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Sample records for light therapy lllt

  1. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  2. Developments in low level light therapy (LLLT) for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James D; Milward, Michael R; Cooper, Paul R; Hadis, Mohammed; Palin, William M

    2014-05-01

    Low level light/laser therapy (LLLT) is the direct application of light to stimulate cell responses (photobiomodulation) in order to promote tissue healing, reduce inflammation and induce analgesia. There have been significant studies demonstrating its application and efficacy at many sites within the body and for treatment of a range of musculoskeletal injuries, degenerative diseases and dysfunction, however, its use on oral tissues has, to date, been limited. The purpose of this review is to consider the potential for LLLT in dental and oral applications by providing background information on its mechanism of action and delivery parameters and by drawing parallels with its treatment use in analogous cells and tissues from other sites of the body. A literature search on Medline was performed on laser and light treatments in a range of dental/orofacial applications from 2010 to March 2013. The search results were filtered for LLLT relevance. The clinical papers were then arranged to eight broad dental/orofacial categories and reviewed. The initial search returned 2778 results, when filtered this was reduced to 153. 41 were review papers or editorials, 65 clinical and 47 laboratory studies. Of all the publications, 130 reported a positive effect in terms of pain relief, fast healing or other improvement in symptoms or appearance and 23 reported inconclusive or negative outcomes. Direct application of light as a therapeutic intervention within the oral cavity (rather than photodynamic therapies, which utilize photosensitizing solutions) has thus far received minimal attention. Data from the limited studies that have been performed which relate to the oral cavity indicate that LLLT may be a reliable, safe and novel approach to treating a range of oral and dental disorders and in particular for those which there is an unmet clinical need. The potential benefits of LLLT that have been demonstrated in many healthcare fields and include improved healing, reduced

  3. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) on muscle tissue: performance, fatigue and repair benefited by the power of light

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of low level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has recently expanded to cover areas of medicine that were not previously thought of as the usual applications such as wound healing and inflammatory orthopedic conditions. One of these novel application areas is LLLT for muscle fatigue and muscle injury. Since it is becoming agreed that mitochondria are the principal photoacceptors present inside cells, and it is known that muscle cells are exceptionally rich in mitochondria, this suggests that LLLT should be highly beneficial in muscle injuries. The ability of LLLT to stimulate stem cells and progenitor cells means that muscle satellite cells may respond well to LLLT and help muscle repair. Furthermore the ability of LLLT to reduce inflammation and lessen oxidative stress is also beneficial in cases of muscle fatigue and injury. This review covers the literature relating to LLLT and muscles in both preclinical animal experiments and human clinical studies. Athletes, people with injured muscles, and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy may all benefit. PMID:23626925

  4. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring.

    PubMed

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Asheesh; Sadasivam, Magesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Pam, Zeev; Pam, Nadav; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-03-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) is a fast-growing technology used to treat a multitude of conditions that require stimulation of healing, relief of pain and inflammation, and restoration of function. Although skin is naturally exposed to light more than any other organ, it still responds well to red and near-infrared wavelengths. The photons are absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores in skin cells. Consequently, electron transport, adenosine triphosphate nitric oxide release, blood flow, reactive oxygen species increase, and diverse signaling pathways are activated. Stem cells can be activated, allowing increased tissue repair and healing. In dermatology, LLLT has beneficial effects on wrinkles, acne scars, hypertrophic scars, and healing of burns. LLLT can reduce UV damage both as a treatment and as a prophylactic measure. In pigmentary disorders such as vitiligo, LLLT can increase pigmentation by stimulating melanocyte proliferation and reduce depigmentation by inhibiting autoimmunity. Inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and acne can also be managed. The noninvasive nature and almost complete absence of side effects encourage further testing in dermatology.

  5. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Asheesh; Sadasivam, Magesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Pam, Zeev; Pam, Nadav; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) is a fast-growing technology used to treat a multitude of conditions that require stimulation of healing, relief of pain and inflammation, and restoration of function. Although the skin is the organ that is naturally exposed to light more than any other organ, it still responds well to red and near-infrared wavelengths. The photons are absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores in skin cells. Consequently electron transport, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) nitric oxide release, blood flow, reactive oxygen species increase and diverse signaling pathways get activated. Stem cells can be activated allowing increased tissue repair and healing. In dermatology, LLLT has beneficial effects on wrinkles, acne scars, hypertrophic scars, and healing of burns. LLLT can reduce UV damage both as a treatment and as a prophylaxis. In pigmentary disorders such as vitiligo, LLLT can increase pigmentation by stimulating melanocyte proliferation and reduce depigmentation by inhibiting autoimmunity. Inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and acne can also benefit. The non-invasive nature and almost complete absence of side-effects encourages further testing in dermatology. PMID:24049929

  6. 830 nm light-emitting diode low level light therapy (LED-LLLT) enhances wound healing: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Min, Pok Kee; Goo, Boncheol Leo

    2013-01-01

    The application of light-emitting diodes in a number of clinical fields is expanding rapidly since the development in the late 1990s of the NASA LED. Wound healing is one field where low level light therapy with LEDs (LED-LLLT) has attracted attention for both accelerating wound healing and controlling sequelae. The present study evaluated LED-LLLT in 5 wounds of various etiologies. There were 5 patients with ages ranging from 7 to 54 years, comprising 2 males and 3 females. The study followed 5 wounds, namely 2 acute excoriation wounds; 1 acute/subacute dog bite with infection; 1 subacute post-filler ulcerated wound with necrotic ischemic tissue and secondary infection; and 1 subacute case of edema and infection of the lips with herpes simplex involvement after an illegal cosmetic tattoo operation. All patients were in varying degrees of pain. All wounds were treated with multiple sessions (daily, every other day or twice weekly) using an LED-LLLT system (830 nm, CW, irradiance of 100 mW/cm(2) and fluence of 60 J/cm(2)) till improvement was achieved. Full wound healing and control of infection and discomfort were achieved in all patients, with wound condition-mediated treatment periods ranging from 1 to 8 weeks. No recurrence of the herpes simplex case was seen in a 4-month follow-up. 830 nm LED-LLLT successfully brought about accelerated healing in wounds of different etiologies and at different stages, and successfully controlled secondary infection. LED-LLLT was easy and pain-free to apply, and was well-tolerated by all patients. The good results warrant the design of controlled studies with a larger patient population.

  7. 830 nm light-emitting diode low level light therapy (LED-LLLT) enhances wound healing: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Min, Pok Kee; Goo, Boncheol Leo

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The application of light-emitting diodes in a number of clinical fields is expanding rapidly since the development in the late 1990s of the NASA LED. Wound healing is one field where low level light therapy with LEDs (LED-LLLT) has attracted attention for both accelerating wound healing and controlling sequelae. The present study evaluated LED-LLLT in 5 wounds of various etiologies. Subjects and methods: There were 5 patients with ages ranging from 7 to 54 years, comprising 2 males and 3 females. The study followed 5 wounds, namely 2 acute excoriation wounds; 1 acute/subacute dog bite with infection; 1 subacute post-filler ulcerated wound with necrotic ischemic tissue and secondary infection; and 1 subacute case of edema and infection of the lips with herpes simplex involvement after an illegal cosmetic tattoo operation. All patients were in varying degrees of pain. All wounds were treated with multiple sessions (daily, every other day or twice weekly) using an LED-LLLT system (830 nm, CW, irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 and fluence of 60 J/cm2) till improvement was achieved. Results: Full wound healing and control of infection and discomfort were achieved in all patients, with wound condition-mediated treatment periods ranging from 1 to 8 weeks. No recurrence of the herpes simplex case was seen in a 4-month follow-up. Conclusions: 830 nm LED-LLLT successfully brought about accelerated healing in wounds of different etiologies and at different stages, and successfully controlled secondary infection. LED-LLLT was easy and pain-free to apply, and was well-tolerated by all patients. The good results warrant the design of controlled studies with a larger patient population. PMID:24155549

  8. Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy (LLLT) for Treatment of Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Clark, Jason; Wikonkal, Norbert; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Alopecia is a common disorder affecting more than half of the population worldwide. Androgenetic alopecia, the most common type, affects 50% of males over the age of 40 and 75% of females over 65. Only two drugs have been approved so far (minoxidil and finasteride) and hair transplant is the other treatment alternative. This review surveys the evidence for low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied to the scalp as a treatment for hair loss and discusses possible mechanisms of actions. Methods and Materials Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar were carried out using keywords alopecia, hair loss, LLLT, photobiomodulation. Results Studies have shown that LLLT stimulated hair growth in mice subjected to chemotherapy-induced alopecia and also in alopecia areata. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that LLLT stimulated hair growth in both men and women. Among various mechanisms, the main mechanism is hypothesized to be stimulation of epidermal stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and shifting the follicles into anagen phase. Conclusion LLLT for hair growth in both men and women appears to be both safe and effective. The optimum wavelength, coherence and dosimetric parameters remain to be determined. PMID:23970445

  9. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) for treatment of hair loss.

    PubMed

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K; Clark, Jason; Wikonkal, Norbert; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-02-01

    Alopecia is a common disorder affecting more than half of the population worldwide. Androgenetic alopecia, the most common type, affects 50% of males over the age of 40 and 75% of females over 65. Only two drugs have been approved so far (minoxidil and finasteride) and hair transplant is the other treatment alternative. This review surveys the evidence for low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied to the scalp as a treatment for hair loss and discusses possible mechanisms of actions. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar were carried out using keywords alopecia, hair loss, LLLT, photobiomodulation. Studies have shown that LLLT stimulated hair growth in mice subjected to chemotherapy-induced alopecia and also in alopecia areata. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that LLLT stimulated hair growth in both men and women. Among various mechanisms, the main mechanism is hypothesized to be stimulation of epidermal stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and shifting the follicles into anagen phase. LLLT for hair growth in both men and women appears to be both safe and effective. The optimum wavelength, coherence and dosimetric parameters remain to be determined. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analgesic effects of preinjection low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT) before third molar surgery: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tuk, Jacco G C; van Wijk, Arjen J; Mertens, Ine C; Keleş, Zühal; Lindeboom, Jérôme A H; Milstein, Dan M J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on preinjection sites in patients scheduled for third molar removal. This double-blind randomized controlled trial included 163 healthy patients undergoing third molar extractions. The study participants were randomly divided into an LLLT and a placebo group. Objective and subjective data sets were obtained from physiologic feedback (heart rate and sweat response) and a questionnaire, respectively. In the LLLT group, each targeted injection site was irradiated twice with 198 mW continuous wave for 30 seconds with a 0.088 cm 2 focal spot at an applied energy of 5.94 J and fluence of 67.50 J/cm 2 . Measurements were recorded from 4 time-points during data acquisition. There was no significant difference between the LLLT and placebo groups in pain experience scores associated with the injected sites for maxillary or mandibular third molar extractions. Mean heart rates before and during injection were lower in the LLLT group than in the placebo group for both maxillary and mandibular regions. No statistically significant differences were observed for any remaining parameters. The present data indicated that preinjection LLLT did not effectively decrease the pain felt during local anesthetic injections before third molar surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces oxidative stress in primary cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Nagata, Kazuya; Tedford, Clark E; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) involves absorption of photons being in the mitochondria of cells leading to improvement in electron transport, increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and greater ATP production. Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by LLLT in normal cells that are beneficial. We exposed primary cultured murine cortical neurons to oxidative stressors: hydrogen peroxide, cobalt chloride and rotenone in the presence or absence of LLLT (3 J/cm², CW, 810 nm wavelength laser, 20 mW/cm²). Cell viability was determined by Prestoblue™ assay. ROS in mitochondria was detected using Mito-sox, while ROS in cytoplasm was detected with CellRox™. MMP was measured with tetramethylrhodamine. In normal neurons LLLT elevated MMP and increased ROS. In oxidatively-stressed cells LLLT increased MMP but reduced high ROS levels and protected cultured cortical neurons from death. Although LLLT increases ROS in normal neurons, it reduces ROS in oxidatively-stressed neurons. In both cases MMP is increased. These data may explain how LLLT can reduce clinical oxidative stress in various lesions while increasing ROS in cells in vitro. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Is light-emitting diode phototherapy (LED-LLLT) really effective?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Serk; Calderhead, R Glen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low level light therapy (LLLT) has attracted attention in many clinical fields with a new generation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) which can irradiate large targets. To pain control, the first main application of LLLT, have been added LED-LLLT in the accelerated healing of wounds, both traumatic and iatrogenic, inflammatory acne and the patient-driven application of skin rejuvenation. Rationale and Applications: The rationale behind LED-LLLT is underpinned by the reported efficacy of LED-LLLT at a cellular and subcellular level, particularly for the 633 nm and 830 nm wavelengths, and evidence for this is presented. Improved blood flow and neovascularization are associated with 830 nm. A large variety of cytokines, chemokines and macromolecules can be induced by LED phototherapy. Among the clinical applications, non-healing wounds can be healed through restoring the collagenesis/collagenase imbalance in such examples, and ‘normal’ wounds heal faster and better. Pain, including postoperative pain, postoperative edema and many types of inflammation can be significantly reduced. Experimental and clinical evidence: Some personal examples of evidence are offered by the first author, including controlled animal models demonstrating the systemic effect of 830 nm LED-LLLT on wound healing and on induced inflammation. Human patients are presented to illustrate the efficacy of LED phototherapy on treatment-resistant inflammatory disorders. Conclusions: Provided an LED phototherapy system has the correct wavelength for the target cells, delivers an appropriate power density and an adequate energy density, then it will be at least partly, if not significantly, effective. The use of LED-LLLT as an adjunct to conventional surgical or nonsurgical indications is an even more exciting prospect. LED-LLLT is here to stay. PMID:24155530

  13. The Use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) For Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cotler, Howard B; Chow, Roberta T; Hamblin, Michael R; Carroll, James

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason for physician consultation in the United States. One out of three Americans is affected by chronic pain annually. The number one reason for missed work or school days is musculoskeletal pain. Currently accepted therapies consist of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, opiate pain medications and surgery, each of which carries their own specific risk profiles. What is needed are effective treatments for pain which have an acceptably low risk-profile. For over forty years, low level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) and LED (light emitting diode) therapy (also known as photobiomodulation) has been shown to reduce inflammation and edema, induce analgesia, and promote healing in a range of musculoskeletal pathologies. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of LLLT for pain, the biochemical mechanisms of action, the dose response curves, and how LLLT may be employed by orthopedic surgeons to improve outcomes and reduce adverse events. With the predicted epidemic of chronic pain in developed countries, it is imperative to validate cost-effective and safe techniques for managing painful conditions which would allow people to live active and productive lives. Moreover the acceptance of LLLT (which is currently being used by many specialties around the world) into the armamentarium of the American health care provider would allow for additional treatment options for patients. A new cost-effective therapy for pain could elevate quality of life while reducing financial strains. PMID:26858986

  14. Strength training prior to muscle injury potentiates low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-induced muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Morais, Samuel Rodrigues Lourenço; Goya, Alexandre Ginei; Urias, Úrsula; Jannig, Paulo Roberto; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Mello, Wagner Garcez; Faleiros, Paula Lazilha; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Ervolino, Edilson; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Dornelles, Rita Cássia Menegati

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated whether strength training (ST) performed prior to skeletal muscle cryolesion would act as a preconditioning, improving skeletal muscle regeneration and responsiveness to low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Wistar rats were randomly assigned into non-exercised (NE), NE plus muscle lesion (NE + LE), NE + LE plus LLLT (NE + LE + LLLT), strength training (ST), ST + LE, and ST + LE + LLLT. The animals performed 10 weeks of ST (climbing ladder; 3× week; 80% overload). Forty-eight hours after the last ST session, tibialis anterior (TA) cryolesion was induced and LLLT (InGaAlP, 660 nm, 0.035 W, 4.9 J/cm 2 /point, 3 points, spot light 0.028 cm 2 , 14 J/cm 2 ) initiated and conducted daily for 14 consecutive days. The difference between intergroups was assessed using Student's t test and intragroups by two-way analysis of variance. Cryolesion induced massive muscle degeneration associated with inflammatory infiltrate. Prior ST improved skeletal regeneration 14-days after cryolesion and potentiated the regenerative response to LLLT. Cryolesion induced increased TNF-α levels in both NE + LE and ST + LE groups. Both isolated ST and LLLT reduced TNF-α to control group levels; however, prior ST potentiated LLLT response. Both isolated ST and LLLT increased IL-10 levels with no additional effect. In contrast, increased TA IL-6 levels were restricted to ST and ST + LE + LLLT groups. TA myogenin mRNA levels were not changed by neither prior ST or ST + LLLT. Both prior ST and LLLT therapies increased MyoD mRNA levels and, interestingly, combined therapies potentiated this response. Myf5 mRNA levels were increased only in ST groups. Taken together, our data provides evidences for prior ST potentiating LLLT efficacy in promoting skeletal muscle regeneration.

  15. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) does not reduce subcutaneous adipose tissue by local adipocyte injury but rather by modulation of systemic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Marek; Gawrych, Mariusz; Adamska, Urszula; Ciescinski, Jakub; Serafin, Zbigniew; Czajkowski, Rafal

    2017-02-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been applied recently to body contouring. However the mechanism of LLLT-induced reduction of subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness has not been elucidated and proposed hypotheses are highly controversial. Non-obese volunteers were subject to 650nm LLLT therapy. Each patient received 6 treatments 2-3 days apart to one side of the abdomen. The contralateral side was left untreated and served as control. Subjects' abdominal adipose tissue thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging at baseline and 2 weeks post-treatment. Our study is to the best of our knowledge, the largest split-abdomen study employing subcutaneous abdominal fat imaging. We could not show a statistically significant reduction of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue by LLLT therapy. Paradoxically when the measurements of the loss of fat thickness on treated side was corrected for change in thickness on non treated side, we have observed that in 8 out of 17 patients LLLT increased adipose tissue thickness. In two patients severe side effect occurred as a result of treatment: one patient developed ulceration within appendectomy scar, the other over the posterior superior iliac spine. The paradoxical net increase in subcutaneous fat thickness observed in some of our patients is a rationale against liquefactive and transitory pore models of LLLT-induced adipose tissue reduction. LLLT devices with laser diode panels applied directly on the skin are not as safe as devices with treatment panels separated from the patient's skin.

  16. Time response of increases in ATP and muscle resistance to fatigue after low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Recently, low-level laser (light) therapy has been used to increase muscle performance in intense exercises. However, there is a lack of understanding of the time response of muscles to light therapy. The first purpose of this study was to determine the time response for light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT)-mediated increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in mice. Second purpose was to test whether LEDT can increase the resistance of muscles to fatigue during intense exercise. Fifty male Balb/c mice were randomly allocated into two equal groups: LEDT-ATP and LEDT-fatigue. Both groups were subdivided into five equal subgroups: LEDT-sham, LEDT-5 min, LEDT-3 h, LEDT-6 h, and LEDT-24 h. Each subgroup was analyzed for muscle ATP content or fatigue at specified time after LEDT. The fatigue test was performed by mice repeatedly climbing an inclined ladder bearing a load of 150 % of body weight until exhaustion. LEDT used a cluster of LEDs with 20 red (630 ± 10 nm, 25 mW) and 20 infrared (850 ± 20 nm, 50 mW) delivering 80 mW/cm(2) for 90 s (7.2 J/cm(2)) applied to legs, gluteus, and lower back muscles. LEDT-6 h was the subgroup with the highest ATP content in soleus and gastrocnemius compared to all subgroups (P < 0.001). In addition, mice in LEDT-6 h group performed more repetitions in the fatigue test (P < 0.001) compared to all subgroups: LEDT-sham and LEDT-5 min (~600 %), LEDT-3 h (~200 %), and LEDT-24 h (~300 %). A high correlation between the fatigue test repetitions and the ATP content in soleus (r = 0.84) and gastrocnemius (r = 0.94) muscles was observed. LEDT increased ATP content in muscles and fatigue resistance in mice with a peak at 6 h. Although the time response in mice and humans is not the same, athletes might consider applying LEDT at 6 h before competition.

  17. Changes in tissue water and indentation resistance of lymphedematous limbs accompanying low level laser therapy (LLLT) of fibrotic skin.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N; Davey, S

    2011-12-01

    Our goal was to determine effects of low-level-laser-therapy (LLLT) on skin water and tissue indentation resistance (TIR) in patients with arm (N = 38) or leg (N = 38) lymphedema. Skin water was determined from tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurements and TIR determined from measurements of force resulting from tissue indentations of 3-4 mm. A limb-location with fibrosis was identified by palpation and treated with an LLLT device for one minute at each of five points within a 3 cm2 area. TDC and TIR at these sites and corresponding sites on the contralateral limb were measured prior to LLLT (pre-LLLT), immediately after LLLT (post-LLLT) and after a manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) session (post-MLD). Results, from arms and legs, showed that post-LLLT values of TIR and TDC were significantly less than pre-LLLT. TIR values remained significantly reduced at post-MLD whereas TDC values were not significantly different from pre-LLLT values. On follow-up visit, 17 previously LLLT treated legs were sham treated with an inactive LLLT unit and measurements replicated. A TIR and TDC change-pattern similar to that obtained with the active LLLT was obtained, but sham-related reductions in TIR and TDC immediately post sham-treatment were significantly less than achieved with the prior active LLLT treatment.

  18. Effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on ouabain induced auditory neuropathy in gerbils (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bae, Sung Huyn; Chang, So-Young; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Aim: to investigate effectiveness of Low level laser therapy (LLLT) in rescueing ouabain induced spiral ganglion cell damage using Mongolian gerbils. Methods: Animals were divided into 3 groups; Control, Ouabain, Ouabain + LLLT group. Auditory neuropathy was induced by topical application of ouabain (1 mmol/L, 3uL) on the round window membrane in gerbils. Transmeatal LLLT was irradiated into the right ear for 1h (200mW, 720 J) daily for 7d in Ouabain + LLLT group. Before and 7 days after ouabain application, hearing was evaluated using both ABR and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Seven days after ouabain application, animals were sacrificed to evaluate the morphological changes of cochlea using cochlear section image and whole mount Immunofluorescent staining. Results: DPOAE tests were normal in all animals after ouabain topical treatment indicating intact outer hair cells. Ouabain group showed ABR threshold increase compared with control group. Ouabain+LLLT group showed significant improvement of ABR threshold compared to ouabain only group. H and E stains of mid-modiolar section of cochlear showed spiral ganglion cells, neurofilaments, and post synaptic receptor counts were decreased while inner and outer hair cells were preserved in ouabain group. Ouabain +LLLT group showed higher numbers of spiral ganglion cells, density of neurofilaments and post synaptic receptor counts compared to ouabain group. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that LLLT was effective to rescue ouabain-induced spiral ganglion neuropathy.

  19. Methodology for assessment of low level laser therapy (LLLT) irradiation parameters in muscle inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Several studies in human and animals show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing some types of pain, treating inflammation and wound healing. However, more scientific evidence is required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT since many aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation of injured tissue with laser remain unknown. Here, we present a methodology that can be used to evaluate the effect of different LLLT irradiation parameters on the treatment of muscle inflammation on animals, through the quantification of four cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 and IL-6) in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We have used this methodology to assess the effect of LLLT parameters (wavelength, dose, power and type of illumination) in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats. Results obtained for laser dose evaluation with continuous illumination are presented.

  20. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) study of blood flow changes during low level laser therapy (LLLT): a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sagar; Wang, Xinlong; Liu, Hanli; Tian, Fenghua

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation with low-power, high-fluence light in the near-infrared range (600-1100nm), also known as low level laser therapy (LLLT), has been used for promoting healing of wounds, reducing pain, and so on. Understanding its physiological effect is essential for treatment optimization and evaluation. In this study, we used diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to investigate the changes of regional blood flow in skeletal muscle induced by a single session of LLLT. DCS is an emerging optical modality to probe microvascular blood flow in human tissues in vivo. We have developed a software-based autocorrelator system with the benefits such as flexibility in raw photon count data processing, portability and low cost. LLLT was administered at the human forearm with a 1064-nm, continuous-wave laser. The emitting power was 3.4 W in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25W/cm2 irradiance. The emitting duration was 10 minutes. Eight healthy adults of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18-40 years old were included. The results indicate that LLLT causes reliable changes in regional blood flow. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are physiological or attributed to the heating effect of the stimulation laser.

  1. Effect of adjunctive low level laser therapy (LLLT) on nonsurgical treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Makhlouf, Mona; Dahaba, Mushira M; Tunér, Jan; Eissa, Sohair A; Harhash, Tarek A-H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this split-mouth, double blinded, short-term, controlled clinical trial was to study the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for treatment of chronic periodontitis. LLLT is reported to improve the outcome of traditional SRP, but the evidence is still weak. Sixteen patients with a probing pocket depth (PPD) of 4-6 mm involving at least three teeth in each quadrant were recruited for the study. Afterwards, SRP quadrants were randomly assigned for 10 sessions of LLLT. Results showed that when compared to sites treated with SRP alone, those treated with SRP+LLLT (10 sessions, 830 nm, 100 mW, 3 J per point, 3 J/cm(2)) exhibited greater reductions in PPD at 5 weeks and 3 months but not at 6 months. Further, SRP+LLLT-treated sites had a statistically significant increase in mean radiographic bone density when comparing 6- and 12-month data and overall from baseline to 12 months. There was a trend to reduce interleukin (IL)-1β but the difference between control and laser sites was not statistically significant. SRP combined with LLLT improved radiographic bone density and short-term PPD reduction in patients with chronic periodontitis, but did not significantly affect either the gingival crevicular fluid of IL-1β or the gingival or plaque index.

  2. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with aerobic plus resistance training to improve inflammatory biomarkers in obese adults.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Campos, Raquel Munhoz; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Masquio, Deborah Cristina Landi; Aquino, Antonio Eduardo; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Duarte, Fernanda Oliveira; Tock, Lian; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Recently, investigations suggest the benefits of low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in noninvasive treatment of cellulite, improvement of body countering, and control of lipid profile. However, the underlying key mechanism for such potential effects associated to aerobic plus resistance training to reduce body fat and inflammatory process, related to obesity in women still unclear. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of combined therapy of LLLT and aerobic plus resistance training in inflammatory profile and body composition of obese women. For this study, it involved 40 obese women with age of 20-40 years. Inclusion criteria were primary obesity and body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m(2) and less than 40 kg/m(2). The voluntaries were allocated in two different groups: phototherapy group and SHAM group. The interventions consisted on physical exercise training and application of phototherapy (808 nm), immediately after the physical exercise, with special designed device. Proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory adipokines were measured. It was showed that LLLT associated to physical exercise is more effective than physical exercise alone to increase adiponectin concentration, an anti-inflammatory adipokine. Also, it showed reduced values of neck circumference (cm), insulin concentration (μU/ml), and interleukin-6 (pg/ml) in LLLT group. In conclusion, phototherapy can be an important tool in the obesity, mostly considering its potential effects associated to exercise training in attenuating inflammation in women, being these results applicable in the clinical practices to control related risk associated to obesity.

  3. Effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on vestibular system after gentamicin ototoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, ChungKu; Hyun, Jai-Hwan; Suh, Myung-Whan; Ahn, Jin Chul; Jung, Jae Yun

    2013-03-01

    Aim: To develop a bilateral vestibulopathy animal model induced by gentamicin using RS rat and to see the effect of LLLT on this bilateral vestibulopathy model. Method: RS rats were divided into 3 groups, control group (C), laser group (L), and histology group (H). All animals in the 3 groups received gentamicin (GM) 110 mg/kg, intravenously once daily for 3 days. The animals underwent sinusoidal oscillation about a vertical axis before the GM injection, 1, 3, and 7 days post injections. Transcanal low level laser therapy (LLLT) was irradiated to left ear canal for 7 days, starting 1 day post the GM injection. The H group animals were irradiated into the left ear of L group for 3 days, starting 1 day post GM injections for 3 days. C and L groups were sacrifice on 9th day and H group was sacrificed on 7th day. Results: The gain of the C group was significantly decreased in 3 and 7 days. The gain of the right ear of L group was decreased significantly in 3 and 7 days. The gain of left ear of L group was decreased in 3 days post LLLT but the decreased gain was improved significantly comparing to the level of 7 days gain of right ear and it was much closer to the pre-GM level. The average number of cells in cupula of H group after laser treatment for 3 days was significantly lower in non laser treated right ear comparing to the laser treated left ear and ears of the normal rats. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that LLLT restores vestibular function and vestibular hair cells in rats post gentamicin induced ototoxic damage. LLLT may have clinical implications in the treatment of various vestibular dysfunction. Further studies are essential to verify the exact mechanisms and the most effective application of LLLT to rescue vestibular dysfunction.

  4. Positive effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on Bouchard's and Heberden's osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, Axel W A; Ostapczuk, Martin S; Stosch, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder. While research usually focuses on OA of the large joints, OA of the hand receives relatively little attention resulting in a lack of a therapeutic gold standard. Low level laser therapy (LLLT)/photobiomodulation therapy has been successfully used to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nevertheless, its merits in the treatment of (hand) OA remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to examine the longitudinal effect of LLLT on the three major hand OA symptoms-pain, swelling, reduced joint mobility-in patients suffering from Bouchard's and Heberden's OA. Thirty-four patients (32 females) aged 61.21 ± 2.13 years were administered 5-10 LLLT sessions to 85 joints (47 proximal and 38 distal interphalangeal joints). Therapy took place twice a week. Pain (Visual Analogue Scale), ring size (perimeter in mm), and range of motion (extension/flexion) were measured at baseline and after five treatments for all patients, and additionally after seven sessions and 8 weeks after treatment ended for patients who received more than five and seven treatments, respectively. Eighteen patients (37 joints) received only five treatments, 10 patients (29 joints) were administered seven treatments, and six patients (19 joints) were administered 10 LLLT sessions. LLLT significantly reduced pain and ring size and increased range of motion after five and seven treatments (all P's < 0.001). The effects were very large (all η(2) 's > 0.14). No further significant change occurred between 7 and 10 treatments. The effects achieved after seven sessions persisted for 8 weeks. LLLT is a safe, non-invasive, efficient and efficacious means to reduce pain and swelling and to increase joint mobility in patients suffering from Heberden's and Bourchard's OA. Further randomized controlled studies are needed to examine medium- to long-term effects as well as the ideal LLLT parameters. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:498-504, 2016. © 2016

  5. Regulation of miRNA Expression by Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Ishihara, Miya

    2013-01-01

    Applications of laser therapy, including low-level laser therapy (LLLT), phototherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), have been proven to be beneficial and relatively less invasive therapeutic modalities for numerous diseases and disease conditions. Using specific types of laser irradiation, specific cellular activities can be induced. Because multiple cellular signaling cascades are simultaneously activated in cells exposed to lasers, understanding the molecular responses within cells will aid in the development of laser therapies. In order to understand in detail the molecular mechanisms of LLLT and PDT-related responses, it will be useful to characterize the specific expression of miRNAs and proteins. Such analyses will provide an important source for new applications of laser therapy, as well as for the development of individualized treatments. Although several miRNAs should be up- or down-regulated upon stimulation by LLLT, phototherapy and PDT, very few published studies address the effect of laser therapy on miRNA expression. In this review, we focus on LLLT, phototherapy and PDT as representative laser therapies and discuss the effects of these therapies on miRNA expression. PMID:23807510

  6. Regulation of miRNA expression by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT).

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Ishihara, Miya

    2013-06-27

    Applications of laser therapy, including low-level laser therapy (LLLT), phototherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), have been proven to be beneficial and relatively less invasive therapeutic modalities for numerous diseases and disease conditions. Using specific types of laser irradiation, specific cellular activities can be induced. Because multiple cellular signaling cascades are simultaneously activated in cells exposed to lasers, understanding the molecular responses within cells will aid in the development of laser therapies. In order to understand in detail the molecular mechanisms of LLLT and PDT-related responses, it will be useful to characterize the specific expression of miRNAs and proteins. Such analyses will provide an important source for new applications of laser therapy, as well as for the development of individualized treatments. Although several miRNAs should be up- or down-regulated upon stimulation by LLLT, phototherapy and PDT, very few published studies address the effect of laser therapy on miRNA expression. In this review, we focus on LLLT, phototherapy and PDT as representative laser therapies and discuss the effects of these therapies on miRNA expression.

  7. A systematic review with meta-analysis of the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Tunèr, Jan; Frigo, Lucio; Gjerde, Kjersti; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Ab

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the prevention and treatment of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis (OM). A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials of LLLT performed during chemotherapy or radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. We found 11 randomised placebo-controlled trials with a total of 415 patients; methodological quality was acceptable at 4.10 (SD ± 0.74) on the 5-point Jadad scale. The relative risk (RR) for developing OM was significantly (p = 0.02) reduced after LLLT compared with placebo LLLT (RR = 2.03 (95% CI, 1.11 to 3.69)). This preventive effect of LLLT improved to RR = 2.72 (95% CI, 1.98 to 3.74) when only trials with adequate doses above 1 J were included. For treatment of OM ulcers, the number of days with OM grade 2 or worse was significantly reduced after LLLT to 4.38 (95% CI, 3.35 to 5.40) days less than placebo LLLT. Oral mucositis severity was also reduced after LLLT with a standardised mean difference of 1.33 (95% CI, 0.68 to 1.98) over placebo LLLT. All studies registered possible side-effects, but they were not significantly different from placebo LLLT. There is consistent evidence from small high-quality studies that red and infrared LLLT can partly prevent development of cancer therapy-induced OM. LLLT also significantly reduced pain, severity and duration of symptoms in patients with cancer therapy-induced OM.

  8. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces inflammatory infiltrate and enhances skeletal muscle repair: Histomorphometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva-Oliveira, E. L.; Lima, N. C.; Silva, P. H.; Sousa, N. T. A.; Barbosa, F. S.; Orsini, M.; Silva, J. G.

    2012-09-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as an effective therapeutics in inflammatory processes modulation and tissue repairing. However, there is a lack of studies that analyze the anti-inflammatory effects of the infrared lasers in muscular skeletal injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy 904 nm in the repair process of skeletal muscle tissue. Swiss mice were submitted to cryoinjury and divided in test (LLLT-treated) and control groups. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to assess general morphology and inflammatory influx, and Picrossirus to quantify collagen fibers deposition. Our results showed significant reduction in inflammatory infiltrated in irradiated mice after 4 days of treatment compared to control ( p = 0.01). After 8 days, the irradiated group showed high levels at regenerating myofibers with significant statistically differences in relation at control group ( p < 0.01). Collagen deposition was significantly increased in the final stages of regeneration at test group, when compared with control group ( p = 0.05). Our data suggests that LLLT reduces the inflammatory response in the initial stages of injury and accelerates the process of muscular tissue repair.

  9. Efficiencies of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and Gabapentin in the Management of Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Khaled G; Daoud, Eitedal M; El Gendy, Aliaa; Mourad, Hagar H; Mannaa, Fathia A; Saber, Maha M

    2018-03-12

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the highly occurred complication of diabetes mellitus; it has been defined as an event of peripheral nerve dysfunction characterized by pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and paraesthesia. The current study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the management of neuropathy in diabetic rats. The used animals were divided into the following groups: negative control, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and diabetic rats with peripheral neuropathy (DNP) and DNP treated with gabapentin or with LLLT. Behavioral tests were carried out through hotplate test for the determination of pain sensations and the Morris water maze test for spatial reference memory evaluation. Blood samples were collected at the end of treatment for biochemical determinations. In the current study, the latency of hind-paw lick decreased significantly when DNP are treated with gabapentin or LLLT. The Morris water maze test showed that LLLT treatment improved memory that deteriorated in DNP more than gabapentin do. The results of the biochemical study revealed that LLLT could not affect the level of beta-endorphin that decreased in DNP but significantly decreased S100B that rose in DNP. PGE2 and cytokines IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α showed significant increase in DNP compared with control group. The gabapentin administration or LLLT application significantly reversed the levels of the mentioned markers towards the normal values of the controls. Levels of serum MDA and nitric oxide increased significantly in the DNP but rGSH showed significant decrease. These markers were improved significantly when the DNP were treated with gabapentin or LLLT. The treatment with gabapentin or LLLT significantly decreased the raised level in total cholesterol in DNP but could not decrease the elevated level of triglycerides, while LDL cholesterol decreased significantly in DNP treated with gabapentin but not affected by LLLT. Values of serum alanine

  10. Superpulsed (Ga-As, 904 nm) low-level laser therapy (LLLT) attenuates inflammatory response and enhances healing of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Yadav, Anju; Gola, Shefali; Chauhan, Satish; Salhan, Ashok K; Bala Singh, Shashi

    2015-06-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) using superpulsed near-infrared light can penetrate deeper in the injured tissue and could allow non-pharmacological treatment for chronic wound healing. This study investigated the effects of superpulsed laser (Ga-As 904 nm, 200 ns pulse width; 100 Hz; 0.7 mW mean output power; 0.4 mW/cm(2) average irradiance; 0.2 J/cm(2) total fluence) on the healing of burn wounds in rats, and further explored the probable associated mechanisms of action. Irradiated group exhibited enhanced DNA, total protein, hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents compared to the control and silver sulfadiazine (reference care) treated groups. LLLT exhibited decreased TNF-α level and NF-kB, and up-regulated protein levels of VEGF, FGFR-1, HSP-60, HSP-90, HIF-1α and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9 compared to the controls. In conclusion, LLLT using superpulsed 904 nm laser reduced the inflammatory response and was able to enhance cellular proliferation, collagen deposition and wound contraction in the repair process of burn wounds. Photomicrographs showing no, absence inflammation and faster wound contraction in LLLT superpulsed (904 nm) laser treated burn wounds as compared to the non-irradiated control and silver sulfadiazine (SSD) ointment (reference care) treated wounds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Low-level light therapy of the eye and brain.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2011-01-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) using red to near-infrared light energy has gained attention in recent years as a new scientific approach with therapeutic applications in ophthalmology, neurology, and psychiatry. The ongoing therapeutic revolution spearheaded by LLLT is largely propelled by progress in the basic science fields of photobiology and bioenergetics. This paper describes the mechanisms of action of LLLT at the molecular, cellular, and nervous tissue levels. Photoneuromodulation of cytochrome oxidase activity is the most important primary mechanism of action of LLLT. Cytochrome oxidase is the primary photoacceptor of light in the red to near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is also a key mitochondrial enzyme for cellular bioenergetics, especially for nerve cells in the retina and the brain. Evidence shows that LLLT can secondarily enhance neural metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function, intraneuronal signaling systems, and redox states. Current knowledge about LLLT dosimetry relevant for its hormetic effects on nervous tissue, including noninvasive in vivo retinal and transcranial effects, is also presented. Recent research is reviewed that supports LLLT potential benefits in retinal disease, stroke, neurotrauma, neurodegeneration, and memory and mood disorders. Since mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in neurodegeneration, LLLT has potential significant applications against retinal and brain damage by counteracting the consequences of mitochondrial failure. Upon transcranial delivery in vivo, LLLT induces brain metabolic and antioxidant beneficial effects, as measured by increases in cytochrome oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. Increases in cerebral blood flow and cognitive functions induced by LLLT have also been observed in humans. Importantly, LLLT given at energy densities that exert beneficial effects does not induce adverse effects. This highlights the value of LLLT as a novel paradigm to treat visual

  12. Low-level light therapy of the eye and brain

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2011-01-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) using red to near-infrared light energy has gained attention in recent years as a new scientific approach with therapeutic applications in ophthalmology, neurology, and psychiatry. The ongoing therapeutic revolution spearheaded by LLLT is largely propelled by progress in the basic science fields of photobiology and bioenergetics. This paper describes the mechanisms of action of LLLT at the molecular, cellular, and nervous tissue levels. Photoneuromodulation of cytochrome oxidase activity is the most important primary mechanism of action of LLLT. Cytochrome oxidase is the primary photoacceptor of light in the red to near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is also a key mitochondrial enzyme for cellular bioenergetics, especially for nerve cells in the retina and the brain. Evidence shows that LLLT can secondarily enhance neural metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function, intraneuronal signaling systems, and redox states. Current knowledge about LLLT dosimetry relevant for its hormetic effects on nervous tissue, including noninvasive in vivo retinal and transcranial effects, is also presented. Recent research is reviewed that supports LLLT potential benefits in retinal disease, stroke, neurotrauma, neurodegeneration, and memory and mood disorders. Since mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in neurodegeneration, LLLT has potential significant applications against retinal and brain damage by counteracting the consequences of mitochondrial failure. Upon transcranial delivery in vivo, LLLT induces brain metabolic and antioxidant beneficial effects, as measured by increases in cytochrome oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. Increases in cerebral blood flow and cognitive functions induced by LLLT have also been observed in humans. Importantly, LLLT given at energy densities that exert beneficial effects does not induce adverse effects. This highlights the value of LLLT as a novel paradigm to treat visual

  13. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for periodontal pockets: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribac, Valentin; Todea, Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    The applications of lasers in medicine, both in the field of diagnosis and treatment are gaining momentum. In dentistry in particular, numerous types of lasers with a wide range of characteristics are being utilized in all fields. In consequence, a lot of experience and knowledge has been gained in the last two decades in this domain; this resulted in the development of novel technologies and devices. A brief overview is made in the first part of this article on these topics. The treatment of periodontal disease with laser therapy is pointed out, as well as the photodynamic therapy which is using LLLT for the activation of the sensitizing gel that is introduced in the periodontal pockets. This paper reviews also the application of photodynamic therapy in clinical trials which have different results; a standardization of the protocol utilized for this procedure is concluded to be necessary.

  14. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) acts as cAMP-elevating agent in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Flávia Mafra; Moreira, Leonardo M; Villaverde, A B; Albertini, Regiane; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Aimbire, Flávio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate if the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on acute lung inflammation (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is linked to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in alveolar macrophages (AM) from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice. LLLT has been reported to actuate positively for relieving the late and early symptoms of airway and lung inflammation. It is not known if the increased TNF mRNA expression and dysfunction of cAMP generation observed in ALI can be influenced by LLLT. For in vivo studies, Balb/c mice (n = 5 for group) received LPS inhalation or TNF intra nasal instillation and 3 h after LPS or TNF-α, leukocytes in BALF were analyzed. LLLT administered perpendicularly to a point in the middle of the dissected bronchi with a wavelength of 660 nm and a dose of 4.5 J/cm(2). The mice were irradiated 15 min after ALI induction. In vitro AM from mice were cultured for analyses of TNF mRNA expression and protein and adenosine3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels. One hour after LPS, the TNF and cAMP levels in AM were measured by ELISA. RT-PCR was used to measure TNF mRNA in AM. The LLLT was inefficient in potentiating the rolipram effect in presence of a TNF synthesis inhibitor. LLLT attenuated the neutrophil influx and TNF in BALF. In AM, the laser increased the cAMP and reduced the TNF-α mRNA. LLLT increases indirectly the cAMP in AM by a TNF-dependent mechanism.

  15. Assessing Health-Related Quality of Life with Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) and Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) after Third Molar Removal.

    PubMed

    Batinjan, Goran; Filipović Zore, Irina; Rupić, Ivana; Bago Jurič, Ivona; Zore, Zvonimir; Gabrić Pandurić, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing, pain intensity, swelling problems, halitosis and the postoperative usage of analgesics after surgical removal of lower third molars. One hundred and fifty patients, randomly divided into three groups were selected (50 per each group). The P1 group received the APDT after a third molar surgery, the P2 group received the LLLT and the C group (control group) was without any additional therapy after surgery. A photoactive substance was applied in the APDT study group before suturing. After 60 seconds the photosensitive substance was thoroughly washed with saline water and the laser light was applied in two intervals (30 seconds each). The irradiation power was 50 mW while the wavelength was 660 nm. The laser therapy in P2 group was performed before suturing and the laser light was applied also in two intervals (90 seconds each), the irradiation power was 90 mW while the wavelength was the same as in the first group - 660 nm. Postoperative follow-ups were scheduled on the third and the seventh day in patients who received laser therapy. The results of the postoperative evaluation showed that there was a statistically significant difference in the postoperative wound healing, pain intensity, swelling problems, halitosis and analgesics intake between patients in all three groups (p<0.001). The patients that were subjected to APDT (P1) had the least postoperative problems. After the laser therapy (P1 and P2) wound healing was without any complications, opposite from the patients from the C group (p<0.001). Postoperative application of a laser therapy significantly reduced patient's use of analgesics over the observed period of time (p<0.001). Both modalities of laser therapy significantly reduced postoperative problems after surgical removal of third lower molars with the best results in both laser groups.

  16. Effect of simvastatin versus low level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone regeneration in rabbit's tibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheith, Mostafa E.; Khairy, Maggie A.

    2014-02-01

    Simvastatin is a cholesterol lowering drug which proved effective on promoting bone healing. Recently low level laser therapy (LLLT) proved its effect as a biostimulator promoting bone regeneration. This study aims to compare the effect of both Simvastatin versus low level laser on bone healing in surgically created bone defects in rabbit's tibia. Material and methods: The study included 12 New Zealand white rabbits. Three successive 3mm defects were created in rabbits tibia first defect was left as control, second defect was filled with Simvastatin while the third defect was acted on with Low Level Laser (optical fiber 320micrometer). Rabbits were sacrificed after 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks intervals. Histopathology was conducted on the three defects Results: The histopathologic studies showed that the bony defects treated with the Low Level Laser showed superior healing patterns and bone regeneration than those treated with Simvastatin. While the control defect showed the least healing pattern.

  17. In vivo low-level light therapy increases cytochrome oxidase in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hayworth, Christopher R; Rojas, Julio C; Padilla, Eimeira; Holmes, Genevieve M; Sheridan, Eva C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2010-01-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) increases survival of cultured cells, improves behavioral recovery from neurodegeneration and speeds wound healing. These beneficial effects are thought to be mediated by upregulation of mitochondrial proteins, especially the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase. However, the effects of in vivo LLLT on cytochrome oxidase in intact skeletal muscle have not been previously investigated. We used a sensitive method for enzyme histochemistry of cytochrome oxidase to examine the rat temporalis muscle 24 h after in vivo LLLT. The findings showed for the first time that in vivo LLLT induced a dose- and fiber type-dependent increase in cytochrome oxidase in muscle fibers. LLLT was particularly effective at enhancing the aerobic capacity of intermediate and red fibers. The findings suggest that LLLT may enhance the oxidative energy metabolic capacity of different types of muscle fibers, and that LLLT may be used to enhance the aerobic potential of skeletal muscle.

  18. Effects of corticopuncture (CP) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the rate of tooth movement and root resorption in rats using micro-CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Garcez, Aguinaldo Silva; Reese, Patricia Oblitas; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Moon, Won

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the rate of tooth displacement, quantity of root resorption, and alveolar bone changes in five groups: corticopuncture (CP), low-level laser therapy (LLLT), CP combined with LLLT (CP + LLLT), control (C), and negative control (NC). A total of 60 half-maxilla from 30 male Wistar rats (10 weeks old) were divided randomly into five groups: three (CP, LLLT, and CP + LLLT) test groups with different stimulation for accelerated-tooth-movement (ATM), one control (C) group, and one negative control (NC) group with no tooth movement. Nickel-titanium coil springs with 50 g of force were tied from the upper left and right first molars to micro-implants placed behind the maxillary incisors. For the CP and CP + LLLT groups, two perforations in the palate and one mesially to the molars were performed. For the LLLT and CP + LLLT groups, GaAlAs diode laser was applied every other day for 14 days (810 nm, 100 mW, 15 s). The tooth displacements were measured directly from the rat's mouth and indirectly from microcomputer (micro-CT) tomographic images. Bone responses at the tension and compression sites and root resorption were analyzed from micro-CT images. The resulting alveolar bone responses were evaluated by measuring bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), and trabecular thickness (TbTh). Root resorption crater volumes were measured on both compression and tension sides of mesial and distal buccal roots. The tooth displacement in the CP + LLLT group was the greatest when measured clinically, followed by the CP, LLLT, and control groups (C and NC), respectively (p <0.05). The tooth movements measured from micro-CT images showed statistically higher displacement in the CP and CP + LLLT groups compared to the LLLT and control groups. The BMD, BV/TV, and TbTh values were lower at the compression side and higher at the tension side for all three test groups compared to the control group. The root

  19. Low level light therapy and tattoos: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Physical therapists (PTs) frequently provide neuromusculoskeletal treatment for patients who incidentally may have one or more tattoos. Low level light therapy (LLLT) is one of the modalities commonly used by physical therapists to decrease pain and facilitate healing. This case report describes a 22 year old man who was given LLLT to address his complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Blistering of the skin was documented over the LLLT application site, a black tattoo. The blisters, which formed after the LLLT treatment were most likely caused by the inadvertent and unexpected heating of the iron oxides and/or the metal salts in the tattoo's black pigment. PTs should exercise caution when applying LLLT in the presence of dark tattoos. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. To evaluate the safety and efficiency of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in treating decubitus ulcers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ambereen

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: Pressure sores (decubitus ulcer) are a serious problem in health care management, especially for middleaged to older people who are bed-ridden. Although preventative measures are used, the condition remains common and development of novel, improved treatment methods are desirable. This article reviews the application of laser-based methods, previously shown to be effective in accelerating wound-healing in animal models and in the treatment of decubitus ulcers in humans. Methods: About 23 scientific articles on the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing in animals and humans from 2000-2014 were reviewed. Additionally, results of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed, and compared with other treatment methods available. Results: Whilst carefully controlled, laboratory-based animal studies indicated that LLLT can reduce healing time for several types of injuries, however similar studies in humans failed to demonstrate consistent beneficial effects in the clinical setting. An acceleration of decubitus ulcer healing has been occasionally found, although limited to certain wavelengths and sometimes only in combination with other types of therapies. Indeed, some of the clinical articles indicated that certain laser wavelengths can have detrimental effects on time of healing. Conclusions: To date, there remains no convincing evidence that LLLT has consistent medical benefit in treating decubitus ulcers. Caution should be applied when considering LLLT since only certain wavelengths utilized have shown beneficial effects. It is concluded that, more RCTs are needed since, there is no clinical justification for LLLT, alone or in combination with other methods, in treating decubitus ulcers.

  1. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) attenuates RhoA mRNA expression in the rat bronchi smooth muscle exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Flávia Mafra; Bjordal, Jan M; Albertini, Regiane; Santos, Fábio V; Aimbire, Flavio

    2010-09-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been found to produce anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of disorders. Bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) hyperreactivity is associated with increased Ca+2 sensitivity and increased RhoA mRNA expression. In the current study, we investigated if LLLT could reduce BSM contraction force and RhoA mRNA expression in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced BSM hyperreactivity. In the study, 112 male Wistar rats were divided randomly into 16 groups, and BSM was harvested and suspended in TNF-alpha baths for 6 and 24 h, respectively. Irradiation with LLLT was performed with a wavelength of 660 nm for 42 s with a dose of 1.3 J/cm2. This LLLT dose was administered once in the 6-h group and twice in the 24-h group. LLLT significantly decreased contraction force in BSM at 6 h (TNF-alpha + LLLT: 11.65+/-1.10 g/100 mg of tissue) (F=3115) and at 24 h (TNF-alpha+ LLLT: 14.15+/-1.1 g/100 mg of tissue) (F=3245, p<0.05) after TNF-alpha, respectively, when compared to vehicle-bathed groups (control). LLLT also significantly decreased the expression of RhoA mRNA in BSM segments at 6 h (1.22+/-0.20) (F=2820, p<0.05) and 24 h (2.13+/-0.20) (F=3324, p<0.05) when compared to BSM segments incubated with TNF-alpha without LLLT irradiation. We conclude that LLLT administered with this protocol, reduces RhoA mRNA expression and BSM contraction force in TNF-alpha-induced BSM hyperreactivity.

  2. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and diclofenac (topical and intramuscular) as single and combined therapy in experimental model of controlled muscle strain in rats.

    PubMed

    de Paiva Carvalho, Rodrigo Leal; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Petrellis, Maria Carla; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli; De Nucci, Gilberto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão

    2013-01-01

    Muscle injuries represent ca 30% of sports injuries and excessive stretching of muscle causes more than 90% of injuries. Currently the most used treatments are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), however, in last years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is becoming an interesting therapeutic modality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of single and combined therapies (LLLT, topical application of diclofenac and intramuscular diclofenac) on functional and biochemical aspects in an experimental model of controlled muscle strain in rats. Muscle strain was induced by overloading tibialis anterior muscle of rats. Injured groups received either no treatment, or a single treatment with topical or intramuscular diclofenac (TD and ID), or LLLT (3 J, 810 nm, 100 mW) 1 h after injury. Walking track analysis was the functional outcome and biochemical analyses included mRNA expression of COX-1 and COX-2 and blood levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ). All treatments significantly decreased COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression compared with injury group (P < 0.05). However, LLLT showed better effects than TD and ID regarding PGE2 levels and walking track analysis (P < 0.05). We can conclude that LLLT has more efficacy than topical and intramuscular diclofenac in treatment of muscle strain injury in acute stage. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Héliton S; Schluckebier, Luciene Fontes; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Ferreira, Elza M S; Dias, Fernando L; Teich, Vanessa; Teich, Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major event increasing treatment costs of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT). This study was designed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in HNSCC patients receiving CRT. From June 2007 to December 2010, 94 patients with HNSCC of nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx entered a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trial. CRT consisted of conventional radiotherapy (RT: 70.2 Gy, 1.8 Gy/d, 5 times/wk)+concurrent cisplatin (100mg/m2) every 3 weeks. An InGaAlP (660 nm-100 mW-4J/cm2) laser diode was used for LLLT. From the perspective of Brazil's public health care system (SUS), total costs were higher in Placebo Group (PG) than Laser Group (LG) for opioid use (LG=US$ 9.08, PG=US$ 44.28), gastrostomy feeding (LG=US$ 50.50, PG=US$ 129.86), and hospitalization (PG=US$ 77.03). In LG, the cost was higher for laser therapy only (US$ 1880.57). The total incremental cost associated with the use of LLLT was US$ 1689.00 per patient. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was US$ 4961.37 per grade 3-4 OM case prevented compared to no treatment. Our results indicate that morbidity was lower in the Laser Group and that LLLT was more cost-effective than placebo up to a threshold of at least US$ 5000 per mucositis case prevented. NCT01439724. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo and in vitro analysis of low level light therapy: a useful therapeutic approach for sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Kim, J E; Cho, K H; Lee, J H

    2013-11-01

    Sensitive skin is a relatively common dermatologic condition and no optimal treatments have been established so far. Low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT) has been used for its biostimulative effect in various clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether low-level laser/light therapy can improve sensitive skin clinically and to evaluate the effects of LLLT on skin in vitro. Twenty-eight patients complaining of sensitive skin were treated with low-level polarized light, and clinical results were evaluated using subjective and objective method. To investigate possible working mechanism of LLLT on skin, cultured human keratinocytes pretreated with nontoxic concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were used. Cytokines released from irritated keratinocytes after LLLT were analyzed. All patients showed subjective and objective improvement after treatment. No adverse effects were reported. The average number of LLLT sessions required to achieve clinical improvement was 9.9, and cumulative dose of LLLT was 71.3 J/cm(2) on the average. Erythema index decreased significantly after LLLT treatment (p = 0.017). In vitro assay showed that LLLT significantly reduced the release of VEGF from SLS-pretreated keratinocytes (p = 0.021). Our results suggest that LLLT could be a useful and safe treatment modality for sensitive skin, and modification of inflammatory cytokines released from irritated keratinocytes may be considered as one of plausible mechanisms in sensitive skin treated with LLLT.

  5. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) accelerates the sternomastoid muscle regeneration process after myonecrosis due to bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Alessi Pissulin, Cristiane Neves; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Sanchez Orellana, Alejandro Manuel; Rossi E Silva, Renata Calciolari; Michelin Matheus, Selma Maria

    2017-03-01

    Because of its long-lasting analgesic action, bupivacaine is an anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block and relief of postoperative pain. Muscle degeneration and neurotoxicity are its main limitations. There is strong evidence that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) assists in muscle and nerve repair. The authors evaluated the effects of a Gallium Arsenide laser (GaAs), on the regeneration of muscle fibers of the sternomastoid muscle and accessory nerve after injection of bupivacaine. In total, 30 Wistar adult rats were divided into 2 groups: control group (C: n=15) and laser group (L: n=15). The groups were subdivided by antimere, with 0.5% bupivacaine injected on the right and 0.9% sodium chloride on the left. LLLT (GaAs 904nm, 0,05W, 2.8J per point) was administered for 5 consecutive days, starting 24h after injection of the solutions. Seven days after the trial period, blood samples were collected for determination of creatine kinase (CK). The sternomastoid nerve was removed for morphological and morphometric analyses; the surface portion of the sternomastoid muscle was used for histopathological and ultrastructural analyses. Muscle CK and TNFα protein levels were measured. The anesthetic promoted myonecrosis and increased muscle CK without neurotoxic effects. The LLLT reduced myonecrosis, characterized by a decrease in muscle CK levels, inflammation, necrosis, and atrophy, as well as the number of central nuclei in the muscle fibers and the percentage of collagen. TNFα values remained constant. LLLT, at the dose used, reduced fibrosis and myonecrosis in the sternomastoid muscle triggered by bupivacaine, accelerating the muscle regeneration process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) treated with Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT): a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Postiglione, Marco; Gabellini, Massimiliano; Longo, Diego

    2009-06-01

    The topic concerns the effect of LLLT on ALS. The purpose is to find a new and effective approach to treat ALS by utilizing the beneficial biological effects on human tissues provided by LLLT and by testing the effectiveness of a specific treatment protocol. There are no reports in literature dealing with this topic. A 69 year old male with signs of lower motor neuron degeneration diagnosed in 2003 as ALS was given LLLT. Two different types of LASERs (wavelengths 810 and 890 nm) where used with specific parameters in March 2007. Three cycles of 20 daily sessions at 40 days interval were given. Gradual and significant improvements were noted after each cycle particularly appreciated by the patient especially in muscular mobility and respiratory functions. However signs of improvement 20 days after the third cycle showed a tendency to regression. Results obtained indicate that LLLT with the specific protocol used gives significant improvement of the ALS clinical picture but that its duration is not permanent. Further research on a large cohort is justified especially as regards LASER parameters and treatment cycles.

  7. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the development of exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue and changes in biochemical markers related to postexercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; De Marchi, Thiago; Rossi, Rafael Paolo; de Godoi, Vanessa; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Silva, Daniela Perin; Basso, Maira; Filho, Pedro Lotti; de Valls Corsetti, Francisco; Iversen, Vegard V; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2010-08-01

    Randomized crossover double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. To investigate if low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can affect biceps muscle performance, fatigue development, and biochemical markers of postexercise recovery. Cell and animal studies have suggested that LLLT can reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in muscle tissue. But it remains uncertain whether these findings can translate into humans in sport and exercise situations. Nine healthy male volleyball players participated in the study. They received either active LLLT (cluster probe with 5 laser diodes; lambda = 810 nm; 200 mW power output; 30 seconds of irradiation, applied in 2 locations over the biceps of the nondominant arm; 60 J of total energy) or placebo LLLT using an identical cluster probe. The intervention or placebo were applied 3 minutes before the performance of exercise. All subjects performed voluntary elbow flexion repetitions with a workload of 75% of their maximal voluntary contraction force until exhaustion. Active LLLT increased the number of repetitions by 14.5% (mean +/- SD, 39.6 +/- 4.3 versus 34.6 +/- 5.6; P = .037) and the elapsed time before exhaustion by 8.0% (P = .034), when compared to the placebo treatment. The biochemical markers also indicated that recovery may be positively affected by LLLT, as indicated by postexercise blood lactate levels (P<.01), creatine kinase activity (P = .017), and C-reactive protein levels (P = .047), showing a faster recovery with LLLT application prior to the exercise. We conclude that pre-exercise irradiation of the biceps with an LLLT dose of 6 J per application location, applied in 2 locations, increased endurance for repeated elbow flexion against resistance and decreased postexercise levels of blood lactate, creatine kinase, and C-reactiveprotein. Performance enhancement, level 1b.

  8. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in human progressive-intensity running: effects on exercise performance, skeletal muscle status, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Thiago; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Bortoli, Celiana; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Salvador, Mirian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on exercise performance, oxidative stress, and muscle status in humans. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial was performed with 22 untrained male volunteers. LLLT (810 nm, 200 mW, 30 J in each site, 30 s of irradiation in each site) using a multi-diode cluster (with five spots - 6 J from each spot) at 12 sites of each lower limb (six in quadriceps, four in hamstrings, and two in gastrocnemius) was performed 5 min before a standardized progressive-intensity running protocol on a motor-drive treadmill until exhaustion. We analyzed exercise performance (VO(2 max), time to exhaustion, aerobic threshold and anaerobic threshold), levels of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the markers of muscle damage creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Compared to placebo, active LLLT significantly increased exercise performance (VO(2 max) p = 0.01; time to exhaustion, p = 0.04) without changing the aerobic and anaerobic thresholds. LLLT also decreased post-exercise lipid (p = 0.0001) and protein (p = 0.0230) damages, as well as the activities of SOD (p = 0.0034), CK (p = 0.0001) and LDH (p = 0.0001) enzymes. LLLT application was not able to modulate CAT activity. The use of LLLT before progressive-intensity running exercise increases exercise performance, decreases exercise-induced oxidative stress and muscle damage, suggesting that the modulation of the redox system by LLLT could be related to the delay in skeletal muscle fatigue observed after the use of LLLT.

  9. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) at 830 nm positively modulates healing of tracheal incisions in rats: a preliminary histological investigation.

    PubMed

    Grendel, Tomáš; Sokolský, Ján; Vaščáková, Andrea; Hrehová, Blanka; Poláková, Martina; Bobrov, Nikita; Sabol, František; Gál, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether LLLT at 830 nm is able to positively modulate trachea incisional wound healing in Sprague-Dawley rats. Tracheotomy may be associated with numerous complications. Development of excess granulation tissue represents a late complication that may lead to airway occlusion. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been shown to have stimulatory effects on wound healing of different tissues. Therefore, it may be suggested that LLLT could be able to positively modulate trachea wound healing as well. Using general anesthesia, a median incision was performed from the second to the fifth tracheal cartilage ring in 24 rats. Animals were then randomly divided into sham-irradiated control and laser-treated groups. LLLT (power density: 450 mW/cm(2); total daily dose: 60 J/cm(2); irradiated area ∼1 cm(2)) treatment was performed daily during the first week after surgery. Samples for histological evaluation were removed 7 and 28 days after surgical procedure. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and van Gieson. Results from our investigation showed that LLLT was able to reduce granulation tissue formation and simultaneously increase new cartilage development at both evaluated time intervals. From this point of view, LLLT at 830 nm may be a valuable tool in trachea wound healing modulation. Nevertheless, further detailed research is needed to find optimal therapeutic parameters and to test these findings on other animal models.

  10. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in Dystrophin-Deficient Muscle Cells: Effects on Regeneration Capacity, Inflammation Response and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Mizobuti, Daniela Sayuri; Fogaça, Aline Reis; Moraes, Fernanda Dos Santos Rapucci; Hermes, Tulio de Almeida; Pertille, Adriana; Minatel, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effects on some physiological pathways that may lead to muscle damage or regeneration capacity in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells of mdx mice, the experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Primary cultures of mdx skeletal muscle cells were irradiated only one time with laser and analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. The LLLT parameter used was 830 nm wavelengths at 5 J/cm² fluence. The following groups were set up: Ctrl (untreated C57BL/10 primary muscle cells), mdx (untreated mdx primary muscle cells), mdx LA 24 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 24 h), and mdx LA 48 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 48 h). The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in cell proliferation, higher diameter in muscle cells and decreased MyoD levels compared to the mdx group. The mdx LA 48 group showed significant increase in Myosin Heavy Chain levels compared to the untreated mdx and mdx LA 24 groups. The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in [Ca2+]i. The mdx group showed significant increase in H2O2 production and 4-HNE levels compared to the Ctrl group and LLLT treatment reduced this increase. GSH levels and GPx, GR and SOD activities increased in the mdx group. Laser treatment reduced the GSH levels and GR and SOD activities in dystrophic muscle cells. The mdx group showed significant increase in the TNF-α and NF-κB levels, which in turn was reduced by the LLLT treatment. Together, these results suggest that the laser treatment improved regenerative capacity and decreased inflammatory response and oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle cells, indicating that LLLT could be a helpful alternative therapy to be associated with other treatment for dystrophinopathies.

  11. Low-level light therapy improves cortical metabolic capacity and memory retention.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio C; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral hypometabolism characterizes mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) enhances the metabolic capacity of neurons in culture through photostimulation of cytochrome oxidase, the mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes oxygen consumption in cellular respiration. Growing evidence supports that neuronal metabolic enhancement by LLLT positively impacts neuronal function in vitro and in vivo. Based on its effects on energy metabolism, it is proposed that LLLT will also affect the cerebral cortex in vivo and modulate higher-order cognitive functions such as memory. In vivo effects of LLLT on brain and behavior are poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that in vivo LLLT facilitates cortical oxygenation and metabolic energy capacity and thereby improves memory retention. Specifically, we tested this hypothesis in rats using fear extinction memory, a form of memory modulated by prefrontal cortex activation. Effects of LLLT on brain metabolism were determined through measurement of prefrontal cortex oxygen concentration with fluorescent quenching oximetry and by quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Experiment 1 verified that LLLT increased the rate of oxygen consumption in the prefrontal cortex in vivo. Experiment 2 showed that LLLT-treated rats had an enhanced extinction memory as compared to controls. Experiment 3 showed that LLLT reduced fear renewal and prevented the reemergence of extinguished conditioned fear responses. Experiment 4 showed that LLLT induced hormetic dose-response effects on the metabolic capacity of the prefrontal cortex. These data suggest that LLLT can enhance cortical metabolic capacity and retention of extinction memories, and implicate LLLT as a novel intervention to improve memory.

  12. Effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on peripheral nerve regeneration using fibrin glue derived from snake venom.

    PubMed

    Buchaim, Rogerio Leone; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Barraviera, Benedito; Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Rosa Junior, Geraldo Marco; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the adhesive permits the collateral repair of axons originating from a vagus nerve to the interior of a sural nerve graft, and whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) assists in the regeneration process. Study sample consisted of 32 rats randomly separated into three groups: Control Group (CG; n=8), from which the intact sural nerve was collected; Experimental Group (EG; n=12), in which one of the ends of the sural nerve graft was coapted to the vagus nerve using the fibrin glue; and Experimental Group Laser (EGL; n=12), in which the animals underwent the same procedures as those in EG with the addition of LLLT. Ten weeks after surgery, the animals were euthanized. Morphological analysis by means of optical and electron microscopy, and morphometry of the regenerated fibers were employed to evaluate the results. Collateral regeneration of axons was observed from the vagus nerve to the interior of the autologous graft in EG and EGL, and in CG all dimensions measured were greater and presented a significant difference in relation to EG and EGL, except for the area and thickness of the myelin sheath, that showed significant difference only in relation to the EG. The present study demonstrated that the fibrin glue makes axonal regeneration feasible and is an efficient method to recover injured peripheral nerves, and the use of low-level laser therapy enhances nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lack of clinical evidence on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on dental titanium implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Frutos, J C; Rodríguez-Molinero, J; Prados-Privado, M; Torres, J H; Rojo, R

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proved to have biostimulating effects on tissues over which they are applied, therefore accelerating the healing process. Most studies in implantology were focused on a reduction of the duration of osseointegration. There exist few articles analyzing the potential effects of these therapies on the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LLLT on the interaction between the bone and the titanium dental implant and the methodological quality of the studies. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed, ISI Web, and Cochrane Library. From 37 references obtained, only 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the studies shows that most of the experiments were performed in animals, which have a high risk of bias from the methodological point of view. Only two studies were conducted in human bone under different conditions. Several protocols for the use of low-power laser and different types of laser for all studies analyzed were used. Although animal studies have shown a positive effect on osseointegration of titanium implants, it can be concluded that it is necessary to improve and define a unique protocol to offer a more conclusive result by meta-analysis.

  14. Comparison between single-diode low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and LED multi-diode (cluster) therapy (LEDT) applications before high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; De Marchi, Thiago; Rossi, Rafael Paolo; Grosselli, Douglas; Generosi, Rafael Abeche; de Godoi, Vanessa; Basso, Maira; Mancalossi, José Luis; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2009-08-01

    There is anecdotal evidence that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may affect the development of muscular fatigue, minor muscle damage, and recovery after heavy exercises. Although manufacturers claim that cluster probes (LEDT) maybe more effective than single-diode lasers in clinical settings, there is a lack of head-to-head comparisons in controlled trials. This study was designed to compare the effect of single-diode LLLT and cluster LEDT before heavy exercise. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study. Young male volleyball players (n = 8) were enrolled and asked to perform three Wingate cycle tests after 4 x 30 sec LLLT or LEDT pretreatment of the rectus femoris muscle with either (1) an active LEDT cluster-probe (660/850 nm, 10/30 mW), (2) a placebo cluster-probe with no output, and (3) a single-diode 810-nm 200-mW laser. The active LEDT group had significantly decreased post-exercise creatine kinase (CK) levels (-18.88 +/- 41.48 U/L), compared to the placebo cluster group (26.88 +/- 15.18 U/L) (p < 0.05) and the active single-diode laser group (43.38 +/- 32.90 U/L) (p < 0.01). None of the pre-exercise LLLT or LEDT protocols enhanced performance on the Wingate tests or reduced post-exercise blood lactate levels. However, a non-significant tendency toward lower post-exercise blood lactate levels in the treated groups should be explored further. In this experimental set-up, only the active LEDT probe decreased post-exercise CK levels after the Wingate cycle test. Neither performance nor blood lactate levels were significantly affected by this protocol of pre-exercise LEDT or LLLT.

  15. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) combined with swimming training improved the lipid profile in rats fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Antonio E.; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Paolillo, Fernanda R.; Duarte, Fernanda O.; Oishi, Jorge C.; Pena, Airton A.; Duarte, Ana C. G. O.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and associated dyslipidemia is the fastest growing health problem throughout the world. The combination of exercise and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could be a new approach to the treatment of obesity and associated disease. In this work, the effects of LLLT associated with exercises on the lipid metabolism in regular and high-fat diet rats were verified. We used 64 rats divided in eight groups with eight rats each, designed: SC, sedentary chow diet; SCL, sedentary chow diet laser, TC, trained chow diet; TCL, trained chow diet laser; SH, sedentary high-fat diet; SHL, sedentary high-fat diet laser; TH, trained high-fat diet; and THL, trained high-fat diet laser. The exercise used was swimming during 8 weeks/90 min daily and LLLT (GA-Al-As, 830 nm) dose of 4.7 J/point and total energy 9.4 J per animal, applied to both gastrocnemius muscles after exercise. We analyzed biochemical parameters, percentage of fat, hepatic and muscular glycogen and relative mass of tissue, and weight percentage gain. The statistical test used was ANOVA, with post hoc Tukey–Kramer for multiple analysis between groups, and the significant level was p<0.001, p<0.01, and p<0.05. LLLT decreased the total cholesterol (p<0.05), triglycerides (p<0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05), and relative mass of fat tissue (p<0.05), suggesting increased metabolic activity and altered lipid pathways. The combination of exercise and LLLT increased the benefits of exercise alone. However, LLLT without exercise tended to increase body weight and fat content. LLLT may be a valuable addition to a regimen of diet and exercise for weight reduction and dyslipidemic control. PMID:23151893

  16. An in vitro method to test the safety and efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the healing of a canine skin model.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dominique; Gibson, Thomas W G; Singh, Ameet; zur Linden, Alex R; Kazienko, Jaimie E; LaMarre, Jonathan

    2016-04-08

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used clinically as a treatment modality for a variety of medical conditions including wound-healing processes. It is an attractive and emerging method to enhance wound healing and improve clinical outcomes both in human and veterinary medicine. Despite the fact that the use of LLLT continues to gain in popularity, there is no universally accepted theory that defends all its cellular effects and beneficial biological processes in tissue repair. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of LLLT on cellular migration and proliferation of cultured canine epidermal keratinocytes (CPEK) in an in vitro wound healing model. Keratinocyte migration and proliferation were assessed using a scratch migration assay and a proliferation assay, respectively. Fifteen independent replicates were performed for each assay. Canine epidermal keratinocyte cells exposed to LLLT with 0.1, 0.2, and 1.2 J/cm(2) migrated significantly more rapidly (p < 0.03) and showed significantly higher rates of proliferation (p < 0.0001) compared to non-irradiated cells cultured in the same medium and cells exposed to the higher energy dose of 10 J/cm(2). Irradiation with 10 J/cm(2) was characterized by decreased cellular migration and proliferation. These results revealed that LLLT has a measurable, dose-dependent effect on two different aspects of keratinocyte biology in vitro. In this in vitro wound-healing model, LLLT increased cellular migration and proliferation at doses of 0.1, 0.2, and 1.2 J/cm(2) while exposure to 10 J/cm(2) decreased cellular migration and proliferation. These data suggest that the beneficial effects of LLLT in vivo may be due, in part, to effects on keratinocyte behavior.

  17. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) combined with swimming training improved the lipid profile in rats fed with high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Antonio E; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Paolillo, Fernanda R; Duarte, Fernanda O; Oishi, Jorge C; Pena, Airton A; Duarte, Ana C G O; Hamblin, Michael R; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Parizotto, Nivaldo A

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and associated dyslipidemia is the fastest growing health problem throughout the world. The combination of exercise and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could be a new approach to the treatment of obesity and associated disease. In this work, the effects of LLLT associated with exercises on the lipid metabolism in regular and high-fat diet rats were verified. We used 64 rats divided in eight groups with eight rats each, designed: SC, sedentary chow diet; SCL, sedentary chow diet laser, TC, trained chow diet; TCL, trained chow diet laser; SH, sedentary high-fat diet; SHL, sedentary high-fat diet laser; TH, trained high-fat diet; and THL, trained high-fat diet laser. The exercise used was swimming during 8 weeks/90 min daily and LLLT (GA-Al-As, 830 nm) dose of 4.7 J/point and total energy 9.4 J per animal, applied to both gastrocnemius muscles after exercise. We analyzed biochemical parameters, percentage of fat, hepatic and muscular glycogen and relative mass of tissue, and weight percentage gain. The statistical test used was ANOVA, with post hoc Tukey-Kramer for multiple analysis between groups, and the significant level was p < 0.001, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05. LLLT decreased the total cholesterol (p < 0.05), triglycerides (p < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.05), and relative mass of fat tissue (p < 0.05), suggesting increased metabolic activity and altered lipid pathways. The combination of exercise and LLLT increased the benefits of exercise alone. However, LLLT without exercise tended to increase body weight and fat content. LLLT may be a valuable addition to a regimen of diet and exercise for weight reduction and dyslipidemic control.

  18. Effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on pressured human osteoblasts: A histomorphologic and quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, S. J.; Song, W. W.; Kim, I. R.; Park, B. S.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, S. S.; Chung, I. K.; Kim, Y. D.

    2012-03-01

    Previous research has investigated the effects of LLLT during titanium implantation, tooth movement and bone graft using deproteinized bovine bone and recognized that these circumstances were nothing more than intentional controlled overpressure against static cells since this controlled trauma could affect cell function/malfunction, or cell recovery/apoptosis. The present preliminary study was conducted to prove if LLL would influence cell viability and cell function after excessive damage, which is enough to diminish cell numbers and distort the features of cells. Our aim is to evaluate whether low level laser irradiation (LLLi) could be helpful in the recovery of traumatized osteoblasts (pressure damaged cells) by observing the morphology and the survival rate of those cells. This model used bone cell cultures which were traumatized by a pressure with 250 G of centripetal force and observed their response to such trauma and low level laser irradiation. In this experiment, a Ga-Al-As diode LLL (IMPRA-ORT, NDLux, Seoul, KOREA) was used with a wavelength of 808 nm, a focus of 14 × 24 mm, which was wide enough to cover the whole dish surface or well within at least 2 times radiation, and an output of 100 mW. Statistical analysis showed a higher recovery rate of damaged osteoblasts in the radiation group than the non-radiation group ( p < 0.05). The nonradiation group had a very poor proliferation rate in comparison to the control group ( p < 0.05) in every time period. In the control group, actin filaments showed a random orientation and cell process branched variously around each cell. In contrast, compressed cells, these patterns were turned into thicker and shorter cytoskeletons. As time progressed, every living cell recovered from the severe stress and recovered both form and function. In summary, the present study showed the capacity of LLLT to aid the recovery of the cell skeleton and affect cell viability on overpressured osteoblasts. These results may

  19. Low-level Light Therapy for Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Review of Clinical Experiences.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Ho, Derek; Dahle, Sara E; Koo, Eugene; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) represent a significant complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). DFU affect one in four patients with DM and treatments of DFU are limited and challenging. The management of DFU remains a significant healthcare and socioeconomic burden ($245 billion). There is a wide range of advanced therapies for DFU, but these are costly and have demonstrated only minimal efficacy in limited published studies. An emerging treatment modality to improve DFU and optimize wound healing is the use of low-level light therapy (LLLT). LLLT involves the use of light in the form of low-level or low-power laser or light emitting diodes to alter biochemical pathways, which may result in changes to cell shape, cell migration, and cell signaling.
    To review published clinical experiences (case series and case reports) using LLLT for treatment of DFU, and provide evidence-based recommendations and future directions on the potential of LLLT as a therapeutic modality for DFU.
    On January 16, 2016 we searched the published literature using databases: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science with key terms: "diabetic foot" AND ("low level laser therapy" OR "low level light therapy" OR "LLLT" OR "light emitting diode" OR "phototherapy" OR "laser").
    After screening of titles, abstracts and/or full-text, 7 original articles were suitable in our review. Our review contains 5 case series and 2 case reports that evaluated LLLT for treatment of DFU, and all reviewed studies have shown positive improvement of DFU using LLLT with no adverse events, albeit with limitations that may be minimized with future RCTs.
    LLLT is an emerging and promising treatment modality to current alternatives that are costly and have shown limited success. Based upon the published evidence, we envision additional research may allow for stronger recommendation with LLLT for treatment of DFU.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):843-848.

  20. Effect of low-level light therapy on diabetic foot ulcers: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Massimo; Rimini, Daniele; Molinari, Filippo; Bestente, Gianni; Bruno, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a diabetic complication due to peripheral vasculopathy and neuropathy. A promising technology for wound healing in DFU is low-level light therapy (LLLT). Despite several studies showing positive effects of LLLT on DFU, LLLT's physiological effects have not yet been studied. The objective of this study was to investigate vascular and nervous systems modification in DFU after LLLT. Two samples of 45 DFU patients and 11 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. The total hemoglobin (totHb) concentration change was monitored before and after LLLT by near-infrared spectroscopy and analyzed in time and frequency domains. The spectral power of the totHb changes in the very-low frequency (VLF, 20 to 60 mHz) and low frequency (LF, 60 to 140 mHz) bandwidths was calculated. Data analysis revealed a mean increase of totHb concentration after LLLT in DFU patients, but not in HC. VLF/LF ratio decreased significantly after the LLLT period in DFU patients (indicating an increased activity of the autonomic nervous system), but not in HC. Eventually, different treatment intensities in LLLT therapy showed a different response in DFU. Overall, our results demonstrate that LLLT improves blood flow and autonomic nervous system regulation in DFU and the importance of light intensity in therapeutic protocols.

  1. Chromophore absorbance change quantification in tissue during low-level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Daniel; Chung, Christine; Qian, Li; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Low Level Light Therapy (LLLT) has been implicated to stimulate tissue, promoting healing and reducing pain. One of the potential pathways stimulated by LLLT relates to the electron transport chain, where photon quantum energy can induce a change in the biochemical reactions within the cell. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility to exploit light additionally as a diagnostic tool to determine tissue physiological states, particularly in quantifying the changes in redox states of Cytochrome C as a result of induced LLLT biochemical reactions.

  2. Effect of Pulsing in Low-Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. PMID:20662021

  3. Effect of pulsing in low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Javad T; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D; Hamblin, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Skin adhesive low-level light therapy for dysmenorrhoea: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Nam-Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Hong, Gi-Youn; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2012-10-01

    The cause of dysmenorrhoea is an abnormal function of smooth muscles in the uterus due to long-term deficient blood supply into smooth muscle tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of skin adhesive low-level light therapy (LLLT) in participants with dysmenorrhoea. Thirty-one women were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. Twenty-one women were treated with active LLLT and ten women were treated with placebo one. The therapy was performed in a laboratory room for 20 min a day over a period of 5 days prior to the expected onset of menstruation. The outcome was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) for each participant's dysmenorrhoeal pain severity. VAS of each subject was measured every month for 6 months. In the active LLLT group, 16 women reported successful results during their first menstrual cycle just after active LLLT and 5 women had successful results from the second menstrual cycle after active LLLT. The pain reduction rate was 83 % in the active LLLT group, whereas there was only a slight and temporary reduction in pain in the placebo LLLT group. Changes of VAS within 6 months of LLLT showed statistical significance (p = 0.001) over placebo control. Our study suggests that skin adhesive LLLT on acupuncture points might be an effective, simple and safe non-pharmacological treatment for dysmenorrhoea.

  5. Low Level Light Therapy with Light-Emitting Diodes for the Aging Face.

    PubMed

    Calderhead, R Glen; Vasily, David B

    2016-07-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is emerging from the mists of black magic as a solid medico-scientific modality, with a substantial buildup of corroborative bodies of evidence for its efficacy and elucidation of the modes of action. Reports are appearing from many different specialties; however, of particular interest to plastic surgeons treating the aging face is the proven action of LED-LLLT on skin cells in both the epidermis and dermis and enhanced blood flow. Thus, LED-LLLT is a safe and effective stand-alone therapy for patients who are prepared to wait until the final effect is perceived. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-level light therapy potentiates NPe6-mediated photodynamic therapy in a human osteosarcoma cell line via increased ATP.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Yin, Rui; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Lee, Si-Chen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is used to stimulate healing, reduce pain and inflammation, and preserve tissue from dying. LLLT has been shown to protect cells in culture from dying after various cytotoxic insults, and LLLT is known to increase the cellular ATP content. Previous studies have demonstrated that maintaining a sufficiently high ATP level is necessary for the efficient induction and execution of apoptosis steps after photodynamic therapy (PDT). We asked whether LLLT would protect cells from cytotoxicity due to PDT, or conversely whether LLLT would enhance the efficacy of PDT mediated by mono-l-aspartyl chlorin(e6) (NPe6). Increased ATP could lead to enhanced cell uptake of NPe6 by the energy dependent process of endocytosis, and also to more efficient apoptosis. In this study, human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 was subjected to 1.5J/cm(2) of 810nm near infrared radiation (NIR) followed by addition of 10μM NPe6 and after 2h incubation by 1.5J/cm(2) of 652nm red light for PDT. PDT combined with LLLT led to higher cell death and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species compared to PDT alone. The uptake of NPe6 was moderately increased by LLLT, and cellular ATP was increased. The mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A abrogated the LLLT-induced increase in cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LLLT potentiates NPe6-mediated PDT via increased ATP synthesis and is a potentially promising strategy that could be applied in clinical PDT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-Level Light Therapy Potentiates NPe6-mediated Photodynamic Therapy in a Human Osteosarcoma Cell Line via Increased ATP

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Yin, Rui; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Lee, Si-Chen; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-Level Light Therapy (LLLT) is used to stimulate healing, reduce pain and inflammation, and preserve tissue from dying. LLLT has been shown to protect cells in culture from dying after various cytotoxic insults, and LLLT is known to increase the cellular ATP content. Previous studies have demonstrated that maintaining a sufficiently high ATP level is necessary for the efficient induction and execution of apoptosis steps after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Methods We asked whether LLLT would protect cells from cytotoxicity due to PDT, or conversely whether LLLT would enhance the efficacy of PDT mediated by mono-L-aspartyl chlorin(e6) (NPe6). Increased ATP could lead to enhanced cell uptake of NPe6 by the energy dependent process of endocytosis, and also to more efficient apoptosis. In this study, human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 was subjected to 1.5 J/cm2 of 810 nm near infrared radiation (NIR) followed by addition of 10 μM NPe6 and after 2 h incubation by 1.5 J/cm2 of 652 nm red light for PDT. Results PDT combined with LLLT led to higher cell death and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species compared to PDT alone. The uptake of NPe6 was moderately increased by LLLT, and cellular ATP was increased. The mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A abrogated the LLLT-induced increase in cytotoxicity. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate that LLLT potentiates NPe6-mediated PDT via increased ATP synthesis and is a potentially promising strategy that could be applied in clinical PDT. PMID:25462575

  8. Effect of low-level light therapy on diabetic foot ulcers: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Massimo; Rimini, Daniele; Molinari, Filippo; Bestente, Gianni; Bruno, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a diabetic complication due to peripheral vasculopathy and neuropathy. A promising technology for wound healing in DFU is low-level light therapy (LLLT). Despite several studies showing positive effects of LLLT on DFU, LLLT’s physiological effects have not yet been studied. The objective of this study was to investigate vascular and nervous systems modification in DFU after LLLT. Two samples of 45 DFU patients and 11 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. The total hemoglobin (totHb) concentration change was monitored before and after LLLT by near-infrared spectroscopy and analyzed in time and frequency domains. The spectral power of the totHb changes in the very-low frequency (VLF, 20 to 60 mHz) and low frequency (LF, 60 to 140 mHz) bandwidths was calculated. Data analysis revealed a mean increase of totHb concentration after LLLT in DFU patients, but not in HC. VLF/LF ratio decreased significantly after the LLLT period in DFU patients (indicating an increased activity of the autonomic nervous system), but not in HC. Eventually, different treatment intensities in LLLT therapy showed a different response in DFU. Overall, our results demonstrate that LLLT improves blood flow and autonomic nervous system regulation in DFU and the importance of light intensity in therapeutic protocols.

  9. Mitigation of Cancer Therapy Side-Effects with Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Raj; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-10-01

    'Light' from low level laser therapy, through a process called photobiomodulation (PBM), has been in existence in supportive care in cancer, in particular in the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation therapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this book the authors attempt to portray the current status of the supportive care interventions that are possible with PBM using low level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients undergoing cancer treatment for solid tumours, harmatological malignancies, and head and neck cancers.

  10. Pre-conditioning with transcranial low-level light therapy reduces neuroinflammation and protects blood-brain barrier after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae In; Park, Jung Hwa; Park, Min Young; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Ii; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial low-level light therapy (LLLT) has gained interest as a non-invasive, inexpensive and safe method of modulating neurological and psychological functions in recent years. This study was designed to examine the preventive effects of LLLT via visible light source against cerebral ischemia at the behavioral, structural and neurochemical levels. The mice received LLLT twice a day for 2 days prior to photothrombotic cortical ischemia. LLLT significantly reduced infarct size and edema and improved neurological and motor function 24 h after ischemic injury. In addition, LLLT markedly inhibited Iba-1- and GFAP-positive cells, which was accompanied by a reduction in the expression of inflammatory mediators and inhibition of MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation in the ischemic cortex. Concomitantly, LLLT significantly attenuated leukocyte accumulation and infiltration into the infarct perifocal region. LLLT also prevented BBB disruption after ischemic events, as indicated by a reduction of Evans blue leakage and water content. These findings were corroborated by immunofluorescence staining of the tight junction-related proteins in the ischemic cortex in response to LLLT. Non-invasive intervention of LLLT in ischemic brain injury may provide a significant functional benefit with an underlying mechanism possibly being suppression of neuroinflammation and reduction of BBB disruption.

  11. Can low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with an aerobic plus resistance training change the cardiometabolic risk in obese women? A placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fernanda Oliveira; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; de Aquino Junior, Antonio Eduardo; da Silveira Campos, Raquel Munhoz; Masquio, Deborah Cristina Landi; Tock, Lian; Garcia de Oliveira Duarte, Ana Claudia; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is one of the most important link factors to coronary artery disease development mainly due to the pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic states favoring atherosclerosis progression. The LLLT acts in the cellular metabolism and it is highly effective to improve inflammation. The same occur in response to different kinds of exercise. However, we have not known the associate effects using LLLT therapies with aerobic plus resistance training as strategy specifically with target at human obesity control and its comorbidities. Investigate the effects of the LLLT associated with aerobic plus resistance training on cardiometabolic risk factors in obese women. Women aged 20-40 years (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), were divided into 2 groups: Phototherapy (PHOTO) and Placebo. They were trained aerobic plus resistance exercises (in a concurrent mode), 1h, 3 times/week during 16 weeks. Phototherapy was applied after each exercise session for 16 min, with infrared laser, wavelength 808 nm, continuous output, power 100 mW, and energy delivery 50 J. The body composition was measured with bioimpedance. Inflammatory mark concentrations were measured using a commercially available multiplex. LLLT associated with aerobic plus resistance training was effective in decrease neck (P=0.0003) and waist circumferences (P=0.02); percentual of fat (P=0.04); visceral fat area (P=0.02); HOMA-IR (P=0.0009); Leptin (P=0.03) and ICAM (P=0.03). Also, the reduction in leptin (P=0.008) and ICAM-1 (0, 05) was much more expressive in the phototherapy group in comparison to placebo group when analyzed by delta values. LLLT associated with concurrent exercise (aerobic plus resistance training) potentiates the exercise effects of decreasing the cardiometabolic risk factors in obese woman. These results suggest the LLLT associated with exercises as a new therapeutic tool in the control of obesity and its comorbidities for obese people, targeting to optimize the strategies to control the cardiometabolic risk

  12. Dual Effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the acute lung inflammation induced by intestinal ischemia and reperfusion: Action on anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    de Lima, F Mafra; Villaverde, A B; Albertini, R; Corrêa, J C; Carvalho, R L P; Munin, E; Araújo, T; Silva, J A; Aimbire, F

    2011-07-01

    It is unknown if pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in acute lung inflammation induced by intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (i-I/R) can be modulated by low-level laser therapy (LLLT). A controlled ex vivo study was developed in which rats were irradiated (660 nm, 30 mW, 0.08 cm² of spot size) on the skin over the right upper bronchus 1 hour post-mesenteric artery occlusion and euthanized 4 hours later. For pretreatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or IL-10 antibodies, the rats received either one of the agents 15 minutes before the beginning of reperfusion. Lung edema was measured by the Evans blue extravasation and pulmonary neutrophils influx was determined by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Both TNF and IL-10 expression and protein in lung were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. LLLT reduced the edema (80.1 ± 41.8 µg g⁻¹  dry weight), neutrophils influx (0.83 ± 0.02 × 10⁶  cells ml⁻¹), MPO activity (2.91 ± 0.60), and TNF (153.0 ± 21.0 pg mg⁻¹  tissue) in lung when compared with respective control groups. Surprisingly, the LLLT increased the IL-10 (0.65 ± 0.13) in lung from animals subjected to i-I/R. Moreover, LLLT (0.32 ± 0.07 pg ml⁻¹) reduced the TNF-α level in RPAECs when compared with i-I/R group. The presence of anti-TNF or IL-10 antibodies did not alter the LLLT effect on IL-10 (465.1 ± 21.0 pg mg⁻¹  tissue) or TNF (223.5 ± 21.0 pg mg⁻¹ tissue) in lung from animals submitted to i-I/R. The results indicate that the LLLT attenuates the i-I/R-induced acute lung inflammation which favor the IL-10 production and reduce TNF generation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT 808 nm) on lower limb spastic muscle activity in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Marcele Florêncio; Dos Reis, Mariana César Ribeiro; de Andrade, Eliana Aparecida Fonseca; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo; Andrade, Adriano Oliveira; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may affect basic motor functions, including spasticity that may be present in the upper extremity and/or the lower extremity, post-stroke. Spasticity causes pain, muscle force reduction, and decreases the time to onset of muscle fatigue. Several therapeutic resources have been employed to treat CVA to promote functional recovery. The clinical use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for rehabilitation of muscular disorders has provided better muscle responses. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of LLLT in spastic muscles in patients with spasticity post-CVA. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 15 volunteer stroke patients who presented with post-stroke spasticity. Both males and females were treated; the average age was 51.5 ± 11.8 years old; the participants entered the study ranging from 11 to 48 months post-stroke onset. The patients participated in three consecutive phases (control, placebo, and real LLLT), in which all tests of isometric endurance of their hemiparetic lower limb were performed. LLLT (diode laser, 100 mW 808 nm, beam spot area 0.0314 cm(2), 127.39 J/cm(2)/point, 40 s) was applied before isometric endurance. After the real LLLT intervention, we observed significant reduction in the visual analogue scale for pain intensity (p = 0.0038), increased time to onset of muscle fatigue (p = 0.0063), and increased torque peak (p = 0.0076), but no significant change in the root mean square (RMS) value (electric signal in the motor unit during contraction, as obtained with surface electromyography). Our results suggest that the application of LLLT may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.

  14. Low level light therapy on stroke with a portable and illumination-parameter adjustable LED helmet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Sun, Jiajing; Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is an obstinate and dreaded disease, which present characteristics of high incidence rates, high relapse rates, high mortality rates and high disability rates. Recent World Health Organization data suggest that a stroke victim is identified every 6 seconds around the world. There are not effective therapies for stroke except surgery that caused stroke victims enormous physical and psychological trauma. Transcranial low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) of neurological diseases and brain trauma has gained momentum due to the character of high-efficiency, safe and non-invasive in the past decade. In this study, we found three conclusions through previous studies. 1). In simulation, 810nm light/laser makes the maximum light penetration (>5cm), which allow light to cross through gray matter into white matter. Gaussian beam with the same size of lesion area achieves better therapeutic. What's more, multi-light/laser- source has potential effect on stroke treatment. 2). In animal tests, LLLT has a positive therapeutic effect and PW mode LLLT has a better effect than XW mode LLLT on stroke treatment. 3). In clinical, large scale human experiment results are not so ideal due to the lower energy density of LLLT. In summary, it is no deny that those research results highlighted the great potential of transcranial LLLT as a novel, effective, and non-invasive therapy for stroke treatment.

  15. The effects of Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) on blood glucose levels in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type I : a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Postiglione, Marco; Buccioni, Tommaso; Longo, Diego

    2009-06-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a widespread disease and a serious public health problem. Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) has been found to reduce glycaemia on DM type 1 patients, an observation requiring further research especially as regards characteristics of treatment protocol. The purpose of this work is to continue the line of research and propose a specific protocol for LLLT use. In spring 2008 a 48 year old man, DM type 1 insulin dependent patient has been submitted to 810 nm wavelength LLLT treatment in specific body areas daily for 3 weeks and then once a week for 4 weeks until normalization of glycaemia. Medical supervision was present before, during and after application. Insulin was reduced progressively and then stopped. A gradual reduction of glycaemia was noted during the course of treatment. In successive follow-ups a reduction in HbA1c was noted. Results confirm previous observations and need for further research on large cohorts. The indication that LASER may become a valuable addition to DM type 1 treatment is confirmed and the proposed protocol appears to be effective. The case presented merits review since it reports a therapeutic challenge, contributes to advance in medical science and spawns research.

  16. The use of low-level light therapy in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia and female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Daigle, Deanne

    2014-04-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) or female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is the most common form of hair loss in men and women. Despite its common occurrence, our understanding of the etiology of AGA and FPHL remains incomplete. As such, traditional therapies demonstrate modest efficacies and new therapies continue to be sought. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is a relatively new technique used to promote hair growth in both men and women with AGA and FPHL. Currently, there exist several LLLT devices marketed for the treatment of alopecia, which claim to stimulate hair growth; yet marketing these devices only requires that safety, not efficacy, be established. A handful of studies have since investigated the efficacy of LLLT for alopecia with mixed results. These studies suffered from power, confounding and analysis issues which resulted in a high risk of bias in LLLT studies. Due to the paucity of well-conducted randomized controlled trials, the efficacy of LLLT devices remains unclear. Randomized controlled trials of LLLT conducted and reported according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement would greatly increase the credibility of the evidence and clarify the ambiguity of the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of AGA and FPHL.

  17. Placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of the effect two different low-level laser therapies (LLLT)--intraoral and extraoral--on trismus and facial swelling following surgical extraction of the lower third molar.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mutan Hamdi; Güngörmüş, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of extraoral and intraoral low-level laser therapies (LLLT) on postoperative trismus and oedema following the removal of mandibular third molars. Forty-eight patients who were to undergo surgical removal of their lower third molars were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups: extraoral LLLT, intraoral LLLT, or placebo. In the study, a Ga-Al-As diode laser device with a continuous wavelength of 808 nm was used, and the laser therapy was applied by using a 1 x 3-cm handpiece. The flat-top laser beam profile was used in this therapy. For both of the LLLT groups, laser energy was applied at 100 mW (0.1 W) for a total of 120 s (0.1 W x 120 s = 12 J). Patients in the extraoral-LLLT group (n = 16) received 12-J (4 J/cm(2)) low-level laser irradiation, and the laser was applied at the insertion point of the masseter muscle immediately after the operation. Patients in the intraoral-LLLT group (n = 16) received 12-J (4 J/cm(2)) low-level laser irradiation intraorally at the operation site 1 cm from the target tissue. In the placebo group (n = 16), the handpiece was inserted intraorally at the operation site and then was touched extraorally to the masseter muscle for 1 min at each site (120 s total), but the laser was not activated. The size of the interincisal opening and facial swelling were evaluated on the second and seventh postoperative days. At the second postoperative day, trismus (29.0 +/- 7.6 mm [p = 0.010]) and swelling (105.3 +/- 5.0 mm [p = 0.047]) in the extraoral-LLLT group were significantly less than in the placebo group (trismus: 21.1 +/- 7.6 mm, swelling: 109.1 +/- 4.4 mm). Trismus (39.6 +/- 9.0 mm [p = 0.002]) in the extraoral-LLLT group at the seventh postoperative day was also significantly less than in the placebo group (29.0 +/- 6.2 mm). However, at the seventh postoperative day in the intraoral-LLLT group, only trismus (35.6 +/- 8.5 [p = 0.002]) was significantly less than

  18. Mechanism of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effects on rat mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Gennady K.; Solovyova, Ludmila I.; Kosel, Arnold I.

    2000-11-01

    The low power laser radiation is widely applied for treatment of various diseases. In our research we investigated the influence of low power laser radiation on the mast cells degranulation process. The object of the research were the mesentery mast cells of the rat thin intestine. A loop of thin intestine was irradiated by the therapeutic diode laser device Uley - 2K (lambda - 890 nm, pulse). The process of mast cells degranulation served as a criterion for their functional activity estimation. The estimation was fulfilled with the help of light microscope (toluidine blue staining, pH02,0; degranulating mast cells counting on 100 cells; immersion technique; X 980). To study the dependence of degranulation process of mast cells irradiated with lasre from intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration we applied 0,000015 M solution of verapamil, which was applied to the mesentery for 2 minutes. Laser radiation (890 nm) stimulates mesentery mast cells degranulation. This effect is dose-dependent. Maximal degranulation was registered after laser irradiation wiht power 25 mW, exposure time 15-30 s (energy density 7.5 x 103 J/m2 to 6 x 104 j/m2). Further increasing of exposure time caused the effect decreasing. The results of our experiments with verpamil let us suppose light interaction with the voltage-dependent subunit of calcium channel, changing intracellular Ca2+ and leading to stimulatory effects.

  19. Effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on acute neural recovery and inflammation-related gene expression after crush injury in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, Carolina C; Gigo-Benato, Davilene; Salvini, Tania F; Oliveira, Alexandre L R; Anders, Juanita J; Russo, Thiago L

    2013-04-01

    Peripheral nerve function can be debilitated by different kinds of injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used successfully during rehabilitation to stimulate recovery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT (660 nm, 60 J/cm(2) , 40 mW/cm(2) ) on acute sciatic nerve injury. Thirty Wistar male rats were divided into three groups: (1) Normal, intact nerves; (2) I3d, crushed nerves evaluated on Day-3 post-injury; (3) I + L3d, crushed nerves submitted to two sessions of LLLT and investigated at 3 days post-injury. Sciatic nerves were removed and processed for gene expression analysis (real-time PCR) of the pro-inflammatory factors TWEAK, Fn14 and TNF-α and extracellular matrix remodeling and axonal growth markers, such as TIMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Zymography was used to determine levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and Western blotting was used to evaluate TNF-α protein content. Shapiro-Wilk and Levene's tests were applied to evaluate data normality and homogeneity, respectively. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test was used for statistical analysis with a significance level set at 5%. An increase in TNF-α protein level was found in I + L3 compared to Normal and I3d (P < 0.05). Zymography showed an increase in proMMP-9 activity, in both I3d and I + L3d groups (P < 0.05). The increase was more evident in I + L3d (P = 0.02 compared to I3d). Active-MMP-9 isoform activity was increased in I + L3d compared to Normal and I3d groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the activity of active-MMP-2 isoform was increased in I3d and I + L3 (P < 0.05). An increase in TIMP-1 expression was observed in both I3d and I + L3d groups (P < 0.05). The current study showed that LLLT increased MMPs activity, mainly MMP-9, and TNF-α protein level during the acute phase of nerve injury, modulating inflammation. Based on these results, it is recommended that LLLT should be started as soon as possible after peripheral

  20. Low-level light therapy for zymosan-induced arthritis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Dai, Tianhong; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Cohen, Richard; Apruzzese, William A.; Smotrich, Michael H.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) can ameliorate the pain, swelling and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. Light is absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and/or cyclic AMP production and consequent gene transcription via activation of transcription factors. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT in medicine, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed animal models designed to objectively quantify response to LLLT and compare different light delivery regimens. In the arthritis model we inject zymosan into rat knee joints to induce inflammatory arthritis. We have compared illumination regimens consisting of a high and low fluence (3 J/cm2 and 30 J/cm2), delivered at a high and low irradiance (5 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2) using 810-nm laser light daily for 5 days, with the effect of conventional corticosteroid (dexamethasone) therapy. Results indicated that illumination with 810-nm laser is highly effective (almost as good as dexamethasone) at reducing swelling and that longer illumination time was more important in determining effectiveness than either total fluence delivered or irradiance. Experiments carried out using 810-nm LLLT on excisional wound healing in mice also confirmed the importance of longer illumination times. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT.

  1. A systematic review of low-level light therapy for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Ho, Derek; Dahle, Sara E; Koo, Eugene; Li, Chin-Shang; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a significant international health concern affecting more than 387 million individuals. A diabetic person has a 25% lifetime risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), leading to limb amputation in up to one in six DFU patients. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) uses low-power lasers or light-emitting diodes to alter cellular function and molecular pathways, and may be a promising treatment for DFU. The goal of this systematic review is to examine whether the clinical use of LLLT is effective in the healing of DFU at 12 and 20 weeks in comparison with the standard of care, and to provide evidence-based recommendation and future clinical guidelines for the treatment of DFU using LLLT. On September 30, 2015, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases using the following terms: "diabetic foot" AND "low level light therapy," OR "light emitting diode," OR "phototherapy," OR "laser." The relevant articles that met the following criteria were selected for inclusion: randomized control trials (RCTs) that investigated the use of LLLT for treatment of DFU. Four RCTs involving 131 participants were suitable for inclusion based upon our criteria. The clinical trials used sham irriadiation, low dose, or nontherapeutic LLLT as placebo or control in comparison to LLLT. The endpoints included ulcer size and time to complete healing with follow-up ranging from 2 to 16 weeks. Each article was assigned a level of evidence (LOE) and graded according to the Oxford Center for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence Grades of Recommendation criteria. Limitations of reviewed RCTs include a small sample size (N < 100), unclear allocation concealment, lack of screening phase to exclude rapid healers, unclear inclusion/exclusion criteria, short (<30 days) follow-up period, and unclear treatment settings (wavelength and treatment time). However, all reviewed RCTs demonstrated therapeutic outcomes with no adverse events using LLLT for

  2. Five-year follow-up of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koev, K.; Avramov, L.; Borissova, E.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine long-term effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The research was implemented for a period of five years. For LLLT, a He-Ne Laser with continuous emission at 633 nm (0.1 mW/cm2) was used in patients with AMD of all stages (dry to wet exudative forms were included). In total, 33 patients (16 men and 17 women – 66 eyes) with AMD of various stages and a mean age of 68.7 ± 4.2 years were included in the study. Progressive, exudative AMD was diagnosed in 8 eyes. 58 eyes had drusen or were depigmented. Laser radiation was applied transpupillary to the macula for six times for three minutes once in two days; 22 patients with AMD (44 eyes) were randomly selected to receive mock treatment (control group 10 men and 12 women with a mean age of 69.3 ± 4.8 years). The visual acuity was followed for a five-year period. The perimetry and Amsler test were used to screen central scotomas. The fluorescein angiography of AMD and the control groups was examined. The visual acuity remained unchanged in all patients in the control group. There was a statistically significant increase in the visual acuity (p<0.001, end of study versus baseline) for AMD patients for the period of five years after the treatment. The edema and hemorrhage in the patients with progressive, exudative AMD significantly decreased. No side effects were observed during the therapy. The prevalence of metamorphopsia, scotoma in AMD group was reduced. In conclusion, this study shows that LLLT may be a novel long-lasting therapeutic option for both forms of AMD. It is a highly-effective treatment that results in a long-term improvement of the visual acuity.

  3. Results of the trials and light-delivery evaluation at low-level laser therapy of acute and chronic pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeva, Tatiana; Petrov, Todor S.; Minkovski, Nikolai I.

    2004-06-01

    Although the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is accepted in the clinical practice, its efficiency is still questionable because of the unclear mechanisms of LLLT action. This work presents the results of LLLT applied to volunteers who need recovery from trauma or suffer from rheumatic diseases, inflammatory disorders, etc. The control group we used for comparison consisted of patients being treated by conventional therapy that included massage and acupuncture needles. The effectiveness of the LLLT was graded under four categories. Short-term and long-term side effects as well as conditions responding only to LLLT were recorded. The successful treatments were up to 70%, which coincided with the result of the control group. The LLLT was performed with a GaAs laser system SIX LASER IR - Bulgaria provided with additional set of six light CW emitting diodes to scan a larger area of a tissue surface. To evaluate the light delivery inside the tissue, the spatial maps of the light spot at the laser output in different operating regimes were measured. On their basis, the absorbed dose was calculated both in the boundary layer under the tissue surface and in depth using a reduced variance Monte-Carlo code.

  4. Results of the trials and light delivery evaluation on low-level laser therapy of acute and chronic pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Roeva, Tatiana; Petrova, Kremena S.; Petrov, Todor S.; Minkovski, Nikolai

    2003-11-01

    Although the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been accepted in the clinical practice, its efficiency is still questionable because of the unclear mechanisms of LLLT action. This work presents the results of LLLT applied to volunteers who need recovery from trauma or suffer from rheumatic diseases, inflammatory disorders, etc. The control group we used for comparison consisted of patients being treated by conventional therapy that included massage and acupuncture needles. The effectiveness of the LLLT was graded under four categories. Short-term and long-term side effects as well as conditions responding only to LLLT were recorded. The successful treatments were up to 70%, which coincided with the result of the control group. The LLLT was performed with a GaAs laser system provided with additional set of six light CW emitting diodes to scan a larger area of a tissue surface. To evaluate the light delivery inside the tissue, the spatial energy distribution within the laser beam was measured with a CCD camera. On its basis, the light dose absorbed in the tissue was calculated both in the boundary layer under the surface and in depth using a reduced variance Monte-Carlo code.

  5. The action of pre-exercise low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α proteins and on the functional fitness of elderly rats subjected to aerobic training.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Eliane Martins; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Guaraldo, Simone A; Silva, José Antônio; Antônio, Ednei Luis; Silva, Flávio; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT), when used in conjunction with aerobic training, interferes with the expression of inflammatory markers IL-6 and TNF-α, thereby influencing the performance of old rats participating in swimming. A total of 30 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were used for this study: 24 aged rats, and 6 young rats. The older animals were randomly divided into four groups designated as follows: aged-control, aged-exercise, aged-LLLT, aged-LLLT/exercise group, and young-control animals. Aerobic capacity (VO2max) was analyzed before and after training period. The aged-exercise and aged-LLLT/exercise groups were trained for 6 weeks. LLLT laser was applied before each training session with 808 nm and 4 J of energy to the indicated groups throughout training. The rats were euthanized, and muscle tissue and serum were collected for muscle cross-sectional area and IL-6 and TNF-α protein analysis. In VO2 showed statistical difference between young- and aged-control groups (used as baseline) (p < 0.05). The same difference can be observed in the young control group compared with all intervention groups (exercise, LLLT and LLLT + exercise). In comparison with the aged-control group, a difference was observed only for comparison with the exercise group (p < 0.05), and exercise associated with LLLT group (p < 0.001). Levels of IL-6 and TNF-α for the aged-exercise and the aged-LLLT/exercise groups were significantly decreased compared to the aged-control group (p < 0.05). Analysis of the transverse section of the gastrocnemius muscle showed a significant difference between the aged-exercise and aged-LLLT/exercise groups (p < 0.001). These results suggest that laser therapy in conjunction with aerobic training may provide a therapeutic approach for reducing the inflammatory markers (IL-6 and TNF-α), however, LLLT without exercise was not able to improve physical performance of

  6. The new heterologous fibrin sealant in combination with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the repair of the buccal branch of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Rodrigues, Antonio de Castro; Buchaim, Rogerio Leone; Barraviera, Benedito; Junior, Rui Seabra Ferreira; Junior, Geraldo Marco Rosa; Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Roque, Domingos Donizeti; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Dare, Leticia Rossi; Andreo, Jesus Carlos

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the repair of the buccal branch of the facial nerve with two surgical techniques: end-to-end epineural suture and coaptation with heterologous fibrin sealant. Forty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: control group (CG) in which the buccal branch of the facial nerve was collected without injury; (2) experimental group with suture (EGS) and experimental group with fibrin (EGF): The buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected on both sides of the face. End-to-end suture was performed on the right side and fibrin sealant on the left side; (3) Experimental group with suture and laser (EGSL) and experimental group with fibrin and laser (EGFL). All animals underwent the same surgical procedures in the EGS and EGF groups, in combination with the application of LLLT (wavelength of 830 nm, 30 mW optical power output of potency, and energy density of 6 J/cm(2)). The animals of the five groups were euthanized at 5 weeks post-surgery and 10 weeks post-surgery. Axonal sprouting was observed in the distal stump of the facial nerve in all experimental groups. The observed morphology was similar to the fibers of the control group, with a predominance of myelinated fibers. In the final period of the experiment, the EGSL presented the closest results to the CG, in all variables measured, except in the axon area. Both surgical techniques analyzed were effective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, where the use of fibrin sealant allowed the manipulation of the nerve stumps without trauma. LLLT exhibited satisfactory results on facial nerve regeneration, being therefore a useful technique to stimulate axonal regeneration process.

  7. Illumination-parameter adjustable and illumination-distribution visible LED helmet for low-level light therapy on brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied. Recently, more and more cases are reported with positive therapeutic effect by using transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs) illumination. Here, we developed a LLLT helmet for treating brain injuries based on LED arrays. We designed the LED arrays in circle shape and assembled them in multilayered 3D printed helmet with water-cooling module. The LED arrays can be adjust to touch the head of subjects. A control circuit was developed to drive and control the illumination of the LLLT helmet. The software portion provides the control of on and off of each LED arrays, the setup of illumination parameters, and 3D distribution of LLLT light dose in human subject according to the illumination setups. This LLLT light dose distribution was computed by a Monte Carlo model for voxelized media and the Visible Chinese Human head dataset and displayed in 3D view at the background of head anatomical structure. The performance of the whole system was fully tested. One stroke patient was recruited in the preliminary LLLT experiment and the following neuropsychological testing showed obvious improvement in memory and executive functioning. This clinical case suggested the potential of this Illumination-parameter adjustable and illuminationdistribution visible LED helmet as a reliable, noninvasive, and effective tool in treating brain injuries.

  8. Pre-Conditioning with Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy: Light Before the Storm

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Tanupriya; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Rai, Vikrant; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-conditioning by ischemia, hyperthermia, hypothermia, hyperbaric oxygen (and numerous other modalities) is a rapidly growing area of investigation that is used in pathological conditions where tissue damage may be expected. The damage caused by surgery, heart attack, or stroke can be mitigated by pre-treating the local or distant tissue with low levels of a stress-inducing stimulus, that can induce a protective response against subsequent major damage. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been used for nearly 50 years to enhance tissue healing and to relieve pain, inflammation and swelling. The photons are absorbed in cytochrome(c) oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain), and this enzyme activation increases electron transport, respiration, oxygen consumption and ATP production. A complex signaling cascade is initiated leading to activation of transcription factors and up- and down-regulation of numerous genes. Recently it has become apparent that LLLT can also be effective if delivered to normal cells or tissue before the actual insult or trauma, in a pre-conditioning mode. Muscles are protected, nerves feel less pain, and LLLT can protect against a subsequent heart attack. These examples point the way to wider use of LLLT as a pre-conditioning modality to prevent pain and increase healing after surgical/medical procedures and possibly to increase athletic performance. PMID:25552961

  9. Long-term survival of a randomized phase III trial of head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation therapy with or without low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Héliton S; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; de Assis Ramos, Gabriela; Dias, Fernando L; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2017-08-01

    The impact of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in patients treated with exclusive chemoradiation therapy remains unknown. This study evaluated the overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of these patients. Overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of 94 patients diagnosed with oropharynx, nasopharynx, and hypopharynx cancer, who participated on a phase III study, was evaluated from 2007 to 2015. The patients were subjected to conventional radiotherapy plus cisplatin every 3weeks. LLLT was applied with an InGaAlP diode (660nm-100mW-1J-4J/cm 2 ). With a median follow-up of 41.3months (range 0.7-101.9), patients receiving LLLT had a statistically significant better complete response to treatment than those in the placebo group (LG=89.1%; PG=67.4%; p=0.013). Patients subjected to LLLT also displayed increase in progression-free survival than those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 40.4%; p=0.030; HR:1:93; CI 95%: 1.07-3.5) and had a tendency for better overall survival (57.4% vs. 40.4%; p=0.90; HR:1.64; CI 95%: 0.92-2.91). This is the first study to suggest that LLLT may improve survival of head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Further studies, with a larger sample, are necessary to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization of low-level light therapy's illumination parameters for spinal cord injury in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Ali; Bourisly, Ali

    2018-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in complete or partial loss of sensation and motor function due to interruption along the severed axonal tract(s). SCI can result in tetraplegia or paraplegia, which can have prohibitive lifetime medical costs and result in shorter life expectancy. A promising therapeutic technique that is currently in experimental phase and that has the potential to be used to treat SCI is Low-level light therapy (LLLT). Preclinical studies have shown that LLLT has reparative and regenerative capabilities on transected spinal cords, and that LLLT can enhance axonal sprouting in animal models. However, despite the promising effects of LLLT as a therapy for SCI, it remains difficult to compare published results due to the use of a wide range of illumination parameters (i.e. different wavelengths, fluences, beam types, and beam diameter), and due to the lack of a standardized experimental protocol(s). Before any clinical applications of LLLT for SCI treatment, it is crucial to standardize illumination parameters and efficacy of light delivery. Therefore, in this study we aim to evaluate the light fluence distribution on a 3D voxelated SCI rat model with different illumination parameters (wavelengths: 660, 810, and 980 nm; beam types: Gaussian and Flat; and beam diameters: 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 cm) for LLLT using Monte Carlo simulation. This study provides an efficient approach to guide researchers in optimizing the illumination parameters for LLLT spinal cord injury in an experimental model and will aid in quantitative and qualitative standardization of LLLT-SCI treatment.

  11. The use of low-level light therapy in supportive care for patients with breast cancer: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Robijns, Jolien; Censabella, Sandrine; Bulens, Paul; Maes, Annelies; Mebis, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, with an incidence of 1.7 million in 2012. Breast cancer and its treatments can bring along serious side effects such as fatigue, skin toxicity, lymphedema, pain, nausea, etc. These can substantially affect the patients' quality of life. Therefore, supportive care for breast cancer patients is an essential mainstay in the treatment. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) also named photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has proven its efficiency in general medicine for already more than 40 years. It is a noninvasive treatment option used to stimulate wound healing and reduce inflammation, edema, and pain. LLLT is used in different medical settings ranging from dermatology, physiotherapy, and neurology to dentistry. Since the last twenty years, LLLT is becoming a new treatment modality in supportive care for breast cancer. For this review, all existing literature concerning the use of LLLT for breast cancer was used to provide evidence in the following domains: oral mucositis (OM), radiodermatitis (RD), lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The findings of this review suggest that LLLT is a promising option for the management of breast cancer treatment-related side effects. However, it still remains important to define appropriate treatment and irradiation parameters for each condition in order to ensure the effectiveness of LLLT.

  12. Radiological and biochemical effects (CTX-II, MMP-3, 8, and 13) of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in chronic osteoarthritis in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    S, Gopal Nambi; Kamal, Walid; George, Julie; Manssor, Elbagir

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation of synovial membrane and degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) lead to major changes in joint space width (JSW) and biochemical components such as collagen-II telopeptide (CTX-II) and matrix metallo protineases (MMP-3, 8, and 13). Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is thought to have an analgesic effect as well as biomodulatory effect on microcirculation and cartilage regeneration in animal studies. The objective of this study was to examine the analgesic and biochemical effect of LLLT in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Subjects (n = 34) who fulfilled the selection criteria were randomly divided into active group (n = 17) and placebo group. Subjects in active group were irradiated laser with the frequency of 3 days per week for 4 weeks with the specific parameters on 8 different points on the joint at 1.5 J per point for 60 s for 8 points for a total dose of 12 J in a skin contact method. The placebo group was treated with the same probe with minimum emission of energy. Visual analog scale for pain intensity, joint space width, collagen-II telopeptide, and matrix metallo protinease-3, 8, and 13 was measured before treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks following treatment. Data are analyzed with mean values and standard deviation with p < 0.05. Baseline values of all outcome measures show insignificant difference (p > 0.05) in both groups which shows homogeneity. After 4- and 8-week treatment, active laser group shows more significant difference (p < 0.001) in all the parameters than the placebo laser group (p > 0.05). Our results show that low-level laser therapy was more efficient in reducing pain and improving cartilage thickness through biochemical changes.

  13. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT; 780 nm) acts differently on mRNA expression of anti- and pro-inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of collagenase-induced tendinitis in rat.

    PubMed

    Pires, Débora; Xavier, Murilo; Araújo, Tiago; Silva, José Antônio; Aimbire, Flavio; Albertini, Regiane

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been found to produce anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of disorders. Tendinopathies are directly related to unbalance in expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which are responsible by degeneration process of tendinocytes. In the current study, we decided to investigate if LLLT could reduce mRNA expression for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β cytokines, and COX-2 enzyme. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided randomly in seven groups, and tendinitis was induced with a collagenase intratendinea injection. The mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR in 7th and 14th days after tendinitis. LLLT irradiation with wavelength of 780 nm required for 75 s with a dose of 7.7 J/cm(2) was administered in distinct moments: 12 h and 7 days post tendinitis. At the 12 h after tendinitis, the animals were irradiated once in intercalate days until the 7th or 14th day in and them the animals were killed, respectively. In other series, 7 days after tendinitis, the animals were irradiated once in intercalated days until the 14th day and then the animals were killed. LLLT in both acute and chronic phases decreased IL-6, COX-2, and TGF-β expression after tendinitis, respectively, when compared to tendinitis groups: IL-6, COX-2, and TGF-β. The LLLT not altered IL-1β expression in any time, but reduced the TNF-α expression; however, only at chronic phase. We conclude that LLLT administered with this protocol reduces one of features of tendinopathies that is mRNA expression for pro-inflammatory mediators.

  14. Treating bulimia with hypnosis and low-level light therapy: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laser, Eleanor; Sassack, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This case report describes an effort to control bulimia nervosa by combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-the application of red and near-infrared light to specific body points-and hypnosis. A 29-year old female with a 14-year history of bulimia received one session of LLLT combined with hypnosis. Two weeks later, following a measurable decrease in bulimic episodes (purging), a session of psychotherapy and hypnosis was administered. Six months post-treatment, the patient has experienced a complete cessation of purging activities without recurrence. LLLT, when used in conjunction with hypnosis and psychotherapy, was effective in managing bulimia and may prove useful in treating other eating disorders.

  15. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Carroll, James; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential show biphasic patterns, while others such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species show a triphasic dose-response with two distinct peaks. The Janus nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may act as a beneficial signaling molecule at low concentrations and a harmful cytotoxic agent at high concentrations, may partly explain the observed responses in vivo. Transcranial LLLT for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice shows a distinct biphasic pattern with peaks in beneficial neurological effects observed when the number of treatments is varied, and when the energy density of an individual treatment is varied. Further understanding of the extent to which biphasic dose responses apply in LLLT will be necessary to optimize clinical treatments. PMID:22461763

  16. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation. PMID:25562608

  17. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation.

  18. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R; Berns, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation.

  19. Low level light therapy modulates inflammatory mediators secreted by human annulus fibrosus cells during intervertebral disc degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Min Ho; Shin, Jae Hee; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Yoo, Chang Min; Jo, Ga Eun; Kim, Joo Han; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) is one of the important causes of low back pain and is associated with inflammation induced by interaction between macrophages and the human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely known to regulate inflammatory reaction. However, the effect of LLLT on macrophage-mediated inflammation in the AF cells has not been studied till date. The aim of this study is to mimic the inflammatory microenvironment and to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LLLT at a range of wavelengths (405, 532 and 650 nm) on the AF treated with macrophage-like THP-1 cells conditioned medium (MCM) containing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and 8). We observed that AF cells exposed to MCM secrete significantly higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α. LLLT markedly inhibited secretion of IL-6 at 405 nm in a time-dependent manner. Level of IL-8 was significantly decreased at all wavelengths in a time-dependent manner. We showed that MCM can induce the inflammatory microenvironment in AF cells and LLLT selectively suppressed IL-6 and 8 levels. The results indicate that LLLT is a potential method of IVD treatment and provide insights into further investigation of its anti-inflammation effect on IVD. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of trigger points that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shenqiti, A.; Oldham, J.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of LLLT in the treatment of trigger points (TrPs) that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis. A double-blind randomized controlled trail was conducted. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups: sham or laser therapy. The laser (Excel, Omega Universal Technologies Ltd, London, UK) parameters used were a wavelength of 820 nm, a power output of 100 mW, a frequency of 5000 Hz (modulated) and energy density of 32 J/cm2. The two groups received a course of 12 treatment sessions for four weeks (3 sessions per week). Pain, functional activities (as measured using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, SPADI), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed pre and post treatment, with a three month follow-up assessment. Significant improvements in pain (p < 0.001) were observed for the laser group (6 cm median improvement on a 10 cm VAS) compared to the sham group (2 cm median improvement) immediately post treatment. The improvements in the laser group continued post treatment with a 7 cm median improvement observed at three month follow-up. Similar between group differences were observed for ROM (p < 0.01), functional activities (p <= 0.001) and PPT (p <= 0.05). The findings of the current study suggested that LLLT is effective in treating patients with TrPs associated with rotator cuff tendonitis, when using the parameters described. However, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear, and will require further investigation.

  1. Inhomogeneity in optical properties of rat brain: a study for LLLT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Yoshimura, Tania M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Magalhães, Ana C.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2013-03-01

    Over the last few years, low-level light therapy (LLLT) has shown an incredible suitability for a wide range of applications for central nervous system (CNS) related diseases. In this therapeutic modality light dosimetry is extremely critical so the study of light propagation through the CNS organs is of great importance. To better understand how light intensity is delivered to the most relevant neural sites we evaluated optical transmission through slices of rat brain point by point. We experimented red (λ = 660 nm) and near infrared (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light analyzing the light penetration and distribution in the whole brain. A fresh Wistar rat (Rattus novergicus) brain was cut in sagittal slices and illuminated with a broad light beam. A high-resolution digital camera was employed to acquire data of transmitted light. Spatial profiles of the light transmitted through the sample were obtained from the images. Peaks and valleys in the profiles show sites where light was less or more attenuated. The peak intensities provide information about total attenuation and the peak widths are correlated to the scattering coefficient at that individual portion of the sample. The outcomes of this study provide remarkable information for LLLT dose-dependent studies involving CNS and highlight the importance of LLLT dosimetry in CNS organs for large range of applications in animal and human diseases.

  2. Low-Level Light Therapy with 410 nm Light Emitting Diode Suppresses Collagen Synthesis in Human Keloid Fibroblasts: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Jung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Sue Kyung; Kim, You-Sun; Sohn, Seonghyang; Kim, You Chan

    2017-04-01

    Keloids are characterized by excessive collagen deposition in the dermis, in which transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling plays an important role. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is reported as effective in preventing keloids in clinical reports, recently. To date, studies investigating the effect of LLLT on keloid fibroblasts are extremely rare. We investigated the effect of LLLT with blue (410 nm), red (630 nm), and infrared (830 nm) light on the collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts. Keloid fibroblasts were isolated from keloid-revision surgery samples and irradiated using 410-, 630-, 830-nm light emitting diode twice, with a 24-hour interval at 10 J/cm 2 . After irradiation, cells were incubated for 24 and 48 hours and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed. Western blot analysis was also performed in 48 hours after last irradiation. The genes and proteins of collagen type I, TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 were analyzed. We observed no statistically significant change in the viability of keloid fibroblasts after irradiation. Collagen type I was the only gene whose expression significantly decreased after irradiation at 410 nm when compared to the non-irradiated control. Western blot analysis showed that LLLT at 410 nm lowered the protein levels of collagen type I compared to the control. LLLT at 410 nm decreased the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts and might be effective in preventing keloid formation in their initial stage.

  3. The Effectiveness of Low-Level Light Therapy in Attenuating Vocal Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Loraine Sydney; Heaton, James T

    2017-05-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is effective in reducing inflammation, promoting wound healing, and preventing tissue damage, but has not yet been studied in the treatment of voice disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible effectiveness of LLLT in attenuating symptoms of vocal fatigue created by a vocal loading task as measured by acoustic, aerodynamic, and self-reported vocal effort. In a randomized, prospective study, 16 vocally healthy adults divided into four groups underwent a 1-hour vocal loading procedure, followed by infrared wavelength LLLT (828 nm), red wavelength LLLT (628 nm), heat, or no heat-light (control) treatment targeting the laryngeal region of the ventral neck surface. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP), relative fundamental frequency (RFF), and the inability to produce soft voice (IPSV) self-perceptual rating scale were recorded (1) at baseline, (2) immediately after vocal loading, (3) after treatment, and (4) 1 hour after treatment. Vocal loading significantly increased PTP and IPSV and decreased onset and offset RFFs, consistent with a shift toward vocal dysfunction. Red light significantly normalized the combination of PTP, IPSV, and RFF measures compared to other conditions. RFF is sensitive to a vocal loading task in conjunction with PTP and IPSV, and red LLLT may have a normalizing effect on objective and subjective measures of vocal fatigue. The results of this study lay the groundwork and rationale for future research to optimize LLLT wavelength combinations and overall dose. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Nuts and Bolts of Low-level Laser (Light) Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon; Dai, Tianhong; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of lasers in the 1960s it was realized that laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain, inflammation and swelling. In recent years the field sometimes known as photobiomodulation has broadened to include light-emitting diodes and other light sources, and the range of wavelengths used now includes many in the red and near infrared. The term “low level laser therapy” or LLLT has become widely recognized and implies the existence of the biphasic dose response or the Arndt-Schulz curve. This review will cover the mechanisms of action of LLLT at a cellular and at a tissular level and will summarize the various light sources and principles of dosimetry that are employed in clinical practice. The range of diseases, injuries, and conditions that can be benefited by LLLT will be summarized with an emphasis on those that have reported randomized controlled clinical trials. Serious life-threatening diseases such as stroke, heart attack, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury may soon be amenable to LLLT therapy. PMID:22045511

  5. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  6. Angiogenic Synergistic Effect of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cell Spheroids with Low-Level Light Therapy in a Model of Acute Skin Flap Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Su; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted hASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level light therapy (LLLT) on transplanted spheroid hASCs in skin flaps of mice. hASCs were cultured in monolayers or spheroids. LLLT, hASCs, spheroids and spheroids transplanted with LLLT were applied to the skin flaps. Healing of the skin flaps was assessed by gross evaluation and by hematoxylin and eosin staining and elastin van Gieson staining. Compared with the spheroid group, skin flap healing was enhanced in the spheroid + LLLT group, including the neovascularization and regeneration of skin appendages. The survival of hASCs was enhanced by decreased apoptosis of hASCs in the skin flaps of the spheroid + LLLT group. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASC and spheroid groups. These data suggest that LLLT was an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in the skin flaps, enhancing the survival of hASCs and stimulating the secretion of growth factors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Low-Level Laser Light Therapy Improves Cognitive Deficits and Inhibits Microglial Activation after Controlled Cortical Impact in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khuman, Jugta; Zhang, Jimmy; Park, Juyeon; Carroll, James D.; Donahue, Chad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level laser light (800 nm) was applied directly to the contused parenchyma or transcranially in mice beginning 60–80 min after CCI. Injured mice treated with 60 J/cm2 (500 mW/cm2×2 min) either transcranially or via an open craniotomy had modestly improved latency to the hidden platform (p<0.05 for group), and probe trial performance (p<0.01) compared to non-treated controls. The beneficial effects of LLLT in open craniotomy mice were associated with reduced microgliosis at 48 h (21.8±2.3 versus 39.2±4.2 IbA-1+ cells/200×field, p<0.05). Little or no effect of LLLT on post-injury cognitive function was observed using the other doses, a 4-h administration time point and 7-day administration of 60 J/cm2. No effect of LLLT (60 J/cm2 open craniotomy) was observed on post-injury motor function (days 1–7), brain edema (24 h), nitrosative stress (24 h), or lesion volume (14 days). Although further dose optimization and mechanism studies are needed, the data suggest that LLLT might be a therapeutic option to improve cognitive recovery and limit inflammation after TBI. PMID:21851183

  8. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces the COX-2 mRNA expression in both subplantar and total brain tissues in the model of peripheral inflammation induced by administration of carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Prianti, Antonio Carlos Guimarães; Silva, José Antonio; Dos Santos, Regiane Feliciano; Rosseti, Isabela Bueno; Costa, Maricilia Silva

    2014-07-01

    In the classical model of edema formation and hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan administration in rat paw, the increase in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to the severity of the inflammatory and pain responses. Prostaglandins are generated by the cyclooxygenase (COX). There are two distinct COX isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. In inflammatory tissues, COX-2 is greatly expressed producing proinflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of inflammatory pathologies, reducing both pain and acute inflammatory process. Herein we studied the effect of LLLT on both COX-2 and COX-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in either subplantar or brain tissues taken from rats treated with carrageenan. The experiment was designed as follows: A1 (saline), A2 (carrageenan-0.5 mg/paw), A3 (carrageenan-0.5 mg/paw + LLLT), A4 (carrageenan-1.0 mg/paw), and A5 (carrageenan-1.0 mg/paw + LLLT). Animals from the A3 and A5 groups were irradiated at 1 h after carrageenan administration, using a diode laser with an output power of 30 mW and a wavelength of 660 nm. The laser beam covered an area of 0.785 cm(2), resulting in an energy dosage of 7.5 J/cm(2). Both COX-2 and COX-1 mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Six hours after carrageenan administration, COX-2 mRNA expression was significantly increased both in the subplantar (2.2-4.1-fold) and total brain (8.65-13.79-fold) tissues. COX-1 mRNA expression was not changed. LLLT (7.5 J/cm(2)) reduced significantly the COX-2 mRNA expression both in the subplantar (~2.5-fold) and brain (4.84-9.67-fold) tissues. The results show that LLLT is able to reduce COX-2 mRNA expression. It is possible that the mechanism of LLLT decreasing hyperalgesia is also related to its effect in reducing the COX-2 expression in the CNS.

  9. Low-level laser therapy of acute and chronic pain: results of the trials and light delivery optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Roeva, Tatiana

    2003-09-01

    The work presents the results of the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) of two groups of volunteers with a variety of conditions performed with a GaAs-system. The volunteers were randomly selected among the patients who were usually treated by conventional therapy that included massage and acupuncture needles. The LLLT was proposed to the first group as extension of conventional treatment. The second group underwent only the LLLT. The effectiveness of the therapy was graded under four categories. Short-term and long-term side effects as well as conditions responding only to LLLT were recorded. The successful treatments were up to 70% for both groups, which coincided with the result of the control group treated by the conventional therapy. For optimization of the light delivery, the spatial maps of the absorbed dose in a homogeneous medium, both in the proximity of the light source and at a distance from it, were compared for collimated and divergent light beams using a reduced variance Monte-Carlo code.

  10. Adjunctive 830 nm light-emitting diode therapy can improve the results following aesthetic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Serk; Ohshiro, Toshio; Trelles, Mario A; Vasily, David B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aggressive, or even minimally aggressive, aesthetic interventions are almost inevitably followed by such events as discomfort, erythema, edema and hematoma formation which could lengthen patient downtime and represent a major problem to the surgeon. Recently, low level light therapy with light-emitting diodes (LED-LLLT) at 830 nm has attracted attention in wound healing indications for its anti-inflammatory effects and control of erythema, edema and bruising. Rationale: The wavelength of 830 nm offers deep penetration into living biological tissue, including bone. A new-generation of 830 nm LEDs, based on those developed in the NASA Space Medicine Laboratory, has enabled the construction of planar array-based LED-LLLT systems with clinically useful irradiances. Irradiation with 830 nm energy has been shown in vitro and in vivo to increase the action potential of epidermal and dermal cells significantly. The response of the inflammatory stage cells is enhanced both in terms of function and trophic factor release, and fibroblasts demonstrate superior collagenesis and elastinogenesis. Conclusions: A growing body of clinical evidence is showing that applying 830 nm LED-LLLT as soon as possible post-procedure, both invasive and noninvasive, successfully hastens the resolution of sequelae associated with patient downtime in addition to significantly speeding up frank wound healing. This article reviews that evidence, and attempts to show that 830 nm LED-LLLT delivers swift resolution of postoperative sequelae, minimizes downtime and enhances patient satisfaction. PMID:26877592

  11. Adjunctive 830 nm light-emitting diode therapy can improve the results following aesthetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Calderhead, R Glen; Kim, Won-Serk; Ohshiro, Toshio; Trelles, Mario A; Vasily, David B

    2015-12-30

    Aggressive, or even minimally aggressive, aesthetic interventions are almost inevitably followed by such events as discomfort, erythema, edema and hematoma formation which could lengthen patient downtime and represent a major problem to the surgeon. Recently, low level light therapy with light-emitting diodes (LED-LLLT) at 830 nm has attracted attention in wound healing indications for its anti-inflammatory effects and control of erythema, edema and bruising. The wavelength of 830 nm offers deep penetration into living biological tissue, including bone. A new-generation of 830 nm LEDs, based on those developed in the NASA Space Medicine Laboratory, has enabled the construction of planar array-based LED-LLLT systems with clinically useful irradiances. Irradiation with 830 nm energy has been shown in vitro and in vivo to increase the action potential of epidermal and dermal cells significantly. The response of the inflammatory stage cells is enhanced both in terms of function and trophic factor release, and fibroblasts demonstrate superior collagenesis and elastinogenesis. A growing body of clinical evidence is showing that applying 830 nm LED-LLLT as soon as possible post-procedure, both invasive and noninvasive, successfully hastens the resolution of sequelae associated with patient downtime in addition to significantly speeding up frank wound healing. This article reviews that evidence, and attempts to show that 830 nm LED-LLLT delivers swift resolution of postoperative sequelae, minimizes downtime and enhances patient satisfaction.

  12. The dark art of light measurement: accurate radiometry for low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Zainal, Siti A; Holder, Michelle J; Carroll, James D; Cooper, Paul R; Milward, Michael R; Palin, William M

    2016-05-01

    Lasers and light-emitting diodes are used for a range of biomedical applications with many studies reporting their beneficial effects. However, three main concerns exist regarding much of the low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation literature; (1) incomplete, inaccurate and unverified irradiation parameters, (2) miscalculation of 'dose,' and (3) the misuse of appropriate light property terminology. The aim of this systematic review was to assess where, and to what extent, these inadequacies exist and to provide an overview of 'best practice' in light measurement methods and importance of correct light measurement. A review of recent relevant literature was performed in PubMed using the terms LLLT and photobiomodulation (March 2014-March 2015) to investigate the contemporary information available in LLLT and photobiomodulation literature in terms of reporting light properties and irradiation parameters. A total of 74 articles formed the basis of this systematic review. Although most articles reported beneficial effects following LLLT, the majority contained no information in terms of how light was measured (73%) and relied on manufacturer-stated values. For all papers reviewed, missing information for specific light parameters included wavelength (3%), light source type (8%), power (41%), pulse frequency (52%), beam area (40%), irradiance (43%), exposure time (16%), radiant energy (74%) and fluence (16%). Frequent use of incorrect terminology was also observed within the reviewed literature. A poor understanding of photophysics is evident as a significant number of papers neglected to report or misreported important radiometric data. These errors affect repeatability and reliability of studies shared between scientists, manufacturers and clinicians and could degrade efficacy of patient treatments. Researchers need a physicist or appropriately skilled engineer on the team, and manuscript reviewers should reject papers that do not report beam measurement

  13. Low-level Laser Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    performance and consists of a photodiode power sensor within a black plastic housing unit to confirm the output of each LED matrix in the helmet. We tested...could be significantly reversed by low level light therapy (LLLT) in vitro study. The effect of LLLT was furthered by a combination with metabolic...it will indicate both a mechanisms of action and provide a strategy for monitoring the effect of LLLT in clinical settings (for example, using

  14. Flexible polymer waveguides for light-activated therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moonseok; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; Lin, Harvey H.; Lee, Dong Hee; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Conventional light-activated therapies, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), photochemical tissue bonding (PTB), collagen crosslinking (CXL), low-level light therapy (LLLT), and antimicrobial therapy utilize external light sources and light propagation through free space, limiting treatment to accessible and superficial areas of the body. Recent progress has been made in developing biocompatible polymer waveguides to enhance light delivery to deep tissues. To further expand clinical utility, waveguides should be flexible and tough enough to enable use in anatomically difficult-to-reach regions, while having the requisite optical properties to achieve uniform and efficient illumination of the target area. Here, we present a new class of flexible polymer waveguides optimized for uniform light extraction into tissues. Our slab waveguides comprise two designs: first, a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based elastomer for CXL, and second, a tough polyacrylamide and alginate hydrogel for large-area phototherapies. Our waveguides are optically transparent in the visible wavelengths (400-750 nm) and a multimode fiber is used to couple light into the waveguide. We characterized the light propagation through the waveguides and light extraction into tissue, and validated our results with optical simulation. By changing the thickness and scattering properties, uniform light extraction through the length of the waveguide could be achieved. We demonstrate proof-of-concept scleral photo-crosslinking of an ex vivo porcine eyeball for prevention of myopia.

  15. Transient repetitive exposure to low level light therapy enhances collateral blood vessel growth in the ischemic hindlimb of the tight skin mouse.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Maria; Krolikowki, John G; Jones, Deron W; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Struve, Janine; Nandedkar, Sandhya D; Lohr, Nicole L; Pagel, Paul S; Weihrauch, Dorothée

    2013-01-01

    The tight skin mouse (Tsk(-/+)) is a model of scleroderma characterized by impaired vasoreactivity, increased oxidative stress, attenuated angiogenic response to VEGF and production of the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) stimulates angiogenesis in myocardial infarction and chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that repetitive LLLT restores vessel growth in the ischemic hindlimb of Tsk(-/+) mice by attenuating angiostatin and enhancing angiomotin effects in vivo. C57Bl/6J and Tsk(-/+) mice underwent ligation of the femoral artery. Relative blood flow to the foot was measured using a laser Doppler imager. Tsk(-/+) mice received LLLT (670 nm, 50 mW cm(-2), 30 J cm(-2)) for 10 min per day for 14 days. Vascular density was determined using lycopersicom lectin staining. Immunofluorescent labeling, Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation were used to determine angiostatin and angiomotin expression. Recovery of blood flow to the ischemic limb was reduced in Tsk(-/+) compared with C57Bl/6 mice 2 weeks after surgery. LLLT treatment of Tsk(-/+) mice restored blood flow to levels observed in C57Bl/6 mice. Vascular density was decreased, angiostatin expression was enhanced and angiomotin depressed in the ischemic hindlimb of Tsk(-/+) mice. LLLT treatment reversed these abnormalities. LLLT stimulates angiogenesis by increasing angiomotin and decreasing angiostatin expression in the ischemic hindlimb of Tsk(-/+) mice. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. A Preliminary Study of the Safety of Red Light Phototherapy of Tissues Harboring Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Istvan; Brondon, Philip; Axe, David R.; Friedman, Mark; Nardia, Frances Barg; Lanzafame, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present. Background data: LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation or promotion of metastatic lesions or new primary tumors. There has been little scientific study of oncologic outcomes after use of LLLT in cancer patients. Methods: A standard SKH mouse nonmelanoma UV-induced skin cancer model was used after visible squamous cell carcinomas were present, to study the effects of LLLT on tumor growth. The red light group (n=8) received automated full body 670 nm LLLT delivered twice a day at 5 J/cm2 using an LED source. The control group (n=8) was handled similarly, but did not receive LLLT. Measurements on 330 tumors were conducted for 37 consecutive days, while the animals received daily LLLT. Results: Daily tumor measurements demonstrated no measurable effect of LLLT on tumor growth. Conclusions: This experiment suggests that LLLT at these parameters may be safe even when malignant lesions are present. Further studies on the effects of photoirradiation on neoplasms are warranted. PMID:22853435

  17. Proposed Mechanisms of Photobiomodulation or Low-Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) also known as low-level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT), has been known for almost 50 years but still has not gained widespread acceptance, largely due to uncertainty about the molecular, cellular, and tissular mechanisms of action. However, in recent years, much knowledge has been gained in this area, which will be summarized in this review. One of the most important chromophores is cytochrome c oxidase (unit IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain), which contains both heme and copper centers and absorbs light into the near-infra-red region. The leading hypothesis is that the photons dissociate inhibitory nitric oxide from the enzyme, leading to an increase in electron transport, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production. Another hypothesis concerns light-sensitive ion channels that can be activated allowing calcium to enter the cell. After the initial photon absorption events, numerous signaling pathways are activated via reactive oxygen species, cyclic AMP, NO and Ca2+, leading to activation of transcription factors. These transcription factors can lead to increased expression of genes related to protein synthesis, cell migration and proliferation, anti-inflammatory signaling, anti-apoptotic proteins, antioxidant enzymes. Stem cells and progenitor cells appear to be particularly susceptible to LLLT. PMID:28070154

  18. Proposed Mechanisms of Photobiomodulation or Low-Level Light Therapy.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) also known as low-level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT), has been known for almost 50 years but still has not gained widespread acceptance, largely due to uncertainty about the molecular, cellular, and tissular mechanisms of action. However, in recent years, much knowledge has been gained in this area, which will be summarized in this review. One of the most important chromophores is cytochrome c oxidase (unit IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain), which contains both heme and copper centers and absorbs light into the near-infra-red region. The leading hypothesis is that the photons dissociate inhibitory nitric oxide from the enzyme, leading to an increase in electron transport, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production. Another hypothesis concerns light-sensitive ion channels that can be activated allowing calcium to enter the cell. After the initial photon absorption events, numerous signaling pathways are activated via reactive oxygen species, cyclic AMP, NO and Ca2+, leading to activation of transcription factors. These transcription factors can lead to increased expression of genes related to protein synthesis, cell migration and proliferation, anti-inflammatory signaling, anti-apoptotic proteins, antioxidant enzymes. Stem cells and progenitor cells appear to be particularly susceptible to LLLT.

  19. Wavelength, beam size and type dependences of cerebral low-level light therapy: A Monte Carlo study on visible Chinese human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Duan, Meixue; Sun, Yunlong; Li, Kai

    2014-02-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been clinically utilized for many indications in medicine requiring protection from cell/tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, pain reduction, swelling and inflammation. Presently, use of LLLT to treat stroke, traumatic brain injury, and cognitive dysfunction is attracting growing interest. Near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain tissue, allowing noninvasive treatment to be carried out with few treatment-related adverse events. Optimization of LLLT treatment effect is one key issue of the field; however, only a few experimental tests on mice for wavelength selection have been reported. We addressed this issue by low-cost, straightforward and quantitative comparisons on light dosage distribution in Visible Chinese human head with Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation. Optimized selection in wavelength, beam type and size were given based on comparisons among frequently-used setups (i.e., wavelengths: 660 nm, 810 nm, 980 nm; beam type: Gaussian and flat beam; beam diameter: 2 cm, 4 cm, 6cm).This study provided an efficient way to guide optimization of LLLT setup and selection on wavelength, beam type and size for clinical brain LLLT.

  20. Effects of the Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in the process of healing diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Maura Cristina Porto; Carvalho, Ana Flávia Machado de; Feitosa, Valrian Campos; Coelho, Isabely Madalena; Oliveira, Rauirys Alencar de; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of the low-level laser therapy applying Laser on the tissue repair in ulcer carriers due to diabetes. Sixteen type II diabetic patients, ulcer carriers in the lower limbs, participated in the research from which eight were in the control group and eight were submitted to the low-level laser therapy with a pulsed wave form, visible ray, wave length of 632.8 nm, 30 mW peak power, (Laser - HTM). The application time was of 80 (4J/cm2) seconds. The application was punctual without contact (approximately 1mm of distance), the pen being held in a perpendicular position related to the wound, in equidistant points. There were 12 appointments, of which three were done weekly in alternated days. Photograph records and an application of the brief inventory of pain were done before and after 30 days of follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the size of the wound when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The pain was also reported as having an intense improvement in the treated group. The low-level laser treatment seems to be an efficient method, viable, painless and of low costs concerning the tissue repair ulcers in a diabetic foot.

  1. Prevention of Thyroidectomy Scars in Asian Adults With Low-Level Light Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joon; Kim, Sang Jin; Song, Hyo Sang; Kim, Sue Kyoung; Lee, Jeonghun; Soh, Euy Young; Kim, You Chan

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal wound-healing after thyroidectomy with a resulting scar is a common dermatologic consultation. Despite many medical and surgical approaches, prevention of postoperative scars is challenging. This study validated the efficacy and safety of low-level light therapy (LLLT) using an 830/590 nm light-emitting diode (LED)-based device for prevention of thyroidectomy scars. Thirty-five patients with linear surgical suture lines after thyroidectomy were treated with 830/590 nm LED-LLLT. Daily application of 60 J/cm (11 minutes) for 1 week starting on postoperative day 1 was followed by treatment 3 times per week for 3 additional weeks. The control group (n = 15) remained untreated. Scar-prevention effects were evaluated 1 and 3 months after thyroidectomy with colorimetric evaluation using a tristimulus-color analyzer. The Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) score, global assessment, and a subjective satisfaction score (range: 1-4) were also determined. Lightness (L*) and chrome values (a*) decreased significantly at the 3-month follow-up visit in the treatment group compared with those of controls. The average VSS and GAS scores were lower in the treatment group, whereas the subjective score was not significantly different. Light-emitting diode based LLLT treatment suppressed the formation of scars after thyroidectomy and could be safely used without noticeable adverse effects.

  2. Transcranial Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy for Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thunshelle, Connor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation (PBM) is a possible treatment for brain injury, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: We review the fundamental mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level and the effects on the brain are discussed. There are several contributing processes that have been proposed to lead to the beneficial effects of PBM in treating TBI such as stimulation of neurogenesis, a decrease in inflammation, and neuroprotection. Both animal and clinical trials for ischemic stroke are outlined. A number of articles have shown how transcranial LLLT (tLLLT) is effective at increasing memory, learning, and the overall neurological performance in rodent models with TBI. Results: Our laboratory has conducted three different studies on the effects of tLLLT on mice with TBI. The first studied pulsed against continuous laser irradiation, finding that 10 Hz pulsed was the best. The second compared four different wavelengths, discovering only 660 and 810 nm to have any effectiveness, whereas 732 and 980 nm did not. The third looked at varying regimens of daily laser treatments (1, 3, and 14 days) and found that 14 laser applications was excessive. We also review several studies of the effects of tLLLT on neuroprogenitor cells, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and synaptogenesis, immediate early response knockout mice, and tLLLT in combination therapy with metabolic inhibitors. Conclusions: Finally, some clinical studies in TBI patients are covered. PMID:28001759

  3. Low-Level Light Therapy with 410 nm Light Emitting Diode Suppresses Collagen Synthesis in Human Keloid Fibroblasts: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Jung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Sue Kyung; Kim, You-Sun; Sohn, Seonghyang

    2017-01-01

    Background Keloids are characterized by excessive collagen deposition in the dermis, in which transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling plays an important role. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is reported as effective in preventing keloids in clinical reports, recently. To date, studies investigating the effect of LLLT on keloid fibroblasts are extremely rare. Objective We investigated the effect of LLLT with blue (410 nm), red (630 nm), and infrared (830 nm) light on the collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts. Methods Keloid fibroblasts were isolated from keloid-revision surgery samples and irradiated using 410-, 630-, 830-nm light emitting diode twice, with a 24-hour interval at 10 J/cm2. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 24 and 48 hours and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed. Western blot analysis was also performed in 48 hours after last irradiation. The genes and proteins of collagen type I, TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 were analyzed. Results We observed no statistically significant change in the viability of keloid fibroblasts after irradiation. Collagen type I was the only gene whose expression significantly decreased after irradiation at 410 nm when compared to the non-irradiated control. Western blot analysis showed that LLLT at 410 nm lowered the protein levels of collagen type I compared to the control. Conclusion LLLT at 410 nm decreased the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts and might be effective in preventing keloid formation in their initial stage. PMID:28392641

  4. Low-level light therapy induces mucosal healing in a murine model of dextran-sodium-sulfate induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Ehud; Varol, Chen; Kaplan, Michail; Shapira, Oz; Melzer, Ehud

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of low-level light therapy (LLLT) in an acute colitis model in mice. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for various inflammatory processes such as oral mucositis and diabetic foot ulcers. Colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in mice in four blinded controlled studies (validation of model, efficacy study, and two studies for evaluation of optimal dose). LLLT was applied to the colon utilizing a small diameter endoscope with an LED-based light source in several wavelengths (440, 660, and 850 nm at 1 J/cm(2)) and then 850 nm at several doses (1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 J/cm(2)). LLLT was initiated 1 day prior to induction of colitis and went on for the 6 day induction period as well as for the following 3-10 days. Dose was controlled by changing exposure time. Disease activity was scored endoscopically and by histopathological assessment. Statistically significant improvement in disease severity was observed in the treatment groups compared with the control groups. The three wavelengths used demonstrated efficacy, and a clear dose-response curve was observed for one of the wavelengths (850 nm). On day 11, colonoscopic scoring in the sham-treated mice increased from 7.9±1.3 to 12.2±2.2, while activity in all treated groups remained stable. Photobiostimulation with LLLT has a significant positive effect on disease progression in mice with DSS colitis.

  5. 3D printing scaffold coupled with low level light therapy for neural tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; George, Jonathan K; Sorger, Volker J; Grace Zhang, Lijie

    2017-04-12

    3D printing has shown promise for neural regeneration by providing customized nerve scaffolds to structurally support and bridge the defect gap as well as deliver cells or various bioactive substances. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) exhibits positive effects on rehabiliation of degenerative nerves and neural disorders. With this in mind, we postulate that 3D printed neural scaffold coupling with LLLT will generate a new strategy to repair neural degeneration. To achieve this goal, we applied red laser light to stimualte neural stem cells on 3D printed scaffolds and investigated the subsequent cell response with respect to cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we show that cell prolifeartion rate and intracellular reactive oxgen species synthesis were significantly increased after 15 s laser stimulation follwed by 1 d culture. Over culturing time of 14 d in vitro, the laser stimulation promoted neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells, while the glial differentiation was suppressed based on results of both immunocytochemistry studies and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing. These findings suggest that integration of 3D printing and LLLT might provide a powerful methodology for neural tissue engineering.

  6. Low-level light therapy for androgenetic alopecia: a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, sham device-controlled multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Choi, Jee Woong; Kim, Jun Young; Shin, Jung Won; Lee, Seok-Jong; Huh, Chang-Hun

    2013-08-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common disorder affecting men and women. Finasteride and minoxidil are well-known, effective treatment methods, but patients who exhibit a poor response to these methods have no additional adequate treatment modalities. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a low-level light therapy (LLLT) device for the treatment of AGA. This study was designed as a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, sham device-controlled trial. Forty subjects with AGA were enrolled and scheduled to receive treatment with a helmet-type, home-use LLLT device emitting wavelengths of 630, 650, and 660 nm or a sham device for 18 minutes daily. Investigator and subject performed phototrichogram assessment (hair density and thickness) and global assessment of hair regrowth for evaluation. After 24 weeks of treatment, the LLLT group showed significantly greater hair density than the sham device group. Mean hair diameter improved statistically significantly more in the LLLT group than in the sham device group. Investigator global assessment showed a significant difference between the two groups, but that of the subject did not. No serious adverse reactions were detected. LLLT could be an effective treatment for AGA. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of LLLT on the level of ATP and ROS from organ of corti cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, ChungKu; Chang, So-Young; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Suh, Myung-Whan; Jung, Jae Yun

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that ototoxic antibiotics and acoustic trauma can damage cochlear hair cells and cause hearing loss. Previous studies using transcanal LLLT (Low level laser therapy) showed that LLLT can promote recovery of hearing thresholds and cochlear hair cells. However, its mechanism has not been studied. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism of hearing recovery from gentamicin induced ototoxic hearing loss by LLLT. Methods: HEI- OC1 (House ear institute organ of Corti) cells were cultured for 18 hours and ototoxicity was induced by gentamicin (GM) treatment to the cells. Cultured cells were divided into 6 groups, No treatment control, LLLT only, GM 6.6 mM and GM 13.1 mM, GM 6.6 mM+LLLT and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells. LD laser 808 nm, 15 mW, was irradiated to the cultured cells for 15 min, at 4 hours after GM treatment to the cells. ATP was assayed using the ATP assay Kit. ROS was measured using confocal microscope after application of H2DCFDA dye. Results: ATP was decreased in GM 13.1 mM cells and increased in LLLT only cells and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells compared to control and 13.1 mM cells. ROS was increased in GM 6.6 mM and GM 13.1 mM cells, and decreased in GM 6.6 mM+LLLT and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells compared to GM 6.6 and 13.1 mM cells immediately after laser irradiation. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that LLLT on GM treated HEI-OC1 cells increased ATP and decreased ROS that may contribute to the recovery of hearing.

  8. Effects of pre-radiation exposure to LLLT of normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Epstein, Joel B; Carroll, James

    2016-06-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) efficacy for the prevention of cancer treatment-induced oral mucositis (OM) has been amply described. However, potential protection of malignant cells remains a legitimate concern for clinicians. We tested LLLT-induced protection from ionizing radiation killing in both malignant and normal cells. We treated six groups each of normal human lymphoblasts (TK6) and human leukemia cells (HL60) with He-Ne LLLT (632.8 nm, 35 mW, CW, 1 cm(2), 35 mW/cm(2) for 3-343 s, 0.1-12 J/cm(2)) prior to exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells were then incubated and counted daily to determine their survival. Optimization of IR dose and incubation time was established prior to testing the effect of LLLT. Growth curves for both cell lines showed significant declines after exposure to 50-200 cGy IR when compared to controls. Pre-radiation exposure to LLLT (4.0 J/cm(2)) followed by 1-h incubation blocked this decline in TK6 but not in HL60 cells. The latter cells were sensitized to the killing effects of IR in a dose-dependent manner. This study shows that pre-IR LLLT treatment results in a differential response of normal vs. malignant cells, suggesting that LLLT does not confer protection and may even sensitize cancer cells to IR killing.

  9. A visible Chinese human-combined Monte Carlo simulation study on low-level light therapy of stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Pan, Boan; Zhong, Fulin; Li, Ting

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease, which is the third leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the incidence of stroke increases progressively with age, morbidity among young and middle-aged adults is increasing annually. Medications nevertheless remain the bulwarks of stroke. The treatment is ineffective, speculative and has a long treatment cycle. The function of acupuncture and moxibustion, which are potential therapeutic tools for stroke, is still controversial. Recently, Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated potent in vivo efficacy for treatment of ischemic conditions of acute myocardial infraction and stroke in multiple validated animal models. Optimum LLLT treatment has a dominant influence on therapy of stroke. While more than a thousand clinical trials have been halted, only a few trials on animals have been reported. We addressed this issue by simulating near-infrared light propagation with accurate visible Chinese human head by Monte Carlo modeling. The visible human head embody region of atherosclerotic plaques in head. Through comparing the light propagation of different light illumination, we can get a precise, optimized and straightforward treatment. Here, we developed a LLLT helmet for treating stroke depend on near-infrared light. There are more than 30 LED arrays in in multi-layered 3D printed helmet. Each LED array has independent water-cooling module and can be adjusted to touch the head of different subjects based on Electro pneumatic module. Moreover, the software provides the setup of illumination parameters and 3D distribution of light fluence rate distribution in human brain.

  10. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  11. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  12. Light Therapy Boxes for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Seasonal affective disorder treatment: Choosing a light therapy box Light therapy boxes can offer an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder. Features such as light intensity, safety, cost and ...

  13. Does addition of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conservative care of knee arthritis successfully postpone the need for joint replacement?

    PubMed

    Ip, David

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates whether the addition of low-level laser therapy into standard conventional physical therapy in elderly with bilateral symptomatic tri-compartmental knee arthritis can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery. A prospective randomized cohort study of 100 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic knee arthritis with each knee randomized to receive either treatment protocol A consisting of conventional physical therapy or protocol B which is the same as protocol A with added low-level laser therapy. The mean follow-up was 6 years. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain which necessitated joint replacement surgery. After a follow-up of 6 years, patients clearly benefited from treatment with protocol B as only one knee needed joint replacement surgery, while nine patients treated with protocol A needed surgery (p < 0.05). We conclude low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis.

  14. The role of nitric oxide in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. Firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. This review will focus on the role of nitric oxide in the cellular and tissue effects of LLLT. Red and near-IR light is primarily absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain). Nitric oxide produced in the mitochondria can inhibit respiration by binding to cytochrome c oxidase and competitively displacing oxygen, especially in stressed or hypoxic cells. If light absorption displaced the nitric oxide and thus allowed the cytochrome c oxidase to recover and cellular respiration to resume, this would explain many of the observations made in LLLT. Why the effect is only seen in hypoxic, stressed or damaged cells or tissues? How the effects can keep working for some time (hours or days) postillumination? Why increased NO concentrations are sometimes measured in cell culture or in animals? How blood flow can be increased? Why angiogenesis is sometimes increased after LLLT in vivo?

  15. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  16. Mechanisms of low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova, Tatiana N.

    2006-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In particular a biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect than higher levels. This introductory review will cover some of the proposed cellular chromophores responsible for the effect of visible light on mammalian cells, including cytochrome c oxidase (with absorption peaks in the near infrared) and photoactive porphyrins. Mitochondria are thought to be a likely site for the initial effects of light, leading to increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species and induction of transcription factors. These effects in turn lead to increased cell proliferation and migration (particularly by fibroblasts), modulation in levels of cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and increased tissue oxygenation. The results of these biochemical and cellular changes in animals and patients include such benefits as increased healing in chronic wounds, improvements in sports injuries and

  17. Prevention of skin flap necrosis by use of adipose-derived stromal cells with light-emitting diode phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Su; Mondal, Arindam; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level light therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) in the skin flap of mice. LLLT, ASC transplantation and ASC transplantation with LLLT (ASC + LLLT) were applied to the skin flap. Immunostaining and Western blot analysis were performed to evaluate cell survival and differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor by the ASCs. Vascular regeneration was assessed by means of immunostaining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin staining. In the ASC + LLLT group, the survival of ASCs was increased as the result of the decreased apoptosis of ASCs. The secretion of growth factors was higher in this group as compared with ASCs alone. ASCs contributed to tissue regeneration through vascular cell differentiation and secretion of angiogenic growth factors. The ASC + LLLT group displayed improved treatment efficacy including neovascularization and tissue regeneration compared with ASCs alone. Transplanting ASCs to ischemic skin flaps improved therapeutic efficacy for ischemia treatment as the result of enhanced cell survival and paracrine effects. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of ASCs in vascular regeneration, which enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in skin flaps. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An optical system adopting liquid crystals with electrical tunability of wavelength and energy density for low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Hung-Shan; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a bistable negative lens by integrating a polarization switch of ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) with a passively anisotropic focusing element. The proposed lens not only exhibits electrically tunable bistability but also fast response time of sub-milliseconds, which leads to good candidate of optical component in optical system for medical applications. In this paper, we demonstrate an optical system consisting of two FLC phase retarders and one LC lenses that exhibits both of electrically tunable wavelength and size of exposure area. The operating principles and the experimental results are discussed. The tunable spectrum, exposure area size and tunable irradiance are illustrated. Compared to conventional lenses with mechanical movements in the medical light therapy system, our electrically switchable optical system is more practical in the portable applications of light therapy (LLLT).

  19. Therapeutic effect of forearm low level light treatment on blood flow, oxygenation, and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Sun, Jiajing; Meng, Lingkang; Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Low level light/laser therapy (LLLT) is considered as a novel, non-invasive, and potential therapy in a variety of psychological and physical conditions, due to its effective intricate photobiomodulation. The mechanism of LLLT is that when cells are stimulated by photons, mitochondria produce a large quantity of ATP, which accelerates biochemical responses in the cell. It is of great significance to gain a clear insight into the change or interplay of various physiological parameters. In this study, we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and venous-occlusion plethysmography to measure the LLLT-induced changes in blood flow, oxygenation, and oxygen consumption in human forearms in vivo. Six healthy human participants (4 males and 2 females) were administered with 810-nm light emitted by LED array in ten minutes and blood flow, oxygenation and oxygen consumption were detected in the entire experiment. We found that LLLT induced an increase of blood flow and oxygen consumption on the treated site. Meanwhile, LLLT took a good role in promoting oxygenation of regional tissue, which was indicated by a significant increase of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]), a nearly invariable deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) and a increase of differential hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbD] = Δ[HbO2] - Δ[Hb]). These results not only demonstrate enormous potential of LLLT, but help to figure out mechanisms of photobiomodulation.

  20. Pulsed versus continuous wave low-level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome): a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta has been identified as a major player in the pathogenic process, where low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940 nm using millisecond pulsing and continuous wave (CW) modes on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Considerable functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with the best results seen with the pulsing mode. No adverse effects were noted. Pulsed LLLT represents a treatment alternative for osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome).

  1. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study. PMID:26830658

  2. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X

    2016-02-02

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  3. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  4. In vivo studies of low level laser (light) therapy for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weijun; Wu, Qiuhe; Huang, Ying-Ying; Ando, Takahiro; Huang, Liyi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) is attracting growing interest to treat both stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain allows non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. It is proposed that red and NIR light is absorbed by chromophores in the mitochondria of cells leading to changes in gene transcription and upregulation of proteins involved in cell survival, antioxidant production, collagen synthesis, reduction of chronic inflammation and cell migration and proliferation. We developed a mouse model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI and examined the effect of 0, 1, 3, and 14 daily 810-nm CW laser treatments in the CCI model as measured by neurological severity score and wire grip and motion test. 1 laser Tx gave a significant improvement while 3 laser Tx was even better. Surprisingly 14 laser Tx was no better than no treatment. Histological studies at necropsy suggested that the neurodegeneration was reduced at 14 days and that the cortical lesion was repaired by BrdU+ve neural progenitor (stem) cells at 28 days. Transcranial laser therapy is a promising treatment for acute (and chronic TBI) and the lack of side-effects and paucity of alternative treatments encourages early clinical trials.

  5. Low level light therapy by LED of different wavelength induces angiogenesis and improves ischemic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dungel, Peter; Hartinger, Joachim; Chaudary, Sidrah; Slezak, Paul; Hofmann, Anna; Hausner, Thomas; Strassl, Martin; Wintner, Ernst; Redl, Heinz; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been revealed as a potential means to improve wound healing. So far, most studies are being performed with irradiation in the red to near-infrared spectra. Recently, we showed that blue light (470 nm) can significantly influence biological systems such as nitric oxide (NO) metabolism and is able to release NO from nitrosyl-hemoglobin or mitochondrial protein complexes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic value of blue or red light emitting diodes (LEDs) on wound healing in an ischemia disturbed rodent flap model. An abdominal flap was rendered ischemic by ligation of one epigastric bundle and subjected to LED illumination with a wavelength of 470 nm (blue, n = 8) or 629 nm (red, n = 8) each at 50 mW/cm(2) and compared to a non-treated control group (n = 8). Illumination was performed for 10 minutes on five consecutive days. LED therapy with both wavelengths significantly increased angiogenesis in the sub-epidermal layer and intramuscularly (panniculus carnosus muscle) which was associated with significantly improved tissue perfusion 7 days after the ischemic insult. Accordingly, tissue necrosis was significantly reduced and shrinkage significantly less pronounced in the LED-treated groups of both wavelengths. LED treatment of ischemia challenged tissue improved early wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis irrespective of the wavelength thus delineating this noninvasive means as a potential, cost effective tool in complicated wounds. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hind limb ischemia mice.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Su; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) spheroid in a hind limb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hind limbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) of the spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blots. Spheroid + LLLT group had enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with the ASC group. The spheroid ASCs contributed to tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs increased with a concomitant decrease in apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hind limb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs and spheroid group. These data suggested that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhanced the survival of ASCs and stimulated the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hind limb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  8. [Light, laser and PDT therapy for acne].

    PubMed

    Borelli, C; Merk, K; Plewig, G; Degitz, K

    2005-11-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have evaluated the treatment of acne using electromagnetic waves, such as lasers, photodynamic therapy, visible light or radio waves. While the efficacy of laser treatment is still uncertain, photodynamic therapy shows promising results, but with marked side-effects, as destruction of sebaceous glands. Treatment with blue light (405-420 nm wavelength) also appears effective and can be regarded as an treatment option for inflammatory acne.

  9. Photobiomodulation of freshly isolated human adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells by pulsed light-emitting diodes for direct clinical application.

    PubMed

    Priglinger, E; Maier, J; Chaudary, S; Lindner, C; Wurzer, C; Rieger, S; Redl, H; Wolbank, S; Dungel, P

    2018-06-01

    A highly interesting source for adult stem cells is adipose tissue, from which the stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-a heterogeneous cell population including the adipose-derived stromal/stem cells-can be obtained. To enhance the regenerative potential of freshly isolated SVF cells, low-level light therapy (LLLT) was used. The effects of pulsed blue (475 nm), green (516 nm), and red (635 nm) light from light-emitting diodes applied on freshly isolated SVF were analysed regarding cell phenotype, cell number, viability, adenosine triphosphate content, cytotoxicity, and proliferation but also osteogenic, adipogenic, and proangiogenic differentiation potential. The colony-forming unit fibroblast assay revealed a significantly increased colony size after LLLT with red light compared with untreated cells, whereas the frequency of colony-forming cells was not affected. LLLT with green and red light resulted in a stronger capacity to form vascular tubes by SVF when cultured within 3D fibrin matrices compared with untreated cells, which was corroborated by increased number and length of the single tubes and a significantly higher concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor. Our study showed beneficial effects after LLLT on the vascularization potential and proliferation capacity of SVF cells. Therefore, LLLT using pulsed light-emitting diode light might represent a new approach for activation of freshly isolated SVF cells for direct clinical application. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Self-organizing phenomena induced by LLLT in Henoch-Schoenlein purpura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailioaie, Laura; Ailioaie, C.

    2001-06-01

    Henoch-Schoenlein purpura is characterized by vasculitis of small vessels, particularly those of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney. Patients have characteristic purpuric skin rash plus all or some of the following: migratory polyarthralgias or polyarthritis, colicky abdominal pain, nephritis. Because until now there is no satisfactory treatment, we applied low level laser therapy (LLLT) in order to compare it with the classical therapy. Twenty-three children (2-15 years of age) have been treated at debut of the disease. They were randomly divided: group A (11 children) received LLLT; group B (12 children) was administrated classical therapy. Two GaAlAs diode lasers (670 nm and 830 nm) were used. The density of energy (4-8 J/cm2), irradiating frequency (2.4 Hz) was applied one session daily, using scanning technique under a special treatment protocol on cutaneous purpuric areas (20 sessions). The best results were obtained in laser group. Despite the complex medication, some patients from group B fell back into the former state after apparent improvement, and two children developed nephritis. The results could be explained by self-organization. LLLT is acting as a trigger factor causing certain systemic effects through circulating blood and a response of the entire immune system, by way of synergetic mechanisms.

  11. Low-Level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Recurrent Aphthous Ulcers: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Fernando Alves; de Almeida, Fernanda Campos Souza

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAUs) are the most common lesion found in the oral cavity. There is no definitive cure for RAUs and current treatments are aimed at minimizing symptoms. Since low-level laser therapy (LLLT) modulates inflammatory responses, and promotes pain reduction and cellular biostimulation, LLLT can be suggested as an alternative treatment for RAUs. The literature concerning the potential of LLLT in the treatment of RAUs was evaluated. A systematic literature review identified 22 publications, of which only 2 studies were adopted. The eligibility criteria consisted of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Both RCTs achieved significant results concerning LLLT and pain-level reductions and reduced healing times. Despite the variance in irradiation conditions applied in both studies, very similar wavelengths were adopted. There is accordingly strong evidence that wavelength plays an important role in RAU treatment. Taking into account the different parameters applied by selected RCTs, it is not possible to suggest that a specific protocol should be used. However, in light of the significant results found in both studies, LLLT can be suggested as an alternative for RAU treatment. Additional RCTs should be performed in order to reach a clinical protocol and better understand the application of LLLT in RAU treatment. PMID:25879049

  12. Investigation on physiological and clinical effects of different light sources in TMJ photobiomodulation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenoff, J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Laser light Electromagnetic energy has some typical properties for discussions on laser irradiation abilities to control the acute and chronic disorders in TMJ. Material and Methods During the last six years we have been completed well controlled clinical trials based on the criteria of the American Academy of orofacial pain. The study over the 600 patients (300 women and 300 men), mean age of 47 years have been developed. Patients have been selected on the main clinical sign of TMJ pain and have been divided into four main groups according to the type of PDT method. Based on the action spectra, various wavelengths have been used for TMJ Photodynamic Therapy. Constant dose and time of exposition, as well as various range of frequencies have been applied. In this way the Laser biostimulation response has been directly proportional to the total energy dose, depending of light intensity. Physiological and clinical effects of the followed "active regions"- 660 - 680, 760 - 780, 810 - 830 and 904 - 987 nm have been valued by method of comparative analysis. Methods applied: LLLT - TENS - red surface laser acupuncture (LA), PIPBM - LA, Laser bioenergetics approach, Complex therapeutic program (CTP). Results evaluation will be demonstrated by comparative digital ortopantomograph analysis, EEG brain maps, VAS, a metric analysis of the level of the maximum active Mandible opening and EPST through electrophysiological signal evaluation of the patient's body.

  13. Light therapy modulates serotonin levels and blood flow in women with headache. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Tomaz de Magalhães, Miriam; Núñez, Silvia Cristina; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Ribeiro, Martha Simões

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we looked at the possible effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on blood flow velocity, and serotonin (5-HT) and cholinesterase levels in patients with chronic headache associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). LLLT has been clinically applied over the past years with positive results in analgesia and without the report of any side effects. The understanding of biological mechanisms of action may improve clinical results and facilitate its indication. Ten patients presenting headache associated with TMD completed the study. An 830-nm infrared diode laser with power of 100 mW, exposure time of 34 s, and energy of 3.4 J was applied on the tender points of masseter and temporal muscle. Blood flow velocity was determined via ultrasound Doppler velocimetry before and after laser irradiation. The whole blood 5-HT and cholinesterase levels were evaluated three days before, immediately, and three days after laser irradiation. Pain score after treatment decreased to a score of 5.8 corresponding to 64% of pain reduction (P < 0.05). LLLT promoted a decrease in the blood flow velocity (P < 0.05). In addition, the 5-HT levels were significantly increased three days after LLLT (P < 0.05). The cholinesterase levels remained unchanged at the analyzed time points (P > 0.05). Our findings indicated that LLLT regulates blood flow in the temporal artery after irradiation and might control 5-HT levels in patients suffering with tension-type headache associated to TMD contributing to pain relief. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  14. Photochemotherapy: Light Dependent Therapies in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zovinka, Edward P.; Sunseri, Danielle R.

    2002-11-01

    Light-dependent therapies, such as photodynamic therapy and extracorporeal photopheresis, are not new, but have remained of interest to chemists and health care professionals since the middle of the twentieth century. While most people link light-dependent therapies only to the treatment of cancer, these therapies may be of use for a diverse set of medical conditions, from acne to AIDS. The techniques arise directly from the application of chemical concepts, such as spectroscopy, MO theory, and organic chemical reactions. Because of its application to health care, the field of photochemistry provides a tool to demonstrate the significance of chemistry to a socially important issue.

    See Featured Molecules.

  15. Low-Level Laser and Light-Emitting Diode Therapy for Pain Control in Hyperglycemic and Normoglycemic Patients Who Underwent Coronary Bypass Surgery with Internal Mammary Artery Grafts: A Randomized, Double-Blind Study with Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lima, Andréa Conceição Gomes; Fernandes, Gilderlene Alves; Gonzaga, Isabel Clarisse; de Barros Araújo, Raimundo; de Oliveira, Rauirys Alencar; Nicolau, Renata Amadei

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for reducing pain in hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery with internal mammary artery grafts. This study was conducted on 120 volunteers who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The volunteers were randomly allocated to four different groups of equal size (n = 30): control, placebo, LLLT [λ = 640 nm and spatial average energy fluence (SAEF) = 1.06 J/cm(2)], and LED (λ = 660 ± 20 nm and SAEF = 0.24 J/cm(2)). Participants were also divided into hyperglycemic and normoglycemic subgroups, according to their fasting blood glucose test result before surgery. The outcome assessed was pain during coughing by a visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The patients were followed for 1 month after the surgery. The LLLT and LED groups showed a greater decrease in pain, with similar results, as indicated by both the VAS and the McGill questionnaire (p ≤ 0.05), on the 6th and 8th postoperative day compared with the placebo and control groups. The outcomes were also similar between hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients. One month after the surgery, almost no individual reported pain during coughing. LLLT and LED had similar analgesic effects in hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients, better than placebo and control groups.

  16. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in rabbit oral mucosa after soft tissue graft application: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kara, Cankat; Demir, Turgut; Ozbek, Elvan

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the histopathological effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on healing of the oral mucosa after soft tissue graft operations. The alterations at the end of healing in normal and LLLT-applied oral mucosa were studied in two healthy adult New Zealand white rabbits by taking specimens for light microscopic inspection. There was no adverse event reported in the study and no post-operative complications, such as swelling, bleeding, or edema, were observed in the rabbits. Complete wound healing was faster in the LLLT-applied rabbit. Compared to the normal rabbit oral mucosa, thickening of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis) was found in the epithelia of the rabbits. A significant increase in the epithelial thickness was found in the samples of rabbits, suggesting increased scar tissue following the wound repair. Additionally, many mitotic figures were present in the epithelia of the LLLT-applied rabbit, indicating epithelial cell hyperplasia. Long and irregular connective tissue protrusions projecting into the undersurface of the epithelium and mononuclear cell infiltrations were noted in the rabbits. The results suggest that LLLT used for soft tissue operations provides better and faster wound healing and that LLLT enhances epithelization.

  17. Light in diagnosis, therapy and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Light and optical techniques have made profound impacts on modern medicine, with numerous lasers and optical devices being currently used in clinical practice to assess health and treat disease. Recent advances in biomedical optics have enabled increasingly sophisticated technologies — in particular those that integrate photonics with nanotechnology, biomaterials and genetic engineering. In this Review, we revisit the fundamentals of light–matter interactions, describe the applications of light in imaging, diagnosis, therapy and surgery, overview their clinical use, and discuss the promise of emerging light-based technologies. PMID:28649464

  18. Light emitting fabric technologies for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mordon, Serge; Cochrane, Cédric; Tylcz, Jean Baptiste; Betrouni, Nacim; Mortier, Laurent; Koncar, Vladan

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered to be a promising method for treating various types of cancer. A homogeneous and reproducible illumination during clinical PDT plays a determinant role in preventing under- or over-treatment. The development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of optical fiber into flexible structures could offer an interesting alternative. This paper aims to describe different methods proposed to develop Side Emitting Optical Fibers (SEOF), and how these SEOF can be integrated in a flexible structure to improve light illumination of the skin during PDT. Four main techniques can be described: (i) light blanket integrating side-glowing optical fibers, (ii) light emitting panel composed of SEOF obtained by micro-perforations of the cladding, (iii) embroidery-based light emitting fabric, and (iv) woven-based light emitting fabric. Woven-based light emitting fabrics give the best performances: higher fluence rate, best homogeneity of light delivery, good flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of LLLT on the periarthritis of the shoulder: a clinical study on different treatments with corticosteroid injections or a wait-and-see policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Giuseppe

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three types of treatments in the periarthritis of the shoulder: corticosteroid injections, Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) or wait-and-see-policy. BACKGROUND DATA: Low level laser irradiation is a treatment method widely used in medical science. Many disorders, such as osteoarthritis and musculoskeletal conditions with pain, have been treated with LLLT. METHODS: Patients, suffering from periarthritis of the shoulder of at least 6 weeks' duration, were recruited by family doctors. We randomly allocated eligible patients to 6 weeks of treatment n. 20 (33%) with corticosteroid injection, n. 21 (35%) with LLLT and with wait-and-see policy n.19 (31%). We applied a number of 12 sessions with infrared Diode Laser Ga-As (904 nm), 60 W maximum power, peak power per pulse 27 W, pulse frequency 1280 Hz, average point region 2-8 J; dose/point = 3-4 J; total energy density 24 J/cm2. Outcome measures included general improvement, severity of the main complaint, pain, shoulder disability, and patient satisfaction. Severity of shoulder complaints, abduction and elevation of the arm, and the pressure pain threshold were assessed. The principal analysis was done on an intention treatment basis. We assessed all outcomes at 3,6, 12, 26, 52 weeks. RESULTS: We randomly assigned 60 patients. At 6 weeks, corticosteroid injections were significantly better than all other therapy options for all outcome measures. Success rates were 90% (18) compared with 52% (11) for LLLT and 35% (7) for wait-and-see policy. Long-term differences between injections and LLLT were significantly in favour of LLLT. Success rate at 52 weeks were 14 (70%) for injections, 19 (90.5%) for LLLT, and 16 (84%) for wait-and-see policy. LLLT had better results than a wait-and-see policy, but differences were not significant ( p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients should be properly informed about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options for the

  20. A light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2017-02-01

    It is generally believed that there are some connections between Alzheimer's disease and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings, loss of motivation and behavioral issues. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. Infrared light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research we have studied the effect of infrared light on Alzheimer's disease through transgenic mouse model. We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily included a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emitted infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by performing two tests: cognitive performance of mice in Morris water maze, and plaque load by immunofluorescence analysis. Immunofluorescence analysis was based on measuring the quantity of plaques in mouse brain slices. Our results show that infrared therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Is LLLT effective in the management of TMJ pain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Manzi, Cecilia T.; Rolim, Aluizio B.; Vieira, Alessandro L. B.

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports the result of the use of LLLT on the treatment of TMJ pain and present LLLT as an effective method of treating such problem. One hundred and eighty one female and 23 male patients aged between 7 and 81 years old (average 36.9 years old) suffering TMJ pain were treated with 632.8, 670, and 830nm diodes lasers at the Laser Center of the UFPE. The treatment consisted of a series of 12 applications twice a week. Patients were treated with an average dose of 3 J/cm2. One hundred forty one out of 204 patients were asymptomatic at the end of the treatment, 37 improved considerably and 26 were symptomatic. These result show although LLLT does not cure TMJ disorders it is effective in reducing TMJ pain.

  2. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Zymosan-Induced Arthritis in Rats: Importance of Illumination Time

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Dai, Tianhong; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Cohen, Richard; Apruzzese, William A.; Smotrich, Michael H.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed for many years that low-level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) can ameliorate the pain, swelling, and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. Light is thought to be absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), reactive oxygen species and/or cyclic AMP production and consequent gene transcription via activation of transcription factors. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT in arthritis and in medicine in general, its use remains controversial. For all indications (including arthritis) the optimum optical parameters have been difficult to establish and so far are unknown. Methods We tested LLLT on rats that had zymosan injected into their knee joints to induce inflammatory arthritis. We compared illumination regimens consisting of a high and low fluence (3 and 30 J/cm2), delivered at high and low irradiance (5 and 50 mW/cm2) using 810-nm laser light daily for 5 days, with the positive control of conventional corticosteroid (dexamethasone) therapy. Results Illumination with 810-nm laser was highly effective (almost as good as dexamethasone) at reducing swelling and a longer illumination time (10 or 100 minutes compared to 1 minute) was more important in determining effectiveness than either the total fluence delivered or the irradiance. LLLT induced reduction of joint swelling correlated with reduction in the inflammatory marker serum prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Conclusion LLLT with 810-nm laser is highly effective in treating inflammatory arthritis in this model. Longer illumination times were more effective than short times regardless of total fluence or irradiance. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT for various arthritides. PMID:17659584

  3. Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy and Strength Training Protocol on Hand Grip by Dynamometry

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Rafael; Marcolino, Alexandre; Souza, Vitor; Bertolino, Guilherme; Fonseca, Marisa; Guirro, Rinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) – 660 nm and 904 nm - before grip strength protocol in healthy subjects. Methods: The study included 45 healthy volunteers with an average age of 22.7 (±1.4) years, subdivided into the following groups, control group: grip strength training associated with placebo LLLT; 660 nm group: LLLT (660 nm, 20 J/cm2, power of 30 mW, and beam area of 0.06 cm2, continuous, energy 1.2 J, and exposure time 40 seconds per point) before grip strength training and 904 nm group: LLLT (904 nm, 10 J/cm2, peak power of 70 W and 0.13 cm2 beam area, with pulsed beam 9.500 Hz and 30 seconds of exposure time per point and emitted energy 1.2 J) before grip strength training. The LLLT was timed to contact 10 points located in the region of the superficial and deep flexor muscles of the fingers, with a total energy of 12.0 J per session. For the strength training protocol, the volunteer exercised their fingers with the dominant hand on a small table, elbow flexed at 90°, forearm in neutral, using a light extension handle. The Oxford protocol was performed during four weeks. The grip strength was assessed using a dynamometer (Jamar™). The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical method. Results: In the comparison of intragroup evaluation, only the 904 nm group showed a difference compared to the baseline assessment after 4 weeks (P < 0.05), in the final intergroup evaluation, a difference was observed in the comparison between the control and 904 nm groups Conclusion: In conclusion, LLLT (904 nm) applied before resistance training was effective in gaining grip strength when compared to LLLT (660 nm) and isolated strength training after 4 weeks. PMID:29123629

  4. Low-level laser therapy for fat layer reduction: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Avci, Pinar; Nyame, Theodore T; Gupta, Gaurav K; Sadasivam, Magesh; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) is a noninvasive, nonthermal approach to disorders requiring reduction of pain and inflammation and stimulation of healing and tissue regeneration. Within the last decade, LLLT started being investigated as an adjuvant to liposuction, for noninvasive body contouring, reduction of cellulite, and improvement of blood lipid profile. LLLT may also aid autologous fat transfer procedures by enhancing the viability of adipocytes. However the underlying mechanism of actions for such effects still seems to be unclear. It is important, therefore, to understand the potential efficacy and proposed mechanism of actions of this new procedure for fat reduction. A review of the literature associated with applications of LLLT related to fat layer reduction was performed to evaluate the findings from pre-clinical and clinical studies with respect to the mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety. The studies as of today suggest that LLLT has a potential to be used in fat and cellulite reduction as well as in improvement of blood lipid profile without any significant side effects. One of the main proposed mechanism of actions is based upon production of transient pores in adipocytes, allowing lipids to leak out. Another is through activation of the complement cascade which could cause induction of adipocyte apoptosis and subsequent release of lipids. Although the present studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of LLLT in fat layer reduction, studies demonstrating the efficacy of LLLT as a stand-alone procedure are still inadequate. Moreover, further studies are necessary to identify the mechanism of action. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Fat Layer Reduction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Nyame, Theodore T.; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Sadasivam, Magesh; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) is a noninvasive, nonthermal approach to disorders requiring reduction of pain and inflammation and stimulation of healing and tissue regeneration. Within the last decade, LLLT started being investigated as an adjuvant to liposuction, for noninvasive body contouring, reduction of cellulite, and improvement of blood lipid profile. LLLT may also aid autologous fat transfer procedures by enhancing the viability of adipocytes. However the underlying mechanism of actions for such effects still seems to be unclear. It is important, therefore, to understand the potential efficacy and proposed mechanism of actions of this new procedure for fat reduction. Materials and Methods A review of the literature associated with applications of LLLT related to fat layer reduction was performed to evaluate the findings from pre-clinical and clinical studies with respect to the mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety. Results The studies as of today suggest that LLLT has a potential to be used in fat and cellulite reduction as well as in improvement of blood lipid profile without any significant side effects. One of the main proposed mechanism of actions is based upon production of transient pores in adipocytes, allowing lipids to leak out. Another is through activation of the complement cascade which could cause induction of adipocyte apoptosis and subsequent release of lipids. Conclusion Although the present studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of LLLT in fat layer reduction, studies demonstrating the efficacy of LLLT as a stand-alone procedure are still inadequate. Moreover, further studies are necessary to identify the mechanism of action. PMID:23749426

  6. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy in TMD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emir, Faruk; Sahin, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is one of the most recent treatment modalities in dentistry. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is suggested to have biostimulating and analgesic effects through direct irradiation without causing thermal response. There are few studies that have investigated the efficacy of laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD), especially in reduced mouth opening. The case report here evaluates performance of LLLT with a diode laser for temporomandibular clicking and postoperative findings were evaluated in two cases of TMD patients. First patient had a history of limited mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region since nine months. Second patient's main complaint was his restricted mouth opening, which was progressed in one year. LLLT was performed with a 685 nm red probed diode laser that has an energy density of 6.2 J/cm2, three times a week for one month, and application time was 30 seconds (685 nm, 25 mW, 30 s, 0.02 Hz, and 6.2 J/cm2) (BTL-2000, Portative Laser Therapy Device). The treatment protocol was decided according to the literature. One year later patients were evaluated and there were no changes. This application suggested that LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMD related pain and limited mouth opening and should be considered as an alternative to other methods. PMID:26587294

  7. Non-specific effects and clusters of women with painful TMD responders and non-responders to LLLT: double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Magri, Laís Valencise; Carvalho, Vinícius Almeida; Rodrigues, Flávia Cássia Cabral; Bataglion, César; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2018-02-01

    The aim was to analyze the non-specific effects (placebo, spontaneous remission, and regression to the mean) of the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in women with myofascial pain (painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD)), as well as to differentiate between responders and non-responder clusters to active and placebo LLLT according to the anxiety levels, salivary cortisol, use of oral contraceptives, and premenstrual period. Sixty-four women diagnosed with myofascial pain (Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD)) were included, divided into laser (n = 20), placebo group (n = 21), and 23 controls (without treatment (WT)). The LLLT applied was 780 nm, masseter and temporal = 5 J/cm 2 (20 mW-0.5 W/cm 2 ), and TMJ area = 7.5 J/cm 2 (30 mW-0.8 W/cm 2 ), eight sessions, twice a week. The pain intensity (visual analogue scale (VAS)), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), salivary cortisol, and menstrual cycle's data at the baseline, T1-T8, and 30 days after LLLT (follow-up) were evaluated. The laser group showed 80% of pain reduction, placebo 85%, and WT 43% in T8. Women with severe anxiety and at the premenstrual period did not reduce pain with any LLLT. Active and placebo LLLT had similar effectiveness during the treatment period; however, women with moderate anxiety, cortisol levels above 10 ng/ml, and without contraceptive use maintain analgesia longer with active LLLT than placebo (follow-up 30 days). Women with low levels of anxiety, salivary cortisol below 10 ng/ml, and with contraceptive use showed the higher pain reduction. The analgesia promoted by LLLT in women with myofascial pain is a result of non-specific effects during the treatment period, although active LLLT is more effective in maintaining the analgesia after treatment (30 days) for the cluster of women with moderate anxiety, salivary cortisol above 10 ng/ml, and without contraceptive use.

  8. Standardization of experimental parameters for LLLT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Taciana D.; Santos, Arnaldo R., Jr.; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to create and do characterization of a setup for irradiation of cultured cells with laser light in which light intensity is homogeneous and to create a method for calculating what exactly the quantity of light used in the irradiation is. The characterization was done by evaluating intensity distributions and by evaluation of irradiated in vitro cell viability with different configurations of the apparatus.

  9. Comparative clinical study of the effect of LLLT in the immediate and late treatments of hypoesthesia due to surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Castanho Garrini, Ana E.; Bologna, Elisangela D.; Takamoto, Marcia; Siqueira, Jose T.; Dias, Pedro; Campos, Roberto A. d. C.

    2002-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of LLLT in 68 patients who presented hypoesthesia due to odontological surgery procedures: dental implant surgeries (N=51); extraction of impacted lower third molars (N=10); endodontics in lower first molars (N=7). Lesions treated within 30 days after the nerve injury had occurred were part of the immediate group, and lesions with more than 30 days from the occurrence of the injury were part of the late group. Treatments were carried out with an infrared diode laser of 40 mW-830nm, continuous wave emission, spot size 3 mm2, and a total dosage of 18 joules per session in a contact mode of application, 20 sessions altogether. The efficacy of laser therapy in peripheral nerve regeneration is also related to the degree of the peripheral nerve lesion, and not only to the lesion duration. LLLT resulted in neurosensory functional improvement in both immediate and late treatments of hypoesthesia.

  10. Low-Level Light Stimulates Excisional Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Herman, Ira M.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Low levels of laser or non-coherent light, termed low-level light therapy (LLLT) have been reported to accelerate some phases of wound healing, but its clinical use remains controversial. Methods A full thickness dorsal excisional wound in mice was treated with a single exposure to light of various wavelengths and fluences 30 minutes after wounding. Wound areas were measured until complete healing and immunofluorescence staining of tissue samples was carried out. Results Wound healing was significantly stimulated in BALB/c and SKH1 hairless mice but not in C57BL/6 mice. Illuminated wounds started to contract while control wounds initially expanded for the first 24 hours. We found a biphasic dose–response curve for fluence of 635-nm light with a maximum positive effect at 2 J/cm2. Eight hundred twenty nanometer was found to be the best wavelength tested compared to 635, 670, and 720 nm. We found no difference between non-coherent 635 ± 15-nm light from a lamp and coherent 633-nm light from a He/Ne laser. LLLT increased the number of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive cells at the wound edge. Conclusion LLLT stimulates wound contraction in susceptible mouse strains but the mechanism remains uncertain. PMID:17960752

  11. The Assessments of the Intracellular Antioxidant Protection of the Organism after LLLT Irradiation

    SciT

    Freitinger-Skalicka, Zuzana; Navratil, Leos; Zolzer, Friedo

    2009-06-19

    The antioxidants are chemical compounds that can bind to free oxygen radicals preventing these radicals from damaging healthy cells. Low levels of antioxidants, or inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes causes oxidative stress and may damage or kill cells. The purpose of this project was to establish the changes at intracellular antioxidant protection of the organism after LLLT irradiation. We used female mice of the strain CD1. The mice were exposed in the abdomen region to laser light. From the blood was assessment the Glutathione peroxidase, Reduced Glutathione and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity. The results obtained in the present study demonstrated thatmore » in vivo irradiation of the mice with low level lasers did not cause any statistically significant changes in superoxide dismutase and Glutathione peroxidase but we found changes in Reduced Glutathione and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity after exposing the mice to the LLLT during the 30 minutes after irradiation, as well on the 4th day. Do not replace the word ''abstract,'' but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your ''Enter'' key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style sample before you begin working on your paper.« less

  12. A review of monochromatic light devices for the treatment of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Darwin, Evan; Arora, Harleen; Hirt, Penelope A; Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2018-02-01

    There are many laser technologies that are being tested that claim to support hair regrowth for patients with alopecia areata (AA). In this paper, we will determine whether the body of evidence supports the use of devices using monochromatic light sources to treat AA. Articles were gathered from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane database using these keywords: lasers, excimer laser, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), low-level light therapy, alopecia, alopecia areata, and hair loss with a category modifier of English. Ten clinical trials and seven case reports/abstracts were assessed. Eight clinical trials and two case reports demonstrated hair regrowth with the 308-nm excimer laser/light in men, women, and children. One case report demonstrated hair regrowth with the ALBA 355® laser. One clinical trial and two case reports demonstrated hair regrowth with LLLT. While two case reports demonstrated hair regrowth with fractional laser therapy, one clinical trial showed no improvement. The 308-nm excimer laser is a safe and effective treatment for men, women, and children with refractory AA of the scalp and beard. Larger, double-blinded clinical trials should be conducted to compare excimer laser therapy to standard treatments. More data is needed to determine the efficacy of LLLT and fractional laser therapy in the treatment of AA.

  13. A Systematic Review of Bright Light Therapy for Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Marshall T; Lundgren, Jennifer D

    2016-10-27

    Bright light therapy is a noninvasive biological intervention for disorders with nonnormative circadian features. Eating disorders, particularly those with binge-eating and night-eating features, have documented nonnormative circadian eating and mood patterns, suggesting that bright light therapy may be an efficacious stand-alone or adjunctive intervention. The purpose of this systematic literature review, using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, was (1) to evaluate the state of the empirical treatment outcome literature on bright light therapy for eating disorders and (2) to explore the timing of eating behavior, mood, and sleep-related symptom change so as to understand potential mechanisms of bright light therapy action in the context of eating disorder treatment. A comprehensive literature search using PsycInfo and PubMed/MEDLINE was conducted in April 2016 with no date restrictions to identify studies published using bright light therapy as a treatment for eating disorders. Keywords included combinations of terms describing disordered eating (eating disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating, binge, eating behavior, eating, and night eating) and the use of bright light therapy (bright light therapy, light therapy, phototherapy). After excluding duplicates, 34 articles were reviewed for inclusion. 14 published studies of bright light therapy for eating disorders met inclusion criteria (included participants with an eating disorder/disordered-eating behaviors; presented as a case study, case series, open-label clinical trial, or randomized/nonrandomized controlled trial; written in English; and published and available by the time of manuscript review). Results suggest that bright light therapy is potentially effective at improving both disordered-eating behavior and mood acutely, although the timing of symptom response and the duration of treatment effects remain unknown. Future research should

  14. Novel Therapies in Light Chain Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Milani, Paolo; Merlini, Giampaolo; Palladini, Giovanni

    2018-05-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of amyloidosis involving the kidney. It is characterized by albuminuria, progressing to overt nephrotic syndrome and eventually end-stage renal failure if diagnosed late or ineffectively treated, and in most cases by concomitant heart involvement. Cardiac amyloidosis is the main determinant of survival, whereas the risk of dialysis is predicted by baseline proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate, and by response to therapy. The backbone of treatment is chemotherapy targeting the underlying plasma cell clone, that needs to be risk-adapted due to the frailty of patients with AL amyloidosis who have cardiac and/or multiorgan involvement. Low-risk patients (∼20%) can be considered for autologous stem cell transplantation that can be preceded by induction and/or followed by consolidation with bortezomib-based regimens. Bortezomib combined with alkylators, such as melphalan, preferred in patients harboring t(11;14), or cyclophosphamide, is used in most intermediate-risk patients, and with cautious dose escalation in high-risk subjects. Novel, powerful anti-plasma cell agents, such as pomalidomide, ixazomib, and daratumumab, prove effective in the relapsed/refractory setting, and are being moved to upfront therapy in clinical trials. Novel approaches based on small molecules interfering with the amyloidogenic process and on antibodies targeting the amyloid deposits gave promising results in preliminary uncontrolled studies, are being tested in controlled trials, and will likely prove powerful complements to chemotherapy. Finally, improvements in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of organ damage are unveiling novel potential treatment targets, moving toward a cure for this dreadful disease.

  15. [Impact of low level laser therapy on skin blood flow].

    PubMed

    Podogrodzki, Jacek; Lebiedowski, Michał; Szalecki, Mieczysław; Kępa, Izabela; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the impact of low level laser therapy on skin blood flow, in terms of two of its components - the flow and trophic and therapeutic effect. Nineteen children aged 3-15 years have been included in the study (seven boys and twelve girls) with a diagnosis of meningomyelocele in the lumbosacral area. In nine of them (47.3%) bedsores were found in the area of paresis location. Studies of skin blood flow were performed using xenon 133 clearance in the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Children's Memorial Health Institute. Xenon 133 radioisotope in saline with intrinsic activity 74 MBq in 1 ml was used as the marker. Laser application was performed immediately prior to the application of the marker with a tag shower 60 mW probe, emitting 680 nm red light with surface power density of 0.5 J/cm2. Within the tested children the laser application resulted in a significantly increased skin blood flow. Average results in tested group before LLLT are 7.47 ml/100 g/min, after LLLT 11.08 ml/100 g/min. 1. LLLT significantly increases the perfusion of the skin. 2. The effect of the increased perfusion as the result of laserotherapy in the most evident in children with skin trophic abnormalities. 3. Results confirmed by clinical observation indicate, that perfusion increase in relation to LLLT takes place with participation of trophic component of skin blood circulation.

  16. Premenstrual mood and empathy after a single light therapy session.

    PubMed

    Aan Het Rot, Marije; Miloserdov, Kristina; Buijze, Anna L F; Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether acute changes in cognitive empathy might mediate the impact of light therapy on mood, we assessed the effects of a single light-therapy session on mood and cognitive empathy in 48 premenstrual women, including 17 who met Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool criteria for moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome / premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD). Using a participant-blind between-groups design, 23 women underwent 30min of morning light therapy (5,000lx; blue-enriched polychromatic light, 17,000K) while 25 women had a sham session (200lx, polychromatic light, 5,000K). We administered the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule and the Affect Grid right before and after the intervention, and 60min later upon completion of a computerized empathic accuracy task. There were no significant effects of light condition on cognitive empathy as assessed using the computer task. Nonetheless, bright light reduced negative affect, specifically in women not using hormonal contraceptives. No effects of bright light on mood were observed in women who were using contraceptives. If a single light-therapy session does not alter cognitive empathy, then cognitive empathy may not mediate the impact of light therapy on mood in premenstrual women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    SciT

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18

  18. Role of low-level laser therapy on the cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction: A systematic review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Fernando Pereira; Gradinetti, Vanessa; Manchini, Martha; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Silva, José Antonio; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Vieira, Stella; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Tucci, Paulo; Serra, Andrey Jorge

    2016-04-15

    We systematically reviewed the role of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Literatures were systematically searched in several electronic databases. We included only studies with a well-standardized coronary occlusion model in vivo LLLT application. After screening, 14 studies were eligible for review. The study heterogeneity was described in terms of rationality, gender, irradiation parameters, treatment numbers and moment of LLLT application. Three studies showed a null role of LLLT on infarct size, and only one study found positive LLLT effects on the cardiac performance. The cardioprotective role of LLLT was mediated by anti-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic and anti-oxidant actions. The reduction in infarct size is a major finding. The LLLT cardioprotection may be mediated by several molecular and cellular mechanisms. Although these results are exciting, there are many limitations that must be resolved before LLLT clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  20. Recent patents on light based therapies: photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy and photoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Barcelo, Emilio J; Mediavilla, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the more recent patents in three kinds of therapeutic strategies using the application of visible light to irradiate photosensible substances (PSs) of different natures. The light-activation of these PSs is directly responsible for the desired therapeutic effects. This group of light therapies includes photodynamic therapy (PDT), photothermal therapy (PTT) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT). Therapeutic mechanisms triggered by the activation of the PSs depend basically (though not exclusively) on the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activation of immune responses (PDT and PIT) or the local generation of heat (PTT). The main difference between PIT and PDT is that in PIT, monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are associated to PSs to improve the selective binding of the PSs to the target tissues. All these therapeutic strategies offer the possibility of destroying tumor tissue without damaging the surrounding healthy tissue, which is not achievable with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PDT is also used as an alternative or adjuvant antimicrobial therapy together with the traditional antibiotic therapy since these organisms are unlikely to develop resistance to the ROS induced by PDT. Furthermore, PDT also induces an immune response against bacterial pathogens. The current challenge in PDT, PIT and PTT is to obtain the highest level of selectivity to act on targeted sick tissues with the minimum effects on the surrounding healthy tissue. The development of new PSs with high affinity for specific tissues, new PSs- MABs conjugates to bind to specific kinds of tumors, and new light-sensible nanoparticles with low toxicity, will increase the clinical utility of these therapies.

  1. Assessment of the actual light dose in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Schaberle, Fabio A

    2018-06-09

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) initiates with the absorption of light, which depends on the spectral overlap between the light source emission and the photosensitizer absorption, resulting in the number of photons absorbed, the key parameter starting PDT processes. Most papers report light doses regardless if the light is only partially absorbed or shifted relatively to the absorption peak, misleading the actual light dose value and not allowing quantitative comparisons between photosensitizers and light sources. In this manuscript a method is presented to calculate the actual light dose delivered by any light source for a given photosensitizer. This method allows comparing light doses delivered for any combination of light source (broad or narrow band or daylight) and photosensitizer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Light-based therapies in acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Susan; Inamadar, Arun C.; Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Tsoukas, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of light and laser in the treatment of acne is increasing as these modalities are safe, effective, and associated with no or minimal complications when used appropriately. These light and laser sources are also being used in combination with pharmacological and/or physical measures to synergize their effects and optimize the therapeutic outcome. This review focuses on optical devices used in treating acne and serves to delineate the current application of various methods, including their utility and efficacy. PMID:26009707

  3. Low level laser therapy and hair regrowth: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Schachner, Lawrence A; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2016-02-01

    Despite the current treatment options for different types of alopecia, there is a need for more effective management options. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was evaluated for stimulating hair growth. Here, we reviewed the current evidence on the LLLT effects with an evidence-based approach, focusing more on randomized controlled studies by critically evaluating them. In order to investigate whether in individuals presenting with hair loss (male pattern hair loss (MPHL), female pattern hair loss (FPHL), alopecia areata (AA), and chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA)) LLLT is effective for hair regrowth, several databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database were searched using the following keywords: Alopecia, Hair loss, Hair growth, Low level laser therapy, Low level light therapy, Low energy laser irradiation, and Photobiomodulation. From the searches, 21 relevant studies were summarized in this review including 2 in vitro, 7 animal, and 12 clinical studies. Among clinical studies, only five were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which evaluated LLLT effect on male and female pattern hair loss. The RCTs were critically appraised using the created checklist according to the Critical Appraisal for Therapy Articles Worksheet created by the Center of Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford. The results demonstrated that all the performed RCTs have moderate to high quality of evidence. However, only one out of five studies performed intention-to-treat analysis, and only another study reported the method of randomization and subsequent concealment of allocation clearly; all other studies did not include this very important information in their reports. None of these studies reported the treatment effect of factors such as number needed to treat. Based on this review on all the available evidence about effect of LLLT in alopecia, we found that the FDA-cleared LLLT devices are both safe and effective in patients with MPHL and FPHL

  4. [Photodrugtherapy of psoriasis with oral psoralen and black light therapy].

    PubMed

    Corrales Padilla, H

    1975-01-01

    Oral 4, 5', 8 trimethoxypsoralen (TMP) or 8-M-methoxypsoralen (8 MP) plus black light therapy of psoriasis produced disappearing of lesions in 6 out of 8 pacients treated with TMP and in 6 out of 7 treated with 8 MP. In three patients treated with the first drug, a paired comparision demonstrated that the ingestion of it, when followed of black exposure, is more effective than the exposure to conventional ultraviolet light. Parrish et al. have shown this for oral methoxalen and long wave ultraviolet light. Combined TMP or 8-MP and black light therapy inhibits epidermal DNA synthesis and this is the scientific base of its application in the therapy of psoriasis, disease in which an accelerated celular cicle and DNA synthesis has been postulated.

  5. Effect of interstitial low level laser therapy on tibial defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Hwang, Donghyun; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Tibial defect is very common musculoskeletal disorder which makes patient painful and uncomfortable. Many studies about bone regeneration tried to figure out fast bone healing on early phase. It is already known that low level laser therapy (LLLT) is very convenient and good for beginning of bone disorder. However, light scattering and absorption obstruct musculoskeletal therapy which need optimal photon energy delivery. This study has used an interstitial laser probe (ILP) to overcome the limitations of light penetration depth and scattering. Animals (mouse, C57BL/6) were divided into three groups: laser treated test group 1 (660 nm; power 10 mW; total energy 5 J) and test group 2 (660 nm; power 20 mW; total energy 10 J); and untreated control group. All animals were taken surgical operation to make tibial defect on right crest of tibia. The test groups were treated every 48 hours with ILP. Bone volume and X-ray attenuation coefficient were measured on 0, 14th and 28th day with u-CT after treatment and were used to evaluate effect of LLLT. Results show that bone volume of test groups has been improved more than control group. X-ray attenuation coefficients of each groups have slightly different. The results suggest that LLLT combined with ILP may affect on early phase of bone regeneration and may be used in various musculoskeletal disease in deep tissue layer.

  6. Effectiveness of the use of LLLT on disorders of the maxillofacial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luiz G. P.; Carvalho, Carolina M.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2012-03-01

    Dentistry has traditionally depended on science and technology for improvement of diagnostic tools and treatment options. The impact of using light sources in clinical Dentistry has been significantly higher than in clinical Medicine and Surgery. Light sources have been used as a therapeutic agent for many centuries. The major use of light for therapeutic applications in health care sciences was noticeably initiated after the development of lasers in 1960. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of LLLT on treating disorders of the maxillofacial region. For this, the records of patients treated at the Laser Center of the School of Dentistry of the Federal University of Bahia were revised. We analyzed 867 treatment cycles in 572 patients. The mean age of the patients was 53.5 years old, most were females. Majority of them complained of some pain. G50.0 and K07.6 were the most frequent diagnostics. The mean energy density per session was 18.36 +/- 14.6 J/cm2 and mean treatment one 176.4 +/- 132.4 J/cm2. IR laser was the most frequently used wavelength. Most patients were asymptomatic or improved at discharge. Improved or asymptomatic patients had a mean age of 50.9 years old. For these, the mean number of sessions was 13, the total mean session energy density was 16.6 J/cm2 and mean total energy density treatment was 169.5 J/cm2. For symptomatic patients, the mean age was 56.4 years old. The mean number of sessions was 10. The mean energy density per session on these patients was 20.6 J/cm2 and mean total treatment energy density was 210.9 J/cm2. 55.34% of the patients were asymptomatic or improved at discharge. For these, the mean number of sessions was 13, the total mean session energy density was 16.6 J/cm2 and mean total energy density treatment was 169.5 J/cm2. For symptomatic patients, the mean age was 56.4 years old. The mean number of sessions was 10. The mean energy density per session on these patients was 20.6 J/cm2 and mean total treatment

  7. Transcranial low-level laser therapy enhances learning, memory, and neuroprogenitor cells after traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weijun; Vatansever, Fatma; Huang, Liyi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    The use of transcranial low-level laser (light) therapy (tLLLT) to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is attracting increasing attention. We previously showed that LLLT using an 810-nm laser 4 h after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-TBI in mice could significantly improve the neurological severity score, decrease lesion volume, and reduce Fluoro-Jade staining for degenerating neurons. We obtained some evidence for neurogenesis in the region of the lesion. We now tested the hypothesis that tLLLT can improve performance on the Morris water maze (MWM, learning, and memory) and increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) after CCI-TBI in mice. One and (to a greater extent) three daily laser treatments commencing 4-h post-TBI improved neurological performance as measured by wire grip and motion test especially at 3 and 4 weeks post-TBI. Improvements in visible and hidden platform latency and probe tests in MWM were seen at 4 weeks. Caspase-3 expression was lower in the lesion region at 4 days post-TBI. Double-stained BrdU-NeuN (neuroprogenitor cells) was increased in the dentate gyrus and SVZ. Increases in double-cortin (DCX) and TUJ-1 were also seen. Our study results suggest that tLLLT may improve TBI both by reducing cell death in the lesion and by stimulating neurogenesis.

  8. Effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Reducing Orthodontic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deana, Naira Figueiredo; Zaror, Carlos; Sandoval, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing orthodontic pain after the application of orthodontic force (OF). Methods A systematic search was conducted in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost databases. The study included randomized clinical trials (RCT) which analysed the effectiveness of LLLT in reducing orthodontic pain assessed at 24 and 72 hrs after the application of OF. The risk of bias of the eligible trials was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. Standard mean difference was calculated and pooled by meta-analysis using random effect models. Results Of 467 identified articles, 20 RCT were finally included. In the risk of bias assessments, 13 studies presented a high risk, 5 an unclear risk, and 2 a low risk. The meta-analysis showed that in patients treated with laser versus placebo there was a difference in favour of LLLT in spontaneous pain 24 and 72 hrs after the installation of light archwires and spontaneous pain and chewing pain 24 and 72 hrs after the installation of elastomeric separators. Conclusions LLLT proved to be effective in promoting a reduction in spontaneous and chewing pain after the application of OF; however, the poor quality of the evidence requires these results to be treated with caution. PMID:29089818

  9. Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder: Acute Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Kelly J; Mahon, Jennifer N; Evans, Maggie; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Meyerhoff, Jonah; Postolache, Teodor T; Vacek, Pamela M

    2015-09-01

    Whereas considerable evidence supports light therapy for winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD), data on cognitive-behavioral therapy for SAD (CBT-SAD) are promising but preliminary. This study estimated the difference between CBT-SAD and light therapy outcomes in a large, more definitive test. The participants were 177 adults with a current episode of major depression that was recurrent with a seasonal pattern. The randomized clinical trial compared 6 weeks of CBT-SAD (N=88) and light therapy (N=89). Light therapy consisted of 10,000-lux cool-white florescent light, initiated at 30 minutes each morning and adjusted according to a treatment algorithm based on response and side effects. CBT-SAD comprised 12 sessions of the authors' SAD-tailored protocol in a group format and was administered by Ph.D. psychologists in two 90-minute sessions per week. Outcomes were continuous scores on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-SAD Version (SIGH-SAD, administered weekly) and Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II, administered before treatment, at week 3, and after treatment) and posttreatment remission status based on cut points. Depression severity measured with the SIGH-SAD and BDI-II improved significantly and comparably with CBT-SAD and light therapy. Having a baseline comorbid diagnosis was associated with higher depression scores across all time points in both treatments. CBT-SAD and light therapy did not differ in remission rates based on the SIGH-SAD (47.6% and 47.2%, respectively) or the BDI-II (56.0% and 63.6%). CBT-SAD and light therapy are comparably effective for SAD during an acute episode, and both may be considered as treatment options.

  10. Red and infrared light distribution in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2013-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is used in several applications, including the reduction of inflammatory processes. It might be used to prevent the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which some patients develop after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. The objectives of this study were to investigate light distribution inside blood, in order to implement the LLLT during CPB, and, through this study, to determine the best wavelength and the best way to perform the treatment. The blood, diluted to the same conditions of CPB procedure was contained inside a cuvette and an optical fiber was used to collect the scattered light. Two wavelengths were used: 632.8 nm and 820 nm. Light distribution in blood inside CPB tubes was also evaluated. Compared to the 820 nm light, the 632.8 nm light is scattered further away from the laser beam, turning it possible that a bigger volume of blood be treated. The blood should be illuminated through the smallest diameter CPB tube, using at least four distinct points around it, in only one cross section, because the blood is kept passing through the tube all the time and the whole volume will be illuminated.

  11. Effects of LLLT for pain: a clinical study on different pain types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Giuseppe

    2002-10-01

    Objective: The aim of this clinical study is to determine the efficacy of the JR diode laser 904 nm pulsed on pain reduction therapy. Summary Background Data: With respect to pain, the existence of a filter (Rolando's substantia gelatinosa) in the spinal marrow is fundamental. Opening or closing, this filter is able to block transmission of pain impulses to a higher cerebral center. This is in proportion with the A big fibres and C small fibres. The action of the laser influences this mechanism. Additionally, laser interferes in the cytochines (TNf-α , interleukin-1 and interleukin-6) that drive inflammation in the arthritis and are secreted from CD4 e T cells. Low power density laser increases the endorphin synthesis in the dorsal posterior horn of the spinal cord. Besides, laser causes local vasodilatation of the capillaries and an improved circulation of drainage liquids in interstitial space causing an analgesic effect. Methods: Treatment was carried out on 482 cases and 464 patients (274 women and 190 men) in the period between 1987 and 2000. The patients, whose age ranged from 25 to 70, with a mean age of 45 years, were suffering from rheumatic, degenerative and traumatic pathologies as well as cutaneous ulcers. The majority of the patients had been seen by orthopaedists and rheumatologists and had undergone x-ray, ultrasound scanning, TAC, RM examination. All patients had previously received drug-based treatment and/or physiotherapy with poor results. Two thirds were experiencing acute symptomatic pain, while the others presented a chronic pathology with recurrent crises. We used a pulsed JR diode laser, GaAs 904 nm wavelength. Results: Jn the evaluation of the results the following parameters have been considered: disappearance of spontaneous and induced pain, anatomic and functional evaluation of the joints, muscular growth, verbal rating scales, hand dinamometer, patient's pain diary. Very good results were achieved especially with cases of symptomatic

  12. Capsule Design for Blue Light Therapy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhangyong; Ren, Binbin; Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Shengrong; Wang, Wei; Pang, Yu; Lin, Jinzhao; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A photo-medical capsule that emits blue light for Helicobacter pylori treatment was described in this paper. The system consists of modules for pH sensing and measuring, light-emitting diode driver circuit, radio communication and microcontroller, and power management. The system can differentiate locations by monitoring the pH values of the gastrointestinal tract, and turn on and off the blue light according to the preset range of pH values. Our experimental tests show that the capsule can operate in the effective light therapy mode for more than 32 minutes and the wireless communication module can reliably transmit the measured pH value to a receiver located outside the body.

  13. Low Reactive Level Laser Therapy for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Ishihara, Miya

    2015-01-01

    Low reactive level laser therapy (LLLT) is mainly focused on the activation of intracellular or extracellular chromophore and the initiation of cellular signaling by using low power lasers. Over the past forty years, it was realized that the laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain and inflammation. In recent years, the term LLLT has become widely recognized in the field of regenerative medicine. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms of action of LLLT at a cellular level and introduce the application to mesenchymal stem cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) therapies. Finally, our recent research results that LLLT enhanced the MSCs differentiation to osteoblast will also be described. PMID:26273309

  14. Advance in Photosensitizers and Light Delivery for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Il; Li, Jia Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The brief history of photodynamic therapy (PDT) research has been focused on photosensitizers (PSs) and light delivery was introduced recently. The appropriate PSs were developed from the first generation PS Photofrin (QLT) to the second (chlorins or bacteriochlorins derivatives) and third (conjugated PSs on carrier) generations PSs to overcome undesired disadvantages, and to increase selective tumor accumulation and excellent targeting. For the synthesis of new chlorin PSs chlorophyll a is isolated from natural plants or algae, and converted to methyl pheophorbide a (MPa) as an important starting material for further synthesis. MPa has various active functional groups easily modified for the preparation of different kinds of PSs, such as methyl pyropheophorbide a, purpurin-18, purpurinimide, and chlorin e6 derivatives. Combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and photothermal therapy with PDT, is shortly described here. Advanced light delivery system is shown to establish successful clinical applications of PDT. Phtodynamic efficiency of the PSs with light delivery was investigated in vitro and/or in vivo. PMID:23423543

  15. Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Taciana D.; dos Santos, Nathalia Villa; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Cerchiaro, Giselle; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2012-10-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000 mJ/cm2. The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5 mJ/cm2, MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1 J/cm2 laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8 mJ/cm2, the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

  16. Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Taciana D; dos Santos, Nathalia Villa; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Cerchiaro, Giselle; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2012-10-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000  mJ/cm². The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5  mJ/cm², MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1  J/cm² laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8  mJ/cm², the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

  17. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  18. New design of textile light diffusers for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Cédric; Mordon, Serge R; Lesage, Jean Claude; Koncar, Vladan

    2013-04-01

    A homogeneous and reproducible fluence delivery rate during clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) plays a determinant role in preventing under- or overtreatment. PDT applied in dermatology has been carried out with a wide variety of light sources delivering a broad range of more or less adapted light doses. Due to the complexities of the human anatomy, these light sources do not in fact deliver a uniform light distribution to the skin. Therefore, the development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of plastic optical fiber (POF) into textile structures could offer an interesting alternative. In this article, a textile light diffuser (TLD) has been developed using POF and Polyester yarns. Predetermined POF macrobending leads to side emission of light when the critical angle is exceeded. Therefore, a specific pattern based on different satin weaves has been developed in order to improve light emission homogeneity and to correct the decrease of side emitted radiation intensity along POF. The prototyped fabrics (approximately 100 cm(2): 5×20 cm) were woven using a hand loom, then both ends of the POF were coupled to a laser diode (5 W, 635 nm). The fluence rate (mW/ cm(2)) and the homogeneity of light delivery by the TLD were evaluated. Temperature evolution, as a function of time, was controlled with an infrared thermographic camera. When using a power source of 5 W, the fluence rate of the TLD was 18±2.5 mw/cm(2). Due to the high efficiency of the TLD, the optical losses were very low. The TLD temperature elevation was 0.6 °C after 10 min of illumination. Our TLD meets the basic requirements for PDT: homogeneous light distribution and flexibility. It also proves that large (500 cm(2)) textile light diffusers adapted to skin, but also to peritoneal or pleural cavity, PDTs can be easily produced by textile manufacturing processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Improvement of Performance and Reduction of Fatigue With Low-Level Laser Therapy in Competitive Cyclists.

    PubMed

    Lanferdini, Fábio J; Bini, Rodrigo R; Baroni, Bruno M; Klein, Kelli D; Carpes, Felipe P; Vaz, Marco A

    2018-01-01

    Evidence indicates that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) minimizes fatigue effects on muscle performance. However, the ideal LLLT dosage to improve athletes'performance during sports activities such as cycling is still unclear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the effects of different LLLT dosages on cyclists'performance in time-to-exhaustion tests. In addition, the effects of LLLT on the frequency content of the EMG signals to assess fatigue mechanisms were examined. Twenty male competitive cyclists participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. They performed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion (on day 1) followed by 4 time-to-exhaustion tests (on days 2-5) at their individual maximal power output. Before each time-to-exhaustion test, different dosages of LLLT (135, 270, and 405 J/thigh, respectively) or placebo were applied at the quadriceps muscle bilaterally. Power output and muscle activation from both lower limbs were recorded throughout the tests. Increased performance in time-to-exhaustion tests was observed with the LLLT-135 J (∼22 s; P < .01), LLLT-270 J (∼13 s; P = .03), and LLLT-405 J (∼13 s; P = .02) compared to placebo (149 ± 23 s). Although LLLT-270 J and LLLT-405 J did not show significant differences in muscle activation compared with placebo, LLLT-135 J led to an increased high-frequency content compared with placebo in both limbs at the end of the exhaustion test (P ≤ .03). In conclusion, LLLT increased time to exhaustion in competitive cyclists, suggesting this intervention as a possible nonpharmacological ergogenic agent in cycling. Among the different dosages, LLLT-135 J seems to promote the best effects.

  20. Light based anti-infectives: ultraviolet C irradiation, photodynamic therapy, blue light, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui; Dai, Tianhong; Avci, Pinar; Jorge, Ana Elisa Serafim; de Melo, Wanessa CMA; Vecchio, Daniela; Huang, Ying-Ying; Gupta, Asheesh; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance, researchers are investigating alternative anti-infective strategies to which it is supposed microorganisms will be unable to develop resistance. Prominent among these strategies, is a group of approaches which rely on light to deliver the killing blow. As is well known, ultraviolet light, particularly UVC (200–280nm), is germicidal, but it has not been much developed as an anti-infective approach until recently, when it was realized that the possible adverse effects to host tissue were relatively minor compared to its high activity in killing pathogens. Photodynamic therapy is the combination of non-toxic photosensitizing dyes with harmless visible light that together produce abundant destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS). Certain cationic dyes or photosensitizers have good specificity for binding to microbial cells while sparing host mammalian cells and can be used for treating many localized infections, both superficial and even deep-seated by using fiber optic delivered light. Many microbial cells are highly sensitive to killing by blue light (400–470 nm) due to accumulation of naturally occurring photosensitizers such as porphyrins and flavins. Near infrared light has also been shown to have antimicrobial effects against certain species. Clinical applications of these technologies include skin, dental, wound, stomach, nasal, toenail and other infections which are amenable to effective light delivery. PMID:24060701

  1. ENLIGHT: European network for Light ion hadron therapy.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Amaldi, Ugo; Mayer, Ramona; Poetter, Richard

    2018-04-03

    The European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy (ENLIGHT) was established in 2002 following various European particle therapy network initiatives during the 1980s and 1990s (e.g. EORTC task group, EULIMA/PIMMS accelerator design). ENLIGHT started its work on major topics related to hadron therapy (HT), such as patient selection, clinical trials, technology, radiobiology, imaging and health economics. It was initiated through CERN and ESTRO and dealt with various disciplines such as (medical) physics and engineering, radiation biology and radiation oncology. ENLIGHT was funded until 2005 through the EC FP5 programme. A regular annual meeting structure was started in 2002 and continues until today bringing together the various disciplines and projects and institutions in the field of HT at different European places for regular exchange of information on best practices and research and development. Starting in 2006 ENLIGHT coordination was continued through CERN in collaboration with ESTRO and other partners involved in HT. Major projects within the EC FP7 programme (2008-2014) were launched for R&D and transnational access (ULICE, ENVISION) and education and training networks (Marie Curie ITNs: PARTNER, ENTERVISION). These projects were instrumental for the strengthening of the field of hadron therapy. With the start of 4 European carbon ion and proton centres and the upcoming numerous European proton therapy centres, the future scope of ENLIGHT will focus on strengthening current and developing European particle therapy research, multidisciplinary education and training and general R&D in technology and biology with annual meetings and a continuously strong CERN support. Collaboration with the European Particle Therapy Network (EPTN) and other similar networks will be pursued. Copyright © 2018 CERN. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of light dosimetry for photodynamic therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Phan, Mary N.; Overholt, Bergein F.; Haydek, John M.

    2004-06-01

    Background and Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may be used for ablation of high grade dysplasia and/or early cancer (HGD/T1) in Barrett's esophagus. A complication of PDT is esophageal stricture. The objective of this study was to find the lowest light dose to potentially reduce the incidence of strictures while effectively ablating HGD/T1. Materials and Methods: Patients (n=113) with HGD/T1 received an intravenous injection of porfimer sodium (2 mg/kg). Three days later, laser light (630 nm) was delivered using a cylindrical diffuser inserted in a 20 mm.diameter PDT balloon. Patients were treated at light doses of 115 J/cm, 105 J/cm, 95 J/cm and 85 J/cm. The efficacy was determined by four quadrant biopsies of the treated area three months after PDT. The formation of stricture was determined by the incidence of dysphagia and the need for esophageal dilation. Strictures were considered mild if they required less than 6 dilations, and severe if 6 or more dilations were required. Efficacy and incidence of strictures were tabulated as a function of light dose. Results: Using 115 J/cm, there were 17% of patients with residual HGD/T1 after one treatment. However, when the light doses of 105 J/cm, 95 J/cm and 85 J/cm were used, the residual HGD/T1 after one PDT session was increased to 33%, 30%, and 32% respectively. The overall incidence of strictures (mild and severe) was not correlated to the light dose. However, the incidence of severe strictures was directly proportional to the light dose. Using the light dose of 115 J/cm, 15.3% of patients developed severe strictures compared to about 5% in the groups of patients who received the lower light doses. Conclusions: Decreasing the light dose below 115 J/cm doubled the rate of residual HGD/T1 after one treatment while reducing the incidence of severe strictures to one-third of cases from 115 J/cm. The results may be used to evaluate the risks and benefits of different light doses.

  3. Influence of low-level laser therapy on the healing process of autogenous bone block grafts in the jaws of systemically nicotine-modified rats: A histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Juliano Milanezi; de Moraes, Ricardo Oliveira; Gusman, David Jonathan Rodrigues; Faleiros, Paula Lazilha; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Theodoro, Letícia Helena; Bosco, Alvaro Francisco

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the bone healing process of autogenous bone block grafts installed in nicotine systemically modified rats. Seventy-two rats (Wistar) were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n=18). SS-BG: saline application+bone graft. SS-BG/LLLT: saline application+bone graft+LLLT. NIC-BG: nicotine application+bone graft. NIC-BG/LLLT: nicotine application+bone graft+LLLT. After 30days of application of solutions, all animals received autogenous bone block graft in the jaw, with the donation from the parietal bone's calvarial area. Treatment with LLLT was in bed-graft interface, after accommodation of the graft. The animals in each group were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 28days after graft surgery. The histologic analyses of NIC-BG group depicted a delay of osteogenic activity in the recipient bed-graft interface and the irradiation of tissue with LLLT provided better bone healing. The histometric analysis revealed that SS-BG/LLLT and NIC-BG/LLLT groups showed increased bone formation compared to BG-SS and NIC-BG groups, after 14days (SS-BG 24.94%±13.06% versus SS-BG/LLLT 27.53%±19.07% and NIC-BG 14.27%±2.22% versus NIC-BG/LLLT 24.37%±11.93%) and 28days (SS-BG 50.31%±2.69% versus SS-BG/LLLT 58 19%±12.32% and NIC-BG 36.89%±8.40% versus NIC-BG/LLLT 45.81%±6.03%). Nicotine harms bone formation in the bed-graft interface and LLLT action can mitigate this. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and light-emitting diodes (LEDT) applied during combined training on performance and post-exercise recovery: protocol for a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Machado, Aryane Flauzino; Micheletti, Jéssica Kirsch; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Nakamura, Fabio Yuzo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Netto Junior, Jayme; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    Previous studies have shown positive results of phototherapy for improving performance and accelerating recovery; however, the effects of phototherapy during training and after a primary adaptation remain unclear. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to analyze the effects of phototherapy and combined training on clinical, functional, and psychological outcomes and on vascular endothelial growth factor. This randomized placebo-controlled trial by stratified sample will involve 45 healthy male participants. In phase 1, the participants will undergo six weeks of combined training (sprints and squats). In phase 2, participants will be allocated through stratified randomization (based on adaptation capacity) into three groups: active phototherapy group (AG), placebo group (PG), and non-treatment control group (CG). A new six-week training program will then start and the participants will receive the recovery strategy between sprints and squats. The primary outcome will be maximal isometric contraction. The secondary outcomes include strength and power testing, maximal incremental test, squat jump, sprint test, muscle soreness, pain threshold, perceptions of exertion and recovery, psychological questionnaire, and vascular endothelial growth factor. This will be the first trial to include phototherapy during training. We believe that this strategy will combine the ergogenic and prophylactic effects in the same session. Furthermore, an application protocol performed after primary adaptation may reflect the real effect of the technique. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Luminous fabric devices for wearable low-level light therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Chui, Chunghin; Tao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a flexible luminous fabric device was developed and investigated for wearable three-dimensionally fitted low-level light therapy. The fabric device exhibited excellent optical and thermal properties. Its optical power density and operating temperature were stable during usage for 10 hours. In vitro experiments demonstrated a significant increase in collagen production in human fibroblast irradiated by the fabric device, compared with the fibroblast without light irradiation. A series of tests were conducted for the safety of the fabric for human skin contact according to ISO standard ISO 10993-1:2003. The results showed that there was no potential hazard when the luminous fabrics were in direct contact with human skin. PMID:24409391

  6. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  7. Effects of polarization in low-level laser therapy of spinal cord injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a promising approach to treat the spinal cord injury (SCI). Since nerve fibers have optical anisotropy, propagation of light in the spinal tissue might be affected by its polarization direction. However, the effect of polarization on the efficacy of LLLT has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared LLLT for SCI. Rat spinal cord was injured with a weight-drop device. The lesion site was irradiated with an 808-nm diode laser beam that was transmitted through a polarizing filter immediately after injury and daily for five consecutive days. The laser power at the injured spinal cord surface was 25 mW, and the dosage per day was 9.6 J/cm2 (spot diameter, 2 cm; irradiation duration, 1200 s). Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. The results showed that the functional scores of the SCI rats that were treated with 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of the SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury, regardless of the polarization direction. Importantly, as compared to the locomotive function of the SCI rats that were treated with the perpendicularly-polarized laser parallel to the spinal column (Group 2), that of the SCI rats that were irradiated with the linearly aligned polarization (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury. In addition, the ATP contents in the injured spinal tissue of Group 3, which were measured immediately after laser irradiation, were moderately higher than those of Group 2. These observations are attributable to the deeper penetration of the parallelpolarized light in the anisotropic spinal tissue, suggesting that polarization direction significantly affects the efficacy of LLLT for SCI.

  8. Low-level laser therapy to treat fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ruaro, J A; Fréz, A R; Ruaro, M B; Nicolau, R A

    2014-11-01

    Several clinical treatments have been proposed to manage symptoms of fibromyalgia. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may be a useful tool to treat this dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in patients with fibromyalgia. A placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was carried out with 20 patients divided randomly into either an LLLT group (n = 10) or a placebo group (n = 10). The LLLT group was treated with a GaAlAs laser (670 nm, 4 J/cm(2) on 18 tender points) three times a week over 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire, and visual analog scale (VAS). Data from the FIQ and McGill questionnaire for the treated and control groups were analyzed by paired t tests, and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze data from the VAS. After LLLT or sham treatment, the number of tender points was significantly reduced in both groups (LLLT, p < 0.0001; placebo, p = 0.0001). However, all other fibromyalgia symptoms showed significant improvements after LLLT compared to placebo (FIQ, p = 0.0003; McGill, p = 0.0078; and VAS, p = 0.0020). LLLT provided relief from fibromyalgia symptoms in patients and should be further investigated as a therapeutic tool for management in fibromyalgia.

  9. [Negotiating light therapy. Kellogg versus Finsen, and the controversy about the health effects of light rays around 1900].

    PubMed

    Ingold, Niklaus

    2015-07-01

    Western medicine has produced different rationales for the application of light rays to cure diseases in the 201h century. Since the 1980s, physicians have used bright light for treating mental disorders. In the interwar period, however, physicians regarded ultraviolet rays rather than bright light as medically relevant. This view goes back to the 1890s, when the physician (and later Nobel Price laureate) Niels R. Finsen started treating skin tuberculosis with light rays. However, Finsen was not the only physician who utilized the new electric light to develop effective therapies. Famous American inventor of the breakfast cereal and eugenicists, John Harvey Kellogg used incandescent lamps to heat a sweatbox. Consequently, two different therapeutic schools emerged from these therapeutic experiments. This article shows how these two schools negotiated the use of light therapy and how a specific idea of medically interesting light rays emerged thereby.

  10. Only lasers can be used for low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, Sergey Vladimirovich

    2017-12-01

    The question of lasers' exclusivity, as well as the degree of influence of special properties of low-intensity laser illumination (LILI), such as coherence, polarity and monochromaticity, on the effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) continues to cause arguments. The study analyzes publications from 1973 to 2016, in which laser and conventional light sources are compared, and the following conclusions are drawn. First, there are a lot of publications with incorrect comparison or unfounded statements. Secondly, other sources of light are often meant by LILI without any justification. Thirdly, all studies, in which the comparison is carried out correctly and close parameters of the impact and the model are used, have a firm conclusion that laser light is much more effective. Fourthly, it is uniquely identified that the most important parameter that determines the efficiency of lasers is monochromaticity, i.e., a much narrower spectral width than for all other light sources. Only laser light sources can be used for LLLT! © Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access by China Medical University.

  11. Only lasers can be used for low level laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moskvin, Sergey Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    The question of lasers' exclusivity, as well as the degree of influence of special properties of low-intensity laser illumination (LILI), such as coherence, polarity and monochromaticity, on the effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) continues to cause arguments. The study analyzes publications from 1973 to 2016, in which laser and conventional light sources are compared, and the following conclusions are drawn. First, there are a lot of publications with incorrect comparison or unfounded statements. Secondly, other sources of light are often meant by LILI without any justification. Thirdly, all studies, in which the comparison is carried out correctly and close parameters of the impact and the model are used, have a firm conclusion that laser light is much more effective. Fourthly, it is uniquely identified that the most important parameter that determines the efficiency of lasers is monochromaticity, i.e., a much narrower spectral width than for all other light sources. Only laser light sources can be used for LLLT! PMID:29130447

  12. Short-term effects of extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field and pulsed low-level laser therapy on rabbit model of corneal alkali burn.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Tabeie, Faraj; Sahebjam, Farzin; Poursani, Nima; Jahanbakhsh, Nazanin; Paymanpour, Pouya; AfsarAski, Sasha

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of combining extremely low frequency-pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on alkali-burned rabbit corneas. Fifty alkali-burned corneas of 50 rabbits were categorized into five groups: ELF-PEMF therapy with 2 mT intensity (ELF 2) for 2 h daily; LLLT for 30 min twice daily; combined ELF-PEMF and LLLT (ELF + LLLT); medical therapy (MT); and control (i.e., no treatment). Clinical examination and digital photography of the corneas were performed on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. After euthanizing the rabbits, the affected eyes were evaluated by histopathology. The clinical and histopathologic results were compared between the groups. On days 7 and 14, no significant difference in the corneal defect area was evident between the ELF, LLLT, ELF + LLLT, and MT groups. Excluding the controls, none of the study groups demonstrated a significant corneal neovascularization in both routine histopathology and immunohistochemistry for CD31. Keratocyte loss was significantly higher in the MT group than in the ELF, LLLT, and ELF + LLLT groups. Moderate to severe stromal inflammation in the LLLT group was comparable with that in the MT group and was significantly lower than that in the other groups. In conclusion, combining LLLT and ELF was not superior to ELF alone or LLLT alone in healing corneal alkali burns. However, given the lower intensity of corneal inflammation and the lower rate of keratocytes loss with LLLT, this treatment may be superior to other proposed treatment modalities for healing alkali-burned corneas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Bright light therapy in pregnant women depression--3 case studies].

    PubMed

    Krzystanek, Marek; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena

    2006-01-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is a new method of biological treatment in psychiatry. Good tolerance makes it an attractive method used not only in seasonal affective disorder. An episode of depression during pregnancy may be a new indication. The study aimed to describe effects of treatment of depression in 3 pregnant women. The women were out-patients in their 6-th, 7-th and 8-th months of pregnancy and diagnosed with depression according to ICD-10 criteria. The treatment was a morning exposure to 1 hour 5 000 LUX bright light from Monday to Friday. The antidepressant effect was assessed after the 2nd and 4th week of BLT. Side effects of BLT were monitored over the whole BLT treatment period. The mean improvement of depressive symptoms after 2 and 4 weeks of BLT was 33% and 55%, respectively. Side effects were not observed in any of the patients. Morning BLT seems to be an effective and a very well tolerated mode of treatment of pregnant women suffering from non-seasonal depression. The manner and length of BLT maintenance treatment requires further studies.

  14. Light therapy as treatment of dyschronosis in brain impaired children.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, C; McCann, C C; Quera-Salva, M; Cetel, M

    1993-09-01

    Fourteen children aged 9 months-4 years with moderate to severe mental retardation and varying neurologic lesions were referred for severe and continuous nocturnal sleep disturbances and very abnormal day/night schedules. All children had previously been given hypnotic medications and behavioral treatments which had little or no effect on nocturnal sleep. The severity of the sleep disturbances significantly affected family life and was a major handicap to the children. All children were treated with light therapy (minimum 4000 lux). Five children responded to treatment and had normal sleep-wake cycles at the most recent post-treatment evaluation (2-5 years after the first treatment). Two of the patients' families were unable to follow the prescribed regimen. Treatment failed in 7 children. One of these seven children spontaneously improved 3 years later. In three of the failure children the neurologic problem progressively worsened, leading to death in one of them. Phototherapy is a treatment worth pursuing in children with very significant sleep/wake disruption which is unresponsive to behavioral or other treatments. It has few side-effects and may lead to normalization of the sleep-wake cycle. Recent improvement in the technology used to monitor the 24-h temperature rhythm over several days and the present commercial availability of "light boxes" should render these therapeutic trials easier than at the time of these initial investigations.

  15. Precise optical dosimetry in low-level laser therapy of soft tissues in oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Sabotinov, O.

    2004-06-01

    The new low level laser therapy (LLLT) is widely applied for treatment of diseases of the oral mucosa and parodont. Depending on indication, different optical tips and light-guides are used to create beams with a required shape. However, to the best of our knowledge, the developed irradiation geometries are usually proposed assuming validity of Bouger-Lambert law. This hardly corresponds to the real situation because of the dominating multiple scattering within 600-1200 nm range that destroys correlation between the emitted laser beam and the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose inside the tissue. The aim of this work is to base the dosimetry of the LLLT procedures of periodontal tissues on radiation transfer theory using a flexible Monte-Carlo code. We studied quantitatively the influence of tissue optical parameters (absorption and scattering coefficients, tissue refraction index, anisotropy factor) on decreasing of correlation between the emitted beam and the energy deposition for converging or diverging beams. We evaluated energy deposition for the developed by us LLLT system in a 3-D model of periodontal tissues created using a cross-sectional image of this region with internal structural information on the gingival and the tooth. The laser source is a CW diode laser emitting elliptical beam within 650-675 nm at output power 5-30 mW. To determine the geometry of the irradiating beam we used CCD camera Spiricon LBA 300.

  16. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy, 660 nm, in Experimental Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Formentão; Silva, Lígia Inez; Meireles, Anamaria; Rosa, Camila Thieimi; Gioppo, Nereida Mello da Rosa; Jorge, Alex Sandro; Kunz, Regina Inês; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the presence of an infectious process has not been well elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in an experimental model of septic arthritis. Methods. Twenty-one Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group, no bacteria; placebo group, bacteria were inoculated; Treated group, bacteria were injected and treatment with LLLTwas performed. To assess nociception, a von Frey digital analgesimeter was applied. Synovial fluid was streaked to analyze bacterial growth. The standard strain of S. aureus was inoculated in the right knee. LLLT was performed with 660 nm, 2 J/cm2, over 10 days. After treatment, the knees were fixed and processed for morphological analysis by light microscopy. Results. It was found that nociception increases in the right knee. There was a lack of results for the seeding of the synovial fluid. The morphological analysis showed slight recovery areas in the articular cartilage and synovia; however, there was the maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion. The parameters used were not effective in the nociception reduction, even with the slight tissue recovery due to the maintenance of inflammatory infiltrate, but produced no change in the natural history of resolution of the infectious process. PMID:23997964

  17. Evaluation of the effects of pulsed wave LLLT on tibial diaphysis in two rat models of experimental osteoporosis, as examined by stereological and real-time PCR gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Mohsenifar, Zhaleh; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-amin; Abbaszadeh, Hojjatallah; Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Fallahnezhad, Somaye; Asghari, Mohammadali; Bayat, Saba; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) and osteoporotic fracture are major public health issues for society; the burden for the affected individual is also high. Previous studies have shown that pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) has osteogenic effects. This study intended to evaluate the impacts of PW LLLT on the cortical bone of osteoporotic rats' tibias in two experimental models, ovariectomized and dexamethasone-treated. We divided the rats into four ovariectomized induced OP (OVX-d) and four dexamethasone-treated (glucocorticoid-induced OP, GIOP) groups. A healthy (H) group of rats was considered for baseline evaluations. At 14 weeks following ovariectomy, we subdivided the OVX-d rats into the following groups: (i) control which had OP, (ii) OVX-d rats treated with alendronate (1 mg/kg), (iii) OVX-d rats treated with LLLT, and (iv) OVX-d rats treated with alendronate and PW LLLT. The remaining rats received dexamethasone over a 5-week period and were also subdivided into four groups: (i) control rats treated with intramuscular (i.m.) injections of distilled water (vehicle), (ii) rats treated with subcutaneous alendronate injections (1 mg/kg), (iii) laser-treated rats, and (iv) rats simultaneously treated with laser and alendronate. The rats received alendronate for 30 days and underwent PW LLLT (890 nm, 80 Hz, 0.972 J/cm(2)) three times per week during 8 weeks. Then, the right tibias were extracted and underwent a stereological analysis of histological parameters and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A significant increase in cortical bone volume (mm(3)) existed in all study groups compared to the healthy rats. There were significant decreases in trabecular bone volume (mm(3)) in all study groups compared to the group of healthy rats. The control rats with OP and rats from the vehicle group showed significantly increased osteoclast numbers compared to most other groups. Alendronate significantly decreased osteoclast numbers in osteoporotic rats. Concurrent

  18. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on M1-Related Cytokine Expression in Monocytes via Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Liao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of LLLT on human monocyte polarization into M1 macrophages are unknown. To evaluate the effects of LLLT on M1-related cytokine and chemokine production and elucidate the mechanism, the human monocyte cell line THP-1 was treated with different doses of LLLT. The expression of M1-related cytokines and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10, and TNF-α) was determined by ELISA and real-time PCR. LLLT-associated histone modifications were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Mitochondrial involvement in the LLLT-induced M1-related cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell surface markers for monocyte polarization. The results showed that LLLT (660 nm) significantly enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression in mRNA and protein levels. Mitochondrial copy number and mRNA levels of complex I-V protein were increased by LLLT (1 J/cm2). Activation of M1 polarization was concomitant with histone modification at TNF-α gene locus and IP-10 gene promoter area. This study indicates that LLLT (660 nm) enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression via mitochondrial biogenesis and histone modification, which may be a potent immune-enhancing agent for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:24692853

  19. Low-level laser therapy improves visual acuity in adolescent and adult patients with amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Ivandic, Boris T; Ivandic, Tomislav

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on visual acuity in adolescent and adult patients with amblyopia. Currently, amblyopia can be treated successfully only in children. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 178 patients (mean age 46.8 years) with amblyopia caused by ametropia (110 eyes) or strabismus (121 eyes) were included. For LLLT, the area of the macula was irradiated through the conjunctiva from 1 cm distance for 30 sec with laser light (780 nm, 292 Hz, 1:1 duty cycle; average power 7.5 mW; spot area 3 mm(2)). The treatment was repeated on average 3.5 times, resulting in a mean total dose of 0.77 J/cm(2). No occlusion was applied, and no additional medication was administered. Best corrected distant visual acuity was determined using Snellen projection optotypes. In 12 patients (12 eyes), the multifocal visual evoked potential (M-VEP) was recorded. A control group of 20 patients (20 eyes) received mock treatment. Visual acuity improved in ∼90% of the eyes treated with LLLT (p<0.001), increasing by three or more lines in 56.2% and 53.6% of the eyes with amblyopia caused by ametropia and strabismus, respectively. The treatment effect was maintained for at least 6 months. The mean M-VEP amplitude increased by 1207 nV (p<0.001) and mean latency was reduced by 7 msec (p=0.14). No changes were noted in the control group. LLLT led to a significant improvement in visual acuity in adolescent and adult patients with amblyopia caused by ametropia or strabismus.

  20. Photostimulation of osteogenic differentiation on silk scaffolds by plasma arc light source.

    PubMed

    Çakmak, Anıl Sera; Çakmak, Soner; Vatansever, H Seda; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2018-05-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for more than 30 years to heal wounds. In recent years, LLLT or photostimulation has been indicated as an effective tool for regenerative and dental medicine by using monochromatic light. The aim of this study is to indicate the usability of plasma arc light source for bone regeneration. This is why we used polychromatic light source providing effective wavelengths in the range of 590-1500 nm for cellular response and investigated photostimulation effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D silk scaffolds. Cellular responses were examined by using cell culture methods in terms of proliferation, differentiation, and morphological analyses. The results showed that photostimulation with a polychromatic light source (applied for 5 min from the 3rd day after seeding up to the 28th day in 2-day intervals with 92-mW/cm 2 power from 10-cm distance to the cells) enhanced osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs according to higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen and calcium content, osteogenic gene expressions, and matrix mineralization. In conclusion, we suggest that the plasma arc light source that was used here has a great potential for bone regeneration.

  1. Could low level laser therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy lead to complete eradication of HIV-1 in vitro?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine or a treatment that would completely eradicate the virus, the quest for new and combination therapies continues. In this study we explored the influence of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Literature reports LLLT as widely used to treat different medical conditions such as diabetic wounds, sports injuries and others. The technique involves exposure of cells or tissue to low levels of red and near infrared laser light. Both HIV infected and uninfected cells were laser irradiated at a wavelength of 640 nm with fluencies ranging from 2 to 10 J/cm2 and cellular responses were assessed 24 hours post laser treatment. In our studies, laser therapy had no inhibitory effects in HIV-1 uninfected cells as was indicated by the cell morphology and proliferation results. However, laser irradiation enhanced cell apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells as the laser fluencies increased. This led to further studies in which laser irradiation would be conducted in the presence of HAART to determine whether HAART would minimise the detrimental effects of laser irradiation in infected cells.

  2. Effects of Color Light and Relaxation Exercise Therapy on Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustigan, Carol J.

    In a study at California State University, Sacramento, the effects of color light and relaxation exercise therapy were investigated with 16 students (ages 23 to 48) with learning disabilities. Therapy consisted of either 20 sessions viewing color light through a Lumatron instrument or 20 sessions listening to relaxation exercise tapes. Diagnostic…

  3. Low-level laser/light therapy for androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Lyons, Danika C A; Abramovits, William

    2014-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a persistent and pervasive condition that affects men worldwide. Some common treatment options for AGA include hair prosthetics, oral and topical medications, and surgical hair restoration (SHR). Pharmaceutical and SHR treatments are associated with limitations including adverse side effects and significant financial burden. Low-level laser or light (LLL) devices offer alternative treatment options that are not typically associated with adverse side effects or significant costs. There are clinic- and home-based LLL devices. One home-based laser comb device has set a standard for others; however, this device requires time devoted to carefully moving the comb through the hair to allow laser penetration to the scalp. A novel helmet-like LLL device for hair growth has proven effective in preliminary trials and allows for hands-free use. Regardless, there are few clinical trials that have been conducted regarding LLL devices for AGA and results are mixed. Further research is required to establish the true efficacy of these devices for hair growth in comparison to existing alternative therapies.

  4. Light distribution in the endometrium during photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Sten; Svaasand, Lars O.; Fehr, Mathias K.; Tadir, Yona; Ngo, Phat; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-01-01

    Hysterectomy is the most common major operation performed in the United States with dysfunctional uterine bleeding being a major indication. Endometrial destruction by photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been suggested as a possible alternative to invasive surgical procedures for abnormal uterine bleeding due to benign changes. Effective destruction of the endometrium during PDT requires a sufficient amount of light to be delivered to the entire endometrium in a reasonable time. To satisfy these criteria, we have developed a trifurcated optical applicator consisting of three cylindrical diffusing fibers. The applicator was inserted into freshly excised, intact human uteri and the optical distribution was measured with an isotropic fiber probe at various locations in the uterus. The results were in good agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model based on diffusion theory. The results indicate that irradiation of the endometrium by the trifurcated applicator can destroy tissue to a depth of 4 mm given an optical power of 100 mW per cm of diffusing tip (100 mW/cm) for an exposure time of less than 20 minutes.

  5. Combination therapy using antioxidants and low level laser therapy (LLLT) on noise induced hearing loss (NIHL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, So-Young; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Min young; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae-Yun; Rhee, Chung-Ku

    2016-02-01

    One of the most common factors that cause hearing disorders is noise trauma. Noise is an increasing hazard and it is pervasive, which makes it difficult to take precautions and prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The prevalence of hearing loss among factory workers to be 42 %[1]. Ocupational noise induced hearing loss (ONIHL) continues to be a significant occupational hazard. ONIHL is permanent and may cause significant disability, for which there currently exists no cure, but is largely preventable. More than 30 million Americans are potentially exposed to hazardous noise levels in occupations such as transportation, construction, and coal mining, as well as recreationally. In the mainstream setting, exposure avoidance strategies aimed to reduce the incidence of ONIHL remain the focus of public health and occupational medicine approaches[2]. In military conditions this is most often caused by such things as explosions, blasts, or loud noises from vehicles ranging from 100 to 140 dB[3] and military weapons generating approximately 140-185 dB peak sound pressure levels[4].

  6. Low-level laser therapy prevents endothelial cells from TNF-α/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Shu-Ya; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Teng, Yi-Hsien; Cheng, Yu-Jung

    2018-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT), widely used in physiotherapy, has been known to enhance wound healing and stimulate cell proliferation, including fibroblast and endothelial cells. Applying LLLT can increase cell proliferation in many kinds of cells including fibroblasts and endothelial cells. However, the protective mechanisms of LLLT on endothelial apoptosis remain unclear. We hypothesized LLLT can protect endothelial cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis. Human endothelial cell line, EA.hy926 cells, and TNF-α/cycloheximide (TNF/CHX) were used to explore the protective effects of LLLT (660 nm) on inflammation-induced endothelial apoptosis. Cell viability, apoptosis, caspase-3/7/8/9 activity, MAPKs signaling, NF-κB activity, and inducible/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/eNOS) expression were measured. Our results showed that LLLT increased EA.hy926 cell proliferation, attenuated the TNF/CHX-induced apoptosis, and reduced the TNF/CHX-mediated caspase-3/7/8/9 activation. In addition, LLLT increased ERK MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed the TNF/CHX-increased p38 MAPK, JNK, IKK phosphorylation, NF-κB translocation, and iNOS expression. The caspases-3 cleavage and cell death were not increased in cells treating with ERK inhibitor U0126, which implicated that ERK is not to be responsible for the protective effects of LLLT. After treating with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activator, the protection of LLLT in cell apoptosis was no longer existed, showing that LLLT protected the endothelial cells by suppressing p38 MAPK signaling. Our results provide a new insight into the possible molecular mechanisms in which LLLT protects against inflammatory-induced endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Use of bright light therapy among psychiatrists in massachusetts: an e-mail survey.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark A; Ciraulo, Domenic A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence on the use of bright light therapy for conditions beyond seasonal affective disorder continues to accrue; however, data on the prevalent use of bright light therapy in the community or in hospitals remain limited, particularly in the United States. We conducted a 5-minute e-mail survey of practicing psychiatrists in Massachusetts using the membership roster through the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society to evaluate prevalent use of bright light therapy as well as to solicit attitudes toward the treatment. Three e-mails were sent out over a 2-week period, and responses were obtained from March 2-24, 2013. An iPad raffle was used to incentivize survey completion. Of the 1,366 delivered e-mails, 197 responses were obtained. Of respondents, 72% indicated that they used bright light therapy in their practice, and, among these, all but 1 used bright light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Only 55% of responding psychiatrists who use bright light therapy consider it to treat nonseasonal depression, and 11% of respondents who recommend bright light therapy would consider its use in inpatient settings. Lack of insurance coverage for light-delivery devices was identified as the largest barrier to using bright light therapy, being cited by 55% of respondents. Survey results suggest that limitations in practitioner knowledge of bright light therapy and the absence of bright light therapy in treatment algorithms are the 2 leading modifiable factors to encourage broader implementation. The principal limitation of our survey was the low response rate. As such, we consider these data preliminary. Response bias very likely led to an overestimation in prevalent use of bright light therapy; however, this bias notwithstanding, it appears that bright light therapy is used significantly less often for nonseasonal depression than for seasonal affective disorder. Further, its use in inpatient settings is significantly less than in outpatient settings. We expect that efforts

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and Their Combination for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Tierney Lindsey, Kathryn; Johnson, Leigh G.; Lippy, Robert D.; Lacy, Timothy J.; Barton, Franca B.

    2007-01-01

    This first controlled psychotherapy trial for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) compared SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy (LT), and their combination to a concurrent wait-list control. Adults (N = 61) with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, were randomized to one of four 6-week conditions: CBT (1.5-hr…

  9. Low level laser therapy before eccentric exercise reduces muscle damage markers in humans.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Marchi, Thiago; Lopes, André Luiz; Salvador, Mirian; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) treatment before knee extensor eccentric exercise on indirect markers of muscle damage. Thirty-six healthy men were randomized in LLLT group (n = 18) and placebo group (n = 18). After LLLT or placebo treatment, subjects performed 75 maximal knee extensors eccentric contractions (five sets of 15 repetitions; velocity = 60° seg(-1); range of motion = 60°). Muscle soreness (visual analogue scale--VAS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were measured prior to exercise, and 24 and 48 h after exercise. Muscle function (maximal voluntary contraction--MVC) was measured before exercise, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Groups had no difference on kineanthropometric characteristics and on eccentric exercise performance. They also presented similar baseline values of VAS (0.00 mm for LLLT and placebo groups), LDH (LLLT = 186 IU/l; placebo = 183 IU/l), CK (LLLT = 145 IU/l; placebo = 155 IU/l) and MVC (LLLT = 293 Nm; placebo = 284 Nm). VAS data did not show group by time interaction (P = 0.066). In the other outcomes, LLLT group presented (1) smaller increase on LDH values 48 h post-exercise (LLLT = 366 IU/l; placebo = 484 IU/l; P = 0.017); (2) smaller increase on CK values 24 h (LLLT = 272 IU/l; placebo = 498 IU/l; P = 0.020) and 48 h (LLLT = 436 IU/l; placebo = 1328 IU/l; P < 0.001) post-exercise; (3) smaller decrease on MVC immediately after exercise (LLLT = 189 Nm; placebo = 154 Nm; P = 0.011), and 24 h (LLLT = 249 Nm; placebo = 205 Nm; P = 0.004) and 48 h (LLLT = 267 Nm; placebo = 216 Nm; P = 0.001) post-exercise compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, LLLT treatment before eccentric exercise was effective in terms of attenuating the increase of muscle proteins in the blood serum and the decrease in muscle force.

  10. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in accelerating tooth movement, preventing relapse and managing acute pain during orthodontic treatment in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Mikael; De Geer, Emelie; Subraian, Jaqueline; Petrén, Sofia

    2016-07-07

    Recently low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proposed to improve orthodontic treatment. The aims of this systematic review were to investigate the scientific evidence to support applications of LLLT: (a) to accelerate tooth movement, (b) to prevent orthodontic relapse and (c) to modulate acute pain, during treatment with fixed appliances in children and young adults. To ensure a systematic literature approach, this systematic review was conducted to Goodman's four step model. Three databases were searched (Medline, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register and Scitation), using predetermined search terms. The quality of evidence was rated according to the GRADE system. The search identified 244 articles, 16 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria: three on acceleration of tooth movement by LLLT and 13 on LLLT modulation of acute pain. No study on LLLT for prevention of relapse was identified. The selected studies reported promising results for LLLT; elevated acceleration of tooth movement and lower pain scores, than controls. With respect to method, there were wide variations in type of laser techniques. The quality of evidence supporting LLLT to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement is very low and low with respect to modulate acute pain. No studies met the inclusion criteria for evaluating LLLT to limit relapse. The results highlight the need for high quality research, with consistency in study design, to determine whether LLLT can enhance fixed appliance treatment in children and young adults.

  11. Laser therapy reduces gelatinolytic activity in the rat trigeminal ganglion during temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Desiderá, A C; Nascimento, G C; Gerlach, R F; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) alters the expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) during different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in rats. It also evaluated whether LLLT modifies mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia. Wistar rats (±250 g) were divided into groups that received saline (SAL) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 50 μl) in the TMJ, and that later underwent LLLT (20 J cm(-2) ) at their TMJ or not (groups SAL, SAL + LLLT, CFA, and CFA + LLLT). LLLT was applied on days 3, 5, 7, and 9 after SAL or CFA. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10; orofacial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 10. Gelatin zymography and in situ zymography aided quantification of MMPs in the TG. Low-level laser therapy abolished the reduction in the mechanical orofacial threshold and the increase in orofacial rubbing during the orofacial formalin test induced by CFA. LLLT also decreased the CFA-induced rise in the levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 as well as the gelatinolytic activity in the TG. Low-level laser therapy could constitute an adjuvant therapy to treat temporomandibular disorders and prevent inflammation-induced alterations in the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the gelatinolytic activity in TGs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effect of low-level laser therapy on oxidative stress and functional fitness in aged rats subjected to swimming: an aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Simone A; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Amadio, Eliane Martins; Antônio, Ednei Luis; Silva, Flávio; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conjunction with aerobic training interferes with oxidative stress, thereby influencing the performance of old rats participating in swimming. Thirty Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) (24 aged and six young) were tested. The older animals were randomly divided into aged-control, aged-exercise, aged-LLLT, aged-LLLT/exercise, and young-control. Aerobic capacity (VO2max(0.75)) was analyzed before and after the training period. The exercise groups were trained for 6 weeks, and the LLLT was applied at 808 nm and 4 J energy. The rats were euthanized, and muscle tissue was collected to analyze the index of lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities. VO2 (0.75)max values in the aged-LLLT/exercise group were significantly higher from those in the baseline older group (p <0.01) and the LLLT and exercise group (p <0.05). The results indicate that the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPx were higher and statistically significant (p <0.05) in the LLLT/exercise group than those in the LLLT and exercise groups. Young animals presented lesser and statistically significant activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the aged group. The LLLT/exercise group and the LLLT and exercise group could also mitigate the concentration of TBARS (p > 0.05). Laser therapy in conjunction with aerobic training may reduce oxidative stress, as well as increase VO2 (0.75)max, indicating that an aerobic exercise such as swimming increases speed and improves performance in aged animals treated with LLLT.

  13. Visually augmented targeted combination light therapy for acne vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Alireza; Lyons, Colin-William; Roberts, Niamh

    2017-10-31

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease. Pharmacological modalities for treatment are proven to be efficacious but have limitations. Light therapy for acne vulgaris has shown promise in previous studies. This case report and its accompanying images show how a novel approach of visually augmented high fluence light therapy has been used to good effect. A 26-year-old Caucasian woman with acne vulgaris resistant to treatment with topical therapy underwent three sessions of combination potassium titanyl phosphate laser (532 nm)/neodymium-doped: yttrium aluminum garnet laser (1064 nm) light therapy with visually augmented narrow spot size and high fluence. A 73% reduction in total inflammatory lesions was evident 6 months after the initial treatment. This case report illustrates that there may be utility in this novel approach of narrow spot size, magnification-assisted, high fluence targeted combination laser therapy for inflammatory acne.

  14. Steroids block the anti-inflammatory effects of low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.; Albertini, Regiane; Lopes-Martins, Patricia Sardinha L.; Iversen, Vegard V.; Bjordal, Jan M.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Concomitant use of multiple therapies is common in musculoskeletal and airway disorders. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is considered a promising therapy in arthritis, tendinopathies and rhinitis. We designed two animal studies to assess if the expected anti-inflammatory effect LLLT could be affected by resection of the adrenal gland or concomitant use of the cortisol antagonist mifepristone. Methods: Two studies were performed, with 40 male Wistar rats and with 40 Balb C male mice respectively.. In both studies, four groups received carrageenan and one control group received saline. At 1, 2, and 3 hours after injections, LLLT irradiation was performed with a dose of 7.5 J/cm2. In the rat study, two of the carrageenan groups had the adrenal gland dissected. In the mice study, two of the carrageenan-injected groups were in addition pre-treated with orally administered mifepristone. Results: In the rat paw study, LLLT reduced edema significantly compared to the carrageenan only group (1.5 vs 0.9 ml, p< 0.05), but LLLT failed to inhibit edema formation in the group which had the adrenal gland resected. In carrageenan-induced pleurisy, LLLT significantly reduced the number of leukocyte cells ( p<0.0001, Mean 34.5 [95%CI: 32.8 - 36.2] versus 87.7 [95%CI: 81.0 - 94.4]), and that the effect of LLLT could be totally blocked by adding the cortisol antagonist mifepristone ( p<0.0001, Mean 34.5 [95%CI: 32.1 - 36.9] versus 82.9 [95%CI: 70.5 - 95.3]). Conclusion: Steroid therapy should not be used concomitantly with LLLT, as the anti-inflammatory effect of LLLT is lost if cortisol receptors are downregulated.

  15. Patient perspectives on low level light therapy and laser therapies for rosacea-associated persistent facial redness.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Meagan; Alinia, Hossein; Kuo, Sandy; Huang, Karen E; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-12-13

    There are no definitive treatments of facial redness for rosacea. All treatments aim to alleviate symptoms. Patients' perspectives of two emerging modalities, Low level light therapy and laser treatments are not well characterized. The purpose is to further understand rosacea patients unmet needs about these modalities, Methods: The publicly accessible, online rosacea forum was accessed at august 2013. Stratified random sampling method has done to identify a 10% sample of total 27,051 posts. The Posts were published in the "Laser and IPL therapy" and "Low level light therapy" forums were qualitatively analyzed. Patients discussed a variety of topics, but most commonly discussed effectiveness (34.2%), treatment education (19.3%), and adverse effects (18%). Relationship with the health care provider (9.9%), cost (8.1%), execution of treatments (8.1%) and convenience of treatments (2.5%) were less commonly discussed, but contributed to patients' decisions about utilizing laser and light therapies. Online forums are utilized to fulfill patients' desire for educational, empathic and collaborative relationship. Patients' adherence to laser and light therapies will likely increase if costs are reduced, reduction in redness is consistent with their expectations, and if physicians empower them through education on device choices and managing adverse effects.

  16. Daily morning light therapy is associated with an increase in choroidal thickness in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Read, Scott A; Pieterse, Emily C; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Bormann, Rebekah; Hong, Seentinie; Lo, Chai-Hoon; Richer, Rhiannon; Syed, Atif; Tran, Linda

    2018-05-29

    Ambient light exposure is one environmental factor thought to play a role in the regulation of eye growth and refractive error development, and choroidal thickness changes have also been linked to longer term changes in eye growth. Therefore in this study we aimed to examine the influence of a 1-week period of morning light therapy upon choroidal thickness. Twenty two healthy young adult subjects had a series of macular choroidal thickness measurements collected with spectral domain optical coherence tomography before, and then following a 7-day period of increased daily light exposure. Increased light exposure was delivered through the use of commercially available light therapy glasses, worn for 30 minutes in the morning each day. A significant increase in subfoveal choroidal thickness (mean increase of +5.4 ± 10.3 µm) was found following 7-days of increased daily light exposure (p = 0.02). An increase in choroidal thickness was also observed associated with light therapy across the central 5 mm macular region. This study provides the first evidence in the human eye that daily morning light therapy results in small magnitude but statistically significant increases in choroidal thickness. These changes may have implications for our understanding of the impact of environmental factors upon eye growth.

  17. Gene therapy: light is finally in the tunnel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huibi; Molday, Robert S; Hu, Jim

    2011-12-01

    After two decades of ups and downs, gene therapy has recently achieved a milestone in treating patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). LCA is a group of inherited blinding diseases with retinal degeneration and severe vision loss in early infancy. Mutations in several genes, including RPE65, cause the disease. Using adeno-associated virus as a vector, three independent teams of investigators have recently shown that RPE65 can be delivered to retinal pigment epithelial cells of LCA patients by subretinal injections resulting in clinical benefits without side effects. However, considering the whole field of gene therapy, there are still major obstacles to clinical applications for other diseases. These obstacles include innate and immune barriers to vector delivery, toxicity of vectors and the lack of sustained therapeutic gene expression. Therefore, new strategies are needed to overcome these hurdles for achieving safe and effective gene therapy. In this article, we shall review the major advancements over the past two decades and, using lung gene therapy as an example, discuss the current obstacles and possible solutions to provide a roadmap for future gene therapy research.

  18. Let There Be Light: Gene and Cell Therapy for Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Goureau, Olivier; Marazova, Katia; Sahel, José-Alain

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Retinal cell death is the main cause of vision loss in genetic disorders such as retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt disease, and Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as in complex age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. For these blinding conditions, gene and cell therapy approaches offer therapeutic intervention at various disease stages. The present review outlines advances in therapies for retinal degenerative disease, focusing on the progress and challenges in the development and clinical translation of gene and cell therapies. A significant body of preclinical evidence and initial clinical results pave the way for further development of these cutting edge treatments for patients with retinal degenerative disorders. PMID:26751519

  19. Let There Be Light: Gene and Cell Therapy for Blindness.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, Deniz; Goureau, Olivier; Marazova, Katia; Sahel, José-Alain

    2016-02-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Retinal cell death is the main cause of vision loss in genetic disorders such as retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt disease, and Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as in complex age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. For these blinding conditions, gene and cell therapy approaches offer therapeutic intervention at various disease stages. The present review outlines advances in therapies for retinal degenerative disease, focusing on the progress and challenges in the development and clinical translation of gene and cell therapies. A significant body of preclinical evidence and initial clinical results pave the way for further development of these cutting edge treatments for patients with retinal degenerative disorders.

  20. Outcomes One and Two Winters Following Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Meyerhoff, Jonah; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Evans, Maggie; Postolache, Teodor T.; Vacek, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The central public health challenge for winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is recurrence prevention. Preliminary studies suggest better long-term outcomes following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-SAD) than light therapy. This study is a large randomized head-to-head comparison of these treatments on outcomes one and two winters after acute treatment. Method Community adults with Major Depression, Recurrent with Seasonal Pattern (N=177) were followed one and two winters after a randomized trial of 6-weeks of CBT-SAD (n=88) or light therapy (n=89). Prospective followup visits occurred in January or February of each year, and major depression status was assessed by phone in October and December of the first year. The primary outcome was winter depression recurrence status on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-SAD Version (SIGH-SAD). Other outcomes were depression severity on the SIGH-SAD and the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), remission status based on severity cutpoints, and major depression status from tracking calls. Results The treatments did not differ on any outcome during the first year of followup. The second winter, CBT-SAD was associated with a smaller proportion of SIGH-SAD recurrences (27.3% vs. 45.6%), less severe symptoms on both measures, and a larger proportion of remissions defined as BDI-II≤8 (63.3% vs. 43.9%) than light therapy. Non-recurrence at next winter was more highly associated with non-recurrence the second winter among CBT-SAD (RR=5.12) than light therapy (RR=1.92) subjects. Conclusions CBT-SAD was superior to light therapy two winters following acute treatment, suggesting greater durability for CBT-SAD. PMID:26539881

  1. Outcomes One and Two Winters Following Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Kelly J; Meyerhoff, Jonah; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Evans, Maggie; Postolache, Teodor T; Vacek, Pamela M

    2016-03-01

    The central public health challenge for winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is recurrence prevention. Preliminary studies suggest better long-term outcomes following cognitive-behavioral therapy tailored for SAD (CBT-SAD) than light therapy. The present study is a large, randomized head-to-head comparison of these treatments on outcomes one and two winters after acute treatment. Community adults with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern (N=177) were followed one and two winters after a randomized trial of 6 weeks of CBT-SAD (N=88) or light therapy (N=89). Prospective follow-up visits occurred in January or February of each year, and major depression status was assessed by telephone in October and December of the first year. The primary outcome was winter depression recurrence status on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD). Other outcomes were depression severity on the SIGH-SAD and the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), remission status based on severity cutoff scores, and major depression status from tracking calls. The treatments did not differ on any outcome during the first year of follow-up. At the second winter, CBT-SAD was associated with a smaller proportion of SIGH-SAD recurrences (27.3% compared with 45.6%), less severe symptoms on both measures, and a larger proportion of remissions defined as a BDI-II score ≤8 (68.3% compared with 44.5%) compared with light therapy. Nonrecurrence at the next winter was more highly associated with nonrecurrence at the second winter among CBT-SAD participants (relative risk=5.12) compared with light therapy participants (relative risk=1.92). CBT-SAD was superior to light therapy two winters following acute treatment, suggesting greater durability for CBT-SAD.

  2. Acute effects of low-level laser therapy irradiation on blood lactate and muscle fatigue perception in hospitalized patients with heart failure-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bublitz, Caroline; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Ramos, Rodrigo Santin; Assis, Livia; Sellera, Carlos Alberto Cyrillo; Trimer, Renata; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on functional capacity, perceived exertion, and blood lactate in hospitalized patients with heart failure (HF). Patients diagnosed with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction <45 %) were randomized and allocated prospectively into two groups: placebo LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to placebo laser and active LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to active laser. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) was performed, and blood lactate was determined at rest (before LLLT application and 6MWT), immediately after the exercise test (time 0) and recovery (3, 6, and 30 min). A multi-diode LLLT cluster probe (DMC, São Carlos, Brazil) was used. Both groups increased 6MWT distance after active or placebo LLLT application compared to baseline values (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively); however, no difference was observed during intergroup comparison. The active LLLT group showed a significant reduction in the perceived exertion Borg (PEB) scale compared to the placebo LLLT group (p = 0.006). In addition, the group that received active LLLT showed no statistically significant difference for the blood lactate level through the times analyzed. The placebo LLLT group demonstrated a significant increase in blood lactate between the rest and recovery phase (p < 0.05). Acute effects of LLLT irradiation on skeletal musculature were not able to improve the functional capacity of hospitalized patients with HF, although it may favorably modulate blood lactate metabolism and reduce perceived muscle fatigue.

  3. Low level laser therapy (photobiomodulation) for the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. David; Liu, Lizhou; Chapple, Cathy; Petrich, Simone; Anders, Juanita J.; Tumilty, Steve

    2018-04-01

    Breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL) is prevalent among breast cancer survivors, and may be painful and disfiguring with associated psychological impact. Previous research shows increasing use of low level laser therapy (LLLT), now commonly referred to as photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy for managing BCRL, in countries including the United States and Australia. However, conclusions were limited by the paucity, heterogeneity, and poor quality of previous studies. LLLT (PBM) has been barely used in clinical practice in New Zealand, and no clinical studies on LLLT (PBM) for BCRL have been conducted in this country. In order to promote this potentially useful treatment modality for BCRL patients, the Laser Lymphedema Trial Team at the University of Otago conducted a program to assess the effectiveness of LLLT (PBM) in management of BCRL. The program comprises three phases including a systematic review (completed), a feasibility study (completed), and a full-scale randomized controlled trial (proposed). This current paper provides an update on the program. Based upon the systematic review, LLLT (PBM) is considered a potentially effective treatment approach for women with BCRL; the review also indicated the need for further research including exploration of the relevance of dosage and other LLLT (PBM) parameters. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is feasible to conduct a fully powered RCT to definitively test the effectiveness of the additional use of LLLT (PBM) in the management of BCRL, and 114 participants will be needed at baseline in the main study. Currently, the full-scale RCT is under preparation.

  4. [Physical treatment methods for acne. Light, laser, photodynamic therapy and peeling].

    PubMed

    Borelli, C; Korting, H C

    2010-02-01

    The medical treatment of acne is generally sufficient to meet the expectations of acne patients. However, in a number of situations additional therapeutic approaches may be advisable. There are a wide variety of useful physical methods. They range from electromagnetic waves, usually light, to peeling and manual therapy. Phototherapy of acne includes not just visible light but also laser and flash lamp therapy. The present review provides an overview on the evidence. Visible light, in particular blue light, provides an effective option for treatment of inflammatory acne. Photodynamic therapy also is efficacious; however, it should not be used because of an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. UV treatment of acne is obsolete. Newer studies on the use of a variety of laser systems and flash lamps have demonstrated in part rewarding results.

  5. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  6. Bardoxolone Brings Nrf2-Based Therapies to Light

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The targeted activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived-2-like 2 (Nrf2) to alleviate symptoms of chronic kidney disease has recently garnered much attention. Unfortunately, the greatest clinical success to date, bardoxolone, failed in phase III clinical trial for unspecified safety reasons. The present letter to the editor discusses the clinical development of bardoxolone and explores potential reasons for the ultimate withdrawal from clinical trials. In particular, was the correct clinical indication pursued and would improved specificity have mitigated the safety concerns? Ultimately, it is concluded that the right clinical indication and heightened specificity will lead to successful Nrf2-based therapies. Therefore, the bardoxolone clinical results do not dampen enthusiasm for Nrf2-based therapies; rather it illuminates the clinical potential of the Nrf2 pathway as a drug target. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 517–518. PMID:23227819

  7. Bardoxolone brings Nrf2-based therapies to light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donna D

    2013-08-10

    The targeted activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived-2-like 2 (Nrf2) to alleviate symptoms of chronic kidney disease has recently garnered much attention. Unfortunately, the greatest clinical success to date, bardoxolone, failed in phase III clinical trial for unspecified safety reasons. The present letter to the editor discusses the clinical development of bardoxolone and explores potential reasons for the ultimate withdrawal from clinical trials. In particular, was the correct clinical indication pursued and would improved specificity have mitigated the safety concerns? Ultimately, it is concluded that the right clinical indication and heightened specificity will lead to successful Nrf2-based therapies. Therefore, the bardoxolone clinical results do not dampen enthusiasm for Nrf2-based therapies; rather it illuminates the clinical potential of the Nrf2 pathway as a drug target.

  8. Laser therapy by noncoherent light field of radiation.

    PubMed

    Djibladze, M I; Melikishvili, Z G; Uchaneishvili, S D

    1997-01-01

    Conducted researches on study of interaction of radiation with blood have shown, that the interaction is the most effective for light with wavelengths in the range of 600-1000 nm that corresponds to the minimum absorption factor of the whole blood. Calculations show, that at interaction of radiation with blood considerably grows effective (electronic) temperature of biological environment, that results in sharp increase of speed of biochemical reactions. The absence of necessity of application of laser radiation coherence in lasertherapy permits to create high efficient noncoherent sources of light on the basis of the GaALAs(Zn) crystals, radiating with two maxima of wavelengths 675 and 900 nm. The radiation spectrum of GaALAs(Zn) crystals falls in the most favourable area of a blood absorption spectrum.

  9. Alopecia: a review of laser and light therapies.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Sophia; Rashid, Rashid M

    2012-02-15

    Since the 1980s, laser technology has become increasingly popular to treat a variety of cutaneous conditions. Its successful use as an epilator comes with the rare but interesting side effect of paradoxical hypertrichosis. In this review, we summarize cases describing hair growth after photoepilation, as well as studies testing laser and light sources as treatment for alopecia, particularly androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata. We also discuss the possible biologic mechanisms by which phototherapy induces hair regeneration.

  10. Flashes of light-radiation therapy to the brain.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Shtraus, Natan

    2015-08-01

    We present a series of three patients who received therapeutic external beam radiation to the brain and experienced a phenomenon of the sensation of flashes of bright or blue light, simultaneous with radiation delivery. We relate this benign phenomenon to low-dose exposure to the eye fields and postulate that the occurrence is underreported in this treated population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of high and low level laser therapy in the treatment of Bell's palsy: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alayat, Mohamed Salaheldien Mohamed; Elsodany, Ahmed Mohamed; El Fiky, Amir Abdel Raouf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the effects of high intensity laser therapy (HILT) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the treatment of patients with Bell's palsy. Forty-eight patients participated in and completed this study. The mean age was 43 ± 9.8 years. They were randomly assigned into three groups: HILT group, LLLT group, and exercise group. All patients were treated with facial massage and exercises, but the HILT and LLLT groups received the respective laser therapy. The grade of facial recovery was assessed by the facial disability scale (FDI) and the House-Brackmann scale (HBS). Evaluation was carried out 3 and 6 weeks after treatment for all patients. Laser treatments included eight points on the affected side of the face three times a week for 6 successive weeks. FDI and HBS were used to assess the grade of recovery. The scores of both FDI and HBS were taken before as well as 3 and 6 weeks after treatment. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were used to compare the FDI and HBS scores within each group. The result showed that both HILT and LLLT significantly improved the recovery of patients with Bell's palsy. Moreover, HILT was the most effective treatment modality compared to LLLT and massage with exercises. Thus, both HILT and LLLT are effective physical therapy modalities for the recovery of patients with Bell's palsy, with HILT showing a slightly greater improvement than LLLT.

  12. A tuneable approach to uniform light distribution for artificial daylight photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Haigh, Neil; Wood, Kenny; Brown, C Tom A; Ibbotson, Sally; Eadie, Ewan

    2018-06-16

    Implementation of daylight photodynamic therapy (dPDT) is somewhat limited by variable weather conditions. Light sources have been employed to provide artificial dPDT indoors, with low irradiances and longer treatment times. Uniform light distribution across the target area is key to ensuring effective treatment, particularly for large areas. A novel light source is developed with tuneable direction of light emission in order to meet this challenge. Wavelength composition of the novel light source is controlled such that the protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX) weighed spectra of both the light source and daylight match. The uniformity of the light source is characterised on a flat surface, a model head and a model leg. For context, a typical conventional PDT light source is also characterised. Additionally, the wavelength uniformity across the treatment site is characterised. The PpIX-weighted spectrum of the novel light source matches with PpIX-weighted daylight spectrum, with irradiance values within the bounds for effective dPDT. By tuning the direction of light emission, improvements are seen in the uniformity across large anatomical surfaces. Wavelength uniformity is discussed. We have developed a light source that addresses the challenges in uniform, multiwavelength light distribution for large area artificial dPDT across curved anatomical surfaces. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Low-Level Laser Therapy and Cryotherapy as Mono- and Adjunctive Therapies for Achilles Tendinopathy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Haslerud, Sturla; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lúcio; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Naterstad, Ingvill Fjell; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Joensen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and cryotherapy are widely used treatments in the acute phase of tendon injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of these two treatments on tendon inflammation and mechanical properties. Six groups of six Wistar rats were used in this study. The Achilles tendons of the healthy control group were not subjected to injury or treatment. The tendons of the injured nontreated group (ING) were injured, but not treated. The remaining four groups were injured and subjected to LLLT, cryotherapy, LLLT first/cryotherapy, or cryotherapy first/LLLT. All treatments were performed at 1 h post-trauma. Inflammatory mediators, tendon histology, and biomechanical properties were assessed at 24 h post-trauma by comparing the treatment groups with the ING. In all treatment groups, the inflammatory process shifted in an anti-inflammatory direction compared with the ING. Significant alterations in cytokine expression were found in only the LLLT group (↓IL-1β) and the combined intervention groups (↓IL-1β, ↓TNF-α, ↑IL-6). It was also found that cryotherapy followed by LLLT was the only treatment that significantly (p < 0.05) improved the biomechanical parameters of force (N) and displacement (mm) at the tendon rupture and corresponded with the best histological scores of all of the treatment groups. Our results demonstrate that cryotherapy in combination with LLLT can produce an anti-inflammatory "add-on" effect. The order of therapy administration seems essential, as superior histology and biomechanical results were found in the cryotherapy first/LLLT group.

  14. Performance of a nonlaser light source for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehurst, Colin; Byrne, Karen T.; Morton, Colin; Moore, James V.

    1995-03-01

    Advances in short arc technology and optical filter coatings led to the design and construction of a table-top light source in 1989; the first viable and cost-effective alternative to a laser. The device can deliver over 3 W within a 30 nm band centered at any wavelength from 200 nm to 1200 nm at fluence rates of over 1 W cm-2. Its relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in vitro has been proven alongside an argon pumped dye laser and a copper vapor pumped dye laser. These in vitro tests showed an efficiency of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) induced cellular photoinactivation close to that of the argon/dye laser (RBE 100%), with a mean RBE for the lamp of 87 +/- 3% (p < 0.05). The lamp proved to be superior to that of the copper/dye laser system with an RBE of up to 150% at fluence rates above 50 mWcm-2. In vivo tests show that the extent and depth of tumor necrosis are comparable to that of an argon/dye laser. An in situ bioassay using tumor regrowth delay is currently underway. Early clinical trials show clearance of Bowen's disease and actinic keratosis using the same light fluences as costly PDT lasers.

  15. Light therapy for non-seasonal depression: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Perera, Stefan; Eisen, Rebecca; Bhatt, Meha; Bhatnagar, Neera; de Souza, Russell; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2016-03-01

    Light therapy is a known treatment for patients with seasonal affective disorder. However, the efficacy of light therapy in treating patients with non-seasonal depression remains inconclusive. To provide the current state of evidence for efficacy of light therapy in non-seasonal depressive disorders. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and CENTRAL from their inception to September 2015. Study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment were independently conducted in duplicate. Meta-analyses were performed to provide a summary statistic for the included RCTs. The reporting of this systematic review follows the PRISMA guidelines. A meta-analysis including 881 participants from 20 RCTs demonstrated a beneficial effect of light therapy in non-seasonal depression (standardised mean difference in depression score -0.41 (95% CI -0.64 to -0.18)). This estimate was associated with significant heterogeneity ( I 2 =60%, P =0.0003) that was not sufficiently explained by subgroup analyses. There was also high risk of bias in the included trials limiting the study interpretation. The overall quality of evidence is poor due to high risk of bias and inconsistency. However, considering that light therapy has minimal side-effects and our meta-analysis demonstrated that a significant proportion of patients achieved a clinically significant response, light therapy may be effective for patients with non-seasonal depression and can be a helpful additional therapeutic intervention for depression. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  16. Comparative effects of low-level laser therapy pre- and post-injury on mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and IL-6 during the skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Alves, Agnelo Neves; Ribeiro, Beatriz Guimarães; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Souza, Nadhia Helena Costa; Rocha, Lília Alves; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the effect of pre-injury and post-injury irradiation with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors and interleukin 6 (IL-6) during the skeletal muscle repair. Male rats were divided into six groups: control group, sham group, LLLT group, injury group; pre-injury LLLT group, and post-injury LLLT group. LLLT was performed with a diode laser (wavelength 780 nm; output power 40 mW' and total energy 3.2 J). Cryoinjury was induced by two applications of a metal probe cooled in liquid nitrogen directly onto the belly of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. After euthanasia, the TA muscle was removed for the isolation of total RNA and analysis of MyoD, myogenin, and IL-6 using real-time quantitative PCR. Significant increases were found in the expression of MyoD mRNA at 3 and 7 days as well as the expression of myogenin mRNA at 14 days in the post-injury LLLT group in comparison to injury group. A significant reduction was found in the expression of IL-6 mRNA at 3 and 7 days in the pre-injury LLLT and post-injury LLLT groups. A significant increase in IL-6 mRNA was found at 14 days in the post-injury LLLT group in comparison to the injury group. LLLT administered following muscle injury modulates the mRNA expression of MyoD and myogenin. Moreover, the both forms of LLLT administration were able to modulate the mRNA expression of IL-6 during the muscle repair process.

  17. Low-level laser therapy for the treatment of androgenic alopecia: a review.

    PubMed

    Darwin, Evan; Heyes, Alexandra; Hirt, Penelope A; Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2018-02-01

    There are many new low-level laser technologies that have been released commercially that claim to support hair regrowth. In this paper, we will examine the clinical trials to determine whether the body of evidence supports the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to treat androgenic alopecia (AGA). A literature search was conducted through Pubmed, Embase, and Clinicaltrials.gov for clinical trials using LLLT to treat AGA. Thirteen clinical trials were assessed. Review articles were not included. Ten of 11 trials demonstrated significant improvement of androgenic alopecia in comparison to baseline or controls when treated with LLLT. In the remaining study, improvement in hair counts and hair diameter was recorded, but did not reach statistical significance. Two trials did not include statistical analysis, but showed marked improvement by hair count or by photographic evidence. Two trials showed efficacy for LLLT in combination with topical minoxidil. One trial showed efficacy when accompanying finasteride treatment. LLLT appears to be a safe, alternative treatment for patients with androgenic alopecia. Clinical trials have indicated efficacy for androgenic alopecia in both men and women. It may be used independently or as an adjuvant of minoxidil or finasteride. More research needs to be undertaken to determine the optimal power and wavelength to use in LLLT as well as LLLT's mechanism of action.

  18. Defining a therapeutic dosage window for transmeatal-LLLT applied to the rats with NIHL to Ameliorate NIHL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, ChungKu; Song, Kevin; Chang, So-Young; Jung, Jae Yun; Lim, Sung-Kyoo; Chung, Phil-Sang; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Aim: The LLLT was found to recover NIHL and ototoxicity induced hearing loss in rats but the optimal LLLT laser dosage to treat NIHL needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to find the optimal laser dosage to recover a NIHL with transmeatal-LLLT. Methods: Bilateral ears of rats were exposed to noise (narrow band noise, 120 dB, 16 kHz, 6 h). Left ears of the rats were irradiated with transmeatal-LLLT (830 nm) of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 mW for 60 minutes per day for 12 days, starting 1 day post induction of NIHL. Right ears were not irradiated and used as control ears. The hearing levels were measured at each frequency of 8, 12, and 32 kHz before the noise exposure, 1, 3, 8, and 12 days post noise exposure. The differences of hearing levels between left treated ear and right controlled ear at each frequency of different laser dosages (50 - 300 mW) were compared to see the most effective laser dosages to treat NIHL. Results: Hearing levels were most improved by 150 mW, slightly improved by 200 mW, not improved by 50 and 250 mW, and became worse by 300 mW. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that most effective therapeutic laser dosage window to treat NIHL with transmeatal-LLLT was 150 mW for 12 days and it was not effective by 50, 250, and 300 mW.

  19. Moderate Versus Light Pressure Massage Therapy Leads to Greater Weight Gain in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel A.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Deeds, Osvelia; Figuereido, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-eight preterm infants (M GA=3Owks.) were randomly assigned to a moderate or to a light pressure massage therapy group to receive 15 massages 3 times per day for 5 days. Behavior state, stress behaviors and heart rate were recorded for 15 minutes before and during the first 15-minute therapy session. Weight gain was recorded over the 5 day therapy period. The moderate versus light pressure massage group gained significantly more weight per day. During the behavior observations the moderate versus light pressure massage group showed significantly lower increases from the pre-session to the session recording on: 1) active sleep; 2) fussing; 3) crying; 4) movement; and 5) stress behavior (hiccupping). They also showed a smaller decrease in deep sleep, a greater decrease in heart rate and a greater increase in vagal tone. Thus, the moderate pressure massage therapy group appeared to be more relaxed and less aroused than the light pressure massage group which may have contributed to the greater weight gain of the moderate pressure massage therapy group. PMID:17138310

  20. Moderate versus light pressure massage therapy leads to greater weight gain in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel A; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Deeds, Osvelia; Figuereido, Barbara

    2006-12-01

    Sixty-eight preterm infants (M GA=30 weeks) were randomly assigned to a moderate or to a light pressure massage therapy group to receive 15 massages three times per day for 5 days. Behavior state, stress behaviors and heart rate were recorded for 15min before and during the first 15-min therapy session. Weight gain was recorded over the 5-day therapy period. The moderate versus light pressure massage group gained significantly more weight per day. During the behavior observations the moderate versus light pressure massage group showed significantly lower increases from the pre-session to the session recording on: (1) active sleep; (2) fussing; (3) crying; (4) movement; and (5) stress behavior (hiccupping). They also showed a smaller decrease in deep sleep, a greater decrease in heart rate and a greater increase in vagal tone. Thus, the moderate pressure massage therapy group appeared to be more relaxed and less aroused than the light pressure massage group which may have contributed to the greater weight gain of the moderate pressure massage therapy group.

  1. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W.; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin®. Photofrin® is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin® is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin® has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin®. First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was measured in these cell lines by tumor DNA synthesis

  2. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-01

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  3. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    SciT

    Mthunzi, Patience

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugsmore » into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.« less

  4. Low level laser therapy (Photobiomodulation therapy) for breast cancer-related lymphedema: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G David; Liu, Lizhou; Petrich, Simone; Gisselman, Angela Spontelli; Chapple, Cathy; Anders, Juanita J; Tumilty, Steve

    2017-12-07

    Breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL) is a prevalent complication secondary to cancer treatments which significantly impacts the physical and psychological health of breast cancer survivors. Previous research shows increasing use of low level laser therapy (LLLT), now commonly referred to as photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy, for BCRL. This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of LLLT (PBM) in the management of BCRL. Clinical trials were searched in PubMed, AMED, Web of Science, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to November 2016. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality and adequacy of LLLT (PBM) in these clinical trials. Primary outcome measures were limb circumference/volume, and secondary outcomes included pain intensity and range of motion. Because data were clinically heterogeneous, best evidence synthesis was performed. Eleven clinical trials were identified, of which seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were chosen for analysis. Overall, the methodological quality of included RCTs was high, whereas the reporting of treatment parameters was poor. Results indicated that there is strong evidence (three high quality trials) showing LLLT (PBM) was more effective than sham treatment for limb circumference/volume reduction at a short-term follow-up. There is moderate evidence (one high quality trial) indicating that LLLT (PBM) was more effective than sham laser for short-term pain relief, and limited evidence (one low quality trial) that LLLT (PBM) was more effective than no treatment for decreasing limb swelling at short-term follow-up. Based upon the current systematic review, LLLT (PBM) may be considered an effective treatment approach for women with BCRL. Due to the limited numbers of published trials available, there is a clear need for well-designed high-quality trials in this area. The optimal treatment parameters for clinical application have yet to be elucidated.

  5. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciT

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, theymore » conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was

  6. Multiphoton microscopy and image guided light activated therapy using nanomaterials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2017-02-01

    This talk will focus on design and applications of nanomaterials exhibiting strong multiphoton upconversion for multiphoton microscopy as well as for image-guided and light activated therapy .1-3 Such processes can occur by truly nonlinear optical interactions proceeding through virtual intermediate states or by stepwise coupled linear excitations through real intermediate states. Multiphoton processes in biocompatible multifunctional nanoparticles allow for 3D deep tissue imaging. In addition, they can produce in-situ photon conversion of deep tissue penetrating near IR light into a needed shorter wavelength light for photo-activated therapy at a targeted site, thus overcoming the limited penetration of UV or visible light into biological media. We are using near IR emitters such as silicon quantum dots which also exhibit strong multiphoton excitation for multiphoton microscopy. Another approach involves nonlinear nanocrystals such as ZnO which can produce four wave mixing, sum frequency generation as well as second harmonic generation to convert a deep tissue penetrating Near IR light at the targeted biological site to a desired shorter wavelength light suitable for bio imaging or activation of a therapy. We have utilized this approach to activate a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy. Yet another type of upconversion materials is rare-earth ion doped optical nanotransformers which transform a Near IR (NIR) light from an external source by sequential single photon absorption, in situ and on demand, to a needed wavelength. Applications of these nanotransformers in multiphoton photoacoustic imaging will also be presented. An exciting direction pursued by us using these multiphoton nanoparticles, is functional imaging of brain. Simultaneously, they can effect optogenetics for regioselective stimulation of neurons for providing an effective intervention/augmentation strategy to enhance the cognitive state and lead to a foundation for futuristic vision of super

  7. Superpulsed low-level laser therapy protects skeletal muscle of mdx mice against damage, inflammation and morphological changes delaying dystrophy progression.

    PubMed

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Joensen, Jon; Johnson, Mark I; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of preventive treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on progression of dystrophy in mdx mice. Ten animals were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups treated with superpulsed LLLT (904 nm, 15 mW, 700 Hz, 1 J) or placebo-LLLT at one point overlying the tibialis anterior muscle (bilaterally) 5 times per week for 14 weeks (from 6th to 20th week of age). Morphological changes, creatine kinase (CK) activity and mRNA gene expression were assessed in animals at 20th week of age. Animals treated with LLLT showed very few morphological changes in skeletal muscle, with less atrophy and fibrosis than animals treated with placebo-LLLT. CK was significantly lower (p=0.0203) in animals treated with LLLT (864.70 U.l-1, SEM 226.10) than placebo (1708.00 U.l-1, SEM 184.60). mRNA gene expression of inflammatory markers was significantly decreased by treatment with LLLT (p<0.05): TNF-α (placebo-control=0.51 µg/µl [SEM 0.12], - LLLT=0.048 µg/µl [SEM 0.01]), IL-1β (placebo-control=2.292 µg/µl [SEM 0.74], - LLLT=0.12 µg/µl [SEM 0.03]), IL-6 (placebo-control=3.946 µg/µl [SEM 0.98], - LLLT=0.854 µg/µl [SEM 0.33]), IL-10 (placebo-control=1.116 µg/µl [SEM 0.22], - LLLT=0.352 µg/µl [SEM 0.15]), and COX-2 (placebo-control=4.984 µg/µl [SEM 1.18], LLLT=1.470 µg/µl [SEM 0.73]). Irradiation of superpulsed LLLT on successive days five times per week for 14 weeks decreased morphological changes, skeletal muscle damage and inflammation in mdx mice. This indicates that LLLT has potential to decrease progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy on scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Carla P; Melo, Cristina; Alexandrino, Ana M; Noites, Andreia

    2013-06-01

    Physiotherapy has a very important role in the maintenance of the integumentary system integrity. There is very few evidence in humans. Nevertheless, there are some studies about tissue regeneration using low-level laser therapy (LLLT). To analyze the effectiveness of LLLT on scar tissue. Seventeen volunteers were stratified by age of their scars, and then randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) - n = 9 - and a placebo group (PG) - n = 8. Fifteen sessions were conducted to both the groups thrice a week. However, in the PG, the laser device was switched off. Scars' thickness, length, width, macroscopic aspect, pain threshold, pain perception, and itching were measured. After 5 weeks, there were no statistically significant differences in any variable between both the groups. However, analyzing independently each group, EG showed a significant improvement in macroscopic aspect (p = 0.003) using LLLT. Taking into account the scars' age, LLLT showed a tendency to decrease older scars' thickness in EG. The intervention with LLLT appears to have a positive effect on the macroscopic scars' appearance, and on old scars' thickness, in the studied sample. However, it cannot be said for sure that LLLT has influence on scar tissue.

  9. Clinical translation of photobiomodulation therapy using evidences from precision molecular pathway analyses (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arany, Praveen

    2017-02-01

    Can `light' be a Drug? To satisfy this definition as a pharmaceutical agent, light must be absorbed and change bodily function. Much evidence from our understanding of our visual cycle and Vitamin D metabolism have all noted this phenomenon. Advances in optophotonic technologies along with a better understanding of light-tissue interactions, especially in in vivo optical imaging and optogenetics, are spearheading the popularity of biophotonics in biology and medicine. The use of lasers and light devices at high doses in dermatology, ophthalmology, oncology and dentistry are now considered mainstream for certain clinical applications such as surgery, skin rejuvenation, ocular and soft tissue recontouring, anti-tumor and anti-microbial photodynamic therapy. In contrast, therapeutic use of low dose biophotonics devices is called Low Level Light / Laser Therapy (LLLT), now termed Photobiomodulation (PBM) Therapy. This therapy is defined as a non-thermal use of non-ionizing forms of electromagnetic radiation to alleviate pain, inflammation, modulating the immune responses and promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Surprisingly, despite vast volumes of scientific literature from both clinical and laboratory studies noting the phenomenological evidences for this innovative therapy, limited mechanistic insights have prevented the development of rigorous, reproducible clinical protocols. This presentation will outline our current efforts at ongoing efforts in our group to assess molecular pathways and precisely define clinical treatment variables to enable clinical translation with PBM therapies.

  10. The duration of light treatment and therapy outcome in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Knapen, S E; van de Werken, M; Gordijn, M C M; Meesters, Y

    2014-09-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent episodes of major depression with a seasonal pattern, treated with light therapy (LT). Duration of light therapy differs. This study investigates retrospectively whether a single week of LT is as effective as two weeks, whether males and females respond differently, and whether there is an effect of expectations as assessed before treatment. 83 women, and 25 men received either one-week (n=42) or two weeks (n=66) of LT were included in three studies. Before LT, patients׳ expectations on therapy response were assessed. Depression severity was similar in both groups before treatment (F(1,106)=0.19ns) and decreased significantly during treatment (main effect "time" F(2,105)=176.7, p<0.001). The speed of therapy response differs significantly in treatment duration, in favor of 1 week (F(2,105)=3.2, p=0.046). A significant positive correlation between expectations and therapy response was found in women (ρ=0.243, p=0.027) and not in men (ρ=-0.154,ns). When expectation was added as a covariate in the repeated-measures analysis it shows a positive effect of the level of expectation on the speed of therapy response (F(2,104)=4.1, p=0.018). A limitation is the retrospective design. There is no difference between 1 and 2 weeks of LT in overall therapy outcome, but the speed of therapy response differed between 1 week LT and 2 weeks LT. Together with the significant correlation between expectations and therapy response in women, we hypothesize that expectations play a role in the speed of therapy response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Approach to Treating Androgenetic Alopecia in Females With Photobiomodulation (Low-Level Laser Therapy).

    PubMed

    Friedman, Shelly; Schnoor, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    Photobiomodulation, also referred to as low-level laser therapy (LLLT), has been studied and used for (among other diseases) the promotion of hair regrowth. A clinical study was developed to define the physiologic effects that occur when the human hair follicle and surrounding tissue structures are exposed to laser light using a novel device that is fitted with an array of laser diode sources operating at 650 nm and placed inside a sports cap to promote discretion while in use. The study demonstrates that low-level laser treatment of the scalp every other day for 17 weeks using the HANDI-DOME LASER device is a safe and effective treatment for androgenetic alopecia in healthy females between the ages of 18 to 60 with Fitzpatrick skin Types I to IV and Ludwig-Savin Baldness Scale I-2 to II-2 baldness patterns. Subjects receiving LLLT at 650 nm achieved a 51% increase in hair counts as compared with sham-treated control patients in this multicenter randomized controlled trial. These results suggest that the emerging technology of low-level laser therapy may play a potentially significant role in health care providers' armamentarium for the disease androgenic alopecia.

  12. Second International Conference on Near-Field Optical Analysis: Photodynamic Therapy and Photobiology Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulgher, Debra L. (Editor); Morrison, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The International NASA/DARPA Photobiology Conference held at the Johnson Space Center in Houston/TX demonstrated where low level laser therapy (LLLT), respectively low intensity light activated biostimulation (LILAB) and nanotechnological applications employing photobiomodulation techniques will presumably go in the next ten years. The conference was a continuation of the 1st International Conference on Nearfield Optical Analysis organized by Andrei Sommer (ENSOMA Lab, University of Ulm, Germany) in November 2000 at Castle Reisenburg, Germany, which started with a group of ten scientists from eight different countries. The 1st conference was co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society to evaluate the molecular mechanism of accelerated and normal wound healing processes. The 2nd conference was co-sponsored by DARPA, NASA-JSC and the Medical College of Wisconsin. Despite the short time between events, the 2nd conference hosted 40 international experts form universities, research institutes, agencies and the industry. The materials published here are expected to become milestones forming a novel platform in biomedical photobiology. The multidisciplinary group of researchers focused on LLLT/LILAB-applications under extreme conditions expected to have beneficial effects particularly in space, on submarines, and under severe battlefield conditions. The group also focused on novel technologies with possibilities allowing investigating the interaction of light with biological systems, molecular mechanisms of wound healing, bone regeneration, nerve regeneration, pain modulation, as well as biomineralization and biofilm formulation processes induced by nanobacteria.

  13. Exploring the effects of low-level laser therapy on fibroblasts and tumor cells following gamma radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Ramos Silva, Camila; Cabral, Fernanda Viana; de Camargo, Claudinei Francisco Morais; Núñez, Silvia Cristina; Mateus Yoshimura, Tania; de Lima Luna, Arthur Cássio; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Ribeiro, Martha Simões

    2016-12-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA damage and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been investigated to prevent or repair detrimental outcomes resulting from IR exposure. Few in vitro studies, however, explore the biological mechanisms underlying those LLLT benefits. Thus, in this work, fibroblasts and tumor cells are submitted to IR with doses of 2.5 Gy and 10 Gy. After twenty-four-h, the cells are exposed to LLLT with fluences of 30 J cm -2 , 90 J cm -2 , and 150 J cm -2 . Cellular viability, cell cycle phases, cell proliferation index and senescence are evaluated on days 1 and 4 after LLLT irradiation. For fibroblasts, LLLT promotes - in a fluence-dependent manner - increments in cell viability and proliferation, while a reduction in the senescence was observed. Regarding tumor cells, no influences of LLLT on cell viability are noticed. Whereas LLLT enhances cell populations in S and G 2 /M cell cycle phases for both cellular lines, a decrease in proliferation and increase in senescence was verified only for tumor cells. Putting together, the results suggest that fibroblasts and tumor cells present different responses to LLLT following exposure to gamma-radiation, and these promising results should stimulate further investigations. Senescence of tumor cells and fibroblasts on the 4 th day after ionizing radiation (IR) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) exposures. The number of senescent cells increased significantly for tumor cells (a) while for fibroblasts no increment was observed (b). The blue collor indicates senescence activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer Cells Using a Flash Wave Light Xenon Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Kashikura, Kasumi; Yokoi, Satomi; Koiwa, Yumiko; Tokuoka, Yoshikazu; Kawashima, Norimichi

    We determined photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy using a flash wave (FW) and a continuous wave (CW) light, of which the fluence rate was 70 W/cm2, for murine thymic lymphoma cells (EL-4) cultivated in vitro. The irradiation frequency and the pulse width of the FW light were in the range of 1-32 Hz and less than one millisecond, respectively. 5-Aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) was used as a photosensitizer. When EL-4 with ALA administration was irradiated by the light for 4 h (irradiation fluence: 1.0J/cm2), the survival rate of EL-4 by the FW light was lower than that by the CW light, except for the FW light with irradiation frequency of 32 Hz, and decreased gradually with decreasing irradiation frequency. Moreover, the FW light, especially at lower irradiation frequency, was superior to the CW light for the generation of singlet oxygen in an aqueous PpIX solution. Therefore, thehigher PDT efficacy for EL-4 of the FW light would be caused by the greater generation of singlet oxygen in the cells.

  15. Amelioration of Cardiac Function and Activation of Anti-Inflammatory Vasoactive Peptides Expression in the Rat Myocardium by Low Level Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of low-level laser and light-emitting diode in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Núbia Cristina Rodrigues; Barbosa, Ana Maria; Vale, Mariana Lima; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; de Lima, Carlos José; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and light-emitting diode (LED) on formation of edema, increase in vascular permeability, and articular joint hyperalgesia in zymosan-induced arthritis. It has been suggested that low-level laser and LED irradiation can modulate inflammatory processes. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats (250-280 g) by intra-articular injection of zymosan (1 mg in 50 microL of a sterile saline solution) into one rear knee joint. Animals were irradiated immediately, 1 h, and 2 h after zymosan administration with a semiconductor laser (685 nm and 830 nm) and an LED at 628 nm, with the same dose (2.5 J/cm(2)) for laser and LED. In the positive control group, animals were injected with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone 1 h prior to the zymosan administration. Edema was measured by the wet/dry weight difference of the articular tissue, the increase in vascular permeability was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue dye, and joint hyperalgesia was measured using the rat knee-joint articular incapacitation test. Irradiation with 685 nm and 830 nm laser wavelengths significantly inhibited edema formation, vascular permeability, and hyperalgesia. Laser irradiation, averaged over the two wavelengths, reduced the vascular permeability by 24%, edema formation by 23%, and articular incapacitation by 59%. Treatment with LED (628 nm), with the same fluence as the laser, had no effect in zymosan-induced arthritis. LLLT reduces inflammatory signs more effectively than LED irradiation with similar irradiation times (100 sec), average outputs (20 mW), and energy doses (2 J) in an animal model of zymosan-induced arthritis. The anti-inflammatory effects of LLLT appear to be a class effect, which is not wavelength specific in the red and infrared parts of the optical spectrum.

  17. Light room therapy effective in mild forms of seasonal affective disorder--a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rastad, C; Ulfberg, J; Lindberg, P

    2008-06-01

    The most common way to provide bright light therapy to Swedish patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), is treatment in a light therapy room. Since few studies have evaluated treatment provided in this setting and few have evaluated the effect of bright light in sub-clinical SAD (S-SAD), such a study including a one-month follow-up was designed. Fifty adults recruited from a previous prevalence study and clinically assessed as having SAD or S-SAD, were randomised to treatment in a light room or to a three-week waiting-list control group. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorders Self-rating 29-items Version (SIGH-SAD/SR) was used to measure depressive mood at baseline, directly following treatment and at the one-month follow-up. ANCOVA with adjustment for baseline depression score, showed a significant main effect for the light room therapy group (p<0.001). Fifty-four percent (n=13/24) improved > or = 50% while no such improvement was seen in the control condition (n=0/24). After merging the two groups, repeated measures ANOVA confirmed the experimental analysis (p<0.001). At the one-month follow-up, 83.0% (n=39/47) had improved > or = 50% and 63.8% (n=30/47) had normal depression scores, i.e. < or = 8. Light room therapy was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in subjects with winter depressive mood. Results were maintained over a period of one month.

  18. Biostimulatory effects of low-level laser therapy on epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts treated with zoledronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, F. G.; Pansani, T. N.; Turrioni, A. P. S.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Hebling, J.; de Souza Costa, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been considered as an adjuvant treatment for bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, presenting positive clinical outcomes. However, there are no data regarding the effect of LLLT on oral tissue cells exposed to bisphosphonates. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LLLT on epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts exposed to a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate—zoledronic acid (ZA). Cells were seeded in wells of 24-well plates, incubated for 48 h and then exposed to ZA at 5 μM for an additional 48 h. LLLT was performed with a diode laser prototype—LaserTABLE (InGaAsP—780 nm ± 3 nm, 25 mW), at selected energy doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3, 5, and 7 J cm-2 in three irradiation sessions, every 24 h. Cell metabolism, total protein production, gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and collagen type I (Col-I), and cell morphology were evaluated 24 h after the last irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests at 5% significance. Selected LLLT parameters increased the functions of epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts treated with ZA. Gene expression of VEGF and Col-I was also increased. Specific parameters of LLLT biostimulated fibroblasts and epithelial cells treated with ZA. Analysis of these in vitro data may explain the positive in vivo effects of LLLT applied to osteonecrosis lesions.

  19. Low-Level Laser Therapy Reduces Lung Inflammation in an Experimental Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Involving P2X7 Receptor.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Moraes, Gabriel; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; de Brito, Auriléia Aparecida; Alves, Cintia Estefano; de Oliveira, Nicole Cristine Rigonato; Dos Santos Dias, Alana; Matos, Yves Silva Teles; Oliveira-Junior, Manoel Carneiro; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; da Palma, Renata Kelly; Candeo, Larissa Carbonera; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestine; Gimenes Júnior, João Antonio; Aimbire, Flavio; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation, airway inflammation and remodeling, and enlargement of alveolar spaces. COPD is in the top five leading causes of deaths worldwide and presents a high economic cost. However, there are some preventive measures to lower the risk of developing COPD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a new effective therapy, with very low cost and no side effects. So, our objective was to investigate if LLLT reduces pulmonary alterations in an experimental model of COPD. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to cigarette smoke for 75 days (2x/day). After 60 days to smoke exposure, the treated group was submitted to LLLT (diode laser, 660 nm, 30 mW, and 3 J/cm 2 ) for 15 days and euthanized for morphologic and functional analysis of the lungs. Our results showed that LLLT significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and the proinflammatory cytokine secretion such as IL-1 β , IL-6, and TNF- α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We also observed that LLLT decreased collagen deposition as well as the expression of purinergic P2X7 receptor. On the other hand, LLLT increased the IL-10 release. Thus, LLLT can be pointed as a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  20. Platelet-rich plasma, low-level laser therapy, or their combination promotes periodontal regeneration in fenestration defects: a preliminary in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Maria J H; de Campos, Natália; Messora, Michel R; Pola, Natália M; Santinoni, Carolina S; Bomfim, Suely R M; Fucini, Stephen E; Ervolino, Edilson; de Almeida, Juliano M; Theodoro, Letícia H; Garcia, Valdir G

    2014-06-01

    This study histomorphometrically analyzes the influence of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), low-level laser therapy (LLLT), or their combination on the healing of periodontal fenestration defects (PFDs) in rats. PFDs were surgically created in the mandibles of 80 rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: 1) C (control) and 2) PRP, defects were filled with blood clot or PRP, respectively; 3) LLLT and 4) PRP/LLLT, defects received laser irradiation, were filled with blood clot or PRP, respectively, and then irradiated again. Animals were euthanized at either 10 or 30 days post-surgery. Percentage of new bone (NB), density of newly formed bone (DNB), new cementum (NC), and extension of remaining defect (ERD) were histomorphometrically evaluated. Data were statistically analyzed (analysis of variance; Tukey test, P <0.05). At 10 days, group PRP presented ERD significantly lower than group C. At 30 days, group PRP presented NB and DNB significantly greater than group C. Groups LLLT, PRP, and PRP/LLLT showed significant NC formation at 30 days, with collagen fibers inserted obliquely or perpendicularly to the root surface. NC formation was not observed in any group C specimen. LLLT, PRP, or their combination all promoted NC formation with a functional periodontal ligament. The combination PRP/LLLT did not show additional positive effects compared to the use of either therapy alone.

  1. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  2. Assessment of laser photobiomodulation and polarized light on the healing of cutaneous wounds on euthyroid and hypothyroid induced rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Weyll, Barbara Mayoral Pedroso; da Costa Lino, Maíra Dória M.; Ramalho, Maria Jose Pedreira; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio Luis

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or polarized light (PL) in cutaneous wound healing of hypothyroid rats at dosages of 20 or 40J/cm2. Bioestimulatory effects of Laser radiation and Polarized light are recognized alternative therapies to improve healing on systemic disease patients, but their usefulness in the improvement of hypothyroidism healing impairment is uncertain till date. Forty Wistar rats were used in this study. Hypothyroidism was propylthiouracil- induced. Standard excisional cutaneous wounds were created without suturing and LLLT (λ660nm, 30mW, φ 3mm) or PL (λ 400-2000nm, 40mW, φ 10mm) was applied every 48 hours up to seven days on experimental groups. The rats were killed on the eighth day when wound contraction was assessed. The healing features were evaluated by light microscopy (H/E and Sirius Red). The cutaneous wounds of hypothyroid rats showed delayed healing process characterized by reduced thickness of epithelial layers, incipient formation of disorganized collagen fibers and wound contraction to a lesser extent (FISHER, p=0.0276), when compared to the euthyroid group. The use of both the Laser and Polarized Light on hypothyroid rats increased the amount of fibroblasts and the thickness of collagen fibers, especially on the L 20J/cm2 group. Euthyroid rats have still demonstrated more regular collagen fibers pattern than hypothyroid rats. It was therefore concluded that hypothyroidism delays wound healing and both Laser photobiomodulation and Polarized Light at 20j/cm2 dosages had improved the healing process in hypothyroid rats.

  3. The effect of polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Sedighipour, Leyla; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy.

  4. The Effect of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) Therapy on Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Results: Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Conclusion: Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy. PMID:25606338

  5. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle: assessment of irradiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT wavelengths, using continuous coherent Laser illumination (830 nm and 980 nm) and non-coherent LED illumination (850 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood. We verified that all applied doses of coherent radiation produce an effect on reducing the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines, while no treatment effect was observed after irradiation with non-coherent radiation. The best results were obtained for 40 mW at 830 nm. The results may suggest an important role of coherence properties of laser in LLLT.

  6. Analgesic effects of oligonol, acupuncture and quantum light therapy on chronic nonbacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Akdere, Hakan; Oztekin, Ilhan; Arda, Ersan; Aktoz, Tevfik; Turan, Fatma Nesrin; Burgazli, Kamil Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis (CNBP) is a condition that frequently causes long-term pain and a significant decrease in the quality of life. The present study aimed to examine the analgesic effects of oligonol, acupuncture, quantum light therapy and their combinations on estrogen-induced CNBP in rats. This experimental study was conducted in Edirne, Turkey, using a simple randomized allocation. A total of 90 adult male Wistar rats were randomized into 9 groups of 10 rats each: Group I, control; Group II, CNBP, Group III, oligonol only, Group IV, acupuncture only; Group V, quantum only; Group VI, oligonol + quantum; Group VII, acupuncture + oligonol; Group VIII, quantum + acupuncture; Group IX, acupuncture + quantum + oligonol. Oligonol treatment was given at a dose of 60 mg/day for 6 weeks. Conceptual vessels (CV) 3 and 4, and bilaterally urinary bladder (Bl) 32 and 34 points were targeted with 1-hour acupuncture stimulation. The quantum light therapy was applied in 5-minute sessions for 6 weeks (3-times/a week). For pain measurements, mechanical pressure was applied to a point 2 cm distal to the root of the tail to elicit pain and consequent parameters (peak force, latency time of response and total length of measurement) were assessed. Analgesic effects were observed with all treatment regimens; however, the most prominent median analgesic effect was shown in the quantum light therapy in combination with acupuncture for estrogen-induced CNBP (PF1 = 663.9, PF2 = 403.4) (P = 0.012). Furthermore, we observed that monotherapy with quantum light showed a better analgesic efficacy as compared to oligonol and acupuncture monotherapies (PF1 = 1044.6, PF2 = 661.2) (P = 0.018, P = 0.008, P = 0.018; respectively). All treatment modalities showed a significant analgesic effect on CNBP in rats, being most prominent with the quantum light therapy.

  7. Bright light therapy and melatonin in motor restless behaviour in dementia: a placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Haffmans, P M; Sival, R C; Lucius, S A; Cats, Q; van Gelder, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bright light therapy combined with melatonin on motor restless behaviour in dementia. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial consisting of four periods. One week wash-out was followed by a 2-week period of light therapy in combination with placebo or melatonin. The second wash-out period of 1 week was followed by 2 weeks of treatment (cross-over). Twenty-four bed medium-stay psychogeriatric ward at a Dutch psychiatric teaching hospital. Ten patients, who met the criteria for dementia (DSM-IV) and motor restless behaviour (subscale 10 of the GIP), were included. Informed consent was obtained by proxy. All subjects were exposed during 2x5 consecutive days for 30 minutes to 10,000 lux bright light and randomly administered 2.5 mg melatonin or placebo at 22.00 h. Clinical Global Impression (CGI), Dutch version of the geriatric behavioural observation scale (GIP), Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale (SDAS) were assessed after each wash-out and treatment period. Outcome criteria were CGI, assessing motor restless behaviour, the SDAS, measuring extrovert aggression and the GIP, assessing social, psychomotor and emotional behaviour. Six demented inpatients completed the trial. Positive effects were found for the treatment combined with placebo. Patients were less restless and more co-operative. The condition with melatonin showed no additional positive effects, additionally, patients became more aggressive and showed the same or more disturbed behaviour. Bright light therapy has a positive effect on motor restless behaviour. Light therapy in combination with melatonin has no positive effects. The results might be explained by a possible overshoot of chronobiological synchronisation or the timing of the melatonin intake. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Randomized clinical trial of bright light therapy for antepartum depression: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Epperson, C Neill; Terman, Michael; Terman, Jiuan Su; Hanusa, Barbara H; Oren, Dan A; Peindl, Kathleen S; Wisner, Katherine L

    2004-03-01

    Bright light therapy was shown to be a promising treatment for depression during pregnancy in a recent open-label study. In an extension of this work, we report findings from a double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study. Ten pregnant women with DSM-IV major depressive disorder were randomly assigned from April 2000 to January 2002 to a 5-week clinical trial with either a 7000 lux (active) or 500 lux (placebo) light box. At the end of the randomized controlled trial, subjects had the option of continuing in a 5-week extension phase. The Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version was administered to assess changes in clinical status. Salivary melatonin was used to index circadian rhythm phase for comparison with antidepressant results. Although there was a small mean group advantage of active treatment throughout the randomized controlled trial, it was not statistically significant. However, in the longer 10-week trial, the presence of active versus placebo light produced a clear treatment effect (p =.001) with an effect size (0.43) similar to that seen in antidepressant drug trials. Successful treatment with bright light was associated with phase advances of the melatonin rhythm. These findings provide additional evidence for an active effect of bright light therapy for antepartum depression and underscore the need for an expanded randomized clinical trial.

  9. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  10. Effects of low-level laser therapy on bone healing of critical-size defects treated with bovine bone graft.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Alvaro Francisco; Faleiros, Paula Lazilha; Carmona, Luana Rodrigues; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Theodoro, Letícia Helena; de Araujo, Nathália Januario; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; de Almeida, Juliano Milanezi

    2016-10-01

    To histomorphometrically analyze the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone formation process in surgically created critical-size defects (CSDs) treated with bovine bone graft (BBG) and its influence over particles' resorption of BBG. A 10-mm diameter CSD was surgically created in the calvaria of 64 male rats, which were distributed into 4 experimental groups: the C group (control), only blood clot; the LLLT group, LLLT (GaAlAs, 660nm) and blood clot; the BBG group, CSD filled with BBG; the BBG/LLLT group, LLLT and CSD filled with BBG. Animals were euthanized at either 30 or 60days post-operation. A histological analysis was performed. Additionally, the percentage of newly formed bone area (NFBA) and remaining particles areas (RPA) of BBG were histometrically evaluated and data statistically analyzed. The LLLT (5.82±2.05; 7.34±1.01) group presented significantly greater NFBA when compared to the C group (1.61±0.30; 5.59±0.94) at 30 and 60days post-operation (p<0.05). The BBG/LLLT group (7.39±1.45; 9.44±2.36) presented significantly greater NFBA than the BBG group (3.85±1.56; 8.02±0.63) at 30 and 60days postoperation (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean percentage of implanted material RPA between the BBG and the BBG/LLLT groups. LLLT can improve bone formation process in CSD filled or not with BBG in rat calvaria, but it is not able to accelerate particles resorption of this material in the interior of bone defect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of low-level laser therapy on the healing of human bone maxillofacial defects: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Santinoni, Carolina Dos Santos; Oliveira, Hiskell Francine Fernandes; Batista, Victor Eduardo de Souza; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Verri, Fellippo Ramos

    2017-04-01

    This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to enhance maxillofacial area bone repair. A comprehensive search of studies published up to February 2017 and listed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The 15 selected studies evaluated a total of 374 patients (mean age, 28.5years) who were treated with LLLT. Gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) were the most commonly used devices, and LLLT parameters varied greatly. Wavelengths varied from 500 to 1000nm. Tooth extraction, distraction osteogenesis, maxillary expansion, periodontal defects, orthodontic movement and maxillary cystic defects were evaluated. From the 15 selected studies, six evaluated bone repair (primary outcomes). Of these, four studies showed improvement in bone formation after using LLLT, two demonstrated improved results for only one follow up period, and one showed no additional benefits. The other 9 studies evaluated secondary parameters related to healing (secondary outcomes) in the maxillofacial area after applying LLLT, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and healing accelerator effects, and quality of life related to oral health. There were no adverse or negative effects of LLLT reported. Within the limitation of this review, a possible improvement in bone density can be found when LLLT is applied postoperatively in maxillofacial bony defects. LLLT also seems to promote anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects and accelerate healing, as well as enhance quality of life related to oral health. However, LLLT use protocols need to be standardized before more specific conclusions can be drawn about this subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Plus Bright Light Therapy for Adolescent Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Design: Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Setting: Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. Patients: 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs WL: N = 17). Interventions: CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. Measurements and Results: DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P < 0.0001), yet 13% still met DSPD criteria at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: CBT plus BLT for adolescent DSPD is effective for improving multiple sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed

  13. Effect of NIR photobiomodulation therapy in a cellular wound healing model.

    PubMed

    König, Anke; Missalla, Svenja; Valesky, Eva M; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja N

    2018-04-26

    Wound healing is a complex process which can be divided into four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and scar-remodelling (1). Imbalance of cell proliferation, synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins can cause e.g. chronic wounds or the development of hypertrophic scars. In recent years the application of photobiomodulatory therapies has increased. Both low level light therapy (LLLT) and near infrared (NIR) have a high tissue penetration efficiency without inducing a severe surface temperature increase or pain (2). Water-filtered near-infrared irradiation (wIRA), composed of a thermal component and NIR (780nm-1.400nm), is applied for a variety of different clinical conditions including wound healing (3). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Delayed sleep phase disorder: clinical perspective with a focus on light therapy

    PubMed Central

    Figueiro, Mariana G

    2016-01-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is common among adolescents and further increases their susceptibility to chronic sleep restriction and associated detrimental outcomes, including increased risk of depression, drug and alcohol use, behavioral problems, and poor scholastic performance. DSPD is characterized by sleep onset that occurs significantly later than desired bedtimes and societal norms. Individuals with DSPD exhibit long sleep latencies when attempting to sleep at conventional bedtimes. Circadian sleep disorders such as DSPD can occur when there is misalignment between sleep timing and societal norms. This review discusses studies using light therapy to advance the timing of sleep in adolescents and college students, in particular on those suffering from DSPD. A discussion on how to increase effectiveness of light therapy in the field will also be provided. PMID:27110143

  15. Spectral matching technology for light-emitting diode-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Ru-ting; Guo, Zhen-ning; Lin, Jie-ben

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to obtain the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED)-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device (JPTD), the bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target spectrum. According to the spectral constructing theory, a simple genetic algorithm as the spectral matching algorithm was first proposed in this study. The optimal combination ratios of LEDs were obtained, and the required LEDs number was then calculated. Meanwhile, the algorithm was compared with the existing spectral matching algorithms. The results show that this algorithm runs faster with higher efficiency, the switching time consumed is 2.06 s, and the fitting spectrum is very similar to the target spectrum with 98.15% matching degree. Thus, blue LED-based JPTD can replace traditional blue fluorescent tube, the spectral matching technology that has been put forward can be applied to the light source spectral matching for jaundice photodynamic therapy and other medical phototherapy.

  16. Bright light treatment as add-on therapy for depression in 28 adolescents: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Niederhofer, Helmut; von Klitzing, Kai

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, a significant incidence of depression in the younger population has been observed. Bright light therapy, an effective therapeutic option for depressed adults, could also provide safe, economical, and effective rapid recovery in adolescents. The randomized trial included 28 inpatients (18 females and 10 males) between 14 and 17 years old with depressive complaints. The study was conducted between February and December of 2010 in Rodewisch, Germany. Half of the patients (n = 14) first received placebo (50 lux) 1 hour a day in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am for 1 week and then received bright light therapy (2,500 lux) for 1 week in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am. The other half (n = 14) first received bright light therapy and then received placebo. Patients were encouraged to continue ongoing treatment (fluoxetine 20 mg/day and 2 sessions of psychotherapy/week) because there were no changes in medication/dosage and psychotherapy since 1 month before the 4-week study period. For assessment of depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, and on the day after and 1 week after bright light treatment. Saliva samples of melatonin and cortisol were collected at 8:00 am and 8:00 pm 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, on the day after bright light treatment, and 1 week after bright light treatment and were assayed for melatonin and cortisol to observe any change in circadian timing. The BDI scores improved significantly (P = .015). The assays of saliva showed significant differences between treatment and placebo for evening melatonin (P = .040). No significant adverse reactions were observed. Antidepressant response to bright light treatment in this age group was statistically superior to placebo. World Health Organization International Clinical

  17. A Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Low-Level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Hair Loss.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Foley, Kelly A

    2017-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is currently in use to stimulate hair growth and is quickly gaining in popularity due to the ease of use and absence of side effects. In 2015 alone, the number of LLLT devices with the Food and Drug Administration clearance has doubled. To consolidate evidence and establish which data are still required for the widespread acceptance of LLLT for hair loss therapy. A thorough search of the PubMed database was conducted to obtain studies investigating LLLT for androgenetic alopecia in men and women. Nine trials were identified for comb and helmet/cap devices, five of which were randomized controlled trials. Data comparison across LLLT trials and with traditional hair loss therapy (minoxidil, finasteride) was not straight forward because there was a lack of visual evidence, sample sizes were low, and there were large variations in study duration and efficacy measurements. There are a number of unanswered questions about the optimum treatment regimen, including maintenance treatment and the long-term consequences of LLLT use. Moving forward, protocols should be standardized across trials. Moreover, it is recommended that future trials include visual evidence and trial duration be expanded to 12 months.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Outcomes of Laser Therapy, Ultrasound Therapy, and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Aslihan; Cerrahoglu, Lale; Orguc, Sebnem

    We determined and compared the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), therapeutic ultrasound (US) therapy, and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a randomized, prospective, comparative clinical study. A total of 60 patients with a diagnosis of chronic plantar fasciitis were divided randomly into 3 treatment groups: group 1 underwent 15 sessions of LLLT (8 J/cm 2 ; 830 nm); group 2 underwent 15 sessions of continuous US (1 mHz; 2 W/cm 2 ); and group 3 underwent 3 sessions of ESWT (2000 shocks). All patients were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), heel tenderness index (HTI), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, Roles-Maudsley score, and MRI before and 1 month after treatment. The primary efficacy success criterion was the percentage of decrease in heel pain of >60% from baseline at 1 month after treatment for ≥2 of the 3 heel pain (VAS) measurements. Significant improvement was measured using the mean VAS, AOFAS scale, and HTI scores for all 3 groups. The thickness of the plantar fascia had decreased significantly on MRI in all 3 groups. The treatment success rate was 70.6% in the LLLT group, 65% in the ESWT group, and 23.5% in the US group. LLLT and ESWT proved significantly superior to US therapy using the primary efficacy criterion (p = .006 and p = .012, respectively), with no significant difference between the LLLT and ESWT groups (p > .05). The treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis with LLLT and ESWT resulted in similar outcomes and both were more successful than US therapy in pain improvement and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of light ion therapy at the Karolinska Hospital and Institute.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Hans; Ringborg, Ulrik; Näslund, Ingemar; Brahme, Anders

    2004-12-01

    Recent developments in radiation therapy have made it possible to optimize the high dose region to cover almost any target volume and shape at the same time as the dose level to adjacent organs at risk is acceptable. Further implementations of IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy), and inverse treatment planning using already available technologies but also foreseeable improved design of therapy accelerators delivering electron- and photon beams, will bring these advances to the benefit of a broad population of cancer patients. Protons will therefore generally not be needed since in most situations the improvement will be insignificant or moderate due to the large lateral penumbra with deep proton therapy. A further step would be to use He-ions, which have only half the penumbra width of protons and still a fairly low-LET in the spread-out Bragg peak. There is however still a group of patients that cannot be helped by these advances as the tumor might be radioresistant for the presently utilized low ionization density beam qualities. The ultimate step in the therapy development process should therefore be to optimize the beam quality for each tumor-normal tissue situation. To facilitate beam quality optimization light ions are needed. It is argued that in many radioresistant tumors a dose-mean LET of 25-50 eV/nm in the target would be optimum as then tumor cells will be lost in the highest proportion through apoptotic cell kill and the superficial tissues will still be irradiated with a fairly low LET. Light ions using Li, Be, B, and C would then be the ideal choice. In this paper a light ion facility is outlined for the Karolinska University Hospital facilitating both dose distribution and beam quality optimization.

  20. Light therapy for multiple sclerosis-associated fatigue: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J; Manalo, Natalie C; Grundy, Sara J; Houghton, Melissa A; Hotan, Gladia C; Erickson, Hans; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    Fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, more than a quarter of whom consider fatigue to be their most disabling symptom. However, there are few effective treatment options for fatigue. We aim to investigate whether supplemental exposure to bright white light will reduce MS-associated fatigue. Eligible participants will have clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis based on the revised McDonald criteria (2010) and a score ≥36 on the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Participants will be randomized 1:1 to bright white light (10,000 lux; active condition) or dim red light (<300 lux; control condition) self-administered for 1 hour twice daily. The study will include a 2-week baseline period, a 4-week treatment period, and a 4-week washout period. Participants will record their sleep duration, exercise, caffeine, and medication intake daily. Participants will record their fatigue using the Visual Analogue Fatigue Scale (VAFS) 4 times every third day, providing snapshots of their fatigue level at different times of day. Participants will self-report their fatigue severity using FSS on 3 separate visits: at baseline (week 0), following completion of the treatment phase (week 6), and at study completion (week 10). The primary outcome will be the change in the average FSS score after light therapy. We will perform an intention-to-treat analysis, comparing the active and control groups to assess the postintervention difference in fatigue levels reported on FSS. Secondary outcome measures include change in global VAFS scores during the light therapy and self-reported quality of life in the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. We present a study design and rationale for randomizing a nonpharmacological intervention for MS-associated fatigue, using bright light therapy. The study limitations relate to the logistical issues of a self-administered intervention requiring frequent participant self-report in a relapsing condition

  1. Comparison of the Light Charged Particles on Scatter Radiation Dose in Thyroid Hadron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, M; Mowlavi, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hadron therapy is a novel technique of cancer radiation therapy which employs charged particles beams, 1H and light ions in particular. Due to their physical and radiobiological properties, they allow one to obtain a more conformal treatment, sparing better the healthy tissues located in proximity of the tumor and allowing a higher control of the disease. Objective: As it is well known, these light particles can interact with nuclei in the tissue, and produce the different secondary particles such as neutron and photon. These particles can damage specially the critical organs behind of thyroid gland. Methods: In this research, we simulated neck geometry by MCNPX code and calculated the light particles dose at distance of 2.14 cm in thyroid gland, for different particles beam: 1H, 2H, 3He, and 4He. Thyroid treatment is important because the spine and vertebrae is situated right behind to the thyroid gland on the posterior side. Results: The results show that 2H has the most total flux for photon and neutron, 1.944E-3 and 1.7666E-2, respectively. Whereas 1H and 3He have best conditions, 8.88609E-4 and 1.35431E-3 for photon, 4.90506E-4 and 4.34057E-3 for neutron, respectively. The same calculation has obtained for energy depositions for these particles. Conclusion: In this research, we investigated that which of these light particles can deliver the maximum dose to the normal tissues and the minimum dose to the tumor. By comparing these results for the mentioned light particles, we find out 1H and 3He is the best therapy choices for thyroid glands whereas 2H is the worst. PMID:25505774

  2. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance.

  3. Treatment of actinic cheilitis by photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Zaiac, Martin; Clement, Annabelle

    2011-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC), a common disorder of the lower lip, should be treated early to prevent progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) activated by blue light for the treatment of AC. Fifteen patients with clinically evident or biopsy-proven AC received two treatments with ALA PDT with blue light activation. Treatments were spaced three to five weeks apart. Most patients achieved 65% to 75% clearance three to five weeks after the first treatment and all achieved more than 75% clearance one month after the second treatment. Three patients achieved complete clearance. Pain and burning during irradiation were absent or mild. All patients said they would repeat the procedure. ALA PDT with 417 nm blue light is a promising option for the treatment of AC of the lower lip.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy for adolescent delayed sleep phase disorder.

    PubMed

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs. WL: N = 17). CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P < 0.0001), yet 13% still met DSPD criteria at the 6-month follow-up. CBT plus BLT for adolescent DSPD is effective for improving multiple sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Australia-New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044.

  5. Light therapy for older patients with non-seasonal depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue; Ma, Jing; Wu, Shiyou; Chi, Iris; Bai, Zhenggang

    2018-05-01

    Light therapy has become an increasingly common treatment for adults with depression, yet the role of light therapy for non-seasonal depression among older adults remains unclear. This meta-analysis sought to evaluate the effectiveness of light therapy among older patients with non-seasonal depression. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI and CBM from the inception of each database to May 2017. Two researchers conducted the literature screening, data extraction, and methodological quality assessment independently. We used the Cochrane Collaboration's bias assessment tool to evaluate the risk of bias for included studies, and Review Manager 5.2.3 Software for the meta-analysis. Six trials with a total of 359 patients were included, and five studies were assessed as being of low risk for bias. We evaluated the effect of light therapy on depression by the reduction of depressive symptoms (SMD = 0.45; 95% CI= [0.14, 0.75]). The subgroup analysis did not find significant moderating effects of depression with intervention intensity, light type, measuring scale or intervention duration. Most of the study samples were not representative of the larger population of adults and therefore caution should be used when interpreting the findings. Light therapy has a positive effect on geriatric non-seasonal depression. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the curative effect of light therapy in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of light therapy on depression and sleep disruption in older adults in a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mann-Chian; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Wen-Li; Smith, Graeme D

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of light therapy on depression and sleep disruption in older adults residing in a long-term care facility. Psychological morbidity is a problem commonly seen in older adults residing in long-term care facilities. Limited research has addressed the effect of light therapy on depression in this population. A quasi-experimental pretest and posttest design was used. Thirty-four participants in the experimental group received light therapy by sitting in front of a 10000-lux light box 30 min in the morning, three times a week for 4 weeks. Thirty-one participants in the control group received routine care without light therapy. Depression was measured by Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form at baseline and week 4. After receiving 4 weeks of light therapy, the mean depression score in the experimental group decreased from 7.24 (SD3.42) at pretest to 5.91 (SD 3.40) at posttest, and had a significant reduction (t = 2.22, P = 0.03). However, there was no significant difference in depression score and sleep disruption between the experimental group and control group. Light therapy might have the potential to reduce depressive symptoms and sleep disruption and may be a viable intervention to improve mental health of older adults in the long-term care facilities. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Shining Light on Nanotechnology to Help Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Asheesh; Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Vecchio, Daniela; Antunes-Melo, Wanessa C; Dai, Tianhong; Chiang, Long Y.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Phototherapy can be used in two completely different but complementary therapeutic applications. While low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) uses red or near-infrared light alone to reduce inflammation, pain and stimulate tissue repair and regeneration, photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of light plus non-toxic dyes (called photosensitizers) to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill infectious microorganisms and cancer cells or destroy unwanted tissue (neo-vascularization in the choroid, atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries). The recent development of nanotechnology applied to medicine (nanomedicine) has opened a new front of advancement in the field of phototherapy and has provided hope for the development of nanoscale drug delivery platforms for effective killing of pathological cells and to promote repair and regeneration. Despite the well-known beneficial effects of phototherapy and nanomaterials in producing the killing of unwanted cells and promoting repair and regeneration, there are few reports that combine all three elements i.e. phototherapy, nanotechnology and, tissue repair and regeneration. However, these areas in all possible binary combinations have been addressed by many workers. The present review aims at highlighting the combined multi-model applications of phototherapy, nanotechnology and, reparative and regeneration medicine and outlines current strategies, future applications and limitations of nanoscale-assisted phototherapy for the management of cancers, microbial infections and other diseases, and to promote tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:22951919

  8. Blue light versus red light for photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinoma in patients with Gorlin syndrome: A bilaterally controlled comparison study.

    PubMed

    Maytin, Edward V; Kaw, Urvashi; Ilyas, Muneeb; Mack, Judith A; Hu, Bo

    2018-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-scarring alternative for treating basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in patients with Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS), also known as Gorlin syndrome. In Europe, red light (635 nm) is the predominant source for PDT, whereas in the United States blue light (400 nm) is more widely available. The objective of this study was to conduct a head-to-head comparison of blue light and red light PDT in the same BCNS patients. In a pilot study of three patients with 141 BCC lesions, 5-aminolevulinate (20% solution) was applied to all tumors. After 4 h, half of the tumors were illuminated with blue light and the remainder with red light. To ensure safety while treating this many tumors simultaneously, light doses were escalated gradually. Six treatments were administered in three biweekly sessions over 4 months, with a final evaluation at 6 months. Tumor status was documented with high-resolution photographs. Persistent lesions were biopsied at 6 months. Clearance rates after blue light (98%) were slightly better than after red light (93%), with blue light shown to be statistically non-inferior to red light. Eight suspicious lesions were biopsied, 5 after red light (5/5 were BCC) and 3 after blue light (1 was BCC). Blue light PDT was reportedly less painful. Blue light and red light PDT appear to be equally safe and perhaps equally effective for treating BCC tumors in BCNS patients. Further studies to evaluate long-term clearance after blue light PDT are needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alternatives to Outdoor Daylight Illumination for Photodynamic Therapy--Use of Greenhouses and Artificial Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Catharina M; Heerfordt, Ida M; Heydenreich, Jakob; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2016-02-29

    Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy (daylight PDT) is a simple and pain free treatment of actinic keratoses. Weather conditions may not always allow daylight PDT outdoors. We compared the spectrum of five different lamp candidates for indoor "daylight PDT" and investigated their ability to photobleach protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Furthermore, we measured the amount of PpIX activating daylight available in a glass greenhouse, which can be an alternative when it is uncomfortable for patients to be outdoors. The lamps investigated were: halogen lamps (overhead and slide projector), white light-emitting diode (LED) lamp, red LED panel and lamps used for conventional PDT. Four of the five light sources were able to photobleach PpIX completely. For halogen light and the red LED lamp, 5000 lux could photobleach PpIX whereas 12,000 lux were needed for the white LED lamp. Furthermore, the greenhouse was suitable for daylight PDT since the effect of solar light is lowered only by 25%. In conclusion, we found four of the five light sources and the greenhouse usable for indoor daylight PDT. The greenhouse is beneficial when the weather outside is rainy or windy. Only insignificant ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) radiation passes through the greenhouse glass, so sun protection is not needed.

  10. Can red-light 5-aminolevulinic photodynamic therapy cure port wine stains on comb animal model?

    PubMed

    Lai, Yongxian; Zhang, Haiyan; Wei, Minglei; Ji, Jie; Shi, Lei; Wang, Peiru; Wang, Bo; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Xiuli

    2018-06-01

    To study the curative effect of red-light 5-Aminolevulinic photodynamic therapy(ALA-PDT) to port wine stains(PWS) on comb animal model. 160 male cocks were randomly divided into 16 groups. The ALA only group was given ALA only topical or systemic application. Light only groups were only given 630 nm red light irradiation with different light density. ALA-PDT groups were given red light after the application of topical or systemic ALA. PDL group was given PDL irradiation. The distribution of fluorescence in tissue after topical or systemic application of ALA was detected. The morphological changes, the pathological changes and the capillary reduction rate of the comb were observed after treatment for 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 days. The PpIX fluorescence generated after topical and systemic application of ALA. In the topical ALA-PDT group at low light density 80 J/cm 2 , the morphology and the histopathology had no obvious change. While under 160 J/cm 2 and 200 J/cm 2 light density, severe erosion and thick scab appeared. The histopathology showed epidermal necrosis and loss. The immunohistochemistry showed that there was no significant change in the number of capillaries under different light density (P > 0.05). In the systemic ALA-PDT group under low light density 80 J/cm 2 , only partial erosion and thin scab was observed on the treatment side. With the increase of light density, thick charred crust and even scar was observed. The histopathology showed that there were different degrees of damage to dermal and epidermal tissues. And the immunohistochemistry showed the capillary reduced significantly in the treatment side (P < 0.01). In control group, the comb is ruddy and plump. These results suggest that either topical or systemic red-light ALA-PDT is not suitable treatment methods for PWS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-level laser therapy improves crescentic glomerulonephritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Masanori; Kaneda, Akira; Kataoka, Yosky

    2013-07-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can reduce inflammation in a variety of clinical conditions, including trauma, postherpetic neuralgia, and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the effect of LLLT on internal organs has not been elucidated. The goal of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of daily external LLLT in an animal model of crescentic glomerulonephritis. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was induced in male Wister Kyoto rats by intravenous injection of antibody for glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The rats were irradiated with a low-reactive level diode laser with an infrared wavelength of 830 nm from the shaved skin surface once a day for 14 days (irradiation spot size on the skin surface, 2.27 cm(2); power intensity, 880 mW/cm(2); irradiation mode, continuous mode; irradiation time, 250 s; energy, 500 J; energy density, 220 J/cm(2)). After laser irradiation for 14 days, animals were killed, and the extent of inflammation was evaluated. Expression of gene for inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Crescent formation in glomeruli and infiltration of macrophages and lymphocytes were assessed by histochemical observation. Injection of anti-GBM antibody induced severe glomerulonephritis with crescent formation. Histological observations indicated that LLLT suppressed crescent formation and infiltration of ED1+ macrophages and CD8+ lymphocytes into the glomeruli. LLLT attenuated the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α messenger RNA in the renal cortex. Externally directed LLLT suppresses the activity of rat anti-GBM crescentic glomerulonephritis in rats. LLLT has the potential to be used for direct treatment of glomerulonephritis.

  12. Early photosensitizer uptake kinetics predict optimum drug-light interval for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown promising results in targeted treatment of cancerous cells by developing localized toxicity with the help of light induced generation of reactive molecular species. The efficiency of this therapy depends on the product of the intensity of light dose and the concentration of photosensitizer (PS) in the region of interest (ROI). On account of this, the dynamic and variable nature of PS delivery and retention depends on many physiological factors that are known to be heterogeneous within and amongst tumors (e.g., blood flow, blood volume, vascular permeability, and lymph drainage rate). This presents a major challenge with respect to how the optimal time and interval of light delivery is chosen, which ideally would be when the concentration of PS molecule is at its maximum in the ROI. In this paper, a predictive algorithm is developed that takes into consideration the variability and dynamic nature of PS distribution in the body on a region-by-region basis and provides an estimate of the optimum time when the PS concentration will be maximum in the ROI. The advantage of the algorithm lies in the fact that it predicts the time in advance as it takes only a sample of initial data points (~12 min) as input. The optimum time calculated using the algorithm estimated a maximum dose that was only 0.58 +/- 1.92% under the true maximum dose compared to a mean dose error of 39.85 +/- 6.45% if a 1 h optimal light deliver time was assumed for patients with different efflux rate constants of the PS, assuming they have the same plasma function. Therefore, if the uptake values of PS for the blood and the ROI is known for only first 12 minutes, the entire curve along with the optimum time of light radiation can be predicted with the help of this algorithm.

  13. Light-oxygen effect in cells and its potential applications in tumour therapy (review)

    SciT

    Zakharov, S D; Ivanov, Andrei V

    1999-12-31

    The light-oxygen effect (POE) represents damage (and at low optical doses, activation) of cells by photogeneration of molecular singlet oxygen from O{sub 2} dissolved in cells, in accordance with the reaction: {sup 3}O{sub 2}+h{nu}{yields}{sup 1}O{sub 2}{yields} biological effect. The phases of evolution of the LOE are similar to the phases, observed in cell experiments, of the photodynamic effect (PDE) the mechanism of which is the basis of the familiar method of photodynamic cancer therapy. The reported proofs of the occurrence of the LOE are in the form of detailed spectra of the biological action of optical radiation on cells recordedmore » in four spectral intervals with the aid of tunable lasers. Allowances are made for the relationships governing a new type of cell excitation, associated with reversible structural transitions in the biomembrane. A demonstration is reported of the same efficiency of cw and pulsed irradiation. An analysis is made of the reasons why the optical doses initiating the PDE and the LOE are comparable. The results are given of the first experimental applications of the LOE in tumour therapy. Identification of the primary photoacceptor (O{sub 2}) in cell biostimulation and photodestruction provides a scientific basis for the development of low-intensity laser light-oxygen cancer therapy methods. (lasers in medicine)« less

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Oligonol, Acupuncture, and Quantum Light Therapy in Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Öztekin, İlhan; Akdere, Hakan; Can, Nuray; Aktoz, Tevfik; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare anti-inflammatory effects of oligonol, acupuncture, and quantum light therapy in rat models of estrogen-induced prostatitis. Adult male Wistar albino rats were grouped as follows: Group I, control (n = 10); Group II, chronic prostatitis (n = 10); Group III, oligonol (n = 10); Group IV, acupuncture (n = 10); Group V, quantum (n = 10); Group VI, oligonol plus quantum (n = 10); Group VII, acupuncture plus oligonol (n = 10); Group VIII, quantum plus acupuncture (n = 10); and Group IX, acupuncture plus quantum plus oligonol (n = 10). Chronic prostatitis (CP) was induced by the administration of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Oligonol was given for 6 weeks at a dose of 60 mg/day. Acupuncture needles were inserted at CV 3/4 and bilaterally B 32/35 points with 1-hour manual stimulation. Quantum therapy was administered in 5-minute sessions three times weekly for 6 weeks. Lateral lobes of prostates were dissected for histopathologic evaluation. Although all of the treatment modalities tested in this study showed anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment of CP in male rats, a synergistic effect was observed for oligonol plus quantum light combination. Monotherapy with oligonol showed a superior anti-inflammatory efficacy as compared to quantum light and acupuncture monotherapies. PMID:26064171

  15. Focused ultrasound-mediated sonochemical internalization: an alternative to light-based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Jonathan; Nair, Rohit Kumar; Madsen, Steen J.; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-07-01

    Activation of sonosensitizers via focused ultrasound (FUS), i.e., sonodynamic therapy has been proposed as an extension to light-activated photodynamic therapy for the treatment of brain as well as other tumors. The use of FUS, as opposed to light, allows treatment to tumor sites buried deep within tissues as well as through the intact skull. We have examined ultrasonic activation of sonosensitizers together with the anticancer agent bleomycin (BLM), i.e., sonochemical internalization (SCI). SCI is a technique that utilizes FUS for the enhanced delivery of endo-lysosomal trapped macromolecules into the cell cytoplasm in a similar manner to light-based photochemical internalization. The released agent can, therefore, exert its full biological activity, in contrast to being degraded by lysosomal hydrolases. Our results indicate that, compared to drug or FUS treatment alone, FUS activation of the sonosensitizer AlPcS2a together with BLM significantly inhibits the ability of treated glioma cells to grow as three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro.

  16. Ultralow-Power Near Infrared Lamp Light Operable Targeted Organic Nanoparticle Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Li, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Wu, Shuang; Zhao, Jianzhang; Han, Gang

    2016-11-09

    Tissue penetration depth is a major challenge in practical photodynamic therapy (PDT). A biocompatible and highly effective near infrared (NIR)-light-absorbing carbazole-substituted BODIPY (Car-BDP) molecule is reported as a class of imaging-guidable deep-tissue activatable photosensitizers for PDT. Car-BDP possesses an intense, broad NIR absorption band (600-800 nm) with a remarkably high singlet oxygen quantum yield (Φ Δ = 67%). After being encapsulated with biodegradable PLA-PEG-FA polymers, Car-BDP can form uniform and small organic nanoparticles that are water-soluble and tumor-targetable. Rather than using laser light, such nanoparticles offer an unprecedented deep-tissue, tumor targeting photodynamic therapeutic effect by using an exceptionally low-power-density and cost-effective lamp light (12 mW cm -2 ). In addition, these nanoparticles can be simultaneously traced in vivo due to their excellent NIR fluorescence. This study signals a major step forward in photodynamic therapy by developing a new class of NIR-absorbing biocompatible organic nanoparticles for effective targeting and treatment of deep-tissue tumors. This work also provides a potential new platform for precise tumor-targeting theranostics and novel opportunities for future affordable clinical cancer treatment.

  17. Novel concept of the smart NIR-light-controlled drug release of black phosphorus nanostructure for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meng; Wang, Dou; Liang, Weiyuan; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Xing; Sang, David Kipkemoi; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Zhongjun; Dong, Biqin; Xing, Feng; Fan, Dianyuan; Bao, Shiyun; Zhang, Han; Cao, Yihai

    2018-01-16

    A biodegradable drug delivery system (DDS) is one the most promising therapeutic strategies for cancer therapy. Here, we propose a unique concept of light activation of black phosphorus (BP) at hydrogel nanostructures for cancer therapy. A photosensitizer converts light into heat that softens and melts drug-loaded hydrogel-based nanostructures. Drug release rates can be accurately controlled by light intensity, exposure duration, BP concentration, and hydrogel composition. Owing to sufficiently deep penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light through tissues, our BP-based system shows high therapeutic efficacy for treatment of s.c. cancers. Importantly, our drug delivery system is completely harmless and degradable in vivo. Together, our work proposes a unique concept for precision cancer therapy by external light excitation to release cancer drugs. If these findings are successfully translated into the clinic, millions of patients with cancer will benefit from our work.

  18. Cognitive predictors and moderators of winter depression treatment outcomes in cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. light therapy.

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, Lilya; Rohan, Kelly J; Evans, Maggie; Mahon, Jennifer N; Nillni, Yael I

    2013-12-01

    There is no empirical basis for determining which seasonal affective disorder (SAD) patients are best suited for what type of treatment. Using data from a parent clinical trial comparing light therapy (LT), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and their combination (CBT + LT) for SAD, we constructed hierarchical linear regression models to explore baseline cognitive vulnerability constructs (i.e., dysfunctional attitudes, negative automatic thoughts, response styles) as prognostic and prescriptive factors of acute and next winter depression outcomes. Cognitive constructs did not predict or moderate acute treatment outcomes. Baseline dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts were prescriptive of next winter treatment outcomes. Participants with higher baseline levels of dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts had less severe depression the next winter if treated with CBT than if treated with LT. In addition, participants randomized to solo LT who scored at or above the sample mean on these cognitive measures at baseline had more severe depressive symptoms the next winter relative to those who scored below the mean. Baseline dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts did not predict treatment outcomes in participants assigned to solo CBT or CBT + LT. Therefore, SAD patients with extremely rigid cognitions did not fare as well in the subsequent winter if treated initially with solo LT. Such patients may be better suited for initial treatment with CBT, which directly targets cognitive vulnerability processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Massage therapy of moderate and light pressure and vibrator effects on EEG and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Diego, Miguel A; Field, Tiffany; Sanders, Chris; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Three types of commonly used massage therapy techniques were assessed in a sample of 36 healthy adults, randomly assigned to: (1) moderate massage, (2) light massage, or (3) vibratory stimulation group (n = 12 per group). Changes in anxiety and stress were assessed, and EEG and EKG were recorded. Anxiety scores decreased for all groups, but the moderate pressure massage group reported the greatest decrease in stress. The moderate massage group also experienced a decrease in heart rate and EEG changes including an increase in delta and a decrease in alpha and beta activity, suggesting a relaxation response. Finally, this group showed increased positive affect, as indicated by a shift toward left frontal EEG activation. The light massage group showed increased arousal, as indicated by decreased delta and increased deta activity and increased heart rate. The vibratory stimulation group also showed increased arousal, as indicated by increased heart rate and increased theta, alpha, and beta activity.

  20. Light delivery over extended time periods enhances the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Mukund; Bellnier, David A; Vaughan, Lurine A; Spernyak, Joseph A; Mazurchuk, Richard; Foster, Thomas H; Henderson, Barbara W

    2008-05-01

    The rate of energy delivery is a principal factor determining the biological consequences of photodynamic therapy (PDT). In contrast to conventional high-irradiance treatments, recent preclinical and clinical studies have focused on low-irradiance schemes. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between irradiance, photosensitizer dose, and PDT dose with regard to treatment outcome and tumor oxygenation in a rat tumor model. Using the photosensitizer HPPH (2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide), a wide range of PDT doses that included clinically relevant photosensitizer concentrations was evaluated. Magnetic resonance imaging and oxygen tension measurements were done along with the Evans blue exclusion assay to assess vascular response, oxygenation status, and tumor necrosis. In contrast to high-incident laser power (150 mW), low-power regimens (7 mW) yielded effective tumor destruction. This was largely independent of PDT dose (drug-light product), with up to 30-fold differences in photosensitizer dose and 15-fold differences in drug-light product. For all drug-light products, the duration of light treatment positively influenced tumor response. Regimens using treatment times of 120 to 240 min showed marked reduction in signal intensity in T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at both low (0.1 mg/kg) and high (3 mg/kg) drug doses compared with short-duration (6-11 min) regimens. Significantly greater reductions in pO(2) were observed with extended exposures, which persisted after completion of treatment. These results confirm the benefit of prolonged light exposure, identify vascular response as a major contributor, and suggest that duration of light treatment (time) may be an important new treatment variable.

  1. Light Delivery Over Extended Time Periods Enhances the Effectiveness of Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Mukund; Bellnier, David A.; Vaughan, Lurine A.; Spernyak, Joseph A.; Mazurchuk, Richard; Foster, Thomas H.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The rate of energy delivery is a principal factor determining the biological consequences of photodynamic therapy (PDT). In contrast to conventional high irradiance treatments, recent preclinical and clinical studies have focused on low irradiance schemes. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between irradiance, photosensitizer dose and PDT dose with regard to treatment outcome and tumor oxygenation in a rat tumor model. Experimental Design Using the photosensitizer HPPH (2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2 devinyl pyropheophorbide), a wide range of PDT doses that included clinically relevant photosensitizer concentrations were evaluated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and oxygen tension measurements were performed along with the Evans blue exclusion assay to assess vascular response, oxygenation status and tumor necrosis. Results In contrast to high incident laser power (150 mW), low power regimens (7 mW) yielded effective tumor destruction. This was largely independent of PDT dose (drug-light product), with up to 30-fold differences in photosensitizer dose and 15-fold differences in drug-light product. For all drug-light products, the duration of light treatment positively influenced tumor response. Regimens utilizing treatment times of 120–240 mins showed marked reduction in signal intensity in T2-weighted MR images at both low (0.1 mg/kg) and high (3 mg/kg) drug doses compared to short duration (6–11 mins) regimens. Significantly greater reductions in pO2 were observed with extended exposures, which persisted after completion of treatment. Conclusions These results confirm the benefit of prolonged light exposure, identify vascular response as a major contributor and suggest that duration of light treatment (time) may be an important new treatment parameter. PMID:18451247

  2. The evaluation and planning of light dose in photodynamic therapy for port wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-juan; Hu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qi-shen

    2014-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the best available treatment for dermatology, especially for port wine stains (PWS), in which the efficacy is associated with the light dose, the photosensitizer concentration, the oxygen concentration and so on. Accurate control of the light dose will help doctors develop more effective treatment protocols, and reduce the treatment cost. Considering the characters of PWS, a binocular vision system composed of a camera, a digital projector and a computing unit is designed. An accurate 3D modeling of patients was achieved using a gray coding structured light, and then the lesions were segmented based on HSV space. Subsequently, each 3D point is fit on the surface by a nearest neighbor algorithm and the surface normal can be obtained. Three dimensional localization of lesion provide digital objective basis for automatic control of light device. The irradiance on the surface at a given angle can be assessed, and the optimum angle for the treatment can be solved and optimized by the doctor to improve irradiation areas.

  3. Light Therapy and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, Nicholas; Figueiro, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in persons with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia (ADRD), resulting in a negative impact on the daytime function of the affected person and on the wellbeing of caregivers. The sleep/wake pattern is directly driven by the timing signals generated by a circadian pacemaker, which may or may not be perfectly functioning in those with ADRD. A 24-hour light/dark pattern incident on the retina is the most efficacious stimulus for entraining the circadian system to the solar day. In fact, a carefully orchestrated light/dark pattern has been shown in several controlled studies of older populations, with and without ADRD, to be a powerful non-pharmacological tool to improve sleep efficiency and consolidation. Discussed here are research results from studies looking at the effectiveness of light therapy in improving sleep, depression, and agitation in older adults with ADRD. A 24-hour lighting scheme to increase circadian entrainment, improve visibility, and reduce the risk of falls in those with ADRD is proposed, and future research needs are discussed. PMID:23099814

  4. Light therapy and Alzheimer's disease and related dementia: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Hanford, Nicholas; Figueiro, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in persons with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia (ADRD), resulting in a negative impact on the daytime function of the affected person and on the wellbeing of caregivers. The sleep/wake pattern is directly driven by the timing signals generated by a circadian pacemaker, which may or may not be perfectly functioning in those with ADRD. A 24-hour light/dark pattern incident on the retina is the most efficacious stimulus for entraining the circadian system to the solar day. In fact, a carefully orchestrated light/dark pattern has been shown in several controlled studies of older populations, with and without ADRD, to be a powerful non-pharmacological tool to improve sleep efficiency and consolidation. Discussed here are research results from studies looking at the effectiveness of light therapy in improving sleep, depression, and agitation in older adults with ADRD. A 24-hour lighting scheme to increase circadian entrainment, improve visibility, and reduce the risk of falls in those with ADRD is proposed, and future research needs are discussed.

  5. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: light fractionation study on a preclinical model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Tétard, Marie-Charlotte; Lejeune, Jean-Paul; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Background Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to form cytotoxic species. Fractionation of light delivery may enhance treatment efficiency by restoring tissue oxygenation. Objectives To evaluate the efficiency of light fractionation using MRI imaging, including diffusion and perfusion, compared to histological data. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine "Nude" rats were grafted with human U87 cells into the right putamen. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomized in three groups: without illumination, with monofractionated illumination and the third one with multifractionated light. Treatment effects were assessed with early MRI including diffusion and perfusion sequences. The animals were eventually sacrificed to perform brain histology. Results On MRI, we observed elevated diffusion values in the center of the tumor among treated animals, especially in multifractionated group. Perfusion decreased around the treatment site, all the more in the multifractionated group. Histology confirmed our MRI findings, with a more extensive necrosis and associated with a rarified angiogenic network in the treatment area, after multifractionated PDT. However, we observed more surrounding edema and neovascularization in the peripheral ring after multifractionated PDT. Conclusion Fractionated interstitial PDT induced specific tumoral lesions. The multifractionated scheme was more efficient, inducing increased tumoral necrosis, but it also caused significant peripheral edema and neovascularization. Diffusion and perfusion MRI imaging were able to predict the histological lesions.

  6. Visible-light-driven dynamic cancer therapy and imaging using graphitic carbon nitride nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heo, Nam Su; Lee, Sun Uk; Rethinasabapathy, Muruganantham; Lee, Eun Zoo; Cho, Hye-Jin; Oh, Seo Yeong; Choe, Sang Rak; Kim, Yeonho; Hong, Won G; Krishnan, Giribabu; Hong, Won Hi; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Jun, Young-Si; Kim, Hae Jin; Huh, Yun Suk

    2018-09-01

    Organic graphitic carbon nitride nanoparticles (NP-g-CN), less than 30 nm in size, were synthesized and evaluated for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and cell imaging applications. NP-g-CN particles were prepared through an intercalation process using a rod-like melamine-cyanuric acid adduct (MCA) as the molecular precursor and a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl (45:55 wt%) as the reaction medium for polycondensation. The nano-dimensional NP-g-CN penetrated the malignant tumor cells with minimal hindrance and effectively generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) under visible light irradiation, which could ablate cancer cells. When excited by visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), NP-g-CN introduced to HeLa and cos-7 cells generated a significant amount of ROS and killed the cancerous cells selectively. The cytotoxicity of NP-g-CN was manipulated by altering the light irradiation and the BP-g-CN caused more damage to the cancer cells than normal cells at low concentrations. As a potential non-toxic organic nanomaterial, the synthesized NP-g-CN are biocompatible with less cytotoxicity than toxic inorganic materials. The combined effects of the high efficacy of ROS generation under visible light irradiation, low toxicity, and bio-compatibility highlight the potential of NP-g-CN for PDT and imaging without further modification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Beyond the Barriers of Light Penetration: Strategies, Perspectives and Possibilities for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Anbil, Sriram; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Obaid, Girgis; Ichikawa, Megumi; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemistry based treatment modality that involves the generation of cytotoxic species through the interactions of a photosensitizer molecule with light irradiation of an appropriate wavelength. PDT is an approved therapeutic modality for several cancers globally and in several cases has proved to be effective where traditional treatments have failed. The key parameters that determine PDT efficacy are 1. the photosensitizer (nature of the molecules, selectivity, and macroscopic and microscopic localization etc.), 2. light application (wavelength, fluence, fluence rate, irradiation regimes etc.) and 3. the microenvironment (vascularity, hypoxic regions, stromal tissue density, molecular heterogeneity etc.). Over the years, several groups aimed to monitor and manipulate the components of these critical parameters to improve the effectiveness of PDT treatments. However, PDT is still misconstrued to be a surface treatment primarily due to the limited depths of light penetration. In this review, we present the recent advances, strategies and perspectives in PDT approaches, particularly in cancer treatment, that focus on increasing the 'damage zone' beyond the reach of light in the body. This is enabled by a spectrum of approaches that range from innovative photosensitizer excitation strategies, increased specificity of phototoxicity, and biomodulatory approaches that amplify the biotherapeutic effects induced by photodynamic action. Along with the increasing depth of understanding of the underlying physical, chemical and physiological mechanisms, it is anticipated that with the convergence of these strategies, the clinical utility of PDT will be expanded to a powerful modality in the armamentarium for the management of cancer. PMID:27877247

  8. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain, quality of life and sleep in patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol for a double-blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used as adjuvant strategy for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. The light-tissue interaction (photobiostimulation) promotes analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and improves tissue healing, which could justify the recommendation of this therapy for patients with fibromyalgia, leading to an improvement in pain and possibly minimizing social impact related to this disease. The present study proposes to evaluate the effect of LLLT on tender points in patients with fibromyalgia, correlating this outcome with quality of life and sleep. Methods/design One hundred and twenty patients with fibromyalgia will be treated at the Integrated Health Center and the Sleep Laboratory of the Post Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences of the Nove de Julho University located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. After fulfilling the eligibility criteria, a clinical evaluation and assessments of pain and sleep quality will be carried out and self-administered quality of life questionnaires will be applied. The 120 volunteers will be randomly allocated to an intervention group (LLLT, n = 60) or control group (CLLLT, n = 60). Patients from both groups will be treated three times per week for four weeks, totaling twelve sessions. However, only the LLLT group will receive an energy dose of 6 J per tender point. A standardized 50-minute exercise program will be performed after the laser application. The patients will be evaluated regarding the primary outcome (pain) using the following instruments: visual analog scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire and pressure algometry. The secondary outcome (quality of life and sleep) will be assessed with the following instruments: Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and polysomnography. ANOVA test with repeated measurements for the time factor will be performed to test between

  9. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain, quality of life and sleep in patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol for a double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Alves, Ana Carolina Araruna; Rambo, Caroline Sobral de Melo; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosa; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Albertini, Regiane; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2012-11-21

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used as adjuvant strategy for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. The light-tissue interaction (photobiostimulation) promotes analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and improves tissue healing, which could justify the recommendation of this therapy for patients with fibromyalgia, leading to an improvement in pain and possibly minimizing social impact related to this disease. The present study proposes to evaluate the effect of LLLT on tender points in patients with fibromyalgia, correlating this outcome with quality of life and sleep. One hundred and twenty patients with fibromyalgia will be treated at the Integrated Health Center and the Sleep Laboratory of the Post Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences of the Nove de Julho University located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. After fulfilling the eligibility criteria, a clinical evaluation and assessments of pain and sleep quality will be carried out and self-administered quality of life questionnaires will be applied. The 120 volunteers will be randomly allocated to an intervention group (LLLT, n = 60) or control group (CLLLT, n = 60). Patients from both groups will be treated three times per week for four weeks, totaling twelve sessions. However, only the LLLT group will receive an energy dose of 6 J per tender point. A standardized 50-minute exercise program will be performed after the laser application. The patients will be evaluated regarding the primary outcome (pain) using the following instruments: visual analog scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire and pressure algometry. The secondary outcome (quality of life and sleep) will be assessed with the following instruments: Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and polysomnography. ANOVA test with repeated measurements for the time factor will be performed to test between-groups differences (followed by the

  10. Low-level light treatment ameliorates immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingke; Zhang, Qi; Li, Peiyu; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally low platelet counts. We reported here the ability of low-level light treatment (LLLT) to alleviate ITP in mice. The treatment is based on noninvasive whole body illumination 30 min a day for a few consecutive days by near infrared light (830 nm) transmitted by an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LLLT significantly lifted the nadir of platelet counts and restored tail bleeding time when applied to two passive ITP models induced by anti-CD41 antibody. The anti-platelet antibody hindered megakaryocyte differentiation from the progenitors, impaired proplatelet and platelet formation, and induced apoptosis of platelets. These adverse effects of anti-CD41 antibody were all mitigated by LLLT to varying degrees, owing to its ability to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in megakaryocytes and preserve mitochondrial functions in platelets in the presence of the antibody. The observations argue not only for contribution of mitochondrial stress to the pathology of ITP, but also clinical potentials of LLLT as a safe, simple, and cost-effective modality of ITP. PMID:27901126

  11. Low-level light treatment ameliorates immune thrombocytopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingke; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Mei X.

    2017-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally low platelet counts. We reported here the ability of low-level light treatment (LLLT) to alleviate ITP in mice. The treatment is based on noninvasive whole body illumination 30 min a day for a few consecutive days by near infrared light (830 nm) transmitted by an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LLLT significantly lifted the nadir of platelet counts and restored tail bleeding time when applied to two passive ITP models induced by anti-CD41 antibody. The anti-platelet antibody hindered megakaryocyte differentiation from the progenitors, impaired proplatelet and platelet formation, and induced apoptosis of platelets. These adverse effects of anti-CD41 antibody were all mitigated by LLLT to varying degrees, owing to its ability to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in megakaryocytes and preserve mitochondrial functions in platelets in the presence of the antibody. The observations argue not only for contribution of mitochondrial stress to the pathology of ITP, but also clinical potentials of LLLT as a safe, simple, and cost-effective modality of ITP.

  12. The "at-home LLLT" in temporo-mandibular disorders pain control: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Pelosi, A; Queirolo, V; Vescovi, P; Merigo, E

    2015-03-31

    The Temporo-Mandibular Disorders (TMD) are a set of dysfunctional patterns concerning the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) and the masticatory muscles; its main symptom is pain, probably caused by inflammatory changes in the synovial membrane, alterations in the bone marrow of the mandibular condyle and impingement and compression. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the effectiveness in the TMD pain reduction of a new laser device recently proposed by the commerce that, due to its reduced dimensions and to be a class I laser according the ANSI classification, may be used at home by the patient himself. Twenty-four patients with TMD were randomly selected: the inclusion criteria for the sample was the diagnosis of mono- or bi-lateral TMD, with acute pain restricted to the joint area, associated with the absence of any muscle tenderness during palpation. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (12 patients): patients receiving real LLLT (experimental group). Group 2 (12 patients): patients receiving inactive laser (placebo group). The treatment was performed once a day for two weeks with an 808 nm diode laser by the patient himself with irradiation of the cutaneous zone corresponding to the TMJ for 15 minutes each side. Each patient was instructed to express its pain in a visual analogue scale (VAS) making a perpendicular line between the two extremes representing the felt pain level. Statistical analysis was realized with GraphPad Instat Software, where P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.01 very significant. The patient's pain evaluation was expressed in the two study groups before the treatment, 1 week and two weeks after the treatment. The differences between the two groups result extremely significant with p<0.0001 for the comparison of VAS value after 1 and 2 weeks. This study, even if it may be considered such a pilot study, investigated a new way to control the pain in the temporo-mandibular diseases by an at home

  13. Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Osmani, Bushra Z.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Naeser, Margaret A.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the laser. The development of lasers for medical use, which became known as low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation, followed in 1967. In recent years, LLLT has become an increasingly mainstream modality, especially in the areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation. At first used mainly for wound healing and pain relief, the medical applications of LLLT have broadened to include diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and degenerative or traumatic brain disorders. This review will cover the mechanisms of LLLT that operate both on a cellular and a tissue level. Mitochondria are thought to be the principal photoreceptors, and increased adenosine triphosphate, reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium, and release of nitric oxide are the initial events. Activation of transcription factors then leads to expression of many protective, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, and pro-proliferation gene products. Animal studies and human clinical trials of LLLT for indications with relevance to neurology, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, degenerative brain disease, spinal cord injury, and peripheral nerve regeneration, will be covered. PMID:21172691

  14. Photodynamic therapy for Barrett's esophagus using a 20-mm diameter light-delivery balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Phan, Mary N.; Haydek, John M.; Robinson, Amy R.

    2002-06-01

    Background and Objective: Patients with high grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's esophagus are at a high risk for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. Esophagectomy is the standard treatment for such patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using an improved light delivery balloon for ablation of Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia and/or early cancer. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with HGD or early cancer (19 with HGD, 1 with T1 cancer) received 2 mg/kg of porfimer sodium, intravenously. Two to three days after the injection, laser light was delivered using a cylindrical diffuser inserted inside a 20-mm diameter reflective esophageal PDT balloon. Initially, the balloon was inflated to a pressure of 80 mm Hg. The balloon pressure was gradually reduced to 30 mm Hg. A KTP/dye laser at 630 nm was used as the light source. Light dose of 115 J/cm was delivered at an intensity of 270 mw/cm. Nodules were pre- treated with an extra 50 J/cm using a short diffuser inserted through the scope. Patients were maintained on PPI therapy to keep the gastric pH higher than 4. Eighteen patients required one treatment, while two patients were treated twice. Follow-up consisted of endoscopy with four quadrant biopsies at every 2 cm of the treated area. Thermal ablation was used to treat small residual islands on the follow-ups. The follow-up endoscopies ranged from 6 to 17 months. Results: On follow-up endoscopy, 12 patients had complete replacement of their Barrett's mucosa with neosquamous mucosa. Five patients had residual non-dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, one had indefinite dysplasia, two had low grad dysplasia. There were no residual HGD or cancers. The average length of Barrett's was reduced from 5.4 cm to 1.2 cm. High balloon pressure resulted in wide variation in PDT response among patients. Lower balloon pressures resulted in more consistent destruction of Barrett's mucosa among patients. Five

  15. Low-level laser therapy stimulates bone metabolism and inhibits root resorption during tooth movement in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Garcez, Aguinaldo Silva; Suzuki, Hideo; Ervolino, Edilson; Moon, Won; Ribeiro, Martha Simões

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the biological effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone remodeling, tooth displacement and root resorption, occurred during the orthodontic tooth movement. Upper first molars of a total of sixty-eight male rats were subjected to orthodontic tooth movement and euthanized on days 3, 6, 9, 14 and 21 days and divided as negative control, control and LLLT group. Tooth displacement and histomorphometric analysis were performed in all animals; scanning electron microscopy analysis was done on days 3, 6 and 9, as well as the immunohistochemistry analysis of RANKL/OPG and TRAP markers. Volumetric changes in alveolar bone were analyzed using MicroCT images on days 14 and 21. LLLT influenced bone resorption by increasing the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and the RANKL expression at the compression side. This resulted in less alveolar bone and hyalinization areas on days 6, 9 and 14. LLLT also induced less bone volume and density, facilitating significant acceleration of tooth movement and potential reduction in root resorption besides stimulating bone formation at the tension side by enhancing OPG expression, increasing trabecular thickness and bone volume on day 21. Taken together, our results indicate that LLLT can stimulate bone remodeling reducing root resorption in a rat model. LLLT improves tooth movement via bone formation and bone resorption in a rat model. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT doses, using continuous illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We verified that all applied doses produce an effect on reducing the number of inflammatory cells and the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines. The best results were obtained for 40 mW. The results may suggest a biphasic dose response curve.

  17. Patterns of depressive symptom remission during the treatment of seasonal affective disorder with cognitive-behavioral therapy or light therapy.

    PubMed

    Meyerhoff, Jonah; Young, Michael A; Rohan, Kelly J

    2018-05-01

    To elucidate mechanisms related to remission in winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD), we explored the course of individual depressive symptom offset across two distinct treatment modalities that show comparable outcomes at treatment endpoint: cognitive-behavioral therapy for SAD (CBT-SAD) and light therapy (LT). One hundred seventy-seven adults with SAD in a depressive episode were randomized to 6-weeks of CBT-SAD (n = 88) or LT (n = 89). Symptoms were assessed via the 29-item Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-SAD Version (SIGH-SAD) at pretreatment and weekly during treatment. Survival analyses were conducted for the 17 SIGH-SAD items endorsed by more than 40 participants at pretreatment. Within each of the included symptoms, data from participants who endorsed the symptom at pretreatment and who had 3 or fewer weeks missing were included. For most (13/17; 76%) symptoms, CBT-SAD and LT did not differ in time to remission. However, for four symptoms (early insomnia, psychic anxiety, hypersomnia, and social withdrawal), LT led to symptom remission more quickly than CBT-SAD. Symptom remission progressed comparably across CBT-SAD and LT for most symptoms. Despite the fact that the two treatments led to similar remission rates and improvements at treatment endpoint, for early insomnia, psychic anxiety, hypersomnia, and social withdrawal, LT led to symptom remission faster than CBT-SAD. These results suggest different mechanisms and pathways to the same therapeutic end. Speedier remission of early insomnia and hypersomnia is consistent with the theory that SAD is related to a pathological circadian phase-shift that can be corrected with LT. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Shine on: Review of Laser- and Light-Based Therapies for the Treatment of Burn Scars

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, C. Scott; Edkins, Renee E.; Lee, Clara N.; Calvert, Catherine T.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of form and function after burn injury remains challenging, but emerging laser and pulsed light technologies now offer hope for patients with hypertrophic scars, which may be associated with persistent hyperemia, chronic folliculitis, intense pruritis, and neuropathic pain. In addition to impairing body image, these scars may limit functional recovery, compromise activities of daily living, and prevent return to work. Three different platforms are now poised to alter our reconstructive algorithm: (1) vascular-specific pulsed dye laser (PDL) to reduce hyperemia, (2) ablative fractional CO2 laser to improve texture and pliability of the burn scar, and (3) intense pulsed light (IPL) to correct burn scar dyschromia and alleviate chronic folliculitis. In this paper, we will provide an overview of our work in this area, which includes a systematic review, a retrospective analysis of our preliminary experience, and interim data from our on-going, prospective, before-after cohort trial. We will demonstrate that laser- and light-based therapies can be combined with each other safely to yield superior results, often at lower cost, by reducing the need for reconstructive surgery. Modulating the burn scar, through minimally invasive modalities, may replace conventional methods of burn scar excision and yield outcomes not previously possible or conceivable. PMID:22778719

  19. Optimization of light source parameters in the photodynamic therapy of heterogeneous prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Altschuler, Martin D.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2008-08-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous distributions of optical properties in a patient prostate can now be measured in vivo. Such data can be used to obtain a more accurate light-fluence kernel. (For specified sources and points, the kernel gives the fluence delivered to a point by a source of unit strength.) In turn, the kernel can be used to solve the inverse problem that determines the source strengths needed to deliver a prescribed photodynamic therapy (PDT) dose (or light-fluence) distribution within the prostate (assuming uniform drug concentration). We have developed and tested computational procedures to use the new heterogeneous data to optimize delivered light-fluence. New problems arise, however, in quickly obtaining an accurate kernel following the insertion of interstitial light sources and data acquisition. (1) The light-fluence kernel must be calculated in 3D and separately for each light source, which increases kernel size. (2) An accurate kernel for light scattering in a heterogeneous medium requires ray tracing and volume partitioning, thus significant calculation time. To address these problems, two different kernels were examined and compared for speed of creation and accuracy of dose. Kernels derived more quickly involve simpler algorithms. Our goal is to achieve optimal dose planning with patient-specific heterogeneous optical data applied through accurate kernels, all within clinical times. The optimization process is restricted to accepting the given (interstitially inserted) sources, and determining the best source strengths with which to obtain a prescribed dose. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm is used for this purpose. The dose distribution and source weights obtained for each kernel are analyzed. In clinical use, optimization will also be performed prior to source insertion to obtain initial source positions, source lengths and source weights, but with the assumption of homogeneous optical properties. For this reason, we compare the

  20. Development of high yielding photonic light delivery system for photodynamic therapy of esophageal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premasiri, Amaranath; Happawana, Gemunu; Rosen, Arye

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an approved treatment modality for Barrett's and invasive esophageal carcinoma. Proper Combination of photosentizing agent, oxygen, and a specific wavelength of light to activate the photosentizing agents is necessary for the cytotoxic destruction of cancerous cells by PDT. As a light source expensive solid-state laser sources currently are being used for the treatment. Inexpensive semiconductor lasers have been suggested for the light delivery system, however packaging of semiconductor lasers for optimal optical power output is challenging. In this paper, we present a multidirectional direct water-cooling of semiconductor lasers that provides a better efficiency than the conventional unidirectional cooling. AlGaAsP lasers were tested under de-ionized (DI) water and it is shown that the optical power output of the lasers under the DI water is much higher than that of the uni-directional cooling of lasers. Also, in this paper we discuss how direct DI water-cooling can optimize power output of semiconductor lasers. Thereafter an optimal design of the semiconductor laser package is shown with the DI water-cooling system. Further, a microwave antenna is designed which is to be imprinted on to a balloon catheter in order to provide local heating of esophagus, leading to an increase in local oxygenation of the tumor to generate an effective level of singlet oxygen for cellular death. Finally the optimal level of light energy that is required to achieve the expected level of singlet oxygen is modeled to design an efficient PDT protocol.

  1. Near-infrared light excited upconverting persistent nanophosphors in vivo for imaging-guided cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Bai, Yang; Chen, Hongbin; Pan, Huizhuo; Ji, Wanying; Gong, Xiaoqun; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin

    2018-05-14

    Optical imaging for biological applications is in need of more sensitive tool. Persistent luminescent nanophosphors enable highly sensitive in vivo optical detection and almost completely avoids tissue autofluorescence. Nevertheless, the actual persistent luminescent nanophosphors necessitates ex vivo activation before systemic operation, which severely restricted the use of long-term imaging in vivo. Hence, we introduced a novel generation of optical nanophosphors, based on (Zn2SiO4: Mn): Y3+, Yb3+, Tm3+ upconverting persistent luminescent nanophosphors, these nanophosphors can be excited in vivo through living tissues by highly penetrating near-infrared light. We can trace labeled tumor therapeutic macrophages in vivo after endocytosing these nanophosphors in vitro and follow macrophages biodistribution by a simple whole animal optical detection. These nanophosphors will open novel potentials for cell therapy research and for a variety of diagnosis applications in vivo.

  2. Indwelling Stent Embedded with Light-Emitting Diodes for Photodynamic Therapy of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciT

    Baran, Timothy M., E-mail: timothy.baran@rochester.edu; Mironov, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.mironov@uhn.ca; Sharma, Ashwani K., E-mail: Ashwani-Sharma@URMC.Rochester.edu

    PurposeWe describe the design and preliminary characterization of a stent incorporating light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant biliary obstruction.MethodsA prototype was constructed with red (640 nm) LEDs embedded in a 14.5 French polyurethane tube. The device was evaluated for optical power and subjected to physical and electrical tests. PDT-induced reactive oxygen species were imaged in a gel phantom.ResultsThe stent functioned at a 2.5-cm bend radius and illuminated for 6 months in saline. No stray currents were detected, and it was cool after 30 minutes of operation. Optical power of 5–15 mW is applicable to PDT. Imaging of a reactivemore » oxygen indicator showed LED-stent activation of photosensitizer.ConclusionsThe results motivate biological testing and design optimization.« less

  3. Photodynamic therapy of Curcuma longa extract stimulated with blue light against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Saitawee, Darika; Teerakapong, Aroon; Morales, Noppawan Phumala; Jitprasertwong, Paiboon; Hormdee, Doosadee

    2018-06-01

    Curcumin, one of an established curcuminoid substances extracted from Curcuma longa, has been used as a photosensitizer (PS) in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Curcuminoid substances has been reported to have benefits in treating dental chronic infection and inflammation diseases, such as chronic periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to find the optimum concentration of Curcuma longa (CL) extract, containing all curcuminoid substances, and the power density of blue light (BL) in photodynamic therapy against periodontally pathogenic bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans. Antibacterial activity of various concentrations of CL extract against A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined. Exponentially growing bacteria were combined with 2-fold dilution of CL extract solution ranging from 25 to 0.098 μg/ml. Co-culture bacteria treated with 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) served as the positive control. The effect of photostimulation with light emitting diode (LED) 420-480 nm at 16.8 J/cm 2 for 1 min on the selected concentration of CL extract was examined. Bacteria viability was determined by plate counting technique. In addition, production of free radicals was tested by electron spin resonance spectroscope (ESR) with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The antibacterial activity of CL extract was dose dependent. Without BL, 25 μg/ml CL extract showed 6.03 ± 0.39 log 10 A. actinomycetemcomitans. Interestingly, the combination of BL and 0.78 μg/ml CL extract solution showed complete absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Peak signal intensity of hydroxyl radical production was also detected with the combination of BL and CL. CL extract not only had antimicrobial activity but also could be used as an effective PS when stimulated with BL in PDT. The optimal antibacterial effect of CL extract with BL was equal to the standard oral disinfectant, 0.12% CHX. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lighting

    SciT

    McKay, H.N.

    The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive pathmore » is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.« less

  5. Plasma melatonin circadian rhythms during the menstrual cycle and after light therapy in premenstrual dysphoric disorder and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Parry, B L; Berga, S L; Mostofi, N; Klauber, M R; Resnick, A

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate and extend previous work in which the authors observed lower, shorter, and advanced nocturnal melatonin secretion patterns in premenstrually depressed patients compared to those in healthy control women. The authors also sought to test the hypothesis that the therapeutic effect of bright light in patients was associated with corrective effects on the phase, duration, and amplitude of melatonin rhythms. In 21 subjects with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and 11 normal control (NC) subjects, the authors measured the circadian profile of melatonin during follicular and luteal menstrual cycle phases and after 1 week of light therapy administered daily, in a randomized crossover design. During three separate luteal phases, the treatments were either (1) bright (> 2,500 lux) white morning (AM; 06:30 to 08:30 h), (2) bright white evening (PM; 19:00 to 21:00 h), or (3) dim (< 10 lux) red evening light (RED). In PMDD subjects, during the luteal phase compared to the follicular menstrual cycle phase, melatonin onset time was delayed, duration was compressed, and area under the curve, amplitude, and mean levels were decreased. In NC subjects, melatonin rhythms did not change significantly during the menstrual cycle. After AM light in PMDD subjects, onset and offset times were advanced and both duration and midpoint concentration were decreased as compared to RED light. After PM light in PMDD subjects, onset and offset times were delayed, midpoint concentration was increased, and duration was decreased as compared to RED light. By contrast, after light therapy in NC subjects, duration did not change; onset, offset, and midpoint concentration changed as they did in PMDD subjects. When the magnitude of advance and delay phase shifts in onset versus offset time with AM, PM, or RED light were compared, the authors found that in PMDD subjects light shifted offset time more than onset time and that AM light had a greater effect on

  6. Cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. light therapy for preventing winter depression recurrence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Kelly J; Evans, Maggie; Mahon, Jennifer N; Sitnikov, Lilya; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Nillni, Yael I; Postolache, Teodor T; Vacek, Pamela M

    2013-03-21

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of recurrent depression involving major depressive episodes during the fall and/or winter months that remit in the spring. The central public health challenge in the management of SAD is prevention of winter depression recurrence. Light therapy (LT) is the established and best available acute SAD treatment. However, long-term compliance with daily LT from first symptom through spontaneous springtime remission every fall/winter season is poor. Time-limited alternative treatments with effects that endure beyond the cessation of acute treatment are needed to prevent the annual recurrence of SAD. This is an NIMH-funded R01-level randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a novel, SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT) against LT in a head-to-head comparison on next winter outcomes. This project is designed to test for a clinically meaningful difference between CBT and LT on depression recurrence in the next winter (the primary outcome). This is a concurrent two-arm study that will randomize 160 currently symptomatic community adults with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, to CBT or LT. After 6 weeks of treatment in the initial winter, participants are followed in the subsequent summer, the next winter, and two winters later. Key methodological issues surround timing study procedures for a predictably recurrent and time-limited disorder with a focus on long-term outcomes. The chosen design answers the primary question of whether prior exposure to CBT is associated with a substantially lower likelihood of depression recurrence the next winter than LT. This design does not test the relative contributions of the cognitive-behavioral treatment components vs. nonspecific factors to CBT's outcomes and is not adequately powered to test for differences or equivalence between cells at treatment endpoint. Alternative designs addressing these limitations would have required more patients

  7. Intense pulsed light therapy for the treatment of evaporative dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Vora, Gargi K; Gupta, Preeya K

    2015-07-01

    Evaporative dry eye disease is one of the most common types of dry eye. It is often the result of chronic meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and associated ocular rosacea. Evaporative dry eye and MGD significantly reduce patient's quality of life. Traditional treatments, such as artificial tears, warm compresses, and medications, such as topical cyclosporine, azithromycin, and oral doxycycline, provide some relief; however, many patients still suffer from dry eye symptoms. Intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy, which has been used extensively in dermatology to treat chronic skin conditions, is a relatively new treatment in ophthalmology for patients with evaporative dry eye disease. There are very few studies published on the use of IPL in patients with dry eye disease. The present review describes the theoretical mechanisms of IPL treatment of MGD and ocular rosacea. Personal clinical experience and recently presented data are reported as well. IPL therapy has promising results for evaporative dry eye patients. There are statistically significant improvements in clinical exam findings of dry eye disease. More importantly, patients report subjective improvement in their symptoms. More research is needed in this area to help understand the mechanism of dry eye disease and how it can be effectively treated.

  8. Topical methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy using red light-emitting diode light for treatment of multiple actinic keratoses: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pariser, David; Loss, Robert; Jarratt, Michael; Abramovits, William; Spencer, James; Geronemus, Roy; Bailin, Philip; Bruce, Suzanne

    2008-10-01

    The use of light-emitting diode light offers practical advantages in photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) for management of actinic keratoses (AK). We sought to evaluate the efficacy of MAL PDT using red light-emitting diode light. We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, randomized study. A total of 49 patients with 363 AK lesions had 16.8% MAL cream applied under occlusion for 3 hours, and 47 patients with 360 AK lesions had vehicle cream similarly applied. The lesions were then illuminated (630 nm, light dose 37 J/cm2) with repeated treatment 1 week later. Complete lesion and patient (all lesions showing complete response) response rates were evaluated 3 months after last treatment. MAL PDT was superior (P<.0001) to vehicle PDT with respect to lesion complete response (86.2% vs 52.2%, odds ratio 6.9 [95% confidence interval 4.7-10.3]) and patient complete response (59.2% vs 14.9%, odds ratio 13.2 [95% confidence interval 4.1-43.1]). The study population may not be representative of all patients with AK. MAL PDT using red light-emitting diode light is an appropriate treatment alternative for multiple AK lesions.

  9. Near-Infrared-Light-Responsive Magnetic DNA Microgels for Photon- and Magneto-Manipulated Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yitong; Wang, Ling; Yan, Miaomiao; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-08-30

    Functional DNA molecules have been introduced into polymer-based nanocarrier systems to incorporate chemotherapy drugs for cancer therapy. Here is the first report of dual-responsive microgels composed of a core of Au nanorods and a shell of magnetic ionic liquid and DNA moieties in the cross-linking network simultaneously, as effective drug delivery vectors. TEM images indicated a magnetic polymer shell has an analogous "doughnut" shape which loosely surround the AuNRs core. When irradiated with a near-infrared-light (near-IR) laser, Au nanorods are the motors which convert the light to heat, leading to the release of the encapsulated payloads with high controllability. DNA acts not only as a cross-linker agent, but also as a gatekeeper to regulate the release of drugs. The internalization study and MTT assay confirm that these core-shell DNA microgels are excellent candidates which can enhance the cytotoxicity of cancer cells controlled by near-IR laser and shield the high toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents to improve the killing efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents efficiently in due course.

  10. Performance of a contact textile-based light diffuser for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tania; Unternährer, Merthan; Buchholz, Julia; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara; Selm, Bärbel; Rothmaier, Markus; Walt, Heinrich

    2006-03-01

    Medical textiles offer a unique contact opportunity that could provide value-added comfort, reliability, and safety for light or laser-based applications. We investigated a luminous textile diffuser for use in photodynamic therapy. Textile diffusers are produced by an embroidery process. Plastic optical fibers are bent and sewn into textile to release light by macrobending. A reflective backing is incorporated to improve surface homogeneity, intensity, and safety. Clonogenic assay (MCF-7 cells) and trypan blue exclusion (NuTu19 cells) tests were performed in vitro using 0.1μg/ml m-THPC with three textile diffusers and a standard front lens diffuser. Heating effects were studied in solution and on human skin. PDT application in vivo was performed with the textile diffuser on equine sarcoids (three animals, 50mW/cm(2), 10-20J) and eight research animals. Lastly, computer simulations were performed to see how the textile diffuser might work on a curved object. At low fluency rate, there is a trend for the textile diffuser to have lower survival rates than the front lens diffuser for both cell lines. The textile diffuser was observed to retain more heat over a long period (>1min). All animals tolerated the treatments well and showed similar initial reactions. The simulations showed a likely focusing effect in a curved geometry. The initial feasibility and application using a textile-based optical diffuser has been demonstrated. Possibilities that provide additional practical advantages of the textile diffuser are discussed.

  11. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  12. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial

    PubMed Central

    ter Wee, Marieke M; Coupé, Veerle MH; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit JSM; Nurmohamed, Mike T; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. Methods This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164 patients with early RA. Non-responders to COBRA or COBRA-light received etanercept (50 mg/week) for 3–6 months. The societal perspective analysis took medical direct, non-medical direct and indirect costs into account. Costs were measured with patient cost diaries for the follow-up period of 52 weeks. Bootstrapping techniques estimated uncertainty around the cost-effectiveness ratios, presented in cost-effectiveness planes. Results 164 patients were randomised to either COBRA or COBRA-light strategy. At week 52, COBRA-light proved to be non-inferior to COBRA therapy on all clinical outcome measures. The results of the base-case cost-utility analysis (intention-to-treat analyses) revealed that COBRA-light strategy is more expensive (k€9.3 (SD 0.9) compared with COBRA (k€7.2 (SD 0.8)), but the difference in costs were not significant (k€2.0; 95% CI –0.3 to 4.4). Also, both strategies produced similar quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The sensitivity analyses showed robustness of these results. In a per-protocol sensitivity analysis, in which costs of etanercept were assumed to be provided as prescribed according to protocol, both arms had much higher costs: COBRA-light: k€11.5 (8.3) compared with k€8.5 (6.8) for COBRA, and the difference in costs was significant (k€2.9; 0.6 to 5.3). Conclusions In the base-case cost-utility analysis, the two strategies produced similar QALYs for similar costs. But it is anticipated that if protocol had been followed correctly, the COBRA-light strategy would have been more costly due to additional etanercept costs, for a limited health gain. Given the limited added benefit and high costs of starting

  13. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial.

    PubMed

    Ter Wee, Marieke M; Coupé, Veerle Mh; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit Jsm; Nurmohamed, Mike T; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164 patients with early RA. Non-responders to COBRA or COBRA-light received etanercept (50 mg/week) for 3-6 months. The societal perspective analysis took medical direct, non-medical direct and indirect costs into account. Costs were measured with patient cost diaries for the follow-up period of 52 weeks. Bootstrapping techniques estimated uncertainty around the cost-effectiveness ratios, presented in cost-effectiveness planes. 164 patients were randomised to either COBRA or COBRA-light strategy. At week 52, COBRA-light proved to be non-inferior to COBRA therapy on all clinical outcome measures. The results of the base-case cost-utility analysis (intention-to-treat analyses) revealed that COBRA-light strategy is more expensive (k€9.3 (SD 0.9) compared with COBRA (k€7.2 (SD 0.8)), but the difference in costs were not significant (k€2.0; 95% CI -0.3 to 4.4). Also, both strategies produced similar quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The sensitivity analyses showed robustness of these results. In a per-protocol sensitivity analysis, in which costs of etanercept were assumed to be provided as prescribed according to protocol, both arms had much higher costs: COBRA-light: k€11.5 (8.3) compared with k€8.5 (6.8) for COBRA, and the difference in costs was significant (k€2.9; 0.6 to 5.3). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, the two strategies produced similar QALYs for similar costs. But it is anticipated that if protocol had been followed correctly, the COBRA-light strategy would have been more costly due to additional etanercept costs, for a limited health gain. Given the limited added benefit and high costs of starting etanercept in the presence of low disease

  14. Outcomes of intense pulsed light therapy for treatment of evaporative dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Preeya K; Vora, Gargi K; Matossian, Cynthia; Kim, Michelle; Stinnett, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    To determine the clinical outcomes of intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy for the treatment of evaporative dry eye disease (DED). Multicentre cohort study. Patients with a diagnosis of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and dry eye presenting to the ophthalmology clinic at either the Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, or Matossian Eye Associates' private practice in Pennington, NJ, and Doylestown, PA. Clinical data were reviewed from 100 patients with diagnosis of MGD and DED who underwent IPL therapy from September 2012 through December 2014 at 1 of 2 centres (Duke Eye Center or Matossian Eye Associates). Demographics, clinical history, examination findings (eyelid and facial vascularity, eyelid margin edema, meibomian gland oil flow, and quality score-all graded on a scale of 0 to 4), tear break up time (TBUT), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) scoring data were collected from each visit. On average, patients underwent 4 IPL sessions. There was significant decrease in scoring of lid margin edema (mean = -0.3; range -1.5 to 0), facial telangiectasia (mean = -0.7; range -2.5 to 0), lid margin vascularity (mean = -1.2; range -2.5 to 0), meibum viscosity (mean = -1.1; range -3 to 0), and OSDI score (mean = -9.6), all with p < 0.001. There was a significant increase in oil flow score (mean = 0.9, range -0.5 to 2) and TBUT (mean = 3.4 seconds, range -2 to 7), both p < 0.001. No significant changes in intraocular pressure or acuity were noted. There were no cases of adverse ocular effects. IPL therapy for evaporative DED is a safe procedure. The positive change in objective clinical examination findings and subjective OSDI scoring data suggest that IPL is an effective treatment for patients with evaporative DED. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain and perineal healing after episiotomy: A triple-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Marina B; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; Francisco, Adriana A; da Silva, Flora Maria B; Sousa, Marcelo; Nobre, Moacyr Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Episiotomy is associated with perineal pain and healing complications. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces pain and inflammation and stimulates the healing process. This study aimed to assess the effect of LLLT on pain and perineal healing after an episiotomy. A randomized, triple-blind, parallel clinical trial with 54 postpartum women who had a spontaneous birth with a right mediolateral episiotomy. The women were randomized into two groups: the experimental group (applications of LLLT n = 29) or the placebo group (simulated LLLT applications n = 25). Three sessions of real or sham irradiation were performed at 6-10 hours after normal birth, and the 2nd and 3rd applications were performed at 20-24 hours and 40-48 hours after the first session, respectively. Perineal pain was recorded using a Numeric Scale ranging from 0 to 10 (0 = absence and 10 = worst pain). Perineal healing was assessed using the redness, oedema, ecchymosis, discharge, and approximation (REEDA) scale. Both groups were assessed four times: in each of the three LLLT sessions and at 7-10 days after normal birth. The groups were compared using the Student's t, Mann-Whitney, and Chi-square tests. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding perineal healing after LLLT. The perineal pain scores were statistically higher in the experimental group in the first assessment and after the third LLLT. There was no significant difference between the groups related to the perineal pain scores 7-10 days after normal birth. The use of LLLT does not provide any benefit for treating postpartum perineal trauma using these specific protocol and parameters. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:181-188, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Intense pulsed light, near infrared pulsed light, and fractional laser combination therapy for skin rejuvenation in Asian subjects: a prospective multi-center study in China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Wu, Jiaqiang; Qian, Hui; Lu, Zhong; Li, Yuanhong; Wang, Weizhen; Zhao, Xiaozhong; Tu, Ping; Yin, Rui; Xiang, Leihong

    2015-09-01

    Ablative skin rejuvenation therapies have limitations for Asian people, including post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and long down time. Non-ablative lasers are safer but have limited efficacy. This study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of a combination therapy consisting of intense pulsed light (IPL), near infrared (NIR) light, and fractional erbium YAG (Er:YAG) laser for skin rejuvenation in Asian people. This study recruited 113 subjects from six sites in China. Subjects were randomly assigned to a full-face group, who received combination therapy, and split-face groups, in which one half of the face received combination therapy and the other half received IPL monotherapy. Each subject received five treatment sessions during a period of 90 days. Subjects were followed up at 1 and 3 months post last treatment. Three months after last treatment, the full-face group (n = 57) had a global improvement rate of 29 % and 29 % for wrinkles, 32 % for skin texture, 33 % for pigment spots, 28 % for pore size, respectively. For patients in the split-face groups (n = 54), monotherapy side had a global improvement rate of 23 % and 20 % for wrinkles, 27 % for skin texture, 25 % for pigment spots, 25 % for pore size, respectively. Both combination therapy and monotherapy resulted in significant improvements at the follow-up visits compared to baseline (P < 0.001). Combination therapy showed significantly greater improvements compared to monotherapy at two follow-up visits (P < 0.05). Combination therapy is a safe and more effective strategy than IPL monotherapy for skin rejuvenation in Asian people.

  17. Effect of the transdermal low-level laser therapy on endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Szymczyszyn, Alicja; Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Rola, Piotr; Gutherc, Radosław; Jasiczek, Jakub; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-09-01

    The effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the cardiovascular system is not fully established. Since the endothelium is an important endocrine element, establishing the mechanisms of LLLT action is an important issue.The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of transdermal LLLT on endothelial function.In this study, healthy volunteers (n = 40, age = 20-40 years) were enrolled. N = 30 (14 female, 16 male, mean age 30 ± 5 years) constituted the laser-irradiated group (LG). The remaining 10 subjects (6 women, 4 men, mean age 28 ± 5 years) constituted the control group (CG). Participants were subjected to LLLT once a day for three consecutive days. Blood for biochemical assessments was drawn before the first irradiation and 24 h after the last session. In the LG, transdermal illumination of radial artery was conducted (a semiconductor laser λ = 808 nm, irradiation 50 mW, energy density 1.6 W/cm(2) and a dose 20 J/day, a total dose of 60 J). Biochemical parameters (reflecting angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), angiostatin; antioxidative status: glutathione (GSH) and the nitric oxide metabolic pathway: symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine) were assessed. In the LG, a significant increase in GSH levels and considerable decrease in angiostatin concentration following the LLLT were observed. No significant differences in levels of the VEGF, FGF, SDMA, ADMA were observed.LLLT modifies vascular endothelial function by increasing its antioxidant and angiogenic potential. We found no significant differences in levels of the nitric oxide pathway metabolites within 24 h following the LLLT irradiation.

  18. Low-level laser therapy improves the VO2 kinetics in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Lanferdini, Fábio J; Krüger, Renata L; Baroni, Bruno M; Lazzari, Caetano; Figueiredo, Pedro; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Vaz, Marco A

    2018-04-01

    Some evidence supports that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces neuromuscular fatigue, so incrementing sports performance. A previous randomized controlled trial of our group showed increased exercise tolerance in male competitive cyclists treated with three different LLLT doses (3, 6, and 9 J/diode; or 135, 270, and 405 J/thigh) before time-to-exhaustion cycling tests. Now, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of these LLLT doses on the VO 2 kinetics of athletes during cycling tests. Twenty male competitive cyclists (29 years) participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. On the first day, the participants performed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2MAX ) and maximal power output (PO MAX ), as well as a familiarization with the time-to-exhaustion test. In the following days (2 to 5), all participants performed time-to-exhaustion tests at PO MAX . Before the exhaustion test, different doses of LLLT (3, 6, and 9 J/diode; or 135, 270, and 405 J/thigh, respectively) or placebo were applied bilaterally to the quadriceps muscle. All exhaustion tests were monitored online by an open-circuit spirometry system in order to analyze the VO 2 amplitude, VO 2 delay time, time constant (tau), and O 2 deficit. Tau and O 2 deficit were decreased with LLLT applications compared to the placebo condition (p < 0.05). No differences (p > 0.05) were found between the experimental conditions for VO 2 amplitude and VO 2 delay time. In conclusion, LLLT decreases tau and O 2 deficit during time-to-exhaustion tests in competitive cyclists, and these changes in VO 2 kinetics response can be one of the possible mechanisms to explain the ergogenic effect induced by LLLT.

  19. Timed Light Therapy for Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness Associated With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Wang, Wei; Marconi, Angelica; Kuhta, Teresa; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-04-01

    Impaired sleep and alertness are some of the most common nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson disease (PD) and currently have only limited treatment options. Light therapy (LT), a widely available treatment modality in sleep medicine, has not been systematically studied in the PD population. To determine the safety and efficacy of LT on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) associated with PD. This randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical intervention study was set in PD centers at Northwestern University and Rush University. Participants were 31 patients with PD receiving stable dopaminergic therapy with coexistent EDS, as assessed by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 12 or greater, and without cognitive impairment or primary sleep disorder. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive bright LT or dim-red LT (controlled condition) twice daily in 1-hour intervals for 14 days. This trial was conducted between March 1, 2007, and October 31, 2012. Data analysis of the intention-to-treat population was conducted from November 1, 2012, through April 30, 2016. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score comparing the bright LT with the dim-red LT. Secondary outcome measures included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale score, the visual analog scale score for daytime sleepiness, and sleep log-derived and actigraphy-derived metrics. Among the 31 patients (13 males and 18 females; mean [SD] disease duration, 5.9 [3.6] years), bright LT resulted in significant improvements in EDS, as assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (mean [SD], 15.81 [3.10] at baseline vs 11.19 [3.31] after the intervention). Both bright LT and dim-red LT were associated with improvements in sleep quality as captured by mean (SD) scores on the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (7.88 [4.11] at baseline vs 6.25 [4.27] after bright LT, and 8.87 [2.83] at baseline vs 7.33 [3.52] after dim-red LT) and the Parkinson's Disease

  20. A non-laser light source for photodynamic therapy: in vitro effects on normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Kashtan, Hanoch; Haddad, Riad; Greenberg, Ron; Skornick, Yehuda; Kaplan, Ofer

    2002-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the use of photosensitizing drugs combined with light to treat tumors. Laser systems, the current source of light for PDT, have several inherent drawbacks: the spectrum is essentially monochromatic which may be problematic for second generation photosensitizers, the systems are bulky and nearly impossible to move between hospital locations and require complicated electrical and cooling installations, the cost of a typical system is enormous, and its maintenance and operation require highly trained personnel. We now introduce a new non-laser light system, Versa-Light, which appears to work as effectively and has none of the above drawbacks. A series of in vitro studies were performed using various murine and human normal and cancer cells which underwent PDT using aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS4) as a photosensitizer and Versa-Light as the light source. PDT of cancer cells at light energy levels of 50, 100 and 200 j/cm2 significantly decreased cell viability. PDT also decreased cell viability of normal murine splenocytes and normal human lymphocytes, but to a lesser extent. The observed significant hyperthermia was light dose-dependent. We believe that Versa-Light can replace laser systems as an enhanced light source for PDT. Further in vitro and pre-clinical studies are in progress.

  1. Bright light therapy decreases winter binge frequency in women with bulimia nervosa: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Braun, D L; Sunday, S R; Fornari, V M; Halmi, K A

    1999-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the effect of winter bright light therapy on binge and purge frequencies and depressive symptoms in subjects with bulimia nervosa. Thirty-four female bulimic outpatients were treated with either 10,000 lux bright white light or 50 lux dim red light (placebo control) during the winter months. In this double-blind study, the placebo group (n = 18) and the bright light group (n = 16) were matched for age, degree of seasonality (measured by the Seasonal Patterns Assessment Questionnaire [SPAQ]), and concurrent depression (measured by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Three weeks of baseline data collection were followed by 3 weeks of half-hour daily morning light treatment and 2 weeks of follow-up evaluation. There was a significant light-treatment by time interaction (Wilks' lambda = .81, F(2,28) = 3.31, P = .05). The mean binge frequency decreased significantly more from baseline to the end of treatment for the bright light group (F(1,29) = 6.41, P = .017) than for the placebo group. The level of depression (measured by daily Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] scores) did not significantly differ between the groups during any phase, and neither depression nor seasonality affected the response to light treatment. In this double-blind study, bulimic women who received 3 weeks of winter bright light treatment reported a reduced binge frequency between baseline and the active treatment period in comparison to subjects receiving dim red light.

  2. Improvement in depression scores after 1 hour of light therapy treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gloria M; Nijjar, Gagan Virk; Langenberg, Patricia; Johnson, Mary A; Khabazghazvini, Baharak; Sleemi, Aamar; Vaswani, Dipika; Lapidus, Manana; Manalai, Partam; Tariq, Muhammad; Acharya, Monika; Cabassa, Johanna; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible rapid effects of light therapy on depressed mood in patients with seasonal affective disorder. Participants received 1 hour of bright light therapy and 1 hour of placebo dim red light in a randomized order crossover design. Depressed mood was measured at baseline and after each hour of light treatment using two self-report depression scales (Profile of Mood States-Depression-Dejection [POMS-D] subscale and the Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]). When light effects were grouped for the two sessions, there was significantly greater reduction in self-report depression scores by -1.3 (p = 0.02) on the BDI-II and -1.2 (p = 0.02) on the POMS-D. A significant but modest improvement was detected after a single active light session. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to document an immediate improvement with light treatment using a placebo-controlled design with a clinical sample of depressed individuals.

  3. Chronic gingivitis: the prevalence of periodontopathogens and therapy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Igic, M; Kesic, L; Lekovic, V; Apostolovic, M; Mihailovic, D; Kostadinovic, L; Milasin, J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of gingival inflammation and the prevalence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms in adolescents with chronic gingivitis, as well as to compare the effectiveness of two approaches in gingivitis treatment-basic therapy alone and basic therapy + adjunctive low-level laser therapy (LLLT). After periodontal evaluation, the content of gingival pockets of 140 adolescents with gingivitis was analyzed by multiplex PCR for the presence of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythensis and P. intermedia. Subsequent to bacteria detection, the examinees were divided into two groups with homogenous clinical and microbiological characteristics. Group A was subjected to basic gingivitis therapy, and group B underwent basic therapy along with adjunctive LLLT. A statistically significant difference between the values of plaque-index (PI) and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) before and after therapy was confirmed in both groups (p<0.001), though more pronounced in group B. Following therapy, the incidence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms decreased considerably. The best result was obtained in P. gingivalis eradication by combined therapy (p=0.003). The presence of periodontopathogens in adolescents with gingivitis should be regarded as a sign for dentists to foster more effective oral health programs. LLLT appears to be beneficial as adjuvant to basic therapy.

  4. Comparison of Blue and White Lamp Light with Sunlight for Daylight-Mediated, 5-ALA Photodynamic Therapy, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marra, Kayla; LaRochelle, Ethan P; Chapman, M Shane; Hoopes, P Jack; Lukovits, Karina; Maytin, Edward V; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W

    2018-04-16

    Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy (d-PDT) as a treatment for actinic keratosis (AK) is an increasingly common technique due to a significant reduction in pain, leading to better patient tolerability. While past studies have looked at different light sources and delivery methods, this study strives to provide equivalent PpIX-weighted light doses with the hypothesis that artificial light sources could be equally as effective as natural sunlight if their PpIX-weighted fluences were equalized. Normal mouse skin was used as the model to compare blue LED light, metal halide white light and natural sunlight, with minimal incubation time between topical ALA application and the onset of light delivery. A total PpIX-weighted fluence of 20 J eff cm -2 was delivered over 2 h, and the efficacy of response was quantified using three acute bioassays for PDT damage: PpIX photobleaching, Stat3 crosslinking and quantitative histopathology. These bioassays indicated blue light was slightly inferior to both sunlight and white light, but that the latter two were not significantly different. The results suggest that metal halide white light could be a reasonable alternative to daylight PDT, which should allow a more controlled treatment that is independent of weather and yet should have similar response rates with limited pain during treatment. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. A Bifunctional Photosensitizer for Enhanced Fractional Photodynamic Therapy: Singlet Oxygen Generation in the Presence and Absence of Light.

    PubMed

    Turan, Ilke Simsek; Yildiz, Deniz; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Gunaydin, Gurcan; Akkaya, Engin U

    2016-02-18

    The photosensitized generation of singlet oxygen within tumor tissues during photodynamic therapy (PDT) is self-limiting, as the already low oxygen concentrations within tumors is further diminished during the process. In certain applications, to minimize photoinduced hypoxia the light is introduced intermittently (fractional PDT) to allow time for the replenishment of cellular oxygen. This condition extends the time required for effective therapy. Herein, we demonstrated that a photosensitizer with an additional 2-pyridone module for trapping singlet oxygen would be useful in fractional PDT. Thus, in the light cycle, the endoperoxide of 2-pyridone is generated along with singlet oxygen. In the dark cycle, the endoperoxide undergoes thermal cycloreversion to produce singlet oxygen, regenerating the 2-pyridone module. As a result, the photodynamic process can continue in the dark as well as in the light cycles. Cell-culture studies validated this working principle in vitro. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Red/near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Ho, Michael D.; Krengel, Maxine H.; Bogdanova, Yelena; Knight, Jeffrey A.; Yee, Megan K.; Zafonte, Ross; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R.; Koo, Bang-Bon

    2015-05-01

    This invited paper reviews our research with scalp application of red/near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) to improve cognition in chronic, traumatic brain injury 1. Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased ATP, important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. Eleven chronic, mTBI participants with closed-head injury and cognitive dysfunction received 18 outpatient treatments (MWF, 6 Wks) starting at 10 Mo. to 8 Yr. post-mTBI (MVA, sports-related, IED blast injury). LED therapy is non-invasive, painless, non-thermal (FDA-cleared, non-significant risk device). Each LED cluster head (2.1" diameter, 500mW, 22.2mW/cm2) was applied 10 min (13J/cm2) to 11 scalp placements: midline, from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, temporal, and parietal areas. Testing performed pre- and post-LED (+1 Wk, 1 and 2 Mo post- 18th treatment) showed significant linear trend for LED effect over time, on improved executive function and verbal memory. Fewer PTSD symptoms were reported. New studies at VA Boston include TBI patients treated with transcranial LED (26J/cm2); or treated with only intranasal red, 633nm and NIR, 810nm diodes placed into the nostrils (25 min, 6.5mW, 11.4J/cm2). Intranasal LEDs are hypothesized to deliver photons to hippocampus. Results are similar to Naeser et al. (2014). Actigraphy sleep data show increased sleep time (average, +1 Hr/night) post-18th transcranial or intranasal LED treatment. LED treatments may be self-administered at home (Naeser et al., 2011). A shamcontrolled study with Gulf War Illness Veterans is underway.

  7. Far-red light-mediated programmable anti-cancer gene delivery in cooperation with photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; He, Hua; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Yongbing; Yin, Lichen

    2018-07-01

    Effective anti-cancer therapy is hurdled by the complicated extracellular and intracellular barriers, and thus a smart gene vector that can enable programmable gene delivery is highly demanded. Photo-manipulation of gene delivery processes features spatial and temporal precision, while majority of current strategies utilizes short-wavelength UV/visible light with poor tissue penetration or high-power-density near-infrared (NIR) light that would cause undesired heat damage. Herein, an ROS-degradable polycation was designed and co-delivered with a photosensitizer (PS), thus realizing photo-programmable gene delivery using far-red light (661 nm) at low optical power density (down to 5 mW cm -2 ). Thioketal-crosslinked polyethylenimine (TK-PEI) was synthesized to condense p53 gene to form nanocomplexes (NCs), and hyaluronic acid (HA) modified with pheophytin a (Pha) was coated onto NCs to enhance their colloidal stability and enable cancer cell targeting. Short-time (8-min) light irradiation produced non-lethal amount of ROS to disrupt the endosomal membranes and facilitate p53 gene release via degradation of TK-PEI, which collectively enhanced p53 expression levels toward anti-cancer gene therapy. Long-time (30-min) light irradiation at the post-transfection state generated lethal amount of ROS, which cooperatively killed cancer cells to strengthen p53 gene therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first example of an "one stone, three birds" approach to realize cooperative anti-cancer gene therapy using low-power-density, long-wavelength visible light as a single stimulus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Single photon detection imaging of Cherenkov light emitted during radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Philip M.; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; LaRochelle, Ethan; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2018-03-01

    Cherenkov imaging during radiation therapy has been developed as a tool for dosimetry, which could have applications in patient delivery verification or in regular quality audit. The cameras used are intensified imaging sensors, either ICCD or ICMOS cameras, which allow important features of imaging, including: (1) nanosecond time gating, (2) amplification by 103-104, which together allow for imaging which has (1) real time capture at 10-30 frames per second, (2) sensitivity at the level of single photon event level, and (3) ability to suppress background light from the ambient room. However, the capability to achieve single photon imaging has not been fully analyzed to date, and as such was the focus of this study. The ability to quantitatively characterize how a single photon event appears in amplified camera imaging from the Cherenkov images was analyzed with image processing. The signal seen at normal gain levels appears to be a blur of about 90 counts in the CCD detector, after going through the chain of photocathode detection, amplification through a microchannel plate PMT, excitation onto a phosphor screen and then imaged on the CCD. The analysis of single photon events requires careful interpretation of the fixed pattern noise, statistical quantum noise distributions, and the spatial spread of each pulse through the ICCD.

  10. The effects of light emitting diode therapy following high intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Denis, Romain; O'Brien, Christopher; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2013-05-01

    To determine the effects of light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) irradiation on blood lactate concentration ([La]) clearance, peak power output and fatigue index (FI) following high intensity fatiguing exercise. Single-blinded randomised cross-over placebo controlled trial. University College Dublin, Institute for Sport and Health, Human performance laboratory. Eighteen healthy male athletes were recruited from field-based sports (including soccer, hockey and rugby union) and participated in the present study. Dependent variables were the peak power output elicited during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT), FI and [La] before and after each exercise. WAnT performance was measured prior to high intensity fatiguing exercise (Yo-Yo IR2), prior to LEDT or placebo, and following LEDT or placebo. [La] was measured at baseline, immediately after the Yo-Yo IR2, and in the 3rd, 9th, and 15th min following LEDT or placebo condition. No significant group by treatment interactions were observed for any outcome measures (P > 0.05). We conclude that LEDT irradiation applied following high intensity exercise was not effective and has no immediate effect on [La] clearance, peak power and FI, and thus has no significant effect on muscle recovery in athletes at the intensity and irradiation parameters used in the present study. Further research using different parameters is required to determine how LEDT may contribute to post-exercise recovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biophoton detection and low-intensity light therapy: a potential clinical partnership.

    PubMed

    Tafur, Joseph; Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Van Wijk, Roeland; Mills, Paul J

    2010-02-01

    Low-intensity light therapy (LILT) is showing promise in the treatment of a wide variety of medical conditions. Concurrently, our knowledge of LILT mechanisms continues to expand. We are now aware of LILT's potential to induce cellular effects through, for example, accelerated ATP production and the mitigation of oxidative stress. In clinical use, however, it is often difficult to predict patient response to LILT. It appears that cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state may play a central role in determining sensitivity to LILT and may help explain variability in patient responsiveness. In LILT, conditions associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, e.g. diabetic hyperglycemia, demonstrate increased sensitivity to LILT. Consequently, assessment of tissue redox conditions in vivo may prove helpful in identifying responsive tissues. A noninvasive redox measure may be useful in advancing investigation in LILT and may one day be helpful in better identifying responsive patients. The detection of biophotons, the production of which is associated with cellular redox state and the generation of ROS, represents just such an opportunity. In this review, we will present the case for pursuing further investigation into the potential clinical partnership between biophoton detection and LILT.

  12. Biophoton Detection and Low-Intensity Light Therapy: A Potential Clinical Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Van Wijk, Eduard P.A.; Van Wijk, Roeland; Mills, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Low-intensity light therapy (LILT) is showing promise in the treatment of a wide variety of medical conditions. Concurrently, our knowledge of LILT mechanisms continues to expand. We are now aware of LILT's potential to induce cellular effects through, for example, accelerated ATP production and the mitigation of oxidative stress. In clinical use, however, it is often difficult to predict patient response to LILT. It appears that cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state may play a central role in determining sensitivity to LILT and may help explain variability in patient responsiveness. In LILT, conditions associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, e.g. diabetic hyperglycemia, demonstrate increased sensitivity to LILT. Consequently, assessment of tissue redox conditions in vivo may prove helpful in identifying responsive tissues. A noninvasive redox measure may be useful in advancing investigation in LILT and may one day be helpful in better identifying responsive patients. The detection of biophotons, the production of which is associated with cellular redox state and the generation of ROS, represents just such an opportunity. In this review, we will present the case for pursuing further investigation into the potential clinical partnership between biophoton detection and LILT. PMID:19754267

  13. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in hair growth-promoting effect of 655-nm red light and LED in in vitro culture model.

    PubMed

    Han, Le; Liu, Ben; Chen, Xianyan; Chen, Haiyan; Deng, Wenjia; Yang, Changsheng; Ji, Bin; Wan, Miaojian

    2018-04-01

    Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair growth. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was evaluated for stimulating hair growth in numerous clinical studies, in which 655-nm red light was found to be most effective and practical for stimulating hair growth. We evaluated whether 655-nm red light + light-emitting diode (LED) could promote human hair growth by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. An in vitro culture of human hair follicles (HFs) was irradiated with different intensities of 655-nm red light + LED, 21 h7 (an inhibitor of β-catenin), or both. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to assess the expression of β-catenin, GSK3β, p-GSK3β, and Lef1 in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The 655-nm red light + LED not only enhanced hair shaft elongation, but also reduced catagen transition in human hair follicle organ culture, with the greatest effectiveness observed at 5 min (0.839 J/cm 2 ). Additionally, 655-nm red light + LED enhanced the expression of β-catenin, p-GSK3β, and Lef1, signaling molecules of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, in the hair matrix. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in hair growth-promoting effect of 655-nm red light and LED in vitro and therefore may serve as an alternative therapeutic option for alopecia.

  14. Self-Expandable Metal Stents and Trans-stent Light Delivery: Are Metal Stents and Photodynamic Therapy Compatible?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luo-Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Li, Zhao-Shen; Chen, Yang K; Hetzel, Fred W.; Huang, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Obstructive non-small cell lung cancer and obstructive esophageal cancer are US FDA approved indications of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The usefulness of PDT for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma is currently under clinical investigation. Endoscopic stenting for lumen restoration is a common palliative intervention for those indications. It is important to assess whether self-expandable metal stents are compatible with trans-stent PDT light delivery. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Direct effects of various components of metal biliary (n = 2), esophageal (n = 2), and bronchial (n = 1) stents on PDT light transmittance and distribution were examined using a point or linear light source (630 or 652 nm diode laser). Resected pig biliary duct and esophageal wall tissues were used to examine the feasibility of PDT light delivery through the fully expanded metal stents. Results: While using a point light source, the metal components (thread and joint) of the stent could cause a significant shadow effect. The liner material (polytetrafluoroethylene or polyurethane) could cause various degrees of light absorption. When the stent was covered with a thin layer of biliary duct and esophageal tissues containing all wall layers, the shadow effect could be mitigated due to tissue scattering. Conclusions: This study clearly demonstrates that it is feasible to combine stenting and PDT for the treatment of luminal lesions. PDT light dose should be adjusted to counteract the reduction of light transmittance caused by the metal and liner materials of stent. PMID:18951422

  15. The effectiveness of low-level diode laser therapy on orthodontic pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chong; McGrath, Colman; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of diode low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for orthodontic pain control, a systematic and extensive electronic search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of diode LLLT on orthodontic pain prior to November 2014 was performed using the Cochrane Library (Issue 9, 2014), PubMed (1997), EMBASE (1947) and Web of Science (1956). The Cochrane tool for risk of bias evaluation was used to assess the bias risk in the chosen data. A meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3. Of the 186 results, 14 RCTs, with a total of 659 participants from 11 countries, were included. Except for three studies assessed as having a 'moderate risk of bias', the RCTs were rated as having a 'high risk of bias'. The methodological weaknesses were mainly due to 'blinding' and 'allocation concealment'. The meta-analysis showed that diode LLLT significantly reduced orthodontic pain by 39 % in comparison with placebo groups (P = 0.02). Diode LLLT was shown to significantly reduce the maximum pain intensity among parallel-design studies (P = 0.003 versus placebo groups; P = 0.000 versus control groups). However, no significant effects were shown for split-mouth-design studies (P = 0.38 versus placebo groups). It was concluded that the use of diode LLLT for orthodontic pain appears promising. However, due to methodological weaknesses, there was insufficient evidence to support or refute LLLT's effectiveness. RCTs with better designs and appropriate sample power are required to provide stronger evidence for diode LLLT's clinical applications.

  16. Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy in an Experimental Model of Osteoarthritis in Rats Evaluated Through Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mangueira, Nilton Maciel; Xavier, Murilo; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This work aimed to investigate the biochemical changes associated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) using 660 and 780 nm, on a well-established experimental model of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knees of rats with induced collagenase, using histomorphometry and Raman spectroscopy. Materials and methods: Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (GCON, n=9), collagenase without treatment (GCOL, n=9), collagenase with LLLT 660 nm treatment (G660, n=8), and collagenase with LLLT 780 nm treatment (G780, n=10). LLLT protocol was: 30 mW power output, 10 sec irradiation time, 0.04 cm2 spot size, 0.3 J energy, 0.75 W/cm2 irradiance, and 7.5 J/cm2 fluence per session per day, during 14 days. Then, knees were withdrawn and submitted to histomorphometry and Raman spectroscopy analysis. Principal components analysis (PCA) and Mahalanobis distance were employed to characterize the spectral findings. Results: Histomorphometry revealed a significant increase in the amount of collagen III for the group irradiated with 660 nm. The Raman bands at 1247, 1273, and 1453 cm−1 (from principal component score PC2), attributed to collagen type II, and 1460 cm−1 (from PC3), attributed to collagen type III, suggested that the LLLT causes acceleration in cellular activity, especially on the cells that repair cartilage, accelerating the breakdown of cartilage destroyed by collagenase and stimulating the fibroblast to synthesize repairing collagen III. Conclusions: LLLT accelerated the initial breakdown of cartilage destroyed by collagenase and stimulated the fibroblast to synthesize the repairing collagen III, suggesting a beneficial effect of LLLT on OA. PMID:25714387

  17. Low-Level Laser Therapy (808 nm) Reduces Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in Rat Tibialis Anterior Muscle After Cryolesion

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Lívia; Moretti, Ana I.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.; Cury, Vivian; Souza, Heraldo P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Muscle regeneration is a complex phenomenon, involving coordinated activation of several cellular responses. During this process, oxidative stress and consequent tissue damage occur with a severity that may depend on the intensity and duration of the inflammatory response. Among the therapeutic approaches to attenuate inflammation and increase tissue repair, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may be a safe and effective clinical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT on oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammatory mediators produced during a cryolesion of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in rats. Material and Methods Sixty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20): control (BC), injured TA muscle without LLLT (IC), injured TA muscle submitted to LLLT (IRI). The injured region was irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days, starting immediately after the lesion using a AlGaAs laser (continuous wave, 808 nm, tip area of 0.00785 cm2, power 30 mW, application time 47 seconds, fluence 180 J/cm2; 3.8 mW/cm2; and total energy 1.4 J). The animals were sacrificed on the fourth day after injury. Results LLLT reduced oxidative and nitrative stress in injured muscle, decreased lipid peroxidation, nitrotyrosine formation and NO production, probably due to reduction in iNOS protein expression. Moreover, LLLT increased SOD gene expression, and decreased the inflammatory response as measured by gene expression of NF-kβ and COX-2 and by TNF-α and IL-1β concentration. Conclusion These results suggest that LLLT could be an effective therapeutic approach to modulate oxidative and nitrative stress and to reduce inflammation in injured muscle. PMID:23001637

  18. Low-level laser therapy (808 nm) reduces inflammatory response and oxidative stress in rat tibialis anterior muscle after cryolesion.

    PubMed

    Assis, Lívia; Moretti, Ana I S; Abrahão, Thalita B; Cury, Vivian; Souza, Heraldo P; Hamblin, Michael R; Parizotto, Nivaldo A

    2012-11-01

    Muscle regeneration is a complex phenomenon, involving coordinated activation of several cellular responses. During this process, oxidative stress and consequent tissue damage occur with a severity that may depend on the intensity and duration of the inflammatory response. Among the therapeutic approaches to attenuate inflammation and increase tissue repair, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may be a safe and effective clinical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT on oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammatory mediators produced during a cryolesion of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in rats. Sixty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20): control (BC), injured TA muscle without LLLT (IC), injured TA muscle submitted to LLLT (IRI). The injured region was irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days, starting immediately after the lesion using a AlGaAs laser (continuous wave, 808 nm, tip area of 0.00785 cm(2) , power 30 mW, application time 47 seconds, fluence 180 J/cm(2) ; 3.8 mW/cm(2) ; and total energy 1.4 J). The animals were sacrificed on the fourth day after injury. LLLT reduced oxidative and nitrative stress in injured muscle, decreased lipid peroxidation, nitrotyrosine formation and NO production, probably due to reduction in iNOS protein expression. Moreover, LLLT increased SOD gene expression, and decreased the inflammatory response as measured by gene expression of NF-kβ and COX-2 and by TNF-α and IL-1β concentration. These results suggest that LLLT could be an effective therapeutic approach to modulate oxidative and nitrative stress and to reduce inflammation in injured muscle. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Efficiency of photodynamic therapy using indocyanine green and infrared light on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhi, Mustafa K.; Ak, Ayşe.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is one of the main reasons of death in all around the world. The main treatments of cancer include surgical intervention, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. These treatments can be applied separately or in a combined manner. Another therapeutic method that is still being researched and recently has started to be used in clinical applications is Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). Most photosensitizers currently being investigated are sensitive to red light. However, it is known that infrared light has a better penetration into the skin or tissue. Indocyanine Green (ICG), which is used in this study, is sensitive to infrared light. The aim of this in vitro study is to investigate the effect of PDT on breast cancer cells by using different doses of ICG and infrared light irradiation. 25, 50 and 100 μM ICG concentrations and 25 and 50 J/cm2 laser energy doses were applied to MCF-7 cell lines. MTT analyses were performed on 24, 48 and 72 hours following the treatments. As a result, inhibition of cell viability was observed in a time and dose dependent manner. It can be concluded that ICG-PDT application is a good alternative to conventional radiation therapy and chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment.

  20. Minibeam therapy with protons and light ions: physical feasibility and potential to reduce radiation side effects and to facilitate hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Dilmanian, F Avraham; Eley, John G; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-06-01

    Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Light Visor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal Affective Disorder is a form of depression brought on by reduced light. For some people, this can lead to clinical depression. NASA has conducted research in light therapy and employs it to help astronauts adjust internal rhythms during orbital flight. Dr. George Brainard, a medical researcher and NASA consultant, has developed a portable light therapy device, which is commercially available. The Light Visor allows continuous light therapy and can be powered by either batteries or electricity. Dr. Brainard continues to research various aspects of light therapy.

  2. Comparative study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field and low level laser therapy on mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    El-Makakey, Ayman M; El-Sharaby, Radwa M; Hassan, Mohammed H; Balbaa, Alaa

    2017-03-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) consist of three major signaling members: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and C-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK). We investigated physiological effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMFT) and Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) on human body, adopting the expression level of mitogen-activated protein kinases as an indicator via assessment of the activation levels of three major families of MAPKS, ERK, p38 and JNK in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients before and after the therapies. Assessment for the expression levels of MAPKs families' were done, in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients recently have appendectomy, using flow cytometric analysis of multiple signaling pathways, pre and post LLLT and PEMFT application (twice daily for 6 successive days) on the appendectomy wound. There were non-significant differences in the expression levels of MAPKs families' pre- therapies application. But there were significant increase in the ERK expression levels post application of LLLT compared to its pre application (p<0.01). Also, there was significant increase in the ERK, p38 and C-Jun N terminal expression level values post application of PEMFT compared to its pre application expression levels (p<0.01 for each). The present study demonstrates that PEMFT has a powerful healing effect more than LLLT as it increase the activation of ERK, P38 and C-Jun-N Terminal while LLLT only increase the activation of ERK. LLLT has more potent pain decreasing effect than PEMFT as it does not activate P38 pathway like PEMFT.

  3. Smart pH-responsive upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Chunhong; Su, Lin; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A smart pH-responsive photodynamic therapy system based on upconversion nanoparticle loaded PEG coated polymeric lipid vesicles (RB-UPPLVs) was designed and prepared. These RB-UPPLVs which are promising agents for deep cancer photodynamic therapy applications can achieve enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

  4. A historical justification for and retrospective analysis of the systematic application of light therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Willis, Gregory L; Moore, Cleo; Armstrong, Stuart M

    2012-03-01

    For the past 40 years the primary purpose of therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been to replace deficient dopamine (DA) in the nigrostriatal dopamine (NSD) system. Even in the presence of limited efficacy, abundant side effects and impoverished quality of life, the involvement of other systems in the aetiology and treatment of this disorder has been sorely neglected and the excessive use of DA replacement therapy (DART) continues on a global basis. Recent scientific work suggests that the retina plays a major role in NSD function and intimates light therapy in the management of PD. After a thorough review of historical evidence supporting this contention, a retrospective, open-label study on 129 PD patients, whereby they were monitored for a period extending for a few months to eight years, was carried out. Primary motor and non-motor symptoms were monitored using an objectified global rating scale and timed motor tests that were assessed at regular intervals for the duration of the study. Thirty-one patients with other neurological disorders (OND) served as controls to determine whether any therapeutic effects seen with light were generalizable across other conditions. Patients were classified as compliant (COM), semi-compliant (SCOM), or early quit (EQUIT; prematurely discontinued treatment). EQUIT patients showed deterioration, while the COM group improved on most parameters. The SCOM patients were not as good as the COM group. The OND group showed significant improvement in depression and insomnia, but exposure to light did not improve motor function. The total drug burden of PD patients maintained on light was less with fewer side effects than SCOM or EQUIT groups. These results confirm the value of the strategic application of light therapy with controlled doses of DART in PD and warrants further controlled investigation. That the symptomatic improvement continued as long patients remained in the program suggests that exposure to light, under a

  5. Effect of light polarization on the efficiency of photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinomas: an in vitro cellular study.

    PubMed

    JalalKamali, M; Nematollahi-Mahani, S N; Shojaei, M; Shamsoddini, A; Arabpour, N

    2018-02-01

    In an in vitro study, the effect of light polarization on the efficiency of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) was investigated. Three states of light polarization (non-polarized, linearly polarized, and circularly polarized) were considered. Cells were exposed to green (532 pm 20 nm) irradiation from light emitting diodes. Cell survival was measured by the colorimetric assay (WST-1) and Trypan blue staining. The colorimetric assay showed a pronounced decrease in the cell viability (up to 30%) using polarized light compared to the non-polarized one in the wavelength region used. Similar results were obtained by the cell counting method (20-30% increase in cell death). The observed effect was dependent on the concentration of photosensitizer. The effect is more expressed in the case of linearly polarized light compared to the circularly polarized one. Results show that the use of polarized light increases the efficiency of in vitro ALA-PDT of BCC. Utilizing polarized light, it is possible to obtain the same effect from PDT by lower concentrations of photosensitizer. Additionally, the concentration dependency of PDT response and photo-bleaching is also reduced.

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy after extraction of impacted lower third molars.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Maurizio; Petrini, Morena; Trentini, Paolo; Perfetti, Giorgio; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the control of pain, swelling, and trismus associated with surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups, each with 15 patients-group test (LLLT) and a group control (no-LLLT)-and were told to avoid any analgesics 12 h before the procedure. In group test, the 980-nm diode-laser (G-Laser 25 Galbiati, Italy) was applied, using a 600-μm handpiece, intraorally (lingual and vestibular) at 1 cm from the involved area and extraoral at the insertion point of the masseter muscle immediately after surgery and at 24 h. The group control received only routine management. Parameters used for LLLT were: continuous mode, at 300 mW (0.3 W) for a total of 180 s (60 s × 3) (0.3 W × 180 s=54 J). Group test showed improvement in the interincisal opening and remarkable reduction of trismus, swelling and intensity of pain on the first and the seventh postoperative days. Although LLLT has been reported to prevent swelling and trismus following the removal of impacted third molars, some of these studies reported a positive laser effect while others did not. All references to the use of laser therapy in the postoperative management of third molar surgery employ different methodologies and, in some, explanations as to selection of their respective radiation parameters are not given. This study has demonstrated that LLLT, with these parameters, is useful for the reduction of postoperative discomfort after third-molar surgery.

  7. Low-level laser therapy improves vision in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ivandic, Boris T; Ivandic, Tomislav

    2014-03-01

    This case report describes the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in a single patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). RP is a heritable disorder of the retina, which eventually leads to blindness. No therapy is currently available. LLLT was applied using a continuous wave laser diode (780 nm, 10 mW average output at 292 Hz, 50% pulse modulation). The complete retina of eyes was irradiated through the conjunctiva for 40 sec (0.4 J, 0.333 W/cm2) two times per week for 2 weeks (1.6 J). A 55-year-old male patient with advanced RP was treated and followed for 7 years. The patient had complained of nyctalopia and decreasing vision. At first presentation, best visual acuity was 20/50 in each eye. Visual fields were reduced to a central residual of 5 degrees. Tritan-dyschromatopsy was found. Retinal potential was absent in electroretinography. Biomicroscopy showed optic nerve atrophy, and narrow retinal vessels with a typical pattern of retinal pigmentation. After four initial treatments of LLLT, visual acuity increased to 20/20 in each eye. Visual fields normalized except for a mid-peripheral absolute concentric scotoma. Five years after discontinuation of LLLT, a relapse was observed. LLLT was repeated (another four treatments) and restored the initial success. During the next 2 years, 17 additional treatments were performed on an "as needed" basis, to maintain the result. LLLT was shown to improve and maintain vision in a patient with RP, and may thereby have contributed to slowing down blindness.

  8. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2) low-level laser therapy (LLLT), a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses. Methods To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For the LLLT-induced neuroprotective study, neuronal cells with activated microglial cells in a Transwell™ cell-culture system were used. For the phagocytosis study, fluorescence-labeled microspheres were added into the treated microglial cells to confirm the role of LLLT. Results Our results showed that LLLT (20 J/cm2) could attenuate toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated proinflammatory responses in microglia, characterized by down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression and nitric oxide (NO) production. LLLT-triggered TLR signaling inhibition was achieved by activating tyrosine kinases Src and Syk, which led to MyD88 tyrosine phosphorylation, thus impairing MyD88-dependent proinflammatory signaling cascade. In addition, we found that Src activation could enhance Rac1 activity and F-actin accumulation that typify microglial phagocytic activity. We also found that Src/PI3K/Akt inhibitors prevented LLLT-stimulated Akt (Ser473 and Thr308) phosphorylation and blocked Rac1 activity and actin-based microglial phagocytosis, indicating the activation of Src/PI3K/Akt/Rac1 signaling pathway. Conclusions The present study underlines the importance of Src in suppressing inflammation and enhancing microglial phagocytic function in activated microglia during LLLT stimulation. We have identified a new and important neuroprotective signaling pathway that consists of regulation of microglial phagocytosis and inflammation under LLLT treatment. Our research

  9. The growth of human scalp hair mediated by visible red light laser and LED sources in males.

    PubMed

    Lanzafame, Raymond J; Blanche, Raymond R; Bodian, Adam B; Chiacchierini, Richard P; Fernandez-Obregon, Adolfo; Kazmirek, Eric R

    2013-10-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used to promote hair growth. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken to define the safety and physiologic effects of LLLT on males with androgenic alopecia. Forty-four males (18-48 yo, Fitzpatrick I-IV, Hamilton-Norwood IIa-V) were recruited. A transition zone scalp site was selected; hairs were trimmed to 3 mm height; the area was tattooed and photographed. The active group received a "TOPHAT655" unit containing 21, 5 mW lasers (655 ± 5 nm), and 30 LEDS (655 ± 20 nm), in a bicycle-helmet like apparatus. The placebo group unit appeared identical, containing incandescent red lights. Patients treated at home every other day × 16 weeks (60 treatments, 67.3 J/cm(2) irradiance/25 minute treatment), with follow up and photography at 16 weeks. A masked 2.85 cm(2) photographic area was evaluated by another blinded investigator. The primary endpoint was the percent increase in hair counts from baseline. Forty-one patients completed the study (22 active, 19 placebo). No adverse events or side effects were reported. Baseline hair counts were 162.7 ± 95.9 (N = 22) in placebo and 142.0 ± 73.0 (N = 22) and active groups respectively (P = 0.426). Post Treatment hair counts were 162.4 ± 62.5 (N = 19) and 228.7 ± 102.8 (N = 22), respectively (P = 0.0161). A 39% percent hair increase was demonstrated (28.4 ± 46.2 placebo, N = 19; 67.2 ± 33.4, active, N = 22) (P = 0.001) Deleting one placebo group subject with a very high baseline count and a very large decrease, resulted in baseline hair counts of 151.1 ± 81.0 (N = 21) and 142.0 ± 73.0 (N = 22), respectively (P = 0.680). Post treatment hair counts were 158.2 ± 61.5 (N = 18) and 228.7 ± 102.8 (N = 22) (P = 0.011), resulting in a 35% percent increase in hair growth (32.3 ± 44.2, placebo, N = 18; 67.2 ± 33.4, active, N = 22) (P = 0.003). LLLT of the scalp at 655 nm significantly improved hair counts in males with androgenetic alopecia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals

  10. Light-emitting diode therapy reduces persistent inflammatory pain: Role of interleukin 10 and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Martins, D F; Turnes, B L; Cidral-Filho, F J; Bobinski, F; Rosas, R F; Danielski, L G; Petronilho, F; Santos, A R S

    2016-06-02

    During the last decades, the use of light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) has increased significantly for the treatment of wound healing, analgesia and inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, scientific data on the mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LEDT are still insufficient. Thus, this study investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect of LEDT in the model of chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mice injected with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) underwent behavioral, i.e. mechanical and hot hyperalgesia; determination of cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-10), oxidative stress markers (protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS)) and antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)). Additionally, mice were pretreated with either naloxone or fucoidin and mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed. LEDT inhibited mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by CFA injection. LEDT did not reduce paw edema, neither influenced the levels of TNF-α and IL1-β; although it increased the levels of IL-10. LEDT significantly prevented TBARS increase in both acute and chronic phases post-CFA injection; whereas protein carbonyl levels were reduced only in the acute phase. LEDT induced an increase in both SOD and CAT activity, with effects observable in the acute but not in the chronic. And finally, pre-administration of naloxone or fucoidin prevented LEDT analgesic effect. These data contribute to the understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of LEDT as well as provides additional support for its use in the treatment of painful conditions of inflammatory etiology. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the application of light therapy in German-speaking countries.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Reinhard; Kasper, Siegfried; Pjrek, Edda; Winkler, Dietmar

    2012-09-01

    Many studies have investigated seasonal affective disorder (SAD; fall-winter-depression) and its treatment with light therapy (LT). However, to the best of our knowledge, no other study has investigated the usage of LT in Europe since 1994. Thus, we performed a survey in hospitals with adult psychiatric departments in German-speaking countries by questionnaire. First, a questionnaire was constructed, considering also recent developments in LT. This questionnaire was sent to all hospitals with adult psychiatric departments listed in the "Deutsches Krankenhaus Adressbuch," which contains hospitals from all German-speaking countries (Germany, Switzerland, and Austria). Non-responders were asked to answer the questionnaire by mail and by phone. We achieved a completion rate of 58%. Data show almost no relevant, non-artificial differences between countries as well as between type of hospital. LT is more frequently used in university and state hospitals than in other types of treatment facilities. Compared to 1994, the major findings are (1) a substantial increase in the use of LT from 13.0 to 69.8% with no differences between Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, (2) this increase is mostly due to treatment for various forms of depression and further possible applications are less often considered, (3) there is a shift in the usage of LT from monotherapy to combination of pharmacotherapy with LT as an adjunctive treatment, and (4) a north-south comparison showed no substantial differences. Considerably higher rates of usage of LT have been found compared to the last survey in German-speaking countries taking place in 1994. Usage almost tripled; however, possible indications for LT other than SAD and non-seasonal depression are not applied to full extent. Further efforts on the propagation of LT should therefore be undertaken, with the same rigorous studies as for pharmacotherapy.

  12. Development of a center for light ion therapy and accurate tumor diagnostics at karolinska institutet and hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K.

    2002-04-01

    Radiation therapy is today in a state of very rapid development with new intensity modulated treatment techniques continuously being developed. This has made intensity modulated electron and photon beams almost as powerful as conventional uniform beam proton therapy. To be able to cure also the most advanced hypoxic and radiation resistant tumors of complex local spread, intensity modulated light ion beams are really the ultimate tool and only slightly more expensive than proton therapy. The aim of the new center for ion therapy and tumor diagnostics in Stockholm is to develop radiobiologically optimized 3-dimensional pencil beam scanning techniques. Beside the "classical" approaches using low ionization density hydrogen ions (protons, but also deuterons and tritium nuclei) and high ionization density carbon ions, two new approaches will be developed. In the first one lithium or beryllium ions, that induce the least detrimental biological effect to normal tissues for a given biological effect in a small volume of the tumor, will be key particles. In the second approach, referred patients will be given a high-dose high-precision "boost" treatment with carbon or oxygen ions during one week preceding the final treatment with conventional radiations in the referring hospital. The rationale behind these approaches is to reduce the high ionization density dose to the normal tissue stroma inside the tumor and to ensure a microscopically uniform dose delivery. The principal idea of the center is to closely integrate ion therapy into the clinical routine and research of a large radiotherapy department. The light ion therapy center will therefore be combined with advanced tumor diagnostics including MR and PET-CT imaging to facilitate efficient high-precision high-dose boost treatment of remitted patients. The possibility to do 3D tumor diagnostics and 3D dose delivery verification with the same PET camera will be the ultimate step in high quality adaptive radiation therapy

  13. Clinical efficacy, onset time and safety of bright light therapy in acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Hang; Dang, Wei-Min; Ma, Yan-Tao; Hu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Wang, Gang; Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Bin; Zhou, Shu-Zhe; Feng, Lei; Geng, Shu-Xia; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Tang, Guan-Wen; He, Zhong-Kai; Zhen, Long; Yu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and non- seasonal depression. The efficacy of BLT in treating patients with bipolar disorder is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy, onset time and clinical safety of BLT in treating patients with acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy (trial registration at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02009371). This was a multi-center, single blind, randomized clinical trial. Seventy-four participants were randomized in one of two treatment conditions: BLT and control (dim red light therapy, dRLT). Sixty-three participants completed the study (33 BLT, 30 dRLT). Light therapy lasted for two weeks, one hour every morning. All participants were required to complete several scales assessments at baseline, and at the end of weeks 1 and 2. The primary outcome measures were the clinical efficacy of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of HAMD-17 scores, and the onset time of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of QIDS-SR16 scores. The secondary outcome measures were rates of switch into hypomania or mania and adverse events. 1) Clinical efficacy: BLT showed a greater ameliorative effect on bipolar depression than the control, with response rates of 78.19% vs. 43.33% respectively (p < 0.01). 2) Onset day: Median onset day was 4.33 days in BLT group. 3) BLT-emergent hypomania: No participants experienced symptoms of hypomania. 4) Side effects: No serious adverse events were reported. BLT can be considered as an effective and safe adjunctive treatment for patients with acute bipolar depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lighting

    SciT

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} inmore » EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.« less

  15. Evaluation of the low-level laser therapy application parameters for skin burn treatment in experimental model: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brassolatti, Patricia; de Andrade, Ana Laura Martins; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Otterço, Albaiza Nicoletti; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio

    2018-05-05

    Burn is defined as a traumatic injury of thermal origin, which affects the organic tissue. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has gained great prominence as a treatment in this type of injury; however, the application parameters are still controversial in the literature. The aims of this study were to review the literature studies that use LLLT as a treatment in burns conducted in an experimental model, discuss the main parameters used, and highlight the benefits found in order to choose an appropriate therapeutic window to be applied in this type of injury. The selection of the studies related to the theme was carried out in the main databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, and Scopus in the period from 2001 to 2017). Subsequently, the articles were then chosen that fell within the inclusion criteria previously established. In the end, 22 were evaluated, and the main parameters were presented. The analyzed studies presented both LLLT use in continuous and pulsed mode. Differences between the parameters used (power, fluence, and total energy) were observed. In addition, the protocols are distinct as to the type of injury and the number of treatment sessions. Among the results obtained by the authors are the improvements in the local microcirculation and cellular proliferation; however, a study reported no effects with LLLT as a treatment. LLLT is effective in accelerating the healing process. However, there is immense difficulty in establishing the most adequate protocol, due to the great discrepancy found in the applied dosimetry values.

  16. LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY AFTER CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the post-operative treatment of CTS, using the LLLT. Method: We prospectively evaluated 58 patients with CTS, randomly divided into two groups: treatment with LLLT (Group 1) and placebo (Group 2). A 830 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenic laser was used, with a power of 30 mW. Results: There was female predominance in both groups. The mean age of the patients in Group 1 was 44.3 years and in Group 2, 51.9 years. The average duration of disease progression was around two years in both groups. The average time elapsed since discharge from treatment was 3.6 months in both groups, and fewer patients had postoperative complaints in Group 1 than in Group 2. At the end of the treatment, in Group 1, 29.41% of the patients presented electromyographic abnormalities, while in Group 2, 63.64% of the patients had abnormalities, after six months. Conclusion: This was an initial study on adjuvant therapy using postoperative LLLT on CTS. The method presented was sufficient for postoperative evaluation of the patients in this study. Patients undergoing LLLT after surgery for CTS were benefited and had better functional outcomes than shown by the control group. The technique was effective and did not have any adverse effects on the patients studied. PMID:27027075

  17. Low level laser therapy for patients with cervical disk hernia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Harada, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Musya, Yoshiro

    2012-09-30

    In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic shoulder joint pain, elbow, hand and finger pain, and low back pain. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic neck pain. Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm(2)/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks. 1. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). 2. After treatment, no significant differences in cervical spine range of motion were observed. 3. Discussions with the patients revealed that in order to receive continued benefits from treatment, it was important for them to be taught how to avoid postures that would cause them neck pain in everyday life. The present study demonstrates that LLLT was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training.

  18. Low Level Laser Therapy for Patients with Cervical Disk Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Harada, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Musya, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic shoulder joint pain, elbow, hand and finger pain, and low back pain. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic neck pain. Materials and Methods: Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm2/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks. Results: 1. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). 2. After treatment, no significant differences in cervical spine range of motion were observed. 3. Discussions with the patients revealed that in order to receive continued benefits from treatment, it was important for them to be taught how to avoid postures that would cause them neck pain in everyday life. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that LLLT was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training. PMID:24511189

  19. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy using a light-emitting diode lamp against Enterococcus faecalis in extracted human teeth.

    PubMed

    Rios, Alejandro; He, Jianing; Glickman, Gerald N; Spears, Robert; Schneiderman, Emet D; Honeyman, Allen L

    2011-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with high-power lasers as the light source has been proven to be effective in disinfecting root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of PDT using toluidine blue O (TBO) and a low-energy light-emitting diode (LED) lamp after the conventional disinfection protocol of 6% NaOCl. Single-rooted extracted teeth were cleaned, shaped, and sealed at the apex before incubation with Enterococcus faecalis for 2 weeks. Roots were randomly assigned to five experimental groups and three control groups. Dentin shavings were collected from the root canals of all groups with a #50/.06 rotary file, colony-forming units were determined, and the bacterial survival rate was calculated for each treatment. The bacterial survival rate of the NaOCl/TBO/light group (0.1%) was significantly lower (P < .005) than the NaOCl (0.66%) and TBO/light groups (2.9%). PDT using TBO and a LED lamp has the potential to be used as an adjunctive antimicrobial procedure in conventional endodontic therapy. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An open pilot study of ambulatory photodynamic therapy using a wearable low-irradiance organic light-emitting diode light source in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Attili, S K; Lesar, A; McNeill, A; Camacho-Lopez, M; Moseley, H; Ibbotson, S; Samuel, I D W; Ferguson, J

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a popular treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancer with clearance rates of between 70% and 100%. Although reported to have a superior cosmetic outcome, the inconvenience of hospital visits and discomfort during therapy are considered drawbacks. To present an open pilot study of a low-irradiance, potentially disposable, lightweight, organic light-emitting diode (OLED), which is an area-emitting light source (2 cm diameter), suitable for ambulatory PDT. Twelve patients with Bowen's disease (eight) and superficial basal cell carcinoma (four) < 2 cm in diameter were recruited into the study following histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Two treatments (45-60 J cm(-2) red light, 550-750 nm, peak 620 nm, irradiance 5 mW cm(-2)) were administered 1 month apart following application of aminolaevulinic acid for 4 h. At the 12-month follow-up, seven of the 12 patients remained clear, with four of the nonresponders demonstrating peripheral margin failure. Patients were scored for pain during and immediately after treatment using the numerical rating scale (NRS; 1-10). All 12 subjects scored pain as < 2 using the NRS (median score 1). In contrast, a similar cohort of 50 consecutive patients from our routine PDT clinic (Aktilite inorganic LED source; 75 J cm(-2), irradiance 80 mW cm(-2)) scored a median of 6 on the NRS. Pain and inconvenience are practical barriers to the use of conventional PDT. This pilot study suggests that OLED-PDT is less painful than conventional PDT with the added advantage of being lightweight, and therefore has the potential for more convenient 'home PDT'. These results need to be validated in larger studies.

  1. Effectiveness of low level laser therapy for treating male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Vladimirovich Moskvin, Sergey; Ivanovich Apolikhin, Oleg

    2018-01-01

    In half of the cases, the infertility of the couple is due to the disorder of the male fertility. The leading factors that cause male infertility are urogenital infections, disorders of the immune system, testicular and prostate pathology, as well as endocrine disorders. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is a very effective physical therapy method, used in many areas of medicine, including obstetrics and gynaecology, andrology and urology; and it is recommended as an integral part of the complex treatment of infertility. The literature review showed that LLLT is beneficial in treating male infertility. Laser can significantly improve the survival, motility and speed of movement of spermatozoa. Laser therapy of patients with prostatitis and vesiculitis can eliminate infiltrative-exudative changes, improve reproductive and copulatory functions. Local illumination of red (635 nm) and infrared (904 nm) spectra should be combined with intravenous laser blood illumination (ILBI) of red (635 nm) and ultraviolet (UV) (365 nm) spectra. PMID:29806585

  2. The fluence effects of low-level laser therapy on inflammation, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and synovial apoptosis in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Cheng, Yu-Jung; Huang, Fang-Chuen; Yang, Chen-Chia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) operating at low and high fluences on joint inflammation, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), and synovial apoptosis in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by pronounced inflammation and FLS proliferation within affected joints. Certain data indicate that LLLT is effective in patients with inflammation caused by RA; however, the fluence effects of LLLT on synovium are unclear. Monoarthritis was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) via intraarticular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the tibiotarsal joint. Animals were irradiated 72 h after CFA administration with a 780 nm GaAlAs laser at 4.5 J/cm2 (30 mW, 30 sec/spot) and 72 J/cm2 (80 mW, 180 sec/spot) daily for 10 days. After LLLT, the animals were euthanized and their arthritic ankles were collected for histopathological analysis, immunoassays of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)3 and 5B5, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. LLLT at a fluence of 4.5 J/cm2 significantly reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells and expressions of TNF-α-, MMP3- and 5B5-like immunoreactivities, as well as resulting in more TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in the synovium. No significant changes were observed in these biochemicals and inflammation in arthritic animals treated with 72 J/cm2. LLLT with low fluence is highly effective in reducing inflammation to sites of injury by decreasing the numbers of FLS, inflammatory cells, and mediators in the CFA-induced arthritic model. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT for RA.

  3. Influence of postoperative low-level laser therapy on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants in the posterior maxilla: a 6-week split-mouth clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mandić, Borka; Lazić, Zoran; Marković, Aleksa; Mandić, Bojan; Mandić, Miška; Djinić, Ana; Miličić, Biljana

    2015-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proven to stimulate bone repair, affecting cellular proliferation, differentiation and adhesion, and has shown a potential to reduce the healing time following implant placement. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of postoperative LLLT osseointegration and early success of self-tapping implants placed into low-density bone. Following the split-mouth design, self-tapping implants n = 44) were inserted in the posterior maxilla of 12 patients. One jaw side randomly received LLLT (test group), while the other side was placebo (control group). For LLLT, a 637 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) laser (Medicolaser 637, Technoline, Belgrade, Serbia) with an output power of 40 mW and continuous wave was used. Low-level laser treatment was performed immediately after the surgery and then repeated every day in the following 7 days. The total irradiation dose per treatment was 6.26 J/cm2 per implant. The study outcomes were: implant stability, alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) activity and early implant success rate. The follow-up took 6 weeks. Irradiated implants achieved a higher stability compared with controls during the entire follow-up and the difference reached significance in the 5th postoperative week (paired t-test, p = 0.030). The difference in ALP activity between the groups was insignificant in any observation point (paired t-test, p > 0.05). The early implant success rate was 100%, regardless of LLLT usage. LLLT applied daily during the first postoperative week expressed no significant influence on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants placed into low density bone of the posterior maxilla. Placement of self-tapping macro-designed implants into low density bone could be a predictable therapeutic procedure with a high early success rate regardless of LLLT usage.

  4. The Fluence Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Inflammation, Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes, and Synovial Apoptosis in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Cheng, Yu-Jung; Huang, Fang-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) operating at low and high fluences on joint inflammation, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), and synovial apoptosis in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. Background data: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by pronounced inflammation and FLS proliferation within affected joints. Certain data indicate that LLLT is effective in patients with inflammation caused by RA; however, the fluence effects of LLLT on synovium are unclear. Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in adult male Sprague–Dawley rats (250–300 g) via intraarticular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the tibiotarsal joint. Animals were irradiated 72 h after CFA administration with a 780 nm GaAlAs laser at 4.5 J/cm2 (30 mW, 30 sec/spot) and 72 J/cm2 (80 mW, 180 sec/spot) daily for 10 days. After LLLT, the animals were euthanized and their arthritic ankles were collected for histopathological analysis, immunoassays of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)3 and 5B5, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Results: LLLT at a fluence of 4.5 J/cm2 significantly reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells and expressions of TNF-α-, MMP3- and 5B5-like immunoreactivities, as well as resulting in more TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in the synovium. No significant changes were observed in these biochemicals and inflammation in arthritic animals treated with 72 J/cm2. Conclusions: LLLT with low fluence is highly effective in reducing inflammation to sites of injury by decreasing the numbers of FLS, inflammatory cells, and mediators in the CFA-induced arthritic model. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT for RA. PMID:25394331

  5. Low-level laser therapy as a treatment for androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ladan; Maranda, Eric L; Zarei, Mina; Delcanto, Gina M; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Kluijfhout, Wouter P; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2017-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) affects 50% of males by age 50 and 50% of females by age 80. Recently, the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proposed as a treatment for hair loss and to stimulate hair regrowth in AGA. This paper aims to review the existing research studies to determine whether LLLT is an effective therapy for AGA based on objective measurements and patient satisfaction. A systematic literature review was done to identify articles on Medline, Google Scholar, and Embase that were published between January 1960 and November 2015. All search hits were screened by two reviewers and examined for relevant abstracts and titles. Articles were divided based on study design and assessed for risk of bias. Eleven studies were evaluated, which investigated a total of 680 patients, consisting of 444 males and 236 females. Nine out of 11 studies assessing hair count/hair density found statistically significant improvements in both males and females following LLLT treatment. Additionally, hair thickness and tensile strength significantly improved in two out of four studies. Patient satisfaction was investigated in five studies, and was overall positive, though not as profound as the objective outcomes. The majority of studies covered in this review found an overall improvement in hair regrowth, thickness, and patient satisfaction following LLLT therapy. Although we should be cautious when interpreting these findings, LLLT therapy seems to be a promising monotherapy for AGA and may serve as an effective alternative for individuals unwilling to use medical therapy or undergo surgical options. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:27-39, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modulating nitric oxide levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of rat with low-level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; He, Yi-peng; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Hong-qin; Zhang, Yan-ding; Xie, Shu-sen

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have an important role in pain signaling transmission in animal models. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is known to have an analgesic effect, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of LLLT on NO release and NOS synthesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, in order to find whether LLLI can ameliorate pain through modulating NO production at the cellular level. The results show that in stress conditions, the laser irradiation at 658 nm can modulate NO production in DRG neurons with soma diameter of about 20 μm in a short time after illumination, and affect NOS synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. It is demonstrated that LLLT might treat pain by altering NO release directly and indirectly in DRG neurons.

  7. Study concerning the psychological profiles of patients who are responding to LLLT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, A.; Trasa, L.; Pascu, Mihaela O.; Pascu, Ruxandra

    2000-06-01

    It is well known, in the low level laser therapy, that an important number of patients exhibit positive results at PLACEBO treatment. That is why we decided to analyze the psychological profile of 156 patients presented rheumatical diseases, divided into tow groups: laser group and PLACEBO group. We applied the Woodworth-Mathews test to all patients before the laser treatment. This is a test for identification of the abnormal tendencies in the normal human behavior. Finally, following the PLACEBO exposure, we noticed that the patients' emotional tendencies and psychological instability had a strong influence on the obtained good results. We conclude that the Woodworth- Mathews test is useful to anticipate the possible false/positive results in the real treatment. Nevertheless it may also be used from the psychological point of view.

  8. Effect of red and infrared low-level laser therapy in endodontic sealer on subcutaneous tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivieri-Araujo, G.; Berbert, F. L. C. V.; Ramalho, L. T. O.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Crisci, F. S.; Bonetti-Filho, I.; Tanomaru-Filho, M.

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the reactions of connective tissue after the implant of one endodontic sealer (Endofill) that was irradiated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Sixty mice were distributed into three Groups ( n = 20): GI—the tubes filled with Endofill were implanted in the animals and were not irradiated with LLLT; GII—the tubes containing Endofill were implanted in the animals and then irradiated with red LLLT (InGaAlP, λ = 685 nm, P = 35 mW, t = 58 s, D = 72 J/cm2, E = 2 J, Ø = 0.60 mm, continuous mode) and GIII—the tubes with Endofill were implanted and irradiated with infrared LLLT (AsGaAl, λ = 830 nm, P = 50 mW, t = 40 s, D = 70 J/cm2, E = 2 J, Ø = 0.60 mm, continuous wave) both are semiconductor diode laser device. The animals were killed after 7 and 30 days. Series sections of 6 μm thickness were obtained and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin and Masson Trichrome. The data of the histopathological evaluation were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests at 5% significance level. At the 7th day: GI showed the presence of inflammation; GII and GIII reduced inflammation. At 30th day: GI showed low inflammation; GII and GII the absence of inflammation. It was possible show that LLLT reduced the irritating effect promoted by the Endofill, in the period of 7 days ( p > 0.05). The tissue repair occurred in 30 days, regardless of the use of LLLT.

  9. Thermographic analysis of photodynamic therapy with intense pulsed light and needle-free injection photosensitizer delivery: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena, Michelle B.; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José Dirceu; de Nardi, Andrigo B.; Escobar, Andre; da Rocha, Rozana W.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; de Menezes, Priscila F. C.

    2018-02-01

    The photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a therapeutic modality that depends mostly on photosensitizer (PS), light and molecular oxygen species. However, there are still technical limitations in clinical PDT that are under constant development, particularly concerning PS and light delivery. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) sources are systems able to generate pulses of high energy with polychromatic light. IPL is a technique mainly used in the cosmetic area to perform various skin treatments for therapeutic and aesthetic applications. The goals of this study were to determine temperature variance during the application of IPL in porcine skin model, and the PDT effects using this light source with PS delivery by a commercial high pressure, needle-free injection system. The PSs tested were Indocyanine Green (ICG) and Photodithazine (PDZ), and the results showed an increase bellow 10 °C in the skin surface using a thermographic camera to measure. In conclusion, our preliminary study demonstrated that IPL associated with needle-free injection PS delivery could be a promising alternative to PDT.

  10. Minibeam Therapy With Protons and Light Ions: Physical Feasibility and Potential to Reduce Radiation Side Effects and to Facilitate Hypofractionation

    SciT

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: avraham.dilmanian@stonybrook.edu; Eley, John G.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Methods and Materials: Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulationsmore » were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. Results: A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Conclusions: Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage.« less

  11. The effect of low level laser therapy on ventilator-induced lung injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Hariri, Lida P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Musch, Guido; Stroh, Helene; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is necessary to support gas exchange in critically ill patients, it can contribute to the development of lung injury and multiple organ dysfunction. It is known that high tidal volume (Vt) MV can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in healthy lungs and increase the mortality of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether LLLT could alleviate inflammation from injurious MV in mice. Adult mice were assigned to 2 groups: VILI+LLLT group (3 h of injurious MV: Vt=25-30 ml/kg, respiratory rate (RR)=50/min, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)=0 cmH20, followed by 3 h of protective MV: Vt=9 ml/kg, RR=140/min, PEEP=2 cmH20) and VILI+no LLLT group. LLLT was applied during the first 30 min of the MV (810 nm LED system, 5 J/cm2, 1 cm above the chest). Respiratory impedance was measured in vivo with forced oscillation technique and lung mechanics were calculated by fitting the constant phase model. At the end of the MV, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and inflammatory cells counted. Lungs were removed en-bloc and fixed for histological evaluation. We hypothesize that LLLT can reduce lung injury and inflammation from VILI. This therapy could be translated into clinical practice, where it can potentially improve outcomes in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the operating room or in the intensive care units.

  12. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Light-oxygen effect in cells and its potential applications in tumour therapy (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, S. D.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1999-12-01

    The light-oxygen effect (POE) represents damage (and at low optical doses, activation) of cells by photogeneration of molecular singlet oxygen from O2 dissolved in cells, in accordance with the reaction: 3O2+hν→1O2→ biological effect. The phases of evolution of the LOE are similar to the phases, observed in cell experiments, of the photodynamic effect (PDE) the mechanism of which is the basis of the familiar method of photodynamic cancer therapy. The reported proofs of the occurrence of the LOE are in the form of detailed spectra of the biological action of optical radiation on cells recorded in four spectral intervals with the aid of tunable lasers. Allowances are made for the relationships governing a new type of cell excitation, associated with reversible structural transitions in the biomembrane. A demonstration is reported of the same efficiency of cw and pulsed irradiation. An analysis is made of the reasons why the optical doses initiating the PDE and the LOE are comparable. The results are given of the first experimental applications of the LOE in tumour therapy. Identification of the primary photoacceptor (O2) in cell biostimulation and photodestruction provides a scientific basis for the development of low-intensity laser light-oxygen cancer therapy methods.

  13. Light-controlled drug release from singlet-oxygen sensitive nanoscale coordination polymers enabling cancer combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Guangbao; Zhu, Wenwen; Dong, Ziliang; Yang, Yu; Chao, Yu; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-11-01

    The development of smart drug delivery systems to realize controlled drug release for highly specific cancer treatment has attracted tremendous attention. Herein, nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) constructed from hafnium ions and bis-(alkylthio) alkene (BATA), a singlet-oxygen responsive linker, are fabricated and applied as nanocarriers to realize light-controlled drug release under a rather low optical power density. In this system, NCPs synthesized through a solvothermal method are sequentially loaded with chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizer, and doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapeutic drug, and then coated with lipid bilayer to allow modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to acquire excellent colloidal stability. The singlet oxygen produced by such NCP-Ce6-DOX-PEG nanocomposite can be used not only for photodynamic therapy, but also to induce the break of BATA linker and thus the destruction of nanoparticle structures under light exposure, thereby triggering effective drug release. Notably, with efficient tumor accumulation after intravenous injection as revealed by CT imaging, those NCP-Ce6-DOX-PEG nanoparticles could be utilized for combined chemo-photodynamic therapy with great antitumor efficacy. Thus, this work presents a unique type of NCP-based drug delivery system with biodegradability, sensitive responses to light, as well as highly efficient tumor retention for effective cancer combinational treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of a single dose of low-level laser therapy in reducing pain, swelling, and trismus following third molar extraction surgery.

    PubMed

    Landucci, A; Wosny, A C; Uetanabaro, L C; Moro, A; Araujo, M R

    2016-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for the reduction of pain, swelling, and trismus following the surgical extraction of third molars was evaluated. Mandibular third molars, with similar radiographic positions on two distinct sections, were extracted from 22 patients. Immediately after extraction from the randomly selected right or left side, LLLT was applied (study group). The same extraction procedure was performed 21 days later on the other third molar, without the application of LLLT (control group). LLLT was applied at 10 points: four intraoral in close proximity to the socket and six extraoral along the masseter muscle. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analogue scale, swelling was measured as the distance from the tragus to the median base of the mentum, and trismus was assessed by the extent of mouth opening. Data were collected at four time points: before surgery, immediately after surgery, 48h postoperatively, and 7 days postoperatively. Compared with the control group, the study group showed significant reductions in pain, swelling, and trismus at 48h and 7 days postoperatively. In conclusion, a single dose of LLLT was effective at reducing the postoperative discomforts (pain, swelling, and trismus) associated with third molar extraction surgery. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of low-level laser therapy on trismus and facial swelling following surgical extraction of a lower third molar.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mutan Hamdi; Güngörmüş, Metin

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on postoperative trismus and edema after the removal of mandibular third molars. Thirty-two patients who were to undergo surgical removal of lower third molars were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups, LLLT and placebo. Patients in the LLLT group received 12 J (4 J/cm(2)) low-level laser irradiation to the operative side intraorally 1 cm from the target tissue, and to the masseter muscle extraorally immediately after surgery. In the placebo group the handpiece was inserted into the operative side intraorally and was applied to the masseter muscle extraorally each for 1 min, but laser power was not activated. Inter-incisal opening and facial swelling were evaluated on postoperative days 2 and 7. Student's t-test used to analyze the data. It was determined that the trismus and the swelling in LLLT group were significantly less than in the placebo group on postoperative days 2 and 7. Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that LLLT can be beneficial for the reduction of postoperative trismus and swelling after third molar surgery.

  16. Low-level laser therapy induces an upregulation of collagen gene expression during the initial process of bone healing: a microarray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tim, Carla Roberta; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Malavazi, Iran; von Zeska Kress, Marcia Regina; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Rennó, Ana Cláudia; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the histological modifications produced by low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the first day of bone repair, as well as evaluates the LLLT effects on collagen expression on the site of a fracture. Twenty Wistar rats were distributed into a control group (CG) and a laser group (LG). Laser irradiation of Ga-Al-As laser 830 nm, 30 mW, 94 s, 2.8 J was performed in five sessions. Animals were euthanized on day 5 postsurgery. Histopathological analysis showed that LLLT was able to increase deposition of granulation tissue and newly formed bone at the site of the injury. In addition, picrosirius analysis showed that collagen fiber organization in the LG was enhanced compared to CG. Microarray analysis demonstrated that LLLT produced an upregulation type I collagen (COL-I). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the subjects that were treated presented a higher immunoexpression of COL-I. Our findings indicated that LLLT improves bone healing by producing a significant increase in the expression of collagen genes.

  17. Complete regression of a melanocytic nevus under intense pulsed light therapy for axillary hair removal in a cosmetic center.

    PubMed

    Martín, José M; Monteagudo, Carlos; Bella, Rebeca; Reig, Irela; Jordá, Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy using noncoherent broad-spectrum light has been reported to be effective for hair removal, and also for treating superficial pigmented lesions like ephelides and solar lentigines. We report complete regression of a pigmented melanocytic nevus, histologically confirmed, after hair removal treatment with IPL. The use of lasers and IPL is a common procedure used by dermatologists and even other professions for the treatment of cosmetically troubling skin conditions. The main advantage of such treatment is a reduction of surgical scars, thus producing a favorable cosmetic outcome, but a major limitation is that histopathologic diagnosis is not usually obtained prior to treatment. Such devices should be carefully used in patients with potentially dangerous melanocytic lesions. We also review the recent literature regarding inadequate treatment of melanocytic lesions with lasers. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Towards a uniform specification of light therapy devices for the treatment of affective disorders and use for non-image forming effects: Radiant flux.

    PubMed

    Aarts, M P J; Rosemann, A L P

    2018-08-01

    For treating affective disorders like SAD, light therapy is used although the underlying mechanism explaining this success remains unclear. To accelerate the research on defining the light characteristics responsible for inducing a specific effect a uniform manner for specifying the irradiance at the eye should be defined. This allows a genuine comparison between light-affect studies. An important factor impacting the irradiance at the eye are the radiant characteristics of the used light therapy device. In this study the radiant fluxes of five different light therapy devices were measured. The values were weighted against the spectral sensitivity of the five photopigments present in the human eye. A measurement was taken every five minutes to control for a potential stabilizing effect. The results show that all five devices show large differences in radiant flux. The devices equipped with blue LED lights have a much lower spectral radiant flux than the devices equipped with a fluorescent light source or a white LED. The devices with fluorescent lamps needed 30 min to stabilize to a constant radiant flux. In this study only five devices were measured. Radiant flux is just the first step to identify uniform specifications for light therapy devices. It is recommended to provide all five α-opic radiant fluxes. Preferably, the devices should come with a spectral power distribution of the radiant flux. For the devices equipped with a fluorescent lamp it is recommended to provide information on the stabilization time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of DMP-1 in the human pulp tissue using low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Oliveira Rodini, Camila; Cruvinel Silva, Thiago; Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade; Marchini Oliveira, Thais

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on DMP-1 expression in pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. Twenty mandibular primary molars were randomly assigned into the following groups: Group I—Buckley’s Formocresol (FC); Group II—Calcium Hydroxide (CH); Group III—LLLT + CH and Group IV—LLLT + Zinc oxide/Eugenol. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Descriptive analysis was performed on the dentin pulp complex. Histopathological assessment showed internal resorption in group FC. Groups CH and LLLT + CH provided better pulpal repair due to the absence of inflammation and the formation of hard tissue barrier. These two groups presented odontoblastic layer expressing DMP-1. According to this study, low level laser therapy preceding the use of calcium hydroxide exhibited satisfactory bio-inductive activity on pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. However, other histological and cellular studies are needed to confirm the laser tissue action and efficacy.

  20. A photosensitive liposome with NIR light triggered doxorubicin release as a combined photodynamic-chemo therapy system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingpo; Li, Wei; Di, Haixiao; Luo, Lihua; Zhu, Chunqi; Yang, Jie; Yin, Xiaoyi; Yin, Hang; Gao, Jianqing; Du, Yongzhong; You, Jian

    2018-05-10

    The targeted drug delivery with the help of nanocarriers and the controlled drug release at the lesion sites are the most effective ways to enhance therapeutic efficacy and reduce side effects. Here, we built a light sensitive liposome (Her2-I&D-LSL) which was formed by a special phospholipid (PLsPC) and a hydrophobically modified photosensitizer (ICG-ODA). DOX was employed as the therapeutic drug, encapsulating in the internal phase of the liposome whose surface was modified by Her2 antibodies for recognizing tumor cells with high Her2 receptor expression. Mediated by NIR light, Her2-I&D-LSL was proved to generate sufficient ROS to realize PDT, which then triggered the release of DOX for combined chemotherapy. The ROS generation and DOX release were verified to be strictly controlled by NIR light and the proportion of ICG-ODA. Thanks to the mediation of Her2 receptor, the specific DOX release and the combination of PDT-chemotherapy triggered by NIR light, Her2-I&D-LSL showed a significant accumulation in MCF7 and SKOV3 tumors, thus leading to the strongest tumor growth inhibition effect compared to PDT alone (I-LSL) or chemotherapy alone (D-LSL). Her2-I&D-LSL also possessed a great biocompatibility due to the targeted treatment, holding promise for future cancer therapy in clinic. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. T-Opt: A 3D Monte Carlo simulation for light delivery design in photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2017-02-01

    The interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a safe and feasible treatment modality of malignant glioblastoma. In order to cover the tumour volume, the exact position of the light diffusers within the lesion is needed to decide precisely. The aim of this study is the development of evaluation method of treatment volume with 3D Monte Carlo simulation for iPDT using 5-ALA. Monte Carlo simulations of fluence rate were performed using the optical properties of the brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells and normal tissue. 3-D Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate the position of the light diffusers within the lesion and light transport. The fluence rate near the diffuser was maximum and decreased exponentially with distance. The simulation can calculate the amount of singlet oxygen generated by PDT. In order to increase the accuracy of simulation results, the parameter for simulation includes the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation, the accumulated concentration of photosensitizer within tissue, fluence rate, molar extinction coefficient at the wavelength of excitation light. The simulation is useful for evaluation of treatment region of iPDT with 5-ALA.

  2. Influence of drug-light-interval on photodynamic therapy of port wine stains--simulation and validation of mathematic models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Naiyan; Cheng, Gang; Li, Xiaosong; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fanguang; Zhong, Qiuhai; Wang, Ying; Zen, Jin; Qiu, Haixia; Chen, Hongxia

    2008-06-01

    We established mathematical models of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on port wine stains (PWS) to observe the effect of drug-light-interval (DLI) and optimize light dose. The mathematical simulations included determining (1) the distribution of laser light by Monte Carlo model, (2) the change of photosensitizer concentration in PWS vessels by a pharmacokinetics equation, (3) the change of photosensitizer distribution in tissue outside the vessels by a diffuse equation and photobleaching equation, and (4) the change of tissue oxygen concentration by the Fick's law with a consideration of the oxygen consumption during PDT. The concentration of singlet oxygen in the tissue model was calculated by the finite difference method. To validate those models, a PWS lesion of the same patient was divided into two areas and subjected to different DLIs and treated with different energy density. The color of lesion was assessed 8-12 weeks later. The simulation indicated the singlet oxygen concentration of the second treatment area (DLI=40 min) was lower than that of the first treatment area (DLI=0 min). However, it would be increased to a level similar to that of the first treatment area if the light irradiation time of the second treatment area was prolonged from 40 min to 55 min. Clinical results were consistent with the results predicted by the mathematical models. The mathematical models established in this study are helpful to optimize clinical protocol.

  3. Au Nanoclusters Sensitized Black TiO2-x Nanotubes for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy Driven by Near-Infrared Light.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Gulzar, Arif; Yang, Guixin; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Dai, Yunlu; Zhong, Chongna; Yang, Piaoping

    2017-12-01

    The low reactive oxygen species production capability and the shallow tissue penetration of excited light (UV) are still two barriers in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here, Au cluster anchored black anatase TiO 2- x nanotubes (abbreviated as Au 25 /B-TiO 2- x NTs) are synthesized by gaseous reduction of anatase TiO 2 NTs and subsequent deposition of noble metal. The Au 25 /B-TiO 2- x NTs with thickness of about 2 nm exhibit excellent PDT performance. The reduction process increased the density of Ti 3+ on the surface of TiO 2 , which effectively depresses the recombination of electron and hole. Furthermore, after modification of Au 25 nanoclusters, the PDT efficiency is further enhanced owing to the changed electrical distribution in the composite, which forms a shallow potential well on the metal-TiO 2 interface to further hamper the recombination of electron and hole. Especially, the reduction of anatase TiO 2 can expend the light response range (UV) of TiO 2 to the visible and even near infrared (NIR) light region with high tissue penetration depth. When excited by NIR light, the nanoplatform shows markedly improved therapeutic efficacy attributed to the photocatalytic synergistic effect, and promotes separation or restrained recombination of electron and hole, which is verified by experimental results in vitro and in vivo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Use of Low-Level Laser Therapy as Monotherapy or Concomitant Therapy for Male and Female Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central