gamma, and delta/beta) are nuclear hormone receptors and ligand-activated transcription factors that serve as key determinants of myocardial fatty acid metabolism. Long-term cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta deficiency in mice leads to depressed myocardial fatty acid oxidation, bioenergetics, and premature death with lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. To explore the essential role of PPARdelta in the adult heart. We investigated the consequences of inducible short-term PPARdelta knockout in the adult mouse heart. In addition to a substantial transcriptional downregulation of lipid metabolic proteins, short-term PPARdelta knockout in the adult mouse heart attenuated cardiac expression of both Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase, leading to increased oxidative damage to the heart. Moreover, expression of key mitochondrial biogenesis determinants such as PPARgamma coactivator-1 were substantially decreased in the short-term PPARdelta deficient heart, concomitant with a decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Rates of palmitate and glucose oxidation were markedly depressed in cardiomyocytes of PPARdelta knockout hearts. Consequently, PPARdelta deficiency in the adult heart led to depressed cardiac performance and cardiac hypertrophy. PPARdelta is an essential regulator of cardiac mitochondrial protection and biogenesis and PPARdelta activation can be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac disorders.

  2. FADS2 genotype regulates delta-6 desaturase activity and inflammation in human adipose tissue[S

    PubMed Central

    Vaittinen, Maija; Walle, Paula; Kuosmanen, Emmi; Männistö, Ville; Käkelä, Pirjo; Ågren, Jyrki; Schwab, Ursula; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with disturbed lipid metabolism and low-grade inflammation in tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between FA metabolism and adipose tissue (AT) inflammation in the Kuopio Obesity Surgery study. We investigated the association of surgery-induced weight loss and FA desaturase (FADS)1/2 genotypes with serum and AT FA profile and with AT inflammation, measured as interleukin (IL)-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression, in order to find potential gene-environment interactions. We demonstrated an association between serum levels of saturated and polyunsaturated n-6 FAs, and estimated enzyme activities of FADS1/2 genes with IL-1β expression in AT both at baseline and at follow-up. Variation in the FADS1/2 genes associated with IL-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression in SAT after weight reduction, but not at baseline. In addition, the FA composition in subcutaneous and visceral fat correlated with serum FAs, and the associations between serum PUFAs and estimated D6D enzyme activity with AT inflammation were also replicated with corresponding AT FAs and AT inflammation. We conclude that the polymorphism in FADS1/2 genes associates with FA metabolism and AT inflammation, leading to an interaction between weight loss and FADS1/2 genes in the regulation of AT inflammation. PMID:26609056

  3. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  4. Reciprocal regulation of p63 by C/EBP delta in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Serena; Testoni, Barbara; Callari, Maurizio; Alotto, Daniela; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Romano, Rose-Anne; Sinha, Satrajit; Viganò, Alessandra M; Mantovani, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Genetic experiments have clarified that p63 is a key transcription factor governing the establishment and maintenance of multilayered epithelia. Key to our understanding of p63 strategy is the identification of target genes. We perfomed an RNAi screening in keratinocytes for p63, followed by profiling analysis. Results C/EBPδ, member of a family with known roles in differentiation pathways, emerged as a gene repressed by p63. We validated C/EBPδ as a primary target of ΔNp63α by RT-PCR and ChIP location analysis in HaCaT and primary cells. C/EBPδ is differentially expressed in stratification of human skin and it is up-regulated upon differentiation of HaCaT and primary keratinocytes. It is bound to and activates the ΔNp63 promoter. Overexpression of C/EBPδ leads to alteration in the normal profile of p63 isoforms, with the emergence of ΔNp63β and γ, and of the TA isoforms, with different kinetics. In addition, there are changes in the expression of most p63 targets. Inactivation of C/EBPδ leads to gene expression modifications, in part due to the concomitant repression of ΔNp63α. Finally, C/EBPδ is found on the p63 targets in vivo by ChIP analysis, indicating that coregulation is direct. Conclusion Our data highlight a coherent cross-talk between these two transcription factors in keratinocytes and a large sharing of common transcriptional targets. PMID:17903252

  5. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  6. [Regulation of photosynthesis by light quality and its mechanism in plants].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Hu, Mei-Jun; Guo, Yan-Ping

    2008-07-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis of plant growth and development. The regulations of photosynthesis by light quality include regulations of stomatal movement, leaf growth, chloroplast structure, photosynthetic pigment, D1 protein and its gene and photosynthetic carbon assimilation by visible light, and effect of ultraviolet light on photosystem II in plant. Blue light and red light can promote the opening of stomata, while the green light can close stomata. Blue light can improve the development of chloroplast, complex light of red, blue and green lights can expand leaf area, and red light can increase the accumulation of photosynthesis production. Effects of different light quality differ in various plants, organs and tissues. Blue light and far red light can promote the accumulation of psbA gene transcription. Most higher plants and green algae have highest photosynthesis rate in orange and red lights, secondly in blue-violet light, and minimum in green light. Ultraviolet light can decline the electron transfer activity of photosystem II. Moreover, questions regarding the effect of light quality on photosynthesis and some topics for future study were also discussed in this paper.

  7. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  8. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  9. Impacts of the dam-orientated water-sediment regulation scheme on the lower reaches and delta of the Yellow River (Huanghe): A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Houjie; Wu, Xiao; Bi, Naishuang; Li, Song; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Aimei; Syvitski, James P. M.; Saito, Yoshiki; Yang, Zuosheng; Liu, Sumei; Nittrouer, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    The water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS), beginning in 2002, is an unprecedented engineering effort to manage the Yellow River with the aims to mitigate the siltation both in the lower river channel and within the Xiaolangdi Reservoir utilizing the dam-regulated flood water. Ten years after its initial implementation, multi-disciplinary indicators allow us to offer a comprehensive review of this human intervention on a river-coastal system. The WSRS generally achieved its objective, including bed erosion in the lower reaches with increasing capacity for flood discharge and the mitigation of reservoir siltation. However, the WSRS presented unexpected disturbances on the delta and coastal system. Increasing grain size of suspended sediment and decreasing suspended sediment concentration at the river mouth resulted in a regime shift of sediment transport patterns that enhanced the disequilibrium of the delta. The WSRS induced an impulse delivery of nutrients and pollutants within a short period ( 20 days), which together with the altered hydrological cycle, impacted the estuarine and coastal ecosystem. We expect that the sediment yield from the loess region in the future will decrease due to soil-conservation practices, and the lower channel erosion will also decrease as the riverbed armors with coarser sediment. These, in combination with uncertain water discharge concomitant with climate change, increasing water demands and delta subsidence, will put the delta and coastal ocean at high environmental risks. In the context of global change, this work depicts a scenario of human impacts in the river basin that were transferred along the hydrological pathway to the coastal system and remotely transformed the different components of coastal environment. The synthesis review of the WSRS indicates that an integrated management of the river-coast continuum is crucially important for the sustainability of the entire river-delta system. The lessons learned from the WSRS in

  10. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  11. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  12. Loss of function of def selectively up-regulates Delta113p53 expression to arrest expansion growth of digestive organs in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ruan, Hua; Ng, Sok Meng; Gao, Chuan; Soo, Hui Meng; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Zhenhai; Wen, Zilong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong

    2005-12-01

    Transcription factor p53 forms a network with associated factors to regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis in response to environmental stresses. However, there is currently no direct genetic evidence to show if or how the p53 pathway functions during organogenesis. Here we present evidence to show that the zebrafish def (digestive-organ expansion factor) gene encodes a novel pan-endoderm-specific factor. A loss-of-function mutation in def confers hypoplastic digestive organs and selectively up-regulates the expression of Delta113p53, counterpart to a newly identified isoform of p53 produced by an alternative internal promoter in intron 4 of the p53 gene in human. The increased Delta113p53 expression is limited to within the mutant digestive organs, and this increase selectively induces the expression of p53-responsive genes to trigger the arrest of the cell cycle but not apoptosis, resulting in compromised organ growth in the mutant. Our data demonstrate that, while induction of expression of p53 and/or its isoforms is crucial to suppress abnormal cell growth, Delta113p53 is tightly regulated by an organ/tissue-specific factor Def, especially during organogenesis, to prevent adverse inhibition of organ/tissue growth.

  13. Light-dependent gene regulation in nonphototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to light, a fundamental environmental factor, by employing highly evolved machineries and mechanisms. Cellular systems exist to harness light energy usefully as in phototrophic bacteria, to combat photo-oxidative damage stemming from the highly reactive species generated on absorption of light energy, and to link the light stimulus to DNA repair, taxis, development, and virulence. Recent findings on the genetic response to light in nonphototrophic bacteria highlight the ingenious transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the panoply of factors that have evolved to perceive and transmit the signal, and to bring about finely tuned gene expression.

  14. Differential regulation of osteoclastogenesis by Notch2/Delta-like 1 and Notch1/Jagged1 axes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Osteoclastogenesis plays an important role in the bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, Notch receptors have been implicated in the development of osteoclasts. However, the responsible Notch ligands have not been identified yet. This study was undertaken to determine the role of individual Notch receptors and ligands in osteoclastogenesis. Methods Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages or human peripheral blood monocytes were used as osteoclast precursors and cultured with receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to induce osteoclasts. Osteoclasts were detected by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. K/BxN serum-induced arthritic mice and ovariectomized mice were treated with anti-mouse Delta-like 1 (Dll1) blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb). Results Blockade of a Notch ligand Dll1 with mAb inhibited osteoclastogenesis and, conversely, immobilized Dll1-Fc fusion protein enhanced it in both mice and humans. In contrast, blockade of a Notch ligand Jagged1 enhanced osteoclastogenesis and immobilized Jagged1-Fc suppressed it. Enhancement of osteoclastogenesis by agonistic anti-Notch2 mAb suggested that Dll1 promoted osteoclastogenesis via Notch2, while suppression by agonistic anti-Notch1 mAb suggested that Jagged1 suppressed osteoclastogenesis via Notch1. Inhibition of Notch signaling by a gamma-secretase inhibitor suppressed osteoclastogenesis, implying that Notch2/Dll1-mediated enhancement was dominant. Actually, blockade of Dll1 ameliorated arthritis induced by K/BxN serum transfer, reduced the number of osteoclasts in the affected joints and suppressed ovariectomy-induced bone loss. Conclusions The differential regulation of osteoclastogenesis by Notch2/Dll1 and Notch1/Jagged1 axes may be a novel target for amelioration of bone erosion in RA patients. PMID:22390640

  15. Lipid Metabolism, Oxidative Stress and Cell Death Are Regulated by PKC Delta in a Dietary Model of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Michael W.; Burrington, Christine M.; Lynch, Darin T.; Davenport, Samantha K.; Johnson, Andrew K.; Horsman, Melissa J.; Chowdhry, Saleem; Zhang, Jian; Sparks, Janet D.; Tirrell, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Steatosis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis underlie the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) has been implicated in fatty liver disease and is activated in the methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet model of NASH, yet its pathophysiological importance towards steatohepatitis progression is uncertain. We therefore addressed the role of PKCδ in the development of steatosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and fibrosis in an animal model of NASH. We fed PKCδ−/− mice and wildtype littermates a control or MCD diet. PKCδ−/− primary hepatocytes were used to evaluate the direct effects of fatty acids on hepatocyte lipid metabolism gene expression. A reduction in hepatic steatosis and triglyceride levels were observed between wildtype and PKCδ−/− mice fed the MCD diet. The hepatic expression of key regulators of β-oxidation and plasma triglyceride metabolism was significantly reduced in PKCδ−/− mice and changes in serum triglyceride were blocked in PKCδ−/− mice. MCD diet-induced hepatic oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis were reduced in PKCδ−/− mice. MCD diet-induced NADPH oxidase activity and p47phox membrane translocation were blunted and blocked, respectively, in PKCδ−/− mice. Expression of pro-apoptotic genes and caspase 3 and 9 cleavage in the liver of MCD diet fed PKCδ−/− mice were blunted and blocked, respectively. Surprisingly, no differences in MCD diet-induced fibrosis or pro-fibrotic gene expression were observed in 8 week MCD diet fed PKCδ−/− mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ plays a role in key pathological features of fatty liver disease but not ultimately in fibrosis in the MCD diet model of NASH. PMID:24454937

  16. Mammalian osmolytes and S-nitrosoglutathione promote Delta F508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Howard, Marybeth; Fischer, Horst; Roux, Jeremie; Santos, Bento C; Gullans, Steven R; Yancey, Paul H; Welch, William J

    2003-09-12

    In cystic fibrosis, the absence of functional CFTR results in thick mucous secretions in the lung and intestines, as well as pancreatic deficiency. Although expressed at high levels in the kidney, mutations in CFTR result in little or no apparent kidney dysfunction. In an effort to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function in kidney cells under conditions that are common to the kidney, namely osmotic stress. Kidney cells were grown in culture and adapted to 250 mM NaCl and 250 mM urea. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of lysates from kidney cells adapted to these conditions identified an increase in the cellular osmolytes glycerophosphorylcholine, myo-inositol, sorbitol, and taurine. In contrast to isoosmotic conditions, hyperosmotic stress led to the proper folding and processing of Delta F508 CFTR. Furthermore, three of the cellular osmolytes, when added individually to cells, proved effective in promoting the proper folding and processing of the Delta F508 CFTR protein in both epithelial and fibroblast cells. Whole-cell patch clamping of osmolyte-treated cells showed that Delta F508 CFTR had trafficked to the plasma membrane and was activated by forskolin. Encouraged by these findings, we looked at other features common to the kidney that may impact Delta F508 maturation and function. Interestingly, a small molecule, S-nitrosoglutathione, which is a substrate for gamma glutamyltranspeptidase, an abundant enzyme in the kidney, likewise promoted Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function. S-Nitrosoglutathione-corrected Delta F508 CFTR exhibited a shorter half-life as compared with wild type CFTR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a small molecule approach as a therapeutic treatment in promoting Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function and suggest that an additional treatment may be required to stabilize Delta F508 CFTR protein once present at the plasma membrane. Finally, our observations may help to

  17. Light-regulated gravitropism in seedling roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Briggs, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    Red light-induced changes in the gravitropism of roots of Zea mays variety Merit is a very low fluence response with a threshold of 10(-9) moles per square meter and is not reversible by far red light. Blue light also affects root gravitropism but the sensitivity of roots to blue is 50 to 100 times less than to an equal fluence of red. In Z. mays Merit we conclude that phytochrome is the sole pigment associated with light-induced changes in root gravitropism.

  18. Light-Regulated Gravitropism in Seedling Roots of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Lewis J.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1987-01-01

    Red light-induced changes in the gravitropism of roots of Zea mays variety Merit is a very low fluence response with a threshold of 10−9 moles per square meter and is not reversible by far red light. Blue light also affects root gravitropism but the sensitivity of roots to blue is 50 to 100 times less than to an equal fluence of red. In Z. mays Merit we conclude that phytochrome is the sole pigment associated with light-induced changes in root gravitropism. PMID:11539030

  19. Light-regulated gravitropism in seedling roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Feldman, L J; Briggs, W R

    1987-01-01

    Red light-induced changes in the gravitropism of roots of Zea mays variety Merit is a very low fluence response with a threshold of 10(-9) moles per square meter and is not reversible by far red light. Blue light also affects root gravitropism but the sensitivity of roots to blue is 50 to 100 times less than to an equal fluence of red. In Z. mays Merit we conclude that phytochrome is the sole pigment associated with light-induced changes in root gravitropism.

  20. ZEITLUPE positively regulates hypocotyl elongation at warm temperature under light in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Hypocotyl cell elongation has been studied as a model to understand how cellular expansion contributes to plant organ growth. Hypocotyl elongation is affected by multiple environmental factors, including light quantity and light quality. Red light inhibits hypocotyl growth via the phytochrome signaling pathways. Proteins of the flavin-binding KELCH repeat F-box 1 / LOV KELCH protein 2 / ZEITLUPE family are positive regulators of hypocotyl elongation under red light in Arabidopsis. These proteins were suggested to reduce phytochrome-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Here, we show that ZEITLUPE also functions as a positive regulator in warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under light in Arabidopsis.

  1. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D.; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized (‘entrained’) with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3′UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light. PMID:24423866

  2. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized ('entrained') with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3'UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light.

  3. Light is a positive regulator of strigolactone levels in tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Hinanit; Cohen, Maja; Chesin, Ori; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bécard, Guillaume; Puech, Virginie; Ben Dor, Bruria; Resnick, Natalie; Wininger, Smadar; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2011-11-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) or closely related molecules were recently identified as phytohormones, acting as long-distance branching factors that suppress growth of pre-formed axillary buds in the shoot. The SL signaling pathways and light appear to be connected, as SLs were shown to induce light-regulated pathways and to mimic light-adapted plant growth. However, it is not yet clear how light affects SL levels. Here, we examined the effect of different light intensities on SL levels in tomato roots. The results show that light intensity, above a certain threshold, is a positive regulator of SL levels and of Sl-CCD7 transcription; Sl-CCD7 is involved in SLs biosynthesis in tomato. Moreover, SL accumulation in plant roots is shown to be a time-dependent process. At least some of the similar effects of light and SLs on plant responses might result from a positive effect of light on SL levels.

  4. Characterization and source apportionment of aerosol light extinction with a coupled model of CMB-IMPROVE in Hangzhou, Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Yu-fen; Feng, Yin-chang; Zheng, Xian-jue; Jiao, Li; Hong, Sheng-mao; Shen, Jian-dong; Zhu, Tan; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics and sources of aerosol light extinction in the Yangtze River Delta of China, a campaign was carried out in Hangzhou from December 2013 to November 2014. Hourly data for air pollutants including PM2.5, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO, and aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficient and aerosol absorbing coefficient was obtained in the environmental air quality automatic monitoring station. Meteorological parameters were measured synchronously in the automated meteorology monitoring station. Additionally, around seven sets of ambient PM2.5 samples per month were collected and analyzed during the campaign. The annual mean aerosol scattering coefficient, aerosol absorbing coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo measured in this study was 514 ± 284 Mm- 1, 35 ± 20 Mm- 1 and 94% respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient reconstructed using the modified IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment) formula was compared to the measured extinction coefficient. Better correlations could be found between the measured and reconstructed extinction coefficient when RH was under 90%. A coupled model of CMB (chemical mass balance) and modified IMPROVE was used to apportion the sources of aerosol light extinction in Hangzhou. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate were identified as the most significant sources for aerosol light extinction, accounted for 30.2%, 24.1% and 15.8% respectively.

  5. Regulation by blue light of the fluffy gene encoding a major regulator of conidiation in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, María; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Corrochano, Luis M

    2010-03-01

    The development of asexual spores, that is, the process of conidiation, in the fungus Neurospora crassa is increased by light. The fluffy (fl) gene, encoding a major regulator of conidiation, is activated by light. We describe here a detailed characterization of the regulation by blue light of fl in vegetative hyphae. This induction requires the white collar complex (WCC) while the FLD protein acts as a dark repressor of fl transcription. We show that the WCC directly regulates fl transcription in response to blue light after transiently binding the promoter. We propose that fl is repressed by FLD in vegetative mycelia and that the repression is lost after light exposure and WCC activation. The increase in fl mRNA in vegetative mycelia after light exposure, and the corresponding increase in the amount of the regulatory FL protein, should promote the activation of the conidiation pathway. The activation by light of fl provides a simple mechanism for the activation of conidiation by blue light in Neurospora that may be at work in other fungi.

  6. Plastids Are Major Regulators of Light Signaling in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ruckle, Michael E.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lawrence, Lauren A.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Larkin, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    We previously provided evidence that plastid signaling regulates the downstream components of a light signaling network and that this signal integration coordinates chloroplast biogenesis with both the light environment and development by regulating gene expression. We tested these ideas by analyzing light- and plastid-regulated transcriptomes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the enrichment of Gene Ontology terms in these transcriptomes is consistent with the integration of light and plastid signaling (1) down-regulating photosynthesis and inducing both repair and stress tolerance in dysfunctional chloroplasts and (2) helping coordinate processes such as growth, the circadian rhythm, and stress responses with the degree of chloroplast function. We then tested whether factors that contribute to this signal integration are also regulated by light and plastid signals by characterizing T-DNA insertion alleles of genes that are regulated by light and plastid signaling and that encode proteins that are annotated as contributing to signaling, transcription, or no known function. We found that a high proportion of these mutant alleles induce chloroplast biogenesis during deetiolation. We quantified the expression of four photosynthesis-related genes in seven of these enhanced deetiolation (end) mutants and found that photosynthesis-related gene expression is attenuated. This attenuation is particularly striking for Photosystem II subunit S expression. We conclude that the integration of light and plastid signaling regulates a number of END genes that help optimize chloroplast function and that at least some END genes affect photosynthesis-related gene expression. PMID:22383539

  7. A network of genes regulated by light in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Rajeev; Hihara, Yukako; Singh, Abhay K; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2007-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms require light for their growth and development. However, exposure to high light is detrimental to them. Using time series microarray data from a model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803 transferred from low to high light, we generated a gene co-expression network. The network has twelve sub-networks connected hierarchically, each consisting of an interconnected hub-and-spoke architecture. Within each sub-network, edges formed between genes that recapitulate known pathways. Analysis of the expression profiles shows that the cells undergo a phase transition 6-hours post-shift to high light, characterized by core sub-network. The core sub-network is enriched in proteins that (putatively) bind Fe-S clusters and proteins that mediate iron and sulfate homeostasis. At the center of this core is a sulfate permease, suggesting sulfate is rate limiting for cells grown in high light. To validate this novel finding, we demonstrate the limited ability of cell growth in sulfate-depleted medium in high light. This study highlights how understanding the organization of the networks can provide insights into the coordination of physiologic responses.

  8. Regulation of Ribulose Diphosphate Formation in Vivo by Light

    PubMed Central

    Klob, W.; Kandler, O.; Tanner, W.

    1972-01-01

    Light-dependent formation of ribulose-1,5 diphosphate is completely inhibited by low concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea which do not severely affect cyclic photophosphorylation. Also in Scenedesmus mutant number 11, capable of cyclic photophosphorylation, cellular ribulose-1,5 diphosphate-levels do not increase upon illumination. When mutant cells are H2 adapted, however, a light-dependent formation of ribulose-1,5 diphosphate is observed in the presence of H2. From these results it has been concluded that at least part of the Calvin cycle does not operate in the dark, since a reductant is lacking which is generated in the light. PMID:16658080

  9. Bi-objective analysis of water-sediment regulation for channel scouring and delta maintenance: A study of the lower Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D.; Miao, C.; Duan, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term hydrological data and remotely-sensed satellite images were used to analyze the effects of the water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) implemented in the lower Yellow River (LYR), China, between 1983 and 2013. The WSRS aimed to control channel scouring in the LYR and maintain the Yellow River Delta (YRD). Channel erosion in the LYR has primarily depended on the incoming sediment concentration at Xiaolangdi, where the concentration must be lower than approximately 9.17 × 10-3 t m-3 to avoid rising of the riverbed. In 1996, an artificial diversion altered the evolution of the YRD. To maintain delta equilibrium, an average sediment load of about 441 × 106 t year-1 was required before 1996, after which this value decreased to 167 × 106 t year-1. We provide a preliminary estimate of the incoming water and sediment conditions required at the Xiaolangdi station to guarantee both LYR channel scouring and maintenance of the YRD. Our results show that it is feasible to transport sediment originally deposited in the LYR to the river mouth to maintain the delta, which is of great significance for the future management and environmental protection of the LYR.

  10. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding†

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Orion B.; Sather, Aaron C.; Rebek, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process. PMID:21116523

  11. Regulation of formation of volatile compounds of tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves by single light wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiumin; Chen, Yiyong; Mei, Xin; Katsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of plant growth and development by light wavelength has been extensively studied. Less attention has been paid to effect of light wavelength on formation of plant metabolites. The objective of this study was to investigate whether formation of volatiles in preharvest and postharvest tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves can be regulated by light wavelength. In the present study, in contrast to the natural light or dark treatment, blue light (470 nm) and red light (660 nm) significantly increased most endogenous volatiles including volatile fatty acid derivatives (VFADs), volatile phenylpropanoids/benzenoids (VPBs), and volatile terpenes (VTs) in the preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, blue and red lights significantly up-regulated the expression levels of 9/13-lipoxygenases involved in VFADs formation, phenylalanine ammonialyase involved in VPBs formation, and terpene synthases involved in VTs formation. Single light wavelength had less remarkable influences on formation of volatiles in the postharvest leaves compared with the preharvest leaves. These results suggest that blue and red lights can be promising technology for remodeling the aroma of preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, our study provided evidence that light wavelength can activate the expression of key genes involved in formation of plant volatiles for the first time. PMID:26567525

  12. Regulation of formation of volatile compounds of tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves by single light wavelength.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiumin; Chen, Yiyong; Mei, Xin; Katsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2015-11-16

    Regulation of plant growth and development by light wavelength has been extensively studied. Less attention has been paid to effect of light wavelength on formation of plant metabolites. The objective of this study was to investigate whether formation of volatiles in preharvest and postharvest tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves can be regulated by light wavelength. In the present study, in contrast to the natural light or dark treatment, blue light (470 nm) and red light (660 nm) significantly increased most endogenous volatiles including volatile fatty acid derivatives (VFADs), volatile phenylpropanoids/benzenoids (VPBs), and volatile terpenes (VTs) in the preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, blue and red lights significantly up-regulated the expression levels of 9/13-lipoxygenases involved in VFADs formation, phenylalanine ammonialyase involved in VPBs formation, and terpene synthases involved in VTs formation. Single light wavelength had less remarkable influences on formation of volatiles in the postharvest leaves compared with the preharvest leaves. These results suggest that blue and red lights can be promising technology for remodeling the aroma of preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, our study provided evidence that light wavelength can activate the expression of key genes involved in formation of plant volatiles for the first time.

  13. Fully digital image sensor employing delta-sigma indirect feedback ADC with high-sensitivity to low-light illuminations for astronomical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricic, Danijel; Ignjatovic, Zeljko; Figer, Donald F.; Ashe, Brian; Hanold, Brandon J.; Montagliano, Thomas; Stauffer, Don; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2010-07-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with column-parallel delta-sigma (ΔΣ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The design employs three transistor pixels (3T1) where the unique configuration of the ΔΣ ADC reduces the noise contribution of the readout transistor. A 128 x 128 pixel image sensor prototype is fabricated in 0.35μm TSMC technology. The reset noise and the offset fixed pattern noise (FPN) are removed in the digital domain. The measured readout noise is 37.8μV for an exposure time of 33ms. The low readout noise allows an improved low light response in comparison to other state-of-art designs. The design is suitable for applications demanding excellent low-light response such as astronomical imaging. The sensor has a measured intra-scene dynamic range (DR) of 91 dB, and a peak signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 54 dB.

  14. A light-switchable bidirectional expression module allowing simultaneous regulation of multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yi

    2015-10-02

    Several light-regulated genetic circuits have been applied to spatiotemporally control transgene expression in mammalian cells. However, simultaneous regulation of multiple genes using one genetic device by light has not yet been reported. In this study, we engineered a bidirectional expression module based on LightOn system. Our data showed that both reporter genes could be regulated at defined and quantitative levels. Simultaneous regulation of four genes was further achieved in cultured cells and mice. Additionally, we successfully utilized the bidirectional expression module to monitor the expression of a suicide gene, showing potential for photodynamic gene therapy. Collectively, we provide a robust and useful tool to simultaneously control multiple genes expression by light, which will be widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology.

  15. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue-green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment.

  16. Light-Regulated Molecular Trafficking in a Synthetic Water-Soluble Host.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, Jesús; Ryan, Seán T J; Jambrina, Pablo G; Rosta, Edina; Scherman, Oren A

    2016-05-11

    Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8])-mediated complexation of a dicationic azobenzene in water allows for the light-controlled encapsulation of a variety of second guest compounds, including amino acids, dyes, and fragrance molecules. Such controlled guest sequestration inside the cavity of CB[8] enables the regulation of the thermally induced phase transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-which is not photosensitive-thus demonstrating the robustness and relevancy of the light-regulated CB[8] complexation.

  17. The Regulation of Light Sensing and Light-Harvesting Impacts the Use of Cyanobacteria as Biotechnology Platforms.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Light is harvested in cyanobacteria by chlorophyll-containing photosystems embedded in the thylakoid membranes and phycobilisomes (PBSs), photosystem-associated light-harvesting antennae. Light absorbed by the PBSs and photosystems can be converted to chemical energy through photosynthesis. Photosynthetically fixed carbon pools, which are constrained by photosynthetic light capture versus the dissipation of excess light absorbed, determine the available organismal energy budget. The molecular bases of the environmental regulation of photosynthesis, photoprotection, and photomorphogenesis are still being elucidated in cyanobacteria. Thus, the potential impacts of these phenomena on the efficacy of developing cyanobacteria as robust biotechnological platforms require additional attention. Current advances and persisting needs for developing cyanobacterial production platforms that are related to light sensing and harvesting include the development of tools to balance the utilization of absorbed photons for conversion to chemical energy and biomass versus light dissipation in photoprotective mechanisms. Such tools can be used to direct energy to more effectively support the production of desired bioproducts from sunlight.

  18. The Regulation of Light Sensing and Light-Harvesting Impacts the Use of Cyanobacteria as Biotechnology Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Light is harvested in cyanobacteria by chlorophyll-containing photosystems embedded in the thylakoid membranes and phycobilisomes (PBSs), photosystem-associated light-harvesting antennae. Light absorbed by the PBSs and photosystems can be converted to chemical energy through photosynthesis. Photosynthetically fixed carbon pools, which are constrained by photosynthetic light capture versus the dissipation of excess light absorbed, determine the available organismal energy budget. The molecular bases of the environmental regulation of photosynthesis, photoprotection, and photomorphogenesis are still being elucidated in cyanobacteria. Thus, the potential impacts of these phenomena on the efficacy of developing cyanobacteria as robust biotechnological platforms require additional attention. Current advances and persisting needs for developing cyanobacterial production platforms that are related to light sensing and harvesting include the development of tools to balance the utilization of absorbed photons for conversion to chemical energy and biomass versus light dissipation in photoprotective mechanisms. Such tools can be used to direct energy to more effectively support the production of desired bioproducts from sunlight. PMID:25023122

  19. A CRY-BIC negative-feedback circuitry regulating blue light sensitivity of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Qin; Han, Yun-Jeong; Liu, Qing; Gu, Lianfeng; Yang, Zhaohe; Su, Jun; Liu, Bobin; Zuo, Zecheng; He, Wenjin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Bin; Matsui, Minami; Kim, Jeong-Il; Oka, Yoshito; Lin, Chentao

    2017-08-22

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors that regulate various light responses in plants. Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) and cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) mediate blue light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and long-day (LD) promotion of floral initiation. It has been reported recently that two negative regulators of Arabidopsis cryptochromes, Blue light Inhibitors of Cryptochromes 1 and 2 (BIC1 and BIC2), inhibit cryptochrome function by blocking blue light-dependent cryptochrome dimerization. However, it remained unclear how cryptochromes regulate the BIC gene activity. Here we show that cryptochromes mediate light activation of transcription of the BIC genes, by suppressing the activity of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1), resulting in activation of the transcription activator ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) that is associated with chromatins of the BIC promoters. These results demonstrate a CRY-BIC negative-feedback circuitry that regulates the activity of each other. Surprisingly, phytochromes also mediate light activation of BIC transcription, suggesting a novel photoreceptor co-action mechanism to sustain blue light sensitivity of plants under the broad spectra of solar radiation in nature. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Characterization of light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Amy S; Kertho, Albert; Nguyen, Mary

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms. Two species of conifer were examined: eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss], as well as the angiosperm pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo). Both diurnal time courses in the field and manipulated light experiments in growth chambers were conducted. Results from chlorophyll fluorescence analysis indicated that pumpkin was able to use a larger fraction of absorbed light to drive photochemistry and retain a lower reduction state at a given light intensity relative to the conifers. Results from western blots using anti-phosphothreonine demonstrate that in field conditions, conifers maintained higher light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation than pumpkin; however, this was likely due to a more variable light environment. Manipulated light experiments showed that general patterns of light-dependent LHCII phosphorylation were similar in conifers and pumpkin, with low levels of LHCII phosphorylation occurring in darkness and maximal levels occurring in low light conditions. However, high light-dependent dephosphorylation of LHCIII appears to be regulated differently in conifers, with conifers maintaining phosphorylation of LHCII proteins at higher excitation pressure compared with pumpkin. Additionally, spruce needles maintained relatively high phosphorylation of LHCII even in very high light conditions. Our results suggest that this difference in dephosphorylation of LHCII may be due to differences in the stromal redox status in spruce relative to pine and pumpkin.

  1. Characterization of light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Amy S.; Kertho, Albert; Nguyen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms. Two species of conifer were examined: eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss], as well as the angiosperm pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo). Both diurnal time courses in the field and manipulated light experiments in growth chambers were conducted. Results from chlorophyll fluorescence analysis indicated that pumpkin was able to use a larger fraction of absorbed light to drive photochemistry and retain a lower reduction state at a given light intensity relative to the conifers. Results from western blots using anti-phosphothreonine demonstrate that in field conditions, conifers maintained higher light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation than pumpkin; however, this was likely due to a more variable light environment. Manipulated light experiments showed that general patterns of light-dependent LHCII phosphorylation were similar in conifers and pumpkin, with low levels of LHCII phosphorylation occurring in darkness and maximal levels occurring in low light conditions. However, high light-dependent dephosphorylation of LHCIII appears to be regulated differently in conifers, with conifers maintaining phosphorylation of LHCII proteins at higher excitation pressure compared with pumpkin. Additionally, spruce needles maintained relatively high phosphorylation of LHCII even in very high light conditions. Our results suggest that this difference in dephosphorylation of LHCII may be due to differences in the stromal redox status in spruce relative to pine and pumpkin. PMID:26802541

  2. Design of adaptation actions to compensate the hydrological impact of the river regulation by dams on the Ebro Delta (Spain): combining modeling and field work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Darío; Jurado, Alicia; Carpintero, Miriam; Rovira, Albert; Polo, María J.

    2016-04-01

    River regulation by dams for both flood control and water storage has allowed to decrease both uncertainty and risks associated to extreme hydrological events. However, the alteration of the natural river flow regime and the detraction of high water volumes usually lead to significant effects downstream on the morphology, water quality, ecological status of water… and this is particularly relevant in the transitional waters since the sea level rise poses an additional threat on such conditions. The Ebro River, in northeastern Spain, is one of the highly regulated rivers in Spain with the dams located in the mainstream. Besides an estimated decrease of a 30% of the freshwater inputs, the sediment delivery to the final delta in the Mediterranean has dramatically been decreased up to a 99%, with environmental risks associated to the reduction of the emerged areas from the loss of sediment supply, the impact on the subsidence dynamics, and the sea level rise. The Ebro Delta suffers a mean regression of 10 m per year, and the persistence of macrophyte development in the final reach of the river due to the low water mean flow regime. The project LIFE EBRO-ADMICLIM (ENV/ES/001182), coordinated by the IRTA in Catalonia (Spain), puts forwards pilot actions for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change in the Ebro Delta. An integrated approach is proposed for managing water, sediment and habitats (rice fields and wetlands), with the multiple aim of optimizing ground elevation, reducing coastal erosion, increasing the accumulation (sequestration) of carbon in the soil, reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and improving water quality. This work presents the pilot actions included in the project to mitigate the loss of water flow and sediment supply to the delta. Sediment injections at different points upstream have been designed to calibrate and validate a sediment transport model coupled to a 2D-hydrodinamic model of the river. The combination of an a

  3. Regulation of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase expression and activity in the hypophysectomized rat ovary: Interactions between the stimulatory effect of human chorionic gonadotropin and the luteolytic effect of prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, C.; Labrie, C.; Dupont, E.; Couet, J.; Trudel, C.; Rheaume, E.; Simard, J.; Luu-The, V.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1990-12-01

    The enzyme 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase (3 beta-HSD) catalyzes an obligatory step in the conversion of pregnenolone and other 5-ene-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into progesterone as well as precursors of all androgens and estrogens in the ovary. Since 3 beta-HSD is likely to be an important target for regulation by pituitary hormones, we have studied the effect of chronic treatment with LH (hCG), FSH, and PRL on ovarian 3 beta-HSD expression and activity in hypophysectomized adult female rats. Human CG (hCG) (10 IU, twice a day (bid)), ovine FSH (0.5 microgram, bid), and ovine PRL (1 mg, bid) were administered, singly or in combination, for a period of 10 days starting 15 days after hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized rats, PRL exerted a potent inhibitory effect on all the parameters studied. In fact, PRL caused a 81% decrease in ovarian 3 beta-HSD mRNA content accompanied by a similar decrease in 3 beta-HSD activity and protein levels. In addition, ovarian weight decreased by 40% whereas serum progesterone fell dramatically from 1.92 nmol/liter to undetectable levels after treatment with PRL. Whereas hCG alone had only slight stimulatory effects on 3 beta-HSD mRNA, protein content and activity levels, treatment with the gonadotropin partially or completely reversed the potent inhibitory effects of oPRL on all the parameters measured. FSH, on the other hand, had no significant effect on 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. In situ hybridization experiments using the 35S-labeled rat ovary 3 beta-HSD cDNA probe show that the inhibitory effect of PRL is exerted primarily on luteal cell 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. On the other hand, it can be seen that hCG stimulates 3 beta-HSD mRNA accumulation in interstitial cells.

  4. Delta II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Delta II expendable launch vehicle with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), cooperative space X-ray astronomy mission between NASA, Germany and United Kingdom, was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 1, 1990.

  5. A CRE1- regulated cluster is responsible for light dependent production of dihydrotrichotetronin in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Alberto Alonso; Stappler, Eva; Schuster, Andre; Sulyok, Michael; Schmoll, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Changing light conditions, caused by the rotation of earth resulting in day and night or growth on the surface or within a substrate, result in considerably altered physiological processes in fungi. For the biotechnological workhorse Trichoderma reesei, regulation of glycoside hydrolase gene expression, especially cellulase expression was shown to be a target of light dependent gene regulation. Analysis of regulatory targets of the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1 under cellulase inducing conditions revealed a secondary metabolite cluster to be differentially regulated in light and darkness and by photoreceptors. We found that this cluster is involved in production of trichodimerol and that the two polyketide synthases of the cluster are essential for biosynthesis of dihydrotrichotetronine (syn. bislongiquinolide or bisorbibutenolide). Additionally, an indirect influence on production of the peptaibol antibiotic paracelsin was observed. The two polyketide synthetase genes as well as the monooxygenase gene of the cluster were found to be connected at the level of transcription in a positive feedback cycle in darkness, but negative feedback in light, indicating a cellular sensing and response mechanism for the products of these enzymes. The transcription factor TR_102497/YPR2 residing within the cluster regulates the cluster genes in a light dependent manner. Additionally, an interrelationship of this cluster with regulation of cellulase gene expression was detected. Hence the regulatory connection between primary and secondary metabolism appears more widespread than previously assumed, indicating a sophisticated distribution of resources either to degradation of substrate (feed) or to antagonism of competitors (fight), which is influenced by light.

  6. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism.

  7. Light-regulated differential expression of pea chloroplast and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-W; Hahn, T-R

    2003-02-01

    The light-regulated differential expression of pea chloroplast and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPase) was investigated using enzyme activity assay, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses. The enzyme activities of both chloroplast and cytosolic FBPases gradually increased under continuous white light illumination, although the increase in chloroplast FBPase was more drastic. Northern and immunoblot analyses also indicated that light stimulated the expression of both enzymes. Enzyme activity and the transcript levels of both enzymes gradually decreased under the dark treatment, although protein levels were unchanged for up to 24 h following the initiation of culture in the dark, indicating that reversible modifications of the enzymes may occur during the transition from light to dark (or the reverse). Light pulse experiments using blue (420 nm) and red/far-red (660/730 nm) light were carried out to analyze the photoreceptors related to the light-mediated expression of both enzymes. Expression of the chloroplast enzyme was very sensitive to red or far-red light pulses-it was induced by red light, but suppressed by far-red light pulses, as determined by enzyme activity, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses, suggesting that red light signaling is involved in the control of chloroplast FBPase expression. However, cytosolic FBPase was virtually insensitive to blue or red/far-red light pulses in terms of enzyme activity, as determined by protein and transcript levels, indicating that cytosolic enzyme expression is not directly regulated by light signals. Instead, the expression of the cytosolic enzyme may be closely related to photosynthetic energy conversion accompanied by continuous white light irradiation.

  8. Do PFT1 and HY5 interact in regulation of sulfate assimilation by light in Arabidopsis?

    PubMed

    Koprivova, Anna; Calderwood, Alexander; Lee, Bok-Rye; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-04-02

    Sulfate assimilation pathway is highly responsive to changes in environment, but the mechanisms of such regulation are only slowly beginning to unravel. Here we show evidence that PHYTOCHROME AND FLOWERING TIME 1 (PFT1) may be another component of the sulfate assimilation regulatory circuit. Transcriptional regulation by light of the key enzyme of sulfate assimilation, adenosine 5'phosphosulfate (APS) reductase, is disturbed in pft1-2 mutants. PFT1, however, affects also APS reductase enzyme activity, flux through the sulfate assimilation pathway and accumulation of glutathione. In addition, our data suggest a possible interplay of PFT1 with another transcription factor, HY5, in regulation of APS reductase by light.

  9. Light involved regulation of BZR1 stability andphosphorylation statusto coordinate plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Feng; Huang, Li-Chun; Wei, Ke; Yu, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2017-04-10

    Light and Brassinosteroid (BR) are master environmental stimulus and endogenous cue for plant growth and development, respectively. Great progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms on the crosstalk between light and BR. However, little is known about how BZR1, the pivotal integration node, is regulated by light and dark. Here, we demonstrated that an intact BR signaling pathway is essential for dark-induced hypocotyl elongation. Consequent expression assay showed that light-dark switch affected BZR1 phosphorylation and accumulation. Moreover, blocking the 26S proteasome pathway promoted the accumulation of both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated BZR1 proteins. Restriction of new protein biosynthesis had multiple effects on BZR1 phosphorylation status and stability, relying on the availability of light and the 26S proteasome pathways. Furthermore, sugar treatment strikingly enhanced the accumulation of total BZR1 under either light or dark conditions, likely by repressing transcript abundance of MAX2 , a gene encoding an E3 ligase for BZR1. Finally, light regulated phosphorylation change of BZR1 requires the existence of endogenous BR as well as functional BIN2 and PP2A. Taken together, our results depicted a light-involved complex regulation network of BZR1 stability and phosphorylation status.

  10. DEG9, a serine protease, modulates cytokinin and light signaling by regulating the level of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Wei; Li, Jing; He, Baoye; Chai, Xin; Xu, Xiumei; Sun, Xuwu; Jiang, Jingjing; Feng, Peiqiang; Zuo, Jianru; Lin, Rongcheng; Rochaix, Jean-David; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinin is an essential phytohormone that controls various biological processes in plants. A number of response regulators are known to be important for cytokinin signal transduction. ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4 (ARR4) mediates the cross-talk between light and cytokinin signaling through modulation of the activity of phytochrome B. However, the mechanism that regulates the activity and stability of ARR4 is unknown. Here we identify an ATP-independent serine protease, degradation of periplasmic proteins 9 (DEG9), which localizes to the nucleus and regulates the stability of ARR4. Biochemical evidence shows that DEG9 interacts with ARR4, thereby targeting ARR4 for degradation, which suggests that DEG9 regulates the stability of ARR4. Moreover, genetic evidence shows that DEG9 acts upstream of ARR4 and regulates the activity of ARR4 in cytokinin and light-signaling pathways. This study thus identifies a role for a ubiquitin-independent selective protein proteolysis in the regulation of the stability of plant signaling components. PMID:27274065

  11. Novel light-regulated genes in Trichoderma atroviride: a dissection by cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Saavedra, T; Esquivel-Naranjo, E U; Casas-Flores, S; Martínez-Hernández, P; Ibarra-Laclette, E; Cortes-Penagos, C; Herrera-Estrella, A

    2006-11-01

    The influence of light on living organisms is critical, not only because of its importance as the main source of energy for the biosphere, but also due to its capacity to induce changes in the behaviour and morphology of nearly all forms of life. The common soil fungus Trichoderma atroviride responds to blue light in a synchronized manner, in time and space, by forming a ring of green conidia at what had been the colony perimeter at the time of exposure (photoconidiation). A putative complex formed by the BLR-1 and BLR-2 proteins in T. atroviride appears to play an essential role as a sensor and transcriptional regulator in photoconidiation. Expression analyses using microarrays containing 1438 unigenes were carried out in order to identify early light response genes. It was found that 2.8 % of the genes were light responsive: 2 % induced and 0.8 % repressed. Expression analysis in blr deletion mutants allowed the demonstration of the occurrence of two types of light responses, a blr-independent response in addition to the expected blr-dependent one, as well as a new role of the BLR proteins in repression of transcription. Exposure of T. atroviride to continuous light helped to establish that the light-responsive genes are subject to photoadaptation. Finally, evidence is provided of red-light-regulated gene expression and a possible crosstalk between the blue and red light signalling pathways.

  12. Light regulates the expression of the BDNF/TrkB system in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, C; Bonnin-Arias, C; Guerrera, M C; Calavia, M G; Chamorro, E; Montalbano, G; López-Velasco, S; López-Muñiz, A; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2013-01-01

    The retina of the adult zebrafish express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its signaling receptor TrkB. This functional system is involved in the biology of the vertebrate retina and its expression is regulated by light. This study was designed to investigate the effects of cyclic (12 h light/12 h darkness) or continuous (24 h) exposure during 10 days to white light, white-blue light, and blue light, as well as of darkness, on the expression of BDNF and TrkB in the retina. BDNF and TrkB were assessed in the retina of adult zebrafish using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Exposure to white, white-blue, and blue light causes a decrease of BDNF mRNA and of BDNF immunostaining, independently of the pattern of light exposition. Conversely, in the same experimental conditions, the expression of TrkB mRNA was upregulated and TrkB immunostaining increased. Exposition to darkness diminished BDNF and TrkB mRNAs, and abolished the immunostaining for BDNF but not modified that for TrkB. These results demonstrate the regulation of BDNF and TrkB by light in the retina of adult zebrafish and might contribute to explain some aspects of the complex pathophysiology of light-induced retinopathies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Differential regulation of two sucrose transporters by defoliation and light conditions in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Furet, Pierre-Maxime; Berthier, Alexandre; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie; Meuriot, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Sucrose transport between source and sink tissues is supposed to be a key-step for an efficient regrowth of perennial rye-grass after defoliation and might be altered by light conditions. We assessed the effect of different light regimes (high vs low light applied before or after defoliation) on growth, fructans and sucrose mobilization, as well as on sucrose transporter expression during 14 days of regrowth. Our results reported that defoliation led to a mobilization of C reserves (first sucrose and then fructans), which was parallel to an induction of LpSUT1 sucrose transporter expression in source and sink tissues (i.e. leaf sheaths and elongating leaf bases, respectively) irrespective to light conditions. Light regime (high or low light) had little effects on regrowth and on C reserves mobilization during the first 48 h of regrowth after defoliation. Thereafter, low light conditions, delaying the recovery of photosynthetic capacities, had a negative effect on C reserves re-accumulation (especially sucrose). Surprisingly, high light did not enhance sucrose transporter expression. Indeed, while light conditions had no effect on LpSUT1 expression, LpSUT2 transcripts levels were enhanced for low light grown plants. These results indicate that two sucrose transporter currently identified in Lolium perenne L. are differentially regulated by light and sucrose.

  14. Histone Deacetylase HDA-2 Regulates Trichoderma atroviride Growth, Conidiation, Blue Light Perception, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Concepción, Macario; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema Rosa; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Casas-Flores, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Fungal blue-light photoreceptors have been proposed as integrators of light and oxidative stress. However, additional elements participating in the integrative pathway remain to be identified. In Trichoderma atroviride, the blue-light regulator (BLR) proteins BLR-1 and -2 are known to regulate gene transcription, mycelial growth, and asexual development upon illumination, and recent global transcriptional analysis revealed that the histone deacetylase-encoding gene hda-2 is induced by light. Here, by assessing responses to stimuli in wild-type and Δhda-2 backgrounds, we evaluate the role of HDA-2 in the regulation of genes responsive to light and oxidative stress. Δhda-2 strains present reduced growth, misregulation of the con-1 gene, and absence of conidia in response to light and mechanical injury. We found that the expression of hda-2 is BLR-1 dependent and HDA-2 in turn is essential for the transcription of early and late light-responsive genes that include blr-1, indicating a regulatory feedback loop. When subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS), Δhda-2 mutants display high sensitivity whereas Δblr strains exhibit the opposite phenotype. Consistently, in the presence of ROS, ROS-related genes show high transcription levels in wild-type and Δblr strains but misregulation in Δhda-2 mutants. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitations of histone H3 acetylated at Lys9/Lys14 on cat-3 and gst-1 promoters display low accumulation of H3K9K14ac in Δblr and Δhda-2 strains, suggesting indirect regulation of ROS-related genes by HDA-2. Our results point to a mutual dependence between HDA-2 and BLR proteins and reveal the role of these proteins in an intricate gene regulation landscape in response to blue light and ROS.

  15. Melanopsin Regulates Both Sleep-Promoting and Arousal-Promoting Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Shu K. E.; Hughes, Steven; Jagannath, Aarti; Hankins, Mark W.; Bannerman, David M.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Nolan, Patrick M.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Light plays a critical role in the regulation of numerous aspects of physiology and behaviour, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep. These responses involve melanopsin (OPN4)-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) in addition to rods and cones. Nocturnal light exposure in rodents has been shown to result in rapid sleep induction, in which melanopsin plays a key role. However, studies have also shown that light exposure can result in elevated corticosterone, a response that is not compatible with sleep. To investigate these contradictory findings and to dissect the relative contribution of pRGCs and rods/cones, we assessed the effects of light of different wavelengths on behaviourally defined sleep. Here, we show that blue light (470 nm) causes behavioural arousal, elevating corticosterone and delaying sleep onset. By contrast, green light (530 nm) produces rapid sleep induction. Compared to wildtype mice, these responses are altered in melanopsin-deficient mice (Opn4-/-), resulting in enhanced sleep in response to blue light but delayed sleep induction in response to green or white light. We go on to show that blue light evokes higher Fos induction in the SCN compared to the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), whereas green light produced greater responses in the VLPO. Collectively, our data demonstrates that nocturnal light exposure can have either an arousal- or sleep-promoting effect, and that these responses are melanopsin-mediated via different neural pathways with different spectral sensitivities. These findings raise important questions relating to how artificial light may alter behaviour in both the work and domestic setting. PMID:27276063

  16. Light vehicle regulated and unregulated emissions from different biodiesels.

    PubMed

    Karavalakis, George; Stournas, Stamoulis; Bakeas, Evangelos

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the regulated and unregulated emissions profile and fuel consumption of an automotive diesel and biodiesel blends, prepared from two different biodiesels, were investigated. The biodiesels were a rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and a palm-based methyl ester (PME). The tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer with constant volume sampling (CVS) over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the non-legislated Athens Driving Cycle (ADC), using a Euro 2 compliant passenger vehicle. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of biodiesel chemical structure on the emissions, as well as the influence of the applied driving cycle on the formation of exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. The results showed that NO(x) emissions were influenced by certain biodiesel properties, such as those of cetane number and iodine number. NO(x) emissions followed a decreasing trend over both cycles, where the most beneficial reduction was obtained with the application of the more saturated biodiesel. PM emissions were decreased with the palm-based biodiesel blends over both cycles, with the exception of the 20% blend which was higher compared to diesel fuel. PME blends led to increases in PM emissions over the ADC. The majority of the biodiesel blends showed a tendency for lower CO and HC emissions. The differences in CO(2) emissions were not statistically significant. Fuel consumption presented an increase with both biodiesels. Total PAH and nitro-PAH emission levels were decreased with the use of biodiesel independently of the source material. Lower molecular weight PAHs were predominant in both gaseous and particulate phases. Both biodiesels had a negative impact on certain carbonyl emissions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant aldehydes emitted from both fuels.

  17. Light-Regulated Electrochemical Sensor Array for Efficiently Discriminating Hazardous Gases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongqiu; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Huihui; Jin, Han; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jin, Qinghui; Zou, Jie; Haick, Hossam; Jian, Jiawen

    2017-09-20

    Inadequate detection limit and unsatisfactory discrimination features remain the challenging issues for the widely applied electrochemical gas sensors. Quite recently, we confirmed that light-regulated electrochemical reaction significantly enhanced the electrocatalytic activity, and thereby can potentially extend the detection limit to the parts per billion (ppb) level. Nevertheless, impact of the light-regulated electrochemical reaction on response selectivity has been discussed less. Herein, we systematically report on the effect of illumination on discrimination features via design and fabrication of a light-regulated electrochemical sensor array. Upon illumination (light on), response signal to the examined gases (C3H6, NO, and CO) is selectively enhanced, resulting in the sensor array demonstrating disparate response patterns when compared with that of the sensor array operated at light off. Through processing all the response patterns derived from both light on and light off with a pattern recognition algorithm, a satisfactory discrimination feature is observed. In contrast, apparent mutual interference between NO and CO is found when the sensor array is solely operated without illumination. The impact mechanism of the illumination is studied and it is deduced that the effect of the illumination on the discriminating features can be mainly attributed to the competition of electrocatalytic activity and gas-phase reactivity. If the enhanced electrocatalytic activity (to specific gas) dominates the whole sensing progress, enhancements in the corresponding response signal would be observed upon illumination. Otherwise, illumination gives a negligible impact. Hence, the response signal to part of the examined gases is selectively enhanced by illumination. Conclusively, light-regulated electrochemical reaction would provide an efficient approach to designing future smart sensing devices.

  18. Phytochrome A and B Regulate Primary Metabolism in Arabidopsis Leaves in Response to Light.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaozhen; Tohge, Takayuki; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Devaney, Nicholas; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sulpice, Ronan

    2017-01-01

    Primary metabolism is closely linked to plant productivity and quality. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of primary metabolism by photoreceptors has profound implications for agricultural practices and management. This study aims at identifying the role of light signaling in the regulation of primary metabolism, with an emphasis on starch. We first screened seven cryptochromes and phytochromes mutants for starch phenotype. The phyAB mutant showed impairment in starch accumulation while its biomass, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, and leaf anatomy were unaffected, this deficiency being present over the whole vegetative growth period. Mutation of plastidial nucleoside diphosphate kinase-2 (NDPK2), acting downstream of phytochromes, also caused a deficit in starch accumulation. Besides, the glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase small subunit (APS1) was down-regulated in phyAB. Those results suggest that PHYAB affect starch accumulation through NDPK2 and APS1. Then, we determined changes in starch and primary metabolites in single phyA, single phyB, double phyAB grown in light conditions differing in light intensity and/or light spectral content. PHYA is involved in starch accumulation in all the examined light conditions, whereas PHYB only exhibits a role under low light intensity (44 ± 1 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) or low R:FR (11.8 ± 0.6). PCA analysis of the metabolic profiles in the mutants and wild type (WT) suggested that PHYB acts as a major regulator of the leaf metabolic status in response to light intensity. Overall, we propose that PHYA and PHYB signaling play essential roles in the control of primary metabolism in Arabidopsis leaves in response to light.

  19. Hormone- and light-regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport in plants: current status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yew; Lee, Hak-Soo; Lee, June-Seung; Kim, Seong-Ki; Kim, Soo-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The gene regulation mechanisms underlying hormone- and light-induced signal transduction in plants rely not only on post-translational modification and protein degradation, but also on selective inclusion and exclusion of proteins from the nucleus. For example, plant cells treated with light or hormones actively transport many signalling regulatory proteins, transcription factors, and even photoreceptors and hormone receptors into the nucleus, while actively excluding other proteins. The nuclear envelope (NE) is the physical and functional barrier that mediates this selective partitioning, and nuclear transport regulators transduce hormone- or light-initiated signalling pathways across the membrane to mediate nuclear activities. Recent reports revealed that mutating the proteins regulating nuclear transport through the pores, such as nucleoporins, alters the plant's response to a stimulus. In this review, recent works are introduced that have revealed the importance of regulated nucleocytoplasmic partitioning. These important findings deepen our understanding about how co-ordinated plant hormone and light signal transduction pathways facilitate communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The roles of nucleoporin components within the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are also emphasized, as well as nuclear transport cargo, such as Ran/TC4 and its binding proteins (RanBPs), in this process. Recent findings concerning these proteins may provide a possible direction by which to characterize the regulatory potential of hormone- or light-triggered nuclear transport.

  20. The Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Regulates Growth, Metabolism, and Stress Resistance in Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Kevin K.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Light is a pervasive environmental factor that regulates development, stress resistance, and even virulence in numerous fungal species. Though much research has focused on signaling pathways in Aspergillus fumigatus, an understanding of how this pathogen responds to light is lacking. In this report, we demonstrate that the fungus does indeed respond to both blue and red portions of the visible spectrum. Included in the A. fumigatus light response is a reduction in conidial germination rates, increased hyphal pigmentation, enhanced resistance to acute ultraviolet and oxidative stresses, and an increased susceptibility to cell wall perturbation. By performing gene deletion analyses, we have found that the predicted blue light receptor LreA and red light receptor FphA play unique and overlapping roles in regulating the described photoresponsive behaviors of A. fumigatus. However, our data also indicate that the photobiology of this fungus is complex and likely involves input from additional photosensory pathways beyond those analyzed here. Finally, whole-genome microarray analysis has revealed that A. fumigatus broadly regulates a variety of metabolic genes in response to light, including those involved in respiration, amino acid metabolism, and metal homeostasis. Together, these data demonstrate the importance of the photic environment on the physiology of A. fumigatus and provide a basis for future studies into this unexplored area of its biology. PMID:23532976

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of light-regulated transcripts in the Solanaceae

    PubMed Central

    Rutitzky, Mariana; Ghiglione, Hernan O; Curá, José A; Casal, Jorge J; Yanovsky, Marcelo J

    2009-01-01

    Background Plants use different light signals to adjust their growth and development to the prevailing environmental conditions. Studies in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana and rice indicate that these adjustments are mediated by large changes in the transcriptome. Here we compared transcriptional responses to light in different species of the Solanaceae to investigate common as well as species-specific changes in gene expression. Results cDNA microarrays were used to identify genes regulated by a transition from long days (LD) to short days (SD) in the leaves of potato and tobacco plants, and by phytochrome B (phyB), the photoreceptor that represses tuberization under LD in potato. We also compared transcriptional responses to photoperiod in Nicotiana tabacum Maryland Mammoth (MM), which flowers only under SD, with those of Nicotiana sylvestris, which flowers only under LD conditions. Finally, we identified genes regulated by red compared to far-red light treatments that promote germination in tomato. Conclusion Most of the genes up-regulated in LD were associated with photosynthesis, the synthesis of protective pigments and the maintenance of redox homeostasis, probably contributing to the acclimatization to seasonal changes in irradiance. Some of the photoperiodically regulated genes were the same in potato and tobacco. Others were different but belonged to similar functional categories, suggesting that conserved as well as convergent evolutionary processes are responsible for physiological adjustments to seasonal changes in the Solanaceae. A β-ZIP transcription factor whose expression correlated with the floral transition in Nicotiana species with contrasting photoperiodic responses was also regulated by photoperiod and phyB in potato, and is a candidate gene to act as a general regulator of photoperiodic responses. Finally, GIGANTEA, a gene that controls flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, was regulated by photoperiod in the leaves of

  2. Translational regulation of protein synthesis, in response to light, at a critical stage of Volvox development

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.M.; Kirk, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    In Volvox cultures synchronized by a light-dark cycle, juveniles containing presumptive somatic and reproductive cells are produced during the dark, but their cells do not differentiate until after the lights come on. The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly after the lights come on. Action spectra and effects of photosynthesis inhibitors indicate that this protein synthetic change is not simply a consequence of renewed flow of energy from illuminated chloroplasts. Actinomycin, at a level adequate to block the response to heat shock, has virtually no effect on the response of the same cells to light; furthermore, RNAs isolated from unilluminated and illuminated juveniles yield indistinguishable in vitro translation products. The authors conclude, therefore, that this effect of light is exerted almost exclusively at the translational level, generating one of the most striking examples of translational regulation yet described.

  3. Cross-talk between light and glucose regulation controls toxin production and morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Atoui, A; Kastner, C; Larey, C M; Thokala, R; Etxebeste, O; Espeso, E A; Fischer, R; Calvo, A M

    2010-12-01

    Light is a major environmental stimulus that has a broad effect on organisms, triggering a cellular response that results in an optimal adaptation enhancing fitness and survival. In fungi, light affects growth, and causes diverse morphological changes such as those leading to reproduction. Light can also affect fungal metabolism, including the biosynthesis of natural products. In this study we show that in Aspergillus nidulans the effect of light on the production of the sterigmatocystin (ST) toxin depends on the glucose concentration. In cultures grown with 1% glucose and exposed to light, ST production was lower than when grown in the dark. This lower ST production coincided with an elevated rate of cellular damage with partial loss of nuclear integrity and vacuolated cytoplasm. However, in cultures grown with 2% glucose these effects were reversed and light enhanced ST production. Glucose abundance also affected the light-dependent subcellular localization of the VeA (velvet) protein, a key regulator necessary for normal light-dependent morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in Aspergilli and other fungal genera. The role of other VeA-associated proteins, particularly the blue-light-sensing proteins LreA and LreB (WC-1 and WC-2 orthologs), on conidiation could also be modified by the abundance of glucose. We also show that LreA and LreB, as well as the phytochrome FphA, modulate not only the synthesis of sterigmatocystin, but also the production of the antibiotic penicillin.

  4. Light Regulation of the Growth Response in Corn Root Gravitropism 1

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Maureen O.; Leopold, A. Carl

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event. PMID:11537882

  5. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-02-21

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box-like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression.

  6. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box–like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression. PMID:28167764

  7. A constant light-genetic screen identifies KISMET as a regulator of circadian photoresponses.

    PubMed

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Murad, Alejandro; Rosbash, Michael; Emery, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Circadian pacemakers are essential to synchronize animal physiology and behavior with the dayrationight cycle. They are self-sustained, but the phase of their oscillations is determined by environmental cues, particularly light intensity and temperature cycles. In Drosophila, light is primarily detected by a dedicated blue-light photoreceptor: CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). Upon light activation, CRY binds to the pacemaker protein TIMELESS (TIM) and triggers its proteasomal degradation, thus resetting the circadian pacemaker. To understand further the CRY input pathway, we conducted a misexpression screen under constant light based on the observation that flies with a disruption in the CRY input pathway remain robustly rhythmic instead of becoming behaviorally arrhythmic. We report the identification of more than 20 potential regulators of CRY-dependent light responses. We demonstrate that one of them, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme KISMET (KIS), is necessary for normal circadian photoresponses, but does not affect the circadian pacemaker. KIS genetically interacts with CRY and functions in PDF-negative circadian neurons, which play an important role in circadian light responses. It also affects daily CRY-dependent TIM oscillations in a peripheral tissue: the eyes. We therefore conclude that KIS is a key transcriptional regulator of genes that function in the CRY signaling cascade, and thus it plays an important role in the synchronization of circadian rhythms with the dayrationight cycle.

  8. Differential Regulation of Duplicate Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductases in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability. Results For cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μE m−2 s−1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μE m−2 s−1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μE m−2 s−1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown. Conclusion Given the sensitivity of diatom por1/POR1 to real-time light cues and adherence of por2/POR2 regulation to

  9. Light- and clock-dependent regulation of ribosomal S6 kinase activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Greg Q; Lee, Boyoung; Hsieh, Fortune; Obrietan, Karl

    2004-02-01

    Recent work has revealed that signalling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway couples light to entrainment of the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Given that many effects of the MAPK pathway are mediated by intermediate kinases, it was of interest to identify kinase targets of ERK in the SCN. One potential target is the family of 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs). In this study, we examined light-induced regulation of RSK-1 in the SCN. Immunohistochemical and Western analysis were used to show that photic stimulation during the early and late night triggered the phosphorylation of RSK-1 at two sites that are targeted by ERK. This increase in the phosphorylation state of RSK-1 corresponded with an approximate fourfold increase in kinase activity. Light exposure during the subjective day did not increase the phosphorylated form of RSK-1, indicating that the capacity of light to stimulate RSK-1 activation is phase-restricted. Double immunofluorescent labelling of SCN tissue revealed the colocalized expression of the activated form of ERK with the phosphorylated form of RSK-1 following a light pulse. In vivo pharmacological inhibition of light-induced MAPK pathway activation blocked RSK-1 phosphorylation, indicating that RSK-1 activity is regulated by the MAPK pathway. PDK-1, a coregulator of RSK-1, is also expressed in the SCN and is likely to contribute to RSK-1 activity. RSK-1 phosphorylation was also rhythmically regulated within a subset of phospho-ERK-expressing cells. Together these results identify RSK-1 as a light- and clock-regulated kinase and raise the possibility that it contributes to entrainment and timing of the circadian pacemaker.

  10. Light regulation on growth, development, and secondary metabolism of marine-derived filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Cai, Menghao; Fang, Zhe; Niu, Chuanpeng; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2013-11-01

    Effects of different light conditions on development, growth, and secondary metabolism of three marine-derived filamentous fungi were investigated. Darkness irritated sexual development of Aspergillus glaucus HB1-19, while white, red, and blue lights improved its asexual behavior. The red and blue lights improved asexual stroma formation of Xylaria sp. (no. 2508), but the darkness and white light inhibited it. Differently, development of Halorosellinia sp. (no. 1403) turned out to be insensitive to any tested light irradiation. Upon the experimental data, no regularity was observed linking development with secondary metabolism. However, fungal growth showed inversely correlation with productions of major bioactive compounds (aspergiolide A, 1403C, and xyloketal B) from various strains. The results indicated that aspergiolide A biosynthesis favored blue light illumination, while 1403C and xyloketal B preferred red light irradiation. With the favorite light sensing conditions, productions of aspergiolide A, 1403C, and xyloketal B were enhanced by 32.9, 21.9, and 30.8 % compared with those in the dark, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis comparing the light-responding proteins of A. glaucus HB 1-19 with those in other systems indicated that A. glaucus HB 1-19 was closely related to Aspergillus spp. especially A. nidulans in spite of its role of marine-derived fungus. It indicated that marine fungi might conserve its light response system when adapting the marine environment. This work also offers useful information for process optimization involving light regulation on growth and metabolism for drug candidate production from light-sensitive marine fungi.

  11. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  12. Shedding light on NO homeostasis: Light as a key regulator of glutathione and nitric oxide metabolisms during seedling deetiolation.

    PubMed

    Zuccarelli, Rafael; Coelho, Aline C P; Peres, Lazaro E P; Freschi, Luciano

    2017-01-18

    Despite the significant impacts of light on nitric oxide (NO) levels in plants, the mechanism underlying the influence of this environmental factor on NO metabolism remains poorly understood. A critical mechanism controlling NO levels in plant cells relies on the S-nitrosylation of glutathione (GSH), giving rise to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), which can be either stored or degraded depending on the cellular context. Here, we demonstrate that a strict balance is maintained between NO generation and scavenging during tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedling deetiolation. Given the absence of accurate methods in the literature to estimate NO scavenging in planta, we first developed a simple, robust system to continuously monitor the global in vivo NO scavenging by plant tissues. Then, using photomorphogenic tomato mutants, we demonstrated that the light-evoked de-etiolation is associated with a dramatic rise in NO content followed by a progressive increment in NO scavenging capacity of the tissues. Light-driven increments in NO scavenging rates coincided with pronounced rises in S-nitrosothiol content and GSNO reductase (GSNOR) activity, thereby suggesting that GSNO formation and subsequent removal via GSNOR might be key for controlling NO levels during seedling deetiolation. Accordingly, treatments with thiol-blocking compounds further indicated that thiol nitrosylation might be critically involved in the NO scavenging mechanism responsible for maintaining NO homeostasis during deetiolation. The impacts of both light and NO on the transcriptional profile of glutathione metabolic genes also revealed an independent but coordinated action of these signals on the regulation of key components of glutathione and GSNO metabolisms. Altogether, these data indicated that GSNO formation and subsequent removal might facilitate maintaining NO homeostasis during light-driven seedling deetiolation.

  13. Regulation of pathogenesis by light in Cercospora zeae-maydis: An updated perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fungal genus Cercospora is one of the most ubiquitous groups of plant pathogenic fungi, and grey leaf spot caused by C. zeae-maydis is one of the most widespread and damaging foliar diseases of maize in the world. Although light has long been implicated as a critical environmental regulator of p...

  14. Regulation of embryogenesis by light and its ecological significance in the Asian Tadpole shrimp Triops granarius.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Tsutomu; Ito, Chihiro; Numata, Hideharu

    2009-07-01

    Triops granarius (Lucas) (Notostraca: Triopsidae) lives In paddy fields from the Kanto district to northern Kyushu, Japan. Changes in the size distribution of this species were examined in the paddy fields and then the effect of light on hatching was examined under quasi-natural and laboratory conditions. Adult tadpole shrimps were found about one week after irrigation and plowing in two paddy fields in Sakai, Japan. They developed rapidly and disappeared altogether about one month later. Under conditions of natural daylength and temperature, eggs laid in the soil did not hatch without being removed from the soil. Under constant light at 25 degrees C, the lower the light intensity was, the longer the eggs took to hatch. Moreover, most eggs kept in constant darkness did not hatch, but many of them hatched within a short period after being transferred to constant light with an intensity of 0.3 W/m(2) or more. Because a 1-h light pulse was found to induce hatching, light is considered necessary for the resumption of embryonic development. These results suggest that eggs of T. granarius laid in the soil do not hatch without exposure to light; consequently, this species has a univoltine life cycle in the paddy fields. Histological observations revealed that under constant darkness, embryonic development was arrested at an early stage of organogenesis, in which the nauplius eye had not yet formed. We discuss the role of light in the regulation of embryogenesis in T. granarius.

  15. Highlights of the new Emission Norm for the Regulation of Light Pollution in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Due to the need to deal with the new menace of LEDS, which are very blue emitters, and to address other shortcomings regarding scattering and over illumination of the first lighting regulations passed in Chile in 1998 (DS 686/1998), the Chilean Ministry of Environment (MMA) approved new regulations by Presidential decree (DS 043/2012) on May 03, 2013. This new version of the regulations was developed by OPCC in collaboration with the MMA.This new environmental standard includes the following main restrictions:A full-cut-off requirement for general lighting, which means 0.49cd/Klumen at 90º (i.e., no light distribution above horizontal).For sport and recreational activities, an allowed level of 10cd/Klumen at 90º, together with a visor to cut upper-hemisphere emissions.Spectral restrictions divided into three regulated regions of the visible spectrum (as compared to the total light emission between 380 and 780nm): (a) not more than 15% of total light output in the range 300 to 380nm; (b) not more than 15% in the range 380 to 499nm; and (c) not more than 50% in the range 781nm to 1micron.Over illumination restricted to not more than 20% over the Chilean standard (NSEG 9 n71) for minimal levels in public lighting.Billboards with inner sources of illuminations (LED or plasma big screens) must emit no more than 50cd/m2 at night. No spectral restriction is applied.This new lighting regulation has not come into force yet, due to a delay in approving complementary technical protocols. Enforcement is also a critical issue to deal with, given that the institutional environmental framework in Chile is being modified.The OPCC is working with both the Ministry of Public Works and also Ministry of Housing, seeking to go beyond the new lighting regulation by applying a more restrictive approach in terms of spectral restriction, promoting the use of warm white LEDS with a CCT of 2.700 Kº and, in the case of outdoor illumination near professional observatories, monochromatic

  16. Regulation of extrafloral nectar secretion by jasmonates in lima bean is light dependent

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Mithöfer, Axel; Boland, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    To maximize fitness, plants need to perceive changes in their light environment and adjust their physiological responses accordingly. Whether and how such changes also affect the regulation of their defense responses against herbivores remains largely unclear. We addressed this issue by studying the secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN) in lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), which is known to be activated by the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and functions as an indirect defense mechanism against herbivores. We found that the plant’s EFN secretion in response to JA was light dependent: In the dark, JA reduced EFN secretion, whereas under light conditions, JA induced EFN secretion relative to controls. This modulation was affected by the light’s spectral composition [i.e., ratio of red to far-red (R:FR) radiation], but not light intensity. These findings demonstrate a unique differential effect of JA on EFN secretion depending on the ambient light conditions. Interestingly, treatment with the isoleucine–JA conjugate (JA–Ile) enhanced EFN secretion under light conditions yet did not reduce EFN secretion in the dark. Moreover, inhibition of Ile biosynthesis in light-exposed plants significantly decreased the EFN secretion rate. This reduction could be recovered by additional application of JA–Ile, suggesting that JA–Ile is the active compound required to up-regulate EFN secretion. Finally, experiments with mechanically damaged plants revealed that light was required for the formation of JA–Ile, but not of JA. These results demonstrate that in lima bean, the light environment modulates the plant’s response to jasmonates as well as JA–Ile biosynthesis, which controls the subsequent EFN secretion. PMID:20855624

  17. Dopamine D2 receptors preferentially regulate the development of light responses of the inner retina

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Retinal light responsiveness measured via electroretinography undergoes developmental modulation and is thought to be critically regulated by both visual experience and dopamine. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether the dopamine D2 receptor regulates the visual experience-dependent functional development of the retina. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinograms from wild type mice and mice with a genetic deletion of the gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor raised under normal cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrate that mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially increases the amplitude of the inner retinal light responses evoked by high intensity light measured as oscillatory potentials in adult mice. During postnatal development, all three major components of electroretinograms, the a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increase with age. Comparatively, mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially reduces the age-dependent increase of b-waves evoked by low intensity light. Light deprivation from birth reduces the amplitude of b-waves and completely diminishes the increased amplitude of oscillatory potentials. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the dopamine D2 receptor plays an important role in the activity-dependent functional development of the mouse retina. PMID:25393815

  18. Regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism by blue LED light irradiation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of red and blue LED lights on the accumulation of ascorbic acid (AsA) were investigated in the juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin, Valencia orange, and Lisbon lemon. The results showed that the blue LED light treatment effectively increased the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties, whereas the red LED light treatment did not. By increasing the blue LED light intensity, the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties accumulated more AsA. Moreover, continuous irradiation with blue LED light was more effective than pulsed irradiation for increasing the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties. Gene expression results showed that the modulation of AsA accumulation by blue LED light was highly regulated at the transcription level. The up-regulation of AsA biosynthetic genes (CitVTC1, CitVTC2, CitVTC4, and CitGLDH), AsA regeneration genes (CitMDAR1, CitMDAR2, and CitDHAR) and two GSH-producing genes (CitGR and CitchGR) contributed to these increases in the AsA content in the three citrus varieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The innate immune cell response to bacterial infection in larval zebrafish is light-regulated.

    PubMed

    Du, Lucia Y; Darroch, Hannah; Keerthisinghe, Pramuk; Ashimbayeva, Elina; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Warman, Guy; Cheeseman, James; Hall, Christopher J

    2017-10-04

    The circadian clock, which evolved to help organisms harmonize physiological responses to external conditions (such as the light/dark cycle, LD), is emerging as an important regulator of the immune response to infection. Gaining a complete understanding of how the circadian clock influences the immune cell response requires animal models that permit direct observation of these processes within an intact host. Here, we investigated the use of larval zebrafish, a powerful live imaging system, as a new model to study the impact of a fundamental zeitgeber, light, on the innate immune cell response to infection. Larvae infected during the light phase of the LD cycle and in constant light condition (LL) demonstrated enhanced survival and bacterial clearance when compared with larvae infected during the dark phase of the LD cycle and in constant dark condition (DD). This increased survival was associated with elevated expression of the zebrafish orthologues of the mammalian pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, Tumour necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-8 and Interferon-γ, and increased neutrophil and macrophage recruitment. This study demonstrates for the first time that the larval zebrafish innate immune response to infection is enhanced during light exposure, suggesting that, similar to mammalian systems, the larval zebrafish response to infection is light-regulated.

  20. Light-regulated expression of sensor histidine kinase CKI1 controls cytokinin-related development.

    PubMed

    Dobisova, Tereza; Hrdinova, Vendula; Cuesta, Candela; Michlickova, Sarka; Urbankova, Ivana; Hejatkova, Romana; Žádníková, Petra; Pernisova, Marketa; Benkova, Eva; Hejatko, Jan

    2017-03-14

    In plants, the multistep phosphorelay (MSP) pathway mediates a range of regulatory processes, including those activated by cytokinins. The crosstalk between cytokinin response and light is known for a long time. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactionbetween light and cytokinin signaling remains elusive. In the screen for upstream regulators we identified a LONG PALE HYPOCOTYL (LPH) gene whose activity is indispensable for spatiotemporally correct expression of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT-1 (CKI1), encoding the constitutively active sensor histidine kinase that activates MSP signaling. lph is a new allele of HEME OXYGENASE 1 (HY1) which encodes the key protein in the biosynthesis of phytochromobilin, a cofactor of photoconvertiblephytochromes. Our analysis confirmed the light-dependent regulation oftheCKI1 expression pattern. We show that CKI1 expression is under the control of phytochrome A (phyA), functioning as a dual (both positive and negative) regulator of CKI1 expression, presumably via the phyA-regulated transcription factors PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3) and CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). Changes in CKI1 expression observed in lph/hy1-7 and phy mutants correlatewithmisregulation of MSP signaling, changedcytokinin sensitivity and developmental aberrations,previously shown to be associated with cytokinin and/or CKI1 action. Besides that, we demonstrate novel role of phyA-dependent CKI1 expression in the hypocotyl elongation and hook development during skotomorphogenesis. Based on these results, we propose that the light-dependent regulation of CKI1 provides a plausible mechanistic link underlying the well-known interaction between light- and cytokinin-controlled plant development.

  1. Staring at the Cold Sun: Blue Light Regulation Is Distributed within the Genus Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M.; Actis, Luis A.; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility. PMID:23358859

  2. Staring at the cold sun: blue light regulation is distributed within the genus Acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M; Actis, Luis A; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility.

  3. Interplay of sugar, light and gibberellins in expression of Rosa hybrida vacuolar invertase 1 regulation.

    PubMed

    Rabot, Amélie; Portemer, Virginie; Péron, Thomas; Mortreau, Eric; Leduc, Nathalie; Hamama, Latifa; Coutos-Thévenot, Pierre; Atanassova, Rossitza; Sakr, Soulaiman; Le Gourrierec, José

    2014-10-01

    Our previous findings showed that the expression of the Rosa hybrida vacuolar invertase 1 gene (RhVI1) was tightly correlated with the ability of buds to grow out and was under sugar, gibberellin and light control. Here, we aimed to provide an insight into the mechanistic basis of this regulation. In situ hybridization showed that RhVI1 expression was localized in epidermal cells of young leaves of bursting buds. We then isolated a 895 bp fragment of the promoter of RhVI1. In silico analysis identified putative cis-elements involved in the response to sugars, light and gibberellins on its proximal part (595 bp). To carry out functional analysis of the RhVI1 promoter in a homologous system, we developed a direct method for stable transformation of rose cells. 5' deletions of the proximal promoter fused to the uidA reporter gene were inserted into the rose cell genome to study the cell's response to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Deletion analysis revealed that the 468 bp promoter fragment is sufficient to trigger reporter gene activity in response to light, sugars and gibberellins. This region confers sucrose- and fructose-, but not glucose-, responsive activation in the dark. Inversely, the -595 to -468 bp region that carries the sugar-repressive element (SRE) is required to down-regulate the RhVI1 promoter in response to sucrose and fructose in the dark. We also demonstrate that sugar/light and gibberellin/light act synergistically to up-regulate β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity sharply under the control of the 595 bp pRhVI1 region. These results reveal that the 127 bp promoter fragment located between -595 and -468 bp is critical for light and sugar and light and gibberellins to act synergistically.

  4. The development and characterization of an exogenous green-light-regulated gene expression system in marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Badary, Amr; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-06-01

    A green-light-regulated gene expression system derived from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed and introduced into the marine cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus sp. NKBG 15041c. The regulation system was evaluated using gfp uv as a reporter gene under red-light illumination and under simultaneous red- and green-light illumination. Expression of the reporter gene was effectively repressed under red-light illumination and increased over 10-fold by illuminating with green light. Control vectors missing either the ccaS sensor histidine kinase gene or the ccaR response regulator gene showed no detectable induction of GFPuv expression. Green-light induction of gfp uv expression was further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The constructed system was effective at regulating the recombinant expression of a target gene using green light in a marine cyanobacterial strain that does not naturally possess such a green-light regulation system. Thus, constructed green-light-regulated gene expression system may be used as a core platform technology for the development of marine cyanobacterial strains in which bioprocesses will be regulated by light.

  5. Regulating the Energy Flow in a Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Ido; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Harris, Dvir; Yochelis, Shira; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Adir, Noam; Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-16

    Photosynthetic organisms harvest light energy, utilizing the absorption and energy-transfer properties of protein-bound chromophores. Controlling the harvesting efficiency is critical for the optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we show that the cyanobacterial light-harvesting antenna complex may be able to regulate the flow of energy to switch reversibly from efficient energy conversion to photoprotective quenching via a structural change. We isolated cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, and measured their optical properties in solution and in an aggregated-desiccated state. The results indicate that energy band structures are changed, generating a switch between the two modes of operation, exciton transfer and quenching, achieved without dedicated carotenoid quenchers. This flexibility can contribute greatly to the large dynamic range of cyanobacterial light-harvesting systems.

  6. HtrA3 is regulated by 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 independently of PPAR{gamma} in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, Sandrine; Mottier, Stephanie; Masson, Damien; Denis, Marc G.

    2010-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been shown to possess anti-proliferative effects in many types of cancer. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the targets involved in these effects are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that, in CCRCC cell lines, the endogenous PPAR{gamma} ligand 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) induces the expression, both at the mRNA and the protein levels, of the HtrA3 gene. This gene belongs to the High-Temperature Requirement Factor A family of serine proteases that repress signaling by TGF-{beta} family members and inhibit cell migration. Rosiglitazone or ciglitazone, synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonists, did not induce HtrA3 expression, and the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 did not prevent 15dPGJ2 induction, suggesting that the up-regulation of HtrA3 by 15dPGJ2 is independent of PPAR{gamma}. The MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 dramatically repressed HtrA3 induction. Altogether, these data indicate that 15dPGJ2 is able to stimulate the expression of HtrA3 through an indirect mechanism involving the MEK/ERK pathway but independent of PPAR{gamma}. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of HtrA3, a potential tumor suppressor gene.

  7. Notch ligand delta-like 4 regulates development and pathogenesis of allergic airway responses by modulating IL-2 production and Th2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sihyug; Schaller, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2010-11-15

    Activation of the canonical Notch pathways has been implicated in Th cell differentiation, but the role of specific Notch ligands in Th2-mediated allergic airway responses has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) was upregulated on dendritic cells in response to cockroach allergen. Blocking Dll4 in vivo during either the primary or secondary response enhanced allergen-induced pathogenic consequences including airway hyperresponsiveness and mucus production via increased Th2 cytokines. In vitro assays demonstrated that Dll4 regulates IL-2 in T cells from established Th2 responses as well as during primary stimulation. Notably, Dll4 blockade during the primary, but not the secondary, response increased IL-2 levels in lung and lymph node of allergic mice. The in vivo neutralization of Dll4 was associated with increased expansion and decreased apoptosis during the primary allergen sensitization. Moreover, Dll4-mediated Notch activation of T cells during primary stimulation in vitro increased apoptosis during the contraction/resting phase of the response, which could be rescued by exogenous IL-2. Consistent with the role for Dll4-mediated IL-2 regulation in overall T cell function, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells was also significantly altered by Dll4 both in vivo and in vitro. These data demonstrate a regulatory role of Dll4 both in initial Th2 differentiation and in Th2 cytokine production in established allergic responses.

  8. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyBLys996Arg-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases. PMID:26283376

  9. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator Concept for High Efficiency Light Weight DC Voltage Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in the efficiency and size of DC-DC converters have resulted from advances in components, primarily semiconductors, and improved topologies. One topology, which has shown very high potential in limited applications, is the Series Connected Boost Unit (SCBU), wherein a small DC-DC converter output is connected in series with the input bus to provide an output voltage equal to or greater than the input voltage. Since the DC-DC converter switches only a fraction of the power throughput, the overall system efficiency is very high. But this technique is limited to applications where the output is always greater than the input. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator (SCBBR) concept extends partial power processing technique used in the SCBU to operation when the desired output voltage is higher or lower than the input voltage, and the implementation described can even operate as a conventional buck converter to operate at very low output to input voltage ratios. This paper describes the operation and performance of an SCBBR configured as a bus voltage regulator providing 50 percent voltage regulation range, bus switching, and overload limiting, operating above 98 percent efficiency. The technique does not provide input-output isolation.

  10. Interactions between Light and the Circadian Clock in the Regulation of CAT2 Expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H. H.; Young, J. C.; Pease, E. A.; Hangarter, R. P.; McClung, C. R.

    1994-03-01

    In Arabidopsis seedlings germinated and grown in continuous light, CAT2 mRNA abundance peaks 1 d after imbibition, consistent with the role of catalase in detoxifying H2O2 generated during the [beta]-oxidation of fatty acids stored in the seed. A second peak of CAT2 mRNA abundance, of lower amplitude than the initial peak, appears 6 d after imbibition and may be associated with the development of photosynthetic competence and induction of photorespiration. This second peak in steady-state CAT2 mRNA abundance is regulated by light and is not seen in etiolated seedlings. CAT2 mRNA accumulation is induced by exposure to high-fluence blue or far-red light but not by red light. In addition, light induction is unaffected by several mutations that block blue light-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation (blu1, blu2, blu3, hy4), suggesting phytochrome involvement. When etiolated seedlings are transferred to continuous white light, CAT2 mRNA rapidly (within 30 min) accumulates. It is interesting that in these seedlings CAT2 mRNA abundance undergoes pronounced oscillations with a circadian (24 h) periodicity, indicating control by the endogenous circadian clock. No such oscillations are detected in CAT2 mRNA abundance in etiolated seedlings prior to illumination. Control of CAT2 expression by the circadian clock is also seen in 5-week-old plants grown in a light-dark cycle and transferred either to continuous dark or to continuous light; in continuous light the circadian oscillations in CAT2 mRNA abundance persist for at least five circadian cycles, indicating the robustness of this circadian rhythm.

  11. Differential regulation of duplicate light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DOE PAGES

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ford, Christopher J.; Miller, James S.; ...

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability.more » As a result, for cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μEm–2 s–1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μEm–2 s–1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μEm–2 s–1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown.« less

  12. Light-Dependent Regulation of Sleep and Wake States by Prokineticin 2 in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shijia; Reichert, Sabine; Singh, Chanpreet; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Rihel, Jason; Prober, David A

    2017-07-05

    Light affects sleep and wake behaviors by providing an indirect cue that entrains circadian rhythms and also by inducing a direct and rapid regulation of behavior. While circadian entrainment by light is well characterized at the molecular level, mechanisms that underlie the direct effect of light on behavior are largely unknown. In zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate, we found that both overexpression and mutation of the neuropeptide prokineticin 2 (Prok2) affect sleep and wake behaviors in a light-dependent but circadian-independent manner. In light, Prok2 overexpression increases sleep and induces expression of galanin (galn), a hypothalamic sleep-inducing peptide. We also found that light-dependent, Prok2-induced sedation requires prokineticin receptor 2 (prokr2) and is strongly suppressed in galn mutants. These results suggest that Prok2 antagonizes the direct wake-promoting effect of light in zebrafish, in part through the induction of galn expression in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Light regulation of the cell cycle and gene expression in Euglena gracilis bacillaris

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Muh-ching

    1988-05-01

    Light regulation of the cell division cycle in the photosynthetic unicellular alga Euglena gracilis bacillaris was studied. By inoculating stationary phase, non-dividing cells into fresh media, and exposing the diluted cells to either light or darkness, it was determined that initiation of DNA synthesis is light dependent and requires continuous exposure to more than six hours of light. It is proposed that this is to allow the accumulation of an initiating factor that will enable DNA synthesis to begin. The initiating factor has a half-life of 5 hours in the dark. Flow cytometry analysis shows that once cells are committed to the cell cycle, they will complete the cycle in the dark. The levels of several photosynthetic messenger RNAs have been studied under alternating light-dark conditions and continuous light conditions. RNA levels for psbA, which encodes the Photosynthem II herbicide binding protein known as D1, display a strong circadian rhythm that persists for more than 3 days in continuous light. RNA levels for rbcL, which encodes the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, and for rbcS, which encodes the small subunit of that enzyme, have a shorter free-running circadian cycle. The chloroplast-encoded rbcL is more sensitive to cell cycle state because it does not accumulate in stationary phase cultures while the nuclear-encoded rbcS does accumulate.

  14. Structure of the response regulator RPA3017 involved in red-light signaling in Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefei; Zeng, Xiaoli; Moffat, Keith; Yang, Xiaojing

    2015-10-01

    Two-component signal transduction is the major signaling mechanism that enables bacteria to survive and thrive in complex environmental conditions. The photosynthetic bacterium R. palustris employs two tandem bacteriophytochromes, RpBphP2 and RpBphP3, to perceive red-light signals that regulate the synthesis of light-harvesting complexes under low-light conditions. Both RpBphP2 and RpBphP3 are photosensory histidine kinases coupled to the same response regulator RPA3017. Together, they constitute a two-component system that converts a red-light signal into a biological signal. In this work, the crystal structure of RPA3017 in the unphosphorylated form at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. This structure reveals a tightly associated dimer arrangement that is conserved among phytochrome-related response regulators. The conserved active-site architecture provides structural insight into the phosphotransfer reaction between RpBphP2/RpBphP3 and RPA3017. Based on structural comparisons and homology modeling, how specific recognition between RpBphP2/RpBphP3 and RPA3017 is achieved at the molecular level is further explored.

  15. Regulation of Mu and Delta Opioid Action in Normal and Morphine-Tolerant Cells and Cell Membrane Preparations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-10

    vitro insulin -induced loss of insulin receptors on rat adipocytes . The apparent ubiquity of receptor down-regulation induced by sustained agonist...activators of adenylyl cyclase was due to the analogues’ resistance to hydrolysis. It was suggested by several investigators that the adenylyl cyclase...reported pertussis toxin was able to inhibit coupling of Ca 2+ mobilizing receptors to phospholipase C in neutrophils, adipocytes , mast cells and

  16. Regulation of TCR delta and alpha repertoires by local and long-distance control of variable gene segment chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Hawwari, Abbas; Krangel, Michael S

    2005-08-15

    Murine Tcrd and Tcra gene segments reside in a single genetic locus and undergo recombination in CD4- CD8- (double negative [DN]) and CD4+ CD8+ (double positive [DP]) thymocytes, respectively. TcraTcrd locus variable gene segments are subject to complex regulation. Only a small subset of approximately 100 variable gene segments contributes substantially to the adult TCRdelta repertoire. Moreover, although most contribute to the TCRalpha repertoire, variable gene segments that are Jalpha proximal are preferentially used during primary Tcra recombination. We investigate the role of local chromatin accessibility in determining the developmental pattern of TcraTcrd locus variable gene segment recombination. We find variable gene segments to be heterogeneous with respect to acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Those that dominate the adult TCRdelta repertoire are hyperacetylated in DN thymocytes, independent of their position in the locus. Moreover, proximal variable gene segments show dramatic increases in histone acetylation and germline transcription in DP thymocytes, a result of super long-distance regulation by the Tcra enhancer. Our results imply that differences in chromatin accessibility contribute to biases in TcraTcrd locus variable gene segment recombination in DN and DP thymocytes and extend the distance over which the Tcra enhancer can regulate chromatin structure to a remarkable 525 kb.

  17. Systemic regulation of leaf anatomical structure, photosynthetic performance, and high-light tolerance in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuang-Dao; Wang, Xin; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Shi, Lei; Chow, Wah Soon

    2011-03-01

    Leaf anatomy of C3 plants is mainly regulated by a systemic irradiance signal. Since the anatomical features of C4 plants are different from that of C3 plants, we investigated whether the systemic irradiance signal regulates leaf anatomical structure and photosynthetic performance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a C4 plant. Compared with growth under ambient conditions (A), no significant changes in anatomical structure were observed in newly developed leaves by shading young leaves alone (YS). Shading mature leaves (MS) or whole plants (S), on the other hand, caused shade-leaf anatomy in newly developed leaves. By contrast, chloroplast ultrastructure in developing leaves depended only on their local light conditions. Functionally, shading young leaves alone had little effect on their net photosynthetic capacity and stomatal conductance, but shading mature leaves or whole plants significantly decreased these two parameters in newly developed leaves. Specifically, the net photosynthetic rate in newly developed leaves exhibited a positive linear correlation with that of mature leaves, as did stomatal conductance. In MS and S treatments, newly developed leaves exhibited severe photoinhibition under high light. By contrast, newly developed leaves in A and YS treatments were more resistant to high light relative to those in MS- and S-treated seedlings. We suggest that (1) leaf anatomical structure, photosynthetic capacity, and high-light tolerance in newly developed sorghum leaves were regulated by a systemic irradiance signal from mature leaves; and (2) chloroplast ultrastructure only weakly influenced the development of photosynthetic capacity and high-light tolerance. The potential significance of the regulation by a systemic irradiance signal is discussed.

  18. Light- and Metabolism-related Regulation of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase Has Distinct Mechanisms and Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Kohzuma, Kaori; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Meurer, Jörg; Kramer, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The chloroplast CF0-CF1-ATP synthase (ATP synthase) is activated in the light and inactivated in the dark by thioredoxin-mediated redox modulation of a disulfide bridge on its γ subunit. The activity of the ATP synthase is also fine-tuned during steady-state photosynthesis in response to metabolic changes, e.g. altering CO2 levels to adjust the thylakoid proton gradient and thus the regulation of light harvesting and electron transfer. The mechanism of this fine-tuning is unknown. We test here the possibility that it also involves redox modulation. We found that modifying the Arabidopsis thaliana γ subunit by mutating three highly conserved acidic amino acids, D211V, E212L, and E226L, resulted in a mutant, termed mothra, in which ATP synthase which lacked light-dark regulation had relatively small effects on maximal activity in vivo. In situ equilibrium redox titrations and thiol redox-sensitive labeling studies showed that the γ subunit disulfide/sulfhydryl couple in the modified ATP synthase has a more reducing redox potential and thus remains predominantly oxidized under physiological conditions, implying that the highly conserved acidic residues in the γ subunit influence thiol redox potential. In contrast to its altered light-dark regulation, mothra retained wild-type fine-tuning of ATP synthase activity in response to changes in ambient CO2 concentrations, indicating that the light-dark- and metabolic-related regulation occur through different mechanisms, possibly via small molecule allosteric effectors or covalent modification. PMID:23486473

  19. Light-controlled ion channels formed by amphiphilic small molecules regulate ion conduction via cis-trans photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Bao, Chunyan; Wang, Haiyan; Lin, Yao; Jia, Huijuan; Zhu, Linyong

    2013-11-11

    Light-regulated ion channel-transport across lipid bilayers was realized using structurally simple azobenzene-based amphiphilic small molecules. UV or visible irradiation triggers molecular photoisomerization, which induces structural and membrane affinity changes in self-assembled channels, thus resulting in light-regulated ion transmembrane transport.

  20. Light and nitrogen nutrition regulate apical control in Rosa hybrida L.

    PubMed

    Furet, Pierre-Maxime; Lothier, Jérémy; Demotes-Mainard, Sabine; Travier, Sandrine; Henry, Clémence; Guérin, Vincent; Vian, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Apical control is defined as the inhibition of basal axillary bud outgrowth by an upper actively growing axillary axis, whose regulation is poorly understood yet differs markedly from the better-known apical dominance. We studied the regulation of apical control by environmental factors in decapitated Rosa hybrida in order to remove the apical hormonal influence and nutrient sink. In this plant model, all the buds along the main axis have a similar morphology and are able to burst in vitro. We concentrated on the involvement of light intensity and nitrate nutrition on bud break and axillary bud elongation in the primary axis pruned above the fifth leaf of each rose bush. We observed that apical control took place in low light (92 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), where only the 2-apical buds grew out, both in low (0.25 mM) and high (12.25 mM) nitrate. In contrast, in high light (453 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), the apical control only operates in low nitrate while all the buds along the stem grew out when the plant was supplied with a high level of nitrate. We found a decreasing photosynthetic activity from the top to the base of the plant concomitant with a light gradient along the stem. The quantity of sucrose, fructose, glucose and starch are higher in high light conditions in leaves and stem. The expression of the sucrose transporter RhSUC2 was higher in internodes and buds in this lighting condition, suggesting an increased capacity for sucrose transport. We propose that light intensity and nitrogen availability both contribute to the establishment of apical control.

  1. Regulation of rhodopsin-eGFP distribution in transgenic xenopus rod outer segments by light.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Mohammad; Calvert, Peter D; Solessio, Eduardo; Pugh, Edward N; Knox, Barry E

    2013-01-01

    The rod outer segment (OS), comprised of tightly stacked disk membranes packed with rhodopsin, is in a dynamic equilibrium governed by a diurnal rhythm with newly synthesized membrane inserted at the OS base balancing membrane loss from the distal tip via disk shedding. Using transgenic Xenopus and live cell confocal imaging, we found OS axial variation of fluorescence intensity in cells expressing a fluorescently tagged rhodopsin transgene. There was a light synchronized fluctuation in intensity, with higher intensity in disks formed at night and lower intensity for those formed during the day. This fluctuation was absent in constant light or dark conditions. There was also a slow modulation of the overall expression level that was not synchronized with the lighting cycle or between cells in the same retina. The axial variations of other membrane-associated fluorescent proteins, eGFP-containing two geranylgeranyl acceptor sites and eGFP fused to the transmembrane domain of syntaxin, were greatly reduced or not detectable, respectively. In acutely light-adapted rods, an arrestin-eGFP fusion protein also exhibited axial variation. Both the light-sensitive Rho-eGFP and arrestin-eGFP banding were in phase with the previously characterized birefringence banding (Kaplan, Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 21, 395-402 1981). In contrast, endogenous rhodopsin did not exhibit such axial variation. Thus, there is an axial inhomogeneity in membrane composition or structure, detectable by the rhodopsin transgene density distribution and regulated by the light cycle, implying a light-regulated step for disk assembly in the OS. The impact of these results on the use of chimeric proteins with rhodopsin fused to fluorescent proteins at the carboxyl terminus is discussed.

  2. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  3. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. A light-regulated host-guest-based nanochannel system inspired by channelrhodopsins protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Ma, Junkai; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Fei; Mei, Yuxiao; Liu, Lu; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2017-08-15

    The light-controlled gating of ion transport across membranes is central to nature (e.g., in protein channels). Herein, inspired by channelrhodopsins, we introduce a facile non-covalent approach towards light-responsive biomimetic channelrhodopsin nanochannels using host-guest interactions between a negative pillararene host and a positive azobenzene guest. By switching between threading and dethreading states with alternating visible and UV light irradiation, the functional channels can be flexible to regulate the inner surface charge of the channels, which in turn was exploited to achieve different forms of ion transport, for instance, cation-selective transport and anion-selective transport. Additionally, the pillararene-azobenzene-based nanochannel system could be used to construct a light-activated valve for molecular transport. Given these promising results, we suggest that this system could not only provide a better understanding of some biological processes, but also be applied for drug delivery and various biotechnological applications.Light-controlled gating of ion transport across membranes occurs in nature via channelrhodopsin nanochannels. Here, the authors show facile non-covalent approach towards light-responsive biomimetic nanochannels using host-guest interactions between a negative pillararene host and a positive azobenzene guest.

  6. Melanocytes sense blue light and regulate pigmentation through the Opsin3.

    PubMed

    Regazzetti, Claire; Sormani, Laura; Debayle, Delphine; Bernerd, Françoise; Tulic, Meri K; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Rocchi, Stéphane; Passeron, Thierry

    2017-08-22

    The shorter wavelengths of the visible light have been recently reported to induce a long-lasting hyperpigmentation but only in melano-competent individuals. Here, we provide evidence demonstrating that opsin 3 (OPN3) is the key sensor in melanocytes responsible for hyperpigmentation induced by the shorter wavelengths of the visible light. The melanogenesis induced through OPN3 is calcium-dependent and further activates CAMKII followed by CREB, ERK, and p38 leading to the phosphorylation of MITF and ultimately to the increase of the melanogenesis enzymes: tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase (DCT). Furthermore, blue light induces the formation of a protein complex that we demonstrated to be formed by tyrosinase and DCT. This multimeric tyrosinase / Tyrp complex is mainly formed in dark-skinned melanocytes and induces a sustained tyrosinase activity, thus explaining the long-lasting hyperpigmentation that is observed only in skin type III and higher after blue light irradiation. OPN3 thus functions as the sensor for visible light pigmentation. OPN3 and the multimeric Tyr/P complex induced after its activation appear as new potential targets for regulating melanogenesis but also to protect dark skins against blue light in physiological conditions and in pigmentary disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetic viewpoints on regulation of light harvesting and electron transport in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Grouneva, Irina; Gollan, Peter J; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Suorsa, Marjaana; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2013-02-01

    The comparative study of photosynthetic regulation in the thylakoid membrane of different phylogenetic groups can yield valuable insights into mechanisms, genetic requirements and redundancy of regulatory processes. This review offers a brief summary on the current understanding of light harvesting and photosynthetic electron transport regulation in different photosynthetic eukaryotes, with a special focus on the comparison between higher plants and unicellular algae of secondary endosymbiotic origin. The foundations of thylakoid structure, light harvesting, reversible protein phosphorylation and PSI-mediated cyclic electron transport are traced not only from green algae to vascular plants but also at the branching point between the "green" and the "red" lineage of photosynthetic organisms. This approach was particularly valuable in revealing processes that (1) are highly conserved between phylogenetic groups, (2) serve a common physiological role but nevertheless originate in divergent genetic backgrounds or (3) are missing in one phylogenetic branch despite their unequivocal importance in another, necessitating a search for alternative regulatory mechanisms and interactions.

  8. Light and pheromone-sensing neurons regulates cold habituation through insulin signalling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akane; Ujisawa, Tomoyo; Sonoda, Satoru; Kuhara, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is a critical environmental stimulus that has a strong impact on an organism’s biochemistry. Animals can respond to changes in ambient temperature through behaviour or altered physiology. However, how animals habituate to temperature is poorly understood. The nematode C. elegans stores temperature experiences and can induce temperature habituation-linked cold tolerance. Here we show that light and pheromone-sensing neurons (ASJ) regulate cold habituation through insulin signalling. Calcium imaging reveals that ASJ neurons respond to temperature. Cold habituation is abnormal in a mutant with impaired cGMP signalling in ASJ neurons. Insulin released from ASJ neurons is received by the intestine and neurons regulating gene expression for cold habituation. Thus, temperature sensation in a light and pheromone-sensing neuron produces a robust effect on insulin signalling that controls experience-dependent temperature habituation. PMID:25048458

  9. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  10. Controlling Spatial Heat and Light Distribution by Using Photothermal Enhancing Auto-Regulated Liposomes (PEARLs).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Weersink, Robert A; Lim, Liang; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2016-08-16

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is enhanced by the use of nanoparticles with a large optical absorption at the treatment wavelength. However, this comes at the cost of higher light attenuation that results in reduced depth of heating as well as larger thermal gradients, leading to potential over- and under-treatment in the target tissue. These limitations can be overcome by using photothermal enhancing auto-regulating liposomes (PEARLs), based on thermochromic J-aggregate forming dye-lipid conjugates that reversibly alter their absorption above a predefined lipid phase-transition temperature. Under irradiation by near-infrared light, deeper layers of the target tissue revert to the intrinsic optical absorption, halting the temperature rise and enabling greater light penetration and heat generation at depth. This effect is demonstrated in both nanoparticle solutions and in gel phantoms containing the nanoparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Light-regulated translational control of circadian behavior by eIF4E phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Gkogkas, Christos G; de Zavalia, Nuria; Blum, Ian D; Yanagiya, Akiko; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Xu, Haiyan; Lee, Choogon; Storch, Kai-Florian; Liu, Andrew C; Amir, Shimon; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-06-01

    The circadian (∼24 h) clock is continuously entrained (reset) by ambient light so that endogenous rhythms are synchronized with daily changes in the environment. Light-induced gene expression is thought to be the molecular mechanism underlying clock entrainment. mRNA translation is a key step of gene expression, but the manner in which clock entrainment is controlled at the level of mRNA translation is not well understood. We found that a light- and circadian clock-regulated MAPK/MNK pathway led to phosphorylation of the cap-binding protein eIF4E in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the locus of the master circadian clock in mammals. Phosphorylation of eIF4E specifically promoted translation of Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2) mRNAs and increased the abundance of basal and inducible PER proteins, which facilitated circadian clock resetting and precise timekeeping. Together, these results highlight a critical role for light-regulated translational control in the physiology of the circadian clock.

  12. A direct and melanopsin-dependent fetal light response regulates mouse eye development.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sujata; Chun, Christina; Fan, Jieqing; Kofron, J Matthew; Yang, Michael B; Hegde, Rashmi S; Ferrara, Napoleone; Copenhagen, David R; Lang, Richard A

    2013-02-14

    Vascular patterning is critical for organ function. In the eye, there is simultaneous regression of embryonic hyaloid vasculature (important to clear the optical path) and formation of the retinal vasculature (important for the high metabolic demands of retinal neurons). These events occur postnatally in the mouse. Here we have identified a light-response pathway that regulates both processes. We show that when mice are mutated in the gene (Opn4) for the atypical opsin melanopsin, or are dark-reared from late gestation, the hyaloid vessels are persistent at 8 days post-partum and the retinal vasculature overgrows. We provide evidence that these vascular anomalies are explained by a light-response pathway that suppresses retinal neuron number, limits hypoxia and, as a consequence, holds local expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) in check. We also show that the light response for this pathway occurs in late gestation at about embryonic day 16 and requires the photopigment in the fetus and not the mother. Measurements show that visceral cavity photon flux is probably sufficient to activate melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells in the mouse fetus. These data thus show that light--the stimulus for function of the mature eye--is also critical in preparing the eye for vision by regulating retinal neuron number and initiating a series of events that ultimately pattern the ocular blood vessels.

  13. Dopamine D1 Receptors Regulate the Light Dependent Development of Retinal Synaptic Responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Retinal synaptic connections and function are developmentally regulated. Retinal synaptic activity plays critical roles in the development of retinal synaptic circuitry. Dopamine receptors have been thought to play important roles in the activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in central nervous system. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether dopamine D1 receptor regulates the activity-dependent development of retinal light responsiveness. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinogram from wild type mice and mice with genetic deletion of D1 dopamine receptor (D1−/− mice) raised under cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrated that D1−/− mice have reduced amplitudes of all three major components of electroretinogram in adulthood. When the relative strength of the responses is considered, the D1−/− mice have selective reduction of the amplitudes of a-wave and oscillatory potentials evoked by low-intermediate intensities of lights. During postnatal development, D1−/− mice have increased amplitude of b-wave at the time of eye-opening but reduced developmental increase of the amplitude of b-wave after eye opening. Light deprivation from birth significantly reduced the amplitudes of b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increased the outer retinal light response gain and altered the light response kinetics of both a- and b-waves of wild type mice. In D1−/− mice, the effect of dark rearing on the amplitude of oscillatory potentials was diminished and dark rearing induced effects on the response gain of outer retina and the kinetics of a-wave were reversed. These results demonstrated roles of dopamine D1 receptor in the activity-dependent functional development of mouse retina. PMID:24260267

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the stress-responsive light harvesting complex genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shinichiro; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Minagawa, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Dissipating excess energy of light is critical for photosynthetic organisms to keep the photosynthetic apparatus functional and less harmful under stressful environmental conditions. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, efficient energy dissipation is achieved by a process called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), in which a distinct member of light harvesting complex, LHCSR, is known to play a key role. Although it has been known that two very closely related genes (LHCSR3.1 and LHCSR3.2) encoding LHCSR3 protein and another paralogous gene LHCSR1 are present in the C. reinhardtii genome, it is unclear how these isoforms are differentiated in terms of transcriptional regulation and functionalization. Here, we show that transcripts of both of the isoforms, LHCSR3.1 and LHCSR3.2, are accumulated under high light stress. Reexamination of the genomic sequence and gene models along with survey of sequence motifs suggested that these two isoforms shared an almost identical but still distinct promoter sequence and a completely identical polypeptide sequence, with more divergent 3'-untranscribed regions. Transcriptional induction under high light condition of both isoforms was suppressed by treatment with a photosystem II inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), and a calmodulin inhibitor W7. Despite a similar response to high light, the inhibitory effects of DCMU and W7 to the LHCSR1 transcript accumulation were limited compared to LHCSR3 genes. These results suggest that the transcription of LHCSR paralogs in C. reinhardtii are regulated by light signal and differentially modulated via photosynthetic electron transfer and calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling pathway(s). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Arabidopsis CRY2 and ZTL mediate blue-light regulation of the transcription factor CIB1 by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yawen; Zhao, Xiaoying; Imaizumi, Takato; Somers, David E; Tobin, Elaine M; Lin, Chentao

    2013-10-22

    Plants possess multiple photoreceptors to mediate light regulation of growth and development, but it is not well understood how different photoreceptors coordinate their actions to jointly regulate developmental responses, such as flowering time. In Arabidopsis, the photoexcited cryptochrome 2 interacts with the transcription factor CRYPTOCHROME-INTERACTING basic helix-loop-helix 1 (CIB1) to activate transcription and floral initiation. We show that the CIB1 protein expression is regulated by blue light; CIB1 is highly expressed in plants exposed to blue light, but levels of the CIB1 protein decreases in the absence of blue light. We demonstrate that CIB1 is degraded by the 26S proteasome and that blue light suppresses CIB1 degradation. Surprisingly, although cryptochrome 2 physically interacts with CIB1 in response to blue light, it is not the photoreceptor mediating blue-light suppression of CIB1 degradation. Instead, two of the three light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-domain photoreceptors, ZEITLUPE and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2, but not FLAVIN-BINDING KELCH REPEAT 1, are required for the function and blue-light suppression of degradation of CIB1. These results support the hypothesis that the evolutionarily unrelated blue-light receptors, cryptochrome and LOV-domain F-box proteins, mediate blue-light regulation of the same transcription factor by distinct mechanisms.

  16. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in association with HSP70 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jinah; Lee, Hyun-Il; Chang, Young-Sun; Lee, Soo Jae; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Sang Ick . E-mail: parksi@nih.go.kr

    2007-05-25

    A natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression by an unknown mechanism. Here we found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced eNOS reduction is inversely associated with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in endothelial cells. Treatment of cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} decreased eNOS protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but independently of PPAR{gamma} with no effect on mRNA levels. Although 15d-PGJ{sub 2} elicited endothelial apoptosis, inhibition of both pan-caspases and cathepsins failed to reverse reduction of eNOS protein. Interestingly, we observed that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoprecipitation and heat shock treatment demonstrated that eNOS reduction was strongly related to HSP70 induction. Cellular fractionation revealed that treatment with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} increased eNOS distribution 2.5-fold from soluble to insoluble fractions. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms whereby eNOS regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} is related to HSP70 induction.

  17. [Features of regulating delta sleep-inducing peptide by free radical processes in tissue and erythrocyte membranes in intact animals and under stress].

    PubMed

    Shustanova, T A; Bondarenko, T I; Miliutina, N P; Mikhaleva, I I

    2003-01-01

    In activity the comparative analysis of metabolic effects delta--sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) in tissues and erythrocytes of intact rats and under cold stress is conducted. The regulation effect of DSIP in attitude of free radical processes will be realised through modulation the prooxidant--antioxidant balance: both for intact animal, and at stress. Exogenous DSIP increases the antioxidant system activity in tissues of brain, liver and blood in standard conditions and under cold stress. The anti-stress effect of DSIP is directed as on increase of power endogenic enzymatic antioxidant system activity, specially glutathione peroxidase activity, and not enzymatic of antioxidant protection. The DSIP renders different influence on activity of prooxidant enzymes: for intact animal boosts the myeloperoxidase activity in blood neutrophils, not rendering essential influencing on the xanthine oxidase activity in tissues of brain, liver and activates the myeloperoxidase activity, depresses the xanthine oxidase activity for rats at stress. The membranotropic effect of DSIP in the norm and under stress is connected to increase of stability of protein--lipid interplays. The membranostabilizing effect of DSIP in conditions of stress is characterized decrease of polarity of lipid phase and negative surface charge of erythrocyte membranes, modified in course of lipid peroxidation.

  18. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period.

  19. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30–40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period. PMID:26879008

  20. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-02-16

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period.

  1. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α. The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta expression and regulation in mouse uterus during embryo implantation and decidualization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nai-Zheng; Teng, Chun-Bo; Ma, Hong; Ni, Hua; Ma, Xing-Hong; Xu, Li-Bin; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression and regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) PPARdelta gene in mouse uterus during early pregnancy by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. PPARdelta expression under pseudopregnancy, delayed implantation, hormonal treatment, and artificial decidualization was also investigated. There was a very low level of PPARdelta expression on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5 when embryo implanted, PPARdelta expression was exclusively observed in the subluminal stroma surrounding the implanting blastocyst. No corresponding signals were seen in the uterus on day 5 of pregnancy. There was no detectable PPARdelta signal under delayed implantation. Once delayed implantation was terminated by estrogen treatment and embryo implanted, a strong level of PPARdelta expression was induced in the subluminal stroma surrounding the implanting blastocyst. Estrogen treatment induced a moderate level of PPARdelta expression in the glandular epithelium, while progesterone treatment had no effects in the ovariectomized mice. A strong level of PPARdelta expression was seen in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. PPARdelta expression was also induced under artificial decidualization. These data suggest that PPARdelta expression at implantation sites require the presence of an active blastocyst and may play an essential role for blastocyst implantation.

  3. Desmosterol can replace cholesterol in sustaining cell proliferation and regulating the SREBP pathway in a sterol-Delta24-reductase-deficient cell line.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; de la Cueva, Paloma; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Ferruelo, Antonio J; Lasunción, Miguel A; Rawson, Robert B; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2009-05-13

    Cholesterol homoeostasis is critical for cell viability and proliferation. The SREBP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein) pathway is crucial for the maintenance of cholesterol homoeostasis. This pathway is controlled by cholesterol and cholesterol-derived oxysterols. J774 cells cannot convert desmosterol into cholesterol, a defect resulting from the absence of mRNA for sterol-Delta24-reductase. Using J774 cells, we addressed the capacity of desmosterol to replace cholesterol in sustaining cell proliferation and regulating the SREBP pathway. J774 cells were able to grow indefinitely after the virtually total replacement of cholesterol by desmosterol (J774-D cells). Inhibition of sterol biosynthesis with lovastatin suppressed J774-D cell proliferation. Desmosterol prevented this effect, but its analogue, cholest-5,22-trans-dien-3beta-ol, did not. Addition of desmosterol inhibited processing of SREBP-1 and -2 and also reduced the expression of SREBP-targeted genes. As occurs in cholesterol-containing cells, 25-hydroxycholesterol was more potent than desmosterol or cholesterol in suppressing these processes. Moreover, desmosterol addition enhanced the expression of Abca1 and Srebf1c, two LXR (liver X receptor)-targeted genes. To test the ability of endogenously produced desmosterol to regulate gene expression, J774-D cells were pretreated with lovastatin to inhibit sterol biosynthesis. After removal of the inhibitor the expression of SREBP-targeted genes decreased and that of an LXR-targeted gene increased, reaching control levels. Our results demonstrate that the virtually complete replacement of cholesterol by desmosterol is compatible with cell growth and the functioning of the SREBP pathway. In these cells, desmosterol suppresses SREBP processing and targeted gene expression, and it is especially effective activating LXR-targeted genes.

  4. Hugli River Delta, India

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    The western-most part of the Ganges Delta is seen in this 54.5 by 60 km ASTER sub-scene acquired on January 6, 2005. The Hugli River branches off from the Ganges River 300 km to the north, and flows by the city of Calcutta before emptying into the Bay of Bengal. High sediment load is evident by the light tan colors in the water, particularly downstream from off-shore islands. The deep green colors of some of these islands are mangrove swamps. The image is centered at 21.9 degrees north latitude, 88 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11158

  5. Diurnal and light regulation of sulphur assimilation and glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huseby, Stine; Koprivova, Anna; Lee, Bok-Rye; Saha, Shikha; Mithen, Richard; Wold, Anne-Berit; Bengtsson, Gunnar B; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-02-01

    Glucosinolates are a major class of sulphur-containing secondary metabolites involved in plant defence against pathogens. Recently many regulatory links between glucosinolate biosynthesis and sulphate assimilation were established. Since sulphate assimilation undergoes diurnal rhythm and is light regulated, this study analysed whether the same is true for glucosinolate biosynthesis. The levels of glucosinolates and glutathione were found to be higher during the day than during the night. This agreed with variation in sulphate uptake as well as activity of the key enzyme of the sulphate assimilation pathway, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase. Correspondingly, the flux through sulphate assimilation was higher during the day than during the night, with the maximum flux through primary assimilation preceding maximal incorporation into glucosinolates. Prolonged darkness resulted in a strong reduction in glucosinolate content. Re-illumination of such dark-adapted plants induced accumulation of mRNA for many genes of glucosinolate biosynthesis, leading to increased glucosinolate biosynthesis. The light regulation of the glucosinolate synthesis genes as well as many genes of primary sulphate assimilation was controlled at least partly by the LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription regulator. Thus, glucosinolate biosynthesis is highly co-regulated with sulphate assimilation.

  6. The Role of Light-Dark Regulation of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Kohzuma, Kaori; Froehlich, John E; Davis, Geoffry A; Temple, Joshua A; Minhas, Deepika; Dhingra, Amit; Cruz, Jeffrey A; Kramer, David M

    2017-01-01

    The chloroplast ATP synthase catalyzes the light-driven synthesis of ATP and is activated in the light and inactivated in the dark by redox-modulation through the thioredoxin system. It has been proposed that this down-regulation is important for preventing wasteful hydrolysis of ATP in the dark. To test this proposal, we compared the effects of extended dark exposure in Arabidopsis lines expressing the wild-type and mutant forms of ATP synthase that are redox regulated or constitutively active. In contrast to the predictions of the model, we observed that plants with wild-type redox regulation lost photosynthetic capacity rapidly in darkness, whereas those expressing redox-insensitive form were far more stable. To explain these results, we propose that in wild-type plants, down-regulation of ATP synthase inhibits ATP hydrolysis, leading to dissipation of thylakoid proton motive force (pmf) and subsequent inhibition of protein transport across the thylakoid through the twin arginine transporter (Tat)-dependent and Sec-dependent import pathways, resulting in the selective loss of specific protein complexes. By contrast, in mutants with a redox-insensitive ATP synthase, pmf is maintained by ATP hydrolysis, thus allowing protein transport to maintain photosynthetic activities for extended periods in the dark. Hence, a basal level of Tat-dependent, as well as, Sec-dependent import activity, in the dark helps replenishes certain components of the photosynthetic complexes and thereby aids in maintaining overall complex activity. However, the influence of a dark pmf on thylakoid protein import, by itself, could not explain all the effects we observed in this study. For example, we also observed in wild type plants a large transient buildup of thylakoid pmf and nonphotochemical exciton quenching upon sudden illumination of dark adapted plants. Therefore, we conclude that down-regulation of the ATP synthase is probably not related to preventing loss of ATP per se. Instead

  7. Homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and degradation by light-controlled single synaptic activation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingming; Gilbert, James; Man, Heng-Ye

    2011-01-01

    During homeostatic adjustment in response to alterations in neuronal activity, synaptic expression of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is globally tuned up- or down so that the neuronal activity is restored to a physiological range. Given that a central neuron receives multiple presynaptic inputs, whether and how AMPAR synaptic expression is homeostatically regulated at individual synapses remains unclear. In cultured hippocampal neurons, we report that when activity of an individual presynaptic terminal is selectively elevated by light-controlled excitation, AMPAR abundance at the excited synapses is selectively down-regulated in an NMDAR-dependent manner. The reduction in surface AMPARs is accompanied by enhanced receptor endocytosis and dependent on proteasomal activity. Synaptic activation also leads to a site-specific increase in the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 and polyubiquitination levels, consistent with AMPAR ubiquitination and degradation in the spine. These results indicate that AMPAR accumulation at individual synapses is subject to autonomous homeostatic regulation in response to synaptic activity. PMID:22153376

  8. Integration of light and temperature in the regulation of circadian gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, Catharine E; Wijnen, Herman; Naef, Felix; Saez, Lino; Young, Michael W

    2007-04-06

    Circadian clocks are aligned to the environment via synchronizing signals, or Zeitgebers, such as daily light and temperature cycles, food availability, and social behavior. In this study, we found that genome-wide expression profiles from temperature-entrained flies show a dramatic difference in the presence or absence of a thermocycle. Whereas transcript levels appear to be modified broadly by changes in temperature, there is a specific set of temperature-entrained circadian mRNA profiles that continue to oscillate in constant conditions. There are marked differences in the biological functions represented by temperature-driven or circadian regulation. The set of temperature-entrained circadian transcripts overlaps significantly with a previously defined set of transcripts oscillating in response to a photocycle. In follow-up studies, all thermocycle-entrained circadian transcript rhythms also responded to light/dark entrainment, whereas some photocycle-entrained rhythms did not respond to temperature entrainment. Transcripts encoding the clock components Period, Timeless, Clock, Vrille, PAR-domain protein 1, and Cryptochrome were all confirmed to be rhythmic after entrainment to a daily thermocycle, although the presence of a thermocycle resulted in an unexpected phase difference between period and timeless expression rhythms at the transcript but not the protein level. Generally, transcripts that exhibit circadian rhythms both in response to thermocycles and photocycles maintained the same mutual phase relationships after entrainment by temperature or light. Comparison of the collective temperature- and light-entrained circadian phases of these transcripts indicates that natural environmental light and temperature cycles cooperatively entrain the circadian clock. This interpretation is further supported by comparative analysis of the circadian phases observed for temperature-entrained and light-entrained circadian locomotor behavior. Taken together, these

  9. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  10. Arabidopsis CRY2 and ZTL mediate blue-light regulation of the transcription factor CIB1 by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yawen; Zhao, Xiaoying; Imaizumi, Takato; Somers, David E.; Tobin, Elaine M.; Lin, Chentao

    2013-01-01

    Plants possess multiple photoreceptors to mediate light regulation of growth and development, but it is not well understood how different photoreceptors coordinate their actions to jointly regulate developmental responses, such as flowering time. In Arabidopsis, the photoexcited cryptochrome 2 interacts with the transcription factor CRYPTOCHROME-INTERACTING basic helix–loop–helix 1 (CIB1) to activate transcription and floral initiation. We show that the CIB1 protein expression is regulated by blue light; CIB1 is highly expressed in plants exposed to blue light, but levels of the CIB1 protein decreases in the absence of blue light. We demonstrate that CIB1 is degraded by the 26S proteasome and that blue light suppresses CIB1 degradation. Surprisingly, although cryptochrome 2 physically interacts with CIB1 in response to blue light, it is not the photoreceptor mediating blue-light suppression of CIB1 degradation. Instead, two of the three light–oxygen–voltage (LOV)-domain photoreceptors, ZEITLUPE and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2, but not FLAVIN-BINDING KELCH REPEAT 1, are required for the function and blue-light suppression of degradation of CIB1. These results support the hypothesis that the evolutionarily unrelated blue-light receptors, cryptochrome and LOV-domain F-box proteins, mediate blue-light regulation of the same transcription factor by distinct mechanisms. PMID:24101505

  11. Light regulation of swarming motility in Pseudomonas syringae integrates signaling pathways mediated by a bacteriophytochrome and a LOV protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-06-11

    The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. IMPORTANCE Photosensory proteins enable organisms to perceive and respond to light. The biological and ecological roles of these proteins in nonphotosynthetic bacteria are largely unknown. This study discovered that a blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or

  12. Blue light induces degradation of the negative regulator phytochrome interacting factor 1 to promote photomorphogenic development of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2009-05-01

    Phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) are nuclear basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors that negatively regulate photomorphogenesis both in the dark and in the light in Arabidopsis. The phytochrome (phy) family of photoreceptors induces the rapid phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs in response to both red and far-red light conditions to promote photomorphogenesis. Although phys have been shown to function under blue light conditions, the roles of PIFs under blue light have not been investigated in detail. Here we show that PIF1 negatively regulates photomorphogenesis at the seedling stage under blue light conditions. pif1 seedlings displayed more open cotyledons and slightly reduced hypocotyl length compared to wild type under diurnal (12 hr light/12 hr dark) blue light conditions. Double-mutant analyses demonstrated that pif1phyA, pif1phyB, pif1cry1, and pif1cry2 have enhanced cotyledon opening compared to the single photoreceptor mutants under diurnal blue light conditions. Blue light induced the rapid phosphorylation, polyubiquitination, and degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway. PIF1 interacted with phyA and phyB in a blue light-dependent manner, and the interactions with phys are necessary for the blue light-induced degradation of PIF1. phyA played a dominant role under pulses of blue light, while phyA, phyB, and phyD induced the degradation of PIF1 in an additive manner under prolonged continuous blue light conditions. Interestingly, the absence of cry1 and cry2 enhanced the degradation of PIF1 under blue light conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that PIF1 functions as a negative regulator of photomorphogenesis under blue light conditions and that blue light-activated phys induce the degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway to promote photomorphogenesis.

  13. Evolution and regulation of Bigelowiella natans light-harvesting antenna system.

    PubMed

    A D Neilson, Jonathan; Rangsrikitphoti, Pattarasiri; Durnford, Dion G

    2017-10-01

    Bigelowiella natans is a mixotrophic flagellate and member of the chlorarachniophytes (Rhizaria), whose plastid is derived from a green algal endosymbiont. With the completion of the B. natans nuclear genome we are able to begin the analysis of the structure, function and evolution of the photosynthetic apparatus. B. natans has undergone substantial changes in photosystem structure during the evolution of the plastid from a green alga. While Photosystem II (PSII) composition is well conserved, Photosystem I (PSI) composition has undergone a dramatic reduction in accessory protein subunits. Coinciding with these changes, there was a loss of green algal LHCI orthologs while the PSII-like antenna system has the expected green algal-like proteins (encoded by genes Lhcbm1-8, Lhcb4). There are also a collection of LHCX-like proteins, which are commonly associated with stramenopiles and other eukaryotes with red-algal derived plastids, along with two other unique classes of LHCs- LHCY and LHCZ- whose function remains cryptic. To understand the regulation of the LHC gene family as an initial probe of function, we conducted an RNA-seq experiment under a short-term, high-light (HL) and low-light stress. The most abundant LHCII transcript (Lhcbm6) plus two other LHCBM types (Lhcbm1, 2) were down regulated under HL and up-regulated following a shift to very-low light (VL), as is common in antenna specializing in light harvesting. Many of the other LHCII and LHCY genes had a small, but significant increase in HL and most were only moderately affected under VL. The LHCX and LHCZ genes, however, had a strong up-regulation under HL-stress and most declined under VL, suggesting that they primarily have a role in photoprotection. This contrasts to the LHCY family that is only moderately responsive to light and a much higher basal level of expression, despite being within the LHCSR/LHCX clade. The expression of LHCX/Z proteins under HL-stress may be related to the induction of long

  14. Phycobilisome Mobility and Its Role in the Regulation of Light Harvesting in Red Algae1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaňa, Radek; Kotabová, Eva; Lukeš, Martin; Papáček, Štěpán; Matonoha, Ctirad; Liu, Lu-Ning; Prášil, Ondřej; Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    Red algae represent an evolutionarily important group that gave rise to the whole red clade of photosynthetic organisms. They contain a unique combination of light-harvesting systems represented by a membrane-bound antenna and by phycobilisomes situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces. So far, very little has been revealed about the mobility of their phycobilisomes and the regulation of their light-harvesting system in general. Therefore, we carried out a detailed analysis of phycobilisome dynamics in several red alga strains and compared these results with the presence (or absence) of photoprotective mechanisms. Our data conclusively prove phycobilisome mobility in two model mesophilic red alga strains, Porphyridium cruentum and Rhodella violacea. In contrast, there was almost no phycobilisome mobility in the thermophilic red alga Cyanidium caldarium that was not caused by a decrease in lipid desaturation in this extremophile. Experimental data attributed this immobility to the strong phycobilisome-photosystem interaction that highly restricted phycobilisome movement. Variations in phycobilisome mobility reflect the different ways in which light-harvesting antennae can be regulated in mesophilic and thermophilic red algae. Fluorescence changes attributed in cyanobacteria to state transitions were observed only in mesophilic P. cruentum with mobile phycobilisomes, and they were absent in the extremophilic C. caldarium with immobile phycobilisomes. We suggest that state transitions have an important regulatory function in mesophilic red algae; however, in thermophilic red algae, this process is replaced by nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:24948833

  15. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-02-18

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  16. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  17. Light Activation of the Insulin Receptor Regulates Mitochondrial Hexokinase. A Possible Mechanism of Retinal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Ammaji; Gupta, Vivek K.; Anderson, Robert E.; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has been shown to mediate the anti-apoptotic activity through hexokinase (HK)-mitochondria interaction. We previously reported that Akt activation in retinal rod photoreceptor cells is mediated through light-dependent insulin receptor (IR)/PI3K pathway. Our data indicate that light-induced activation of IR/PI3K/Akt results in the translocation of HK-II to mitochondria. We also found that PHLPPL, a serine/threonine phosphatase, enhanced the binding of HK-II to mitochondria. We found a mitochondrial targeting signal in PHLPPL and our study suggests that Akt translocation to mitochondria could be mediated through PHLPPL. Our results suggest that light-dependent IR/PI3K/Akt pathway regulates hexokinase-mitochondria interaction in photoreceptors. Down-regulation of IR signaling has been associated with ocular diseases of retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and Leber Congenital Amaurosis-type 2, and agents that enhance the binding interaction between hexokinase and mitochondria may have therapeutic potential against these ocular diseases. PMID:23993956

  18. Phycobilisome Mobility and Its Role in the Regulation of Light Harvesting in Red Algae.

    PubMed

    Kaňa, Radek; Kotabová, Eva; Lukeš, Martin; Papáček, Stěpán; Matonoha, Ctirad; Liu, Lu-Ning; Prášil, Ondřej; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-08-01

    Red algae represent an evolutionarily important group that gave rise to the whole red clade of photosynthetic organisms. They contain a unique combination of light-harvesting systems represented by a membrane-bound antenna and by phycobilisomes situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces. So far, very little has been revealed about the mobility of their phycobilisomes and the regulation of their light-harvesting system in general. Therefore, we carried out a detailed analysis of phycobilisome dynamics in several red alga strains and compared these results with the presence (or absence) of photoprotective mechanisms. Our data conclusively prove phycobilisome mobility in two model mesophilic red alga strains, Porphyridium cruentum and Rhodella violacea. In contrast, there was almost no phycobilisome mobility in the thermophilic red alga Cyanidium caldarium that was not caused by a decrease in lipid desaturation in this extremophile. Experimental data attributed this immobility to the strong phycobilisome-photosystem interaction that highly restricted phycobilisome movement. Variations in phycobilisome mobility reflect the different ways in which light-harvesting antennae can be regulated in mesophilic and thermophilic red algae. Fluorescence changes attributed in cyanobacteria to state transitions were observed only in mesophilic P. cruentum with mobile phycobilisomes, and they were absent in the extremophilic C. caldarium with immobile phycobilisomes. We suggest that state transitions have an important regulatory function in mesophilic red algae; however, in thermophilic red algae, this process is replaced by nonphotochemical quenching.

  19. Multiple ketolases involved in light regulation of canthaxanthin biosynthesis in Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, Lotte; Mautz, Jürgen; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    In the genome of Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102, three functional β-carotene ketolase genes exist, one of the crtO and two of the crtW type. They were all expressed and their corresponding enzymes were functional inserting 4-keto groups into β-carotene as shown by functional pathway complementation in Escherichia coli. They all synthesized canthaxanthin but with different efficiencies. Canthaxanthin is the photoprotective carotenoid of N. punctiforme PCC 73102. Under high-light stress, its synthesis was enhanced. This was caused by up-regulation of the transcripts of two genes in combination. The first crtB-encoding phytoene synthase is the gate way enzyme of carotenogenesis resulting in an increased inflow into the pathway. The second was the ketolase gene crtW148 which in high light takes over β-carotene conversion into canthaxanthin from the other ketolases. The other ketolases were down-regulated under high-light conditions. CrtW148 was also exclusively responsible for the last step in 4-keto-myxoxanthophyll synthesis.

  20. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-05-06

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation.

  1. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  2. Co-regulation of dark and light reactions in three biochemical subtypes of C(4) species.

    PubMed

    Kiirats, Olavi; Kramer, David M; Edwards, Gerald E

    2010-08-01

    Regulation of light harvesting in response to changes in light intensity, CO(2) and O(2) concentration was studied in C(4) species representing three different metabolic subtypes: Sorghum bicolor (NADP-malic enzyme), Amaranthus edulis (NAD-malic enzyme), and Panicum texanum (PEP-carboxykinase). Several photosynthetic parameters were measured on the intact leaf level including CO(2) assimilation rates, O(2) evolution, photosystem II activities, thylakoid proton circuit and dissipation of excitation energy. Gross rates of O(2) evolution (J(O)₂'), measured by analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence), net rates of O(2) evolution and CO(2) assimilation responded in parallel to changes in light and CO(2) levels. The C(4) subtypes had similar energy requirements for photosynthesis since there were no significant differences in maximal quantum efficiencies for gross rates of O(2) evolution (average value = 0.072 O(2)/quanta absorbed, approximately 14 quanta per O(2) evolved). At saturating actinic light intensities, when photosynthesis was suppressed by decreasing CO(2), ATP synthase proton conductivity (g (H) (+)) responded strongly to changes in electron flow, decreasing linearly with J(O)₂', which was previously observed in C(3) plants. It is proposed that g (H) (+) is controlled at the substrate level by inorganic phosphate availability. The results suggest development of nonphotochemical quenching in C(4) plants is controlled by a decrease in g (H) (+), which causes an increase in proton motive force by restricting proton efflux from the lumen, rather than by cyclic or pseudocyclic electron flow.

  3. Irradiance-dependent regulation of gravitropism by red light in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, V. D.; Sack, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. are negatively gravitropic in the dark and positively phototropic in red light. Various fluence rates of unilateral red light were tested to determine whether both tropisms operate simultaneously. At irradiances > or = 140 nmol m-2 s-1 no gravitropism could be detected and phototropism predominated, despite the presence of amyloplast sedimentation. Gravitropism occurred at irradiances lower than 140 nmol m-1 s-1 with most cells oriented above the horizontal but not upright. At these low fluence rates, phototropism was indistinct at 1 g but apparent in microgravity, indicating that gravitropism and phototropism compete at 1 g. The frequency of protonemata that were negatively phototropic varied with the fluence rate and the duration of illumination, as well as with the position of the apical cell before illumination. These data show that the fluence rate of red light regulates whether gravitropism is allowed or completely repressed, and that it influences the polarity of phototropism and the extent to which apical cells are aligned in the light path.

  4. Clathrin regulates blue light-triggered lateral auxin distribution and hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qinqin; Jiang, Nan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Qingmei; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Muyuan; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Phototropism is the process by which plants grow towards light in order to maximize the capture of light for photosynthesis, which is particularly important for germinating seedlings. In Arabidopsis, hypocotyl phototropism is predominantly triggered by blue light (BL), which has a profound effect on the establishment of asymmetric auxin distribution, essential for hypocotyl phototropism. Two auxin efflux transporters ATP-binding cassette B19 (ABCB19) and PIN-formed 3 (PIN3) are known to mediate the effect of BL on auxin distribution in the hypocotyl, but the details for how BL triggers PIN3 lateralization remain poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for clathrin in BL-triggered, PIN3-mediated asymmetric auxin distribution in hypocotyl phototropism. We show that unilateral BL induces relocalization of clathrin in the hypocotyl. Loss of clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) and CLC3 affects endocytosis and lateral distribution of PIN3 thereby impairing BL-triggered establishment of asymmetric auxin distribution and consequently, phototropic bending. Conversely, auxin efflux inhibitors N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid affect BL-induced relocalization of clathrin, endocytosis and lateralization of PIN3 as well as asymmetric distribution of auxin. These results together demonstrate an important interplay between auxin and clathrin function that dynamically regulates BL-triggered hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. THRUMIN1 is a light-regulated actin-bundling protein involved in chloroplast motility.

    PubMed

    Whippo, Craig W; Khurana, Parul; Davis, Phillip A; DeBlasio, Stacy L; DeSloover, Daniel; Staiger, Christopher J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2011-01-11

    Chloroplast movement in response to changing light conditions optimizes photosynthetic light absorption. This repositioning is stimulated by blue light perceived via the phototropin photoreceptors and is transduced to the actin cytoskeleton. Some actin-based motility systems use filament reorganizations rather than myosin-based translocations. Recent research favors the hypothesis that chloroplast movement is driven by actin reorganization at the plasma membrane, but no proteins affecting chloroplast movements have been shown to associate with both the plasma membrane and actin filaments in vivo. Here we identified THRUMIN1 as a critical link between phototropin photoreceptor activity at the plasma membrane and actin-dependent chloroplast movements. THRUMIN1 bundles filamentous actin in vitro, and it localizes to the plasma membrane and displays light- and phototropin-dependent localization to microfilaments in vivo. These results suggest that phototropin-induced actin bundling via THRUMIN1 is important for chloroplast movement. A mammalian homolog of THRUMIN1, GRXCR1, has been implicated in auditory responses and hair cell stereocilla development as a regulator of actin architecture. Studies of THRUMIN1 will help elucidate the function of this family of eukaryotic proteins.

  6. Retinophilin is a light-regulated phosphoprotein required to suppress photoreceptor dark noise in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Kirk L; Takemori, Nobuaki; Komori, Naoka; Chu, Brian; Hardie, Roger C; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2010-01-27

    Photoreceptor cells achieve high sensitivity, reliably detecting single photons, while limiting the spontaneous activation events responsible for dark noise. We used proteomic, genetic, and electrophysiological approaches to characterize Retinophilin (RTP) (CG10233) in Drosophila photoreceptors and establish its involvement in dark-noise suppression. RTP possesses membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) motifs, a structure shared with mammalian junctophilins and other membrane-associated proteins found within excitable cells. We show the MORN repeats, and both the N- and C-terminal domains, are required for RTP localization in the microvillar light-gathering organelle, the rhabdomere. RTP exists in multiple phosphorylated isoforms under dark conditions and is dephosphorylated by light exposure. An RTP deletion mutant exhibits a high rate of spontaneous membrane depolarization events in dark conditions but retains the normal kinetics of the light response. Photoreceptors lacking neither inactivation nor afterpotential C (NINAC) myosin III, a motor protein/kinase, also display a similar dark-noise phenotype as the RTP deletion. We show that NINAC mutants are depleted for RTP. These results suggest the increase in dark noise in NINAC mutants is attributable to lack of RTP and, furthermore, defines a novel role for NINAC in the rhabdomere. We propose that RTP is a light-regulated phosphoprotein that organizes rhabdomeric components to suppress random activation of the phototransduction cascade and thus increases the signaling fidelity of dark-adapted photoreceptors.

  7. Regulating the mucosal immune system: the contrasting roles of LIGHT, HVEM, and their various partners.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Marcos W; Shui, Jr-Wen; Ware, Carl F; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-07-01

    LIGHT and herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) comprise a ligand-receptor pair in the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. These molecules play an important role in regulating immunity, particularly in the intestinal mucosa. LIGHT also binds the lymphotoxin beta receptor, and HVEM can act as a ligand for immunoglobulin family molecules, including B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator, which suppresses immune responses. Complexity in this pivotal system arises from several factors, including the non-monogamous pairing of ligands and receptors, and reverse signaling or the ability of some ligands to serve as receptors. As a result, recognition events in this fascinating network of interacting molecules can have pro- or anti-inflammatory consequences. Despite complexity, experiments we and others are carrying out are establishing rules for understanding when and in what cell types these molecules contribute to intestinal inflammation.

  8. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphatase activity in isolated pea nuclei and its photoreversible regulation by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) present in highly purified preparations of pea nuclei was partially characterized. The activity of this enzyme was stimulated by divalent cations (Mg2+ = Mn2+ > Ca2+), but was not affected by the monovalent cations, Na+ and K+. The Mg(2+)-dependent activity was further stimulated by concentrations of Ca2+ in the low micromolar range. It could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP, all with a pH optimum of 7.5. The nuclear NTPase activity was not inhibited by vanadate, oligomycin, or nitrate, but was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of quercetin and the calmodulin inhibitor, compound 48/80. The NTPase was stimulated more than 50% by red light, and this effect was reversed by subsequent irradiation with far-red light. The photoreversibility of the stimulation indicated that the photoreceptor for this response was phytochrome, an important regulator of photomorphogenesis and gene expression in plants.

  9. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphatase activity in isolated pea nuclei and its photoreversible regulation by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) present in highly purified preparations of pea nuclei was partially characterized. The activity of this enzyme was stimulated by divalent cations (Mg2+ = Mn2+ > Ca2+), but was not affected by the monovalent cations, Na+ and K+. The Mg(2+)-dependent activity was further stimulated by concentrations of Ca2+ in the low micromolar range. It could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP, all with a pH optimum of 7.5. The nuclear NTPase activity was not inhibited by vanadate, oligomycin, or nitrate, but was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of quercetin and the calmodulin inhibitor, compound 48/80. The NTPase was stimulated more than 50% by red light, and this effect was reversed by subsequent irradiation with far-red light. The photoreversibility of the stimulation indicated that the photoreceptor for this response was phytochrome, an important regulator of photomorphogenesis and gene expression in plants.

  10. Light and developmental regulation of the Anp-controlled anthocyanin phenotype of bean pods.

    PubMed

    Gantet, P; Bettini, P; Dron, M

    1993-10-01

    In the presence of the dominant allele of the Anp gene, bean pods present a purple-mottled phenotype. The purple pigmentation is variable from cell to cell in the pod epidermal layer and develops as a random mosaic. Three anthocyanidins, delphinidin, petunidin and malvidin, are involved in this purple pigmentation. Anthocyanins accumulated in vacuoles; anthocyanoplasts and cristal bodies were also observed occasionally. A developmental switch is a prerequisite for anthocyanin accumulation in the pods. This does not occur before day 4 after pollination and is controlled by light in competent pods. mRNAs for PAL, CHS, CHI, DFR and UFGT are induced in the pods, indicating that the general anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway is well conserved at both the biochemical and molecular levels in this species. mRNA steady-state level studies of PAL and CHS suggest that the light regulation occurs at the transcriptional level.

  11. Expression of delta-like 1 homologue and insulin-like growth factor 2 through epigenetic regulation of the genes during development of mouse molar.

    PubMed

    Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer; Skalleberg, Natalie; Landin, Maria A; Khuu, Cuong; Risnes, Steinar; Osmundsen, Harald

    2012-08-01

    Delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) are two of six well-studied mouse imprinted gene clusters that are paternally expressed. Their expression is also linked to their maternally expressed non-coding RNAs, encoded by Gene trap locus 2 (Gtl2) and Imprinted maternally expressed transcript (H19), co-located as imprinted gene clusters. Using deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays and real-time RT-PCR analysis we showed Dlk1 and Gtl2 to exhibit a time-course of expression during tooth development that was similar to that of Igf2 and H19. Western blot analysis of proteins encoded by Dlk1 and Igf2 suggested that the levels of these proteins reflected those of the corresponding mRNAs. Immunohistochemical studies of DLK1 in murine molars detected the protein in both epithelial and mesenchymal regions, in developing cusp mesenchyme, and in newly synthesized enamel and dentin tubules. IGF2 protein was detected primarily at prenatal stages, suggesting that it may be active before birth. Analysis of methylation of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands in both Dlk1 and Igf2 suggested the presence of an increasing fraction of hypermethylated bases with increasing time of development. The increased levels of hypermethylation coincided both with the diminished levels of expression of Dlk1 and Igf2 and with decreased levels of DLK1 and IGF2 proteins in the tooth germ, suggesting that their expression is regulated via methylation of CpG islands present in these genes.

  12. Lack of Casein Kinase 1 Delta Promotes Genomic Instability - The Accumulation of DNA Damage and Down-Regulation of Checkpoint Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Yoshimi Endo; Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi; Nussenzweig, Andre; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) is a conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that regulates diverse cellular processes. Mice lacking CK1δ have a perinatal lethal phenotype and typically weigh 30% less than their wild type littermates. However, the causes of death and small size are unknown. We observed cells with abnormally large nuclei in tissue from Csnk1d null embryos, and multiple centrosomes in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in CK1δ (MEFCsnk1d null). Results from γ-H2AX staining and the comet assay demonstrated significant DNA damage in MEFCsnk1d null cells. These cells often contain micronuclei, an indicator of genomic instability. Similarly, abrogation of CK1δ expression in control MEFs stimulated micronuclei formation after doxorubicin treatment, suggesting that CK1δ loss increases vulnerability to genotoxic stress. Cellular levels of total and activated checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), which functions in the DNA damage response and mitotic checkpoints, and its downstream effector, Cdc2/CDK1 kinase, were often decreased in MEFCsnk1d null cells as well as in control MEFs transfected with CK1δ siRNA. Hydroxyurea-induced Chk1 activation, as measured by Ser345 phosphorylation, and nuclear localization also were impaired in MEF cells following siRNA knockdown of CK1δ. Similar results were observed in the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line. The decreases in phosphorylated Chk1 were rescued by concomitant expression of siRNA-resistant CK1δ. Experiments with cycloheximide demonstrated that the stability of Chk1 protein was diminished in cells subjected to CK1δ knockdown. Together, these findings suggest that CK1δ contributes to the efficient repair of DNA damage and the proper functioning of mitotic checkpoints by maintaining appropriate levels of Chk1. PMID:28125685

  13. Short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by delta-opioid receptor are mediated by Galphai2 in neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tetrault, Joan; Wang, Wei; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2006-06-01

    Activation of the opioid receptor results in short-term inhibition of intracellular cAMP levels followed by receptor desensitization and subsequent increase of cAMP above the control level (adenylyl cyclase superactivation). Using adenovirus to deliver pertussis toxin-insensitive mutants of the alpha-subunits of G(i/o) that are expressed in neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells (Galpha(i2), Galpha(i3), and Galpha(o)), we examined the identities of the G proteins involved in the short- and long-term action of the delta-opioid receptor (DOR). Pertussis toxin pretreatment completely abolished the ability of [d-Pen(2), d-Pen(5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE) to inhibit forskolin-stimulated intracellular cAMP production. Expression of the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2), and not the C351L mutants of Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), rescued the short-term effect of DPDPE after pertussis toxin treatment. The ability of Galpha(i2) in mediating DOR inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was also reflected in the ability of Galpha(i2), not Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), to coimmunoprecipitate with DOR. Coincidently, after long-term DPDPE treatment, pertussis toxin treatment eliminated the antagonist naloxone-induced superactivation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Again, only the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) restored the adenylyl cyclase superactivation after pertussis toxin treatment. More importantly, the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) remained associated with DOR after long-term agonist and pertussis toxin treatment whereas the wild-type Galpha(i2) did not. These data suggest that Galpha(i2) serves as the signaling molecule in both DOR-mediated short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity.

  14. Four new Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Four new Delta Scuti stars are reported. Power, modified into amplitude, spectra, and light curves are used to determine periodicities. A complete frequency analysis is not performed due to the lack of a sufficient time base in the data. These new variables help verify the many predictions that Delta Scuti stars probably exist in prolific numbers as small amplitude variables. Two of these stars, HR 4344 and HD 107513, are possibly Am stars. If so, they are among the minority of variable stars which are also Am stars.

  15. High serum luteinizing hormone levels induce ovarian delta4 cytochrome P450c17alpha down-regulation in hirsute women: complete effect on 17-hydroxylase and partial effect on 17,20-lyase.

    PubMed

    Rieu, M; Mourrieras, F; Riveline, J P; Laplanche, S; Both, D; Kuhn, J M

    1998-09-01

    It is well known that normal and mildly elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) levels induce increased activity of ovarian 17-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase, the cytochrome P450cl7alpha (P450) enzymes. This leads to increased ovarian 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione production. In contrast, it has been shown in both in vitro and in vivo studies in animals and in in vitro studies in women that high LH concentrations have opposite effects on these enzymes. These LH down-regulating effects appear to be more marked on 17,20-lyase than on 17-hydroxylase. Finally, these LH effects have not been reported in vivo in women. Therefore, we investigated the relationships between serum LH levels and serum 17-OHP and androstenedione concentrations in 263 consecutive hirsute women (HW) with normal serum 17-OHP responses to acute adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) stimulation. The patterns of basal serum steroid concentrations differed according to the basal serum LH levels. Indeed, for relationships between LH and 17-OHP concentrations, a positive correlation (P < 0.001) was found between the levels of these parameters when LH levels ranged from 0.2 to 9.0 IU/l. Conversely, for LH levels greater than 9.0 to 21.0 IU/l, LH values were negatively correlated (P<0.001) with 17-OHP concentrations. Similar results were observed for relationships between LH and androstenedione levels but the LH peak level related to decreasing androstenedione concentrations was 12.0 IU/l. Finally, the mean 17-OHP level in patients with LH levels which induced marked P450 down-regulation (i.e. more than 12 IU/l) was similar to that in patients with LH levels within the normal range (i.e. less than 6 IU/l). In contrast, the mean androstenedione level in the former patients was markedly higher (P<0.001) than that in the latter patients. In conclusion, as previously reported in in vitro studies, this in vivo study indicates that LH induces stimulating and down-regulating effects on both ovarian delta

  16. Light Regulation of Swarming Motility in Pseudomonas syringae Integrates Signaling Pathways Mediated by a Bacteriophytochrome and a LOV Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S.; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. PMID:23760465

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  18. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  19. Light-independent developmental regulation of cab gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Brusslan, J A; Tobin, E M

    1992-01-01

    We found a transient increase in the amount of mRNA for four nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins during early development of Arabidopsis thaliana. This increase began soon after germination as cotyledons emerged from the seed coat; it occurred in total darkness and was not affected by external factors, such as gibberellins or light treatments used to stimulate germination. Three members of the cab gene family and the rbcS-1A gene exhibited this expression pattern. Because timing of the increase coincided with cotyledon emergence and because it occurred independently of external stimuli, we suggest that this increase represents developmental regulation of these genes. Further, 1.34 kilobases of the cab1 promoter was sufficient to confer this expression pattern on a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings. The ability of the cab genes to respond to phytochrome preceded this developmental increase, showing that these two types of regulation are independent. Images PMID:1380166

  20. Light pulse duration differentially regulates mouse locomotor suppression and phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-10-01

    Brief exposure of mice to nocturnal light causes circadian rhythm phase shifts, simultaneously inducing locomotor suppression, a drop in body temperature, and associated sleep. The exact nature of the relationship between these light-induced responses is uncertain, although locomotor suppression and phase shift magnitudes are related to stimulus irradiance. Whether stimulus duration has similar effects is less clear. Here, the relationship between stimulus duration and response magnitude was evaluated further using 100 µW/cm(2) white light-emitting diode pulses administered for 30, 300, 1200, or 3000 sec. The results show that, in general, shorter pulses yielded smaller responses and larger pulses yielded larger responses. However, the 300-sec pulse failed to augment locomotor suppression compared with the effect of a 30-sec pulse (44.7 ± 4.8 vs 40.6 ± 2.0 min) but simultaneously induced much larger phase shifts (1.28 ± 0.20 vs 0.52 ± 0.11 h). The larger phase shifts induced by the 300-sec stimulus did not differ from those induced by either the 1200- or 3000-sec pulses (1.43 ± 0.10 and 1.30 ± 0.17 h, respectively). The results demonstrate differential photic regulation of the two response types. Pulses ranging from 300 to 3000 sec produce equal phase shifts (present data); pulses ranging from 30 to 600 sec produce equal locomotor suppression levels. Greater suppression can occur additively in response to pulses of 1200 sec or more (present data), but this is not true for phase shifts. Nocturnal light appears to trigger a fixed duration event, locomotor suppression, or phase shift, with the latter followed by a light-refractory interval during which locomotor suppression can additively increase. The results also provide further support for the view that temporal integration of photic energy applies, at best, across a limited set of stimulus durations for both light-induced locomotor suppression/sleep and phase shift regulation.

  1. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  2. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  3. Abscisic acid, high-light, and oxidative stress down-regulate a photosynthetic gene via a promoter motif not involved in phytochrome-mediated transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Staneloni, Roberto J; Rodriguez-Batiller, María José; Casal, Jorge J

    2008-01-01

    In etiolated seedlings, light perceived by phytochrome promotes the expression of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein of photosystem II (Lhcb) genes. However, excess of photosynthetically active radiation can reduce Lhcb expression. Here, we investigate the convergence and divergence of phytochrome, high-light stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which could connect these processes. Etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings bearing an Lhcb promoter fused to a reporter were exposed to continuous far-red light to activate phytochrome and not photosynthesis, and treated with ABA. We identified a cis-acting region of the promoter required for down-regulation by ABA. This region contains a CCAC sequence recently found to be necessary for ABI4-binding to an Lhcb promoter. However, we did not find a G-box-binding core motif often associated with the ABI4-binding site in genes promoted by light and repressed by ABI4. Mutations involving this motif also impaired the responses to reduced water potential, the response to high photosynthetic light and the response to methyl viologen but not the response to low temperature or to Norflurazon. We propose a model based on current and previous findings, in which hydrogen peroxide produced in the chloroplasts under high light conditions interacts with the ABA signaling network to regulate Lhcb expression. Since the mutation that affects high-light and methyl viologen responses does not affect phytochrome-mediated responses, the regulation by retrograde and phytochrome signaling can finally be separated at the target promoter level.

  4. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  5. Exposure to Fluorescent Light Triggers Down Regulation of Genes Involved with Mitotic Progression in Xiphophorus Skin

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Ronald B.; Walter, Dylan J.; Boswell, William T.; Caballero, Kaela L.; Boswell, Mikki; Lu, Yuan; Chang, Jordan; Savage, Markita G.

    2015-01-01

    We report RNA-Seq results from skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B after exposure to various doses of “cool white” fluorescent light (FL). We show that FL exposure incites a genetic transcriptional response in skin nearly as great as observed for UVB exposure; however, the gene sets modulated due to exposure to the two light sources are quite different. Known light responsive genes involved in maintaining circadian cycling (e.g., clock, cry2a, cry1b, per1b, per2, per3, arntl1a, etc.) exhibited expected shifts in transcriptional expression upon FL exposure. Exposure to FL also resulted in down-regulated transcription of many genes involved with cell cycle progression (e.g., cdc20, cdc45, cdca7b, plk1, cdk1, ccnb-3, cdca7a, etc.) and chromosome segregation (e.g., cenpe, cenpf, cenpi, cenpk, cenpo, cenpp, and cenpu; cep70; knstrm, kntc, mcm2, mcm5; smc2, etc.). In addition, several DNA replication and recombination repair genes (e.g., pola1, pole, rec52, rad54l, rpa1, parpbp, etc.) exhibit reduced expression in FL exposed X. maculatus skin. Some genes down modulated by FL are known to be associated with DNA repair and human diseases (e.g., atm2, brip1, fanc1, fancl, xrcc4, etc.). The overall suppression of genes involved with mitotic progression in the skin of adult fish is consistent with entry into the light phase of the circadian cycle. Current efforts are aimed at determining specific wavelengths that may lead to differential expression among the many genes affected by fluorescent light exposure. PMID:26334372

  6. Mutation in cysteine bridge domain of the gamma-subunit affects light regulation of the ATP synthase in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The chloroplast ATP synthase functions to synthesize ATP from ADP and free phosphate coupled by the electrochemical potential across the thylakoid membrane in the light. The light-dependent regulation of ATP synthase activity is carried out in part through redox modulation of a cysteine bridge in CF...

  7. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  8. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-06-27

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals.

  9. Chloroplast signaling and LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 regulate crosstalk between light acclimation and immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mühlenbock, Per; Szechynska-Hebda, Magdalena; Plaszczyca, Marian; Baudo, Marcela; Mateo, Alfonso; Mullineaux, Philip M; Parker, Jane E; Karpinska, Barbara; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2008-09-01

    Plants are simultaneously exposed to abiotic and biotic hazards. Here, we show that local and systemic acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to excess excitation energy (EEE) is associated with cell death and is regulated by specific redox changes of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. These redox changes cause a rapid decrease of stomatal conductance, global induction of ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2 and PATHOGEN RESISTANCE1, and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ethylene that signals through ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). We provide evidence that multiple hormonal/ROS signaling pathways regulate the plant's response to EEE and that EEE stimulates systemic acquired resistance and basal defenses to virulent biotrophic bacteria. In the Arabidopsis LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (lsd1) null mutant that is deregulated for EEE acclimation responses, propagation of EEE-induced programmed cell death depends on the plant defense regulators ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4). We find that EDS1 and PAD4 operate upstream of ethylene and ROS production in the EEE response. The data suggest that the balanced activities of LSD1, EDS1, PAD4, and EIN2 regulate signaling of programmed cell death, light acclimation, and holistic defense responses that are initiated, at least in part, by redox changes of the PQ pool.

  10. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  11. Migration in Deltas: An Integrated Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Robert J.; Hutton, Craig W.; Lazar, Attila; Adger, W. Neil; Allan, Andrew; Arto, Inaki; Vincent, Katharine; Rahman, Munsur; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Sugata, Hazra; Ghosh, Tuhin; Codjoe, Sam; Appeaning-Addo, Kwasi

    2017-04-01

    Deltas and low-lying coastal regions have long been perceived as vulnerable to global sea-level rise, with the potential for mass displacement of exposed populations. The assumption of mass displacement of populations in deltas requires a comprehensive reassessment in the light of present and future migration in deltas, including the potential role of adaptation to influence these decisions. At present, deltas are subject to multiple drivers of environmental change and often have high population densities as they are accessible and productive ecosystems. Climate change, catchment management, subsidence and land cover change drive environmental change across all deltas. Populations in deltas are also highly mobile, with significant urbanization trends and the growth of large cities and mega-cities within or adjacent to deltas across Asia and Africa. Such migration is driven primarily by economic opportunity, yet environmental change in general, and climate change in particular, are likely to play an increasing direct and indirect role in future migration trends. The policy challenges centre on the role of migration within regional adaptation strategies to climate change; the protection of vulnerable populations; and the future of urban settlements within deltas. This paper reviews current knowledge on migration and adaptation to environmental change to discern specific issues pertinent to delta regions. It develops a new integrated methodology to assess present and future migration in deltas using the Volta delta in Ghana, Mahanadi delta in India and Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta across India and Bangladesh. The integrated method focuses on: biophysical changes and spatial distribution of vulnerability; demographic changes and migration decision-making using multiple methods and data; macro-economic trends and scenarios in the deltas; and the policies and governance structures that constrain and enable adaptation. The analysis is facilitated by a range of

  12. Two Essential Light Chains Regulate the MyoA Lever Arm To Promote Toxoplasma Gliding Motility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Melanie J; Alonso, Hernan; Enciso, Marta; Egarter, Saskia; Sheiner, Lilach; Meissner, Markus; Striepen, Boris; Smith, Brian J; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-09-15

    Key to the virulence of apicomplexan parasites is their ability to move through tissue and to invade and egress from host cells. Apicomplexan motility requires the activity of the glideosome, a multicomponent molecular motor composed of a type XIV myosin, MyoA. Here we identify a novel glideosome component, essential light chain 2 (ELC2), and functionally characterize the two essential light chains (ELC1 and ELC2) of MyoA in Toxoplasma. We show that these proteins are functionally redundant but are important for invasion, egress, and motility. Molecular simulations of the MyoA lever arm identify a role for Ca(2+) in promoting intermolecular contacts between the ELCs and the adjacent MLC1 light chain to stabilize this domain. Using point mutations predicted to ablate either the interaction with Ca(2+) or the interface between the two light chains, we demonstrate their contribution to the quality, displacement, and speed of gliding Toxoplasma parasites. Our work therefore delineates the importance of the MyoA lever arm and highlights a mechanism by which this domain could be stabilized in order to promote invasion, egress, and gliding motility in apicomplexan parasites. Tissue dissemination and host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma are pivotal to their pathogenesis. Central to these processes is gliding motility, which is driven by an actomyosin motor, the MyoA glideosome. Others have demonstrated the importance of the MyoA glideosome for parasite motility and virulence in mice. Disruption of its function may therefore have therapeutic potential, and yet a deeper mechanistic understanding of how it works is required. Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent phosphorylation and the direct binding of Ca(2+) to the essential light chain have been implicated in the regulation of MyoA activity. Here we identify a second essential light chain of MyoA and demonstrate the importance of both to Toxoplasma motility. We also investigate the role of Ca(2+) and

  13. Light differentially regulates cell division and the mRNA abundance of pea nucleolin during de-etiolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichler, S. A.; Balk, J.; Brown, M. E.; Woodruff, K.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    The abundance of plant nucleolin mRNA is regulated during de-etiolation by phytochrome. A close correlation between the mRNA abundance of nucleolin and mitosis has also been previously reported. These results raised the question of whether the effects of light on nucleolin mRNA expression were a consequence of light effects on mitosis. To test this we compared the kinetics of light-mediated increases in cell proliferation with that of light-mediated changes in the abundance of nucleolin mRNA using plumules of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. These experiments show that S-phase increases 9 h after a red light pulse, followed by M-phase increases in the plumule leaves at 12 h post-irradiation, a time course consistent with separately measured kinetics of red light-induced increases in the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. These increases in cell cycle-regulated genes are photoreversible, implying that the light-induced increases in cell proliferation are, like nucleolin mRNA expression, regulated via phytochrome. Red light stimulates increases in the mRNA for nucleolin at 6 h post-irradiation, prior to any cell proliferation changes and concurrent with the reported timing of phytochrome-mediated increases of rRNA abundance. After a green light pulse, nucleolin mRNA levels increase without increasing S-phase or M-phase. Studies in animals and yeast indicate that nucleolin plays a significant role in ribosome biosynthesis. Consistent with this function, pea nucleolin can rescue nucleolin deletion mutants of yeast that are defective in rRNA synthesis. Our data show that during de-etiolation, the increased expression of nucleolin mRNA is more directly regulated by light than by mitosis.

  14. Light differentially regulates cell division and the mRNA abundance of pea nucleolin during de-etiolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichler, S. A.; Balk, J.; Brown, M. E.; Woodruff, K.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    The abundance of plant nucleolin mRNA is regulated during de-etiolation by phytochrome. A close correlation between the mRNA abundance of nucleolin and mitosis has also been previously reported. These results raised the question of whether the effects of light on nucleolin mRNA expression were a consequence of light effects on mitosis. To test this we compared the kinetics of light-mediated increases in cell proliferation with that of light-mediated changes in the abundance of nucleolin mRNA using plumules of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. These experiments show that S-phase increases 9 h after a red light pulse, followed by M-phase increases in the plumule leaves at 12 h post-irradiation, a time course consistent with separately measured kinetics of red light-induced increases in the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. These increases in cell cycle-regulated genes are photoreversible, implying that the light-induced increases in cell proliferation are, like nucleolin mRNA expression, regulated via phytochrome. Red light stimulates increases in the mRNA for nucleolin at 6 h post-irradiation, prior to any cell proliferation changes and concurrent with the reported timing of phytochrome-mediated increases of rRNA abundance. After a green light pulse, nucleolin mRNA levels increase without increasing S-phase or M-phase. Studies in animals and yeast indicate that nucleolin plays a significant role in ribosome biosynthesis. Consistent with this function, pea nucleolin can rescue nucleolin deletion mutants of yeast that are defective in rRNA synthesis. Our data show that during de-etiolation, the increased expression of nucleolin mRNA is more directly regulated by light than by mitosis.

  15. A leaf-peroxisomal protein, hydroxypyruvate reductase, is produced by light-regulated alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Mano, S; Hayashi, M; Nishimura, M

    2000-01-01

    Hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) is localized in leaf peroxisomes in plants, and it plays an important role in the glycolate pathway of photorespiration. In this laboratory, two highly homologous cDNAs for pumpkin HPR (HPR1 and HPR2) have been obtained, and appear to be produced from the same primary transcript by alternative splicing. Analyses at the mRNA level showed that the amounts of the two HPR mRNAs is changed in response to light, suggesting that light changes the splicing pattern of HPR pre-mRNA from almost equal amounts of two HPR mRNAs to greater production of HPR2 mRNA. From the sequences of the two HPR cDNAs, the HPR1 protein, but not the HPR2 protein, was found to have a targeting sequence into peroxisomes at the carboxy terminus. Analyses of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein confirmed the different subcellular localizations of the two HPR proteins. These findings indicate the presence of light-regulated alternative splicing of HPR pre-mRNA, which controls the subcellular localizations of two HPR proteins in pumpkin cells.

  16. Volvoxrhodopsin, a light-regulated sensory photoreceptor of the spheroidal green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed Central

    Ebnet, E; Fischer, M; Deininger, W; Hegemann, P

    1999-01-01

    Somatic cells of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri contain a visual rhodopsin that controls the organism's phototactic behavior via two independent photoreceptor currents. Here, we report the identification of an opsinlike gene, designated as volvoxopsin (vop). The encoded protein exhibits homologies to the opsin of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (chlamyopsin) and to the entire animal opsin family, thus providing new perspectives on opsin evolution. Volvoxopsin accumulates within the eyes of somatic cells. However, the vop transcript is detectable only in the reproductive eyeless gonidia and embryos. vop mRNA levels increase 400-fold during embryogenesis, when embryos develop in darkness, whereas the vop transcript does not accumulate when embryos develop in the light. An antisense transformant, T3, was generated. This transformant produces 10 times less volvoxopsin than does the wild type. In T3, the vop transcript is virtually absent, whereas the antisense transcript is predominant and light regulated. It follows that vop expression is under light-dependent transcriptional control but that volvoxopsin itself is not the regulatory photoreceptor. Transformant T3 is phototactic, but its phototactic sensitivity is reduced 10-fold relative to the parental wild-type strain HK10. Thus, we offer definitive genetic evidence that a rhodopsin serves as the photoreceptor for phototaxis in a green alga. PMID:10449581

  17. Dependence of aptamer activity on opposed terminal extensions: improvement of light-regulation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Buff, Maximilian C. R.; Schäfer, Florian; Wulffen, Bernhard; Müller, Jens; Pötzsch, Bernd; Heckel, Alexander; Mayer, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers that can be regulated with light allow precise control of protein activity in space and time and hence of biological function in general. In a previous study, we showed that the activity of the thrombin-binding aptamer HD1 can be turned off by irradiation using a light activatable ‘caged’ intramolecular antisense-domain. However, the activity of the presented aptamer in its ON state was only mediocre. Here we studied the nature of this loss in activity in detail and found that switching from 5′- to 3′-extensions affords aptamers that are even more potent than the unmodified HD1. In particular we arrived at derivatives that are now more active than the aptamer NU172 that is currently in phase 2 clinical trials as an anticoagulant. As a result, we present light-regulatable aptamers with a superior activity in their ON state and an almost digital ON/OFF behavior upon irradiation. PMID:20007153

  18. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  19. A ternary AppA-PpsR-DNA complex mediates light regulation of photosynthesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Andreas; Heintz, Udo; Lindner, Robert; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-07-01

    The anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides uses different energy sources, depending on environmental conditions including aerobic respiration or, in the absence of oxygen, photosynthesis. Photosynthetic genes are repressed at high oxygen tension, but at intermediate levels their partial expression prepares the bacterium for using light energy. Illumination, however, enhances repression under semiaerobic conditions. Here, we describe molecular details of two proteins mediating oxygen and light control of photosynthesis-gene expression: the light-sensing antirepressor AppA and the transcriptional repressor PpsR. Our crystal structures of both proteins and their complex and hydrogen/deuterium-exchange data show that light activation of AppA-PpsR2 affects the PpsR effector region within the complex. DNA binding studies demonstrate the formation of a light-sensitive ternary AppA-PpsR-DNA complex. We discuss implications of these results for regulation by light and oxygen, highlighting new insights into blue light-mediated signal transduction.

  20. The ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, B.; Moyle, P.B. . Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes an ecosystem significantly different from other delta ecosystems in North America. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the 60 largest river deltas in the world and is the largest river delta on the west coast. As the hub of California's water system, the delta is of immense municipal, agricultural, and industrial importance. The amount of freshwater that flows through the delta controls the delta's productivity and regulates the life cycles of many of its organisms. The vast estuary of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers is one of the most highly modified and intensively managed estuaries in the world. Biological processes in the delta are obscured by the temporal dynamics of the system. Many of the most significant alterations, such as leveeing, diking, and agricultural practices, are not now recognized as such by most citizens, making conservation and protection of the delta difficult. 308 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Red light regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and gravitropism in etiolated pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steed, C. L.; Taylor, L. K.; Harrison, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    During gravitropism, the accumulation of auxin in the lower side of the stem causes increased growth and the subsequent curvature, while the gaseous hormone ethylene plays a modulating role in regulating the kinetics of growth asymmetries. Light also contributes to the control of gravitropic curvature, potentially through its interaction with ethylene biosynthesis. In this study, red-light pulse treatment of etiolated pea epicotyls was evaluated for its effect on ethylene biosynthesis during gravitropic curvature. Ethylene biosynthesis analysis included measurements of ethylene; the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); malonyl-conjugated ACC (MACC); and expression levels of pea ACC oxidase (Ps-ACO1) and ACC synthase (Ps-ACS1, Ps-ACS2) genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Red-pulsed seedlings were given a 6 min pulse of 11 micromoles m-2 s-1 red-light 15 h prior to horizontal reorientation for consistency with the timeline of red-light inhibition of ethylene production. Red-pulse treatment significantly reduced ethylene production and MACC levels in epicotyl tissue. However, there was no effect of red-pulse treatment on ACC level, or expression of ACS or ACO genes. During gravitropic curvature, ethylene production increased from 60 to 120 min after horizontal placement in both control and red-pulsed epicotyls. In red-pulsed tissues, ACC levels increased by 120 min after horizontal reorientation, accompanied by decreased MACC levels in the lower portion of the epicotyl. Overall, our results demonstrate that ethylene production in etiolated epicotyls increases after the initiation of curvature. This ethylene increase may inhibit cell growth in the lower portion of the epicotyl and contribute to tip straightening and reduced overall curvature observed after the initial 60 min of curvature in etiolated pea epicotyls.

  2. Red light regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and gravitropism in etiolated pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steed, C. L.; Taylor, L. K.; Harrison, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    During gravitropism, the accumulation of auxin in the lower side of the stem causes increased growth and the subsequent curvature, while the gaseous hormone ethylene plays a modulating role in regulating the kinetics of growth asymmetries. Light also contributes to the control of gravitropic curvature, potentially through its interaction with ethylene biosynthesis. In this study, red-light pulse treatment of etiolated pea epicotyls was evaluated for its effect on ethylene biosynthesis during gravitropic curvature. Ethylene biosynthesis analysis included measurements of ethylene; the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); malonyl-conjugated ACC (MACC); and expression levels of pea ACC oxidase (Ps-ACO1) and ACC synthase (Ps-ACS1, Ps-ACS2) genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Red-pulsed seedlings were given a 6 min pulse of 11 micromoles m-2 s-1 red-light 15 h prior to horizontal reorientation for consistency with the timeline of red-light inhibition of ethylene production. Red-pulse treatment significantly reduced ethylene production and MACC levels in epicotyl tissue. However, there was no effect of red-pulse treatment on ACC level, or expression of ACS or ACO genes. During gravitropic curvature, ethylene production increased from 60 to 120 min after horizontal placement in both control and red-pulsed epicotyls. In red-pulsed tissues, ACC levels increased by 120 min after horizontal reorientation, accompanied by decreased MACC levels in the lower portion of the epicotyl. Overall, our results demonstrate that ethylene production in etiolated epicotyls increases after the initiation of curvature. This ethylene increase may inhibit cell growth in the lower portion of the epicotyl and contribute to tip straightening and reduced overall curvature observed after the initial 60 min of curvature in etiolated pea epicotyls.

  3. Red Light Combined with Blue Light Irradiation Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis in Skin Keratinocytes in Combination with Low Concentrations of Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qing; Ren, Qu; Wei, Lizhao

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a widely known natural phytochemical from plant Curcuma longa. In recent years, curcumin has received increasing attention because of its capability to induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation as well as its anti-inflammatory properties in different cancer cells. However, the therapeutic benefits of curcumin are severely hampered due to its particularly low absorption via trans-dermal or oral bioavailability. Phototherapy with visible light is gaining more and more support in dermatological therapy. Red light is part of the visible light spectrum, which is able to deeply penetrate the skin to about 6 mm, and directly affect the fibroblast of the skin dermis. Blue light is UV-free irradiation which is fit for treating chronic inflammation diseases. In this study, we show that curcumin at low concentrations (1.25–3.12 μM) has a strong anti-proliferative effect on TNF-α-induced psoriasis-like inflammation when applied in combination with light-emitting-diode devices. The treatment was especially effective when LED blue light at 405 nm was combined with red light at 630 or 660 nm, which markedly amplified the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of curcumin. The experimental results demonstrated that this treatment reduced the viability of human skin keratinocytes, decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, inhibited NF-κB activity and activated caspase-8 and caspase-9 while preserving the cell membrane integrity. Moreover, the combined treatment also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of Akt and ERK. Taken together, our results indicated that the combination of curcumin with LED blue light united red light irradiation can attain a higher efficiency of regulating proliferation and apoptosis in skin keratinocytes. PMID:26382065

  4. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  5. AMPK Regulates Mitotic Spindle Orientation through Phosphorylation of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Thaiparambil, Jose T.; Eggers, Carrie M.

    2012-01-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine172 phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine19 phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLCser19) and spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLCser19 spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments. PMID:22688514

  6. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta is a critical regulator of insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Billiard, J.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; McCarthy, T. L.; Rotwein, P.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a major role in promoting skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. Prostaglandin E2 and other agents that induce cAMP production enhance IGF-I gene transcription in cultured rat osteoblasts through a DNA element termed HS3D, located in the proximal part of the major rat IGF-I promoter. We previously determined that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta) is the key cAMP-stimulated regulator of IGF-I transcription in these cells and showed that it transactivates the rat IGF-I promoter through the HS3D site. We now have defined the physical-chemical properties and functional consequences of the interactions between C/EBPdelta and HS3D. C/EBPdelta, expressed in COS-7 cells or purified as a recombinant protein from Escherichia coli, bound to HS3D with an affinity at least equivalent to that of the albumin D-site, a known high affinity C/EBP binding sequence, and both DNA elements competed equally for C/EBPdelta. C/EBPdelta bound to HS3D as a dimer, with protein-DNA contact points located on guanine residues on both DNA strands within and just adjacent to the core C/EBP half-site, GCAAT, as determined by methylation interference footprinting. C/EBPdelta also formed protein-protein dimers in the absence of interactions with its DNA binding site, as indicated by results of glutaraldehyde cross-linking studies. As established by competition gel-mobility shift experiments, the conserved HS3D sequence from rat, human, and chicken also bound C/EBPdelta with similar affinity. We also found that prostaglandin E2-induced expression of reporter genes containing human IGF-I promoter 1 or four tandem copies of the human HS3D element fused to a minimal promoter and show that these effects were enhanced by a co-transfected C/EBPdelta expression plasmid. Taken together, our results provide evidence that C/EBPdelta is a critical activator of IGF-I gene transcription in osteoblasts and potentially in

  7. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta is a critical regulator of insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Billiard, J.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; McCarthy, T. L.; Rotwein, P.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a major role in promoting skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. Prostaglandin E2 and other agents that induce cAMP production enhance IGF-I gene transcription in cultured rat osteoblasts through a DNA element termed HS3D, located in the proximal part of the major rat IGF-I promoter. We previously determined that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta) is the key cAMP-stimulated regulator of IGF-I transcription in these cells and showed that it transactivates the rat IGF-I promoter through the HS3D site. We now have defined the physical-chemical properties and functional consequences of the interactions between C/EBPdelta and HS3D. C/EBPdelta, expressed in COS-7 cells or purified as a recombinant protein from Escherichia coli, bound to HS3D with an affinity at least equivalent to that of the albumin D-site, a known high affinity C/EBP binding sequence, and both DNA elements competed equally for C/EBPdelta. C/EBPdelta bound to HS3D as a dimer, with protein-DNA contact points located on guanine residues on both DNA strands within and just adjacent to the core C/EBP half-site, GCAAT, as determined by methylation interference footprinting. C/EBPdelta also formed protein-protein dimers in the absence of interactions with its DNA binding site, as indicated by results of glutaraldehyde cross-linking studies. As established by competition gel-mobility shift experiments, the conserved HS3D sequence from rat, human, and chicken also bound C/EBPdelta with similar affinity. We also found that prostaglandin E2-induced expression of reporter genes containing human IGF-I promoter 1 or four tandem copies of the human HS3D element fused to a minimal promoter and show that these effects were enhanced by a co-transfected C/EBPdelta expression plasmid. Taken together, our results provide evidence that C/EBPdelta is a critical activator of IGF-I gene transcription in osteoblasts and potentially in

  8. Women’s status in the Polish Society in light of legal regulations till year 2015

    PubMed

    Wróbel–Harmas, Monika; Rachuta, Krzysztof

    Gender equality and women’s rights are the subjects of ongoing discussions in societies all over the world. Women, more often than men, are likely to become victims of gender-based violence. The studies carried out in Europe show that only the every second woman is aware of gender-based legal regulations in her country, 19% cannot recognise any support service, and what is particularly important for the health care system – 87% would like their medical doctor to ask patients with physical injuries about potential violence experienced. The Paper aims at presenting the women’s status in the Polish society in light of current legal regulations implemented to guarantee equal treatment of both genders in every walk of life, which then reflects in the society’s physical and emotional health condition. The Authors analysed the current legal regulations in Poland with the aim to draw a preliminary evaluation of the women’s status in Poland as far as the realisation of the Third Millennium Development Goal within the UN Millennium Project Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women is concerned. The basic tool to combat violence in Poland is so-called the Blue Cards system. Till 2015 the Polish current law protected the women’s rights to a great extent. However, many issues were not covered by legal regulations, and in a great number of cases, women’s rights were practically not respected. Consequently, despite resolutions and international conventions ratified by Poland in order to legally protect women’s rights, they still remain a partially solved issue.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    PubMed

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  10. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  11. Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

    2010-12-03

    The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

  12. Effects of Daytime Exposure to Light from Blue-Enriched Light-Emitting Diodes on the Nighttime Melatonin Amplitude and Circadian Regulation of Rodent Metabolism and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Robert T; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hoffman, Aaron E; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Blask, David E

    2016-01-01

    Regular cycles of exposure to light and dark control pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinate circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in mammals. Previously we demonstrated that the peak circadian amplitude of nocturnal blood melatonin levels of rats were more than 6-fold higher after exposure to cool white fluorescent (CWF) light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we evaluated the effects of light-phase exposure of rats to white light-emitting diodes (LED), which emit light rich in the blue-appearing portion of the visible spectrum (465-485 nm), compared with standard broadspectrum CWF light, on melatonin levels during the subsequent dark phase and on plasma measures of metabolism and physiology. Compared with those in male rats under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle in CWF light, peak plasma melatonin levels at the middark phase (time, 2400) in rats under daytime LED light were over 7-fold higher, whereas midlight phase levels (1200) were low in both groups. Food and water intakes, body growth rate, and total fatty acid content of major metabolic tissues were markedly lower, whereas protein content was higher, in the LED group compared with CWF group. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of total fatty acids, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were generally lower in LED-exposed rats. Therefore, daytime exposure of rats to LED light with high blue emissions has a marked positive effect on the circadian regulation of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and physiologic parameters associated with the promotion of animal health and wellbeing and thus may influence scientific outcomes.

  13. Effects of Daytime Exposure to Light from Blue-Enriched Light-Emitting Diodes on the Nighttime Melatonin Amplitude and Circadian Regulation of Rodent Metabolism and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hoffman, Aaron E; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Blask, David E

    2016-01-01

    Regular cycles of exposure to light and dark control pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinate circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in mammals. Previously we demonstrated that the peak circadian amplitude of nocturnal blood melatonin levels of rats were more than 6-fold higher after exposure to cool white fluorescent (CWF) light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we evaluated the effects of light-phase exposure of rats to white light-emitting diodes (LED), which emit light rich in the blue-appearing portion of the visible spectrum (465–485 nm), compared with standard broad-spectrum CWF light, on melatonin levels during the subsequent dark phase and on plasma measures of metabolism and physiology. Compared with those in male rats under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle in CWF light, peak plasma melatonin levels at the middark phase (time, 2400) in rats under daytime LED light were over 7-fold higher, whereas midlight phase levels (1200) were low in both groups. Food and water intakes, body growth rate, and total fatty acid content of major metabolic tissues were markedly lower, whereas protein content was higher, in the LED group compared with CWF group. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of total fatty acids, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were generally lower in LED-exposed rats. Therefore, daytime exposure of rats to LED light with high blue emissions has a marked positive effect on the circadian regulation of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and physiologic parameters associated with the promotion of animal health and wellbeing and thus may influence scientific outcomes. PMID:27780004

  14. Nucleus accumbens NMDA receptor activation regulates amphetamine cross-sensitization and deltaFosB expression following sexual experience in male rats.

    PubMed

    Beloate, Lauren N; Weems, Peyton W; Casey, Graham R; Webb, Ian C; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-02-01

    Sexual experience in male rats followed by a period of abstinence causes sensitization to d-Amphetamine (Amph) reward, evidenced by an increased conditioned place preference (CPP) for low doses of Amph. Moreover, sexual experience induces neural plasticity within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), including induction of deltaFosB, which plays a key role in Amph reward cross-sensitization. The NMDA receptor subunit NR1 is also upregulated by mating, but the functional relevance of NMDA receptors in sex experience-induced effects is unknown. Here, we examined the influence of intra-NAc MK 801 infusions on sex experience-induced NAc deltaFosB and cFos expression, as well as mating- and Amph-induced CPP in adult male rats. In experiment 1, males received MK 801 or saline into the NAc during each of 4 consecutive days of mating or handling and were tested for Amph CPP and experience-induced deltaFosB 10 days later. Intra-NAc MK 801 during sexual behavior prevented experience-induced increases in Amph CPP and NAc deltaFosB expression without affecting sexual behavior. In experiment 2, the effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced CPP were examined by intra-NAc infusion of MK 801 or saline prior to mating on conditioning days. Intra-NAc MK 801 did not affect mating-induced CPP. Next, effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced cFos immunoreactivity were examined. MK 801 prevented mating-induced cFos expression in NAc shell and core. Together, these results provide evidence that NAc NMDA receptor activation during sexual behavior plays a key role in mating-induced cFos and deltaFosB expression and subsequent experience-induced cross-sensitization to Amph reward. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prolonged illumination up-regulates arrestin and two guanylate cyclase activating proteins: a novel mechanism for light adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Codega, Paolo; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia; Bedolla, Diana E; Subkhankulova, Tatiana; Livesey, Frederick J; Cervetto, Luigi; Torre, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Light adaptation in vertebrate photoreceptors is mediated by multiple mechanisms, one of which could involve nuclear feedback and changes in gene expression. Therefore, we have investigated light adaptation-associated changes in gene expression using microarrays and real-time PCR in isolated photoreceptors, in cultured isolated retinas and in acutely isolated retinas. In all three preparations after 2 h of an exposure to a bright light, we observed an up-regulation of almost 100% of three genes, Sag, Guca1a and Guca1b, coding for proteins known to play a major role in phototransduction: arrestin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. No detectable up-regulation occurred for light exposures of less than 1 h. Functional in vivo electroretinographic tests show that a partial recovery of the dark current occurred 1–2 h after prolonged illumination with a steady light that initially caused a substantial suppression of the photoresponse. These observations demonstrate that prolonged illumination results in the up-regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the phototransduction signalling cascade, possibly underlying a novel component of light adaptation occurring 1–2 h after the onset of a steady bright light. PMID:19332500

  16. Prolonged illumination up-regulates arrestin and two guanylate cyclase activating proteins: a novel mechanism for light adaptation.

    PubMed

    Codega, Paolo; Della Santina, Luca; Gargini, Claudia; Bedolla, Diana E; Subkhankulova, Tatiana; Livesey, Frederick J; Cervetto, Luigi; Torre, Vincent

    2009-06-01

    Light adaptation in vertebrate photoreceptors is mediated by multiple mechanisms, one of which could involve nuclear feedback and changes in gene expression. Therefore, we have investigated light adaptation-associated changes in gene expression using microarrays and real-time PCR in isolated photoreceptors, in cultured isolated retinas and in acutely isolated retinas. In all three preparations after 2 h of an exposure to a bright light, we observed an up-regulation of almost 100% of three genes, Sag, Guca1a and Guca1b, coding for proteins known to play a major role in phototransduction: arrestin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. No detectable up-regulation occurred for light exposures of less than 1 h. Functional in vivo electroretinographic tests show that a partial recovery of the dark current occurred 1-2 h after prolonged illumination with a steady light that initially caused a substantial suppression of the photoresponse. These observations demonstrate that prolonged illumination results in the up-regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the phototransduction signalling cascade, possibly underlying a novel component of light adaptation occurring 1-2 h after the onset of a steady bright light.

  17. Shedding light on auxin movement: light-regulation of polar auxin transport in the photocontrol of plant development.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Wang, Juan; Ruberti, Ida; Vernoux, Teva; Xu, Jian

    2013-03-01

    By being sessile, plants have evolved a remarkable capacity to perceive and respond to changes in environmental conditions throughout their life cycle. Light represents probably the most important environmental factor that impinge on plant development because, other than supplying the energy source for photosynthesis, it also provides seasonal and positional information that are essential for the plant survival and fitness. Changes in the light environment can dramatically alter plant morphogenesis, especially during the early phases of plant life, and a compelling amount of evidence indicates that light-mediated changes in auxin homeostasis are central in these processes. Auxin exerts its morphogenetic action through instructive hormone gradients that drive developmental programs of plants. Such gradients are formed and maintained via an accurate control on directional auxin transport. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the influence of the light environment on polar auxin transport.

  18. Regulation of red fluorescent light emission in a cryptic marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Animal colouration is a trade-off between being seen by intended, intra- or inter-specific receivers while not being seen by the unintended. Many fishes solve this problem by adaptive colouration. Here, we investigate whether this also holds for fluorescent pigments. In those aquatic environments in which the ambient light is dominated by bluish light, red fluorescence can generate high-contrast signals. The marine, cryptic fish Tripterygion delaisi inhabits such environments and has a bright red-fluorescent iris that can be rapidly up- and down-regulated. Here, we described the physiological and cellular mechanism of this phenomenon using a neurostimulation treatment with KCl and histology. Results KCl-treatment revealed that eye fluorescence regulation is achieved through dispersal and aggregation of black-pigmented melanosomes within melanophores. Histology showed that globular, fluorescent iridophores on the anterior side of the iris are grouped and each group is encased by finger-like extensions of a single posterior melanophore. Together they form a so-called chromatophore unit. By dispersal and aggregation of melanosomes into and out of the peripheral membranous extensions of the melanophore, the fluorescent iridophores are covered or revealed on the anterior (outside) of the iris. Conclusion T. delaisi possesses a well-developed mechanism to control the fluorescent emission from its eyes, which may be advantageous given its cryptic lifestyle. This is the first time chromatophore units are found to control fluorescent emission in marine teleost fishes. We expect other fluorescent fish species to use similar mechanisms in the iris or elsewhere in the body. In contrast to a previously described mechanism based on dendritic fluorescent chromatophores, chromatophore units control fluorescent emission through the cooperation between two chromatophore types: an emitting and an occluding type. The discovery of a second mechanism for fluorescence

  19. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  20. Translational regulation of light-induced ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase gene expression in amaranth.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J O; Nikolau, B J; Carr, J P; Klessig, D F

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was examined in amaranth cotyledons in response to changes in illumination. When dark-grown cotyledons were transferred into light, synthesis of the large- and small-subunit polypeptides was initiated very rapidly, before any increase in the levels of their corresponding mRNAs. Similarly, when light-grown cotyledons were transferred to total darkness, synthesis of the large- and small-subunit proteins was rapidly depressed without changes in mRNA levels for either subunit. In vitro translation or in vivo pulse-chase experiments indicated that these apparent changes in protein synthesis were not due to alterations in the functionality of the mRNAs or to protein turnover, respectively. These results, in combination with our previous studies, suggest that the expression of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase genes can be adjusted rapidly at the translational level and over a longer period through changes in mRNA accumulation. Images PMID:3785198

  1. Light-regulated, tissue-specific immunophilins in a higher plant.

    PubMed Central

    Luan, S; Albers, M W; Schreiber, S L

    1994-01-01

    In addition to their application in organ transplantation, immunosuppressive drugs are valuable tools for studying signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Using affinity chromatography, we have purified immunosuppressive drug receptors (immunophilins) from fava bean. Proteins belonging to both major classes of the immunophilin family identified from animal sources [FK506- and rapamycin-binding proteins (FKBPs) and cyclophilins] were present in this higher plant. FKBP13, the most abundant FKBP family member in leaf tissues, was not detected in root tissues, whereas other FKBPs were present in both tissues. While the abundance of cyclophilin A in leaves was similar to that in roots, cyclophilin B/C was expressed at a much higher level in leaf tissues than in root tissues. Subcellular localization of immunophilins in mesophyll cells showed that chloroplasts contained FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C but not other members, which explains the preferential expression of these two proteins in leaves over roots. The abundance of chloroplast-localized immunophilins, FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C, was regulated by light. Although etiolated leaves produced detectable levels of cyclophilin B/C, they did not express FKBP13. Illumination of etiolated plants dramatically increased the expression of both FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C. The light-induced expression of FKBP13 is closely correlated with the accumulation of chlorophyll in the leaf tissue. Our findings suggest that FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C may play a specific role in chloroplasts. Images PMID:7508125

  2. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qijun; Judelson, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  3. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  4. Proposed Rule for Modification of Federal On Board Diagnostic Regulations for: Light Duty Vehicles, Light Duty Trucks, Medium Duty Passenger Vehicles, Complete Heavy Duty Vehicles and Engines Intended for Use in Heavy Duty Vehicles Weighing 14,000 Pounds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Following is information for the proposed rule for the Modification of Federal On Board Diagnostic Regulations for Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, etc. Includes links to Federal Register and final rule.

  5. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  6. Regulation of cellular marker modulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn injured mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakar, Bharath; Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Rai, Sharada; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-12-01

    The present study intends to understand the importance of cellular marker in tissue regeneration regulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn inflicted mice. Under anesthetic conditions, the thermal injury was induced on Swiss albino mice of either sex. Following injury, the animals were randomly divided into three groups; i. e., un-illuminated control, the group treated with 5% Povidone iodine (reference standard) and single exposure of 3 J/cm2 (830 nm). Burn tissue samples from each group were excised at day 6 post burn injury upon euthanization and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) staining was performed on the selected sections to asses proliferation and angiogenesis at day 6 post-injury. For immunohistochemical analysis, tissue sections from all the three treatment groups on day 6 were stained using specific antibody against Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The results of the histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed improved tissue restoration in animals treated with optimal laser influence as compared to un-illuminated controls. The findings of present study clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of 830 nm laser in burn wound healing and its influence in regulating the cellular marker.

  7. [Functional regulation of endothelial Myosin light chain kinase in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma cells].

    PubMed

    Xin, Hua; Han, Zhen-guo

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the functional regulation of endothelial Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. An in vitro model of fibrosarcoma cell transmigration across a monolayer of HUVEC cultured on collagen gel was applied to observe extravascular migration of HT1080 cells,and were the electrical resistance of HUVEC monolayer and endothelial MLC phosphorylation in extravascular migration of HT1080 cells. HT1080 cells migrated through endothelial cells into collagen gel, the electrical resistance of a HUVEC monolayer was reduced and endothelial MLC phosphorylation was enhanced in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma cells. Endothelial MLCK inhibitor (ML-7) blocked extravascular migration of HT1080 cells and inhibited reduction of electrical resistance of a HUVEC monolayer and enhancement of endothelial MLC phosphorylation in extravascular migration of HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Endothelial MLCK regulates fibrosarcoma cell transendothelial migration through MLC phosphorylation, leading to cytoskeletal reorganization and endothelial cell constriction, then fibrosarcoma cells migrate into extravascular tissue through the gaps between endothelial cells.

  8. Pharmacological induction of skin pigmentation unveils the neuroendocrine circuit regulated by light.

    PubMed

    Bertolesi, Gabriel E; Vazhappilly, Sherene T; Hehr, Carrie L; McFarlane, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Light-regulated skin colour change is an important physiological process in invertebrates and lower vertebrates, and includes daily circadian variation and camouflage (i.e. background adaptation). The photoactivation of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) in the eye initiates an uncharacterized neuroendocrine circuit that regulates melanin dispersion/aggregation through the secretion of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). We developed experimental models of normal or enucleated Xenopus embryos, as well as in situ cultures of skin of isolated dorsal head and tails, to analyse pharmacological induction of skin pigmentation and α-MSH synthesis. Both processes are triggered by a melanopsin inhibitor, AA92593, as well as chloride channel modulators. The AA9253 effect is eye-dependent, while functional data in vivo point to GABAA receptors expressed on pituitary melanotrope cells as the chloride channel blocker target. Based on the pharmacological data, we suggest a neuroendocrine circuit linking mRGCs with α-MSH secretion, which is used normally during background adaptation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Regulation of Root Greening by Light and Auxin/Cytokinin Signaling in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Baba, Shinsuke; Obayashi, Takeshi; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Keränen, Mika; Aro, Eva-Mari; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Keiko; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2012-01-01

    Tight coordination between plastid differentiation and plant development is best evidenced by the synchronized development of photosynthetic tissues and the biogenesis of chloroplasts. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana roots demonstrate accelerated chlorophyll accumulation and chloroplast development when they are detached from shoots. However, this phenomenon is repressed by auxin treatment. Mutant analyses suggest that auxin transported from the shoot represses root greening via the function of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID14, AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7), and ARF19. Cytokinin signaling, on the contrary, is required for chlorophyll biosynthesis in roots. The regulation by auxin/cytokinin is dependent on the transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), which is required for the expression of key chlorophyll biosynthesis genes in roots. The expression of yet another root greening transcription factor, GOLDEN2-LIKE2 (GLK2), was found to be regulated in opposing directions by auxin and cytokinin. Furthermore, both the hormone signaling and the GLK transcription factors modified the accumulation of HY5 in roots. Overexpression of GLKs in the hy5 mutant provided evidence that GLKs require HY5 to maximize their activities in root greening. We conclude that the combination of HY5 and GLKs, functioning downstream of light and auxin/cytokinin signaling pathways, is responsible for coordinated expression of the key genes in chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:22415275

  10. Transcriptional and translational regulation of nitrogenase in light-dark- and continuous-light-grown cultures of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142.

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, M S; Sherman, D M; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium which demonstrated extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. N2 fixation and respiration peaked at 24-h intervals early in the dark or subjective-dark period, whereas photosynthesis was approximately 12 h out of phase and peaked toward the end of the light or subjective-light phase. Gene regulation studies demonstrated that nitrogenase is carefully controlled at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Indeed, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 has developed an expensive mode of regulation, such that nitrogenase was synthesized and degraded each day. These patterns were seen when cells were grown under either light-dark or continuous-light conditions. Nitrogenase mRNA was synthesized from the nifHDK operon during the first 4 h of the dark period under light-dark conditions or during the first 6 h of the subjective-dark period when grown in continuous light. The nitrogenase NifH and NifDK subunits reached a maximum level at 4 to 10 h in the dark or subjective-dark periods and were shown by Western blotting and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry to be thoroughly degraded toward the end of the dark periods. An exception is the NifDK protein (MoFe-protein), which appeared not to be completely degraded under continuous-light conditions. We hypothesize that cellular O2 levels were kept low by decreasing photosynthesis and by increasing respiration in the early dark or subjective-dark periods to permit nitrogenase activity. The subsequent increase in O2 levels resulted in nitrogenase damage and eventual degradation. PMID:9209050

  11. Arsenic and heavy metal pollution in wetland soils from tidal freshwater and salt marshes before and after the flow-sediment regulation regime in the Yellow River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhang, Kejiang; Gao, Haifeng

    2012-07-01

    SummarySoil samples were collected in tidal freshwater and salt marshes in the Yellow River Delta (YRD), northern China, before and after the flow-sediment regulation. Total concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate the characteristics of heavy metal pollution in tidal wetlands before and after the regulation regime. The results demonstrated that marsh soils in both marshes had higher silt and total P contents, higher bulk density and lower sand contents after the flow-sediment regulation; moreover, soil salinity was significantly decreased in the tidal salt marsh. As and Cd concentrations were significantly higher in both marsh soils after the regulation than before, and there were no significant differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn measured before and after the regulation. No significant differences in heavy metal concentrations were observed between freshwater and salt marsh soils, either before or after the regulation. Before the regulation regime, soil organic matter, pH and sulfer (S) were the main factors influencing heavy metal distribution in tidal freshwater marshes, whereas for tidal salt marshes, the main factors are soil salinity and moisture, pH and S. However, bulk density and total P became the main influencing factors after the regulation. The sediment quality guidelines and geoaccumulation indices showed moderately or strongly polluted levels of As and Cd and unpolluted or moderately polluted levels of Cu, Pb and Zn; As and Cd pollution became more serious after the regulation. Factor analysis indicated thatthese heavy metals including As were closely correlated and orginated from common pollution sources before the flow-sediment regulation; however, the sources of As and Cd separated from the sources of Cu, Pb and Zn after the regulation regime, implying that the flow-sediment regulation regime

  12. Regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in the trabecular meshwork: role in aqueous humour outflow facility.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Vasantha; Deng, Peifeng; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Epstein, David L

    2005-02-01

    Cellular contraction and relaxation and integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue have been thought to influence aqueous humour outflow. However, the cellular pathways that regulate these events in TM cells are not well understood. In this study, we investigated physiological agonist-mediated regulation of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in the TM, and correlated such effects with alterations in aqueous outflow facility, since MLC phosphorylation is a critical biochemical determinant of cellular contraction in TM cells. Treatment of serum starved human TM cells with endothelin-1 (0.1 microM), thromboxane A2 mimetic U-46619 (1.0 microM), or angiotensin II (1 microM), all of which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptors, triggered activation of MLC phosphorylation, as determined by urea/glycerol-based Western blot analysis. Agonist-stimulated increase in MLC phosphorylation was associated with activation of Rho GTPase in TM cells, as determined in pull-down assays. In contrast, treatment of human TM cells with a novel Rho-kinase inhibitor H-1152 (0.1-2 microM), in the presence of serum reduced basal MLC phosphorylation. H-1152 also increased aqueous outflow facility significantly in a dose-dependent fashion, in perfusion studies with cadaver porcine eyes. This effect of H-1152 on outflow facility was associated with decreased MLC phosphorylation in TM tissue of drug-perfused eyes. Collectively, this study identifies potential physiological regulators of MLC phosphorylation in human TM cells and demonstrates the significance of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway-mediated MLC phosphorylation in modulation of aqueous outflow facility through TM.

  13. Selective down-regulation of the alpha6-integrin subunit in melanocytes by UVB light.

    PubMed

    Krengel, Sven; Stark, Imke; Geuchen, Christian; Knoppe, Bettina; Scheel, Gabriele; Schlenke, Peter; Gebert, Andreas; Wünsch, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Tronnier, Michael

    2005-06-01

    In vivo, melanocytes bind to laminin (LM) molecules of the basement membrane (BM) via the integrins alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1, and they adhere to neighbouring keratinocytes via E-cadherin. Only few studies have addressed the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on the interaction of melanocytes with their microenvironment. In this report, we examined the influence of UVB irradiation on the expression of the most important melanocyte-adhesion molecules (E-, N-cadherin, alpha2-, alpha3-, alpha5-, alpha6-, alphaV-, beta1-, beta3-integrins and ICAM-1) in vitro by flow cytometry. We were able to demonstrate that the alpha6-integrin subunit is selectively and reversibly down-regulated by UVB in a dwzm 150ose-dependent manner. In comparison, keratinocytes lacked UVB-inducible alterations in the expression of alpha6-integrin. In the presence of LM-1, the UVB-induced down-regulation of alpha6-integrin in melanocytes was significantly reduced. Moreover, LM-1 increased the resistance of melanocytes to UVB-induced cell death, as measured by annexinV-binding analysis. This effect was reversed by preincubation with an alpha6-integrin-blocking antibody. By immunofluorescence, we could demonstrate that UVB leads to a dose-dependent internalization of alpha6-integrin, providing an obvious explanation for the down-regulation on the outer cell surface observed by flow cytometry. We suggest that adhesion to LM-1 through alpha6-integrin represents a protective mechanism for melanocytes to withstand UVB damage. Through alpha6-integrin internalization, sunburns might alter the interaction between melanocytes and the BM, resulting in apoptosis induced by loss of anchorage (anoikis). Repeated sunburns may then lead to the selection of a population of melanocytes which are capable of anchorage-independent survival, culminating in solar nevogenesis and melanoma development.

  14. Regulation of CCM genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during conditions of light-dark cycles in synchronous cultures.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Srikanth; Kokkanti, Mallikarjuna; Chaudhari, Vishal; Shukla, Manish; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated transcript level changes of CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) genes during light-dark (12 h:12 h) cycles in synchronized Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at air-level CO(2). CCM gene transcript levels vary at various times of light-dark cycles, even at same air-level CO(2). Transcripts of inorganic carbon transporter genes (HLA3, LCI1, CCP1, CCP2 and LCIA) and mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase genes (CAH4 and CAH5) are up regulated in light, following which their levels decline in dark. Contrastingly, transcripts of chloroplast carbonic anhydrases namely CAH6, CAH3 and LCIB are up regulated in dark. CAH3 and LCIB transcript levels reached maximum by the end of dark, followed by high expression into early light period. In contrast, CAH6 transcript level stayed high in dark, followed by high level even in light. Moreover, the up regulation of transcripts in dark was undone by high CO(2), suggesting that the dark induced CCM transcripts were regulated by CO(2) even in dark when CCM is absent. Thus while the CAH3 transcript level modulations appear not to positively correlate with that of CCM, the protein regulation matched with CCM status: in spite of high transcript levels in dark, CAH3 protein reached peak level only in light and localized entirely to pyrenoid, a site functionally relevant for CCM. Moreover, in dark, CAH3 protein level not only reduced but also the protein localized as a diffused pattern in chloroplast. We propose that transcription of most CCM genes, followed by protein level changes including their intracellular localization of a subset is subject to light-dark cycles.

  15. Roles of Protein Kinase A and Adenylate Cyclase in Light-Modulated Cellulase Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, André; Tisch, Doris; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway represents a central signaling cascade with crucial functions in all organisms. Previous studies of Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) suggested a function of cAMP signaling in regulation of cellulase gene expression. We were therefore interested in how the crucial components of this pathway, adenylate cyclase (ACY1) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), would affect cellulase gene expression. We found that both ACY1 and PKA catalytic subunit 1 (PKAC1) are involved in regulation of vegetative growth but are not essential for sexual development. Interestingly, our results showed considerably increased transcript abundance of cellulase genes in darkness compared to light (light responsiveness) upon growth on lactose. This effect is strongly enhanced in mutant strains lacking PKAC1 or ACY1. Comparison to the wild type showed that ACY1 has a consistently positive effect on cellulase gene expression in light and darkness, while PKAC1 influences transcript levels of cellulase genes positively in light but negatively in darkness. A function of PKAC1 in light-modulated cellulase gene regulation is also reflected by altered complex formation within the cel6a/cbh2 promoter in light and darkness and in the absence of pkac1. Analysis of transcript levels of cellulase regulator genes indicates that the regulatory output of the cAMP pathway may be established via adjustment of XYR1 abundance. Consequently, both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A are involved in light-modulated cellulase gene expression in T. reesei and have a dampening effect on the light responsiveness of this process. PMID:22286997

  16. BZR1 Interacts with HY5 to Mediate Brassinosteroid- and Light-Regulated Cotyledon Opening in Arabidopsis in Darkness.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Feng; He, Jun-Xian

    2016-01-04

    Light and brassinosteroid (BR) are two central stimuli that regulate plant photomorphogenesis. Although previous phenotypic and physiological studies have implied possible interactions between BR and light in regulating photomorphogenesis, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a physical connection between the BR and light signaling pathways, which was mediated by the BR-regulated transcription factor BZR1 and light-regulated transcription factor HY5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic evidence showed that the gain-of-function bzr1-1D mutant in the BR signaling pathway and loss-of-function hy5-215 mutant in the light signaling pathway exhibited closed cotyledons under BR-deficient and dark-grown conditions and both bzr1-1D and hy5-215 mutants were able to suppress the cotyledon opening phenotype of the BR-insensitive mutants bri1-5 and bin2-1. Biochemical studies demonstrated that BZR1 interacts with HY5 both in vitro and in vivo and ectopic expression of HY5 considerably reduces the accumulation of BZR1 protein. In addition, HY5 specifically interacts with the dephosphorylated form of BZR1 and attenuates BZR1's transcriptional activity in regulating its target genes related to cotyledon opening. Our study provides a molecular framework for coordination of BR and light signals in regulating cotyledon opening, an important process in photomorphogenesis in plants. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diverse roles for protein kinase C delta and protein kinase C epsilon in the generation of high-fat-diet-induced glucose intolerance in mice: regulation of lipogenesis by protein kinase C delta.

    PubMed

    Frangioudakis, G; Burchfield, J G; Narasimhan, S; Cooney, G J; Leitges, M; Biden, T J; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether protein kinase C (PKC) delta plays a role in the glucose intolerance caused by a high-fat diet, and whether it could compensate for loss of PKCepsilon in the generation of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Prkcd (-/-), Prkce (-/-) and wild-type mice were fed high-fat diets and subjected to glucose tolerance tests. Blood glucose levels and insulin responses were determined during the tests. Insulin signalling in liver and muscle was assessed after acute in vivo insulin stimulation by immunoblotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Activation of PKC isoforms in muscle from Prkce (-/-) mice was assessed by determining intracellular distribution. Tissues and plasma were assayed for triacylglycerol accumulation, and hepatic production of lipogenic enzymes was determined by immunoblotting. Both Prkcd (-/-) and Prkce (-/-) mice were protected against high-fat-diet-induced glucose intolerance. In Prkce (-/-) mice this was mediated through enhanced insulin availability, while in Prkcd (-/-) mice the reversal occurred in the absence of elevated insulin. Neither the high-fat diet nor Prkcd deletion affected maximal insulin signalling. The activation of PKCdelta in muscle from fat-fed mice was enhanced by Prkce deletion. PKCdelta-deficient mice exhibited reduced liver triacylglycerol accumulation and diminished production of lipogenic enzymes. Deletion of genes encoding isoforms of PKC can improve glucose intolerance, either by enhancing insulin availability in the case of Prkce, or by reducing lipid accumulation in the case of Prkcd. The absence of PKCepsilon in muscle may be compensated by increased activation of PKCdelta in fat-fed mice, suggesting that an additional role for PKCepsilon in this tissue is masked.

  18. Regulation of conidiation in Botrytis cinerea involves the light-responsive transcriptional regulators BcLTF3 and BcREG1.

    PubMed

    Brandhoff, Beate; Simon, Adeline; Dornieden, Anne; Schumacher, Julia

    2017-04-05

    Botrytis cinerea is a plant pathogenic fungus with a broad host range. Due to its rapid growth and reproduction by asexual spores (conidia), which increases the inoculum pressure, the fungus is a serious problem in different fields of agriculture. The formation of the conidia is promoted by light, whereas the formation of sclerotia as survival structures occurs in its absence. Based on this observation, putative transcription factors (TFs) whose expression is induced upon light exposure have been considered as candidates for activating conidiation and/or repressing sclerotial development. Previous studies reported on the identification of six light-responsive TFs (LTFs), and two of them have been confirmed as crucial developmental regulators: BcLTF2 is the positive regulator of conidiation, whose expression is negatively regulated by BcLTF1. Here, the functional characterization of the four remaining LTFs is reported. BcLTF3 has a dual function, as it represses conidiophore development by repressing bcltf2 in light and darkness, and is moreover essential for conidiogenesis. In bcltf3 deletion mutants conidium initials grow out to hyphae, which develop secondary conidiophores. In contrast, no obvious functions could be assigned to BcLTF4, BcLTF5 and BcLTF6 in these experiments. BcREG1, previously reported to be required for virulence and conidiogenesis, has been re-identified as light-responsive transcriptional regulator. Studies with bcreg1 overexpression strains indicated that BcREG1 differentially affects conidiation by acting as a repressor of BcLTF2-induced conidiation in the light and as an activator of a BcLTF2-independent conidiation program in the dark.

  19. Light polymerization-dependent changes in color and translucency of resin composites.

    PubMed

    del Mar Pérez, Maria; Saleh, Arafa; Pulgar, Rosa; Paravina, Rade D

    2009-04-01

    To determine the influence of type of polymerization light on changes in color and translucency of resin composites. 16 shades of commercial composites were analyzed. Specimens were polymerized with quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) polymerization light. Color of non-polymerized and polymerized composites was measured against white and black backgrounds using a spectroradiometer. Changes in color (deltaE'), translucency (deltaTP') and color parameters (deltaL', deltaC' and deltah') were calculated for each polymerization light. The differences among deltaE' values and among deltaTP' values obtained for each device were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the influence of color parameters on deltaE' and deltaTP'. The results indicated that there was significant difference among the deltaE' and deltaTP' values obtained using QTH and LED light polymerization (P< 0.05). The prediction equations for deltaE' and deltaTP' based on the multiple regression analyses indicated that deltaE' was mainly caused by deltaC' for both lights. However deltaTP' was mainly caused by deltah' for LED light and by the deltaC' for QTH light. Changes in translucency significantly influenced the overall color changes after polymerization.

  20. Light-evoked synaptic activity of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells is regulated in developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a continued maturation of visual responsiveness and synaptic activity of retina after eye opening, including the size of receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), light-evoked synaptic output of RGCs, bipolar cell spontaneous synaptic inputs to RGCs, and the synaptic connections between RGCs and ON and OFF bipolar cells. Light deprivation retarded some of these age-dependent changes. However, many other functional and morphological features of RGCs are not sensitive to visual experience. To determine whether light-evoked synaptic responses of RGCs undergo developmental change, we directly examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to RGCs in developing retinas and found that both light-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents decreased, but not increased, with age. We also examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to amacrine cells in developing retinas and found that the light-evoked synaptic input of amacrine cells is also down-regulated in developing mouse retina. Different from the developmental changes of RGC spontaneous synaptic activity, dark rearing has little effect on the developmental changes of light-evoked synaptic activity of both RGCs and amacrine cells. Therefore, we concluded that the synaptic mechanisms mediating spontaneous and light-evoked synaptic activity of RGCs and amacrine cells are likely to be different. PMID:21091802

  1. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors gamma and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors beta/delta and the regulation of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist expression by pioglitazone in ischaemic brain.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Torben; Stöck, Ivonne; Nguyen-Ngoc, Miriam; Gohlke, Peter; Herdegen, Thomas; Culman, Juraj; Zhao, Yi

    2010-07-01

    The imbalance between the production and release of interleukin-1 (IL-1) ligands, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in ischaemic brain exaggerates inflammatory responses and contributes to neuronal death. Cerebral ischaemia also upregulates the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. We studied in rats the effects of the PPARgamma agonist, pioglitazone, on the regulation of IL-1beta, IL-1ra and IL-1 receptor I (IL-1RI) expression in ischaemic brain after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 90 min. Pioglitazone or vehicle was infused intracerebroventricularly over a 5-day period before, during and 24 or 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The expression of IL-1beta, IL-1ra and IL-1RI in the peri-infarct cortex was investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. The mechanisms of the IL-1ra regulation by pioglitazone and the neuroprotection under excitotoxic neuronal injury were studied in primary cortical neurones expressing PPARgamma and PPAR beta/delta. Cerebral ischaemia increased the expression of IL-1beta, IL-1RI and IL-1ra in the ischaemic cortex. Pioglitazone reduced IL-1beta, but upregulated IL-1ra and increased the number of IL-1ra immunoreactive cells. In primary cortical neurones, pioglitazone stimulated the IL-1ra production via activation of the PPARbeta/delta, but prevented excitotoxic neuronal injury and death by a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. Our data demonstrate that activation of PPARgamma and PPAR beta/delta by proglitazone in neurones triggers diverse neuroprotective mechanisms. The restoration of the equilibrium between I1-1beta and IL-1ra in ischaemic brain tissue limits IL-1beta signalling, reduces inflammatory responses and is an important mechanism by which thiazolidinediones improve the recovery from ischaemic stroke.

  2. Light Induced Changes in Protein Expression and Uniform Regulation of Transcription in the Thylakoid Lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Granlund, Irene; Kieselbach, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang P.

    2009-01-01

    In plants oxygenic photosynthesis is performed by large protein complexes found in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. The soluble thylakoid lumen space is a narrow and compressed region within the thylakoid membrane which contains 80–200 proteins. Because the thylakoid lumen proteins are in close proximity to the protein complexes of photosynthesis, it is reasonable to assume that the lumen proteins are highly influenced by the presence of light. To identify light regulated proteins in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana we developed a faster thylakoid preparation and combined this with difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) of dark-adapted and light-adapted lumen proteomes. The DIGE experiments revealed that 19 lumen proteins exhibit increased relative protein levels after eight hour light exposure. Among the proteins showing increased abundance were the PsbP and PsbQ subunits of Photosystem II, major plastocyanin and several other proteins of known or unknown function. In addition, co-expression analysis of publicly available transcriptomic data showed that the co-regulation of lumen protein expression is not limited to light but rather that lumen protein genes exhibit a high uniformity of expression. The large proportion of thylakoid lumen proteins displaying increased abundance in light-adapted plants, taken together with the observed uniform regulation of transcription, implies that the majority of thylakoid lumen proteins have functions that are related to photosynthetic activity. This is the first time that an analysis of the differences in protein level during a normal day/night cycle has been performed and it shows that even a normal cycle of light significantly influences the thylakoid lumen proteome. In this study we also show for the first time, using co-expression analysis, that the prevalent lumenal chloroplast proteins are very similarly regulated at the level of transcription. PMID:19461964

  3. Circadian and Light Regulated Expression of CBFs and their Upstream Signalling Genes in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Novák, Aliz; Ahres, Mohamed; Gulyás, Zsolt; Monostori, István; Galiba, Gábor; Vágújfalvi, Attila

    2017-01-01

    CBF (C-repeat binding factor) transcription factors show high expression levels in response to cold; moreover, they play a key regulatory role in cold acclimation processes. Recently, however, more and more information has led to the conclusion that, apart from cold, light—including its spectra—also has a crucial role in regulating CBF expression. Earlier, studies established that the expression patterns of some of these regulatory genes follow circadian rhythms. To understand more of this complex acclimation process, we studied the expression patterns of the signal transducing pathways, including signal perception, the circadian clock and phospholipid signalling pathways, upstream of the CBF gene regulatory hub. To exclude the confounding effect of cold, experiments were carried out at 22 °C. Our results show that the expression of genes implicated in the phospholipid signalling pathway follow a circadian rhythm. We demonstrated that, from among the tested CBF genes expressed in Hordeum vulgare (Hv) under our conditions, only the members of the HvCBF4-phylogenetic subgroup showed a circadian pattern. We found that the HvCBF4-subgroup genes were expressed late in the afternoon or early in the night. We also determined the expression changes under supplemental far-red illumination and established that the transcript accumulation had appeared four hours earlier and more intensely in several cases. Based on our results, we propose a model to illustrate the effect of the circadian clock and the quality of the light on the elements of signalling pathways upstream of the HvCBFs, thus integrating the complex regulation of the early cellular responses, which finally lead to an elevated abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:28829375

  4. Differential roles of nitric oxide synthases in regulation of ultraviolet B light-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Shiyong

    2010-11-01

    Ultraviolet B light (UVB) activates nitric oxide synthase(s) (NOSs) and nitric oxide (NO()) production, which plays a role in regulation of apoptosis. However, the role of NO() in UVB-induced apoptosis remains controversial. In this study, we analyzed expression and activation of constitutive NOSs (cNOSs) and their roles in UV-induced apoptosis of HaCaT keratinocytes. Our data showed that the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was increased while endothelial NOS (eNOS) was uncoupled in the early phase (0-6 h) post-UVB. The expression of both cNOSs peaked at 12h post-UVB and NO() was transiently elevated with 30 min and then steadily rose from 6 to 18 h post-UVB. The expression of iNOS was detected at 6h post-UVB and then sturdily increased. Inhibition of cNOSs with L-NAME reduced the inducibility of NO(*) in the early and late phases of irradiation. Along with the eNOS uncoupling, an increased level of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) was detected in the early phase, but not in the late phase post-UVB. Inhibition of cNOSs reduced the production of ONOO(-) in the early time, but led to an increase of ONOO(-) in the late time after UVB-irradiation. The results indicate that cNOSs regulate NO()/ONOO(-) imbalance after UVB-irradiation. Our data suggested that the activation of cNOSs in the early phase post-UVB leads to NO()/ONOO(-) imbalance and promotes apoptosis via a caspase 3-independent pathway. The elevation of NO() in the late phase of UVB-irradiation is mainly produced by inducible NOS (iNOS). However, cNOSs also contribute to the NO() production and to maintain a higher NO()/ONOO(-) ratio, which reduces caspase 3 activity and protects cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  5. CP12 provides a new mode of light regulation of Calvin cycle activity in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Wedel, N; Soll, J; Paap, B K

    1997-09-16

    CP12 is a small nuclear encoded chloroplast protein of higher plants, which was recently shown to interact with NAD(P)H-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1. 13), one of the key enzymes of the reductive pentosephosphate cycle (Calvin cycle). Screening of a pea cDNA library in the yeast two-hybrid system for proteins that interact with CP12, led to the identification of a second member of the Calvin cycle, phosphoribulokinase (PRK; EC 2.7.1.19), as a further specific binding partner for CP12. The exchange of cysteines for serines in CP12 demonstrate that interaction with PRK occurs at the N-terminal peptide loop of CP12. Size exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation assays reveal the existence of a stable 600-kDa PRK/CP12/GAPDH complex in the stroma of higher plant chloroplasts. Its stoichiometry is proposed to be of two N-terminally dimerized CP12 molecules, each carrying one PRK dimer on its N terminus and one A2B2 complex of GAPDH subunits on the C-terminal peptide loop. Incubation of the complex with NADP or NADPH, in contrast to NAD or NADH, causes its dissociation. Assays with the stromal 600-kDa fractions in the presence of the four different nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotides indicate that PRK activity depends on complex dissociation and might be further regulated by the accessible ratio of NADP/NADPH. From these results, we conclude that light regulation of the Calvin cycle in higher plants is not only via reductive activation of different proteins by the well-established ferredoxin/thioredoxin system, but in addition, by reversible dissociation of the PRK/CP12/GAPDH complex, mediated by NADP(H).

  6. A Role for Barley CRYPTOCHROME1 in Light Regulation of Grain Dormancy and Germination[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, Jose M.; Downie, A. Bruce; Xu, Qian; Gubler, Frank

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in the regulation of seed dormancy and that transcriptional regulation of genes encoding ABA biosynthetic and degradation enzymes is responsible for determining ABA content. However, little is known about the upstream signaling pathways impinging on transcription to ultimately regulate ABA content or how environmental signals (e.g., light and cold) might direct such expression in grains. Our previous studies indicated that light is a key environmental signal inhibiting germination in dormant grains of barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and Brachypodium distachyon and that this effect attenuates as after-ripening progresses further. We found that the blue component of the light spectrum inhibits completion of germination in barley by inducing the expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and dampening expression of ABA 8’-hydroxylase, thus increasing ABA content in the grain. We have now created barley transgenic lines downregulating the genes encoding the blue light receptors CRYTOCHROME (CRY1) and CRY2. Our results demonstrate that CRY1 is the key receptor perceiving and transducing the blue light signal in dormant grains. PMID:24642944

  7. The site of regulation of light capture in Symbiodinium: does the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein detach to regulate light capture?

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Atsuko; Blanchard, Gary J; Szabó, Milán; Ralph, Peter J; Kramer, David M

    2014-08-01

    Dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium form symbiotic associations with cnidarians including corals and anemones. The photosynthetic apparatuses of these dinoflagellates possess a unique photosynthetic antenna system incorporating the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP). It has been proposed that the appearance of a PCP-specific 77K fluorescence emission band around 672-675 nm indicates that high light treatment results in PCP dissociation from intrinsic membrane antenna complexes, blocking excitation transfer to the intrinsic membrane-bound antenna complexes, chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin-protein-complex (acpPC) and associated photosystems (Reynolds et al., 2008 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:13674-13678).We have tested this model using time-resolved fluorescence decay kinetics in conjunction with global fitting to compare the time-evolution of the PCP spectral bands before and after high light exposure. Our results show that no long-lived PCP fluorescence emission components appear either before or after high light treatment, indicating that the efficiency of excitation transfer from PCP to membrane antenna systems remains efficient and rapid even after exposure to high light. The apparent increased relative emission at around 675nm was, instead, caused by strong preferential exciton quenching of the membrane antenna complexes associated with acpPC and reaction centers. This strong non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is consistent with the activation of xanthophyll-associated quenching mechanisms and the generally-observed avoidance in nature of long-lived photoexcited states that can lead to oxidative damage. The acpPC component appears to be the most strongly quenched under high light exposure suggesting that it houses the photoprotective exciton quencher. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Helium Gas Regulation System for the Light-Ion Guide Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Bryan; Clark, Henry; Chen, Lixin

    2013-10-01

    This is a proof-of-concept project to show that it is possible to construct a cost-effective helium gas regulation system for TAMU Cyclotron Institute's light-ion guide gas cell, using store ordered components. By purchasing the individual necessary parts, we designed and constructed a system that was less expensive than purchasing a pre-constructed system from a manufacturer, and could easily be scaled larger or smaller to accommodate any number of gas bottles. Utilizing LabVIEW software, I was able to write a program that allows the system to be controlled remotely, and an automation program that causes the system to change immediately between bottles, whenever one is almost empty, allowing the system to supply a constant flow of helium gas for several days. Although both the construction and the programming of the system can be seen as rough and unrefined, due to the time-restraints placed on me, the project adequately proves that the concept is valid and entirely possible, as the system is fully functional and able to fulfill its intended purpose. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  9. Opsin co-expression in Limulus photoreceptors: differential regulation by light and a circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Katti, C.; Kempler, K.; Porter, M. L.; Legg, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Garcia-Rivera, E.; Dugger, D.; Battelle, B.-A.

    2010-01-01

    A long-standing concept in vision science has held that a single photoreceptor expresses a single type of opsin, the protein component of visual pigment. However, the number of examples in the literature of photoreceptors from vertebrates and invertebrates that break this rule is increasing. Here, we describe a newly discovered Limulus opsin, Limulus opsin5, which is significantly different from previously characterized Limulus opsins, opsins1 and 2. We show that opsin5 is co-expressed with opsins1 and 2 in Limulus lateral and ventral eye photoreceptors and provide the first evidence that the expression of co-expressed opsins can be differentially regulated. We show that the relative levels of opsin5 and opsin1 and 2 in the rhabdom change with a diurnal rhythm and that their relative levels are also influenced by the animal's central circadian clock. An analysis of the sequence of opsin5 suggests it is sensitive to visible light (400–700 nm) but that its spectral properties may be different from that of opsins1 and 2. Changes in the relative levels of these opsins may underlie some of the dramatic day–night changes in Limulus photoreceptor function and may produce a diurnal change in their spectral sensitivity. PMID:20639420

  10. Light-regulated and cell-specific methylation of the maize PEPC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, Ben J.; Woodfield, Helen; Wanchana, Samart; Bruskiewich, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing PEPC expression in maize remain to be fully defined. Differential methylation of a region in the PEPC promoter has been shown to correlate with transcript accumulation, however, to date, investigations into the role of DNA methylation in maize PEPC expression have relied on the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Bisulphite sequencing was used here to provide a single-base resolution methylation map of the maize PEPC promoter. It is shown that four cytosine residues in the PEPC promoter are heavily methylated in maize root tissue. In leaves, de-methylation of these cytosines is dependent on illumination and is coincident with elevated PEPC expression. Furthermore, light-regulated de-methylation of these cytosines occurs only in mesophyll cells. No methylation was discovered in the 0.6 kb promoter required for mesophyll-specific expression indicating that cytosine methylation is not required to direct the cell-specificity of PEPC expression. This raises interesting questions regarding the function of the cell-specific cytosine de-methylation observed in the upstream region of the PEPC promoter. PMID:22143916

  11. The De-Ubiquitinylating Enzyme, USP2, Is Associated with the Circadian Clockwork and Regulates Its Sensitivity to Light

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Heather Dehlin; Humby, Monica; Yadav, Geetha; Zhang, Qingjiong; Fogerty, Joseph; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel component of the circadian clock that regulates its sensitivity to light at the evening light to dark transition. USP2 (Ubiquitin Specific Protease 2), which de-ubiquitinylates and stabilizes target proteins, is rhythmically expressed in multiple tissues including the SCN. We have developed a knockout model of USP2 and found that exposure to low irradiance light at ZT12 increases phase delays of USP2−/− mice compared to wildtype. We additionally show that USP2b is in a complex with several clock components and regulates the stability and turnover of BMAL1, which in turn alters the expression of several CLOCK/BMAL1 controlled genes. Rhythmic expression of USP2 in the SCN and other tissues offers a new level of control of the clock machinery through de-ubiqutinylation and suggests a role for USP2 during circadian adaptation to environmental day length changes. PMID:21966515

  12. Clathrin self-assembly is regulated by three light-chain residues controlling the formation of critical salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Ybe, J A; Greene, B; Liu, S H; Pley, U; Parham, P; Brodsky, F M

    1998-08-10

    Clathrin self-assembly into a polyhedral lattice mediates membrane protein sorting during endocytosis and organelle biogenesis. Lattice formation occurs spontaneously in vitro at low pH and, intracellularly, is triggered by adaptors at physiological pH. To begin to understand the cellular regulation of clathrin polymerization, we analyzed molecular interactions during the spontaneous assembly of recombinant hub fragments of the clathrin heavy chain, which bind clathrin light-chain subunits and mimic the self-assembly of intact clathrin. Reconstitution of hubs using deletion and substitution mutants of the light-chain subunits revealed that the pH dependence of clathrin self-assembly is controlled by only three acidic residues in the clathrin light-chain subunits. Salt inhibition of hub assembly identified two classes of salt bridges which are involved and deletion analysis mapped the clathrin heavy-chain regions participating in their formation. These combined observations indicated that the negatively charged regulatory residues, identified in the light-chain subunits, inhibit the formation of high-affinity salt bridges which would otherwise induce clathrin heavy chains to assemble at physiological pH. In the presence of light chains, clathrin self-assembly depends on salt bridges that form only at low pH, but is exquisitely sensitive to regulation. We propose that cellular clathrin assembly is controlled via the simple biochemical mechanism of reversing the inhibitory effect of the light-chain regulatory sequence, thereby promoting high-affinity salt bridge formation.

  13. Genomic DNA Microarray Analysis: Identification of New Genes Regulated by Light Color in the Cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon

    PubMed Central

    Stowe-Evans, Emily L.; Ford, James; Kehoe, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria use complementary chromatic adaptation to efficiently utilize energy from both green and red regions of the light spectrum during photosynthesis. Although previous studies have shown that acclimation to changing light wavelengths involves many physiological responses, research to date has focused primarily on the expression and regulation of genes that encode proteins of the major photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae, the phycobilisomes. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genomic DNA microarrays to expand our understanding of the physiology of acclimation to light color in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon. We found that the levels of nearly 80 proteins are altered in cells growing in green versus red light and have cloned and positively identified 17 genes not previously known to be regulated by light color in any species. Among these are homologs of genes present in many bacteria that encode well-studied proteins lacking clearly defined functions, such as tspO, which encodes a tryptophan-rich sensory protein, and homologs of genes encoding proteins of clearly defined function in many species, such as nblA and chlL, encoding phycobilisome degradation and chlorophyll biosynthesis proteins, respectively. Our results suggest novel roles for several of these gene products and highly specialized, unique uses for others. PMID:15205436

  14. Genomic DNA microarray analysis: identification of new genes regulated by light color in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed

    Stowe-Evans, Emily L; Ford, James; Kehoe, David M

    2004-07-01

    Many cyanobacteria use complementary chromatic adaptation to efficiently utilize energy from both green and red regions of the light spectrum during photosynthesis. Although previous studies have shown that acclimation to changing light wavelengths involves many physiological responses, research to date has focused primarily on the expression and regulation of genes that encode proteins of the major photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae, the phycobilisomes. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genomic DNA microarrays to expand our understanding of the physiology of acclimation to light color in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon. We found that the levels of nearly 80 proteins are altered in cells growing in green versus red light and have cloned and positively identified 17 genes not previously known to be regulated by light color in any species. Among these are homologs of genes present in many bacteria that encode well-studied proteins lacking clearly defined functions, such as tspO, which encodes a tryptophan-rich sensory protein, and homologs of genes encoding proteins of clearly defined function in many species, such as nblA and chlL, encoding phycobilisome degradation and chlorophyll biosynthesis proteins, respectively. Our results suggest novel roles for several of these gene products and highly specialized, unique uses for others.

  15. Phytochrome-interacting factors PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis under red light in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongjuan; Zhang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Ping; Zhao, Chengzhou; Chen, Yadi; Bi, Yurong

    2015-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor inducing anthocyanin accumulation in plants. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) have been shown to be a family of bHLH transcription factors involved in light signaling in Arabidopsis. Red light effectively increased anthocyanin accumulation in wild-type Col-0, whereas the effects were enhanced in pif4 and pif5 mutants but impaired in overexpression lines PIF4OX and PIF5OX, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are both negative regulators for red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Consistently, transcript levels of several genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulatory pathway, including CHS, F3'H, DFR, LDOX, PAP1 and TT8, were significantly enhanced in mutants pif4 and pif5 but decreased in PIF4OX and PIF5OX compared to in Col-0, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are transcriptional repressor of these gene. Transient expression assays revealed that PIF4 and PIF5 could repress red light-induced promoter activities of F3'H and DFR in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) test and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that PIF5 could directly bind to G-box motifs present in the promoter of DFR. Taken together, these results suggest that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation through transcriptional repression of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis.

  16. A blue-light photoreceptor mediates the feedback regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Flori, Serena; Greiner, Andre; Magneschi, Leonardo; Cusant, Loic; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria; Hegemann, Peter; Finazzi, Giovanni; Minagawa, Jun

    2016-09-22

    In plants and algae, light serves both as the energy source for photosynthesis and a biological signal that triggers cellular responses via specific sensory photoreceptors. Red light is perceived by bilin-containing phytochromes and blue light by the flavin-containing cryptochromes and/or phototropins (PHOTs), the latter containing two photosensory light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains. Photoperception spans several orders of light intensity, ranging from far below the threshold for photosynthesis to values beyond the capacity of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Excess light may cause oxidative damage and cell death, processes prevented by enhanced thermal dissipation via high-energy quenching (qE), a key photoprotective response. Here we show the existence of a molecular link between photoreception, photosynthesis, and photoprotection in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that PHOT controls qE by inducing the expression of the qE effector protein LHCSR3 (light-harvesting complex stress-related protein 3) in high light intensities. This control requires blue-light perception by LOV domains on PHOT, LHCSR3 induction through PHOT kinase, and light dissipation in photosystem II via LHCSR3. Mutants deficient in the PHOT gene display severely reduced fitness under excessive light conditions, indicating that the sensing, utilization, and dissipation of light is a concerted process that plays a vital role in microalgal acclimation to environments of variable light intensities.

  17. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  18. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  19. Light-triggered in vivo Activation of Adhesive Peptides Regulates Cell Adhesion, Inflammation and Vascularization of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have been recently realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  20. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  1. Light spectrum regulates cell accumulation during daytime in the raphidophyte Chattonella antiqua causing noxious red tides.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Tomoyuki; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Iwahori, Sho; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-07-01

    Most marine raphidophyte species cause noxious red tides in temperate coastal areas around the world. It is known that swimming abilities enable raphidophytes to accumulation of cells and to actively acquire light at surface layers and nutrients over a wide depth range. However, it remains unclear how the swimming behavior is affected by environmental conditions, especially light condition. In the present study, we observed the accumulation of the harmful red-tide raphidophyte Chattonella antiqua under various light conditions during the daytime in the laboratory. When exposed to ultraviolet-A/blue light (320-480nm) or red light (640-680nm) from above, cells moved downward. In the case of blue light (455nm), cells started to swim downward after 5-15min of irradiation at a photon flux density≥10μmolm(-2)s(-1). When exposed to monochromatic lights (400-680nm) from the side, cells moved away from the blue light source and then descended, but just moved downward under red light. However, mixing of green/orange light (520-630nm) diminished the effects of blue light. When exposed to a mixture of 30μmolm(-2)s(-1) of blue light (440nm) and ≥6μmolm(-2)s(-1) of yellow light (560nm) from above, cells did not move downward. These results indicate that blue light induces negative phototaxis and ultraviolet-A/blue and red lights induce descending, and green/orange light cancels out their effects in C. antiqua.

  2. Light Quantity Affects the Regulation of Cell Shape in Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Whitaker, Melissa J; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2012-01-01

    In some cyanobacteria, the color or prevalent wavelengths of ambient light can impact the protein or pigment composition of the light-harvesting complexes. In some cases, light color or quality impacts cellular morphology. The significance of changes in pigmentation is associated strongly with optimizing light absorption for photosynthesis, whereas the significance of changes in light quality-dependent cellular morphology is less well understood. In natural aquatic environments, light quality and intensity change simultaneously at varying depths of the water column. Thus, we hypothesize that changes in morphology that also have been attributed to differences in the prevalent wavelengths of available light may largely be associated with changes in light intensity. Fremyella diplosiphon shows highly reproducible light-dependent changes in pigmentation and morphology. Under red light (RL), F. diplosiphon cells are blue-green in color, due to the accumulation of high levels of phycocyanin, a RL-absorbing pigment in the light-harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes (PBSs), and the shape of cells are short and rounded. Conversely, under green light (GL), F. diplosiphon cells are red in color due to accumulation of GL-absorbing phycoerythrin in PBSs, and are longer and brick-shaped. GL is enriched at lower depths in the water column, where overall levels of light also are reduced, i.e., to 10% or less of the intensity found at the water surface. We hypothesize that longer cells under low light intensities at increasing depths in the water column, which are generally also enriched in green wavelengths, are associated with greater levels of total photosynthetic pigments in the thylakoid membranes. To test this hypothesis, we grew F. diplosiphon under increasing intensities of GL and observed whether the length of cells diminished due to reduced pressure to maintain larger cells and the associated increased photosynthetic membrane capacity under high light intensity

  3. Light Quantity Affects the Regulation of Cell Shape in Fremyella diplosiphon

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Whitaker, Melissa J.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2012-01-01

    In some cyanobacteria, the color or prevalent wavelengths of ambient light can impact the protein or pigment composition of the light-harvesting complexes. In some cases, light color or quality impacts cellular morphology. The significance of changes in pigmentation is associated strongly with optimizing light absorption for photosynthesis, whereas the significance of changes in light quality-dependent cellular morphology is less well understood. In natural aquatic environments, light quality and intensity change simultaneously at varying depths of the water column. Thus, we hypothesize that changes in morphology that also have been attributed to differences in the prevalent wavelengths of available light may largely be associated with changes in light intensity. Fremyella diplosiphon shows highly reproducible light-dependent changes in pigmentation and morphology. Under red light (RL), F. diplosiphon cells are blue-green in color, due to the accumulation of high levels of phycocyanin, a RL-absorbing pigment in the light-harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes (PBSs), and the shape of cells are short and rounded. Conversely, under green light (GL), F. diplosiphon cells are red in color due to accumulation of GL-absorbing phycoerythrin in PBSs, and are longer and brick-shaped. GL is enriched at lower depths in the water column, where overall levels of light also are reduced, i.e., to 10% or less of the intensity found at the water surface. We hypothesize that longer cells under low light intensities at increasing depths in the water column, which are generally also enriched in green wavelengths, are associated with greater levels of total photosynthetic pigments in the thylakoid membranes. To test this hypothesis, we grew F. diplosiphon under increasing intensities of GL and observed whether the length of cells diminished due to reduced pressure to maintain larger cells and the associated increased photosynthetic membrane capacity under high light intensity

  4. Multi-level Modeling of Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Offers New Insights into Its Regulation by Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 1031 distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  5. The Transcription Factor BcLTF1 Regulates Virulence and Light Responses in the Necrotrophic Plant Pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim Christopher; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold diseases in a range of dicotyledonous plant species. The fungus can reproduce asexually by forming macroconidia for dispersal and sclerotia for survival; the latter also participate in sexual reproduction by bearing the apothecia after fertilization by microconidia. Light induces the differentiation of conidia and apothecia, while sclerotia are exclusively formed in the absence of light. The relevance of light for virulence of the fungus is not obvious, but infections are observed under natural illumination as well as in constant darkness. By a random mutagenesis approach, we identified a novel virulence-related gene encoding a GATA transcription factor (BcLTF1 for light-responsive TF1) with characterized homologues in Aspergillus nidulans (NsdD) and Neurospora crassa (SUB-1). By deletion and over-expression of bcltf1, we confirmed the predicted role of the transcription factor in virulence, and discovered furthermore its functions in regulation of light-dependent differentiation, the equilibrium between production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary metabolism. Microarray analyses revealed 293 light-responsive genes, and that the expression levels of the majority of these genes (66%) are modulated by BcLTF1. In addition, the deletion of bcltf1 affects the expression of 1,539 genes irrespective of the light conditions, including the overexpression of known and so far uncharacterized secondary metabolism-related genes. Increased expression of genes encoding alternative respiration enzymes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX), suggest a mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of bcltf1. The hypersensitivity of Δbctlf1 mutants to exogenously applied oxidative stress - even in the absence of light - and the restoration of virulence and growth rates in continuous light by antioxidants, indicate that BcLTF1 is required to cope with oxidative stress that is caused either by exposure to light

  6. The transcription factor BcLTF1 regulates virulence and light responses in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim Christopher; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold diseases in a range of dicotyledonous plant species. The fungus can reproduce asexually by forming macroconidia for dispersal and sclerotia for survival; the latter also participate in sexual reproduction by bearing the apothecia after fertilization by microconidia. Light induces the differentiation of conidia and apothecia, while sclerotia are exclusively formed in the absence of light. The relevance of light for virulence of the fungus is not obvious, but infections are observed under natural illumination as well as in constant darkness. By a random mutagenesis approach, we identified a novel virulence-related gene encoding a GATA transcription factor (BcLTF1 for light-responsive TF1) with characterized homologues in Aspergillus nidulans (NsdD) and Neurospora crassa (SUB-1). By deletion and over-expression of bcltf1, we confirmed the predicted role of the transcription factor in virulence, and discovered furthermore its functions in regulation of light-dependent differentiation, the equilibrium between production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary metabolism. Microarray analyses revealed 293 light-responsive genes, and that the expression levels of the majority of these genes (66%) are modulated by BcLTF1. In addition, the deletion of bcltf1 affects the expression of 1,539 genes irrespective of the light conditions, including the overexpression of known and so far uncharacterized secondary metabolism-related genes. Increased expression of genes encoding alternative respiration enzymes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX), suggest a mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of bcltf1. The hypersensitivity of Δbctlf1 mutants to exogenously applied oxidative stress--even in the absence of light--and the restoration of virulence and growth rates in continuous light by antioxidants, indicate that BcLTF1 is required to cope with oxidative stress that is caused either by exposure to light or

  7. Differential regulation of duplicate light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ford, Christopher J.; Miller, James S.; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Ianora, Adrianna

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability. As a result, for cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μEm–2 s–1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μEm–2 s–1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μEm–2 s–1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in

  8. The Arabidopsis floral homeotic proteins APETALA3 and PISTILLATA negatively regulate the BANQUO genes implicated in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Mara, Chloe D; Huang, Tengbo; Irish, Vivian F

    2010-03-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MADS box transcription factors APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) heterodimerize and are required to specify petal identity, yet many details of how this regulatory process is effected are unclear. We have identified three related genes, BHLH136/BANQUO1 (BNQ1), BHLH134/BANQUO2 (BNQ2), and BHLH161/BANQUO3 (BNQ3), as being directly and negatively regulated by AP3 and PI in petals. BNQ1, BNQ2, and BNQ3 encode products belonging to a family of atypical non-DNA binding basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that heterodimerize with and negatively regulate bHLH transcription factors. We show that bnq3 mutants have pale-green sepals and carpels and decreased chlorophyll levels, suggesting that BNQ3 has a role in regulating light responses. The ap3 bnq3 double mutant displays pale second-whorl organs, supporting the hypothesis that BNQ3 is downstream of AP3. Consistent with a role in light response, we show that the BNQ gene products regulate the function of HFR1 (for LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1), which encodes a bHLH protein that regulates photomorphogenesis through modulating phytochrome and cryptochrome signaling. The BNQ genes also are required for appropriate regulation of flowering time. Our results suggest that petal identity is specified in part through downregulation of BNQ-dependent photomorphogenic and developmental signaling pathways.

  9. CRYPTOCHROME is a blue-light sensor that regulates neuronal firing rate.

    PubMed

    Fogle, Keri J; Parson, Kelly G; Dahm, Nicole A; Holmes, Todd C

    2011-03-18

    Light-responsive neural activity in central brain neurons is generally conveyed through opsin-based signaling from external photoreceptors. Large lateral ventral arousal neurons (lLNvs) in Drosophila melanogaster increase action potential firing within seconds in response to light in the absence of all opsin-based photoreceptors. Light-evoked changes in membrane resting potential occur in about 100 milliseconds. The light response is selective for blue wavelengths corresponding to the spectral sensitivity of CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). cry-null lines are light-unresponsive, but restored CRY expression in the lLNv rescues responsiveness. Furthermore, expression of CRY in neurons that are normally unresponsive to light confers responsiveness. The CRY-mediated light response requires a flavin redox-based mechanism and depends on potassium channel conductance, but is independent of the classical circadian CRY-TIMELESS interaction.

  10. UVB light regulates expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Black, Adrienne T.; Gordon, Marion. K.; Heck, Diane E.; Gallo, Michael A.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    The cornea is highly sensitive to ultraviolet B (UVB) light-induced oxidative stress, a process that results in the production of inflammatory mediators which have been implicated in tissue injury. In the present studies, we characterized the inflammatory response of human corneal epithelial cells to UVB (2.5 - 25 mJ/cm2). UVB caused a dose-dependent increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species in the cells. This was associated with increases in mRNA expression of the antioxidants Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Mn-SOD, catalase and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as well as the glutathione S-transferases (GST), GSTA1-2, GSTA3, GSTA4, GSTM1, mGST2. UVB also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IFNγ, IL-1β, TGFβ and TNFα, and enzymes important in prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the PG synthases mPGES-2, PGDS, PGFS and thromboxane synthase, and in leukotriene biosynthesis including 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the epidermal and platelet forms of 12-LOX and 15-LOX-2. UVB was found to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases in corneal epithelial cells; ERK1/2 MAP kinase is constitutively active, but its activity was increased following UVB treatment. Inhibition of p38 blocked UVB-induced expression of TNFα, COX-2, PGDS and 15-LOX-2, while JNK inhibition suppressed TNFα and HO-1. These data indicate that UVB modulates corneal epithelial cell expression of antioxidants and proinflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Alterations in expression of these mediators are likely to be important in regulating inflammation and protecting the cornea from UVB-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21300015

  11. Light regulation of mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway during greening of etiolated wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Garmash, Elena V; Grabelnych, Olga I; Velegzhaninov, Iliya O; Borovik, Olga A; Dalke, Igor V; Voinikov, Victor K; Golovko, Tamara K

    2015-02-01

    This study deals with effects of de-etiolation (48h) of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Irgina) seedlings on differential expression of AOX1 genes, levels of AOX protein and the alternative respiratory pathway (AP) capacity. As a result of exposure to continuous irradiation of dark-grown wheat seedlings, the respiratory activity and AP capacity in leaves significantly increased during the first 6h of studies. Expression of AOX1a was up-regulated by light and proved consistent with changes in the AP capacity. Effects on expression of AOX1c were less pronounced. Immunoblot analysis showed three distinct bands of AOX with molecular weights of 34, 36 and 38kDa, with no significant changes in the relative levels during de-etiolation. The lack of a clear correlation between AOX protein amount, AOX1a expression, and AP capacity suggests post-translational control of the enzyme activation. The AOX1a suppression and a decrease in the AP capacity correlated with the sugar pool depletion after 24h of the de-etiolation, which may mean a possible substrate dependence of the AOX activity in the green cells. More efficient malate oxidation by mitochondria as well as the higher AOX capacity during the first 6h of de-etiolation was detected, whereas respiration and AOX capacity with exogenous NADH and glycine increased after 6 and 24h, respectively. We conclude that AOX plays an important role during development of an actively photosynthesizing cell, and can rapidly adapt to changes in metabolism and photosynthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Adjustment of carbon fluxes to light conditions regulates the daily turnover of starch in plants: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Flis, Anna; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2014-03-04

    In the light, photosynthesis provides carbon for metabolism and growth. In the dark, plant growth depends on carbon reserves that were accumulated during previous light periods. Many plants accumulate part of their newly-fixed carbon as starch in their leaves in the day and remobilise it to support metabolism and growth at night. The daily rhythms of starch accumulation and degradation are dynamically adjusted to the changing light conditions such that starch is almost but not totally exhausted at dawn. This requires the allocation of a larger proportion of the newly fixed carbon to starch under low carbon conditions, and the use of information about the carbon status at the end of the light period and the length of the night to pace the rate of starch degradation. This regulation occurs in a circadian clock-dependent manner, through unknown mechanisms. We use mathematical modelling to explore possible diurnal mechanisms regulating the starch level. Our model combines the main reactions of carbon fixation, starch and sucrose synthesis, starch degradation and consumption of carbon by sink tissues. To describe the dynamic adjustment of starch to daily conditions, we introduce diurnal regulators of carbon fluxes, which modulate the activities of the key steps of starch metabolism. The sensing of the diurnal conditions is mediated in our model by the timer α and the "dark sensor"β, which integrate daily information about the light conditions and time of the day through the circadian clock. Our data identify the β subunit of SnRK1 kinase as a good candidate for the role of the dark-accumulated component β of our model. The developed novel approach for understanding starch kinetics through diurnal metabolic and circadian sensors allowed us to explain starch time-courses in plants and predict the kinetics of the proposed diurnal regulators under various genetic and environmental perturbations.

  13. Improvement of carrier injection symmetry and quantum efficiency in InGaN light-emitting diodes with Mg delta-doped barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Can, N.; Hafiz, S.; Monavarian, M.; Das, S.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü. Morkoç, H.

    2015-05-04

    The effect of δ-doping of In{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N barriers with Mg on the quantum efficiency of blue light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) with active regions composed of 6 (hex) 3-nm In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N is investigated. Compared to the reference sample, δ-doping of the first barrier on the n-side of the LED structure improves the peak external quantum efficiency (EQE) by 20%, owing to the increased hole concentration in the wells adjacent to the n-side, as confirmed by numerical simulations of carrier distributions across the active region. Doping the second barrier, in addition to the first one, did not further enhance the EQE, which likely indicates compensation of improved hole injection by degradation of the active region quality due to Mg doping. Both LEDs with Mg δ-doped barriers effectively suppress the drop of efficiency at high injection when compared to the reference sample, and the onset of EQE peak roll-off shifts from ∼80 A/cm{sup 2} in the reference LED to ∼120 A/cm{sup 2} in the LEDs with Mg δ-doped barriers.

  14. A glutathione S-transferase regulated by light and hormones participates in the modulation of Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Wei; Liu, Ming-Jung; Chen, Ing-Chien; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Chao, Li-Ya; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) have been well documented to be involved in diverse aspects of biotic and abiotic stresses, especially detoxification processes. Whether they regulate plant development remains unclear. Here, we report on our isolation by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of a plant GST, AtGSTU17, from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and demonstrate that its expression is regulated by multiple photoreceptors, especially phytochrome A (phyA) under all light conditions. Further physiological studies indicated that AtGSTU17 participates in various aspects of seedling development, including hypocotyl elongation, anthocyanin accumulation, and far-red light-mediated inhibition of greening with a requirement of functional phyA. The loss-of-function mutant of AtGSTU17 (atgstu17) resulted in reduced biomass of seedlings and number of lateral roots in the presence of auxin, as well as insensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated inhibition of root elongation, with similarity to different phyA mutant alleles. Moreover, the root phenotype conferred by atgstu17 was reflected by histochemical β-glucuronidase staining of AtGSTU17 promoter activity with the addition of auxin or ABA. Further microarray analysis of wild-type Columbia and atgstu17 seedlings treated with far-red irradiation or ABA revealed that AtGSTU17 might modulate hypocotyl elongation by positively regulating some light-signaling components and negatively regulating a group of auxin-responsive genes and modulate root development by negatively controlling an auxin transport protein in the presence of ABA. Therefore, our data reveal that AtGSTU17 participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of Arabidopsis development by affecting glutathione pools via a coordinated regulation with phyA and phytohormones.

  15. Differential regulation of circadian melatonin rhythm and sleep-wake cycle by bright lights and nonphotic time cues in humans.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yujiro; Hashimoto, Satoko; Masubuchi, Satoru; Natsubori, Akiyo; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that physical exercise under dim lights (<10 lux) accelerated reentrainment of the sleep-wake cycle but not the circadian melatonin rhythm to an 8-h phase-advanced sleep schedule, indicating differential effects of physical exercise on the human circadian system. The present study examined the effects of bright light (>5,000 lux) on exercise-induced acceleration of reentrainment because timed bright lights are known to reset the circadian pacemaker. Fifteen male subjects spent 12 days in temporal isolation. The sleep schedule was advanced from habitual sleep times by 8 h for 4 days, which was followed by a free-run session. In the shift session, bright lights were given during the waking time. Subjects in the exercise group performed 2-h bicycle running twice a day. Subjects in the control kept quiet. As a result, the sleep-wake cycle was fully entrained by the shift schedule in both groups. Bright light may strengthen the resetting potency of the shift schedule. By contrast, the circadian melatonin rhythm was phase-advanced by 6.9 h on average in the exercise group but only by 2.0 h in the control. Thus physical exercise prevented otherwise unavoidable internal desynchronization. Polysomnographical analyses revealed that deterioration of sleep quality by shift schedule was protected by physical exercise under bright lights. These findings indicate differential regulation of sleep-wake cycle and circadian melatonin rhythm by physical exercise in humans. The melatonin rhythm is regulated primarily by bright lights, whereas the sleep-wake cycle is by nonphotic time cues, such as physical exercise and shift schedule.

  16. Role and Function of LitR, an Adenosyl B12-Bound Light-Sensitive Regulator of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, in Regulation of Carotenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Kou; Hagiwara, Kenta; Hirata, Naoya; Watanabe, Shoko; Toriyabe, Minami; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Ueda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The LitR/CarH family of proteins is a light-sensitive MerR family of transcriptional regulators that contain an adenosyl B12 (coenzyme B12 or AdoB12)-binding domain at the C terminus. The genes encoding these proteins are found in phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera; however, the biochemical properties of these proteins from Gram-positive bacteria remain poorly understood. We performed genetic and biochemical analyses of a homolog of the LitR protein from Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, a Gram-positive endospore-forming soil bacterium. Carotenoid production was induced by illumination in this bacterium. In vivo analysis demonstrated that LitR plays a central role in light-inducible carotenoid production and serves as a negative regulator of the light-inducible transcription of crt and litR itself. Biochemical evidence showed that LitR in complex with AdoB12 binds to the promoter regions of litR and the crt operon in a light-sensitive manner. In vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that AdoB12-LitR inhibited the specific transcription of the crt promoter generated by a σA-containing RNA polymerase holoenzyme under dark conditions. Collectively, these data indicate that the AdoB12-LitR complex serves as a photoreceptor with DNA-binding activity in B. megaterium QM B1551 and that its function as a transcriptional repressor is fundamental to the light-induced carotenoid production. IMPORTANCE Members of the LitR/CarH family are AdoB12-based photosensors involved in light-inducible carotenoid production in nonphototrophic Gram-negative bacteria. Our study revealed that Bacillus LitR in complex with AdoB12 also serves as a transcriptional regulator with a photosensory function, which indicates that the LitR/CarH family is generally involved in the light-inducible carotenoid production of nonphototrophic bacteria. PMID:25917914

  17. Role and Function of LitR, an Adenosyl B12-Bound Light-Sensitive Regulator of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, in Regulation of Carotenoid Production.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki; Mise, Kou; Hagiwara, Kenta; Hirata, Naoya; Watanabe, Shoko; Toriyabe, Minami; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Ueda, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    The LitR/CarH family of proteins is a light-sensitive MerR family of transcriptional regulators that contain an adenosyl B12 (coenzyme B12 or AdoB12)-binding domain at the C terminus. The genes encoding these proteins are found in phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera; however, the biochemical properties of these proteins from Gram-positive bacteria remain poorly understood. We performed genetic and biochemical analyses of a homolog of the LitR protein from Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, a Gram-positive endospore-forming soil bacterium. Carotenoid production was induced by illumination in this bacterium. In vivo analysis demonstrated that LitR plays a central role in light-inducible carotenoid production and serves as a negative regulator of the light-inducible transcription of crt and litR itself. Biochemical evidence showed that LitR in complex with AdoB12 binds to the promoter regions of litR and the crt operon in a light-sensitive manner. In vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that AdoB12-LitR inhibited the specific transcription of the crt promoter generated by a σ(A)-containing RNA polymerase holoenzyme under dark conditions. Collectively, these data indicate that the AdoB12-LitR complex serves as a photoreceptor with DNA-binding activity in B. megaterium QM B1551 and that its function as a transcriptional repressor is fundamental to the light-induced carotenoid production. Members of the LitR/CarH family are AdoB12-based photosensors involved in light-inducible carotenoid production in nonphototrophic Gram-negative bacteria. Our study revealed that Bacillus LitR in complex with AdoB12 also serves as a transcriptional regulator with a photosensory function, which indicates that the LitR/CarH family is generally involved in the light-inducible carotenoid production of nonphototrophic bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Bulge Delta Scuti Stars in the MACHO database

    SciTech Connect

    Minnniti, D; Alcock, C; Alves,D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Rodgers, A W; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Tomanet, A; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    1997-07-29

    The authors describe the search for {delta} Scuti stars in the MACHO database of bulge fields. Concentrating on a sample of high amplitude {delta} Scutis, they examine the light curves and pulsation modes. They also discuss their spatial distribution and evolutionary status using mean colors and absolute magnitudes.

  19. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  20. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  1. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  2. How attention and contrast gain control interact to regulate lightness contrast and assimilation: a computational neural model.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Michael E

    2010-12-31

    Recent theories of lightness perception assume that lightness (perceived reflectance) is computed by a process that contrasts the target's luminance with that of one or more regions in its spatial surround. A challenge for any such theory is the phenomenon of lightness assimilation, which occurs when increasing the luminance of a surround region increases the target lightness: the opposite of contrast. Here contrast and assimilation are studied quantitatively in lightness matching experiments utilizing concentric disk-and-ring displays. Whether contrast or assimilation is seen depends on a number of factors including: the luminance relations of the target, surround, and background; surround size; and matching instructions. When assimilation occurs, it is always part of a larger pattern in which assimilation and contrast both occur over different ranges of surround luminance. These findings are quantitatively modeled by a theory that assumes lightness is computed from a weighted sum of responses of edge detector neurons in visual cortex. The magnitude of the neural response to an edge is regulated by a combination of contrast gain control acting between neighboring edge detectors and a top-down attentional gain control that selectively weights the response to stimulus edges according to their task relevance.

  3. Connectivity in river deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, P.; Hiatt, M. R.; Sendrowski, A.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas host approximately half a billion people and are rich in ecosystem diversity and economic resources. However, human-induced activities and climatic shifts are significantly impacting deltas around the world; anthropogenic disturbance, natural subsidence, and eustatic sea-level rise are major causes of threat to deltas and in many cases have compromised their safety and sustainability, putting at risk the people that live on them. In this presentation, I will introduce a framework called Delta Connectome for studying connectivity in river deltas based on different representations of a delta as a network. Here connectivity indicates both physical connectivity (how different portions of the system interact with each other) as well as conceptual (pathways of process coupling). I will explore several network representations and show how quantifying connectivity can advance our understanding of system functioning and can be used to inform coastal management and restoration. From connectivity considerations, the delta emerges as a leaky network that evolves over time and is characterized by continuous exchanges of fluxes of matter, energy, and information. I will discuss the implications of connectivity on delta functioning, land growth, and potential for nutrient removal.

  4. Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator

    PubMed Central

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Miyashita, Yuito; Satoh, Manami; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells. PMID:26323524

  5. Reflective films and expression of light-regulated genes in field-grown apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reflective films are used in orchard management to improve fruit coloration. Numerous physiological studies on the effects of application of these films have been conducted, including variation of angles of light incidence and reflection, spectral determination of reflected light and effects on pho...

  6. Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Miyashita, Yuito; Satoh, Manami; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

  7. Light regulates motility, attachment and virulence in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Río-Álvarez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Herva, José Juan; Martínez, Pedro Manuel; González-Melendi, Pablo; García-Casado, Gloria; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pto) is the causal agent of the bacterial speck of tomato, which leads to significant economic losses in this crop. Pto inhabits the tomato phyllosphere, where the pathogen is highly exposed to light, among other environmental factors. Light represents a stressful condition and acts as a source of information associated with different plant defence levels. Here, we analysed the presence of both blue and red light photoreceptors in a group of Pseudomonas. In addition, we studied the effect of white, blue and red light on Pto features related to epiphytic fitness. While white and blue light inhibit motility, bacterial attachment to plant leaves is promoted. Moreover, these phenotypes are altered in a blue-light receptor mutant. These light-controlled changes during the epiphytic stage cause a reduction in virulence, highlighting the relevance of motility during the entry process to the plant apoplast. This study demonstrated the key role of light perception in the Pto phenotype switching and its effect on virulence.

  8. Solanum tuberosum ZPR1 encodes a light-regulated nuclear DNA-binding protein adjusting the circadian expression of StBBX24 to light cycle.

    PubMed

    Kiełbowicz-Matuk, Agnieszka; Czarnecka, Jagoda; Banachowicz, Ewa; Rey, Pascal; Rorat, Tadeusz

    2017-03-01

    ZPR1 proteins belong to the C4-type of zinc finger coordinators known in animal cells to interact with other proteins and participate in cell growth and proliferation. In contrast, the current knowledge regarding plant ZPR1 proteins is very scarce. Here, we identify a novel potato nuclear factor belonging to this family and named StZPR1. StZPR1 is specifically expressed in photosynthetic organs during the light period, and the ZPR1 protein is located in the nuclear chromatin fraction. From modelling and experimental analyses, we reveal the StZPR1 ability to bind the circadian DNA cis motif 'CAACAGCATC', named CIRC and present in the promoter of the clock-controlled double B-box StBBX24 gene, the expression of which peaks in the middle of the day. We found that transgenic lines silenced for StZPR1 expression still display a 24 h period for the oscillation of StBBX24 expression but delayed by 4 h towards the night. Importantly, other BBX genes exhibit altered circadian regulation in these lines. Our data demonstrate that StZPR1 allows fitting of the StBBX24 circadian rhythm to the light period and provide evidence that ZPR1 is a novel clock-associated protein in plants necessary for the accurate rhythmic expression of specific circadian-regulated genes.

  9. Seeing new light: recent insights into the occurrence and regulation of chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2017-04-06

    Cyanobacteria exhibit a form of photomorphogenesis termed chromatic acclimation (CA), which involves tuning metabolism and physiology to external light cues, with the most readily recognized acclimation being the alteration of pigmentation. Historically, CA has been represented by three types that occur in organisms which synthesize green-light-absorbing phycoerythrin (PE) and red-light-absorbing phycocyanin (PC). The distinct CA types depend upon whether organisms adjust levels of PE (type II), both PE and PC (type III, also complementary chromatic acclimation), or neither (type I) in response to red or green wavelengths. Recently new forms of CA have been described which include responses to blue and green light (type IV) or far-red light (FaRLiP). Here, the molecular bases of distinct forms of CA are discussed.

  10. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  11. Light regulated I-V hysteresis loop of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lujun; Sun, Bai; Zhao, Wenxi; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A hysteresis loop of current-voltage characteristics based multiferroic BiFeO3 nanoribbons memory device is observed. Moreover, the white-light can greatly regulate both the current-voltage hysteresis loop and the ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The stored space charges within the electrodes/BiFeO3 interface can lead to hysteresis-type I-V characteristics of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO devices. The white-light controlled I-V loop and ferroelectric loop result from photon-generated carries. Since the I-V hysteresis loop and ferroelectric hysteresis loop have a potential application prospect to the memory devices, these two white-light controlled the hysteresis loops curves are likely to provide promising opportunity for developing the multi-functional memory devices.

  12. Transcriptional analysis of rat photoreceptor cells reveals daily regulation of genes important for visual signaling and light damage susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Hölter, Philip; Wengert, Alexander; Grether, Markus; Sticht, Carsten; Weyer, Veronika; Wolfrum, Uwe; Spessert, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Photoreceptor cells face the challenge of adjusting their function and, possibly, their susceptibility to light damage to the marked daily changes in ambient light intensity. To achieve a better understanding of photoreceptor adaptation at the transcriptional level, this study aimed to identify genes which are under daily regulation in photoreceptor cells using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR. Included in the gene set obtained were a number of genes which up until now have not been shown to be expressed in photoreceptor cells, such as Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) and Pde8a (phosphodiesterase 8A), and others with a known impact on phototransduction and/or photoreceptor survival, such as Grk1 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1) and Pgc-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, coactivator 1alpha). According to their daily dynamics, the genes identified could be clustered in two groups: those with peak expression during the second part of the day which are uniformly promoted to cycle by light/dark transitions and those with peak expression during the second part of the night which are predominantly driven by a clock. Since Grk1 and Pgc-1α belong in the first group, the present results support a concept in which transcriptional regulation of genes by ambient light contributes to the functional adjustment of photoreceptor cells over the 24-h period. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Luminescence Color Tuning by Regulating Electrostatic Interaction in Light-Emitting Devices and Two-Photon Excited Information Decryption.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Huiran; Zeng, Yi; She, Pengfei; Zhu, Nianyong; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2017-03-06

    It is well-known that the variation of noncovalent interactions of luminophores, such as π-π interaction, metal-to-metal interaction, and hydrogen-bonding interaction, can regulate their emission colors. Electrostatic interaction is also an important noncovalent interaction. However, very few examples of luminescence color tuning induced by electrostatic interaction were reported. Herein, a series of Zn(II)-bis(terpyridine) complexes (Zn-AcO, Zn-BF4, Zn-ClO4, and Zn-PF6) containing different anionic counterions were reported, which exhibit counterion-dependent emission colors from green-yellow to orange-red (549 to 622 nm) in CH2Cl2 solution. More importantly, it was found that the excited states of these Zn(II) complexes can be regulated by changing the electrostatic interaction between Zn(2+) and counterions. On the basis of this controllable excited state, white light emission has been achieved by a single molecule, and a white light-emitting device has been fabricated. Moreover, a novel type of data decryption system with Zn-PF6 as the optical recording medium has been developed by the two-photon excitation technique. Our results suggest that rationally controlled excited states of these Zn(II) complexes by regulating electrostatic interaction have promising applications in various optoelectronic fields, such as light-emitting devices, information recording, security protection, and so on.

  14. Maize LAZY1 mediates shoot gravitropism and inflorescence development through regulating auxin transport, auxin signaling, and light response.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaobin; Jiang, Chuan; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Tao; Ding, Lian; Song, Weibin; Luo, Hongbing; Lai, Jinsheng; Chen, Huabang; Liu, Renyi; Zhang, Xiaolan; Jin, Weiwei

    2013-11-01

    Auxin is a plant hormone that plays key roles in both shoot gravitropism and inflorescence development. However, these two processes appear to be parallel and to be regulated by distinct players. Here, we report that the maize (Zea mays) prostrate stem1 mutant, which is allelic to the classic mutant lazy plant1 (la1), displays prostrate growth with reduced shoot gravitropism and defective inflorescence development. Map-based cloning identified maize ZmLA1 as the functional ortholog of LAZY1 in rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). It has a unique role in inflorescence development and displays enriched expression in reproductive organs such as tassels and ears. Transcription of ZmLA1 responds to auxin and is repressed by light. Furthermore, ZmLA1 physically interacts with a putative auxin transport regulator in the plasma membrane and a putative auxin signaling protein in the nucleus. RNA-SEQ data showed that dozens of auxin transport, auxin response, and light signaling genes were differentially expressed in la1 mutant stems. Therefore, ZmLA1 might mediate the cross talk between shoot gravitropism and inflorescence development by regulating auxin transport, auxin signaling, and probably light response in maize.

  15. The back and forth of energy transfer between carotenoids and chlorophylls and its role in the regulation of light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Holleboom, Christoph-Peter; Walla, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Many aspects in the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting of plants are still quite poorly understood. For example, it is still a matter of debate which physical mechanism(s) results in the regulation and dissipation of excess energy in high light. Many researchers agree that electronic interactions between chlorophylls (Chl) and certain states of carotenoids are involved in these mechanisms. However, in particular, the role of the first excited state of carotenoids (Car S1) is not easily revealed, because of its optical forbidden character. The use of two-photon excitation is an elegant approach to address directly this state and to investigate the energy transfer in the direction Car S1 → Chl. Meanwhile, it has been applied to a large variety of systems starting from simple carotenoid-tetrapyrrole model compounds up to entire plants. Here, we present a systematic summary of the observations obtained by two-photon excitation about Car S1 → Chl energy transfer in systems with increasing complexity and the correlation to fluorescence quenching. We compare these observations directly with the energy transfer in the opposite direction, Chl → Car S1, for the same systems as obtained in pump-probe studies. We discuss what surprising aspects of this comparison led us to the suggestion that quenching excitonic Car-Chl interactions could contribute to the regulation of light harvesting, and how this suggestion can be connected to other models proposed.

  16. Light and plastid signals regulate different sets of genes in the albino mutant pap7-1.

    PubMed

    Grübler, Björn; Merendino, Livia; Twardziok, Sven O; Mininno, Morgane; Allorent, Guillaume; Chevalier, Fabien; Liebers, Monique; Blanvillain, Robert; Mayer, Klaus; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Ravanel, Stephane; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2017-09-21

    Plants possessing dysfunctional plastids due to defects in pigment biosynthesis or translation are known to repress photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) via retrograde signals from the disturbed organelles towards the nucleus. These signals are thought to be essential for proper biogenesis and function of the plastid. Mutants lacking plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-associated proteins (PAPs) display a genetic arrest in eoplast-chloroplast transition leading to an albino phenotype in the light. Retrograde signaling in these mutants, thus, could be expected to be similar as under conditions inducing plastid dysfunction. In order to answer this question we performed plastome- and genome-wide array analyses in the pap7-1 mutant of Arabidopsis. In parallel, we determined the potential overlap with light-regulated expression networks. To this end we performed a comparative expression profiling approach using light- and dark-grown wild-type plants as relative control for the expression profiles obtained from light-grown pap7-1 mutants. Our data indicate a specific impact of retrograde signals on metabolism related genes in pap7-1 mutants reflecting the starvation situation of the albino seedlings. In contrast light regulation of PhANGs and other nuclear gene groups appears to be fully functional in this mutant indicating that a block in chloroplast biogenesis per se does not repress expression of them as suggested by earlier studies. Only genes for light harvesting complex proteins displayed a significant repression indicating an exclusive retrograde impact on this gene family. Our results indicate that chloroplasts and arrested plastids each emit specific signals that control different target gene modules both in positive and negative manner. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-Wide Characterization of Light-Regulated Genes in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng; Yang, Fei; Smith, Kristina M.; Peterson, Matthew; Dekhang, Rigzin; Zhang, Ying; Zucker, Jeremy; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Mallappa, Chandrashekara; Zhou, Xiaoying; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Galagan, James E.; Freitag, Michael; Dunlap, Jay C.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Sachs, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa responds to light in complex ways. To thoroughly study the transcriptional response of this organism to light, RNA-seq was used to analyze capped and polyadenylated mRNA prepared from mycelium grown for 24 hr in the dark and then exposed to light for 0 (control) 15, 60, 120, and 240 min. More than three-quarters of all defined protein coding genes (79%) were expressed in these cells. The increased sensitivity of RNA-seq compared with previous microarray studies revealed that the RNA levels for 31% of expressed genes were affected two-fold or more by exposure to light. Additionally, a large class of mRNAs, enriched for transcripts specifying products involved in rRNA metabolism, showed decreased expression in response to light, indicating a heretofore undocumented effect of light on this pathway. Based on measured changes in mRNA levels, light generally increases cellular metabolism and at the same time causes significant oxidative stress to the organism. To deal with this stress, protective photopigments are made, antioxidants are produced, and genes involved in ribosome biogenesis are transiently repressed. PMID:25053707

  18. Structure of a Light-Activated LOV Protein Dimer That Regulates Transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Chen, Chen-Hui; Dunlap, Jay C.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2012-10-25

    Light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) protein domains are present in many signaling proteins in bacteria, archaea, protists, plants, and fungi. The LOV protein VIVID (VVD) of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa enables the organism to adapt to constant or increasing amounts of light and facilitates proper entrainment of circadian rhythms. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the fully light-adapted VVD dimer and reveal the mechanism by which light-driven conformational change alters the oligomeric state of the protein. Light-induced formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct generated a new hydrogen bond network that released the amino (N) terminus from the protein core and restructured an acceptor pocket for binding of the N terminus on the opposite subunit of the dimer. Substitution of residues critical for the switch between the monomeric and the dimeric states of the protein had profound effects on light adaptation in Neurospora. The mechanism of dimerization of VVD provides molecular details that explain how members of a large family of photoreceptors convert light responses to alterations in protein-protein interactions.

  19. Blue-light irradiation up-regulates the ent-kaurene synthase gene and affects the avoidance response of protonemal growth in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Toyoshima, Hikaru; Natsume, Masahiro; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    We report a novel physiological response to blue light in the moss Physcomitrella patens . Blue light regulates ent -kaurene biosynthesis and avoidance response to protonemal growth. Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of diterpene-type plant hormones biosynthesized from ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene. While the moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway, from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid, no GA is found in this species. Caulonemal differentiation in a P. patens mutant with a disrupted bifunctional ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase/ent-kaurene synthase (PpCPS/KS) gene is suppressed under red light, and is recovered by application of ent-kaurene and ent-kaurenoic acid. This indicates that derivatives of ent-kaurenoic acid, not GAs, might act as endogenous developmental regulators. Here, we found unique responses in the protonemal growth of P. patens under unilateral blue light, and these regulators were involved in the responses. When protonemata of the wild type were incubated under blue light, the chloronemal filaments grew in the opposite direction to the light source. Although this avoidance was not observed in the ent-kaurene deficient mutant, chloronemal growth toward a blue-light source in the mutant was suppressed by application of ent-kaurenoic acid, and the growth was rescued to that in the wild type. Expression analysis of the PpCPS/KS gene showed that the mRNA level under blue light was rapidly increased and was five times higher than under red light. These results suggest that regulators derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are strongly involved not only in the growth regulation of caulonemal differentiation under red light, but also in the light avoidance response of chloronemal growth under blue light. In particular, growth under blue light is regulated via the PpCPS/KS gene.

  20. Nonvisual Opsins and the Regulation of Peripheral Clocks by Light and Hormones.

    PubMed

    Poletini, Maristela O; Ramos, Bruno C; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock machinery is conserved throughout evolution. However, how environmental cues are perceived has evolved in such a way that peripheral clocks in mammals require a variety of signals, including hormones. On the other hand, in nonmammalian cells able to directly detect light, light seems to play a major role in the synchronization of the clock. The interaction between perception of circadian light by nonvisual opsins and hormones will be discussed under the perspective of clock synchronization at the molecular level. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Regulation of lipid peroxidation in the retina under the effect of bright light.

    PubMed

    Dzhafarov, A I; Kasimov, E M; Mamedov, Sh Y

    2011-04-01

    Changes in LPO intensity under the effect of exposure to bright light and the possibility of their correction with antioxidants were studied on rabbits with diabetic retinopathy. It was found that enhanced LPO caused by exposure to bright light in rabbits with diabetic retinopathy can be corrected with antioxidants. Phenosan potassium salt, α-tocopherol, and oxypyridine were more effective than SOD and taurine in preventing MDA accumulation. A complex of natural and synthetic antioxidants was most efficient in correcting LPO under conditions of exposure to bright light.

  2. Orally administered H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2), a potent mu/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, regulates obese-related factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Myers, Page H; Blankenship, Terry; Wilson, Ralph; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2009-08-15

    Orally active dual mu-/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH(2)-Ph (MZ-2) was applied to study body weight gain, fat content, bone mineral density, serum insulin, cholesterol and glucose levels in female ob/ob (B6.V-Lep/J homozygous) and lean wild mice with or without voluntary exercise on wheels for three weeks, and during a two week post-treatment period under the same conditions. MZ-2 (10mg/kg/day, p.o.) exhibited the following actions: (1) reduced body weight gain in sedentary obese mice that persisted beyond the treatment period without effect on lean mice; (2) stimulated voluntary running on exercise wheels of both groups of mice; (3) decreased fat content, enhanced bone mineral density (BMD), and decreased serum insulin and glucose levels in obese mice; and (4) MZ-2 (30 microM) increased BMD in human osteoblast cells (MG-63) comparable to naltrexone, while morphine inhibited mineral nodule formation. Thus, MZ-2 has potential application in the clinical management of obesity, insulin and glucose levels, and the amelioration of osteoporosis.

  3. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5′ donor sites, alternative 3′ acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  4. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Hernán R; Posadas, Diana M; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2012-07-24

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum.

  5. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Hernán R.; Posadas, Diana M.; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A.; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum. PMID:22773814

  6. Solid-state lighting for the International Space Station: Tests of visual performance and melatonin regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainard, George C.; Coyle, William; Ayers, Melissa; Kemp, John; Warfield, Benjamin; Maida, James; Bowen, Charles; Bernecker, Craig; Lockley, Steven W.; Hanifin, John P.

    2013-11-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) that house fluorescent lamps for illuminating the astronauts' working and living environments. Solid-state light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attractive candidates for replacing the GLAs on the ISS. The advantages of LEDs over conventional fluorescent light sources include lower up-mass, power consumption and heat generation, as well as fewer toxic materials, greater resistance to damage and long lamp life. A prototype Solid-State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) was developed and successfully installed on the ISS. The broad aim of the ongoing work is to test light emitted by prototype SSLAs for supporting astronaut vision and assessing neuroendocrine, circadian, neurobehavioral and sleep effects. Three completed ground-based studies are presented here including experiments on visual performance, color discrimination, and acute plasma melatonin suppression in cohorts of healthy, human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions within a high-fidelity replica of the ISS Crew Quarters (CQ). All visual tests were done under indirect daylight at 201 lx, fluorescent room light at 531 lx and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ at 1266 lx. Visual performance was assessed with numerical verification tests (NVT). NVT data show that there are no significant differences in score (F=0.73, p=0.48) or time (F=0.14, p=0.87) for subjects performing five contrast tests (10%-100%). Color discrimination was assessed with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue tests (FM-100). The FM-100 data showed no significant differences (F=0.01, p=0.99) in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ. Plasma melatonin suppression data show that there are significant differences (F=29.61, p<0.0001) across the percent change scores of plasma melatonin for five corneal irradiances, ranging from 0 to 405 μW/cm2 of 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ (0-1270 lx). Risk factors for the health and

  7. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B.

  8. The Mediator Complex Subunit PFT1 Interferes with COP1 and HY5 in the Regulation of Arabidopsis Light Signaling1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Cornelia; Büche, Claudia; Fernandez, Aurora Piñas; Schäfer, Eberhard; Zwick, Eva; Kretsch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants hypersensitive to far-red light were isolated under a light program of alternating red and far-red light pulses and were named eid (for empfindlicher im dunkelroten Licht). The dominant eid3 mutant carries a missense mutation in a conserved domain of PHYTOCHROME AND FLOWERING TIME1 (PFT1), an important component of the plant mediator coactivator complex, which links promoter-bound transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II complexes. Epistatic analyses were performed to obtain information about the coaction between the mutated PFT1eid3 and positively and negatively acting components of light signaling cascades. The data presented here provide clear evidence that the mutation mainly enhances light sensitivity downstream of phytochrome A (phyA) and modulates phyB function. Our results demonstrate that the Mediator component cooperates with CONSTITUTIVE PHOTORMORPHOGENIC1 in the regulation of light responses and that the hypersensitive phenotype strictly depends on the presence of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 transcription factor, an important positive regulator of light-dependent gene expression. Expression profile analyses revealed that PFT1eid3 alters the transcript accumulation of light-regulated genes even in darkness. Our data further indicate that PFT1 regulates the floral transition downstream of phyA. The PFT1 missense mutation seems to create a constitutively active transcription factor by mimicking an early step in light signaling. PMID:22760208

  9. Characterization of Light and Nitrogen Regulated Gene Expression Pathways in Marine Diatoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-31

    harvesting capacity of marine diatoms and play a central role in the coupling of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in these cells. To characterize the... kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, although homologous sequences were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana genomic DNA under these conditions. These results...period, thereby leading to enhancement of light- harvesting efficiency in low light conditions. Isolation of FCP cDNA sequences from night and day samples

  10. MKK5 regulates high light-induced gene expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Cao, Qingqin; Zhang, Qing; Qin, Ling; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-07-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) convert the superoxide radical to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, and play crucial roles in plant tolerance to oxidative stress. Expression of many genes encoding SODs is promoted in response to environmental stresses, but the exact mechanism of such promotion is largely unknown. Here, we report that MKK5, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, mediated the high light-induced expression of genes of two copper/zinc SODs, CSD1 and CSD2, and was involved in the oxidative adaptation to high light stress. In response to high light, wild-type Arabidopsis plants showed much enhanced expression of CSD1 and CSD2 and higher enzyme activity of MKK5. In the MKK5-RNAi (RNA interference) lines, however, the induction of CSD1 and CSD2 as well as the activation of MKK5 activity were completely arrested. In contrast, overexpression of MKK5 promoted the expression of CSD1 and CSD2. MKK5-RNAi gene silencing and CSD1/2-RNAi suppression plants became much more sensitive to high light stress than wild-type plants, and the double mutant mkk5 csd1 exhibited hypersensitivity to the stress. Plants overexpressing MKK5 showed enhanced tolerance to high light stress. Our results demonstrate that MKK5 mediated a signal of the high light-induced expression of the genes CSD1 and CSD2. Manipulating MKK5 and thereby up-regulating the levels of CSD1 and CSD2 transcripts can improve plant tolerance to high light stress.

  11. Blue-Light Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cab1 Gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J.; Kaufman, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    The steady-state level of Cab RNA in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana increases as a result of a single pulse of blue light. The threshold for the response is at or below 10[deg] [mu]mol m-2 and begins within 1 h of irradiation. The response is not prevented by far-red treatment, and the blue-light source used does not elicit and observable very low fluence phytochrome response for RbcS RNA. The time course for blue-light-induced transcript accumulation differs from that of red, the blue beginning more quickly. Transcripts derived from the Cab1 (AB140; Lhcb1*3) member of the gene family are responsible in part for the blue-light-induced accumulation. This is the same member of the gene family that is responsible for phytochrome-induced Cab gene expression (G.A. Karlin-Neumann, L. Sun, E.M. Tobin [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 1323-1331). The mutant hy4, which lacks blue-light-induced suppression of hypocotyl elongation, retains the ability of Cab RNA to respond to blue light. PMID:12232164

  12. Light-dependent regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis in chlorophyllide a oxygenase overexpressing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Biswal, Ajaya K; Reddy, Vanga S; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2005-01-14

    Chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) that converts chlorophyllide a to chlorophyllide b was overexpressed in tobacco to increase chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis and alter the Chl a/b ratio. Transgenic plants along with their wild-type cultivars were grown in low and high light intensities. In low light there was 20% increase in chlorophyll b contents in transgenic plants, which resulted in 16% reduction in the Chl a/b ratio. In high light, total Chl contents were 31% higher in transgenic plants than those of wild type. The increase in Chl a was 19% and that of Chl b was 72% leading to 31% decline of Chl a/b ratio. The increase in Chl b contents was accompanied by enhanced CAO expression that was highly pronounced in low light. As compared to low light, in high light Lhcb1 and Chl a/b transcripts abundance was significantly increased in transgenic plants suggesting a close relationship between Chl b synthesis and cab gene expression. However, there was a small increase in expression of LHCII proteins, which did not correspond to 72% increase in Chl b content in transgenic line, implying that LHCPII has the ability to bind more Chl b molecules.

  13. The Trichoderma atroviride cryptochrome/photolyase genes regulate the expression of blr1-independent genes both in red and blue light.

    PubMed

    García-Esquivel, Mónica; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U; Hernández-Oñate, Miguel A; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative transcriptome analysis led to the identification of 331 transcripts regulated by white light. Evaluation of the response to white light in mutants affected in the previously characterized blue-light receptor Blr1, demonstrated the existence of both Blr1-dependent and independent responses. Functional categorization of the light responsive genes indicated the effect of light on regulation of various transcription factors, regulators of chromatin structure, signaling pathways, genes related to different kinds of stress, metabolism, redox adjustment, and cell cycle among others. In order to establish the participation of other photoreceptors, gene expression was validated in response to different wavelengths. Gene regulation by blue and red light suggests the involvement of several photoreceptors in integrating light signals of different wavelengths in Trichoderma atroviride. Functional analysis of potential blue light photoreceptors suggests that several perception systems for different wavelengths are involved in the response to light. Deletion of cry1, one of the potential photoreceptors, resulted in severe reduction in the photoreactivation capacity of the fungus, as well as a change in gene expression under blue and red light.

  14. Interactive effect of light colours and temporal synergism of circadian neural oscillations in reproductive regulation of Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suneeta; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2016-09-01

    Avian literature reports the modulation of 'photoperiodic gonadal responses' by the temporal phase relation of serotonergic and dopaminergic oscillations in Japanese quail. But, the modulation of 'light colour responses' by the temporal synergism of neural oscillations is not yet known. Hence the present study was designed to investigate the interaction of the light colour (blue, red) and the phase relation of neural oscillations in the reproductive regulation of Japanese quail. Three week old male Japanese quail were divided into two groups and maintained under a long day length condition (16L:8D) and were exposed to a 30 lux intensity of blue LED (light emitting diode) (B LED) and a red LED light (R LED). At the age of 15.5weeks, quail of one subgroup of B LED were injected with serotonin precursor (5-HTP) and dopamine precursor (l-DOPA) 12hrs apart (B LED+12-hr) and those of the R LED group were injected with the same drugs (5mg/100g body weight over a period of thirteen days) but 8hrs apart (R LED+8-hr). The remaining subgroups of both the light colour groups (B LED & R LED) received normal saline twice daily and served as controls. Cloacal gland volume was recorded weekly until 35.5weeks of age when the study was terminated and reproductive parameters (testicular volume, GSI, seminiferous tubule diameter and plasma testosterone) were assessed. Results indicate that the 8-hr temporal phase relation of neural oscillations suppresses reproductive activity even during the photosensitive phase of the red light exposed quail (R LED+8-hr) compare to the R LED controls. On the other hand, the 12-hr temporal phase relation stimulates the gonadal development of the B LED+12-hr quail compared to the B LED controls which after completing one cycle entered into a regressive phase and remained sexually quiescent. These experiments suggest that the temporal phase relations of circadian neural oscillations, in addition to modulating the classical photoperiodic responses, may

  15. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  16. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  17. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  18. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  19. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  20. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  1. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  2. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-10-13

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  3. Thermal dissipation of light energy is regulated differently and by different mechanisms in lichens and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, J; Azarkovich, M; Pfündel, E E; Shuvalov, V A; Heber, U

    2005-03-01

    Modulated chlorophyll fluorescence was used to compare dissipation of light energy as heat in photosystem II of homoiohydric and poikilohydric photosynthetic organisms which were either hydrated or dehydrated. In hydrated chlorolichens with an alga as the photobiont, fluorescence quenching revealed a dominant mechanism of energy dissipation which was based on a protonation reaction when zeaxanthin was present. CO2 was effective as a weak protonating agent and actinic light was not necessary. In a hydrated cyanobacterial lichen, protonation by CO2 was ineffective to initiate energy dissipation. This was also true for leaves of higher plants. Thus, regulation of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation by protonation was different in leaves and in chlorolichens. A mechanism of energy dissipation different from that based on zeaxanthin became apparent on dehydration of both lichens and leaves. Quenching of maximum or Fm fluorescence increased strongly during dehydration. In lichens, this was also true for so-called basal or Fo fluorescence. In contrast to zeaxanthin-dependent quenching, dehydration-induced quenching could not be inhibited by dithiothreitol. Both zeaxanthin-dependent and dehydration-induced quenching cooperated in chlorolichens to increase thermal dissipation of light energy if desiccation occurred in the light. In cyanolichens, which do not possess a zeaxanthin cycle, only desiccation-induced thermal energy dissipation was active in the dry state. Fluorescence emission spectra of chlorolichens revealed stronger desiccation-induced suppression of 685-nm fluorescence than of 720-nm fluorescence. In agreement with earlier reports of , fluorescence excitation data showed that desiccation reduced flow of excitation energy from chlorophyll b of the light harvesting complex II to emitting centres more than flow from chlorophyll a of core pigments. The data are discussed in relation to regulation and localization of thermal energy dissipation mechanisms. It is

  4. Identification of genes involved in carbon metabolism from Eleusine coracana (L.) for understanding their light-mediated entrainment and regulation.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Pooja; Gupta, Supriya; Arora, Sandeep; Kumar, Anil

    2014-08-01

    The study would be helpful in understanding the synchronization of genes of a pathway and its effect on carbon metabolism which can be further utilized for better agronomic performance. Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) is a C4 crop with high nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) said to be organic by default. Being carbon and nitrogen mutually exclusive, in the present study, it was investigated how light regulates the expression of genes of carbon metabolism and photosynthesis in two finger millet genotypes (GE 3885 and GE 1437) with differing grain protein content (13.8 and 6.2%). Different genes associated with carbon metabolism were isolated (Cab, RBCS, PEPC, PPDK, PEPC-k, ME, SPS, PK, 14-3-3 and SnRK1) and the co-expression of Dof1 and these genes was investigated under different light-dark conditions. The deduced protein sequences of isolated genes showed relationship of marked variations with their homolog which might corresponds to difference in photosynthetic efficiency between finger millet and other plants. In 24 h day-night conditions, the identified genes exhibited diurnal rhythm in both genotypes with different time of peak expression. In dark, the expression of identified genes in both genotypes oscillated with varied amplitude indicating their control by an endogenous clock. However, Cab, RBCS and PPDK showed no oscillations suggesting that genes are light inducible. Exceptionally, ME transcript showed differential response within genotypes. Upon illumination, genes were induced within the measured period indicating that light is a signal involved in the entrainment of these genes. Exception was ME and SnRK1 in GE 1437. We conclude that expression of Dof1 in higher grain protein genotype was more consistent with the expression of carbon metabolism genes under study suggesting that Dof1 differentially regulates the expression of these light inducible genes and simultaneously controls the grain protein content in finger millet genotypes.

  5. Gravity-dependent regulation of red light induced moss protonemata branching and gametophore bud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripetskyj, R. T.; Kit, N. A.

    Isolated leafy shoots of the moss Pottia intermedia positioned horizontally on the agar surface in vertically oriented petri dishes regenerate unbranching negatively gravitropic protonemata on upper side of the regenerant. Gravity determines the site of regeneration not the process itself. White light of low intensity unsufficient to induce positive phototropism of dark-grown protonemata can, however, provoke their branching and gametophore bud formation (Ripetskyj et al., 1998; 1999). The presented experiments have been carried out with red light in Biological Research in Canisters/Light Emitting Diode (BRIC/LED) hardware developed at Kennedy Space Center, USA. Seven-day-old dark-grown negatively gravitropic secondary P. intermedia protonemata were positioned differently with respect to gravity vector and to the source of red light of low, 1 or 2 μ mol\\cdot m-2\\cdot s-1, intensities. The light induced intensive branching of the protonemata and gametophore bud formation initiation site of both processes as well as the direction of growth of branches and buds being depent on the position of protonemata with respect to gravity and light vectors. Vertically positioned, i.e. ungravistimulated, dark grown protonemata illuminated from one side with red light of 2 μ mol\\cdot m-2\\cdot s-1 intensity produced 96,9 ± 2,2% of side branches and buds growing directly towards the light source from the lit protonema side. Horizontally disposed protonemata irradiated from below with red light of the same intensity regenerate 31,7 ± 3,9% of branches and buds on the upper, i.e. shaded protonemata side, the upward growth of which should undoubtedly be determined by gravity. In vertically disposed protonemata illuminated with red light of 1 μ mol\\cdot m-2\\cdot s-1 intensity from aside 31,9 ± 5,5% of side branches and buds arised on shaded protonema side and grew away from the light. Illumination of the protonemata in horizontal position from below increased the number of

  6. GIGANTEA acts in blue light signaling and has biochemically separable roles in circadian clock and flowering time regulation.

    PubMed

    Martin-Tryon, Ellen L; Kreps, Joel A; Harmer, Stacey L

    2007-01-01

    Circadian clocks are widespread in nature. In higher plants, they confer a selective advantage, providing information regarding not only time of day but also time of year. Forward genetic screens in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have led to the identification of many clock components, but the functions of most of these genes remain obscure. To identify both new constituents of the circadian clock and new alleles of known clock-associated genes, we performed a mutant screen. Using a clock-regulated luciferase reporter, we isolated new alleles of ZEITLUPE, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, and GIGANTEA (GI). GI has previously been reported to function in red light signaling, central clock function, and flowering time regulation. Characterization of this and other GI alleles has helped us to further define GI function in the circadian system. We found that GI acts in photomorphogenic and circadian blue light signaling pathways and is differentially required for clock function in constant red versus blue light. Gene expression and epistasis analyses show that TIMING OF CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN1 (TOC1) expression is not solely dependent upon GI and that GI expression is only indirectly affected by TOC1, suggesting that GI acts both in series with and in parallel to TOC1 within the central circadian oscillator. Finally, we found that the GI-dependent promotion of CONSTANS expression and flowering is intact in a gi mutant with altered circadian regulation. Thus GI function in the regulation of a clock output can be biochemically separated from its role within the circadian clock.

  7. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Kun; Shao, Hongbo; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Glycine soja (BB52) is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn) was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+) and Cl(-). Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  8. A role in the regulation of transcription by light for RCO-1 and RCM-1, the Neurospora homologs of the yeast Tup1-Ssn6 repressor.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, María; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Kim, Sang-Rae; Jeong, Byung-Kap; Lee, Bheong-Uk; Corrochano, Luis M

    2010-11-01

    The activation of gene transcription by light is transient since light-dependent mRNA accumulation ceases after long exposures to light. This phenomenon, photoadaptation, has been observed in plants and fungi, and allows the perception of changes in light intensities. In the fungus Neurosporacrassa photoadaptation involves the transient binding of the photoresponsive White Collar Complex (WCC) to the promoters of light-regulated genes. We show that RCO-1 and RCM-1, the Neurospora homologs of the components of the yeast Tup1-Ssn6 repressor complex, participate in photoadaptation. Mutation in either rco-1 or rcm-1 result in high and sustained accumulation of mRNAs for con-10 and other light-regulated genes after long exposures to light. The mutation of rco-1 increased the sensitivity to light for con-10 activation and delayed synthesis and/or degradation of con-10 and con-6 mRNAs without altering the amount or the light-dependent phosphorylation of the photoreceptor WC-1. RCO-1 and RCM-1 are located in the Neurospora nuclei were they regulate gene transcription. We show that RCO-1 and RCM-1 participate in the light-transduction pathway of Neurospora and has a role in photoadaptation by repressing gene transcription after long exposures to light.

  9. Analysis of Pigeon (Columba) Ovary Transcriptomes to Identify Genes Involved in Blue Light Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jia-Tong; Yang, Hai-Ming; Yan, Zheng-Jie; Cao, Wei; Li, Yang-Bai

    2015-01-01

    Monochromatic light is widely applied to promote poultry reproductive performance, yet little is currently known regarding the mechanism by which light wavelengths affect pigeon reproduction. Recently, high-throughput sequencing technologies have been used to provide genomic information for solving this problem. In this study, we employed Illumina Hiseq 2000 to identify differentially expressed genes in ovary tissue from pigeons under blue and white light conditions and de novo transcriptome assembly to construct a comprehensive sequence database containing information on the mechanisms of follicle development. A total of 157,774 unigenes (mean length: 790 bp) were obtained by the Trinity program, and 35.83% of these unigenes were matched to genes in a non-redundant protein database. Gene description, gene ontology, and the clustering of orthologous group terms were performed to annotate the transcriptome assembly. Differentially expressed genes between blue and white light conditions included those related to oocyte maturation, hormone biosynthesis, and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, 17,574 SSRs and 533,887 potential SNPs were identified in this transcriptome assembly. This work is the first transcriptome analysis of the Columba ovary using Illumina technology, and the resulting transcriptome and differentially expressed gene data can facilitate further investigations into the molecular mechanism of the effect of blue light on follicle development and reproduction in pigeons and other bird species.

  10. Molecular mechanism of photoactivation of a light-regulated adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Mio; Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Tame, Jeremy R H; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong

    2017-08-08

    The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) detects light through a flavin chromophore within the N-terminal BLUF domain. BLUF domains have been found in a number of different light-activated proteins, but with different relative orientations. The two BLUF domains of OaPAC are found in close contact with each other, forming a coiled coil at their interface. Crystallization does not impede the activity switching of the enzyme, but flash cooling the crystals to cryogenic temperatures prevents the signature spectral changes that occur on photoactivation/deactivation. High-resolution crystallographic analysis of OaPAC in the fully activated state has been achieved by cryocooling the crystals immediately after light exposure. Comparison of the isomorphous light- and dark-state structures shows that the active site undergoes minimal changes, yet enzyme activity may increase up to 50-fold, depending on conditions. The OaPAC models will assist the development of simple, direct means to raise the cyclic AMP levels of living cells by light, and other tools for optogenetics.

  11. Light-Regulated Polymerization under Near-Infrared/Far-Red Irradiation Catalyzed by Bacteriochlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Xu, Jiangtao; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-01-18

    Photoregulated polymerizations are typically conducted using high-energy (UV and blue) light, which may lead to undesired side reactions. Furthermore, as the penetration of visible light is rather limited, the range of applications with such wavelengths is likewise limited. We herein report the first living radical polymerization that can be activated and deactivated by irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) and far-red light. Bacteriochlorophyll a (Bachl a) was employed as a photoredox catalyst for photoinduced electron transfer/reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polymerization. Well-defined polymers were thus synthesized within a few hours under NIR (λ=850 nm) and far-red (λ=780 nm) irradiation with excellent control over the molecular weight (M(n)/M(w)<1.25). Taking advantage of the good penetration of NIR light, we showed that the polymerization also proceeded smoothly when a translucent barrier was placed between light source and reaction vessel.

  12. HYPERSENSITIVE TO RED AND BLUE 1, a ZZ-type zinc finger protein, regulates phytochrome B-mediated red and cryptochrome-mediated blue light responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Chong, Jason; Ni, Min

    2005-03-01

    Plant photoreceptors that regulate photomorphogenic development include red/far-red-light-absorbing phytochromes and blue/UV-A-light-absorbing cryptochromes. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components downstream of the photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a short hypocotyl mutant under red and blue light, hypersensitive to red and blue 1 (hrb1). Mutation in HRB1 also enhances the end-of-day far-red light response, inhibits leaf expansion and petiole elongation, and attenuates the expression of CAB3 and CHS. Double mutant analysis indicates that phyB is epistatic to hrb1 under red light, and cry1 cry2 is epistatic to hrb1 under blue light for both hypocotyl growth and light-regulated gene expression responses. HRB1 localizes to the nucleus and belongs to a protein family of Drought induced 19 (Di19). HRB1 and all other family members contain a ZZ-type zinc finger domain, which in other organisms is implicated in protein-protein interactions between dystrophin and calmodulin and between transcriptional adaptors and activators. HRB1 activity is also required for red and blue light-induced expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). pif4 shows a very similar hypersensitive response as hrb1 to both red light and blue light and is epistatic to hrb1 in control of light-regulated gene expression responses. Thus, the roles of HRB1 and PIF4 together in regulating both red and blue light responses may represent points where red light signaling and blue light signaling intersect.

  13. PIF4 and PIF5 transcription factors link blue light and auxin to regulate the phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaqiang; Qi, Linlin; Li, Yanan; Zhai, Qingzhe; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-06-01

    Both blue light (BL) and auxin are essential for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanisms by which light is molecularly linked to auxin during phototropism remain elusive. Here, we report that phytochrome interacting factoR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 act downstream of the BL sensor phototropin1 (PHOT1) to negatively modulate phototropism in Arabidopsis. We also reveal that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate auxin signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PIF4 directly activates the expression of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) genes IAA19 and IAA29 by binding to the G-box (CACGTG) motifs in their promoters. Our genetic assays demonstrate that IAA19 and IAA29, which physically interact with auxin response factor7 (ARF7), are sufficient for PIF4 to negatively regulate auxin signaling and phototropism. This study identifies a key step of phototropic signaling in Arabidopsis by showing that PIF4 and PIF5 link light and auxin.

  14. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Hepatitis D (Delta agent) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis D is a viral infection caused by the ...

  15. Delta in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    This unnamed crater in northern Terra Cimmeria has a small channel that created a delta feature. Such features are important indicators of liquid water in Mars past as shown in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey.

  16. Federal Funding in the Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.; Calhoun, Samuel D.

    2002-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Delta region, especially the rural Delta, faces many economic challenges. The rural Delta has received much federal aid in basic income support and funding for human resource development, but less for community resource programs, which are important for economic development. Federal aid to the Delta is analyzed in terms of…

  17. Control of the light-regulated current in rod photoreceptors by cyclic GMP, calcium, and l-cis-diltiazem.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J H; Kaupp, U B; MacLeish, P R

    1986-01-01

    The effect of calcium ions on the cGMP-activated current of outer segment membrane was examined by the excised-patch technique. Changes in the extracellular calcium concentration had marked effects on the cGMP-activated current, while changes in intracellular calcium concentration were ineffective. Changes in calcium concentration in the absence of cGMP had little, if any, effect on membrane conductance. These results suggest that both intracellular cGMP and extracellular calcium can directly affect the conductance underlying the light response in rod cells. The pharmacological agent l-cis-diltiazem reversibly inhibited the cGMP-activated current when applied to the intracellular side of an excised patch. When superfused over intact rod cells, l-cis-diltiazem reversibly blocked much of the normal light response. The isomer, d-cis-diltiazem, did not significantly affect either patches or intact rod cells. Thus, the light-regulated conductance has binding sites for both calcium and cGMP that may interact during the normal light response in rod cells and a site specific for l-cis-diltiazem that can be used to identify and further study the conductance mechanism. PMID:3006029

  18. Control of the light-regulated current in rod photoreceptors by cyclic GMP, calcium, and l-cis-diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Stern, J H; Kaupp, U B; MacLeish, P R

    1986-02-01

    The effect of calcium ions on the cGMP-activated current of outer segment membrane was examined by the excised-patch technique. Changes in the extracellular calcium concentration had marked effects on the cGMP-activated current, while changes in intracellular calcium concentration were ineffective. Changes in calcium concentration in the absence of cGMP had little, if any, effect on membrane conductance. These results suggest that both intracellular cGMP and extracellular calcium can directly affect the conductance underlying the light response in rod cells. The pharmacological agent l-cis-diltiazem reversibly inhibited the cGMP-activated current when applied to the intracellular side of an excised patch. When superfused over intact rod cells, l-cis-diltiazem reversibly blocked much of the normal light response. The isomer, d-cis-diltiazem, did not significantly affect either patches or intact rod cells. Thus, the light-regulated conductance has binding sites for both calcium and cGMP that may interact during the normal light response in rod cells and a site specific for l-cis-diltiazem that can be used to identify and further study the conductance mechanism.

  19. A desiccation-related Elip-like gene from the resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum is regulated by light and ABA.

    PubMed

    Bartels, D; Hanke, C; Schneider, K; Michel, D; Salamini, F

    1992-08-01

    The resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum tolerates an extreme loss of cellular water. Therefore this plant is being studied as model system to analyse desiccation tolerance at the molecular level. Upon dehydration, new transcripts are abundantly expressed in different tissues of the plant. One such desiccation-related nuclear gene (dsp-22 for desiccation stress protein) encodes a mature 21 kDa protein which accumulates in the chloroplasts. Sequence analysis indicates that dsp-22 is closely related to early light inducible genes (Elip) of higher plants and to a carotene biosynthesis related gene (cbr) isolated from the green alga Dunaliella bardawil. In contrast to other desiccation-related genes, light is an essential positive factor regulating the expression of dsp-22: ABA-mediated gene activation leads to the accumulation of the transcript only in the presence of light. During the desiccation process, light acts at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The implications of these different controls and the possible role of the dsp-22 protein in the desiccation/rehydration process are discussed.

  20. Light regulation of pyruvate allocation into primary and secondary carbon metabolism in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Werner, C.; Wegener, F.; Meyers, K.; Abrell, L.

    2012-12-01

    While plant metabolic processes are known to exert a large influence on climate and air quality through the emission of CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), controls over the allocation of assimilated carbon to these important components of the global carbon cycle are poorly understood. In plants, pyruvate lies at the heart of carbon metabolism by acting as a key product of photosynthesis and glycolysis and as a substrate used in respiratory and secondary biosynthetic pathways (e.g. VOCs). It is now well recognized that light has a strong inhibitory effect on mitochondrial respiration and recent studies have shown this contributes to an accumulation of pyruvate. However, little is known about the impact(s) this has on biosynthetic processes including VOCs and how the different carbon atoms within pyruvate are utilized. In this study, we quantified diurnal VOC and CO2 fluxes from intact branches of a Mediterranean shrub (Halimium halimifolium) under controlled light conditions. In addition, we utilized positionally specific 13C-labeled pyruvate branch feeding together with stable isotope analysis to trace the partitioning of C1, C2, and C3 carbon atoms of pyruvate into VOCs and CO2 emissions in the light and in the dark. In the light, we found high emission rates of a large array of VOC including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, green leaf volatiles, aromatics, sulfides, and nitrogen containing VOCs. In addition, elevated 13C-VOC emissions were stimulated by pyruvate-2-13C and pyruvate-2,3-13C but not pyruvate-1-13C while the opposite was the case for 13CO2 emissions (respiration). Moreover, we found that in the dark, 13C-VOC emissions dramatically declined while 13CO2 emissions were strongly stimulated. Our observations suggest that in the light, H. halimifolium dedicates a high pyruvate flux through secondary biosynthetic pathways including the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass, mevalonic acid, MEP/DOXP, shikimic acid, and fatty acid pathways, which are

  1. Is Chile Complying with its Light Pollution Regulations? A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. G.; Sanhueza, P.; Schwarz, H. E.; Walker, A. R.

    2005-12-01

    Monte Patria is the first Municipality in Chile to comply fully with Supreme Decree 686, the Chilean, environmentally-based legislation governing exterior lighting in Northern Chile - the "norma luminica". "Before" and "after" photographs of Monte Patria were published in last June's issue of "Physics Today", in the context of the global effort to control light pollution. Some photographs of other Chilean towns have been obtained for this poster and for display at the International Dark Sky Association's stand at this meeting. Highlights include detailed midnight and dawn panoramas taken by us during October, 2005 - the month in which the six-year "grace period" for all external lighting in northern Chile's astronomically-sensitive 2nd, 3rd and 4th Regions was supposed to come into full compliance. It is clear that significant progress is being made. The chief obstacle has been financial. Large-scale changeout of street lighting requires an outlay of many millions of dollars from cash-strapped municipalities. Chile's central government has moved in to provide financing at the 80-100/% level in many cases. Once Chile's congressional elections are over, we will be able to judge the political will to complete the changeover. Various large mining operations are currently engaged in major lighting changeovers; such changes are especially important in the various mines that are directly visible from existing major observatories in Northern Chile. The importance to astronomy is that full compliance with DS686 will, on average, extend the potential useful life of all the major optical observatories in Northern Chile by several decades. Funding for the Office for the Protection of the Quality of the Skies of Chile (OPCC) is provided by the Chilean National Environment Committee (CONAMA), NOAO, Gemini, ESO and the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institute of Washington.

  2. Arrhythmic rats after SCN lesions and constant light differ in short time scale regulation of locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Juan José; Cambras, Trinitat; Carpentieri, Agata Rita; Díez-Noguera, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    Circadian rhythm disruption (i.e., arrhythmicity) in motor activity is an abnormal behavioral pattern. In rats, it can be caused by the lesion of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and by prolonged exposure to constant light (LL). We carried out a comparative study of these arrhythmic phenotypes to assess the role of the SCN in the regulation of the motor output beyond circadian rhythmicity. Motor activity series were studied in rats that had become arrhythmic as a result of 1) LL exposure at 2 light intensities: 300 lux (LL(300)) and 1.3 lux (LL(1.3)), and 2) SCN lesion (SCNx). The Fourier spectra, the fractal Hurst coefficient (H) from the autocorrelation function, and the beta slope from the power spectral density were calculated in data sections at baseline, when the rats were still rhythmic, and later at stages with undetectable circadian rhythms. In the LL(300) group, high power content was detected at frequencies of 8 to 4 h (i.e., ultradian). Lower power content for these harmonics was found in the LL(1.3) group, whereas no dominant harmonics appeared in the SCNx group. Independently of the manifestation of circadian rhythm, H values were higher and more sustained in time in rats exposed to LL( 300) but gradually decreased in rats exposed to LL(1.3). Fractal correlation was found in control DD group but was absent in the SCNx group. We conclude that scale-invariant regulation of the motor pattern by SCN activity is dependent on light intensity but independent of the circadian rhythm output. Adjusting the light intensity by modifying the coupling degree between the population of oscillations could affect the dynamics of each individual oscillator in the SCN, making it less predictable.

  3. Light-modulated NADP-malate dehydrogenases from mossfern and green algae: insights into evolution of the enzyme's regulation.

    PubMed

    Ocheretina, O; Haferkamp, I; Tellioglu, H; Scheibe, R

    2000-11-27

    Chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase is one of the best-studied light-regulated enzymes. In C3 plants, NADP-MDH is a part of the 'malate valve' that controls the export of reducing equivalents in the form of malate to the cytosol. NADP-MDH is completely inactive in the dark and is activated in the light with reduced thioredoxin. Compared with its permanently active NAD-linked counterparts, NADP-MDH exhibits N- and C-terminal sequence extensions, each bearing one regulatory disulphide. Upon reduction of the C-terminal disulphide, the enzyme active site becomes accessible for the substrate. Reduction of the N-terminal disulphide promotes a conformational change advantageous for catalysis. To trace the evolutionary development of this intricate regulation mechanism, we isolated cDNA clones for NADP-MDH from the mossfern Selaginella and from two unicellular green algae. While the NADP-MDH sequence from Selaginella demonstrates the classic cysteine pattern of the higher plant enzyme, the sequences from the green algae are devoid of the N-terminal regulatory disulphide. Phylogenetic analysis of new sequences and of those available in the databases led to the conclusion that the chloroplast NADP-MDH and the cytosolic NAD-dependent form arose via duplication of an ancestral eubacterial gene, which preceded the separation of plant and animal lineages. Redox-sensitive NADP-MDH activity was detected only in the 'green' plant lineage starting from the primitive prasinophytic algae but not in cyanobacteria, Cyanophora paradoxa, red algae and diatoms. The latter organisms therefore appear to utilize mechanisms other than the light-regulated 'malate valve' to remove from plastids excessive electrons produced by photosynthesis.

  4. The importance of light, postural and social cues in the regulation of the plasma cortisol rhythm in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to assess the role of photoperiodic postural and social cues in the regulation of the plasma cortisol rhythm in normal human subjects. Young healthy adult male volunteers, aged 20-25, were used as the test subjects and were selected following extensive physical and psychological examinations. The time at which peak plasma cortisol concentration occurred was calculated from harmonic curves fitted to each set of 24-hr data from each subject. The findings suggest that the plasma cortisol rhythm is not affected appreciably by the absence of postural change, whereas light and social interaction affect this rhythm profoundly.

  5. The importance of light, postural and social cues in the regulation of the plasma cortisol rhythm in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to assess the role of photoperiodic postural and social cues in the regulation of the plasma cortisol rhythm in normal human subjects. Young healthy adult male volunteers, aged 20-25, were used as the test subjects and were selected following extensive physical and psychological examinations. The time at which peak plasma cortisol concentration occurred was calculated from harmonic curves fitted to each set of 24-hr data from each subject. The findings suggest that the plasma cortisol rhythm is not affected appreciably by the ab