Science.gov

Sample records for light-induced survival response

  1. Discrimination of phytochrome dependent light inducible from non-light inducible plant genes. Prediction of a common light-responsive element (LRE) in phytochrome dependent light inducible plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Grob, U; Stüber, K

    1987-01-01

    We aligned 14 5'-leading sequences of small subunit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) genes. A strong consensus sequence ("CCTTATCAT") was located directly upstream of the TATA-box. The occurrence of this motif in other light dependent phytochrome regulated plant genes led to the calculation of two consensus matrices. With these two matrices we are able to distinguish almost all known light induced plant genes which are phytochrome regulated from non-light induced plant genes indicating, that all these genes share a common light-responsive element (LRE). The results obtained by computer analysis are discussed with regard to experimental data. PMID:3697087

  2. Differential light-induced responses in sectorial inherited retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Eva; Cordomí, Arnau; Aguilà, Mònica; Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Dong, Xiaoyun; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Cheetham, Michael E; Garriga, Pere

    2014-12-26

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited degenerative retinopathies caused by abnormalities of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor located in the vertebrate retina and is responsible for dim light vision. Here, novel M39R and N55K variants were identified as causing an intriguing sector phenotype of RP in affected patients, with selective degeneration in the inferior retina. To gain insights into the molecular aspects associated with this sector RP phenotype, whose molecular mechanism remains elusive, the mutations were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in heterologous systems, and studied by biochemical, spectroscopic, and functional assays. M39R and N55K opsins had variable degrees of chromophore regeneration when compared with WT opsin but showed no gross structural misfolding or altered trafficking. M39R showed a faster rate for transducin activation than WT rhodopsin with a faster metarhodopsinII decay, whereas N55K presented a reduced activation rate and an altered photobleaching pattern. N55K also showed an altered retinal release from the opsin binding pocket upon light exposure, affecting its optimal functional response. Our data suggest that these sector RP mutations cause different protein phenotypes that may be related to their different clinical progression. Overall, these findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms of sector RP associated with rhodopsin mutations. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Differential Light-induced Responses in Sectorial Inherited Retinal Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Eva; Cordomí, Arnau; Aguilà, Mònica; Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Dong, Xiaoyun; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Garriga, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited degenerative retinopathies caused by abnormalities of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor located in the vertebrate retina and is responsible for dim light vision. Here, novel M39R and N55K variants were identified as causing an intriguing sector phenotype of RP in affected patients, with selective degeneration in the inferior retina. To gain insights into the molecular aspects associated with this sector RP phenotype, whose molecular mechanism remains elusive, the mutations were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in heterologous systems, and studied by biochemical, spectroscopic, and functional assays. M39R and N55K opsins had variable degrees of chromophore regeneration when compared with WT opsin but showed no gross structural misfolding or altered trafficking. M39R showed a faster rate for transducin activation than WT rhodopsin with a faster metarhodopsinII decay, whereas N55K presented a reduced activation rate and an altered photobleaching pattern. N55K also showed an altered retinal release from the opsin binding pocket upon light exposure, affecting its optimal functional response. Our data suggest that these sector RP mutations cause different protein phenotypes that may be related to their different clinical progression. Overall, these findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms of sector RP associated with rhodopsin mutations. PMID:25359768

  4. Blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization for root negative phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-10-01

    Root negative phototropism is an important response in plants. Although blue light is known to mediate this response, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying root negative phototropism remain unclear. Here, we report that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 3 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. Unilateral blue-light illumination polarized PIN3 to the outer lateral membrane of columella cells at the illuminated root side, and increased auxin activity at the illuminated side of roots, where auxin promotes growth and causes roots bending away from the light source. Furthermore, root negative phototropic response and blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization were modulated by a brefeldin A-sensitive, GNOM-dependent, trafficking pathway and by phot1-regulated PINOID (PID)/PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) activity. Our results indicate that blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization is needed for asymmetric auxin distribution during root negative phototropic response.

  5. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  6. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  7. Light-induced transient ion flux responses from maize leaves and their association with leaf growth and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zivanović, B D; Pang, J; Shabala, S

    2005-03-01

    Net fluxes of H+, K+ and Ca2+ ions from maize (Zea mays L.) isolated leaf segments were measured non-invasively using ion-selective vibrating microelectrodes (the MIFE technique). Leaf segments were isolated from the blade base, containing actively elongating cells (basal segments), and from non-growing tip regions (tip segments). Ion fluxes were measured in response to bright white light (2600 micromoles m-2 s-1) from either the leaf segments or the underlying mesophyll (after stripping the epidermis). Fluxes measured from the mesophyll showed no significant difference between basal and tip regions. In leaf segments (epidermis attached), light-induced flux kinetics of all ions measured (H+, Ca2+ and K+) were strikingly different between the two regions. It appears that epidermal K+ fluxes are required to drive leaf expansion growth, whereas in the mesophyll light-induced K+ flux changes are likely to play a charge balancing role. Light-stimulated Ca2+ influx was not directly attributable either to leaf photosynthetic performance or to leaf expansion growth. It is concluded that light-induced ion flux changes are associated with both leaf growth and photosynthesis.

  8. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400-700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

  9. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D.; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400–700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions. PMID:26121474

  10. Increased susceptibility to fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration in mice deficient in oxidative stress response proteins.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Aredo, Bogale; Zhong, Xin; Zhao, Cynthia X; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative stress is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of many retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinal dystrophies. Light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) can serve as a model in which to study the response of the retina to stress. Of note, many genetic mutant mice are in a C57BL/6 J background and are thus resistant to the usual LIRD models. We recently developed a new model of fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration (FCD-LIRD) which is effective in strains of mice expressing the light-resistant variant of RPE65 (450Met), including C57BL/6 J. In this work we investigated whether FCD-LIRD would be useful as a model in which to test the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to stress. Furthermore, we tested whether oxidative stress plays an important role in the setting of this new FCD-LIRD model. FCD-LIRD was applied to C57BL/6 J mice and to mice simultaneously deficient in three proteins that are important in the response of the retina to oxidative stress (SOD1, DJ-1 and Parkin). Using fundus photography, we found that retinal damage was dramatically increased in the SOD1/DJ-1/Parkin deficient mice compared to C57BL/6 J. Outer retinal OCT volume and RPE cell morphology analysis in ZO-1-stained flat mounts added support to these findings. Gene expression analysis confirmed a strong oxidative stress response after FCD-LIRD, which was differentially altered in the SOD1/DJ1/Parkin deficient mice. We conclude that FCD-LIRD is useful to study the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to light stress in light-resistant strains of mice. Furthermore, oxidative stress seems to be an important component of FCD-LIRD. Finally, we have established protocols to quantify the effect of FCD-LIRD on the retina and RPE which will be useful for future studies. Further dissection of the mechanisms by which the retina responds to light-induced oxidative stress may result in new

  11. Light-Induced Responses of Slow Oscillatory Neurons of the Rat Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Szkudlarek, Hanna J.; Orlowska, Patrycja; Lewandowski, Marian H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN) is a small midbrain structure responsible for pupil constriction in response to eye illumination. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that OPN neurons code light intensity levels and therefore are called luminance detectors. Recently, we described an additional population of OPN neurons, characterized by a slow rhythmic pattern of action potentials in light-on conditions. Rhythmic patterns generated by these cells last for a period of approximately 2 minutes. Methodology To answer whether oscillatory OPN cells are light responsive and whether oscillatory activity depends on retinal afferents, we performed in vivo electrophysiology experiments on urethane anaesthetized Wistar rats. Extracellular recordings were combined with changes in light conditions (light-dark-light transitions), brief light stimulations of the contralateral eye (diverse illuminances) or intraocular injections of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Conclusions We found that oscillatory neurons were able to fire rhythmically in darkness and were responsive to eye illumination in a manner resembling that of luminance detectors. Their firing rate increased together with the strength of the light stimulation. In addition, during the train of light pulses, we observed two profiles of responses: oscillation-preserving and oscillation-disrupting, which occurred during low- and high-illuminance stimuli presentation respectively. Moreover, we have shown that contralateral retina inactivation eliminated oscillation and significantly reduced the firing rate of oscillatory cells. These results suggest that contralateral retinal innervation is crucial for the generation of an oscillatory pattern in addition to its role in driving responses to visual stimuli. PMID:22427957

  12. Functional characterization of blue-light-induced responses and PHOTOTROPIN 1 gene in Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Ishishita, Kazuhiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Yuki; Higa, Takeshi; Doi, Michio; Wada, Masamitsu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Gotoh, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The blue light (BL) receptor phototropin (phot) is specifically found in green plants; it regulates various BL-induced responses such as phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two phototropins--phot1 and phot2--respond to blue light in overlapping but distinct ways. These BL-receptor-mediated responses enhance the photosynthetic activity of plants under weak light and minimize photodamage under strong light conditions. Welwitschia mirabilis Hook.f. found in the Namib Desert, and it has adapted to severe environmental stresses such as limiting water and strong sunlight. Although the plant has physiologically and ecologically unique features, it is unknown whether phototropin is functional in this plant. In this study, we assessed the functioning of phot-mediated BL responses in W. mirabilis. BL-dependent phototropism and stomatal opening was observed but light-dependent chloroplast movement was not detected. We performed a functional analysis of the PHOT1 gene of W. mirabilis, WmPHOT1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We generated transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing WmPHOT1 in a phot1 phot2 double mutant background. Several Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal growth, although phot1 phot2 double mutant plants showed stunted growth. Furthermore, Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal phot1-mediated responses including phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening, but lacked the chloroplast avoidance response that is specifically mediated by phot2. Thus, our findings indicate that W. mirabilis possesses typical phot-mediated BL responses that were at least partially mediated by functional phototropin 1, an ortholog of Atphot1.

  13. Function of Light in the Light-induced Geotropic Response in Zea Roots

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Tanaka, Minoru; Fujii, Tadashi

    1981-01-01

    The light doses just above the threshold energy value for inducing the geotropic responsiveness in the roots of Zea mays L., cv. Golden Cross Bantam 70, caused a drastic rise in the NADPH level and a drop in the NADP level in 2-millimeter root tips. Some reducing agents lowered the threshold energy value up to about one-third of the control. From these results, we deduce that light may exert two functions in the geotropic response of Zea primary roots, one being the photochemical transformation of a photoreceptor and the other being the induction of a reduction state in the tissue. PMID:16661651

  14. The different response mechanisms of Wolffia globosa: Light-induced silver nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoyan; Li, Penghui; Huang, Qing; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have emerged as a promising bactericide. Plants are a major point of entry of contaminants into trophic chains. Here, the physiological responses of Wolffia globosa to AgNPs have been probed using different light schemes, and these data may reveal new insights into the toxic mechanism of AgNPs. W. globosa was grown in culture medium and treated with different concentrations of AgNPs for 24h under pre- and post-illuminated conditions. However, fluorescence quenching, the accumulation of sugar and the reduction of Hill reaction activity were found in response to the AgNP-stresses. In the pre-illuminated condition, oxidative damage was obvious, as indicated by the higher malondialdehyde (MDA) content and an up-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The maximum increases of MDA content and SOD activity were 1.14 and 2.52 times the respective controls when exposed to 10mg/L AgNPs. In contrast, in the post-illuminated condition, the alterations in photosynthetic pigment and soluble proteins content were more significant than the alterations in oxidative stress. The contents of chlorophyll a, carotenoids and soluble protein decreased to 77.7%, 66.2% and 72.9% of the controls after treatment with the highest concentration of AgNPs (10mg/L). Based on the different physiological responses, we speculated that in the pre-illuminated condition, oxidative stress was responsible for the decline in the oxygen evolution rate, while in the post-illuminated condition, the decrease in the Hill reaction activity could be attributed to the blocking of electron transfer and an insufficient proton supply. Our findings demonstrate that environmental factors regulate the physiological responses of plants to AgNPs through distinct mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational classification of different wild-type zebrafish strains based on their variation in light-induced locomotor response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Gaonan; Jelfs, Beth; Carmer, Robert; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Ghadami, Mohammad; Brown, Skye A; Pang, Chi Pui; Leung, Yuk Fai; Chan, Rosa H M; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-02-01

    Zebrafish larvae display a rapid and characteristic swimming behaviour after abrupt light onset or offset. This light-induced locomotor response (LLR) has been widely used for behavioural research and drug screening. However, the locomotor responses have long been shown to be different between different wild-type (WT) strains. Thus, it is critical to define the differences in the WT LLR to facilitate accurate interpretation of behavioural data. In this investigation, we used support vector machine (SVM) models to classify LLR data collected from three WT strains: AB, TL and TLAB (a hybrid of AB and TL), during early embryogenesis, from 3 to 9 days post-fertilisation (dpf). We analysed both the complete dataset and a subset of the data during the first 30after light change. This initial period of activity is substantially driven by vision, and is also known as the visual motor response (VMR). The analyses have resulted in three major conclusions: First, the LLR is different between the three WT strains, and at different developmental stages. Second, the distinguishable information in the VMR is comparable to, if not better than, the full dataset for classification purposes. Third, the distinguishable information of WT strains in the light-onset response differs from that in the light-offset response. While the classification accuracies were higher for the light-offset than light-onset response when using the complete LLR dataset, a reverse trend was observed when using a shorter VMR dataset. Together, our results indicate that one should use caution when extrapolating interpretations of LLR/VMR obtained from one WT strain to another.

  16. Light-induced transcriptional responses associated with proteorhodopsin-enhanced growth in a marine flavobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Young, Curtis R; Martinez, Asuncion; DeLong, Edward F

    2011-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is a photoprotein that functions as a light-driven proton pump in diverse marine Bacteria and Archaea. Recent studies have suggested that PR may enhance both growth rate and yield in some flavobacteria when grown under nutrient-limiting conditions in the light. The direct involvement of PR, and the metabolic details enabling light-stimulated growth, however, remain uncertain. Here, we surveyed transcriptional and growth responses of a PR-containing marine flavobacterium during carbon-limited growth in the light and the dark. As previously reported (Gómez-Consarnau et al., 2007), Dokdonia strain MED134 exhibited light-enhanced growth rates and cell yields under low carbon growth conditions. Inhibition of retinal biosynthesis abolished the light-stimulated growth response, supporting a direct role for retinal-bound PR in light-enhanced growth. Among protein-coding transcripts, both PR and retinal biosynthetic enzymes showed significant upregulation in the light. Other light-associated proteins, including bacterial cryptochrome and DNA photolyase, were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the light. Membrane transporters for Na+/phosphate and Na+/alanine symporters, and the Na+-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) linked electron transport chain, were also significantly upregulated in the light. Culture experiments using a specific inhibitor of Na+-translocating NQR indicated that sodium pumping via NQR is a critical metabolic process in the light-stimulated growth of MED134. In total, the results suggested the importance of both the PR-enabled, light-driven proton gradient, as well as the generation of a Na+ ion gradient, as essential components for light-enhanced growth in these flavobacteria. PMID:21472017

  17. Arabidopsis FHY3 and FAR1 Regulate Light-Induced myo-Inositol Biosynthesis and Oxidative Stress Responses by Transcriptional Activation of MIPS1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Tian, Tian; Lin, Rongcheng; Deng, Xing-Wang; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Gang

    2016-04-04

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the limiting step of inositol biosynthesis and has crucial roles in plant growth and development. In response to stress, the transcription of MIPS1 is induced and the biosynthesis of inositol or inositol derivatives is promoted by unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the light signaling protein FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) and its homolog FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE1 (FAR1) regulate light-induced inositol biosynthesis and oxidative stress responses by activating the transcription of MIPS1. Disruption of FHY3 and FAR1 caused light-induced cell death after dark-light transition, precocious leaf senescence, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Reduction of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation by overexpression of SALICYLIC ACID 3-HYDROXYLASE largely suppressed the cell death phenotype of fhy3 far1 mutant plants, suggesting that FHY3- and FAR1-mediated cell death is dependent on SA. Furthermore, comparative analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray results revealed that FHY3 and FAR1 directly target both MIPS1 and MIPS2. The fhy3 far1 mutant plants showed severely decreased MIPS1/2 transcript levels and reduced inositol levels. Conversely, constitutive expression of MIPS1 partially rescued the inositol contents, caused reduced transcript levels of SA-biosynthesis genes, and prevented oxidative stress in fhy3 far1. Taken together, our results indicate that the light signaling proteins FHY3 and FAR1 directly bind the promoter of MIPS1 to activate its expression and thereby promote inositol biosynthesis to prevent light-induced oxidative stress and SA-dependent cell death.

  18. Light induced diffusion driven self assembly of Ag nanoparticles in a-Se/Ag bi-layer thin film with ultrafast optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapna, Mukund; Sharma, Rituraj; Barik, A. R.; Khan, Pritam; Ranjan Kumar, Rakesh; Adarsh, K. V.

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that femtosecond light-induced interdiffusion of Ag driven by the electrostatic attraction between photo-excited Ag+ ions and negatively charged amorphous layer can act as an efficient single step method for hybrid integration of spatially ordered and interconnected nanoparticles on the surface of amorphous films. Such self assembled complex hybrid structures of silver nanoparticles via bottom-up nano-construction method on a-Se thin film show an ultrafast optical response over an unusually broad wavelength range that can be used to construct optical modulators operating at switching speed of ˜5 ps.

  19. Effect of Percent Relative Humidity, Moisture Content, and Compression Force on Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Response as a Process Analytical Tool.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ishan G; Stagner, William C

    2016-08-01

    The effect of percent relative humidity (16-84% RH), moisture content (4.2-6.5% w/w MC), and compression force (4.9-44.1 kN CF) on the light-induced fluorescence (LIF) response of 10% w/w active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) compacts is reported. The fluorescent response was evaluated using two separate central composite designs of experiments. The effect of % RH and CF on the LIF signal was highly significant with an adjusted R (2)  = 0.9436 and p < 0.0001. Percent relative humidity (p = 0.0022), CF (p < 0.0001), and % RH(2) (p = 0.0237) were statistically significant factors affecting the LIF response. The effects of MC and CF on LIF response were also statistically significant with a p value <0.0001 and adjusted R (2) value of 0.9874. The LIF response was highly impacted by MC (p < 0.0001), CF (p < 0.0001), and MC(2) (p = 0022). At 10% w/w API, increased % RH, MC, and CF led to a nonlinear decrease in LIF response. The derived quadratic model equations explained more than 94% of the data. Awareness of these effects on LIF response is critical when implementing LIF as a process analytical tool.

  20. Light-induced Ethylene Production in Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Craker, L. E.; Abeles, F. B.; Shropshire, W.

    1973-01-01

    Ethylene production was induced in sections of dark-grown Sorghum vulgare L. seedlings by treatment with light in the blue and far red regions of the light spectrum. The action spectrum closely resembled the previously reported spectra for high irradiance response; thus, light-induced ethylene production is probably a high irradiance response with phytochrome as the initial photoreceptor. PMID:16658470

  1. Channelrhodopsin-1 Initiates Phototaxis and Photophobic Responses in Chlamydomonas by Immediate Light-Induced Depolarization[W

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, Peter; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Mages, Wolfgang; Gradmann, Dietrich; Hegemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (CHR1 and CHR2) are light-gated ion channels acting as sensory photoreceptors in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In neuroscience, they are used to trigger action potentials by light in neuronal cells, tissues, or living animals. Here, we demonstrate that Chlamydomonas cells with low CHR2 content exhibit photophobic and phototactic responses that strictly depend on the availability of CHR1. Since CHR1 was described as a H+-channel, the ion specificity of CHR1 was reinvestigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our experiments show that, in addition to H+, CHR1 also conducts Na+, K+, and Ca2+. The kinetic selectivity analysis demonstrates that H+ selectivity is not due to specific translocation but due to selective ion binding. Purified recombinant CHR1 consists of two isoforms with different absorption maxima, CHR1505 and CHR1463, that are in pH-dependent equilibrium. Thus, CHR1 is a photochromic and protochromic sensory photoreceptor that functions as a light-activated cation channel mediating phototactic and photophobic responses via depolarizing currents in a wide range of ionic conditions. PMID:18552201

  2. Photosensitizer-Loaded pH-Responsive Hollow Gold Nanospheres for Single Light-Induced Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng; Guo, Fang; Wang, Jinping; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2015-08-19

    Novel photoinduced triple-response antitumor therapeutic system based on hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP), and Chlorin e6 (Ce6), was reported for the first time. The system was able to intracellularly deliver the nanocarriers by the transmembrane ability of pHLIP at the condition of pH 6.2. Ce6 and pHLIP were then released from the surface of the carriers due to the weakening electrostatic interaction with HAuNS under the photoirradiation. Herein, HAuNS performed two different functions: (1) as a nanocarrier because of the excellent loading capability; (2) experienced the photothermal therapy (PTT) effect as a photothermal coupling agent (PTCA), thus enhancing the photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect of Ce6.

  3. Light-induced rapid Ca²⁺ response and MAPK phosphorylation in the cells heterologously expressing human OPN5.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Takahashi, Takeo

    2014-06-19

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool for investigating intracellular signalling, but it is difficult to acquire conventional fluorescence imaging from photoreceptive cells. Here we demonstrated that human opsin5 (OPN5) photoreceptor mediates light-induced Ca(2+) response in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cell lines using a luminescence imaging system with a fluorescent indicator and a newly synthesized bioluminescent indicator. Weak light fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging revealed rapid and transient light-stimulated Ca(2+) release from thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores, whereas long-lasting Ca(2+) elevation was observed using a conventional fluorescence imaging system. Bioluminescence imaging also demonstrated that OPN5 activation in HEK293 cells induced a decrease in pertussis toxin-sensitive cAMP, confirming previous reports. In addition, ultraviolet radiation induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases when OPN5 was stimulated in Neuro2a cells. These findings suggest that the combination of these imaging approaches may provide a new means to investigate the physiological characteristics of photoreceptors.

  4. The HT1 protein kinase is essential for red light-induced stomatal opening and genetically interacts with OST1 in red light and CO2 -induced stomatal movement responses.

    PubMed

    Matrosova, Anastasia; Bogireddi, Hanumakumar; Mateo-Peñas, Alfonso; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The question of whether red light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by a photosynthesis-derived reduction in intercellular [CO2 ] (Ci ) remains controversial and genetic analyses are needed. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein kinase HIGH TEMPERATURE 1 (HT1) is a negative regulator of [CO2 ]-induced stomatal closing and ht1-2 mutant plants do not show stomatal opening to low [CO2 ]. The protein kinase mutant ost1-3 exhibits slowed stomatal responses to CO2 . The functions of HT1 and OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) to changes in red, blue light or [CO2 ] were analyzed. For comparison we assayed recessive ca1ca4 carbonic anhydrase double mutant plants, based on their slowed stomatal response to CO2 . Here, we report a strong impairment in ht1 in red light-induced stomatal opening whereas blue light was able to induce stomatal opening. The effects on photosynthetic performance in ht1 were restored when stomatal limitation of CO2 uptake, by control of [Ci ], was eliminated. HT1 was found to interact genetically with OST1 both during red light- and low [CO2 ]-induced stomatal opening. Analyses of ca1ca4 plants suggest that more than a low [Ci ]-dependent pathway may function in red light-induced stomatal opening. These results demonstrate that HT1 is essential for red light-induced stomatal opening and interacts genetically with OST1 during stomatal responses to red light and altered [CO2 ].

  5. Exclusion of the Unfolded Protein Response in Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in the Canine T4R RHO Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Stefania; Genini, Sem; Sudharsan, Raghavi; Gingrich, Jeremy; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Beltran, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute light damage in the naturally-occurring canine model of RHO-adRP (T4R RHO dog). Methods The left eyes of T4R RHO dogs were briefly light-exposed and retinas collected 3, 6 and 24 hours later. The contra-lateral eyes were shielded and used as controls. To evaluate the time course of cell death, histology and TUNEL assays were performed. Electron microscopy was used to examine ultrastructural alterations in photoreceptors at 15 min, 1 hour, and 6 hours after light exposure. Gene expression of markers of ER stress and UPR were assessed by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and western blot at the 6 hour time-point. Calpain and caspase-3 activation were assessed at 1, 3 and 6 hours after exposure. Results A brief exposure to clinically-relevant levels of white light causes within minutes acute disruption of the rod outer segment disc membranes, followed by prominent ultrastructural alterations in the inner segments and the initiation of cell death by 6 hours. Activation of the PERK and IRE1 pathways, and downstream targets (BIP, CHOP) of the UPR was not observed. However increased transcription of caspase-12 and hsp70 occurred, as well as calpain activation, but not that of caspase-3. Conclusion The UPR is not activated in the early phase of light-induced photoreceptor cell death in the T4R RHO model. Instead, disruption in rods of disc and plasma membranes within minutes after light exposure followed by increase in calpain activity and caspase-12 expression suggests a different mechanism of degeneration. PMID:25695253

  6. MerR and ChrR mediate blue light induced photo-oxidative stress response at the transcriptional level in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Tardu, Mehmet; Bulut, Selma; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil

    2017-01-01

    Blue light (BL) is a major environmental factor that affects the physiology, behavior, and infectivity of bacteria as it contributes to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while increasing photo-oxidative stress in cells. However, precise photo-oxidative response mechanism in non-phototrophic bacteria is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of BL in Vibrio cholerae by using genetics and transcriptome profiling. Genome-wide analysis revealed that transcription of 6.3% of V. cholerae genes were regulated by BL. We further showed that BL enhances ROS production, which is generated through the oxidative phosphorylation. To understand signaling mechanisms, we generated several knockouts and analyzed their transcriptome under BL exposure. Studies with a double-knockout confirm an anti-sigma factor (ChrR) and putative metalloregulatory-like protein (MerR) are responsible for the genome-wide regulation to BL response in V. cholerae. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MerR-like proteins, in addition to ChrR, are required for V. cholerae to mount an appropriate response against photo-oxidative stress induced by BL. Outside its natural host, V. cholerae can survive for extended periods in natural aquatic environments. Therefore, the regulation of light response for V. cholerae may be a critical cellular process for its survival in these environments. PMID:28098242

  7. Light induced increases of photoreceptor layer reflectance in response to rhodopsin bleaching in mice measured in vivo with optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    We have recently reported observations of light-induced broadband fundus reflectance changes in two most commonly used strains of laboratory mice, C57Bl/6J (pigmented) and Balb/c (un- pigmented albino). The action spectrum of the reflectance increase corresponded to the absorption spectrum of mouse rhodopsin in situ. Spectral changes in mouse fundus reflectivity were calculated from measurements made by broadband spectrometer, interfaced with our mouse retinal SLO system, obtained before and after bleaching. This results were fitted with a model of mouse fundus reflectance, quantifying contributions from loss of rhodopsin absorption with bleaching, absorption by oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) in the choroid (Balb/c), and absorption by melanin (C57Bl/6J) additionally both mouse strains exhibited light-induced broadband reflectance changes explained as bleaching-induced reflectivity increases at photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions and OS tips. Here we present results investigating the kinetics of the increases in reflectivity with Optical Coherence Tomography operating in a 780-950 nm band.

  8. Solar light induced opacity of MIND cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznicki, Zbigniew T.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Multi-interface novel devices (MIND) exhibit a dramatically low UV- and blue-spectrum photovoltaic (PV) performance. A paradox could even be observed, the better the electronic passivation the poorer the PV performance. The paradox appears under relatively low excitations in comparison with intense laser fluxes usually at its origin. The effect can be explained by solar light induced opacity, which reduces considerably or even totally the photon penetration into deeper layers, from which exclusively the photocarrier collection is possible. This opacity results from a feedback occasioned by the free-carrier absorption: better surface passivation, higher free-carrier density, stronger surface dead zone absorptance. The total energy of the incident short wavelength beam can be absorbed before a carrier collection limit buried in the emitter. This limit acts simultaneously on the electronic performance, blocking free-carriers, and on the optical performance, being at the origin of an enhancement of the surface absorptance. As a consequence, a thin surface zone dominates the optical functions of MIND cells through the free-carrier gas confined inside it. In this work we report specific effects concerning the solar-light induced opacity in MIND cells. The investigation allows modification of the free-carrier confinement using different device architectures. The main characterization methods were reflectivity and spectral response with a varying incident beam. The results prove the domination of the free-carrier optical functions on the MIND PV conversion.

  9. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-02-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions.

  10. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions. PMID:28198374

  11. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  12. Light-induced electrohydrodynamic instability in plasmonically absorbing gold nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Dominguez-Juarez, Jorge Luis; Vuong, Luat T.

    2017-06-01

    Plasmonically absorbing nanofluids exhibit light-induced electrokinetics. We measure an electrical response to the light-induced Rayleigh-Bénard-Marangoni convective instabilities in gold-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in isopropanol and water. Microampere current oscillations are measured and attributed to the presence of the Au-PVP NPs with negative zeta potential, in correspondence with the accompanying thermal lens oscillations and a nanofluid thermoelectric effect. The measured electrical oscillations represent an electrohydrodynamic stability driven by light, one among many that should be observed with plasmonic nanoparticles in liquids.

  13. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5. PMID:26175515

  14. Oxygen and hydrogen peroxide enhance light-induced carotenoid synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Iigusa, Hideo; Yoshida, Yusuke; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2005-07-18

    Previously, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) affect photomorphogenesis in Neurospora crassa. In this study, we investigated the physiological roles of ROS in the response to light and found that the exposure of mycelia to air was important for the light-induced carotenogenesis. Mycelia treated with a high concentration of O(2) gas and H(2)O(2) to release ROS showed an enhancement of light-induced carotenoid accumulation and the expression of gene related to light-inducible carotenogenesis. These results suggested that stimuli caused by the exposure of the mycelia to air containing O(2) gas triggered the light-induced carotenoid synthesis.

  15. Synergy between the light-induced acute response and the circadian cycle: a new mechanism for the synchronization of the Phaseolus vulgaris clock to light.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Athanasios-Dimitrios; Prombona, Anastasia

    2006-08-01

    PvLHY and Lhcb expression has been studied in primary bean leaves after exposure of etiolated leaves to two or three white light-pulses and under different photoperiods. Under the tested photoperiods, the steady-state mRNA levels exhibit diurnal oscillations with zenith in the morning between ZT21 and 4 for PvLHY and between ZT4 and 6 for Lhcb. Nadir is in the evening between ZT12 and 18 for PvLHY and ZT18 and 24 for Lhcb. Light-pulses to etiolated seedlings induce a differentiated acute response that is reciprocally correlated with the amplitude of the following circadian cycle. In addition, the clock modulates the duration of the acute response (descending part of the curve included), which according to the phase of the rhythm at light application extends from 7 to 18 h. This constitutes the response dynamics of the Phaseolus clock to light. Similarly, the waveform of PvLHY and Lhcb expression during the day of different photoperiods resembles in induction capability (accomplishment of peak after lights-on) and duration (from lights-on phase to trough) the phase-dependent progression of acute response in etiolated seedlings. Consequently, the peak of Lhcb (all tested photoperiods) and PvLHY (in LD 18:6) attained in the photophase corresponds to the acute response peak, while the peak of PvLHY during the scotophase (in LD 12:12 and 6:18) corresponds to the circadian peak. Thus, the effect of the response dynamics in the photoperiod determines the coincidence of the peak with the photo- or scotophase, respectively. This represents a new model mechanism for the adaptation of the Phaseolus clock to light.

  16. Sprayed zinc oxide films: Ultra-violet light-induced reversible surface wettability and platinum-sensitization-assisted improved liquefied petroleum gas response.

    PubMed

    Nakate, Umesh T; Patil, Pramila; Bulakhe, R N; Lokhande, C D; Kale, Sangeeta N; Naushad, Mu; Mane, Rajaram S

    2016-10-15

    We report the rapid (superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic) transition property and improvement in the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensing response of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) on UV-irradiation and platinum (Pt) surface sensitization, respectively. The morphological evolution of ZnO NRs is evidenced from the field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope digital images and for the structural elucidation X-ray diffraction pattern is used. Elemental survey mapping is obtained from energy dispersive X-ray analysis spectrum. The optical properties have been studied by UV-Visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements. The rapid (120sec) conversion of superhydrophobic (154°) ZnO NRs film to superhydrophilic (7°) is obtained under UV light illumination and the superhydrophobicity is regained by storing sample in dark. The mechanism for switching wettability behavior of ZnO NRs has thoroughly been discussed. In second phase, Pt-sensitized ZnO NRs film has demonstrated considerable gas sensitivity at 260ppm concentration of LPG. At 623K operating temperature, the maximum LPG response of 58% and the response time of 49sec for 1040ppm LPG concentration of Pt- sensitized ZnO NRs film are obtained. This higher LPG response of Pt-sensitized ZnO NRs film over pristine is primarily due to electronic effect and catalytic effect (spill-over effect) caused by an additional of Pt on ZnO NRs film surface.

  17. Immobilized Multifunctional Polymersomes on Solid Surfaces: Infrared Light-Induced Selective Photochemical Reactions, pH Responsive Behavior, and Probing Mechanical Properties under Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Iyisan, Banu; Janke, Andreas; Reichenbach, Philipp; Eng, Lukas M; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-06-22

    Fixing polymersomes onto surfaces is in high demand not only for the characterization with advanced microscopy techniques but also for designing specific compartments in microsystem devices in the scope of nanobiotechnology. For this purpose, this study reports the immobilization of multifunctional, responsive, and photo-cross-linked polymersomes on solid substrates by utilizing strong adamantane-β-cyclodextrin host-guest interactions. To reduce nonspecific binding and retain better spherical shape, the level of attractive forces acting on the immobilized polymersomes was tuned through poly(ethylene glycol) passivation as well as decreased β-cyclodextrin content on the corresponding substrates. One significant feature of this system is the pH responsivity of the polymersomes which has been demonstrated by swelling of the immobilized vesicles at acidic condition through in situ AFM measurements. Also, light responsivity has been provided by introducing nitroveratryloxycarbonyl (NVOC) protected amine molecules as photocleavable groups to the polymersome surface before immobilization. The subsequent low-energy femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation resulted in the cleavage of NVOC groups on immobilized polymersomes which in turn led to free amino groups as an additional functionality. The freed amines were further conjugated with a fluorescent dye having an activated ester that illustrates the concept of bio/chemo recognition for a potential binding of biological compounds. In addition to the responsive nature, the mechanical stability of the analyzed polymersomes was supported by computing Young's modulus and bending modulus of the membrane through force curves obtained by atomic force microscopy measurements. Overall, polymersomes with a robust and pH-swellable membrane combined with effective light responsive behavior are promising tools to design smart and stable compartments on surfaces for the development of microsystem devices such as chemo/biosensors.

  18. Differential responses to different light spectral ranges of violaxanthin de-epoxidation and accumulation of Cbr, an algal homologue of plant early light inducible proteins, in two strains of Dunaliella.

    PubMed

    Banet; Pick; Malkin; Zamir

    1999-11-01

    Unicellular green algae of the genus Dunaliella, similar to higher plants, respond to light stress by enhanced de-epoxidation of violaxanthin and accumulation of Cbr, a protein homologous to early light inducible proteins (Elips) in plants. These proteins belong to the superfamily of chlorophyll a/b binding proteins. Two Dunaliella strains, D. bardawil and D. salina, were compared for these two responses under light in the UVA, blue, green and red spectral ranges. In D. bardawil, the two stress responses were similarly induced under UVA, blue or red light and to a lesser extent under green light. In D. salina, a similar spectral range dependence was exhibited for violaxanthin de-epoxidation. However, Cbr accumulated only under UVA or blue light but not under green or red light. A strong synergistic effect of a low dose of blue light superimposed on red light resulted in Cbr accumulation. These results reveal strain-specific differences in spectral range requirements of the two light-stress responses. In the two strains, violaxanthin de-epoxidation is triggered under photosynthetically-active spectral ranges but at least in D. salina, Cbr accumulation appears to require a specific light signal additionally to a signal(s) generated by light stress.

  19. Rhythmic and light-inducible appearance of clock-associated pseudo-response regulator protein PRR9 through programmed degradation in the dark in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shogo; Nakamichi, Norihito; Kiba, Takatoshi; Yamashino, Takafumi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2007-11-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, it is currently believed that the members of a small family of PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) proteins, including TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1), coordinately play roles close to the circadian clock. Among these PRR members, the PRR9 gene is unique in that not only does its transcription oscillate diurnally, but it is also rapidly induced by light in a manner dependent on phytochromes. These events at the level of transcription must be crucial for the clock-associated functions of PRR9. Nonetheless, little is known about the expression of the PRR9 protein product itself in plant cells. Here, we show that PRR9 polypeptides themselves oscillate diurnally, and that they accumulate rapidly in response to light. Our work further suggests that the presence of PRR9 polypeptides is controlled through proteasome-mediated programmed degradation in the dark.

  20. The STN8 kinase-PBCP phosphatase system is responsible for high-light-induced reversible phosphorylation of the PSII inner antenna subunit CP29 in rice.

    PubMed

    Betterle, Nico; Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Rosa, Anthony; Wu, Guangxi; Bassi, Roberto; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid light-harvesting proteins is a mechanism to compensate for unbalanced excitation of photosystem I (PSI) versus photosystem II (PSII) under limiting light. In monocots, an additional phosphorylation event on the PSII antenna CP29 occurs upon exposure to excess light, enhancing resistance to light stress. Different from the case of the major LHCII antenna complex, the STN7 kinase and its related PPH1 phosphatase were proven not to be involved in CP29 phosphorylation, indicating that a different set of enzymes act in the high-light (HL) response. Here, we analyze a rice stn8 mutant in which both PSII core proteins and CP29 phosphorylation are suppressed in HL, implying that STN8 is the kinase catalyzing this reaction. In order to identify the phosphatase involved, we produced a recombinant enzyme encoded by the rice ortholog of AtPBCP, antagonist of AtSTN8, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. The recombinant protein was active in dephosphorylating P-CP29. Based on these data, we propose that the activities of the OsSTN8 kinase and the antagonistic OsPBCP phosphatase, in addition to being involved in the repair of photo-damaged PSII, are also responsible for the HL-dependent reversible phosphorylation of the inner antenna CP29.

  1. Functional development of the visual system in normal and protein deprived rats. I. Persistent changes in light-induced cortical evoked response.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, A; Conradi, N G; Andersson, S A

    1984-04-01

    During an investigation focused on development of visual evoked responses (VER) in normal and protein deprived rats indications of persisting latency differences were found. Since such differences are in variance with previous reports special attention was paid to compare control and protein deprived adult rats. Protein deprivation was induced by feeding rats a diet with 50% reduction in protein content compared with control rat diet from two weeks before onset of gestation until examination. Dependence on experimental variables of latencies and complexity of the VER illustrated the need of a well defined experimental situation. Adult protein deprived rats showed significantly longer latencies to onset and to the first three peaks of the VER and an altered complexity of the response. It is suggested that the observed alterations result from effects of the protein deprivation on early brain development since this and previous studies have shown similar alterations in developing young rats. The divergence in findings between the present and previous reports may be explained by differences in degree of malnutrition and in other experimental conditions.

  2. Bacterial survival responses to extreme desiccation and high humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yinjie; Yokobori, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    The presence of water is thought to be essential for life and strongly considered in life searching operation on extraterrestrial planets. In this study we show different survival responses of bacterial species to water availability and temperatures (25, 4 and - 70 o C). At these temperatures, E.coli lost viability much faster under extreme desiccation than under high humidity. Deinococcus radiodurans exhibited much higher survival rate under desiccation than under high humidity at 25 o C, while its survivals under desiccation and high humidity increased to the same level at 4 and - 70 o C. Bacillus pumilus spores generally survived well under all tested conditions. Water is favorable for the survival of most microorganisms but not a "safeguard" for all microorganisms. Microbial survival at low temperatures may not be affected by water availability. Water absence should not preclude us from seeking life on other planets.

  3. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  4. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  5. Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium current in Hermissenda crassicornis.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, K T

    2000-01-01

    A model of phototransduction is developed as a first step toward a model for investigating the critical interaction of light and turbulence stimuli within the type B photoreceptor of Hermissenda crassicronis. The model includes equations describing phototransduction, release of calcium from intracellular stores, and other calcium regulatory mechanisms, as well as equations describing ligand-gating of a rhabdomeric sodium current. The model is used to determine the sources of calcium in the soma, whether calcium or IP3 is a plausible ligand of the light-induced sodium current, and whether the light-induced potassium current is equivalent to the calcium-dependent potassium current activated by light-induced calcium release. Simulations show that the early light-induced calcium elevation is due to influx through voltage-dependent channels, whereas the later calcium elevation is due to release from intracellular stores. Simulations suggest that the ligand of the fast, light-induced sodium current is IP3 but that there is a smaller, prolonged component of the light-induced sodium current that is activated by calcium. In the model, the calcium-dependent potassium current, located in the soma, is activated only slightly by light-induced calcium elevation, leading to the prediction that a calcium-dependent potassium current, active at resting potential, is located in the rhabdomere and is responsible for the light-induced potassium current.

  6. Association of response endpoints with survival outcomes in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lonial, S; Anderson, K C

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, more patients with multiple myeloma are achieving deep, durable responses and disease control, and are living longer. These improvements have afforded more robust analyses of the relationship between response and survival. Generally, these studies have demonstrated that improvements in the quality of response across all stages of treatment are associated with better disease control and longer survival. Thus, achievement of maximal response should be strongly considered, particularly in the frontline setting, but must also be balanced with tolerability, quality of life and patient preferences. In select patients, achievement of a lesser response may be adequate to prolong survival, and attempts to treat these patients to a deeper response may place them at unnecessary risk without significant benefit. Maintenance therapy has been shown to improve the quality of response and disease control and, in some studies, survival. Studies support maintenance therapy for high-risk patients as a standard of care, and there are emerging data supporting maintenance therapy in standard-risk patients to improve progression-free and possibly overall survival. Multidrug regimens combining a proteasome inhibitor and an IMiD have shown exceptional response outcomes with acceptable increases in toxicity in both the frontline and salvage settings, and are becoming a standard treatment approach. Moving forward, the use of immunophenotypic and molecular response criteria will be essential in better understanding the impact of highly active and continuous treatment regimens across myeloma patient populations. Future translational studies will help to develop antimyeloma agents to their fullest potential. The introduction of novel targeted therapies, including the IMiD pomalidomide and the proteasome inhibitors carfilzomib and ixazomib (MLN9708), will provide

  7. Light-induced atomic elevator in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown how an atomic elevator that can elevate falling cold atoms in a vertical optical lattice can be created. The effect appears near resonance owing to the nonlinear interaction between the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of an atom, which is responsible for its random walk in rigid optical lattices without any modulation and additional action. Numerical experiments involving spontaneous emission demonstrate that random walk of atoms and light-induced atomic elevator can be observed in a real experiment.

  8. Light-induced actuating nanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Tao; Valev, Ventsislav K.; Salmon, Andrew R.; Forman, Chris J.; Smoukov, Stoyan K.; Scherman, Oren A.; Frenkel, Daan; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoactuators and nanomachines have long been sought after, but key bottlenecks remain. Forces at submicrometer scales are weak and slow, control is hard to achieve, and power cannot be reliably supplied. Despite the increasing complexity of nanodevices such as DNA origami and molecular machines, rapid mechanical operations are not yet possible. Here, we bind temperature-responsive polymers to charged Au nanoparticles, storing elastic energy that can be rapidly released under light control for repeatable isotropic nanoactuation. Optically heating above a critical temperature Tc = 32 °C using plasmonic absorption of an incident laser causes the coatings to expel water and collapse within a microsecond to the nanoscale, millions of times faster than the base polymer. This triggers a controllable number of nanoparticles to tightly bind in clusters. Surprisingly, by cooling below Tc their strong van der Waals attraction is overcome as the polymer expands, exerting nanoscale forces of several nN. This large force depends on van der Waals attractions between Au cores being very large in the collapsed polymer state, setting up a tightly compressed polymer spring which can be triggered into the inflated state. Our insights lead toward rational design of diverse colloidal nanomachines. PMID:27140648

  9. Light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Engel, Eva; Schraml, Rüdiger; Maisch, Tim; Kobuch, Karin; König, Burkhard; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Hillenkamp, Jost; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Vasold, Rudolf

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green (ICG) and to test the cytotoxicity of light-induced ICG decomposition products. ICG in solution was irradiated with laser light, solar light, or surgical endolight. The light-induced decomposition of ICG was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Porcine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were incubated with the light-induced decomposition products of ICG, and cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion assay. Independent of the light source used, singlet oxygen (photodynamic type 2 reaction) is generated by ICG leading to dioxetanes by [2+2]-cycloaddition of singlet oxygen. These dioxetanes thermally decompose into several carbonyl compounds. The decomposition products were identified by mass spectrometry. The decomposition of ICG was inhibited by adding sodium azide, a quencher of singlet oxygen. Incubation with ICG decomposition products significantly reduced the viability of RPE cells in contrast to control cells. ICG is decomposed by light within a self-sensitized photo oxidation. The decomposition products reduce the viability of RPE cells in vitro. The toxic effects of decomposed ICG should be further investigated under in vivo conditions.

  10. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  11. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  12. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    SciTech Connect

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A.

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  13. Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion organogels for light induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Qipeng

    2016-03-25

    Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) organogels have been fabricated and investigated for light induced reactions. High transparency facilitates both the UV and visible light induced reactions within HIPE organogels. Transparent HIPE organogels are advantageous for light induced polymerizations, accelerating such polymerizations and enabling the preparation of large polyHIPE monoliths.

  14. Light-induced body color change in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Tomoya; Kojima, Daisuke; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2010-11-01

    In response to ambient light levels, many lower vertebrates darken or lighten their body colors by regulating dispersion or aggregation, respectively, of melanin granules (melanosomes) in the melanophore. This physiological reaction is mediated by photoreception in the eyes, the pineal gland, the deep brain and the melanophores themselves, depending on species and their developmental stages. In this study, we established a method for quantitative measurement of the light-induced body color change in zebrafish larvae. From 2 days post-fertilization (dpf), the dermal melanophores responded to light illumination, but the response patterns and temporal profiles changed across the developmental stages. At 2 dpf, light illumination on larvae induced a relatively fast dispersion of the pigments in the melanophores, whereas continuous illumination additionally caused a delayed pigment aggregation at 3 dpf or later stages. Removal of the eyes abolished the light-dependent pigment aggregation but not the pigment dispersion at 5 dpf, while the pigment dispersion at 2 dpf was retained even in the isolated tail. These results suggest that the pigment dispersion is triggered by photoreception intrinsic to the melanophores and that the pigment aggregation is mediated by photoreception in the eyes. The monitoring system developed in this study will be useful to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the body color change depending on the ocular system. We also discussed the putative role(s) of opsin-type photoreceptive molecules in the light-induced body color change of the larval zebrafish.

  15. Strain Differences in Light-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Anna; Bessaklia, Hyba; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the role of ocular pigmentation and genetics in light-induced retinal damage. Adult pigmented [Long Evans (LE) and Brown Norway (BN)] and albino [Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LW)] rats were exposed to a bright cyclic light for 6 consecutive days and where compared with juvenile animals exposed to the same bright light environment from postnatal age 14 to 28. Flash ERGs and retinal histology were performed at predetermined days (D) post-light exposure. At D1, ERGs were similar in all adult groups with no recordable a-waves and residual b-waves. A transient recovery was noticed at D30 in the LW and LE only [b-wave: 18% and 25% of their original amplitude respectively]. Histology revealed that BN retina was the most damaged, while LE retina was best preserved. SD and LW rats were almost as damaged as BN rats. In contrast, the retina of juvenile BN was almost as resistant to the bright light exposure as that of juvenile LE rats. Our results strongly suggest that, although ocular pigmentation and genetic background are important factors in regulating the severity of light-induced retinal damage, the age of the animal at the onset of light exposure appears to be the most important determining factor. PMID:27355622

  16. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  17. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  18. A light-induced microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a novel oscillator that converts continuous light energy into sta ble and spectrally pure microwave signals. This light-induced microwave oscillator (LIMO) consists of a pump laser and a feedback circuit, including an intensity modulator, an optical fiber delay line, a photodetector, an amplifier, and a filter. We develop a quasilinear theory and obtain expressions for the threshold condition, the amplitude, the frequency, the line width, and the spectral power density of the oscillation. We also present experimental data to compare with the theoretical results. Our findings indicate that the LIMO can generate ultrastable, spectrally pure microwave reference signals up to 75 GHz with a phase noise lower than -140 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz.

  19. Broadband Visible Light Induced NO Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubart, Rachel; Eichler, Maor; Friedmann, Harry; Ankri, Rinat; Savion, N.; Breitbart, Haim

    2009-06-19

    Nitric oxide formation is a potential mechanism for photobiomodulation because it is synthesized in cells by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which contains both flavin and heme, and thus absorbs visible light. The purpose of this work was to study broadband visible light induced NO formation in various cells. Cardiac, endothelial, sperm cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were illuminated with broadband visible light, 40-130 mW/cm2, 2.4-39 J/cm2, and nitric oxide production was quantified by using the Griess reagent. The results showed that visible light illumination increased NO concentration both in sperm and endothelial cells, but not in cardiac cells. Activation of RAW 264.7 macrophages was very small. It thus appears that NO is involved in photobiomodulation, though different light parameters and illumination protocols are needed to induce NO in various cells.

  20. Visible-Light-Induced Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan O; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-08-24

    A rapid and catalyst-free cycloaddition system for visible-light-induced click chemistry is reported. A readily accessible photoreactive 2H-azirine moiety was designed to absorb light at wavelengths above 400 nm. Irradiation with low-energy light sources thus enables efficient small-molecule synthesis with a diverse range of multiple-bond-containing compounds. Moreover, in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the current approach, quantitative ligation of the photoactivatable chromophore with functional polymeric substrates was performed and full conversion with irradiation times of only 1 min at ambient conditions was achieved. The current report thus presents a highly efficient method for applications involving selective cycloaddition to electron-deficient multiple-bond-containing materials.

  1. Light-Induced Dielectrophoretic Manipulation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoeb, Marco; Rädler, Joachim O.; Klein, Stefan; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced dielectrophoretic movement of polystyrene beads and λ-DNA is studied using thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon as local photoaddressable electrodes with a diameter of 4 μm. Positive (high-field seeking) dielectrophoretic movement is observed for both types of objects. The absence of strong negative (low-field seeking) dielectrophoresis of DNA at high frequencies is in agreement with the similarity of the dielectric constants of DNA and water, the real part of the dielectric function. The corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function governed by the conductivity of DNA can be determined from a comparison of the frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic drift velocity with the Clausius-Mossotti relation. PMID:17483160

  2. CNS leptin action modulates immune response and survival in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tschöp, Johannes; Nogueiras, Ruben; Haas-Lockie, Sarah; Kasten, Kevin; Castañeda, Tamara R.; Huber, Nadine; Guanciale, Kelsey; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Habegger, Kirk; Ottaway, Nickki; Woods, Stephen C.; Oldfield, Brian; Clarke, Iain; Chua, Streamson; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Caldwell, Charles C.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis describes a complex clinical syndrome that results from an infection, setting off a cascade of systemic inflammatory responses that can lead to multiple organ failure and death. Leptin is a 16 kDa adipokine that, among its multiple known effects, is involved in regulating immune function. Here we demonstrate that leptin deficiency in ob/ob mice leads to higher mortality and more severe organ damage in a standard model of sepsis in mice (cecal ligation and puncture, CLP). Moreover, systemic leptin replacement improved the immune response to CLP. Based on the molecular mechanisms of leptin regulation of energy metabolism and reproductive function, we hypothesized that leptin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to efficiently coordinate peripheral immune defense in sepsis. We now report that leptin signaling in the brain increases survival during sepsis in leptin-deficient as well as in wild-type mice and that endogenous CNS leptin action is required for an adequate systemic immune response. These findings reveal the existence of a relevant neuroendocrine control of systemic immune defense, and suggest a possible therapeutic potential for leptin analogues in infectious disease. PMID:20427662

  3. Effect Of Free Radical Quenchers On Dye-Mediated Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Leukemic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James L.; Fay, Joseph W.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of free radical quenchers (ascorbate, catalase, and mannitol) on merocyanine 540 (MC540) mediated, laser light induced photolysis of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) was investigated. Results show that in the presence of human albumin (0.25%), dye-mediated (2014/m1), laser light induced photolysis of leukemic cells resulted in a 99.9999% cell kill. Seventy percent of the normal bone marrow cells survived the treatment. The addition of free radical quenchers prior to laser irradiation procedure increases the HL-60 cell survival. Increases of 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, were observed in the presence of catalase and ascorbate or mannitol. In the presence of a mixture of catalase and mannitol or catalase and ascorbate, this increase in viability was not observed. However, the viability of normal bone marrow cells under these conditions also decreased from 70% to 63%. These findings may be useful in ex-vivo bone marrow purging.

  4. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  5. EDITORIAL Light-induced material organization Light-induced material organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainos, Nikos; Rode, Andrei V.

    2010-12-01

    Light-induced material organization extends over a broad area of research, from photon momentum transfer to atoms, molecules and particles, serving the basis for optical trapping, and expands into the laser-induced changes of material properties through photopolymerization, photodarkening, and materials ablation. Relevant phenomena are observed over many orders of magnitude of light intensity, from a few kW cm-2 for the optical trapping of living cells to 1014 W cm-2 encountered in femtosecond laser micromachining and micro-explosion. Relevant interactions reveal a rich palette of novel phenomena in the solid state, from subtle excitations and material organization to phase transformations, non-equilibrium and transient states. The laser-induced material modifications relate to changes in the crystal structure and the molecular bonding, phase transitions in liquid state, ablation and plasma production associated with extreme pressure and temperature conditions towards entirely new states of matter. The underlying physical mechanisms form the foundations for micro-engineering photonic and other functional devices and lead the way to relevant applications. At the same time, they hold the potential for creating non-equilibrium material states and a range of fundamentally new products not available by other means. The fundamental understanding of both materials nature and functional behaviour will ultimately yield novel devices and improved performance in several fields. The far reaching goals of these studies relate to the development of new methods and technologies for micro- and nano-fabrication, not only offering a significant reduction of cost, but also expanding the fabrication capabilities into unexplored areas of biophotonics and nanotechnology. This special issue of Journal of Optics presents some very recent and exciting advances in the field of materials manipulation by laser beams, aiming to underline its current trends. In optical trapping research we

  6. Light-induced fluorescence for pulpal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.

    2001-04-01

    A direct non-histological means of pulpal diagnosis remains elusive to clinical practice. Clinical vitality testing remains limited to electric, thermal criteria, or laser Doppler flowmetry. The goal of these investigations was to determine the feasibility of using light-induced fluorescence as a non-invasive modality for pulpal evaluation. Such a capability would, for example, permit expanded use of pulpotomy/pulpectomy techniques. Clinically healthy and diseased human extirpated pulpal tissues were used in this study. After excision, they were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections prepared. Measurement of tissue excitation/emission characteristics was performed using spectrographic analysis. A low-light level fluorescence microscopy system was then used to image autofluorescence localization and intensity at optimal excitation/detection parameters. Excitation/detection parameters used in this study included 405/605, 405/635, 405/670, 440/550, and 440/635. Autofluorescence intensities in healthy tissues were significantly stronger than those in diseased tissues at optimal parameters. It is postulated that autofluorescence characteristics are related to pathology- related structural changes in the pulp. This work provides the basis for further investigation into the relation between autofluorescence, histology and clinical symptoms.

  7. Light-induced quantitative microprinting of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Azioune, Ammar; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Lecomte, Yohan; Chahid, Makhlad; Studer, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Printing of biomolecules on substrates has developed tremendously in the past few years. The existing methods either rely on slow serial writing processes or on parallelized photolithographic techniques where cumbersome mask alignment procedures usually impair the ability to generate multi-protein patterns. We recently developed a new technology allowing for high resolution multi protein micro-patterning. This technology named "Light-Induced Molecular Adsorption of Proteins (LIMAP)" is based on a water-soluble photo-initiator able to reverse the antifouling property of polymer brushes when exposed to UV light. We developed a wide-field pattern projection system based on a DMD coupled to a conventional microscope which permits to generate arbitrary grayscale patterns of UV light at the micron scale. Interestingly, the density of adsorbed molecules scales with the dose of UV light thus allowing the quantitative patterning of biomolecules. The very low non specific background of biomolecules outside of the UV-exposed areas allows for the sequential printing of multiple proteins without alignment procedures. Protein patterns ranging from 500 nm up to 1 mm can be performed within seconds, as well as gradients of arbitrary shapes. The range of applications of the LIMAP approach extends from the single molecule up to the multicellular scale with an exquisite control over local protein density. We show that it can be used to generate complex protein landscapes useful to study protein-protein, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  8. Light-induced shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendlein, Andreas; Jiang, Hongyan; Jünger, Oliver; Langer, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Materials are said to show a shape-memory effect if they can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape, and recover their original, permanent shape only on exposure to an external stimulus. Shape-memory polymers have received increasing attention because of their scientific and technological significance. In principle, a thermally induced shape-memory effect can be activated by an increase in temperature (also obtained by heating on exposure to an electrical current or light illumination). Several papers have described light-induced changes in the shape of polymers and gels, such as contraction, bending or volume changes. Here we report that polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes-such as (but not exclusively) elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals-by ultraviolet light illumination. These new shapes are stable for long time periods, even when heated to 50°C, and they can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength. The ability of polymers to form different pre-determined temporary shapes and subsequently recover their original shape at ambient temperatures by remote light activation could lead to a variety of potential medical and other applications.

  9. Light-induced shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, Andreas; Jiang, Hongyan; Jünger, Oliver; Langer, Robert

    2005-04-14

    Materials are said to show a shape-memory effect if they can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape, and recover their original, permanent shape only on exposure to an external stimulus. Shape-memory polymers have received increasing attention because of their scientific and technological significance. In principle, a thermally induced shape-memory effect can be activated by an increase in temperature (also obtained by heating on exposure to an electrical current or light illumination). Several papers have described light-induced changes in the shape of polymers and gels, such as contraction, bending or volume changes. Here we report that polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes--such as (but not exclusively) elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals--by ultraviolet light illumination. These new shapes are stable for long time periods, even when heated to 50 degrees C, and they can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength. The ability of polymers to form different pre-determined temporary shapes and subsequently recover their original shape at ambient temperatures by remote light activation could lead to a variety of potential medical and other applications.

  10. Light-induced drift of Na atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    Light can induce a flux of optically absorbing particles immersed in a buffer gas, when these particles have a different mobility in the ground and excited state. This paper presents a study of light-induced drift (LID) of Na atoms in noble gases, which can be regarded as the “canonical” system for experiments in this field. We have experimentally studied the LID effect in the optically thin and the optically thick regimes. Parameters which have been varied are laser frequency, laser intensity, buffer gas pressure and buffer gas species. This work gives the first critical comparison of LID experiments with realistic theory in which the multilevel complications of the Na atom have been incorporated. In the optically thick case (“optical piston”) one can distinguish the open cell and the closed cell regimes. Effects of adsorption and desorption of Na atoms at the surface of the cell wall have been incorporated into the theory. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID which incorporates the fine and hyperfine structure of the level scheme of the Na absorbers.

  11. Influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast relocations.

    PubMed

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses.

  12. Influence of Sugars on Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocations

    PubMed Central

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses. PMID:19516992

  13. An Analysis of Light-Induced Retroactive Inhibition in Pigeon Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William A.; Grant, Douglas S.

    1978-01-01

    Grant and Roberts found that houselight presented throughout the delay period on a delayed matching-to-sample task caused pigeons to demonstrate a much lower level of accuracy than was found when the delay was spent in darkness. A series of experiments was carried out to examine possible mechanisms responsible for this light-induced retroactive…

  14. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  15. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. Results We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. Conclusions A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds

  16. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  17. The regulatory mechanism underlying light-inducible production of carotenoids in nonphototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Light is a ubiquitous environmental factor serving as an energy source and external stimulus. Here, I review the conserved molecular mechanism of light-inducible production of carotenoids in three nonphototrophic bacteria: Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Thermus thermophilus HB27, and Bacillus megaterium QM B1551. A MerR family transcriptional regulator, LitR, commonly plays a central role in their light-inducible carotenoid production. Genetic and biochemical studies on LitR proteins revealed a conserved function: LitR in complex with adenosyl B12 (AdoB12) has a light-sensitive DNA-binding activity and thus suppresses the expression of the Crt biosynthesis gene cluster. The in vitro DNA-binding and transcription assays showed that the LitR-AdoB12 complex serves as a repressor allowing transcription initiation by RNA polymerase in response to illumination. The existence of novel light-inducible genes and the unique role of the megaplasmid were revealed by the transcriptomic analysis of T. thermophilus. The findings suggest that LitR is a general regulator responsible for the light-inducible carotenoid production in the phylogenetically divergent nonphototrophic bacteria, and that LitR performs diverse physiological functions in bacteria.

  18. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-07-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  19. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    PubMed Central

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light. PMID:27404551

  20. A possible mechanism for visible-light-induced skin rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Lubart, Rachel; Friedman, Harry; Lavie, R.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years there has been intensive research in the field of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. This comes as a response to the desire for a simple method of treating rhytids caused by aging, UV exposure and acne scars. In numerous studies intense visible light pulsed systems (20-30J/cm2) are used. The mechanism of action was supposed to be a selective heat induced denaturalization of dermal collagen that leads to subsequent reactive synthesis. In this study we suggest a different mechanism for photorejuvenation based on light induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. We irradiated collagen in-vitro with a broad band of visible light, 400-800 nm, 12-22J/cm2, and used the spin trapping coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect ROS. In vivo, we used dose 30 J in average (35 for acnis scars, 25 for wrinkles and redness). Irradiated collagen results in hydroxyl and methyl radicals formation. We propose, as a new concept, that visible light at the intensity used for skin rejuvenation, 20-30J/cm2, produces high amounts of ROS which destroy old collagen fibers encouraging the formation of new ones. On the other hand at inner depths of the skin, where the light intensity is much weaker, low amounts of ROS are formed which are well known to stimulate fibroblast proliferation.

  1. UV-A light induces anthocyanin biosynthesis in a manner distinct from synergistic blue + UV-B light and UV-A/blue light responses in different parts of the hypocotyls in turnip seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhou, Bo; Sun, Mei; Li, Yuhua; Kawabata, Saneyuki

    2012-08-01

    The effects of irradiating blue, UV-A, UV-B and a combination of the lights on anthocyanin accumulation at different hypocotyl positions were investigated in seedlings of the purple top turnip 'Tsuda'. The location of anthocyanin accumulation varied depending on different light spectra. Stronger accumulation of anthocyanin was induced (i) at the upper hypocotyl positions by blue light; (ii) mainly at the upper position, but also at the middle position by UV-B light; and (iii) at the upper to lower position by UV-A light. There were synergistic effects between blue and UV-B, while such effects were not observed for the other light combinations. Among the six chalcone synthase (CHS) genes identified in the 'Tsuda' turnip, BrCHS1, 4 and 5 exhibited light-dependent expression patterns, while the other three showed no apparent light responses. The expression of BrCHS1, 4 and 5 was increased particularly by UV-A and blue + UV-B irradiation at the middle to lower hypocotyl positions, in accordance with anthocyanin accumulation patterns. The highest induction of gene expression was observed for BrCHS4 upon blue + UV-B co-irradiation. In contrast, CHS expression was induced only slightly at higher hypocotyl positions by blue light. The R2R3-type MYB transcription factor genes PAP1, MYB4, MYB12 and MYB111 exhibited differential expression patterns at different hypocotyl positions; these patterns were unique for different light spectra. These unique anthocyanin accumulation patterns and gene expression profiles depending on hypocotyl positions and light sources demonstrate that there is a distinct UV-A response, blue + UV-B synergistic response and blue/UV-A light response for anthocyanin biosynthesis in turnip. UV-A light-dependent anthocyanin biosynthesis appeared to be regulated in a manner that is distinct from that mediated by cryptochromes and UV-B photoreceptors.

  2. Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival: a response.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François; Wells, Athol U

    2011-07-25

    Better survival in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema than in lone pulmonary fibrosis: bias or reality? A response to Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival by Todd et al., Fibrogenesis & Tissue Repair 2011, 4:6.Please see related letter http://fibrogenesis.com/content/4/1/17.

  3. Predicting response and survival in chemotherapy-treated triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prat, A; Lluch, A; Albanell, J; Barry, W T; Fan, C; Chacón, J I; Parker, J S; Calvo, L; Plazaola, A; Arcusa, A; Seguí-Palmer, M A; Burgues, O; Ribelles, N; Rodriguez-Lescure, A; Guerrero, A; Ruiz-Borrego, M; Munarriz, B; López, J A; Adamo, B; Cheang, M C U; Li, Y; Hu, Z; Gulley, M L; Vidal, M J; Pitcher, B N; Liu, M C; Citron, M L; Ellis, M J; Mardis, E; Vickery, T; Hudis, C A; Winer, E P; Carey, L A; Caballero, R; Carrasco, E; Martín, M; Perou, C M; Alba, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this study, we evaluated the ability of gene expression profiles to predict chemotherapy response and survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Methods: Gene expression and clinical–pathological data were evaluated in five independent cohorts, including three randomised clinical trials for a total of 1055 patients with TNBC, basal-like disease (BLBC) or both. Previously defined intrinsic molecular subtype and a proliferation signature were determined and tested. Each signature was tested using multivariable logistic regression models (for pCR (pathological complete response)) and Cox models (for survival). Within TNBC, interactions between each signature and the basal-like subtype (vs other subtypes) for predicting either pCR or survival were investigated. Results: Within TNBC, all intrinsic subtypes were identified but BLBC predominated (55–81%). Significant associations between genomic signatures and response and survival after chemotherapy were only identified within BLBC and not within TNBC as a whole. In particular, high expression of a previously identified proliferation signature, or low expression of the luminal A signature, was found independently associated with pCR and improved survival following chemotherapy across different cohorts. Significant interaction tests were only obtained between each signature and the BLBC subtype for prediction of chemotherapy response or survival. Conclusions: The proliferation signature predicts response and improved survival after chemotherapy, but only within BLBC. This highlights the clinical implications of TNBC heterogeneity, and suggests that future clinical trials focused on this phenotypic subtype should consider stratifying patients as having BLBC or not. PMID:25101563

  4. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  6. Polychromatic light-induced osteogenic activity in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Nazife; Çakmak, Anıl S; Kiremitçi, Arlin S; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-11-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been applied to manipulate cellular responses by using monochromatic light in different wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared (IR) region. Until now, an effective wavelength has not been revealed to induce proliferation and/or differentiation of cells. Therefore, in the presented study, we decided to use a specially designed plasma arc light source providing wavelengths between 590 and 1500 nm in order to investigate its biomodulatory effects on chitosan scaffold-supported three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. For comparison, two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures were also carried out in tissue-culture polystyrene dishes (TCPS). The results showed that light-induced temperature rise did not affect cells when the distance between the light source and the cells was 10 cm and the frequency of administration was daily. Moreover, light was applied for 5 and 10 min to the cells in TCPS and in chitosan scaffold groups, respectively. Cell culture studies under static conditions indicated that polychromatic light significantly stimulated bone nodule formation via the prolonged cell survival and stimulated differentiation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells in both TCPS and chitosan scaffold groups. In conclusion, specially designed plasma arc light source used in this study induces formation of bone tissue and so, this light source is proposed as an appropriate system for in vitro bone tissue engineering applications. Statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA by using GraphPad Instat software and standard deviations were calculated by using data of three parallel samples for each group.

  7. Irradiation of skin with visible light induces reactive oxygen species and matrix-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Frank; Kaur, Simarna; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Kollias, Nikiforos; Southall, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    Daily skin exposure to solar radiation causes cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are a primary factor in skin damage. Although the contribution of the UV component to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology. Solar radiation comprises <10% of UV, and thus the purpose of this study was to examine the physiological response of skin to visible light (400-700 nm). Irradiation of human skin equivalents with visible light induced production of ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression. Commercially available sunscreens were found to have minimal effects on reducing visible light-induced ROS, suggesting that UVA/UVB sunscreens do not protect the skin from visible light-induced responses. Using clinical models to assess the generation of free radicals from oxidative stress, higher levels of free radical activity were found after visible light exposure. Pretreatment with a photostable UVA/UVB sunscreen containing an antioxidant combination significantly reduced the production of ROS, cytokines, and MMP expression in vitro, and decreased oxidative stress in human subjects after visible light irradiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that other portions of the solar spectrum aside from UV, particularly visible light, may also contribute to signs of premature photoaging in skin.

  8. Efficient Light-Induced Phase Transitions in Halogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a new family of light-responsive, fluorinated supramolecular liquid crystals (LCs) showing efficient and reversible light-induced LC-to-isotropic phase transitions. Our materials design is based on fluorinated azobenzenes, where the fluorination serves to strengthen the noncovalent interaction with bond-accepting stilbazole molecules, and increase the lifetime of the cis-form of the azobenzene units. The halogen-bonded LCs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, hot-stage polarized optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Simultaneous analysis of light-induced changes in birefringence, absorption, and optical scattering allowed us to estimate that <4% of the mesogenic units in the cis-form suffices to trigger the full LC-to-isotropic phase transition. We also report a light-induced and reversible crystal-to-isotropic phase transition, which has not been previously observed in supramolecular complexes. In addition to fundamental understanding of light-responsive supramolecular complexes, we foresee this study to be important in the development of bistable photonic devices and supramolecular actuators. PMID:27917024

  9. Difference in light-induced annealing behavior of deposition- and light-induced defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, N.; Matsuda, A.

    1993-10-01

    First experimental results on light-induced annealing (LIA) of deposition-induced defects (DID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are reported. LIA of DID and of light-induced defects (LID) showed a big difference: the reduction in density of DID by LIA is as low as one third or less of LID reduced by LIA, while thermal annealing reduced DID and LID very similarly. Those results indicate a structural difference between DID and LID, and are discussed in connection with a structural model of a-Si:H.

  10. LIGHT-INDUCED OIL GLOBULE MIGRATION IN HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE).

    PubMed

    Peled, Ehud; Pick, Uri; Zarka, Aliza; Shimoni, Eyal; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy

    2012-10-01

    Astaxanthin-rich oil globules in Haematococcus pluvialis display rapid light-induced peripheral migration that is unique to this organism and serves to protect the photosynthetic system from excessive light. We observed rapid light-induced peripheral migration that is associated with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, whereas the recovery was slow. A simple assay to follow globule migration, based on chlorophyll fluorescence level has been developed. Globule migration was induced by high intensity blue light, but not by high intensity red light. The electron transport inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethylurea did not inhibit globule migration, whereas the quinone analog (dibromo-methyl-isopropylbenzoquinone), induced globule migration even at low light. Actin microfilament-directed toxins, such as cytochalasin B and latrunculin A, inhibited the light-induced globule migration, whereas toxins against microtubules were ineffective. Electron microscopic (EM) imaging confirmed the cytoplasmic localization and peripheral migration of globules upon exposure to very high light (VHL). Scanning EM of freeze-fractured cells also revealed globules within cytoplasmic bridges traversing the chloroplast, presumably representing the pathway of migration. Close alignments of globules with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes were also observed following VHL illumination. We propose that light-induced globule migration is regulated by the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport system. Possible mechanisms of actin-based globule migration are discussed.

  11. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  12. Pore-forming toxins induce multiple cellular responses promoting survival.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Bischofberger, Mirko; Frêche, Barbara; Ho, Sylvia; Parton, Robert G; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2011-07-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are secreted proteins that contribute to the virulence of a great variety of bacterial pathogens. They inflict one of the more disastrous damages a target cell can be exposed to: disruption of plasma membrane integrity. Since this is an ancient form of attack, which bears similarities to mechanical membrane damage, cells have evolved response pathways to these perturbations. Here, it is reported that PFTs trigger very diverse yet specific response pathways. Many are triggered by the decrease in cytoplasmic potassium, which thus emerges as a central regulator. Upon plasma membrane damage, cells activate signalling pathways aimed at restoring plasma membrane integrity and ion homeostasis. Interestingly these pathways do not require protein synthesis. Cells also trigger signalling cascades that allow them to enter a quiescent-like state, where minimal energy is consumed while waiting for plasma membrane damage to be repaired. More specifically, protein synthesis is arrested, cytosolic constituents are recycled by autophagy and energy is stored in lipid droplets. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Parasitic Infection Improves Survival from Septic Peritonitis by Enhancing Mast Cell Responses to Bacteria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Rachel E.; Xu, Xiang; Kim, Sophia S.; Seeley, Eric J.; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2–4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host. PMID:22110673

  14. Molecular keys unlock the mysteries of variable survival responses of blue crabs to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Geoffrey W; Eggleston, David B; Noga, Edward J

    2010-05-01

    Hypoxia is a major stressor in coastal ecosystems, yet generalizing its impacts on fish and shellfish populations across hypoxic events is difficult due to variability among individuals in their history of exposure to hypoxia and related abiotic variables, and subsequent behavioral and survival responses. Although aquatic animals have diverse physiological responses to cope with hypoxia, we know little about how inter-individual variation in physiological state affects survival and behavioral decisions under hypoxic conditions. Laboratory experiments coupled with molecular techniques determined how extrinsic factors (e.g., water body and temperature) and respiratory physiology (hemocyanin concentration and structure) affected survival and behavior of adult blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) exposed to different levels of hypoxia over a 30-h time period. Nearly 100% of crabs survived the 1.3 mg dissolved oxygen (DO) l(-1) treatment (18.4% air saturation), suggesting that adult blue crabs are tolerant of severe hypoxia. Probability of survival decreased with increasing hypoxic exposure time, lower DO, and increasing temperature. Individual-level differences in survival correlated with water body and crab size. Crabs collected from the oligo/mesohaline and hypoxic Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, USA survived hypoxic exposures longer than crabs from the euhaline and normoxic Bogue and Back Sounds, North Carolina. Furthermore, small NRE crabs survived longer than large NRE crabs. Hemocyanin (Hcy) concentration did not explain these individual-level differences, however, hypoxia-tolerant crabs had Hcy structures indicative of a high-O(2)-affinity form of Hcy, suggesting Hcy "quality" (i.e., structure) may be more important for hypoxia survival than Hcy "quantity" (i.e., concentration). The geographic differences in survival we observed also highlight the importance of carefully selecting experimental animals when planning to extrapolate results to the population

  15. Role of space charges on light-induced effects in nematic liquid crystals doped by methyl red.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, L; Simoni, F

    2014-03-01

    We show that both the extraordinarily large nonlinear response and the light-induced permanent reorientation in liquid crystals doped by the azo dye methyl red originates from the same phenomenon of modification of the charge density on the irradiated surface. The demonstration is done by applying ac voltage to the samples, showing that in this case no permanent anchoring is possible. The measurements confirm the role of photoisomerization that gives a transient contribution to the actual reorientation process only in the high dose regime. This result allows us to draw a picture for light-induced effects that might be applied to a large class of compounds.

  16. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tomohiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sugitani, Sou; Kudo, Takashi; Imai, Shunsuke; Inokuchi, Yuta; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to excessive levels of light induces photoreceptor apoptosis and can be a causative factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the cellular events that mediate this apoptotic response are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in light-induced cell death in the murine retina and murine photoreceptor cells (661W). Excessive light exposure induced retinal dysfunction, photoreceptor degeneration, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and the transcriptional expression of ER stress-related factors, including 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78)/immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), were increased in light-exposed retinas. Light exposure also induced both cell death and up-regulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, S-opsin aggregation, bip and chop mRNAs in 661W cells in vitro. Knock-down of chop mRNA inhibited photoreceptor cell death induced by light exposure. Furthermore, treatment with BiP inducer X (BIX), an ER stress inhibitor, induced bip mRNA and reduced both chop expression and light-induced photoreceptor cell death. These data indicate that excessive ER stress may induce photoreceptor cell death in light-exposed retinas via activation of the CHOP-dependent apoptotic pathway, suggesting that the ER stress may play a pivotal role in light exposure-induced retinal damage. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Light induced structural changes of the photoprotein mnemiopsin: Characterization and contribution in photoinactivation.

    PubMed

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Molakarimi, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Taghdir, Majid; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Mnemiopsin, an EF-hand Ca(2+) binding photoprotein isolated from luminous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, emits blue light from its chromophore, coelenterazine, which is non-covalently bond in its central hydrophobic core. Previous studies have revealed unique biochemical properties for ctenophore photoproteins such as inactivation by light, but only few have focused on photoinactivation process. To understand the nature of photoinactivation process we have investigated the impact of light alone and in the presence of Ca(2+) ion on the structure of this photoprotein. We used UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy following Ca(2+) binding assay to analyze the light effects on mnemiopsin conformation in comparison with aequorin at both apo and holo form. Our results showed light induced structural changes which resulted into photoinactivation. These changes include significant modification on secondary structure of mnemiopsin in comparison with aequorin. Our data also revealed that light could influence structure of apo protein regardless of presence of coelenterazine. The comparative studies of Ca(2+) ion binding affinity following light exposure, also showed that light induced structural changes could presumably affect coelenterazine binding or its conformation in binding site in such a way that causes photoinactivation. In conclusion, we have proposed that structural rearrangement of helix 5 and C-terminal motif could be responsible for light induced structural changes.

  18. Light-induced Conductance Switching in Photomechanically Active Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Schneider, V; Polonskyi, O; Strunskus, T; Elbahri, M; Faupel, F

    2017-08-29

    Novel, optically responsive devices with a host of potential applications have been demonstrated by coupling carbon nanomaterials with photochromic molecules. For light-induced conductance switching in particular, we have recently shown that carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites containing azobenzene are very attractive and provide stable and non-degradable changes in conductivity over time at standard laboratory conditions. In these composites, the photoswitching mechanisms are based on light-induced changes in electronic properties and related to the Pool-Frenkel conduction mechanism. However, no link between conductivity switching and the molecular motion of azobenzene chromophores could be found due to application of high elastic modulus polymer matrices. Here we report on single wall carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites with a soft polycaprolactone polymer host. Such a system clearly shows the transfer of light-induced, nano-sized molecular motion to macroscopic thickness changes of the composite matrix. We demonstrate that these photomechanical effects can indeed overshadow the electronic effects in conductivity switching behavior and lead to a reversion of the conductivity switching direction near the percolation threshold.

  19. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Veronica M; Piontkivska, Helen; Mintz, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders. PMID:18021443

  20. Dimension Reduction of Microarray Data in the Presence of a Censored Survival Response: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuan S; Rojo, Javier

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of microarray studies involves the prediction of patient survival based on their gene expression levels. To cope with the high dimensionality of the microarray gene expression data, it is customary to first reduce the dimension of the gene expression data via dimension reduction methods, and then use the Cox proportional hazards model to predict patient survival. In this paper, we propose a variant of Partial Least Squares, denoted as Rank-based Modified Partial Least Squares (RMPLS), that is insensitive to outlying values of both the response and the gene expressions. We assess the performance of RMPLS and several dimension reduction methods using a simulation model for gene expression data with a censored response. In particular, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), modified Partial Least Squares (MPLS), RMPLS, Sliced Inverse Regression (SIR), Correlation Principal Component Regression (CPCR), Supervised Principal Component Regression (SPCR) and Univariate Selection (UNIV) are compared in terms of mean squared error of the estimated survival function and the estimated coefficients of the covariates, and in terms of the bias of the estimated survival function. It turns out that RMPLS outperforms all other methods in terms of the mean squared error and the bias of the survival function in the presence of outliers in the response. In addition, RMPLS is comparable to MPLS in the absence of outliers. In this setting, both RMPLS and MPLS outperform all other methods considered in this study in terms of mean squared error and bias of the estimated survival function. PMID:19222387

  1. Dimension reduction of microarray data in the presence of a censored survival response: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan S; Rojo, Javier

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of microarray studies involves the prediction of patient survival based on their gene expression levels. To cope with the high dimensionality of the microarray gene expression data, it is customary to first reduce the dimension of the gene expression data via dimension reduction methods, and then use the Cox proportional hazards model to predict patient survival. In this paper, we propose a variant of Partial Least Squares, denoted as Rank-based Modified Partial Least Squares (RMPLS), that is insensitive to outlying values of both the response and the gene expressions. We assess the performance of RMPLS and several dimension reduction methods using a simulation model for gene expression data with a censored response. In particular, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), modified Partial Least Squares (MPLS), RMPLS, Sliced Inverse Regression (SIR), Correlation Principal Component Regression (CPCR), Supervised Principal Component Regression (SPCR) and Univariate Selection (UNIV) are compared in terms of mean squared error of the estimated survival function and the estimated coefficients of the covariates, and in terms of the bias of the estimated survival function. It turns out that RMPLS outperforms all other methods in terms of the mean squared error and the bias of the survival function in the presence of outliers in the response. In addition, RMPLS is comparable to MPLS in the absence of outliers. In this setting, both RMPLS and MPLS outperform all other methods considered in this study in terms of mean squared error and bias of the estimated survival function.

  2. Survival and Inflammatory Response in Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell-enriched Mouse Fat Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Anadi; Isfoss, Björn L.; Lønnerød, Linn K.; Vigen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ATMSCs) are currently used in grafting procedures in a number of clinical trials. The reconstructive role of such cells in fat graft enrichment is largely unclear. This study was undertaken to assess survival and inflammatory response in fat grafts enriched with ATMSCs in mice. Methods: ATMSC-enriched adipose tissue was grafted subcutaneously in a clinically relevant manner in mice, and survival and inflammatory response were determined by bioluminescence imaging of transgenic tissue constitutively expressing luciferase or driven by inflammation in wild-type animals. Results: Only a minor fraction of ATMSCs transplanted subcutaneously were found to survive long term, yet fat grafts enriched with ATMSCs showed improved survival for a limited period, compared with no enrichment. NF-κB activity was transiently increased in ATMSC-enriched grafts, and the grafts responded adequately to a proinflammatory stimulus. In one animal, cells originating from the subcutaneous graft were found at a site of inflammation distant from the site of engraftment. Conclusion: ATMSCs display limited subcutaneous survival. Still, ATMSC enrichment may improve the outcome of adipose tissue grafting procedures by facilitating short-term graft survival and adequate inflammatory responses. Migration of cells from grafted adipose tissue requires further investigation. PMID:28293494

  3. The Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16INK4a Physically Interacts with Transcription Factor Sp1 and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 4 to Transactivate MicroRNA-141 and MicroRNA-146b-5p Spontaneously and in Response to Ultraviolet Light-induced DNA Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalaf, Huda H.; Mohideen, Peer; Nallar, Shreeram C.; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya V.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2013-01-01

    p16INK4a is a tumor suppressor protein involved in several stress-related cellular responses, including apoptosis. Recent lines of evidence indicate that p16INK4a is also a modulator of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this novel function are still obscure. Here, we present clear evidence that p16INK4a modulates the levels of various microRNAs, with marked positive effect on miR-141 and miR-146b-5p. This effect is mediated through the formation of the p16-CDK4-Sp1 heterocomplex, which binds to Sp1 consensus-binding motifs present in the promoters of miR-141 and miR-146b-5p, and it enables their transcription. In addition, we have shown that p16INK4a interacts with Sp1 through the fourth ankyrin repeat, which is crucial for Sp1 binding to the miR-141 and miR-146b-5p promoters and their transcriptional activation. The physiological importance of this association was revealed by the inability of cancer-related p16INK4a mutants to interact with Sp1. Moreover, we have shown p16-CDK4-Sp1-dependent up-regulation of miR-141 and miR-146b-5p following UV light-induced DNA damage and the role of these two microRNAs in mediating p16-related induction of apoptosis in response to this genotoxic stress. Together, these results indicate that p16INK4a associates with CDK4 not only to inhibit the cell cycle but also to enable the transcription of two important onco-microRNAs, which act as downstream effectors. PMID:24163379

  4. Blue and green light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinitz, B.; Ren, Z.; Poff, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wavelengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. The authors advise care in the use of green safelights for studies of phototropism.

  5. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  6. Increased sensitivity to light-induced damage in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinal disease.

    PubMed

    White, D Alan; Fritz, Jason J; Hauswirth, William W; Kaushal, Shalesh; Lewin, Alfred S

    2007-05-01

    To describe a sensitivity to light-induced damage associated with expression of a T17M mutant human rhodopsin (hT17M) transgene in mice, with the goal of minimizing retinal injury during the subretinal delivery of rAAV-mediated gene therapy. Mice were bred to express the hT17M rhodopsin transgene in a line that was hemizygous null for wild-type mouse rhodopsin (mrho(+/-)), and the eyes of transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermates were exposed for 2.5 minutes to unilateral illumination with fiber-optic light ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 lux. Funduscopic images were made with a handheld camera (Genesis; Kowa Company, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Full-field scotopic electroretinographic analysis (ERG) was performed to measure loss of retinal function. Morphometry in the light microscope was used to measure loss of rod photoreceptors. TUNEL staining and a nucleosome release assay were used to measure levels of apoptosis in retinal specimens. mrho(+/-);hT17M mice exhibited a sensitivity to light-induced damage that caused severe loss of a- and b-wave ERG responses. hT17M transgenic mice on the mrho(+/+) background were equally sensitive to light-induced damage. Histologic analysis showed a concomitant loss of photoreceptors and TUNEL labeling of fragmented DNA in rod photoreceptor cells, demonstrating that the damage occurred via an apoptotic pathway. Nontransgenic littermate mice were not affected by this exposure to light. Mice expressing an hP23H mutant human rhodopsin transgene were minimally sensitive to light-induced damage at these intensities, in comparison to hT17M mice. Treating the hT17M mice with an equivalent regimen of exposure to red light was less damaging to the retina, as measured by ERG and histology. Expression of a human hT17M mutant rhodopsin transgene in mice is associated with photoreceptor apoptosis in response to moderate exposure to light. This phenotype was not observed in nontransgenic littermates or in mice expressing an hP23H mutant human

  7. British Thoracic Society Study on cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis: response to treatment and survival

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Robin M; Prescott, Robin J; Chalmers, J C; Johnston, Ian D A

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective The initial results of a survey of 588 patients with a clinical presentation of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) also known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, have been published. This article reports further results pertaining to response to treatment and survival. Methods Data on the treatment given and lung function response were collected over 4–6 years. Survival data were collected over 10 years. Results Treatment was given to 445 (76%) patients, 55% were given prednisolone alone and the remainder another immunosuppressive agent, usually with prednisolone. Treated patients had worse lung function initially. At 3 months after study entry, treated patients were more likely to have improved forced vital capacity (FVC) than the untreated patients. Patients whose FVC improved were younger (p = 0.001 analysis of variance (ANOVA)) and had lower initial FVC (p<0.001, ANOVA). Patients who responded to treatment at 3 months or at 1 year survived longer than those who remained stable, who in turn survived longer than those who deteriorated (p = 0.002). These differences were largely accounted for by patients with better lung function surviving longer. Younger age at entry, female sex and higher percentage predicted FVC and reduced carbon monoxide transfer factor at study entry were associated with greater chances of survival at 4 years. Overall median survival from entry was 2.43 years (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.17 to 3.18). Conclusions About a third of patients with CFA showed improved lung function after initiation of corticosteroid or immunosuppressive treatment, and those who improved survived longer. Poorer lung function, male sex and age are adverse prognostic features. Overall survival was poor. PMID:16769717

  8. Association of Pembrolizumab With Tumor Response and Survival Among Patients With Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Antoni; Hamid, Omid; Daud, Adil; Hodi, F Stephen; Wolchok, Jedd D; Kefford, Richard; Joshua, Anthony M; Patnaik, Amita; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Weber, Jeffrey S; Gangadhar, Tara C; Hersey, Peter; Dronca, Roxana; Joseph, Richard W; Zarour, Hassane; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Lawrence, Donald P; Algazi, Alain; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Hoffner, Brianna; Mateus, Christine; Gergich, Kevin; Lindia, Jill A; Giannotti, Maxine; Li, Xiaoyun Nicole; Ebbinghaus, Scot; Kang, S Peter; Robert, Caroline

    2016-04-19

    The programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathway limits immune responses to melanoma and can be blocked with the humanized anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab. To characterize the association of pembrolizumab with tumor response and overall survival among patients with advanced melanoma. Open-label, multicohort, phase 1b clinical trials (enrollment, December 2011-September 2013). Median duration of follow-up was 21 months. The study was performed in academic medical centers in Australia, Canada, France, and the United States. Eligible patients were aged 18 years and older and had advanced or metastatic melanoma. Data were pooled from 655 enrolled patients (135 from a nonrandomized cohort [n = 87 ipilimumab naive; n = 48 ipilimumab treated] and 520 from randomized cohorts [n = 226 ipilimumab naive; n = 294 ipilimumab treated]). Cutoff dates were April 18, 2014, for safety analyses and October 18, 2014, for efficacy analyses. Pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks continued until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or investigator decision. The primary end point was confirmed objective response rate (best overall response of complete response or partial response) in patients with measurable disease at baseline per independent central review. Secondary end points included toxicity, duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Among the 655 patients (median [range] age, 61 [18-94] years; 405 [62%] men), 581 had measurable disease at baseline. An objective response was reported in 194 of 581 patients (33% [95% CI, 30%-37%]) and in 60 of 133 treatment-naive patients (45% [95% CI, 36% to 54%]). Overall, 74% (152/205) of responses were ongoing at the time of data cutoff; 44% (90/205) of patients had response duration for at least 1 year and 79% (162/205) had response duration for at least 6 months. Twelve-month progression-free survival rates were 35% (95% CI, 31%-39%) in the

  9. The Hippo pathway promotes cell survival in response to chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Di Cara, F; Maile, T M; Parsons, B D; Magico, A; Basu, S; Tapon, N; King-Jones, K

    2015-01-01

    Cellular stress defense mechanisms have evolved to maintain homeostasis in response to a broad variety of environmental challenges. Stress signaling pathways activate multiple cellular programs that range from the activation of survival pathways to the initiation of cell death when cells are damaged beyond repair. To identify novel players acting in stress response pathways, we conducted a cell culture RNA interference (RNAi) screen using caffeine as a xenobiotic stress-inducing agent, as this compound is a well-established inducer of detoxification response pathways. Specifically, we examined how caffeine affects cell survival when Drosophila kinases and phosphatases were depleted via RNAi. Using this approach, we identified and validated 10 kinases and 4 phosphatases that are essential for cell survival under caffeine-induced stress both in cell culture and living flies. Remarkably, our screen yielded an enrichment of Hippo pathway components, indicating that this pathway regulates cellular stress responses. Indeed, we show that the Hippo pathway acts as a potent repressor of stress-induced cell death. Further, we demonstrate that Hippo activation is necessary to inhibit a pro-apoptotic program triggered by the interaction of the transcriptional co-activator Yki with the transcription factor p53 in response to a range of stress stimuli. Our in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function data therefore implicate Hippo signaling in the transduction of cellular survival signals in response to chemical stress. PMID:26021298

  10. Systematic review of FDG-PET prediction of complete pathological response and survival in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sameer; Lynch, A Craig; Akhurst, Timothy; Ngan, Samuel Y; Warrier, Satish K; Michael, Michael; Heriot, Alexander G

    2014-10-01

    Advances in the management of rectal cancer have resulted in an increased application of multimodal therapy with the aim of tailoring therapy to individual patients. Complete pathological response (pCR) is associated with improved survival and may be potentially managed without radical surgical resection. Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the ability of functional imaging to predict complete response to treatment. The aim of this review was to assess the role of (18)F-flurordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in prediction of pCR and prognosis in resectable locally advanced rectal cancer. A search of the MEDLINE and Embase databases was conducted, and a systematic review of the literature investigating positron emission tomography (PET) in the prediction of pCR and survival in rectal cancer was performed. Seventeen series assessing PET prediction of pCR were included in the review. Seven series assessed postchemoradiation SUVmax, which was significantly different between response groups in all six studies that assessed this. Nine series assessed the response index (RI) for SUVmax, which was significantly different between response groups in seven series. Thirteen studies investigated PET response for prediction of survival. Metabolic complete response assessed by SUV2max or visual response and RISUVmax showed strong associations with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). SUV2max and RISUVmax appear to be useful FDG-PET markers for prediction of pCR and these parameters also show strong associations with DFS and OS. FDG-PET may have a role in outcome prediction in patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  11. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.

  12. UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts by increasing intracellular levels of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Ae Jeong; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Bae, Sun Sik; Yun, Jeanho

    2009-06-05

    Akt/PKB plays a pivotal role in cell survival and proliferation. Previously, we reported that UV-irradiation induces extensive cell death in Akt2{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) while Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs show cell cycle arrest. Here, we find that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs exhibit phenotypic changes characteristics of senescence upon UV-irradiation. An enlarged and flattened morphology, a reduced cell proliferation and an increased senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA {beta}-gal) staining indicate that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs undergo premature senescence after UV-irradiation. Restoring Akt1 expression in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs suppressed SA {beta}-gal activity, indicating that UV-induced senescence is due to the absence of Akt1 function. Notably, levels of ROS were rapidly increased upon UV-irradiation and the ROS scavenger NAC inhibits UV-induced senescence of Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs, suggesting that UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs by modulating intracellular levels of ROS. In conjunction with our previous work, this indicates that different isoforms of Akt have distinct function in response to UV-irradiation.

  13. Phytochromes A and B Mediate Red-Light-Induced Positive Phototropism in Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30° to 40°, compared with 5° to 10° without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants. PMID:12644690

  14. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  15. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  16. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  17. Visible Light-Induced Plasticity of Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaobo; Fan, Fuqiang; Sun, Chenxing; Yu, Ying; Xu, Huaping

    2017-09-27

    Plasticity of thermoset polymers has been realized by introducing exchangeable bonds, and the plasticity is mostly triggered via heat or UV light. Visible light is a relatively mild trigger that has not been used to induce plasticity in polymer materials. Herein, thermoset polyurethanes (PUs) containing diselenide bonds are fabricated that possess visible light-induced plasticity along with shape memory behavior. A series of PUs with different diselenide bond contents were tested and their shape memory properties and plasticity varied. With a higher diselenide bond content, both shape memory and light-induced plasticity are achieved. By combining these two properties, reshaping the permanent shapes of the PUs is easier. Compared with heat or UV light, visible light has the advantage of spatial control. For instance, a pattern of visible light was introduced by a commercial projector to demonstrate facile reshaping of the materials. Because visible light can be introduced via various methods, PUs with visible light-induced plasticity have great potential applications.

  18. The nss mutation or lanthanum inhibits light-induced Ca2+ influx into fly photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ion-selective calcium microelectrodes were inserted into the compound eyes of the wild-type sheep blowfly Lucilia or into the retina of the no steady state (nss) mutant of Lucilia. These electrodes monitored light-induced changes in the extracellular concentration of calcium (delta[Ca2+]o) together with the extracellularly recorded receptor potential. Prolonged dim lights induced a steady reduction in [Ca2+]o during light in the retina of normal Lucilia, while relatively little change in [Ca2+]o was observed in the retina of the nss mutant. Prolonged intense light induced a multiphasic change in [Ca2+]o: the [Ca2+]o signal became transient, reaching a minimum within 6 s after light onset, and then rose to a nearly steady-state phase below the dark concentration. When lights were turned off, a rapid increase in [Ca2+]o was observed, reaching a peak above the dark level and then declining again to the dark level within 1 min. In analogy to similar studies conduced in the honeybee drone, we suggest that the reduction in [Ca2+]o reflects light-induced Ca2+ influx into the photoreceptors, while the subsequent increase in [Ca2+]o reflects the activation of the Na-Ca exchange which extrudes Ca2+ from the cells. In the nss mutant in response to intense prolonged light, the receptor potential declines to baseline during light while the Ca2+ signal is almost abolished, revealing only a short transient reduction in [Ca2+]o. Application of lanthanum (La3+), but not nickel (Ni2+), into the retinal extracellular space of normal Lucilia mimicked the effect of the nss mutation on the receptor potential, while complete elimination of the Ca2+ signal in a reversible manner was observed. The results suggest that La3+ and the nss mutation inhibit light-induced Ca2+ influex into the photoreceptor in a manner similar to the action of the trp mutation in Drosophila, which has been shown to block specifically a light-activated Ca2+ channel necessary to maintain light excitation. PMID

  19. Complete responses and long-term survivals after systemic chemotherapy for patients with advanced malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmann, D L; Creagan, E T; Hahn, R G; Edmonson, J H; Bisel, H F; Schaid, D J

    1989-01-15

    Five hundred three patients with advanced malignant melanoma were exposed to a number of clinical investigative chemotherapeutic regimens between 1971 and 1984 in an effort to assess the clinical activity of these regimens in this disease. Of the 503 patients participating in the studies, ten patients experienced a complete response. However, only three of these patients survived more than 5 years. Of this group of 503 patients, seven additional patients who did not experience a complete response survived more than five years. Of the ten patients surviving more than 5 years, two had immediate progression after institution of investigative regimens, whereas five remained stable for brief periods of time before progressive metastatic disease. Three patients experienced a complete response. It appeared that systemic therapeutic interventions in these trials were conspicuously ineffective for this large group of patients. A few long-term survivors attest to the capricious nature of this neoplasm and its association with likely spontaneous regressions. Although these long-term survivors did survive after institution of systemic chemotherapy, it is likely that this survival was related temporally, but perhaps not causally, to the institution of treatment.

  20. Survival and stress responses of E. coli exposed to alkaline cleaners

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of alkaline cleaners commonly used in food processing environments on survival and stress responses of the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. Alkaline cleaners containing either sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide and hypochlorite had gre...

  1. Light-Induced Resistance Effect Observed in Nano Au Films Covered Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Meizhen; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Hui; Jin, Kui-juan; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2015-09-09

    Tailoring resistance response using periodic nanostructures is one of the key issues in the current research. Two-dimensional colloidal crystals (CCs) structure is one of popular periodic nanospheres' structures and most of reports are focused on anomalous transmission of light or biomedical applications. In this work, a light-induced resistance effect is observed on silicon-based Au films covered CCs, featuring a remarkable resistance change as much as 56% and resistance switching characteristic. The diffusion and recombination of photocarriers is the crucial factor for this effect. This finding will expand photoelectricity functionality and be useful for future development of CC-based photoelectric devices.

  2. Light-induced generation of electric potential difference in membranes of purple and green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krasinskaya, N P; Samuilov, V D

    1977-06-01

    When associated with a planar phospholipid membrane, chromatophores isolated from photosynthetic sulfur bacteria Chromatium minutissimum, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii, and Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum were shown to generate a light-induced transmembrane electric potential difference measured by a direct method using macroelectrodes and a voltmeter. The maximal photoelectric responses were observed upon the addition of 1,4-naphthoquinone in combination with phenazine methosulfate (or TMPD) and ascorbate. The photoeffects were inhibited by CCCP and gramicidin. The data demonstrate that similar mechanisms of photoelectric generation function in membranes of the different bacteria studied.

  3. Influence of saliva-coating on the ultraviolet-light-induced photocatalytic bactericidal effects on modified titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Park, So-Yoon; Chang, Young-Il; Lim, Young-Jun; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ultraviolet-light-induced photocatalytic bactericidal effects of titanium surfaces on Streptococcus sanguinis in the presence of saliva-coating. Three different titanium disks were prepared: machined (MA), heat-treated (HT), and anodized surfaces (AO). Each disk was incubated with whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline for 2 h. Antibacterial tests were performed by incubating a S. sanguinis suspension with each disk for 90 or 180 min under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. The viable counts of bacteria were enumerated from the cell suspension and the UV-light-induced photocatalytic bactericidal effects were determined by the bacterial survival rate. Without saliva-coating, AO disks exhibited significantly decreased bacterial survival rates compared to MA disks. The bacterial survival rates of the HT disks were intermediate between MA and AO in the absence of saliva-coating. However, saliva-coating significantly increased bacterial survival rates in all surface types. There was no significant difference in bacterial survival rates among the three surface types after saliva-coating. This study suggests that Ti-based antibacterial implant materials using TiO2 photocatalyst may have a limitation for intraoral use.

  4. Complete Pathologic Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer Is Associated With Enhanced Survival

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, James M.; Nichols, Francis C.; Li, Zhuo; Schomas, David A.; Allen, Mark S.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Jatoi, Aminah; Miller, Robert C.; Wigle, Dennis A.; Shen, K. Robert; Deschamps, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagogastrectomy has become the standard of care for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. This report analyzes our experience with this treatment approach. Methods From January 1998 through December 2003, all patients from a single institution receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagogastrectomy were reviewed for operative mortality, morbidity, long-term survival, and factors affecting survival. Only patients preoperatively staged with both computed tomographic scans and endoscopic ultrasound were included. Results There were 162 patients (142 men, 20 women), and the median age was 61 years (range, 22 to 81 years). Histopathology was adenocarcinoma in 143 patients and squamous cell in 19. Pretreatment clinical stage was II in 28 patients (17%), III in 111 (68%), and IV (M1a) in 23 (14%). Ivor Lewis esophagogastrectomy was the most common procedure, occurring in 132 patients. Operative mortality and morbidity was 4.9% and 37%, respectively. Pathologic response was complete in 42 patients (26%), near complete in 27 (17%), partial in 88 (54%), and unresectable in 5 (3%). Five-year survival for overall, complete, near complete, and partial response patients was 34%, 55%, 27%, and 27%, respectively (p = 0.013). Patients whose lymph nodes were rendered free of cancer showed improved overall and disease-free survival compared with patients having persistently positive lymph nodes (p = 0.019). Conclusion Esophagogastrectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy can be performed with low mortality and morbidity. Patients with complete pathologic response have significantly improved long-term survival compared with patients with near complete and partial responses. Future efforts should be directed at understanding determinants of complete responses. PMID:19161745

  5. Response as a predictor of survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael; Cloughesy, Timothy; Samant, Meghna; Fang, Liang; Wen, Patrick Y.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schiff, David; Abrey, Lauren E.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Paleologos, Nina; Nicholas, Martin K.; Jensen, Randy; Vredenburgh, James; Das, Asha; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and reliable, timely evaluation of their benefit are needed. Understanding the relationship between objective response (OR) and survival is important for determining whether OR can provide an early signal of treatment activity in clinical trials. We performed a landmark analysis to evaluate the association between OR and survival at 9, 18, and 26 weeks for 167 patients with recurrent GBM who participated in BRAIN, a phase II trial that evaluated efficacy of bevacizumab alone or in combination with irinotecan, using the Cox regression models adjusted for age, baseline Karnofsky performance score, first vs second relapse, and treatment arm. Hazard ratios (HRs) and P-values for survival between responders and nonresponders were calculated. Additional analyses were performed to test robustness, validity, fit, and accuracy of the models. The relationships between progression-free survival (PFS) and survival and between OR and PFS were also explored. There were 55 responders and 112 nonresponders across the 2 treatment arms in BRAIN. OR status at 9, 18, and 26 weeks was a statistically significant predictor of survival (HR ≤ 0.52, P < .01). PFS was also a statistically significant predictor of survival at each landmark (HR ≤ 0.25, P < .0001). The association between OR and PFS was not statistically significant, likely due to inadequate statistical power for the analysis. Clarifying the relationship of OR and survival is important for determining whether OR can be a reliable predictor of the benefit of a therapeutic agent in patients with recurrent GBM. PMID:21084434

  6. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS) data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS) through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (<250/km2) and very high-density (≥10,000/km2) areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR), 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.44 - 1.87; p < 0.001) and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rate (OR, 1.47; 95%CI, 1.22 - 1.77; p < 0.001) compared with those in very low-density areas. Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas. PMID:21489299

  7. Predator functional response and prey survival: direct and indirect interactions affecting a marked prey population.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A; Grand, James B; Fondell, Thomas F; Anthony, Michael

    2006-01-01

    1. Predation plays an integral role in many community interactions, with the number of predators and the rate at which they consume prey (i.e. their functional response) determining interaction strengths. Owing to the difficulty of directly observing predation events, attempts to determine the functional response of predators in natural systems are limited. Determining the forms that predator functional responses take in complex systems is important in advancing understanding of community interactions. 2. Prey survival has a direct relationship to the functional response of their predators. We employed this relationship to estimate the functional response for bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocepalus predation of Canada goose Branta canadensis nests. We compared models that incorporated eagle abundance, nest abundance and alternative prey presence to determine the form of the functional response that best predicted intra-annual variation in survival of goose nests. 3. Eagle abundance, nest abundance and the availability of alternative prey were all related to predation rates of goose nests by eagles. There was a sigmoidal relationship between predation rate and prey abundance and prey switching occurred when alternative prey was present. In addition, predation by individual eagles increased as eagle abundance increased. 4. A complex set of interactions among the three species examined in this study determined survival rates of goose nests. Results show that eagle predation had both prey- and predator-dependent components with no support for ratio dependence. In addition, indirect interactions resulting from the availability of alternative prey had an important role in mediating the rate at which eagles depredated nests. As a result, much of the within-season variation in nest survival was due to changing availability of alternative prey consumed by eagles. 5. Empirical relationships drawn from ecological theory can be directly integrated into the estimation process to

  8. Predator functional response and prey survival: Direct and indirect interactions affecting a marked prey population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Grand, J.B.; Fondell, T.F.; Anthony, M.

    2006-01-01

    1. Predation plays an integral role in many community interactions, with the number of predators and the rate at which they consume prey (i.e. their functional response) determining interaction strengths. Owing to the difficulty of directly observing predation events, attempts to determine the functional response of predators in natural systems are limited. Determining the forms that predator functional responses take in complex systems is important in advancing understanding of community interactions. 2. Prey survival has a direct relationship to the functional response of their predators. We employed this relationship to estimate the functional response for bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocepalus predation of Canada goose Branta canadensis nests. We compared models that incorporated eagle abundance, nest abundance and alternative prey presence to determine the form of the functional response that best predicted intra-annual variation in survival of goose nests. 3. Eagle abundance, nest abundance and the availability of alternative prey were all related to predation rates of goose nests by eagles. There was a sigmoidal relationship between predation rate and prey abundance and prey switching occurred when alternative prey was present. In addition, predation by individual eagles increased as eagle abundance increased. 4. A complex set of interactions among the three species examined in this study determined survival rates of goose nests. Results show that eagle predation had both prey- and predator-dependent components with no support for ratio dependence. In addition, indirect interactions resulting from the availability of alternative prey had an important role in mediating the rate at which eagles depredated nests. As a result, much of the within-season variation in nest survival was due to changing availability of alternative prey consumed by eagles. 5. Empirical relationships drawn from ecological theory can be directly integrated into the estimation process to

  9. Retinal ganglion cell axonal compression by retinal vessels in light-induced retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Alarcón-Martínez, Luis; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the damage produced by light in mydriatic and miotic albino retinas under two different sources of light. Methods Albino Sprague Dawley female rats were exposed to 3,000 lx during 48 h under two different light sources: linear and circular bulbs. Before exposure, their left pupils were dilated. Before and at different times after light exposure (ALE), electroretinographic signals were recorded. One week before processing, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were traced by applying fluorogold on the superior colliculi. Just before processing, some animals were intravenously injected with horseradish peroxidase to analyze retinal vascular leakage. At different times ALE, animals were sacrificed and their retinas dissected as whole mounts or cross-sections. Cross-sections were used to study the retinal degeneration and to detect apoptotic nuclei by the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Whole mounts were used to analyze vascular leakage; investigate the nerve fiber layer, identified by immunodetection of neurofilaments; and quantify the whole population of RGCs identified by fluorogold tracing and Brn3a immunodetection. With the quantitative data, detailed isodensity maps were generated to study the spatial loss of RGCs. Results Phototoxicity causes an immediate and permanent abolishment of the electroretinographic response. Early ALE, photoreceptors degenerate by apoptosis and this death is more severe in mydriatic conditions and under circular bulbs. Photoreceptor loss starts in an arciform dorsomedial retinal area, but at 3 months ALE has spread to the whole retina and there are no differences related to either pupil dilation or light source. Three months ALE, RGC axons show distorted trajectories and abnormal expression of neurofilaments. Six months or more ALE, there is significant death of RGCs caused by axonal strangulation by displaced inner retinal vessels. Topography of the surviving RGCs shows that their loss is not uniform

  10. Transcriptomic analyses reveal species-specific light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Tang, Xingjiao; Huang, He; Zhang, Yuan; Dai, Silan

    2015-03-17

    The flower colour of agricultural products is very important for their commercial value, which is mainly attributed to the accumulation of anthocyanins. Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect the anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the deep molecular mechanism remains elusive, and many problems regarding the phenotypic change and the corresponding gene regulation are still unclear. In the present study, Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan', a light-responding pigmentation cultivar, was selected to investigate the mechanism of light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis using transcriptomic analyses. Only cyanidin derivatives were identified based on the analyses of the pigmentation in ray florets. Shading experiments revealed that the capitulum was the key organ and that its bud stage was the key phase responding to light. These results were used to design five libraries for transcriptomic analyses, including three capitulum developmental stages and two light conditions. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 103,517 unigenes, of which 60,712 were annotated against four public protein databases. As many as 2,135 unigenes were differentially expressed between the light and dark libraries with 923 up-regulated and 1,212 down-regulated unigenes in response to shading. Next, interactive pathway analysis showed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway was the only complete metabolic pathway both modulated in response to light and related to capitulum development. Following the shading treatment, nearly all structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were down-regulated. Moreover, three CmMYB genes and one CmbHLH gene were identified as key transcription factors that might participate in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions based on clustering analysis and validation by RT-qPCR. Finally, a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in chrysanthemums was inferred. The pigmentation of the ray

  11. Blue Light-Induced Phosphorylation of a Plasma Membrane-Associated Protein in Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J. M.; Short, T. W.; Gallagher, S.; Briggs, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Blue light induces a variety of photomorphogenic responses in higher plants, among them phototropic curvature, the bending of seedlings toward a unidirectional light source. In dark-grown coleoptiles of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings, blue light induces rapid phosphorylation of a 114-kD protein at fluence levels that are sufficient to stimulate phototropic curvature. Phosphorylation in response to blue light can be detected in vivo in coleoptile tips preincubated in 32Pi or in vitro in isolated membranes supplemented with [[gamma]-32P]ATP. Phosphorylation reaches a maximum level in vitro within 2 min following an inductive light pulse, but substantial labeling occurs within the first 15 s. Isolated membranes remain activated for several minutes following an in vitro blue light stimulus, even in the absence of exogenous ATP. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the 114-kD protein detected phosphoserine and a trace of phosphothreonine. The kinase involved in phosphorylating the protein in vitro is not dependent on calcium. The 114-kD protein itself has an apparent binding site for ATP, detected by incubating with the nonhydrolyzable analog, 5[prime]-p-fluorosulfonyl-benzoyladenosine. This result suggests that the 114-kD protein, which becomes phosphorylated in response to blue light, may also be capable of kinase activity. PMID:12231896

  12. A priori Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response and Survival in Breast Cancer Patients using Quantitative Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Kim, Christina; Ghandi, Sonal; Trudeau, Maureen; Pritchard, Kathleen; Tran, William T.; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can probe tissue structure and analyze tumour characteristics. Using a 6-MHz ultrasound system, radiofrequency data were acquired from 56 locally advanced breast cancer patients prior to their neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and QUS texture features were computed from regions of interest in tumour cores and their margins as potential predictive and prognostic indicators. Breast tumour molecular features were also collected and used for analysis. A multiparametric QUS model was constructed, which demonstrated a response prediction accuracy of 88% and ability to predict patient 5-year survival rates (p = 0.01). QUS features demonstrated superior performance in comparison to molecular markers and the combination of QUS and molecular markers did not improve response prediction. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that non-invasive QUS features in the core and margin of breast tumours can indicate breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and predict five-year recurrence-free survival.

  13. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  14. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  15. Light-induced superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses allow for optical control of superconductivity on picosecond timescales. Intriguing experiments at mid-IR and THz frequencies using tailored excitation pulses tuned resonantly to specific phonon modes have been shown to induce transient superconducting states even far above the equilibrium transition temperature (T c). So far, experiments with light-induced superconductivity can be roughly divided into two classes: on the one hand the light pulses trigger the interplay of competing order parameters in favor of superconductivity, while in the second class of experiments a transient superconducting coherence is induced and dynamically stabilized.

  16. Effect of hyperfine splitting on light-induced drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    1986-09-01

    The influence of the hyperfine structure (hfs) of the levels upon the light-induced drift (LID) effect is investigated. It is shown that hfs considerably affects the dependence of the LID velocity upon the radiation frequency. It is concluded that for decreasing separation between the hfs components the LID effect can both increase and decrease depending upon the relationship of the system parameters (collision frequencies in different levels, the pressure of a buffer gas, etc.). A considerable decrease of the effect however is highly unlikely. It is shown that a change in the buffer gas pressure can lead to reversal of the LID velocity direction.

  17. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, J. Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-04-21

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  18. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, J.; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  19. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  20. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1995-07-04

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC. The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 18 figs.

  1. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, David C.; Elliott, Diane G.; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Linda K.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-γ, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  2. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H.; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J.; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C. Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann–Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Results A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115–4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222–3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. Conclusions The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. PMID:27930716

  3. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vincent; Chung, Liping; Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115-4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222-3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival.

  4. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Lewis, David H; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J; Jameson, Paula E; Davies, Kevin M

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols, as well as the activation of the early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes required for flavonol and anthocyanin production. Pigmentation in Lc petunia only occurred under conditions which normally induce a modest amount of anthocyanin to accumulate in wild-type Mitchell petunia [Petunia axillaris x (Petunia axillaris x Petunia hybrida cv. 'Rose of Heaven')]. Anthocyanin pigmentation in Lc petunia leaves appears to screen underlying photosynthetic tissues, increasing light saturation and light compensation points, without reducing the maximal photosynthetic assimilation rate (A(max)). In the Lc petunia system, where the bHLH factor Leaf colour is constitutively expressed, expression of the bHLH (Lc) and WD40 (An11) components of the anthocyanin regulatory system were not limited, suggesting that the high-light-induced anthocyanin pigmentation is regulated by endogenous MYB transcription factors.

  5. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-03-15

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA.

  6. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J.; Jameson, Paula E.; Davies, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols, as well as the activation of the early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes required for flavonol and anthocyanin production. Pigmentation in Lc petunia only occurred under conditions which normally induce a modest amount of anthocyanin to accumulate in wild-type Mitchell petunia [Petunia axillaris×(Petunia axillaris×Petunia hybrida cv. ‘Rose of Heaven’)]. Anthocyanin pigmentation in Lc petunia leaves appears to screen underlying photosynthetic tissues, increasing light saturation and light compensation points, without reducing the maximal photosynthetic assimilation rate (Amax). In the Lc petunia system, where the bHLH factor Leaf colour is constitutively expressed, expression of the bHLH (Lc) and WD40 (An11) components of the anthocyanin regulatory system were not limited, suggesting that the high-light-induced anthocyanin pigmentation is regulated by endogenous MYB transcription factors. PMID:19380423

  7. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  8. IDH mutations predict longer survival and response to temozolomide in secondary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    SongTao, Qi; Lei, Yu; Si, Gui; YanQing, Ding; HuiXia, Han; XueLin, Zhang; LanXiao, Wu; Fei, Yao

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutations occur frequently in secondary glioblastoma. This study aimed to investigate their impact on temozolomide chemosensitivity and relationship with O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in secondary glioblastoma. Searches for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, 1p19q codeletion, MGMT promoter methylation, and p53 expression were carried out in a series of 86 secondary glioblastomas and correlated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Response to temozolomide was evaluated by progression-free survival, as well as by tumor size on successive MRI scans, then correlated with molecular alterations. IDH (IDH1 or IDH2) mutations were found in 58/79 patients (73.4%). IDH mutation, MGMT promoter methylation, and 1p19q codeletion were associated with prolonged progression-free survival in univariate (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.003, respectively) and multivariate analysis (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.035, respectively). IDH mutation (P = 0.001) and MGMT promoter methylation (P = 0.011) were correlated with a higher rate of objective response to temozolomide. Further analysis of response to temozolomide showed that patients with both IDH mutation and MGMT promoter methylation had the best response rate to temozolomide. IDH mutation appears to be a significant marker of positive chemosensitivity in secondary glioblastoma. Use of IDH status combined with MGMT promoter status as a stratification factor seems appropriate in future clinical trials involving temozolomide for the treatment of patients with secondary glioblastoma.

  9. JAK/STAT signalling mediates cell survival in response to tissue stress.

    PubMed

    La Fortezza, Marco; Schenk, Madlin; Cosolo, Andrea; Kolybaba, Addie; Grass, Isabelle; Classen, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-08-15

    Tissue homeostasis relies on the ability of tissues to respond to stress. Tissue regeneration and tumour models in Drosophila have shown that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) acts as a prominent stress-response pathway promoting injury-induced apoptosis and compensatory proliferation. A central question remaining unanswered is how both responses are balanced by activation of a single pathway. Signalling through the Janus kinase/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, which is a potential JNK target, is implicated in promoting compensatory proliferation. While we observe JAK/STAT activation in imaginal discs upon damage, our data demonstrate that JAK/STAT and its downstream effector Zfh2 promote the survival of JNK signalling cells. The JNK component fos and the pro-apoptotic gene hid are regulated in a JAK/STAT-dependent manner. This molecular pathway restrains JNK-induced apoptosis and spatial propagation of JNK signalling, thereby limiting the extent of tissue damage, as well as facilitating systemic and proliferative responses to injury. We find that the pro-survival function of JAK/STAT also drives tumour growth under conditions of chronic stress. Our study defines the function of JAK/STAT in tissue stress and illustrates how crosstalk between conserved signalling pathways establishes an intricate equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis and survival to restore tissue homeostasis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Interspecies variation in survival and growth of filamentous heterotrophic bacteria in response to UVC radiation.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Manuela; Ortelli, Claudio; Svercel, Miroslav; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-06-02

    Ultraviolet radiation is an important environmental constraint on the evolution of life. In addition to its harmful effects, ultraviolet radiation plays an important role in generating genetic polymorphisms and acting as a selective agent. Understanding how prokaryotes cope with high radiation can give insights on the evolution of life on Earth. Four representative filamentous bacteria from the family Cytophagaceae with different pigmentation were selected and exposed to different doses of UVC radiation (15-32,400Jm(-2)). The effect of UVC radiation on bacterial survival, growth and morphology were investigated. Results showed high survival in response to UVC for Rudanella lutea and Fibrisoma limi, whereas low survival was observed for Fibrella aestuarina and Spirosoma linguale. S. linguale showed slow growth recovery after ultraviolet exposure, R. lutea and F. limi showed intermediate growth recovery, while F. aestuarina had the fastest recovery among the four tested bacteria. In terms of survival, S. linguale was the most sensitive bacterium whereas R. lutea and F. limi were better at coping with UVC stress. The latter two resumed growth even after 2h exposure (∼10,800Jm(-2)). Additionally, the ability to form multicellular filaments after exposure was tested using two bacteria: one representative of the high (R. lutea) and one of the low (F. aestuarina) survival rates. The ability to elongate filaments due to cell division was preserved but modified. In R. lutea 10min exposure reduced the average filament length. The opposite was observed in F. aestuarina, where the 5 and 10min exposures increased the average filament length. R. lutea and F. limi are potential candidates for further research into survival and resistance to ultraviolet radiation stress. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hidden survival heterogeneity of three Common eider populations in response to climate fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Guéry, Loreleï; Descamps, Sébastien; Pradel, Roger; Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Gilchrist, H Grant; Bêty, Joël

    2017-01-26

    Understanding how individuals and populations respond to fluctuations in climatic conditions is critical to explain and anticipate changes in ecological systems. Most such studies focus on climate impacts on single populations without considering inter- and intra-population heterogeneity. However, comparing geographically dispersed populations limits the risk of faulty generalizations and helps to improve ecological and demographic models. We aimed to determine whether differences in migration tactics among and within populations would induce inter- or intra-population heterogeneity in survival in relation to winter climate fluctuations. Our study species was the Common eider (Somateria mollissima), a marine duck with a circumpolar distribution, which is strongly affected by climatic conditions during several phases of its annual cycle. Capture-mark-recapture data were collected in two arctic (northern Canada and Svalbard) and one subarctic (northern Norway) population over a period of 18, 15, and 29 years respectively. These three populations have different migration tactics and experience different winter climatic conditions. Using multi-event and mixture modelling, we assessed the association between adult female eider survival and winter conditions as measured by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. We found that winter weather conditions affected the survival of female eiders from each of these three populations. However, different mechanisms seemed to be involved. Survival of the two migrating arctic populations was impacted directly by changes in the NAO, whereas the subarctic resident population was affected by the NAO with time lags of 2-3 years. Moreover, we found evidence for intra-population heterogeneity in the survival response to the winter NAO in the Canadian eider population, where individuals migrate to distinct wintering areas. Our results illustrate how individuals and populations of the same species can vary in their responses to

  12. Response to combined modality therapy correlates with survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Wook; Shyr, Yu; Chen, Heidi; Akerley, Wallace; Johnson, David H.; Choy, Hak . E-mail: Hak.Choy@utsouthwestern.edu

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Although concurrent chemoradiotherapy can now achieve demonstrated long-term survival in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC), it is difficult to predict which patients will benefit most from this therapeutic approach. Studies have suggested that local control, and the response to therapy, may be linked to improved survival; however, detailed analysis of the impact of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy on survival has not been thoroughly reported. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of the response rate on survival for patients who were treated with combined modality therapy for LANSCLC. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the data from 116 patients enrolled between 1994 and 1997 in three trials investigating paclitaxel-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy for LANSCLC. Tumor size measurements were assessed immediately before and 2 months after completion of combined modality therapy to determine the response and to calculate the percentage of decrease in tumor size. Results: Patients with a response (complete or partial) had an improved 4-year overall survival rate compared with patients with no response (stable or progressive disease; 21.1% vs. 3.3%, p <0.0001) in the 109 assessable patients. Progression-free survival also improved significantly with response. An analysis of the percentage of decrease in tumor size vs. survival was performed (n = 74) using Cox proportion model analysis. After combined modality therapy, a 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% decrease in tumor size conferred a 39%, 63%, 78%, 86%, and 92% reduction in risk of death compared with a 0% decrease in tumor size (p <0.0001). Conclusion: The response by conventional response criteria correlated strongly with improved overall survival and progression-free survival and an increasing percentage of decrease in tumor size resulted in a reduction in the risk of death. Additional investigation of the degree of response as a factor predictive of improved

  13. Clinical Characteristics, Response to Therapy, and Survival of African American Patients Diagnosed With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Keating, Michael J.; Wang, Xuemei; Coombs, Catherine C.; Lanasa, Mark C.; Strom, Sara; Wierda, William G.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding racial disparities in characteristics and outcomes among patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods The characteristics and outcomes of untreated African American (AA) patients with CLL (n=84) were analyzed and compared with a reference nonblack (NB) patient population (n=1571). Results At the time of presentation, AA patients had lower median hemoglobin levels (12.9 g/dL vs 13.7 g/dL), higher β2 microglobulin levels (2.7 mg/dL vs 2.4 mg/dL), greater frequency of constitutional symptoms (27% vs 10%), unmutated immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (IGHV) mutation status (65% vs 47%), ζ-chain-associated protein kinase 70 (ZAP70) expression (58% vs 32%), and deletion of chromosome 17p or chromosome 11q (28% vs 17%; P ≤ 02 for each comparison). Fifty-one percent of AA patients and 39% of NB patients required first-line therapy and 91% and 88%, respectively, received chemoimmunotherapy. Overall response rates to treatment were 85% for AA patients and 94% for NB patients (P=.06); and the complete response rates were 56% and 58%, respectively (P=.87). The median survival of AA patients was shorter compared with that of NB patients (event-free survival: 36 months vs 61 months; P=.007; overall survival: 152 months vs not reached; P=.0001). AA race was an independent predictor of shorter event-free and overall survival in multivariable regression models. Conclusions The current results indicated that AA patients with CLL have more unfavorable prognostic characteristics and shorter survival compared with their NB counterparts. PMID:24022787

  14. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Responses by Parasites: A Common Strategy to Survive

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, César A.; Terrazas, Luis I.; Gómez-García, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic infections are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in our planet and the immune responses triggered by these organisms are critical to determine their outcome. Dendritic cells are key elements for the development of immunity against parasites; they control the responses required to eliminate these pathogens while maintaining host homeostasis. However, there is evidence showing that parasites can influence and regulate dendritic cell function in order to promote a more permissive environment for their survival. In this review we will focus on the strategies protozoan and helminth parasites have developed to interfere with dendritic cell activities as well as in the possible mechanisms involved. PMID:20204070

  15. MYB75 Phosphorylation by MPK4 Is Required for Light-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengnan; Wang, Wenyi; Gao, Jinlan; Yin, Kangquan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chengcheng; Mundy, John

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental cue affecting various physiological and metabolic processes in plants. Although plant photoreceptors are well characterized, the mechanisms by which light regulates downstream responses are less clear. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the accumulation of photoprotective anthocyanin pigments is light dependent, and the R2R3 MYB transcription factor MYB75/PAP1 regulates anthocyanin accumulation. Here, we report that MYB75 interacts with and is phosphorylated by MAP KINASE4 (MPK4). Their interaction is dependent on MPK4 kinase activity and is required for full function of MYB75. MPK4 can be activated in response to light and is involved in the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanins. We show that MPK4 phosphorylation of MYB75 increases its stability and is essential for light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Our findings reveal an important role for a MAPK pathway in light signal transduction. PMID:27811015

  16. Light-induced metastable defects or light-induced metastable H atoms in a-Si:H films?

    SciTech Connect

    Godet, C.

    1997-07-01

    In hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films, the increase of the metastable defect density under high-intensity illumination is usually described by an empirical two-parameter stretched-exponential time dependence (characteristic time {tau}{sub SE} and dispersion parameter {beta}). In this study, a clearly different (one-parameter) analytic function is obtained from a microscopic model based on the formation of metastable H (MSH) atoms in a-Si:H films. Assuming that MSH atoms are the only mobile species, only three chemical reactions are significant: MSH are produced from doubly hydrogenated (SiH HSi) configurations and trapped either at broken bonds or Si-H bonds, corresponding respectively to light-induced annealing (LIA) and light-induced creation (LIC) of defects. Competition between trapping sites results in a saturation of N(t) at a steady-state value N{sub ss}. A one-parameter fit of this analytical function to experimental data is generally good, indicating that the use of a statistical distribution of trap energies is not necessary.

  17. Postchemoradiotherapy Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jayachandran, Priya; Pai, Reetesh K.; Quon, Andrew; Graves, Edward; Krakow, Trevor E.; La, Trang; Loo, Billy W.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To correlate the prechemoradiotherapy (CRT) and post-CRT metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with the pathologic response and survival in patients receiving preoperative CRT for esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 37 patients with histologically confirmed Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer treated with CRT with or without surgical resection were reviewed. Of the 37 patients, 21 received preoperative CRT (57%) and 16 received definitive CRT (43%). All patients had a pre-CRT and 32 had a post-CRT PET scan. The MTV was measured on the pre-CRT PET and post-CRT PET scan, respectively, using a minimum standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold x, where x = 2, 2.5, 3, or the SUV maximum Multiplication-Sign 50%. The total glycolytic activity (TGA{sub x}) was defined as the mean SUV Multiplication-Sign MTV{sub x}. The MTV ratio was defined as the pre-CRT PET MTV/post-CRT MTV. The SUV ratio was defined similarly. A single pathologist scored the pathologic response using a tumor regression grade (TRG) scale. Results: The median follow-up was 1.5 years (range, 0.4-4.9). No significant correlation was found between any parameters on the pre-CRT PET scan and the TRG or overall survival (OS). Multiple post-CRT MTV values and post-TGA values correlated with the TRG and OS; however, the MTV{sub 2.5Post} and TGA{sub 2.5Post} had the greatest correlation. The MTV{sub 2} ratio correlated with OS. The maximum SUV on either the pre-CRT and post-CRT PET scans or the maximum SUV ratio did not correlate with the TRG or OS. Patients treated preoperatively had survival similar compared with those treated definitively with a good PET response (p = 0.97) and significantly better than that of patients treated definitively with a poor PET response (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The maximum SUV was not a predictive or prognostic parameter. The MTV{sub 2.5} and TGA{sub 2.5} were useful markers for predicting the response and

  18. Survival interval in earthquake entrapments: research findings reinforced during the 2010 Haiti earthquake response.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Anthony G; Barbera, Joseph A; Petinaux, Bruno P

    2011-03-01

    Earthquakes can result in collapsed structures with the potential to entrap individuals. In some cases, people can survive entrapment for lengthy periods. The search for and rescue of entrapped people is resource intensive and competes with other postdisaster priorities. The decision to end search and rescue activities is often difficult and in some cases protracted. Medical providers participating in response may be consulted about the probability of continued survival in undiscovered trapped individuals. Historically, many espouse a rigid time frame for viability of entrapped living people (eg, 2 days, 4 days, 14 days). The available medical and engineering data and media reports demonstrate a wide variety in survival "time to rescue," arguing against the acceptance of a single time interval applicable to all incidents. This article presents historical evidence and reports from the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Factors that may contribute to survival after entombment are listed. Finally, a decision process for projecting viability that considers the critical factors in each incident rather than adhering to a single time frame for ceasing search and rescue activities is proposed.

  19. Light-induced size changes in BiFeO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundys, B.; Viret, M.; Colson, D.; Kundys, D. O.

    2010-10-01

    Multifunctional oxides are promising materials because of their fundamental physical properties as well as their potential in applications. Among these materials, multiferroics exhibiting ferroelectricity and magnetism are good candidates for spin electronic applications using the magnetoelectric effect, which couples magnetism and ferroelecticity. Furthermore, because ferroelectrics are insulators with a reasonable bandgap, photons can efficiently interact with electrons leading to photoconduction or photovoltaic effects. However, until now, coupling of light with mechanical degrees of freedom has been elusive, although ferroelasticity is a well-known property of these materials. Here, we report on the observation, for the first time, of a substantial visible-light-induced change in the dimensions of BiFeO3 crystals at room temperature. The relative light-induced photostrictive effect is of the order of 10-5 with response times below 0.1 s. It depends on the polarization of incident light as well as applied magnetic fields. This opens the perspective of combining mechanical, magnetic, electric and optical functionalities in future generations of remote switchable devices.

  20. Health-related quality of life as prognostic factor for response, progression-free survival, and survival in women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Helene; Hatschek, Thomas; Johansson, Hemming; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to, on an exploratory basis, investigate the role of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at randomization as an independent prognostic factor for response to treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), and survival. In the TEX trial, 287 patients with locally advanced or distant metastatic breast cancer were randomized to either epirubicin and paclitaxel (ET) or epirubicin, paclitaxel, and capecitabine (TEX). Treatment was repeated every 3 weeks. The EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire was used to assess HRQoL before randomization. A total of 252 (88%) patients completed EORTC QLQ-C30 before randomization. Clinical conditions included in the multivariate model were age, number of metastases, ECOG performance status, time between diagnosis and randomization, and treatment arm. Univariate analysis revealed an association between prolonged survival and the HRQoL variables global health, physical functioning, role functioning, fatigue, and pain (P < 0.01). After controlling for clinical conditions, only fatigue remained statistically significant. No statistically significant relationships were found between HRQoL and PFS. In the analysis of the association between HRQoL and response to treatment, role functioning, social functioning, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and appetite loss remained statistically significant. HRQoL variables could act as important predictors of response to treatment, progression-free survival, and overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer.

  1. Significance of light-induced hook exaggeration as reinforced by the concomitant anatomical change of germinating tomato seeds.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, Chizuko; Takahashi-Asami, Miki; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Hashimoto, Tohru

    2010-10-01

    Progression of the apical hook of tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, exaggerated by phytochrome mediation at the early germination stage is followed in detail macroscopically and anatomically, and its proposed significance, i.e. survival by securing the seed coat release in the field, is reinforced by new findings. Furthermore, after self-release or artificial removal of the seed coat and the endosperm, no hook exaggeration occurs any more. Similar light-induced hook exaggeration (LIHE) is also found in carrot, parsley, and Cryptotaenia japonica, which share some seed characteristics with tomato. These findings also support the above-stated significance. © 2010 Landes Bioscience

  2. Light-induced effects in liquid crystals: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we outline that light-induced effects in liquid crystals are still able to provide scientific and technological novelty in spite of a long time investigation started more than thirty years ago. Here we review some recent achievements related to new phenomena that have been studied in the past few years. In the first part of our report we discuss optical trapping of nematic colloids whose origin relies on the elastic properties of liquid crystals rather than on the field gradient that is on the basis of conventional optical tweezing. In the second part we present some recent results obtained in studying the self-phase modulation in bent core nematic liquid crystals, pointing out a peculiar two regimes behavior.

  3. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; De Wolf, Stefaan; Levrat, Jacques; Christmann, Gabriel; Descoeudres, Antoine; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; Watabe, Yoshimi; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  4. Light-induced binding of metal nanoparticles via surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Zheng, M. J.; Yu, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, nanomachines based on the interaction of nanosize objects with nanostructrued surfaces have attracted much attention. In this work, we study theoretically the light-induced binding forces between a metallic nanosphere and a planar structure, and also between nanoparticles in a diatomic plamonic chain of shelled and unshelled metallic nanoparticles placed alternatively. These forces are calculated by Bergman-Milton spectral representation and multiple image methods within the long wavelength limit. When we tune the incident frequency to the surface plasmon resonant frequency, a stable local minimum in the potential energy is found. It signifies a binding between nanoparticles (nanostructures), which indicates a possible stable structure of the metallic clusters. Such binding is caused by the excitation of collective plasmon modes, which depends on the interparticle distances. This study has potential applications in plasmonic waveguides and colloidal metallic clusters on the nanoscales.

  5. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  6. Light-induced metastability in pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, D. R.; Liu, X.; Karel, J.; Wang, Q.; Crandall, R. S.; Metcalf, T. H.; Hellman, F.

    2015-10-01

    Light soaking is found to increase the specific heat C and internal friction Q-1 of pure (a-Si) and hydrogenated (a-Si:H) amorphous silicon. At the lowest temperatures, the increases in C and Q-1 are consistent with an increased density of two-level systems (TLS). The light-induced increase in C persists to room temperature. Neither the sound velocity nor shear modulus change with light soaking indicating that the Debye specific heat is unchanged which suggests that light soaking creates localized vibrational modes in addition to TLS. The increase can be reversibly added and removed by light soaking and annealing, respectively, suggesting that it is related to the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), even in a-Si without H, and involves a reversible nanoscale structural rearrangement that is facilitated by, but does not require, H to occur.

  7. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  8. Femtosecond light-induced macromolecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebane, Aleksander; Mikhaylov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We report femtosecond light-induced macromolecular self-assembly (FLIMSA), which is observed when a high peak intensity femtosecond laser beam propagates through aqueous solution of pseudoisocyanine iodide (PIC) J-aggregates and induces the formation of 0.1 - 1.0 mm-size tube-like structure surrounding the laser beam, while at the same time allowing the beam to continue propagating without obstruction or scattering. The FLIMSA material is morphologically heterogeneous and gel-like and is formed at the margins rather than at the center of the beam. As a potential explanation of this effect we assume that the FLIMSA is induced by the high photon flux gradient characteristic of the femtosecond laser beam periphery. This hypothesis is corroborated by control experiments, where J-aggregate samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser sources with a varying pulse duration, power- and beam shape characteristics, but where no FLIMSA formation was observed.

  9. Polymer-Fullerene Network Formation via Light-Induced Crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yuuki; Hiltebrandt, Kai; Blasco, Eva; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    A facile and efficient methodology for the formation of polymer-fullerene networks via a light-induced reaction is reported. The photochemical crosslinking is based on a nitrile imine-mediated tetrazole-ene cycloaddition reaction, which proceeds catalyst-free under UV-light irradiation (λmax = 320 nm) at ambient temperature. A tetrazole-functionalized polymer (Mn = 6500 g mol(-1) , Ð = 1.3) and fullerene C60 are employed for the formation of the hybrid networks. The tetrazole-functionalized polymer as well as the fullerene-containing networks are carefully characterized by NMR spectrometry, size exclusion chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Furthermore, thermal analysis of the fullerene networks and their precursors is carried out. The current contribution thus induces an efficient platform technology for fullerene-based network formation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  11. Light-induced unfolding and refolding of supramolecular polymer nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Bimalendu; Yamada, Yuki; Yamauchi, Mitsuaki; Wakita, Kengo; Lin, Xu; Aratsu, Keisuke; Ohba, Tomonori; Karatsu, Takashi; Hollamby, Martin J.; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Takagi, Hideaki; Haruki, Rie; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Yagai, Shiki

    2017-01-01

    Unlike classical covalent polymers, one-dimensionally (1D) elongated supramolecular polymers (SPs) can be encoded with high degrees of internal order by the cooperative aggregation of molecular subunits, which endows these SPs with extraordinary properties and functions. However, this internal order has not yet been exploited to generate and dynamically control well-defined higher-order (secondary) conformations of the SP backbone, which may induce functionality that is comparable to protein folding/unfolding. Herein, we report light-induced conformational changes of SPs based on the 1D exotic stacking of hydrogen-bonded azobenzene hexamers. The stacking causes a unique internal order that leads to spontaneous curvature, which allows accessing conformations that range from randomly folded to helically folded coils. The reversible photoisomerization of the azobenzene moiety destroys or recovers the curvature of the main chain, which demonstrates external control over the SP conformation that may ultimately lead to biological functions. PMID:28488694

  12. Light-induced spin polarizations in quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joibari, Fateme K.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-10-01

    Nonresonant circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation can exert torques on magnetizations by the inverse Faraday effect (IFE). Here, we discuss the enhancement of IFE by spin-orbit interactions. We illustrate the principle by studying a simple generic model system, i.e., the quasi-one-dimensional ring in the presence of linear/cubic Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions. We combine the classical IFE in electron plasmas that is known to cause persistent currents in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the propagation of light with the concept of current and spin-orbit-induced spin transfer torques. We calculate light-induced spin polarization that in ferromagnets might give rise to magnetization switching.

  13. Light-induced potentials ignite dissociation of N22+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Fang, Li; Gibson, George N.

    2006-04-01

    Direct ionization to dissociative potential curves is the dominant explanation for intense-field dissociative ionization of N2 . In this article we contradict this notion by showing that the dissociation of N22+ adiabatically follows the avoided crossing formed by the ∣XΠu3,n⟩ and ∣DΠg3,n-1⟩ dressed curves. Dissociation along this light-induced molecular potential implies that one photon is absorbed and adds to the kinetic release of the fragments. We compare the fragmentation energies for three different laser wavelengths and find that nitrogen shows photon absorption whereas iodine does not. From this we conclude that one must account for the absorbed photon when interpreting the time-of-flight spectra for molecules with appreciable nuclear motion during the laser pulse. In nitrogen, doing so allows us to identify enhanced ionization of the dication at 2.2Å independent of laser wavelength.

  14. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Takala, Heikki; Niebling, Stephan; Berntsson, Oskar; Björling, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Häkkänen, Heikki; Panman, Matthijs; Gustavsson, Emil; Hoernke, Maria; Newby, Gemma; Zontone, Federico; Wulff, Michael; Menzel, Andreas; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27679804

  15. Light-Induced Degradation of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelmann, F. U.; Weicht, J. A.; Behrens, G.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon-wafer based solar cells are still domination the market for photovoltaic energy conversion. However, most of the silicon is used only for mechanical stability, while only a small percentage of the material is needed for the light absorption. Thin film silicon technology reduces the material demand to just some hundred nanometer thickness. But even in a tandem stack (amorphous and microcrystalline silicon) the efficiencies are lower, and light-induced degradation is an important issue. The established standard tests for characterisation are not precise enough to predict the performance of thin film silicon solar cells under real conditions, since many factors do have an influence on the degradation. We will show some results of laboratory and outdoor measurements that we are going to use as a base for advanced modelling and simulation methods.

  16. Light-induced aggregation of microbial exopolymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luni; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Lin, Peng; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2017-08-01

    Sunlight can inhibit or disrupt the aggregation process of marine colloids via cleavage of high molecular weight compounds into smaller, less stable fragments. In contrast, some biomolecules, such as proteins excreted from bacteria can form aggregates via cross-linking due to photo-oxidation. To examine whether light-induced aggregation can occur in the marine environment, we conducted irradiation experiments on a well-characterized protein-containing exopolymeric substance (EPS) from the marine bacterium Sagitulla stellata. Our results show that after 1 h sunlight irradiation, the turbidity level of soluble EPS was 60% higher than in the dark control. Flow cytometry also confirmed that more particles of larger sized were formed by sunlight. In addition, we determined a higher mass of aggregates collected on filter in the irradiated samples. This suggests light can induce aggregation of this bacterial EPS. Reactive oxygen species hydroxyl radical and peroxide played critical roles in the photo-oxidation process, and salts assisted the aggregation process. The observation that Sagitulla stellata EPS with relatively high protein content promoted aggregation, was in contrast to the case where no significant differences were found in the aggregation of a non-protein containing phytoplankton EPS between the dark and light conditions. This, together with the evidence that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of aggregates formed under light condition is significantly higher than that formed under dark condition suggest that proteins are likely the important component for aggregate formation. Light-induced aggregation provides new insights into polymer assembly, marine snow formation, and the fate/transport of organic carbon and nitrogen in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Light-induced colour changes by the iridophores of the Neon tetra, Paracheirodon innesi.

    PubMed

    Clothier, J; Lythgoe, J N

    1987-12-01

    The iridophores of the Neon tetra Paracheirodon innesi consist of alternating layers of guanine and cytoplasm. In the dark-adapted state the reflected light from constructive interference is in the ultraviolet or blue. When exposed to light the cytoplasm layers increase in thickness and as a result the reflections shift to longer wavelengths and the iridophores appear green. The iridophores are thought to contain a rhodopsin-like molecule and we suggest that the colour-change mechanism involves the light-induced opening of sodium channels in the plasma membrane, leading osmotically to an increase in thickness of the cytoplasm layers. Experimental support for this suggestion was obtained by the substitution of choline chloride for sodium chloride in the perfusing medium, which can be done without altering the osmotic strength of the perfusing medium. This procedure almost abolished the light response and makes it seem likely that sodium ions are necessary for the light response to take place.

  18. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  19. Effect of temperature, salinity and nutrient content on the survival responses of Vibrio splendidus biotype I.

    PubMed

    Armada, Susana P; Farto, Rosa; Pérez, María J; Nieto, Teresa P

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival responses of two strains of Vibrio splendidus, both in natural and in defined media. For this purpose, freshwater and defined media containing different salinities (3.3-0.9 %) and nutrient concentrations (17-0.005 mg x l(-1)) were assayed. The incubation temperatures were established at 4, 10 and 22 degrees C. The acridine orange staining technique was used for total cell enumeration and the number of viable cells was determined using two direct assays, nalidixic acid and tetrazolium salt reduction and plate spreading. Resuscitation assays of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells were conducted. According to the counting procedures employed, at least four different subpopulations were found: (i). active (positive response in both nalidixic acid and tetrazolium assays) culturable cells; (ii). active non-culturable cells; (iii). tetrazolium-salt-responsive non-culturable cells and (iv). non-active (responsive to none of the direct viable assays) non-culturable cells. Long-term survival was found at salinities and nutrient concentrations of seawater environments (3.3 % and 5 mg x l(-1) or 1 g l(-1)), whereas the strains entered a VBNC state in freshwater and in brackish (0.9 or 1.6 % salinities) or high nutrient content (17 g x l(-1)) defined medium. The recovery of VBNC cells was not achieved.

  20. Foxo and Fos regulate the decision between cell death and survival in response to UV irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xi; Puig, Oscar; Hyun, Joogyung; Bohmann, Dirk; Jasper, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    Cells damaged by environmental insults have to be repaired or eliminated to ensure tissue homeostasis in metazoans. Recent studies suggest that the balance between cell survival signals and pro-apoptotic stimuli controls the decision between cell repair and death. How these competing signals are integrated and interpreted to achieve accurate control over cell fate in vivo is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the Forkhead Box O transcription factor Foxo and the AP-1 transcription factor DFos are required downstream of Jun-N-terminal kinase signaling for the apoptotic response to UV-induced DNA damage in the developing Drosophila retina. Both transcription factors regulate the pro-apoptotic gene hid. Our results indicate that UV-induced apoptosis is repressed by receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated inactivation of Foxo. These data suggest that integrating stress and survival signals through Foxo drives the decision between cell death and repair of damaged cells in vivo. PMID:17183370

  1. A circulating ghrelin mimetic attenuates light-induced phase delay of mice and light-induced Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Kalsbeek, Andries; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2008-04-01

    Anatomical evidence suggests that the ventromedial arcuate nucleus (vmARC) is a route for circulating hormonal communications to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Whether this vmARC-SCN connection is involved in the modulation of circadian activity of the SCN is not yet known. We recently demonstrated, in rats, that intravenous (i.v.) injection of a ghrelin mimetic, GHRP-6, during the daytime activated neurons in the vmARC and reduced the normal endogenous daytime Fos expression in the SCN. In the present study we show that i.v. administration of GHRP-6 decreases light-induced Fos expression at ZT13 in the rat SCN by 50%, indicating that light-induced changes in the SCN Fos expression can also be reduced by GHRP-6. Because it is difficult to study light-induced phase changes in rats, we examined the functional effects of GHRP-6 on light-induced phase shifts in mice and demonstrated that peripherally injected GHRP-6 attenuates light-induced phase delays at ZT13 by 45%. However, light-induced Fos expression in the mice SCN was not blocked by GHRP-6. These results illustrate that acute stimulation of the ghrelinergic system may modulate SCN activity, but that its effect on light-induced phase shifts and Fos expression in the SCN might be species related.

  2. ECOG is as independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy, overall survival and progression-free survival in carcinoma of unknown primary site

    PubMed Central

    Grajales-Álvarez, Rocío; Martin-Aguilar, Ana; Silva, Juan A.; De La Garza-Salazar, Jaime G.; Ruiz-García, Erika; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A.; La Vega, Horacio Astudillo-De

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether age, gender, functional status, histology, tumor location, number of metastases, and levels of the tumor markers, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin, are poor prognostic factors for the response to chemotherapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site. A total of 149 patients diagnosed with carcinoma of unknown primary site that was histologically confirmed, and treated with chemotherapy in the Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, ‘Century XXI’ IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico during the period between January 2002 to December 2009, were carefully selected for the present study. The analysis of 149 patients diagnosed with carcinoma of unknown primary site revealed that the liver was the organ with the highest frequency of metastases (33.5%). The objective response rates to chemotherapy were ~30.2%. Notably, ECOG was an important predictor of response to chemotherapy (P=0.008). The median progression-free survival was 7.1 months. Upon multivariate analysis, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Scale of Performance Status was observed as an independent predictor of progression (P<0.0001). The median overall survival was 14.2 months. The ECOG was also an independent predictor of mortality (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the data from the present study have demonstrated that ECOG is an independent predictor of a poor response to chemotherapy, lower overall survival and progression-free survival in carcinoma of unknown primary site. PMID:28515916

  3. Survival, growth and stress response of juvenile tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, to interspecific competition for food

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Daniel A.; Flynn, Erin E.; Todgham, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Reintroduction of endangered fishes to historic habitat has been used as a recovery tool; however, these fish may face competition from other fishes that established in their native habitat since extirpation. This study investigated the physiological response of tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, an endangered California fish, when competing for food with threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, a native species, and rainwater killifish, Lucania parva, a non-native species. Survival, growth and physiological indicators of stress (i.e. cortisol, glucose and lactate concentrations) were assessed for juvenile fish held for 28 days in two food-limited conditions. When fed a 75% ration, survival of E. newberryi was significantly lower when held with G. aculeatus. In all fish assemblages, weight and relative condition decreased then stabilized over the 28 day experiment, while length remained unchanged. Whole-body cortisol in E. newberryi was not affected by fish assemblage; however, glucose and lactate concentrations were significantly higher with conspecifics than with other fish assemblages. When fed a 50% ration, survival of E. newberryi decreased during the second half of the experiment, while weight and relative condition decreased and length remained unchanged in all three fish assemblages. Cortisol concentrations were significantly higher for all fish assemblages compared with concentrations at the start of the experiment, whereas glucose and lactate concentrations were depressed relative to concentrations at the start of the experiment, with the magnitude of decrease dependent on the species assemblage. Our findings indicate that E. newberryi exhibited reduced growth and an elevated generalized stress response during low food availability. In response to reduced food availability, competition with G. aculeatus had the greatest physiological effect on E. newberryi, with minimal effects from the non-native L. parva. This study presents the first

  4. Impact of clinical and echocardiographic response to cardiac resynchronization therapy on long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Matteo; Höke, Ulas; van Bommel, Rutger J; Ng, Arnold C T; Shanks, Miriam; Nucifora, Gaetano; Auger, Dominique; Borleffs, C Jan Willem; van Rijnsoever, Eva P M; van Erven, Lieselot; Schalij, Martin J; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2013-08-01

    Clinical or echocardiographic mid-term responses to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may have a different influence on a long-term prognosis of heart failure patients treated with CRT. The aim of the evaluation was to establish which definition of response to CRT, clinical or echocardiographic, best predicts long-term prognosis. A total of 679 heart failure patients treated with CRT were included. All the patients underwent a complete history and physical examination and transthoracic echocardiogram prior to CRT implantation and at 6-month follow-up. The clinical and echocardiographic responses to CRT were defined based on clinical improvement (≥1 NYHA class) and LV reverse remodelling (reduction in LV end-systolic volume ≥15%) at 6-month follow-up, respectively. All the patients were prospectively followed up for the occurrence of death. The mean age was 65 ± 11 years and 79% of the patients were male. At 6-month follow-up, 510 (77%) patients showed clinical response to CRT and 412 (62%) patients showed echocardiographic response to CRT. During a mean follow-up of 37 ± 22 months, 140 (21%) patients died. Clinical and echocardiographic responses to CRT were both significantly related to all-cause mortality on univariable analysis. However, on multivariable Cox-regression analysis only echocardiographic response to CRT was independently associated with superior survival (hazard ratio: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.27-0.50; P < 0.001). In a large population of heart failure patients treated with CRT, the reduction in LV end-systolic volume at the mid-term follow-up demonstrated to be a better predictor of long-term survival than improvement in the clinical status.

  5. Theory of light-induced drift. III. Models of surface and bulk light-induced drift in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Frank O.

    2003-01-01

    Light-induced drift (LID) of a rarefied gas in a cell is studied, and exact analytical closed-form solutions to the model rate equations, which model the gas motion in one dimension, are obtained for cases of both surface LID (SLID) and bulk LID (BLID); the special case of the limit of low radiation absorption by the gas is given particular attention. Similarities and differences among the results for SLID and BLID are discussed. This is part III of a series of papers, parts I and II having studied LID, but concentrating on SLID, with flat-plate and circular-cylindrical cell geometries, respectively [F. O. Goodman, Phys. Rev. A 65, 064309 (2002); 65, 064310 (2002)].

  6. Light-induced refractive index changes in singlemode channel waveguides in KTiOPO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruske, J.-P.; Rottschalk, M.; Steinberg, S.

    1995-02-01

    Light-induced changes of the effective refractive index in Rb ↔ K ion-exchanged singlemode channel waveguides in KTiOPO 4 have been investigated in the visible wavelength region dependent on time, guided optical mode intensity and temperature. A hypothesis for the explanation of the light-induced effects is suggested. Thermooptic and pyroelectric effects are discussed. The light-induced refractive index changes do not restrict the function of integrated-optic components in the visible.

  7. Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Lymphomas Cells And Normal Bone Marrow Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Nealon, Don G.; VanderMeulen, David L.

    1988-06-01

    Dye mediated, laser light induced photosensitization was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating the contaminating tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Daudi and U-937 cells (3 x 106/ml) in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 0.25% human albumin were mixed with 20 µg/ml and 25 µg/ml of MC-540, respectively. These cell-dye mixtures were then exposed to 514 nm argon laser light. Identical treatment was given to the normal bone marrow cells. Viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 irradiation, 99.9999% Daudi cells were killed while 87% of the normal bone marrow cells survived. No regrowth of Daudi cells was observed for 30 days in culture. However, a light dose of 93.6 J/cm2 was required to obtain 99.999% U-937 cell kill with 80% normal bone marrow cell survival. Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with an equal number of lymphoma cells did not interfere with the photodynamic killing of lymphoma cells. Exposure of cells to low doses of recombinant interferon-alpha prior to photodynamic therapy increased the viability of lymphoma cells.

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Shankar, Esaki M.; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Methods We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS) and its secreted proteins (CCMS). Results We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms) or to escape potential sensing by macrophages. Conclusion Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27367858

  9. Corrupting the DNA damage response: a critical role for Rad52 in tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Rachel; You, Ming

    2017-07-15

    The DNA damage response enables cells to survive, maintain genome integrity, and to safeguard the transmission of high-fidelity genetic information. Upon sensing DNA damage, cells respond by activating this multi-faceted DNA damage response leading to restoration of the cell, senescence, programmed cell death, or genomic instability if the cell survives without proper repair. However, unlike normal cells, cancer cells maintain a marked level of genomic instability. Because of this enhanced propensity to accumulate DNA damage, tumor cells rely on homologous recombination repair as a means of protection from the lethal effect of both spontaneous and therapy-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Thus, modulation of DNA repair pathways have important consequences for genomic instability within tumor cell biology and viability maintenance under high genotoxic stress. Efforts are underway to manipulate specific components of the DNA damage response in order to selectively induce tumor cell death by augmenting genomic instability past a viable threshold. New evidence suggests that RAD52, a component of the homologous recombination pathway, is important for the maintenance of tumor genome integrity. This review highlights recent reports indicating that reducing homologous recombination through inhibition of RAD52 may represent an important focus for cancer therapy and the specific efforts that are already demonstrating potential.

  10. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  11. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Danielle N; Bahous, Renata H; Best, Ana F; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host's immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs.

  12. Combinatorial Control of Light Induced Chromatin Remodeling and Gene Activation in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Cigdem; Ha, Nati; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tesorero, Rafael; Fisher, Tamas; Brunner, Michael; Sancar, Gencer

    2015-01-01

    Light is an important environmental cue that affects physiology and development of Neurospora crassa. The light-sensing transcription factor (TF) WCC, which consists of the GATA-family TFs WC1 and WC2, is required for light-dependent transcription. SUB1, another GATA-family TF, is not a photoreceptor but has also been implicated in light-inducible gene expression. To assess regulation and organization of the network of light-inducible genes, we analyzed the roles of WCC and SUB1 in light-induced transcription and nucleosome remodeling. We show that SUB1 co-regulates a fraction of light-inducible genes together with the WCC. WCC induces nucleosome eviction at its binding sites. Chromatin remodeling is facilitated by SUB1 but SUB1 cannot activate light-inducible genes in the absence of WCC. We identified FF7, a TF with a putative O-acetyl transferase domain, as an interaction partner of SUB1 and show their cooperation in regulation of a fraction of light-inducible and a much larger number of non light-inducible genes. Our data suggest that WCC acts as a general switch for light-induced chromatin remodeling and gene expression. SUB1 and FF7 synergistically determine the extent of light-induction of target genes in common with WCC but have in addition a role in transcription regulation beyond light-induced gene expression. PMID:25822411

  13. Quantitative investigation of light induced defects in glassy Se90Ag10 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, D.; Dwivedi, Prabhat K.; Kumar, A.

    2016-05-01

    An attempt is made to investigate light induced defects (LID) in amorphous chalcogenide Se90Ag10 thin films prepared by vacuum evaporation technique. For the determination of light induced defects quantitatively, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements have been made in a vacuum ~ 10-3 Torr before and after exposing amorphous films to white light for different exposure times (0 to 6 hours). Results indicate that light induced defects are created due to prolonged exposure of light which is explained by a microscopic model for light induced defects creation proposed by Shimakawa and co-workers.

  14. CK2 inhibition induced PDK4-AMPK axis regulates metabolic adaptation and survival responses in glioma.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Ahmad, Fahim; Ghildiyal, Ruchi; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Sen, Ellora

    2016-05-15

    Understanding mechanisms that link aberrant metabolic adaptation and pro-survival responses in glioma cells is crucial towards the development of new anti-glioma therapies. As we have previously reported that CK2 is associated with glioma cell survival, we evaluated its involvement in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Inhibition of CK2 increased the expression of metabolic regulators, PDK4 and AMPK along with the key cellular energy sensor CREB. This increase was concomitant with altered metabolic profile as characterized by decreased glucose uptake in a PDK4 and AMPK dependent manner. Increased PDK4 expression was CREB dependent, as exogenous inhibition of CREB functions abrogated CK2 inhibitor mediated increase in PDK4 expression. Interestingly, PDK4 regulated AMPK phosphorylation which in turn affected cell viability in CK2 inhibitor treated glioma cells. CK2 inhibitor 4,5,6,7-Tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB) significantly retarded the growth of glioma xenografts in athymic nude mouse model. Coherent with the in vitro findings, elevated senescence, pAMPK and PDK4 levels were also observed in TBB-treated xenograft tissue. Taken together, CK2 inhibition in glioma cells drives the PDK4-AMPK axis to affect metabolic profile that has a strong bearing on their survival.

  15. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  16. Temporal variation in survival and recovery rates of lesser scaup: A response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, Todd W.; Afton, Alan D.; Anteau, Michael J.; Koons, David N.; Nicolai, Chris A.

    2017-01-01

    We recently analyzed long-term (1951–2011) continental band-recovery data from lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and demonstrated that harvest rates declined through time, but annual survival rates exhibited no such trends; moreover, annual harvest and survival rates were uncorrelated for all age-sex classes. We therefore concluded that declining fecundity was most likely responsible for recent population declines, rather than changes in harvest or survival. Lindberg et al. (2017) critiqued our conclusions, arguing that we did little more than fail to reject a null hypothesis of compensatory mortality, postulated ecologically unrealistic changes in fecundity, and failed to give sufficient consideration to additive harvest mortality. Herein, we re-summarize our original evidence indicating that harvest has been compensatory, or at most weakly additive, and demonstrate that our analysis had sufficient power to detect strongly additive mortality if it occurred. We further demonstrate that our conclusions were not confounded by population size, band loss, or individual heterogeneity, as suggested by Lindberg et al. (2017), and we provide additional support for our conjecture that low fecundity played a major role in declining scaup populations during 1983–2006. We therefore reiterate our original management recommendations: given low harvest rates and lack of demonstrable effect on scaup survival, harvest regulations could return to more liberal frameworks, and waterfowl biologists should work together to continue banding lesser scaup and use these data to explore alternative hypotheses to identify the true ecological causes of population change, given that it is unlikely to be excessive harvest. 

  17. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  18. Ultrafast light-induced symmetry changes in single BaTiO3 nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Kuo, Yi -Hong; Nah, Sanghee; He, Kai; ...

    2017-01-23

    The coupling of light to nanoscale ferroelectric materials enables novel means of controlling their coupled degrees of freedom and engineering new functionality. Here we present femtosecond time-resolution nonlinear-optical measurements of light-induced dynamics within single ferroelectric barium titanate nanowires. By analyzing the time-dependent and polarization-dependent second harmonic intensity generated by the nanowire, we identify its crystallographic orientation and then make use of this information in order to probe its dynamic structural response and change in symmetry. Here, we show that photo-excitation leads to ultrafast, non-uniform modulations in the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, indicative of changes in the local symmetry ofmore » the nanostructure occurring on sub-picosecond time-scales.« less

  19. Light-induced changes in photocarrier transport in magnetron sputtered a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. R.; Maley, N.; Abelson, J. R.

    1991-08-01

    The effect of light soaking on the steady-state reverse bias collection efficiency has been studied for hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by reactive magnetron sputtering. Films with optical gaps of 1.63 and 1.74 eV both showed considerable degradation in the collection efficiency, correlating with increases in sub-gap absorption and decreases in the spectral response quantum efficiency. The collection efficiency data have been fitted with the two-field Hecht expression, and effective mobility-life-time products have been extracted. These results indicate that straightforward measurements on Schottky barriers can be utilized as sensitive monitors of light induced degradation in a-Si:H

  20. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  1. Photosynthetic Independence of Light-induced Anthocyanin Formation in Zea Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Stephen O.; Fox, Sue B.; Naylor, Aubrey W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported which support the view that the photosynthetic photosystems are not involved in the high irradiance response (HIR) phenomenon of light-dependent anthocyanin biosynthesis in dark-grown Zea mays L. seedlings. A negative correlation between change in greening rates and change in light-dependent anthocyanin accumulation rates with age was demonstrated. Lack of chlorophyll synthesis in a strain of maize possessing a temperature-sensitive lesion for chlorophyll synthesis could not be correlated with light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Furthermore, seedlings totally lacking photosynthetic capabilities, either due to a genetic lesion or to excision of all photosynthetic tissue, had an enhanced rate of photoinduced anthocyanin formation. This evidence indicates that the HIR results in the initiation of processes that are in competition with chloroplast development for substrate in normal, intact seedlings. PMID:16659449

  2. Light-Induced Temperature Transitions in Biodegradable Polymer and Nanorod Composites**

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, Kolin C.; Metter, Robert B.; Ifkovits, Jamie L.; Troxler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shape-memory materials (including polymers, metals, and ceramics) are those that are processed into a temporary shape and respond to some external stimuli (e.g., temperature) to undergo a transition back to a permanent shape.[1, 2] Shape memory polymers are finding use in a range of applications from aerospace to fabrics, to biomedical devices and microsystem components.[3–5] For many applications, it would be beneficial to initiate heating with an external trigger (e.g., transdermal light exposure). In this work, we formulated composites of gold nanorods (<1% by volume) and biodegradable networks, where exposure to infrared light induced heating and consequently, shape transitions. The heating is repeatable and tunable based on nanorod concentration and light intensity and the nanorods did not alter the cytotoxicity or in vivo tissue response to the networks. PMID:19408258

  3. Sweet waste extract uptake by a mosquito vector: Survival, biting, fecundity responses, and potential epidemiological significance.

    PubMed

    Dieng, Hamady; Satho, Tomomitsu; Abang, Fatimah; Meli, Nur Khairatun Khadijah Binti; Ghani, Idris A; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Hakim, Hafijah; Miake, Fumio; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Noor, Sabina; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ahmad, Hamdan; Majid, Abdul Hafiz A; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Morales, Noppawan P; Attrapadung, Siriluck; Noweg, Gabriel Tonga

    2017-05-01

    In nature, adult mosquitoes typically utilize nectar as their main energy source, but they can switch to other as yet unidentified sugary fluids. Contemporary lifestyles, with their associated unwillingness to consume leftovers and improper disposal of waste, have resulted in the disposal of huge amounts of waste into the environment. Such refuse often contains unfinished food items, many of which contain sugar and some of which can collect water from rain and generate juices. Despite evidence that mosquitoes can feed on sugar-rich suspensions, semi-liquids, and decaying fruits, which can be abundant in garbage sites, the impacts of sweet waste fluids on dengue vectors are unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of extracts from some familiar sweet home waste items on key components of vectorial capacity of Aedes aegypti. Adult mosquitoes were fed one of five diets in this study: water (WAT); sucrose (SUG); bakery product (remnant of chocolate cake, BAK); dairy product (yogurt, YOG); and fruit (banana (BAN). Differences in survival, response time to host, and egg production were examined between groups. For both males and females, maintenance on BAK extract resulted in marked survival levels that were similar to those seen with SUG. Sweet waste extracts provided better substrates for survival compared to water, but this superiority was mostly seen with BAK. Females maintained on BAK, YOG, and BAN exhibited shorter response times to a host compared to their counterparts maintained on SUG. The levels of egg production were equivalent in waste extract- and SUG-fed females. The findings presented here illustrate the potential of sweet waste-derived fluids to contribute to the vectorial capacity of dengue vectors and suggest the necessity of readdressing the issue of waste disposal, especially that of unfinished sweet foods. Such approaches can be particularly relevant in dengue endemic areas where rainfall is frequent and waste collection infrequent.

  4. 'Deepness of Response' Is Associated with Overall Survival in Standard Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The identification of responders is an important issue in chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). 'Deepness of response' (DpR), defined as the maximum rate of reduction from the initial tumor burden, was recently proposed as a novel hypothetical parameter associated with overall survival (OS) in first-line chemotherapy plus cetuximab for mCRC. We determined whether this concept was universally applicable to diverse standard chemotherapeutic regimens for mCRC. We reviewed mCRC patients who received the first-line systemic chemotherapy regimens FOLFOX, CapeOX or FOLFIRI (with biologics) at our department between June 2005 and March 2015. Data such as clinicopathological parameters, metastasized organs, chemotherapeutic regimens, the best response by RECIST v1.1, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS were retrospectively retrieved for patients who exhibited tumor shrinkage. DpR was calculated as the uni-dimensional maximum reduction rate of measurable tumors. We addressed the association between DpR and survival. Of the 156 patients receiving first-line chemotherapy regimens, tumor shrinkage was observed in 63 (41 of whom were men; median age 62 years). Complete remission was achieved in 6 patients, partial remission in 42 and stable disease in 15. The median DpR was 44.2% and was employed as the cutoff, in line with previous reports. DpR ≥45% (31 patients) was correlated with longer PFS (median 16.4 vs. 8.1 months for DpR <45%, p = 0.006) and OS (median 58.6 vs. 30.9 months for DpR <45%, p = 0.041). There was basically no difference in the subsequent chemotherapy between the DpR ≥45% and DpR <45% groups. DpR correlated with OS in various first-line systemic upfront chemotherapy regimens for mCRC. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Do either early warning systems or emergency response teams improve hospital patient survival? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    McNeill, G; Bryden, D

    2013-12-01

    For critical care to be effective it must have a system in place to achieve optimal care for the deteriorating ward patient. To systematically review the available literature to assess whether either early warning systems or emergency response teams improve hospital survival. In the event of there being a lack of evidence regarding hospital survival, secondary outcome measures were considered (unplanned ICU admissions, ICU mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, cardiac arrest rates). The Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane library and NHS databases were searched in September 2012 along with non-catalogued resources for papers examining the effect of early warning systems or emergency response teams on hospital survival. Inclusion criteria were original clinical trials and comparative studies in adult inpatients that assessed either an early warning system or emergency response team against any of the predefined outcome measures. Exclusion criteria were previous systematic reviews, non-English abstracts and studies incorporating paediatric data. Studies were arranged in to sections focusing on the following interventions: Early warning systems - Single parameter systems - Aggregate weighted scoring systems (AWSS) Emergency response teams - Medical emergency teams - Multidisciplinary outreach services . In each section an appraisal of the level of evidence and a recommendation has been made using the SIGN grading system. 43 studies meeting the review criteria were identified and included for analysis. 2 studies assessed single parameter scoring systems and 4 addressed aggregate weighted scoring systems. A total of 20 studies examined medical emergency teams and 22 studies examined multidisciplinary outreach teams. The exclusion of non English studies and those including paediatric patients does limit the applicability of this review. Much of the available evidence is of poor quality. It is clear that a 'whole system' approach

  6. Role of BAG3 protein in leukemia cell survival and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; Falco, Antonia; d'Avenia, Morena; Festa, Michelina; Graziano, Vincenzo; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Arra, Claudio; Pascale, Maria; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2012-12-01

    The ability of BAG3, a member of the BAG family of heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 - cochaperones, to sustain the survival of human primary B-CLL and ALL cells was recognized about nine years ago. Since then, the anti-apoptotic activity of BAG3 has been confirmed in other tumor types, where it has been shown to regulate the intracellular concentration and localization of apoptosis-regulating factors, including NF-κB-activating (IKKγ) and Bcl2-family (Bax) proteins. Furthermore, growing evidences support its role in lymphoid and myeloid leukemia response to therapy. Moreover in the last years, the contribution of BAG3 to autophagy, a process known to be involved in the pathogenesis and response to therapy of leukemia cells, has been disclosed, opening a new avenue for the interpretation of the role of this protein in leukemias' biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser phototherapy enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to the dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Ivana Márcia Alves; Matos, Adriana Bona; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm(2), 40 mW, 1 W/cm(2), 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm(2)). After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  8. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcia Martins

    2015-01-01

    Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm2, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2, 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm2). After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Results. Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. Conclusion. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives. PMID:25879065

  9. Ubiquitination by SAG regulates macrophage survival/death and immune response during infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Ding, J L

    2014-09-01

    The checkpoint between the life and death of macrophages is crucial for the host's frontline immune defense during acute phase infection. However, the mechanism as to how the immune cell equilibrates between apoptosis and immune response is unclear. Using in vitro and ex vivo approaches, we showed that macrophage survival is synchronized by SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), which is a key member of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When challenged by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we observed a reciprocal expression profile of pro- and antiapoptotic factors in macrophages. However, SAG knockdown disrupted this balance. Further analysis revealed that ubiquitination of Bax and SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein) by SAG-UPS confers survival advantage to infected macrophages. SAG knockdown caused the accumulation of proapoptotic Bax and SARM, imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, induction of cytosolic cytochrome c and activation of caspase-9 and -3, all of which led to disequilibrium between life and death of macrophages. In contrast, SAG-overexpressing macrophages challenged with PAMPs exhibited upregulation of protumorigenic cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), and downregulation of antitumorigenic cytokine (IL-12p40) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). This suggests that SAG-dependent UPS is a key switch between immune defense and apoptosis or immune overactivation and tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results indicate that SAG-UPS facilitates a timely and appropriate level of immune response, prompting future development of potential immunomodulators of SAG-UPS.

  10. Thermotolerance after fractionated hyperthermia: assessment of cell survival by response to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Law, M P; Ahier, R G; Somaia, S; Field, S B

    1985-01-01

    A previous study of the mouse ear showed that daily treatment at 43.5 degrees C, either 10 X 20 min or 20 min + 9 X 70 min, induced the same resistance to further heating as was induced by a single treatment of 20 min. The results could be explained in at least two ways: (a) no cells are killed by the heat treatments but thermotolerance is induced; and (b) a proportion of cells is killed by each fraction and the degree of thermotolerance induced in survivors increases as the number of fractions is increased. These two possibilities were tested by measuring the response to X-rays at 24 h after various regimes of fractionated hyperthermia. At this time interval the enhancing effect of a single heat treatment would have decayed, so that radiosensitivity should then be related to the number of surviving cells. Up to 49 daily treatments of 20 min had little effect on radiosensitivity, suggesting that these heating regimes did not cause a significant reduction in the number of basal epidermal cells. A regime of 20 min + 4 X 70 min daily also had little effect but a treatment of 20 min + 9 X 70 min daily increased the radiation response, suggesting that the more severe heat treatment had reduced cell survival to approximately 4 per cent.

  11. Green Light Induces Shade Avoidance Symptoms1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A.; Folta, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment. PMID:21852417

  12. Intensity modulated radiotherapy induces pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    EL-SAGHIRE, HOUSSEIN; VANDEVOORDE, CHARLOT; OST, PIET; MONSIEURS, PIETER; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; DE MEERLEER, GERT; BAATOUT, SARAH; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern conformal radiotherapies that is widely used within the context of cancer patient treatment. It uses multiple radiation beams targeted to the tumor, however, large volumes of the body receive low doses of irradiation. Using γ-H2AX and global genome expression analysis, we studied the biological responses induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in prostate cancer patients following IMRT. By means of different bioinformatics analyses, we report that IMRT induced an inflammatory response via the induction of viral, adaptive, and innate immune signaling. In response to growth factors and immune-stimulatory signaling, positive regulation in the progression of cell cycle and DNA replication were induced. This denotes pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses. Furthermore, double strand DNA breaks were induced in every patient 30 min after the treatment and remaining DNA repair and damage signaling continued after 18–24 h. Nine genes belonging to inflammatory responses (TLR3, SH2D1A and IL18), cell cycle progression (ORC4, SMC2 and CCDC99) and DNA damage and repair (RAD17, SMC6 and MRE11A) were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This study emphasizes that the risk assessment of health effects from the out-of-field low doses during IMRT should be of concern, as these may increase the risk of secondary cancers and/or systemic inflammation. PMID:24435511

  13. The stringent response plays a key role in Bacillus subtilis survival of fatty acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Pulschen, André A; Sastre, Diego E; Machinandiarena, Federico; Crotta Asis, Agostina; Albanesi, Daniela; de Mendoza, Diego; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J

    2017-02-01

    The stringent response is a universal adaptive mechanism to protect bacteria from nutritional and environmental stresses. The role of the stringent response during lipid starvation has been studied only in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report that the stringent response also plays a crucial role in the adaptation of the model Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis to fatty acid starvation. B. subtilis lacking all three (p)ppGpp-synthetases (RelBs , RelP and RelQ) or bearing a RelBs variant that no longer synthesizes (p)ppGpp suffer extreme loss of viability on lipid starvation. Loss of viability is paralleled by perturbation of membrane integrity and function, with collapse of membrane potential as the likely cause of death. Although no increment of (p)ppGpp could be detected in lipid starved B. subtilis, we observed a substantial increase in the GTP/ATP ratio of strains incapable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp. Artificially lowering GTP with decoyinine rescued viability of such strains, confirming observations that low intracellular GTP is important for survival of nutritional stresses. Altogether, our results show that activation of the stringent response by lipid starvation is a broadly conserved response of bacteria and that a key role of (p)ppGpp is to couple biosynthetic processes that become detrimental if uncoordinated.

  14. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  15. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices

    PubMed Central

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics—a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or “rectified”) by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured “primordial soup” of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  16. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    PubMed

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.

  17. Diagnosis of dental caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-10-01

    Current dental diagnostic methods can detect caries but cannot quantify the mineral status of the lesion. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) measures the percentage fluorescence radiance change of demineralised enamel with respect to surround sound enamel, and related it directly to the amount of mineral lost during demineralisation. Demineralisation of teeth to produce caries-like lesions and the subsequent remineralisation of the lesions were monitored quantitatively and longitudinally with QLF. The influence of factors such as presence of plaque or saliva, lesion staining, lesion magnification, tooth thickness and developmental hypomineralisation, on the reproducibility of QLF imaging and analysis were investigated, Results showed that the integrated fluorescence change (hence the mineral loss) increased linearly with demineralisation time and decreased with increasing remineralisation time. Caries detection was limited by saliva or plaque, but enhanced by staining. QLF could not discriminate between developmental hypomineralisation and caries. Neither the variation in tooth thickness nor lesion magnification within the limit of a sharp image made a significant difference in QLF analysis. It was concluded that QLF could detect and quantitatively monitor the mineral changes in an incipient caries on a longitudinal basis, however detection may be limited by the presence of saliva or plaque or enhanced by staining.

  18. Light induced DEP for immobilizing and orienting Escherichia coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, Lisa; Marchesano, Valentina; Mugnano, Martina; Grilli, Simonetta; Ferraro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating bacteria and understanding their behavior when interacting with different substrates are of fundamental importance for patterning, detection, and any other topics related to health-care, food-enterprise, etc. Here, we adopt an innovative dielectrophoretic (DEP) approach based on electrode-free DEP for investigating smart but simple strategies for immobilization and orientation of bacteria. Escherichia coli DH5-alpha strain has been selected as subject of the study. The light induced DEP is achieved through ferroelectric iron-doped lithium niobate crystals used as substrates. Due to the photorefractive (PR) property of such material, suitable light patterns allow writing spatial-charges-distribution inside its volume and the resultant electric fields are able to immobilize E. coli on the surface. The experiments showed that, after laser irradiation, about 80% of bacteria is blocked and oriented along a particular direction on the crystals within an area of few square centimeters. The investigation presented here could open the way for detection or patterning applications based on a new driving mechanism. Future perspectives also include the possibility to actively switch by light the DEP forces, through the writing/erasing characteristic of PR fields, to dynamically control biofilm spatial structure and arrangement.

  19. The light-induced carotenoid absorbance changes in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: an analysis and interpretation of the band shifts.

    PubMed

    Symons, M; Swysen, C; Sybesma, C

    1977-12-23

    An analysis has been made of the spectrum of the carotenoid absorption band shift generated by continuous illumination of chromatophores of the GlC-mutant of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides at room temperature by means of three computer programs. There appears to be at least two pools of the same carotenoid, only one of which, comprising about 20% of the total carotenoid content, is responsible for the light-induced absorbance changes. The 'remaining' pool absorbs at wavelengths which were about 5 nm lower than those at which the 'changing' pool absorbs. This difference in absorption wavelength could indicate that the two pools are influenced differently by permanent local electric fields. The electrochromic origin of the absorbance changes has been demonstrated directly; the isosbestic points of the absorption difference spectrum move to shorter wavelengths upon lowering of the light-induced electric field. Band shifts up to 1.7 nm were observed. A comparison of the light-induced absorbance changes with a KCl-valinomycin-induced diffusion potential has been used to calibrate the electrochromic shifts. The calibration value appeared to be 137 +/- 6 mV per nm shift.

  20. Light-induced phosphorylation of a membrane protein plays an early role in signal transduction for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reymond, P.; Short, T. W.; Briggs, W. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light is known to cause rapid phosphorylation of a membrane protein in etiolated seedlings of several plant species, a protein that, at least in etiolated pea seedlings and maize coleoptiles, has been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. The light-driven phosphorylation has been proposed on the basis of correlative evidence to be an early step in the signal transduction chain for phototropism. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant JK224, the sensitivity to blue light for induction of first positive phototropism is known to be 20- to 30-fold lower than in wild type, whereas second positive curvature appears to be normal. While light-induced phosphorylation can be demonstrated in crude membrane preparations from shoots of the mutant, the level of phosphorylation is dramatically lower than in wild type, as is the sensitivity to blue light. Another A. thaliana mutant, JK218, that completely lacks any phototropic responses to up to 2 h of irradiation, shows a normal level of light-induced phosphorylation at saturation. Since its gravitropic sensitivity is normal, it is presumably blocked in some step between photoreception and the confluence of the signal transduction pathways for phototropism and gravitropism. We conclude from mutant JK224 that light-induced phosphorylation plays an early role in the signal transduction chain for phototropism in higher plants.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  2. Comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves in chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Yang, Li-Wen; Li, Meng-Ling; Dai, Si-Lan

    2016-06-01

    Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear, and many problems regarding phenotypic change and corresponding gene regulation have not been solved. In the present study, comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves were performed in Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan'. After contrasting the variations in the flower color phenotype and relative pigment content, as well as expression patterns of structural and regulator genes responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photoreceptor between different plant organs under light and dark conditions, we concluded that (1) both the capitulum and foliage are key organs responding to light for chrysanthemum coloration; (2) compared with flavones, shading makes a greater decrease on the anthocyanins accumulation; (3) most of the structural and regulatory genes in the light-induced anthocyanin pathway specifically express in the ray florets; and (4) CmCHS, CmF3H, CmF3'H, CmANS, CmDFR, Cm3GT, CmMYB5-1, CmMYB6, CmMYB7-1, CmbHLH24, CmCOP1 and CmHY5 are key genes for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum ray florets, while on the transcriptional level, the expressions of CmPHYA, CmPHYB, CmCRY1a, CmCRY1b and CmCRY2 are insignificantly changed. Moreover, the inferred comprehensive effect of multiple signals on the accumulation of anthocyanins and transmission channel of light signal that exist between the leaves and ray florets were further discussed. These results further our understanding of the relationship between the gene expression and light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis, and lay foundations for the promotion of the molecular breeding of novel flower colors in chrysanthemums. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Protects Retinal Photoreceptors: Evidence From a Rat Model of Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Alice; Johnstone, Daniel M; Stone, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    To test whether remote ischemic preconditioning (RIP) is protective to photoreceptors, in a light damage model, and to identify mechanisms involved. A pressure cuff was used to induce ischemia (2 × 5 minutes) in one hind limb of 4- to 6-month-old albino Sprague-Dawley rats raised in dim, cyclic light (12 hours 5 lux, 12 hours dark). Immediately following the ischemia, rats were exposed to bright continuous light (1000 lux) for 24 hours. After 7-day survival in dim, cyclic light conditions, retinal function was assessed using the flash electroretinogram (ERG) and retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death, as well as for stress. Messenger RNA and protein expression of growth factors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptors was also assessed at 7-day survival. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of the a- and b-waves of the ERG, upregulated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) by Müller cells, increased the number of dying (TUNEL+) photoreceptors, and reduced the number of surviving photoreceptors. Remote ischemic preconditioning mitigated all of these bright light-induced effects. Remote ischemic preconditioning-induced protection was associated with increased retinal expression of BDNF and its low-affinity receptor NGFR. The present study provides evidence, for the first time, that RIP protects photoreceptors against bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. This observation is consistent with previous reports of RIP-induced protection of the inner retina and of other vital organs. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor may play a role in mediating the RIP-induced neuroprotection through activation of NGFR.

  4. Lymphoma development and survival in refractory coeliac disease type II: Histological response as prognostic factor

    PubMed Central

    van Wanrooij, RLJ; van Gils, T; Wierdsma, NJ; Tack, GJ; Witte, BI; Bontkes, HJ; Visser, O; Mulder, CJJ; Bouma, G

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) frequently transforms into an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) and therefore requires intensive treatment. Current evaluated treatment strategies for RCDII include cladribine (2-CdA) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auSCT). Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival and define clear prognostic criteria for EATL development comparing two treatment strategies. Methods A total of 45 patients were retrospectively analysed. All patients received 2-CdA, after which they were either closely monitored (monotherapy, n = 30) or a step-up approach was used including auSCT (step-up therapy, n = 15). Results Ten patients (22%) ultimately developed EATL; nine of these had received monotherapy. Absence of histological remission after monotherapy was associated with EATL development (p = 0.010). Overall, 20 patients (44%) died with a median survival of 84 months. Overall survival (OS) within the monotherapy group was significantly worse in those without histological remission compared to those with complete histological remission(p = 0.030). The monotherapy group who achieved complete histological remission showed comparable EATL occurrence and OS as compared to the step-up therapy group (p = 0.80 and p = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion Histological response is an accurate parameter to evaluate the effect of 2-CdA therapy and this parameter should be leading in the decisions whether or not to perform a step-up treatment approach in RCDII. PMID:28344788

  5. Lymphoma development and survival in refractory coeliac disease type II: Histological response as prognostic factor.

    PubMed

    Nijeboer, P; van Wanrooij, Rlj; van Gils, T; Wierdsma, N J; Tack, G J; Witte, B I; Bontkes, H J; Visser, O; Mulder, Cjj; Bouma, G

    2017-03-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) frequently transforms into an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) and therefore requires intensive treatment. Current evaluated treatment strategies for RCDII include cladribine (2-CdA) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auSCT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival and define clear prognostic criteria for EATL development comparing two treatment strategies. A total of 45 patients were retrospectively analysed. All patients received 2-CdA, after which they were either closely monitored (monotherapy, n = 30) or a step-up approach was used including auSCT (step-up therapy, n = 15). Ten patients (22%) ultimately developed EATL; nine of these had received monotherapy. Absence of histological remission after monotherapy was associated with EATL development (p = 0.010). Overall, 20 patients (44%) died with a median survival of 84 months. Overall survival (OS) within the monotherapy group was significantly worse in those without histological remission compared to those with complete histological remission(p = 0.030). The monotherapy group who achieved complete histological remission showed comparable EATL occurrence and OS as compared to the step-up therapy group (p = 0.80 and p = 0.14 respectively). Histological response is an accurate parameter to evaluate the effect of 2-CdA therapy and this parameter should be leading in the decisions whether or not to perform a step-up treatment approach in RCDII.

  6. Prophylactic neuroprotection by blueberry-enriched diet in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, François; Waterhouse, Jenna; Nason, Janette; Kalt, Wilhelmina

    2013-04-01

    The role of anthocyanins is controversial in vision health. This study investigates the impact of a blueberry-enriched diet as neuroprotectant in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy. Thirty-eight albino Wistar rats and 25 pigmented Brown-Norway rats were fed by gavage with long (7 weeks) and short (2 weeks) intervention with fortified blueberry juice (1 ml; 2.8 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents) or with a placebo solution (7 weeks) that contained the abundant nonanthocyanin blueberry phenolic, namely, chlorogenic acid, before being submitted to 2 hours of intense light regimen (1.8×10(4) lux). Retinal health was measured by fitting electroretinogram responses with the Naka-Rushton equation. The light-induced retinal damage was severe in the placebo groups, with the maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram being significantly reduced in both Wistar and Brown-Norway rats. The maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram was significantly protected from the light insult in the Wistar rats supplemented with blueberry juice for 7 or 2 weeks, and there was no significant difference between these two groups. The same dietary intervention in the Brown-Norway groups failed to protect the retina. Histological examination of retinal section confirmed the electroretinography results, showing protection of the outer nuclear layer of the retina in the Wistar rats fed with blueberries, while all placebo-fed rats and blueberry-fed Brown-Norway rats showed evidence of retinal damage concentrated in the superior hemiretina. The neuroprotective potential of anthocyanins in this particular model is discussed in terms of interaction with rhodopsin/phototransduction and in terms of antioxidative capacity.

  7. Numerical study of light-induced phase behavior of smectic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hayoung; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-10-01

    By the chemical cross-linking of rigid molecules, liquid crystal polymer (LCP) has been envisaged as a novel heterogeneous material due to the fact that various optical and geometric states of the liquid crystalline (LC) phases are projected onto the polymeric constituents. The phase behavior, which refers to the macroscopic shape change of LCP under thermotropic phase change, is a compelling example of such optical-mechanical coupling. In this study, the photomechanical behavior, which broadly refers to the thermal- or light-induced actuation of smectic solids, is investigated using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). First, the various phases of LC are considered as well as their relation to polymeric conformation defined by the strain energy of the smectic polymer; a comprehensive constitutive equation that bridges the strong, optomechanical coupling is then derived. Such photomechanical coupling is incorporated in the FEA considering geometric nonlinearity, which is vital to understanding the large-scale light-induced bending behavior of the smectic solid.To demonstrate the simulation capability of the present model, numerous examples of photomechanical deformations are investigated parametrically, either by changing the operating conditions such as stimuli (postsynthesis) or the intrinsic properties (presynthesis). When compared to nematic solids, distinguished behaviors due to smectic substances are found herein and discussed through experiments. The quasisoftness that bidirectionally couples microscopic variables to mechanical behavior is also explained, while considering the effect of nonlinearity. In addition to providing a comprehensive measure that could deepen the knowledge of photomechanical coupling, the use of the proposed finite element framework offers an insight into the design of light-responsive actuating systems made of smectic solids.

  8. Theory of light-induced deformation of azobenzene elastomers: Influence of network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshchevikov, V. P.; Saphiannikova, M.; Heinrich, G.

    2012-07-01

    Azobenzene elastomers have been extensively explored in the last decade as photo-deformable smart materials which are able to transform light energy into mechanical stress. Presently, there is a great need for theoretical approaches to accurately predict the quantitative response of these materials based on their microscopic structure. Recently, we proposed a theory of light-induced deformation of azobenzene elastomers using a simple regular cubic network model [V. Toshchevikov, M. Saphiannikova, and G. Heinrich, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 913 (2012), 10.1021/jp206323h]. In the present study, we extend the previous theory using more realistic network models which take into account the random orientation of end-to-end vectors of network strands as well as the molecular weight distribution of the strands. Interaction of the chromophores with the linearly polarized light is described by an effective orientation potential which orients the chromophores perpendicular to the polarization direction. We show that both monodisperse and polydisperse azobenzene elastomers can demonstrate either a uniaxial expansion or contraction along the polarization direction. The sign of deformation (expansion/contraction) depends on the orientation distribution of chromophores with respect to the main chains which is defined by the chemical structure and by the lengths of spacers. The degree of cross-linking and the polydispersity of network strands do not affect the sign of deformation but influence the magnitude of light-induced deformation. We demonstrate that photo-mechanical properties of mono- and poly-disperse azobenzene elastomers with random spatial distribution of network strands can be described in a very good approximation by a regular cubic network model with an appropriately chosen length of the strands.

  9. Light-Induced Reversible Change of Roughness and Thickness of Photosensitive Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Kopyshev, Alexey; Galvin, Casey J; Patil, Rohan R; Genzer, Jan; Lomadze, Nino; Feldmann, David; Zakrevski, Juri; Santer, Svetlana

    2016-07-27

    We investigate light-induced changes in thickness and roughness of photosensitive polymer brushes containing azobenzene cationic surfactants by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in real time during light irradiation. Because the cis-state of azobenzene unit requires more free volume than its trans counterpart, the UV light-induced expansion of polymer thin films associated with the trans-to-cis isomerism of azobenzene groups is expected to occur. This phenomenon is well documented in physisorbed polymer films containing azobenzene groups. In contrast, photosensitive polymer brushes show a decrease in thickness under UV irradiation. We have found that the azobenzene surfactants in their trans-state form aggregates within the brush. Under irradiation, the surfactants undergo photoisomerization to the cis-state, which is more hydrophilic. As a consequence, the aggregates within the brush are disrupted, and the polymer brush contracts. When subsequently irradiated with blue light the polymer brush thickness returns back to its initial value. This behavior is related to isomerization of the surfactant to the more hydrophobic trans-state and subsequent formation of surfactant aggregates within the polymer brush. The photomechanical function of the dry polymer brush, i.e., contraction and expansion, was found to be reversible with repeated irradiation cycles and requires only a few seconds for switching. In addition to the thickness change, the roughness of the brush also changes reversibly between a few Angstroms (blue light) and several nanometers (UV light). Photosensitive polymer brushes represent smart films with light responsive thickness and roughness that could be used for generating dynamic fluctuating surfaces, the function of which can be turned on and off in a controllable manner on a nanometer length scale.

  10. Salidroside attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and improves survival in murine endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuang; Feng, Haihua; Song, Bocui; Guo, Weixiao; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Guoren; Zhong, Weiting; Huo, Meixia; Chen, Na; Lu, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2011-12-01

    Salidroside is a major component isolated from the Rhodiola rosea. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of salidroside on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that salidroside reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretions. This inspired us to further study the effects of salidroside in vivo. Salidroside significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 productions in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with salidroside prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that salidroside significantly increased mouse survival. Further studies revealed that salidroside could downregulate LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-қB (NF-қB) DNA-binding activation and ERK/MAPKs signal transduction pathways production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that salidroside modulated early cytokine responses by blocking NF-қB and ERK/MAPKs activation, and thus, increased mouse survival. These effects of salidroside may be of potential usefulness in the treatment of inflammation-mediated endotoxemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A retrospective study of ampullary adenocarcinomas: overall survival and responsiveness to fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z.-Q.; Varadhachary, G.; Wang, X.; Kopetz, S.; Lee, J. E.; Wang, H.; Shroff, R.; Katz, M.; Wolff, R. A.; Fleming, J.; Overman, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater should be classified with biliary tract tumors and treated in a similar manner remains unknown. We sought to compare the outcomes of similarly staged periampullary adenocarcinomas (AAs) and analyze the chemotherapy responsiveness of AAs. Patients and methods A total of 905 patients with resected periampullary adenocarcinomas were identified from a prospective surgical registry from 1988 to 2010. A second cohort of 64 metastatic AA patients from 1992 to 2009 who received either front-line fluoropyrimidine-based or gemcitabine-based chemotherapy was also identified. Results Overall survival (OS) for AAs was similar to survival with duodenal adenocarcinomas, but was significantly different from both extrahepatic biliary and pancreatic adenocarcinomas (P < 0.001 for each comparison). In multivariate analysis, AAs had a significantly improved OS in comparison with extrahepatic biliary adenocarcinomas (HR = 1.97, P = 0.006). Fluoropyrimidine-based as opposed to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for metastatic AAs resulted in a significant improvement in time to progression (P = 0.001) but only a trend toward benefit for OS (P = 0.07) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Differences in the natural history of ampullary and extrahepatic biliary adenocarcinomas exist. Analyses of metastatic ampullary adenocarcinomas suggest that fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy may represent a more appropriate front-line chemotherapy approach. PMID:23704197

  12. Translation suppression promotes stress granule formation and cell survival in response to cold shock

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sarah; Cherkasova, Valeria; Bankhead, Peter; Bukau, Bernd; Stoecklin, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cells respond to different types of stress by inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequent assembly of stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic aggregates that contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Global translation is regulated through the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and the mTOR pathway. Here we identify cold shock as a novel trigger of SG assembly in yeast and mammals. Whereas cold shock–induced SGs take hours to form, they dissolve within minutes when cells are returned to optimal growth temperatures. Cold shock causes eIF2α phosphorylation through the kinase PERK in mammalian cells, yet this pathway is not alone responsible for translation arrest and SG formation. In addition, cold shock leads to reduced mitochondrial function, energy depletion, concomitant activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, prevents the formation of SGs and strongly reduces cellular survival in a translation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that cells actively suppress protein synthesis by parallel pathways, which induce SG formation and ensure cellular survival during hypothermia. PMID:22875991

  13. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  14. Orally administered epigallocatechin gallate attenuates light-induced photoreceptor damage.

    PubMed

    Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira Andrade da; Fawcett, Rebecca; Li, Guang-Yu; Safa, Rukhsana; Osborne, Neville N

    2008-07-01

    EGCG, a major component of green tea, has a number of properties which includes it being a powerful antioxidant. The purpose of this investigation was to deduce whether inclusion of EGCG in the drinking water of albino rats attenuates the effect of a light insult (2200lx, for 24h) to the retina. TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the outer nuclear layer of the retina, indicating the efficacy of the light insult in inducing photoreceptor degeneration. Moreover, Ret-P1 and the mRNA for rhodopsin located at photoreceptors were also significantly reduced as well as the amplitude of both the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram was also reduced showing that photoreceptors in particular are affected by light. An increase in protein/mRNA of GFAP located primarily to Müller cells caused by light shows that other retinal components are also influenced by the light insult. However, antigens associated with bipolar (alpha-PKC), ganglion (Thy-1) and amacrine (GABA) cells, in contrast, appeared unaffected. The light insult also caused a change in the content of various proteins (caspase-3, caspase-8, PARP, Bad, and Bcl-2) involved in apoptosis. A number of the changes to the retina caused by a light insult were significantly attenuated when EGCG was in the drinking water. The reduction of the a- and b-waves and photoreceptor specific mRNAs/protein caused by light were significantly less. In addition, EGCG attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (especially at after 2 days) but did not appear to significantly influence the light-induced up-regulation of GFAP protein/mRNA. It is concluded that orally administered EGCG blunts the detrimental effect of light to the retina of albino rats where the photoreceptors are primarily affected.

  15. NAD+ maintenance attenuates light induced photoreceptor degeneration Δ

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Sheline, Christian T.

    2013-01-01

    Light-induced retinal damage (LD) occurs after surgery or sun exposure. We previously showed that zinc (Zn2+) accumulated in photoreceptors and RPE cells after LD but prior to cell death, and pyruvate or nicotinamide attenuated the resultant death perhaps by restoring nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels. We first examined the levels of NAD+ and the efficacy of pyruvate or nicotinamide in oxidative toxicities using primary retinal cultures. We next manipulated NAD+ levels in vivo and tested the affect on LD to photoreceptors and RPE. NAD+ levels cycle with a 24-h rhythm in mammals, which is affected by the feeding schedule. Therefore, we tested the affect of increasing NAD+ levels on LD by giving nicotinamide, inverting the feeding schedule, or using transgenic mice which overexpress cytoplasmic nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyl-transferase-1 (cytNMNAT1), an NAD+ synthetic enzyme. Zn2+ accumulation was also assessed in culture and in retinal sections. Retinas of light damaged animals were examined by OCT and plastic sectioning, and retinal NAD levels were measured. Day fed, or nicotinamide treated rats showed less NAD+ loss, and LD compared to night fed rats or untreated rats without changing the Zn2+ staining pattern. CytNMNAT1 showed less Zn2+ staining, NAD+ loss, and cell death after LD. In conclusion, intense light, Zn2+ and oxidative toxicities caused an increase in Zn2+, NAD+ loss, and cell death which were attenuated by NAD+ restoration. Therefore, NAD+ levels play a protective role in LD-induced death of photoreceptors and RPE cells. PMID:23274583

  16. Light-induced metastable states in ferroelectric oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. K.; Vikhnin, V. S.; Kapphan, S. E.

    2007-07-01

    New Raman scattering lines (at 463 cm-1 and at 156 cm-1) induced by strong enough optical pumping in nominally pure KTaO3 crystals are manifested. The model of such effect is proposed. This model is based on the light-induced formation of metastable polar clusters constructed from bi-polaronic excitons - Charge Transfer Vibronic Excitons (CTVEs) with their high degree alignment. The CTVEs are caused by photo-carriers with high local concentration which are trapped to local potential wells related with long-range defect fields. CTVE formation are realized in these potential wells due to significant easing of charge transfer fluctuations induced by photo-carrier screening effects. This model is effective also for explanation of giant dielectric constant inducing by strong illumination which was detected recently in KTaO3 and SrTiO3 by Japanese investigators [M. Takesada, T. Yagi, M. Itoh, S. Koshihara, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 37; T. Hasegawa, S. Mouri, Y. Yamada, K. Tanaka, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 41; I. Katayama, Y. Ichikawa, K. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 100102(R)]. Another aspect of the present study was specific recombination luminescence of CTVEs which was investigated here with respect to the influence of additional IR pumping. The present investigation has led to experimental evidence of new, mainly non-linear CTVE with good defined metastable behavior. Such an essentially anharmonic CTVE with respect to charge transfer and lattice displacements was predicted recently in our work [V.S. Vikhnin, Solid State Commun. 127 (2003) 283]. Here, we present experimental evidence of the existence of a new type of exciton state.

  17. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  18. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  19. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  20. Monitoring powder blend homogeneity using light-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Karumanchi, Vineela; Taylor, Michael K; Ely, Kevin J; Stagner, William C

    2011-12-01

    Light-induced fluorescence (LIF) was evaluated as a process analytical technology to monitor blend homogeneity and establish a relationship with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Secondary aims for this study included a determination of blend steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point. Also, identification of potential "dead spots" in the 124 L intermediate bulk container mixing tote was explored. Individual samples from 13 sample locations were collected at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 min and analyzed using LIF and HPLC. LIF and HPLC methods showed similar mixing profiles. A coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.86 (p value < 0.0001) was obtained for a second-degree polynomial bivariate fit of LIF counts by HPLC percent label claim (%LC). A significant linear relationship was determined between LIF percent relative standard (%RSD) and HPLC %RSD (R(2) = 0.97, p < 0.0001). The LIF steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point were determined to be 1-20, 2-20, and 2 min, respectively. The steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point determined by HPLC were 1-20, 5-10, and 5 min, respectively. The Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference analysis of HPLC %LC by sample location at 5 and 10 min mixing times showed that there was a statistical difference between the HPLC %LC group means at two blender locations.

  1. Adjuvant Autologous Melanoma Vaccine for Macroscopic Stage III Disease: Survival, Biomarkers, and Improved Response to CTLA-4 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Michal; Merims, Sharon; Frank, Stephen; Hamburger, Tamar; Nissan, Aviram; Kadouri, Luna; Cohen, Jonathan; Straussman, Ravid; Eisenberg, Galit; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Carmon, Einat; Alaiyan, Bilal; Shneibaum, Shlomo; Ozge Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Isbilen, Murat; Mert Senses, Kerem; Ron, Ilan; Steinberg, Hanna; Smith, Yoav; Shiloni, Eitan; Gure, Ali Osmay; Peretz, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is not yet an agreed adjuvant treatment for melanoma patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III B and C. We report administration of an autologous melanoma vaccine to prevent disease recurrence. Patients and Methods. 126 patients received eight doses of irradiated autologous melanoma cells conjugated to dinitrophenyl and mixed with BCG. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to unmodified melanoma cells was determined on the vaccine days 5 and 8. Gene expression analysis was performed on 35 tumors from patients with good or poor survival. Results. Median overall survival was 88 months with a 5-year survival of 54%. Patients attaining a strong DTH response had a significantly better (p = 0.0001) 5-year overall survival of 75% compared with 44% in patients without a strong response. Gene expression array linked a 50-gene signature to prognosis, including a cluster of four cancer testis antigens: CTAG2 (NY-ESO-2), MAGEA1, SSX1, and SSX4. Thirty-five patients, who received an autologous vaccine, followed by ipilimumab for progressive disease, had a significantly improved 3-year survival of 46% compared with 19% in nonvaccinated patients treated with ipilimumab alone (p = 0.007). Conclusion. Improved survival in patients attaining a strong DTH and increased response rate with subsequent ipilimumab suggests that the autologous vaccine confers protective immunity. PMID:27294163

  2. Centromere and kinetochore gene misexpression predicts cancer patient survival and response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiguo; Mao, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Wei; Jain, Anshu K.; Liu, Ke; Brown, James B.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a hallmark of cancer that contributes to tumour heterogeneity and other malignant properties. Aberrant centromere and kinetochore function causes CIN through chromosome missegregation, leading to aneuploidy, rearrangements and micronucleus formation. Here we develop a Centromere and kinetochore gene Expression Score (CES) signature that quantifies the centromere and kinetochore gene misexpression in cancers. High CES values correlate with increased levels of genomic instability and several specific adverse tumour properties, and prognosticate poor patient survival for breast and lung cancers, especially early-stage tumours. They also signify high levels of genomic instability that sensitize cancer cells to additional genotoxicity. Thus, the CES signature forecasts patient response to adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Our results demonstrate the prognostic and predictive power of the CES, suggest a role for centromere misregulation in cancer progression, and support the idea that tumours with extremely high CIN are less tolerant to specific genotoxic therapies. PMID:27577169

  3. A latent pharmacokinetic time profile to model dose-response survival data.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Tom; Straetemans, Roel; Molenberghs, Geert; Adriaan Bouwknecht, J; Bijnens, Luc

    2010-07-01

    The accelerating rotarod test is a preclinical pharmacodynamic test to assess the effect of a treatment on an animal's motor coordination. Two models are proposed to analyze the dose-response time-to-event data that typically result from such experiments: (1) a linear regression model and (2) an E(max) model with latent drug concentration at the site of action. Both cope with the survival character of the data. The latter model allows a direct comparison of compounds, but raises the question of whether the study design would benefit from the inclusion of additional mice for plasma concentration sampling on the one hand or whether additional time-to-event data without plasma concentration sampling should be ascertained from these additional mice on the other hand. A simulation study explores the impact on operational characteristics of this change of study design.

  4. Survival and behavioral responses of larvae of the caddis fly Hydropsyche angustipennis to copper and diazinon

    SciTech Connect

    Geest, H.G. van der; Greve, G.D.; Haas, E.M. De; Scheper, B.B.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Stuijfzand, S.C.; Augustijn, K.H.; Admiraal, W.

    1999-09-01

    This study reports on newly developed short-term survival and behavioral tests with larvae of the caddis fly Hydropsyche angustipennis using two model toxicants, copper and diazinon. Mortality of first instar larvae was shown to be a reliable endpoint, and it was demonstrated that H. angustipennis is among the more sensitive aquatic insects in terms of both copper and diazinon. In addition, short-term behavioral responses were found to be indicative of adverse effects of ecologically relevant low doses of copper. Using the tests developed in this study, hydropsychid species are excellent tools for discerning the effects of individual toxicants present in large European rivers, and these species may help in defining the conditions for ecological rehabilitation.

  5. YAP enhances autophagic flux to promote breast cancer cell survival in response to nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinghe; Mao, Beibei; Cheng, Jinbo; Gao, Yuhao; Jiang, Ke; Chen, Jun; Yuan, Zengqiang; Meng, Songshu

    2015-01-01

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcriptional coactivator inactivated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, functions as an oncoprotein in a variety of cancers. However, its contribution to breast cancer remains controversial. This study investigated the role of YAP in breast cancer cells under nutrient deprivation (ND). Here, we show that YAP knockdown sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to nutrient deprivation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, in response to ND, YAP increased the autolysosome degradation, thereby enhancing the cellular autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. Of note, autophagy is crucial for YAP to protect MCF7 cells from apoptosis under ND conditions. In addition, the TEA domain (TEAD) family of growth-promoting transcription factors was indispensable for YAP-mediated regulation of autophagy. Collectively, our data reveal a role for YAP in promoting breast cancer cell survival upon ND stress and uncover an unappreciated function of YAP/TEAD in the regulation of autophagy.

  6. Controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning via visible-light induced electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Zixun; Li, Wenjun; Shi, Peng; Shen, Yajing

    2016-04-25

    The fabrication of alginate hydrogel in 3D has recently received increasing attention owing to its distinct efficacy as biocompatible scaffold for 3D cell culture, biomedical and tissue engineering. We report a controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning method by developing a visible-light induced electrodeposition chip. The chip mainly consists of a photoconductive titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) anode plate, an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode plate and the mixed solution (1% sodium alginate and 0.25% CaCO3 nano particles) between them. After a designed visible-light pattern is projected onto the TiOPc plate, the produced H(+) by electrolysis will trigger Ca(2+) near the anode (illuminated area), and then the gelation of calcium alginate patterns, as desired, happens controllably. In addition, we further establish an exponential model to elucidate the gel growth v.s. time and current density. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to fabricate various 3D alginate hydrogel patterns in a well controllable manner, and maintain the laden cells at high survival rate (>98% right after gel formation). This research paves an alternative way for 3D alginate hydrogel patterning with high controllability and productivity, which would benefit the research in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  7. Mechanisms of survival of necrotrophic fungal plant pathogens in hosts expressing the hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Mayer, A M; Staples, R C; Gil-ad, N L

    2001-09-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), elicited when resistant hosts are infected by incompatible races of biotrophic fungi, has been researched extensively. New studies on host responses to necrotrophic fungi are beginning to show that when the HR occurs in hosts colonized by necrotrophs, fungal growth is accelerated rather than retarded. We review current knowledge about how necrotrophs survive in host plants in which the HR is expressed. We discuss how necrotrophs cope with the environmental factors formed as a result of the HR. Necrotrophs contain an array of enzymes, which can help in exploiting the hostile environment in order to colonize the host and to remove or inactivate active oxygen species (AOS). Among this array of enzymes are superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidases, catalase, and perhaps laccases and polyphenol oxidases. Of these, only SOD and catalase have been studied in any detail. The precise significance of SOD and catalase in host invasion and fungal resistance is still not adequately known. The importance of different peroxidases is also still far from clear. We speculate that AOS species may trigger the response of necrotrophs to the host environment.

  8. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Discrete Survival Responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to Sapienic Acid.

    PubMed

    Moran, Josephine C; Alorabi, Jamal A; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcal colonization of human skin is ubiquitous, with particular species more frequent at different body sites. Whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis can be isolated from the skin of every individual tested, Staphylococcus aureus is isolated from <5% of healthy individuals. The factors that drive staphylococcal speciation and niche selection on skin are incompletely defined. Here we show that S. aureus is inhibited to a greater extent than S. epidermidis by the sebaceous lipid sapienic acid, supporting a role for this skin antimicrobial in selection of skin staphylococci. We used RNA-Seq and comparative transcriptomics to identify the sapienic acid survival responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Consistent with the membrane depolarization mode of action of sapienic acid, both species shared a common transcriptional response to counteract disruption of metabolism and transport. The species differed in their regulation of SaeRS and VraRS regulons. While S. aureus upregulated urease operon transcription, S. epidermidis upregulated arginine deiminase, the oxygen-responsive NreABC nitrogen regulation system and the nitrate and nitrite reduction pathways. The role of S. aureus ACME and chromosomal arginine deiminase pathways in sapienic acid resistance was determined through mutational studies. We speculate that ammonia production could contribute to sapienic acid resistance in staphylococci.

  9. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Discrete Survival Responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to Sapienic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Josephine C.; Alorabi, Jamal A.; Horsburgh, Malcolm J.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcal colonization of human skin is ubiquitous, with particular species more frequent at different body sites. Whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis can be isolated from the skin of every individual tested, Staphylococcus aureus is isolated from <5% of healthy individuals. The factors that drive staphylococcal speciation and niche selection on skin are incompletely defined. Here we show that S. aureus is inhibited to a greater extent than S. epidermidis by the sebaceous lipid sapienic acid, supporting a role for this skin antimicrobial in selection of skin staphylococci. We used RNA-Seq and comparative transcriptomics to identify the sapienic acid survival responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Consistent with the membrane depolarization mode of action of sapienic acid, both species shared a common transcriptional response to counteract disruption of metabolism and transport. The species differed in their regulation of SaeRS and VraRS regulons. While S. aureus upregulated urease operon transcription, S. epidermidis upregulated arginine deiminase, the oxygen-responsive NreABC nitrogen regulation system and the nitrate and nitrite reduction pathways. The role of S. aureus ACME and chromosomal arginine deiminase pathways in sapienic acid resistance was determined through mutational studies. We speculate that ammonia production could contribute to sapienic acid resistance in staphylococci. PMID:28179897

  10. Conditioned avoidance responses survive contingency degradation in the garden slug, Lehmannia valentiana.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Dunaway, Elizabeth P; Gennaro, Kyle H

    2014-12-01

    Joint presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) strengthen the contingency between them, whereas presentations of one stimulus without the other degrade this contingency. For example, the CS can be presented without the US either before conditioning (CS-no US and then CS-US; latent inhibition) or after conditioning (CS-US and then CS-no US; extinction). In vertebrate subjects and several invertebrate species, a time lapse usually results in a return of the conditioned response, or spontaneous recovery. However, in land mollusks, spontaneous recovery from extinction has only recently been reported, and response recovery after latent inhibition has not been reported. In two experiments, using conditioned aversion to a food odor as a measure of learning and memory retention, we observed contingency degradation via latent inhibition (Experiment 1) and extinction (Experiment 2) in the common garden slug, Lehmannia valentiana. In both situations, the contingency degradation procedure successfully attenuated conditioned responding, and delaying testing by several days resulted in recovery of the conditioned response. This suggests that the CS-US association survived the degradation manipulation and was retained over an interval of several days.

  11. Mechanisms of response to silver nanoparticles on Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta): survival, reproduction and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Susana I L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2013-06-15

    Silver has antimicrobial properties and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) have been some of the most widely used NPs. Information regarding their effects is still insufficient, in particular for soil dwelling organisms. The standard soil Oligochaete Enchytraeus albidus was used to study the effects of Ag in soils, using differential gene expression (microarray) and population (survival, reproduction) response to Ag-NPs (PVP coated) and AgNO₃. Results showed higher toxicity of AgNO₃ (EC₅₀<50 mg/kg) compared to toxicity of Ag-NPs (EC₅₀=225 mg/kg). Based on the biological and material identity, the difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO₃ could possibly be explained by a release of Ag(+) ions from the particles or by a slower uptake of Ag-NPs. The indications were that the responses to Ag-NPs reflect an effect of Ag ions and Ag-NPs given the extent of similar/dissimilar genes activated. The particles characterization supports this deduction as there were limited free ions measured in soil extracts, maybe related to little oxidation and/or complexation in the soil matrix. The possibility that gene differences were due to different levels of biological impact (i.e. physiological responses) should not be excluded. Testing of Ag-NPs seem to require longer exposure period to be comparable in terms of effect/risk assessment with other chemicals.

  12. Survival response to increased ceramide involves metabolic adaptation through novel regulators of glycolysis and lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Nirala, Niraj K; Rahman, Motiur; Walls, Stanley M; Singh, Alka; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Srideshikan, Sargur M; Harris, Greg L; Ip, Y Tony; Bodmer, Rolf; Acharya, Usha R

    2013-06-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide elicits several stress responses, however, organisms survive despite increased ceramide but how they do so is poorly understood. We demonstrate here that the AKT/FOXO pathway regulates survival in increased ceramide environment by metabolic adaptation involving changes in glycolysis and lipolysis through novel downstream targets. We show that ceramide kinase mutants accumulate ceramide and this leads to reduction in energy levels due to compromised oxidative phosphorylation. Mutants show increased activation of Akt and a consequent decrease in FOXO levels. These changes lead to enhanced glycolysis by upregulating the activity of phosphoglyceromutase, enolase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase to provide energy. A second major consequence of AKT/FOXO reprogramming in the mutants is the increased mobilization of lipid from the gut through novel lipase targets, CG8093 and CG6277 for energy contribution. Ubiquitous reduction of these targets by knockdown experiments results in semi or total lethality of the mutants, demonstrating the importance of activating them. The efficiency of these adaptive mechanisms decreases with age and leads to reduction in adult life span of the mutants. In particular, mutants develop cardiac dysfunction with age, likely reflecting the high energy requirement of a well-functioning heart. The lipases also regulate physiological triacylglycerol homeostasis and are important for energy metabolism since midgut specific reduction of them in wild type flies results in increased sensitivity to starvation and accumulation of triglycerides leading to cardiac defects. The central findings of increased AKT activation, decreased FOXO level and activation of phosphoglyceromutase and pyruvate kinase are also observed in mice heterozygous for ceramide transfer protein suggesting a conserved role of this pathway in mammals. These data reveal novel glycolytic and non-autonomous lipolytic pathways in response to increased

  13. Ubiquitination by SAG regulates macrophage survival/death and immune response during infection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S C; Ding, J L

    2014-01-01

    The checkpoint between the life and death of macrophages is crucial for the host's frontline immune defense during acute phase infection. However, the mechanism as to how the immune cell equilibrates between apoptosis and immune response is unclear. Using in vitro and ex vivo approaches, we showed that macrophage survival is synchronized by SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), which is a key member of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). When challenged by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we observed a reciprocal expression profile of pro- and antiapoptotic factors in macrophages. However, SAG knockdown disrupted this balance. Further analysis revealed that ubiquitination of Bax and SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein) by SAG-UPS confers survival advantage to infected macrophages. SAG knockdown caused the accumulation of proapoptotic Bax and SARM, imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, induction of cytosolic cytochrome c and activation of caspase-9 and -3, all of which led to disequilibrium between life and death of macrophages. In contrast, SAG-overexpressing macrophages challenged with PAMPs exhibited upregulation of protumorigenic cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), and downregulation of antitumorigenic cytokine (IL-12p40) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). This suggests that SAG-dependent UPS is a key switch between immune defense and apoptosis or immune overactivation and tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results indicate that SAG-UPS facilitates a timely and appropriate level of immune response, prompting future development of potential immunomodulators of SAG-UPS. PMID:24786833

  14. Zinc-finger protein 91 plays a key role in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hong Ri; Jin, Xuejun; Lee, Jung Joon

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} LIGHT induces ZFP91expression and nuclear translocation of p65, p52, and RelB in LT{beta}R signaling. {yields} ZFP91 knock-down abolishes DNA-binding activity of p52 and RelB but not of p65. {yields} ZFP91 regulates LIGHT-induced stabilization and activation of NIK. {yields} ZFP91 is required for the expression of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B target genes. -- Abstract: LIGHT is a member of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, and its function is mediated through lymphotoxin-{beta} receptor (LT{beta}R), which is known to play important roles in inflammatory and immune responses through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathways. However, molecular mechanism of LT{beta}R ligation-induced NF-{kappa}B signaling remains incompletely understood. In this report we demonstrate that a novel zinc-finger protein 91 (ZFP91) is a critical regulator in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway. ZFP91 appears to be required for NF-{kappa}B2 (p100) processing to p52, nuclear translocation of p52 and RelB, and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway. Furthermore, ZFP91 knock-down by RNA interference blocks the LIGHT-induced accumulation of NIK and p100 processing, as well as the expression of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B target genes. These data clearly indicate that ZFP91 is a key regulator in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway in LT{beta}R signaling.

  15. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  16. Light-hormone interaction in the red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ansuman; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-03-01

    Red light perceived by the shoot bottom suppresses photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings mediated by phytochrome A. Shoots of these seedlings grown in red light having their shoot bottom exposed were deficient in chlorophyll and accumulated high concentration of trans-zeatin riboside. However, reduced presence of isopentynyl adenosine, dihydrozeatin riboside was observed in shoots of red-light-grown non-green seedlings in comparison to green seedling. The message abundance of cytokinin receptor (OsHK5), transporters (OsENT1, OsENT2), and response regulators (OsRR4, OsRR10) was downregulated in these red-light-grown non-green seedlings. Attenuation of greening process was reversed by application of exogenous cytokinin analogue, benzyladenine, or supplementing red light with blue light. In the same vein, the suppression of gene expression of cytokinin receptor, transporters, and type-A response regulators was reversed in red-light-grown seedlings treated with benzyladenine suggesting that the disarrayed cytokinin (CK) signaling cascade is responsible for non-greening of seedlings grown in red light. The reversal of red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis by blue light and benzyladenine demonstrates the interaction of light and cytokinin signaling cascades in the regulation of photomorphogenesis. Partial reversal of greening process by exogenous application of benzyladenine suggests, apart from CKs perception, transportation and responsiveness, other factors are also involved in modulation of suppression of photomorphogenesis by red light.

  17. [Impact of stages of axillary lymph nodes and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyan; Zhang, Bailin; Xu, Xiaozhou; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the relevance between lymph node status and pathological response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival in breast cancer patients. The clinicopathological data of 653 needle biopsy proved breast cancer patients, who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery in our hospital from July 1998 to April 2012, were retrospective analyzed. The median follow up time was 59.3 months. The 653 cases were classified into ypN0 (242 cases), ypN1 (182 cases), ypN2 (135 cases), and ypN3 (94 cases) stages, and the 5-year overall survival rates in the four groups were 93.4%, 93.4%, 87.4%, and 83.0%, respectively. The Log rank test showed a significant difference in the overall survival rates between the ypN0, ypN1, ypN2 stages and ypN3 stage (P=0.046). No significant differences were observed between the disease free survival (DFS) rates in the four groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that the postoperative pathological response of metastatic lymph nodes was a major prognostic factor affecting the overall survival and disease-free survival (RR=1.051, P=0.007; RR=1.028, P=0.028). The stage and pathological response of axillary lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are effective indicators for predicting the OS and DFS in breast cancer patients.

  18. Modeling post-fledging survival of lark buntings in response to ecological and biological factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yackel Adams, A.A.; Skagen, S.K.; Savidge, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the influences of several ecological, biological, and methodological factors on post-fledging survival of a shortgrass prairie bird, the Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys). We estimated daily post-fledging survival (n = 206, 82 broods) using radiotelemetry and color bands to track fledglings. Daily survival probabilities were best explained by drought intensity, time in season (quadratic trend), ages a??3 d post-fledging, and rank given drought intensity. Drought intensity had a strong negative effect on survival. Rank was an important predictor of fledgling survival only during the severe drought of 2002 when the smallest fledglings had lower survival. Recently fledged young (ages a??3 d post-fledging) undergoing the transition from nest to surrounding habitat experienced markedly lower survival, demonstrating the vulnerable nature of this time period. Survival was greater in mid and late season than early season, corresponding to our assumptions of food availability. Neither mark type nor sex of attending parent influenced survival. The model-averaged product of the 22-d survival calculated using mean rank and median value of time in season was 0.360 A? 0.08 in 2001 and 0.276 A? 0.08 in 2002. Survival estimates that account for age, condition of young, ecological conditions, and other factors are important for parameterization of realistic population models. Biologists using population growth models to elucidate mechanisms of population declines should attempt to estimate species-specific of post-fledging survival rather than use generalized estimates.

  19. Early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy can help predict long-term survival in patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong; Huang, Kecheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Shen, Jian; Zhou, Hang; Yang, Runfeng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Jiong; Zhang, Jincheng; Sun, Haiying; Jia, Yao; Du, Xiaofang; Wang, Haoran; Deng, Song; Ding, Ting; Jiang, Jingjing; Lu, Yunping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2016-12-27

    It is still controversial whether cervical cancer patients with clinical responses after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) have a better long-term survival or not. This study was designed to investigate the effect of the clinical response on the disease-free survival (DFS) of cervical cancer patients undergoing NACT. A total of 853 patients from a retrospective study were used to evaluate whether the clinical response was an indicator for the long-term response, and 493 patients from a prospective cohort study were used for further evaluation. The survival difference was detected by log-rank test, univariate and multivariate Cox regression and a pooled analysis. The log-rank test revealed that compared with non-responders, the DFS of responders was significantly higher in the retrospective data (P = 0.007). Univariate Cox regression showed that the clinical response was an indicator of long-term survival in the retrospective study (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.18-2.85, P = 0.007). In a multivariate Cox model, the clinical response was still retained as an independent significant prognostic factor in the retrospective study (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.01-2.50, P = 0.046). The result was also validated in the prospective data with similar results. These findings implied that the clinical response can be regarded as an independent predictor of DFS.

  20. Early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy can help predict long-term survival in patients with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jian; Zhou, Hang; Yang, Runfeng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Jiong; Zhang, Jincheng; Sun, Haiying; Jia, Yao; Du, Xiaofang; Wang, Haoran; Deng, Song; Ding, Ting; Jiang, Jingjing; Lu, Yunping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2016-01-01

    It is still controversial whether cervical cancer patients with clinical responses after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) have a better long-term survival or not. This study was designed to investigate the effect of the clinical response on the disease-free survival (DFS) of cervical cancer patients undergoing NACT. A total of 853 patients from a retrospective study were used to evaluate whether the clinical response was an indicator for the long-term response, and 493 patients from a prospective cohort study were used for further evaluation. The survival difference was detected by log-rank test, univariate and multivariate Cox regression and a pooled analysis. The log-rank test revealed that compared with non-responders, the DFS of responders was significantly higher in the retrospective data (P = 0.007). Univariate Cox regression showed that the clinical response was an indicator of long-term survival in the retrospective study (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.18-2.85, P = 0.007). In a multivariate Cox model, the clinical response was still retained as an independent significant prognostic factor in the retrospective study (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.01-2.50, P = 0.046). The result was also validated in the prospective data with similar results. These findings implied that the clinical response can be regarded as an independent predictor of DFS. PMID:27557523

  1. CarF mediates signaling by singlet oxygen, generated via photoexcited protoporphyrin IX, in Myxococcus xanthus light-induced carotenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Galbis-Martínez, Marisa; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco J; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat

    2012-03-01

    Blue light triggers carotenogenesis in the nonphototrophic bacterium Myxococcus xanthus by inducing inactivation of an anti-σ factor, CarR, and the consequent liberation of the cognate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor, CarQ. CarF, the protein implicated earliest in the response to light, does not resemble any known photoreceptor. It interacts physically with CarR and is required for its light-driven inactivation, but the mechanism is unknown. Blue-light sensing in M. xanthus has been attributed to the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which can generate the highly reactive singlet oxygen species ((1)O(2)) by energy transfer to oxygen. However, (1)O(2) involvement in M. xanthus light-induced carotenogenesis remains to be established. Here, we present genetic evidence of the involvement of PPIX as well as (1)O(2) in light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus and of how these are linked to CarF in the signal transduction pathway. Response to light was examined in carF-bearing and carF-deficient M. xanthus strains lacking endogenous PPIX due to deletion of hemB or accumulating PPIX due to deletion of hemH (hemB and hemH are early- and late-acting heme biosynthesis genes, respectively). This demonstrated that light induction of the CarQ-dependent promoter, P(QRS), correlated directly with cellular PPIX levels. Furthermore, we show that P(QRS) activation is triggered by (1)O(2) and is inhibited by exogenously supplied hemin and that CarF is essential for the action of (1)O(2). Thus, our findings indicate that blue light interaction with PPIX generates (1)O(2), which must be transmitted via CarF to trigger the transcriptional response underlying light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus.

  2. CarF Mediates Signaling by Singlet Oxygen, Generated via Photoexcited Protoporphyrin IX, in Myxococcus xanthus Light-Induced Carotenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Galbis-Martínez, Marisa; Padmanabhan, S.; Murillo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Blue light triggers carotenogenesis in the nonphototrophic bacterium Myxococcus xanthus by inducing inactivation of an anti-σ factor, CarR, and the consequent liberation of the cognate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor, CarQ. CarF, the protein implicated earliest in the response to light, does not resemble any known photoreceptor. It interacts physically with CarR and is required for its light-driven inactivation, but the mechanism is unknown. Blue-light sensing in M. xanthus has been attributed to the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which can generate the highly reactive singlet oxygen species (1O2) by energy transfer to oxygen. However, 1O2 involvement in M. xanthus light-induced carotenogenesis remains to be established. Here, we present genetic evidence of the involvement of PPIX as well as 1O2 in light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus and of how these are linked to CarF in the signal transduction pathway. Response to light was examined in carF-bearing and carF-deficient M. xanthus strains lacking endogenous PPIX due to deletion of hemB or accumulating PPIX due to deletion of hemH (hemB and hemH are early- and late-acting heme biosynthesis genes, respectively). This demonstrated that light induction of the CarQ-dependent promoter, PQRS, correlated directly with cellular PPIX levels. Furthermore, we show that PQRS activation is triggered by 1O2 and is inhibited by exogenously supplied hemin and that CarF is essential for the action of 1O2. Thus, our findings indicate that blue light interaction with PPIX generates 1O2, which must be transmitted via CarF to trigger the transcriptional response underlying light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus. PMID:22267513

  3. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  4. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  5. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was…

  6. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was…

  7. Delayed ultraviolet light-induced cessation of respiration by inadequate aeration of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J G; Swenson, P A; Schenley, R L

    1977-02-01

    Inadequately aerated Escherichia coli B/r cultures did not shut their respiration off 60 min after ultraviolet light (52 M/m2 at 254 nm) as they did when well supplied with oxygen. Since cessation of respiaration is associated with cell death, the result suggested that oxygen toxicity by superoxide radicals generated by cell metabolism might be responsible for cell death. The specific activity of superoxide dismutase, which scavenges O2- radicals, increased twofold after 90 min of adequate aeration, but the specific activity of catalase remained constant. Respiration and viability of irradiated cells were affected not at all by the presence of superoxide dismutase and only slightly by the presence of catalase. Metal ions such as Mn2+ and Fe2+ inducers of superoxide dismutase, had no effect on respiration and viability. When irradiated cells were incubated under N2 for 90 min, the respiration, growth, and viability time-course responses were the same as for the cells not exposed to anareobiosis. We conclude that superoxide anions generated at the time of irradiation play no part in cessation delays the ultraviolet light-induced synthesis of proteins responsible for the irreversible cessation of respiration.

  8. Reduction of Light-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation in Inoculated Sorghum Mesocotyls1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sze-Chung Clive; Nicholson, Ralph L.

    1998-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) accumulates the anthocyanin cyanidin 3-dimalonyl glucoside in etiolated mesocotyls in response to light. Inoculation with the nonpathogenic fungus Cochliobolus heterostrophus drastically reduced the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin by repressing the transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding flavanone 3-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase. In contrast to these repression effects, fungal inoculation resulted in the synthesis of the four known 3-deoxyanthocyanidin phytoalexins and a corresponding activation of genes encoding the key branch-point enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase. In addition, a gene encoding the pathogenesis-related protein PR-10 was strongly induced in response to inoculation. The accumulation of phytoalexins leveled off by 48 h after inoculation and was accompanied by a more rapid increase in the rate of anthocyanin accumulation. The results suggest that the plant represses less essential metabolic activities such as anthocyanin synthesis as a means of compensating for the immediate biochemical and physiological needs for the defense response. PMID:9501130

  9. Roles of diet and the acid tolerance response in survival of common Salmonella serotypes in feces of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Leonard, Nola; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P < 0.1) and increased rates of decline (P < 0.0001) of salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P < 0.1) the duration of survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature.

  10. Roles of Diet and the Acid Tolerance Response in Survival of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Feces of Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P < 0.1) and increased rates of decline (P < 0.0001) of salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P < 0.1) the duration of survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature. PMID:22038599

  11. Galerkin analysis of light-induced patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Sen, Shrabani; Riaz, Syed Shahed; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2009-05-01

    The photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system has been an experimental paradigm for the study of Turing pattern over the last several years. When subjected to illumination of varied intensity by visible light the patterns undergo changes from spots to stripes, vice versa, and their mixture. We carry out a nonlinear analysis of the underlying model in terms of a Galerkin scheme with finite number of modes to explore the nature of the stability and existence of various modes responsible for the type and crossover of the light-induced patterns.

  12. Survival of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) and saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) seedlings in response to flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gladwin, D.N.; Roelle, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the response of first year saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) and plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) seedlings to flooding in fall (25 days) and spring (28 days) using potgrown plants (12-18 individuals/26.5-liter pot). Seedlings were initially counted in all pots prior to fall treatment. Survival was calculated as the proportion of seedlings in each pot still alive following spring treatment. Mean survival rates of seedlings flooded in fall (saltcedar = 0.8%, cottonwood = 20.8%, n = 14 pots) were lower compared to the spring flooding treatment (saltcedar = 91.1%, cottonwood = 92.2%, n = 13) and control (saltcedar = 93.9%, cottonwood = 98.7%, n = 14). We used multiple response permutation procedures to detect omnibus distributional differences in survival data (total tests = 9) because assumptions of normality and equal variance were not met. Survival distributions differed between saltcedar and cottonwood fall flooding groups (P 0.07). Smaller size and consequent lack of energy reserves may account for lower survival of saltcedar compared to cottonwood in the fall treatment and for lower survival of both species in the fall treatment compared to the spring treatment. Fall flooding for controlling first year saltcedar seedlings is suggested as a potentially useful technique in riparian habitat restoration and management in the southwestern United States.

  13. Modeling the survival responses of a multi-component biofilm to environmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Manzoni, Stefano; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are consortia of microorganisms embedded in self-produced matrices of biopolymers. The survival of such communities depends on their capacity to improve the environmental conditions of their habitat by mitigating, or even benefitting from some adverse external factors. The mechanisms by which the microbial habitat is regulated remain mostly unknown. However, many studies have reported physiological responses to environmental stresses that include the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the induction of a dormancy state. A sound understanding of these capacities is required to enhance the knowledge of the microbial dynamics in soils and its potential role in the carbon cycle, with significant implications for the degradation of contaminants and the emission of greenhouse gases, among others. We present a numerical analysis of the dynamics of soil microbes and their responses to environmental stresses. The conceptual model considers a multi-component heterotrophic biofilm made up of active cells, dormant cells, EPS, and extracellular enzymes. Biofilm distribution and properties are defined at the pore-scale and used to determine nutrient availability and water saturation via feedbacks of biofilm on soil hydraulic properties. The pore space micro-habitat is modeled as a simplified pore-network of cylindrical tubes in which biofilms proliferate. Microbial compartments and most of the carbon fluxes are defined at the bulk level. Microbial processes include the synthesis, decay and detachment of biomass, the activation/deactivation of cells, and the release and reutilization of EPS. Results suggest that the release of EPS and the capacity to enter a dormant state offer clear evolutionary advantages in scenarios characterized by environmental stress. On the contrary, when the conditions are favorable, the diversion of carbon into the production of the aforementioned survival mechanisms does not confer any additional benefit and the population

  14. Homeopathy outperforms antibiotics treatment in juvenile scallop Argopecten ventricosus: effects on growth, survival, and immune response.

    PubMed

    Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel; García-Bernal, Milagro; Saucedo, Pedro Enrique; Campa-Córdova, Ángel; Abasolo-Pacheco, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Mortality from vibriosis in mollusk production is attributed to pathogenic bacteria, particularly Vibrio alginolyticus. Use of increasingly potent antibiotics has led to bacterial resistance and increased pathogenicity. Alternatives in sanitation, safety, and environmental sustainability are currently under analysis. To-date, homeopathy has been investigated in aquaculture of freshwater fish, but not in marine mollusks. The effect of the homeopathic complexes in the growth, survival, and immune response of the Catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus were assessed. A bioassay to assess the potential of homeopathy in improving cultivation of juvenile A. ventricosus was conducted for 21 days, with a final challenge of 120 h with V. alginolyticus. The experimental design included two homeopathic formulas The homeopathic complex Passival, consisting of Passiflora incarnata 30 CH, Valeriana officinalis 30 CH, Ignatia amara 30 CH and Zincum valerianicum 30 CH plus Phosphoricum acid 30 CH (treatment TH1) or Silicea terra 30 CH (TH2), two antibiotics (ampicillin = AMP, oxytetracycline = OXY), and two reference treatments (without homeopathic or antibiotic treatment = CTRL, ethanol 30° GL = ETH). Additionally, a negative control CTRL- (untreated/uninfected) is included in the challenge test. Juvenile scallops (4.14 ± 0.06 mm, 13.33 mg wet weight) were cultivated in 4 L tanks provided with aerated, filtered (1 μm), and UV-sterilized seawater that was changed every third day. They were fed a blend of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans (150,000 cells mL(-1) twice a day). All treatments were directly added to the tank water and then 500 mL challenge units were inoculated with 1 × 10(7) CFU/mL (LD50) of V. alginolyticus. Juveniles grew significantly larger and faster in height and weight with TH2 compared to the ETH and CTRL (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Higher concentrations of proteins occurred in scallops exposed to TH2 (160.57 ± 7

  15. Survival, Durable Response, and Long-Term Safety in Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Nivolumab

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David F.; Drake, Charles G.; Sznol, Mario; Choueiri, Toni K.; Powderly, John D.; Smith, David C.; Brahmer, Julie R.; Carvajal, Richard D.; Hammers, Hans J.; Puzanov, Igor; Hodi, F. Stephen; Kluger, Harriet M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Kollia, Georgia D.; Gupta, Ashok; McDonald, Dan; Sankar, Vindira; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Atkins, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Blockade of the programmed death-1 inhibitory cell-surface molecule on immune cells using the fully human immunoglobulin G4 antibody nivolumab mediates tumor regression in a portion of patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumors. We report clinical activity, survival, and long-term safety in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with nivolumab in a phase I study with expansion cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 34 patients with previously treated advanced RCC, enrolled between 2008 and 2012, received intravenous nivolumab (1 or 10 mg/kg) in an outpatient setting once every two weeks for up to 96 weeks and were observed for survival and duration of response after treatment discontinuation. Results Ten patients (29%) achieved objective responses (according to RECIST [version 1.0]), with median response duration of 12.9 months; nine additional patients (27%) demonstrated stable disease lasting > 24 weeks. Three of five patients who stopped treatment while in response continued to respond for ≥ 45 weeks. Median overall survival in all patients (71% with two to five prior systemic therapies) was 22.4 months; 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 71%, 48%, and 44%, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 18% of patients; all were reversible. Conclusion Patients with advanced treatment-refractory RCC treated with nivolumab demonstrated durable responses that in some responders persisted after drug discontinuation. Overall survival is encouraging, and toxicities were generally manageable. Ongoing randomized clinical trials will further assess the impact of nivolumab on overall survival in patients with advanced RCC. PMID:25800770

  16. Light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated/liquid-crystal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Francescangeli, O.; Lucchetti, L.; Simoni, F.; Stanic, V.; Mazzulla, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental study, by means of x-ray reflectometry (XRR) and half-leaky guided mode (HLGM) optical characterization, of the light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at the polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated (PVCN-F)/liquid-crystal (LC) interface of a LC cell doped with the azo-dye methyl red (MR). The XRR data allowed characterizing the microscopic structure of the adsorbed dye layer both before irradiation (dark adsorption) and after irradiation (light-induced adsorption). The HLGM optical characterization has made possible the experimental determination of the nematic director profile in the LC cell and evaluation of the effects of light-induced adsorption on the LC anchoring conditions. The experimental findings have confirmed the formation of a dark-adsorbed layer and are in agreement with the absorption model previously proposed to account for the complex phenomenology related to light-induced anchoring and reorientation in dye-doped liquid crystals.

  17. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Light-Induced Mycelial Brown Film Formation in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li Hua; Tan, Qi; Bao, Da Peng; Zhang, Xue Hong; Jian, Hua Hua; Li, Yan; Yang, Rui heng

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced brown film (BF) formation by the vegetative mycelium of Lentinula edodes is important for ensuring the quantity and quality of this edible mushroom. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenotype is still unclear. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis of mycelial BF formation in L. edodes was performed. Seventy-three protein spots with at least a twofold difference in abundance on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) maps were observed, and 52 of them were successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF/MS). These proteins were classified into the following functional categories: small molecule metabolic processes (39%), response to oxidative stress (5%), and organic substance catabolic processes (5%), followed by oxidation-reduction processes (3%), single-organism catabolic processes (3%), positive regulation of protein complex assembly (3%), and protein metabolic processes (3%). Interestingly, four of the proteins that were upregulated in response to light exposure were nucleoside diphosphate kinases. To our knowledge, this is the first proteomic analysis of the mechanism of BF formation in L. edodes. Our data will provide a foundation for future detailed investigations of the proteins linked to BF formation. PMID:27868065

  18. Light-induced fading of the PSL signal from irradiated herbs and spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, A.; Corda, U.; Fuochi, P.; Bortolin, E.; Calicchia, A.; Onori, S.

    2007-08-01

    Reliability of the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique, as screening method for irradiated food identification, has been tested with three kinds of herbs and spices (oregano, red pepper and fennel), prepared in two different ways (granular: i.e. seeds and flakes, or powdered), over a long period of storage with different light exposures. The irradiated samples kept in the dark gave always a positive response (the sample is correctly classified as "irradiated") for the overall examination period. The samples kept under ambient light conditions, in typical commercial glass containers, exhibited a reduction of the PSL signal, more or less pronounced depending on the type of food and packaging. The different PSL response of the irradiated samples is to be related to the quantity and quality of the mineral debris present in the individual food. It was also found that, for the same type of food, the light-induced fading was much stronger for the flaked and seed samples than for the corresponding powder samples, the penetrating capability of light being much more inhibited in powdered than in whole seeds or flaked form samples. The observed light bleaching of the PSL signal in irradiated herbs and spices is of practical relevance since it may lead to false negative classifications.

  19. Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaney, Lindsay; Richardson, Bryce A.; Germino, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata(big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common-garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype variations. Survival was monitored for 5 years to assess differences in survival between gardens and populations. We found evidence of adaptive genetic variation for survival. Survival within gardens differed by source-population and a substantial proportion of this variation was explained by seed climate of origin. Plants from areas with the coldest winters had the highest levels of survival, while populations from warmer and drier sites had the lowest levels of survival. Survival was lowest, 36%, in the garden that was prone to the lowest minimum temperatures. These results suggest the importance of climatic driven genetic differences and their effect on survival. Understanding how genetic variation is arrayed across the landscape, and its association with climate can greatly enhance the success of restoration and conservation.

  20. Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata).

    PubMed

    Chaney, Lindsay; Richardson, Bryce A; Germino, Matthew J

    2017-04-01

    A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common-garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype variations. Survival was monitored for 5 years to assess differences in survival between gardens and populations. We found evidence of adaptive genetic variation for survival. Survival within gardens differed by source-population and a substantial proportion of this variation was explained by seed climate of origin. Plants from areas with the coldest winters had the highest levels of survival, while populations from warmer and drier sites had the lowest levels of survival. Survival was lowest, 36%, in the garden that was prone to the lowest minimum temperatures. These results suggest the importance of climatic driven genetic differences and their effect on survival. Understanding how genetic variation is arrayed across the landscape, and its association with climate can greatly enhance the success of restoration and conservation.

  1. Signal Integration by ABA in the Blue Light-Induced Acidification of Leaf Pavement Cells in Pea (Pisum sativum L. var. Argenteum)

    PubMed Central

    den Os, Désirée; Staal, Marten

    2007-01-01

    Leaf pavement cell expansion in light depends on apoplastic acidification by a plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase, modifying cell wall extensibility and providing the driving force for uptake of osmotically active solutes generating turgor. This paper shows that the plant hormone ABA inhibits light-induced leaf disk growth as well as the blue light-induced pavement cell growth in pea (Pisum sativum L.). In the phytochrome chromophore-deficient mutant pcd2, the effect of ABA on the blue light-induced apoplastic acidification response, which exhibits a high fluence phase via phytochrome and a low fluence phase via an unknown blue light receptor, is still present, indicating an interaction of ABA with the blue light receptor pathway. Furthermore, it is shown that ABA inhibits the blue light-induced apoplastic acidification reversibly. These results indicate that the effect of ABA on apoplastic acidification can provide a mechanism for short term, reversible adjustment of leaf growth rate to environmental change. PMID:19516983

  2. PiwiRNA-651 as marker of treatment response and survival in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Anna; Navarro, Alfons; Gaya, Anna; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Gonzalez-Farré, Blanca; Castellano, Joan Josep; Fuster, Dolors; Martínez, Carmen; Martínez, Antonio; Monzó, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    PiwiRNAs, small non-coding RNAs processed by Piwi proteins, are involved in maintaining genome stability in germline cells. Recently, piwiRNA expression has been identified in some tumors. We have examined the potential reactivation of the Piwi/piwiRNA pathway in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We found that Piwi proteins and three selected piwiRNAs, including piR-651, were expressed in cHL patients and cell lines, indicating that the Piwi/piwiRNA pathway is active in cHL. Interestingly, low levels of piR-651 were associated with lack of complete response to first-line treatment, as well as shorter disease-free and overall survival in a cohort of 94 cHL patients. At diagnosis, piR-651 was underexpressed in cHL serum samples compared to healthy controls, while after complete remission, piR-651 levels increased to levels similar to healthy controls. This is the first evidence that piwiRNAs are active in tumor and serum samples and impact prognosis in cHL. PMID:27329591

  3. Oosorption in response to poor food: complexity in the trade-off between reproduction and survival

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Patricia J; Attisano, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in reproductive physiology is one avenue by which environmental signals, such as poor quality food, can be coordinated with adaptive responses. Insects have the ability to resorb oocytes that are not oviposited. Oosorption is proposed to be an adaptive mechanism to optimize fitness in hostile environments, recouping resources that might otherwise be lost, and reinvesting them into future reproductive potential. We tested the hypothesis that oosorption is an evolved mechanism by which females can reallocate resources from current reproductive effort to survival and future reproduction, when conditions for reproduction are poor, by examining the reproductive physiology and life-history outcome under poor quality food in populations of the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) that have adapted to live on sunflower seed. Females fed a diet of pumpkin seeds, known to be a poor host food, had higher levels of ovarian apoptosis (oosorption), lower reproductive output, but no reduction in life span under poor nutrition, as predicted under the oosorption hypothesis. However, the schedule of reproduction was surprising given the “wait to reproduce” assumption of oosorption as early fecundity was unaffected. PMID:22393481

  4. SPHK1 regulates proliferation and survival responses in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Arpita; Loo, Ser Yue; Huang, Baohua; Wong, Lingkai; Tan, Sheryl S L; Tan, Tuan Zea; Lee, Soo-Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yong, Wei Peng; Lam, Yulin; Kumar, Alan Prem; Yap, Celestial T

    2014-03-27

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by unique aggressive behavior and lack of targeted therapies. Among the various molecular subtypes of breast cancer, it was observed that TNBCs express elevated levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) compared to other breast tumor subtypes. High levels of SPHK1 gene expression correlated with poor overall and progression- free survival, as well as poor response to Doxorubicin-based treatment. Inhibition of SPHK1 was found to attenuate ERK1/2 and AKT signaling and reduce growth of TNBC cells in vitro and in a xenograft SCID mouse model. Moreover, SPHK1 inhibition by siRNA knockdown or treatment with SKI-5C sensitizes TNBCs to chemotherapeutic drugs. Our findings suggest that SPHK1 inhibition, which effectively counteracts oncogenic signaling through ERK1/2 and AKT pathways, is a potentially important anti-tumor strategy in TNBC. A combination of SPHK1 inhibitors with chemotherapeutic agents may be effective against this aggressive subtype of breast cancer.

  5. SPHK1 regulates proliferation and survival responses in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Arpita; Loo, Ser Yue; Huang, Baohua; Wong, Lingkai; Tan, Sheryl S L; Tan, Tuan Zea; Lee, Soo-Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yong, Wei Peng; Lam, Yulin; Kumar, Alan Prem; Yap, Celestial T

    2014-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by unique aggressive behavior and lack of targeted therapies. Among the various molecular subtypes of breast cancer, it was observed that TNBCs express elevated levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) compared to other breast tumor subtypes. High levels of SPHK1 gene expression correlated with poor overall and progression- free survival, as well as poor response to Doxorubicin-based treatment. Inhibition of SPHK1 was found to attenuate ERK1/2 and AKT signaling and reduce growth of TNBC cells in vitro and in a xenograft SCID mouse model. Moreover, SPHK1 inhibition by siRNA knockdown or treatment with SKI-5C sensitizes TNBCs to chemotherapeutic drugs. Our findings suggest that SPHK1 inhibition, which effectively counteracts oncogenic signaling through ERK1/2 and AKT pathways, is a potentially important anti-tumor strategy in TNBC. A combination of SPHK1 inhibitors with chemotherapeutic agents may be effective against this aggressive subtype of breast cancer.

  6. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, N J; Hangarter, R P; Kiss, J Z

    2001-02-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  7. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, N. J.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  8. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, N. J.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  9. Root based responses account for Psidium guajava survival at high nickel concentration.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Redwan, Mirvat; Taiti, Cosimo; Giordano, Cristiana; Monetti, Emanuela; Masi, Elisa; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    The presence of Psidium guajava in polluted environments has been reported in recent studies, suggesting that this species has a high tolerance to the metal stress. The present study aims at a physiological characterization of P. guajava response to high nickel (Ni) concentrations in the root-zone. Three hydroponic experiments were carried out to characterize the effects of toxic Ni concentrations on morphological and physiological parameters of P. guajava, focusing on Ni-induced damages at the root-level and root ion fluxes. With up to 300μM NiSO4 in the root-zone, plant growth was similar to that in control plants, whereas at concentrations higher than 1000μM NiSO4 there was a progressive decline in plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters; this occurred despite, at all considered concentrations, plants limited Ni(2+) translocation to the shoot, therefore avoiding shoot Ni(2+) toxicity symptoms. Maintenance of plant growth with 300μM Ni(2+) was associated with the ability to retain K(+) in the roots meanwhile 1000 and 3000μM NiSO4 led to substantial K(+) losses. In this study, root responses mirror all plant performances suggesting a direct link between root functionality and Ni(2+) tolerance mechanisms and plant survival. Considering that Ni was mainly accumulated in the root system, the potential use of P. guajava for Ni(2+) phytoextraction in metal-polluted soils is limited; nevertheless, the observed physiological changes indicate a good Ni(2+) tolerance up to 300μM NiSO4 suggesting a potential role for the phytostabilization of polluted soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutrophil microbicides induce a pathogen survival response in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo-Ballance, Amy M; Reniere, Michelle L; Braughton, Kevin R; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Otto, Michael; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Skaar, Eric P; DeLeo, Frank R

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. MW2 (pulsed-field type USA400), the prototype CA-MRSA strain, is highly virulent and has enhanced ability to evade killing by neutrophils. Although progress has been made, the molecular basis for enhanced virulence of CA-MRSA remains incompletely defined. To that end, we studied resistance of MW2 to key microbicides of human neutrophils. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hypochlorous acid, and azurophilic granule proteins had significant bacteriostatic but limited staphylocidal activity toward MW2 under the conditions tested. An MW2-specific microarray revealed common changes in S. aureus gene expression following exposure to each microbicide, such as up-regulation of transcripts involved in gene regulation (e.g., saeRS and kdpDE) and stress response. Azurophilic granule proteins elicited the greatest number of changes in MW2 transcripts, including up-regulation of mRNAs encoding multiple toxins and hemolysins (e.g., hlgA, hlgB, hlgC, hla, lukS-PV, lukF-PV, sec4, and set17-26). Notably, H2O2 triggered up-regulation of transcripts related to heme/iron uptake (e.g., isdA, isdB, and isdCDEFsrtBisdG), and an isogenic isdAB-negative strain of MW2 had increased susceptibility to H2O2 (p<0.001) and human neutrophils (p<0.05) compared with the wild-type parental strain. These findings reveal a S. aureus survival response wherein Iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins are important for resistance to innate host defense. Collectively, the data provide an enhanced view of the mechanisms used by S. aureus to circumvent destruction by the innate immune system.

  11. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  12. CA 19-9 as a Predictor for Response and Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koom, Woong Sub; Seong, Jinsil Kim, Yong Bae; Pyun, Hae Ok; Song, Si Young

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels for predicting response and survival in pancreatic cancer (PC) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 69 patients with PC between 1999 and 2005. All patients had elevated CA 19-9 levels before treatment. CA 19-9 levels (pre- and posttreatment CA 19-9) and their decline were analyzed for radiologic response and overall survival. Results: Seventeen patients (25%) had a 50% or greater reduction in tumor size within 3 months of chemoradiotherapy (1 complete response, 16 partial responses). CA 19-9 decline was significantly correlated with radiologic response (p = 0.03). The median survival time (MST) was 12 months (range, 4-48 months), and 1-year survival rate was 44%. Pretreatment CA 19-9 > 1,200 U/mL (MST, 13 vs. 8 months; p = 0.002), posttreatment CA 19-9 >100 U/mL (MST, 17 vs. 10 months; p = 0.0003), and CA 19-9 decline {<=}40% (MST, 13 vs. 10 months; p = 0.005) were the strongest and most unfavorable prognostic factors. In addition, patients with multiple unfavorable CA 19-9 levels had significantly worse outcomes than those without. Conclusions: CA 19-9 decline shows a correlation with radiologic response. The combination of pretreatment CA 19-9 >1,200 U/mL, posttreatment CA 19-9 >100 U/mL, and CA 19-9 decline {<=}40% may possibly serve as a surrogate marker for poor survival in advanced PC receiving chemoradiotherapy.

  13. HCMV activation of ERK-MAPK drives a multi-factorial response promoting the survival of infected myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Verity; Wills, Mark; Reeves, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Viral binding and entry provides the first trigger of a cell death response and thus how human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) evades this – particularly during latent infection where a very limited pattern of gene expression is observed – is less well understood. It has been demonstrated that the activation of cellular signalling pathways upon virus binding promotes the survival of latently infected cells by the activation of cell encoded anti-apoptotic responses. In CD34+ cells, a major site of HCMV latency, ERK signalling is important for survival and we now show that the activation of this pathway impacts on multiple aspects of cell death pathways. The data illustrate that HCMV infection triggers activation of pro-apoptotic Bak which is then countered through multiple ERK-dependent functions. Specifically, ERK promotes ELK1 mediated transcription of the key survival molecule MCL-1, along with a concomitant decrease of the pro-apoptotic BIM and PUMA proteins. Finally, we show that the elimination of ELK-1 from CD34+ cells results in elevated Bak activation in response to viral infection, resulting in cell death. Taken together, these data begin to shed light on the poly-functional response elicited by HCMV via ERK-MAPK to promote cell survival. PMID:28491825

  14. All or nothing: Survival, reproduction and oxidative balance in Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) in response to cold.

    PubMed

    Plantamp, Christophe; Salort, Katleen; Gibert, Patricia; Dumet, Adeline; Mialdea, Gladys; Mondy, Nathalie; Voituron, Yann

    2016-06-01

    Winter severity and overwintering capacity are key ecological factors in successful invasions, especially in ectotherms. The integration of physiological approaches into the study of invasion processes is emerging and promising. Physiological information describes the mechanisms underlying observed survival and reproductive capacities, and it can be used to predict an organism's response to environmental perturbations such as cold temperatures. We investigated the effects of various cold treatments on life history and physiological traits of an invasive pest species, Drosophila suzukii, such as survival, fertility and oxidative balance. This species, a native of temperate Asian areas, is known to survive where cold temperatures are particularly harsh and has been recently introduced into Europe and North America. We found that cold treatments had a strong impact on adult survival but no effect on female's fertility. Although only minor changes were observed after cold treatment on studied physiological traits, a strong sex-based difference was observed in both survival and physiological markers (antioxidant defences and oxidative markers). Females exhibited higher survival, reduced oxidative defences, less damage to nucleic acids, and more damage to lipids. These results suggest that D. suzukii relies on a pathway other than oxidative balance to resist cold injury. Altogether, our results provide information concerning the mechanisms of successful invasion by D. suzukii. These findings may assist in the development of population models that predict the current and future geographic ranges of this species.

  15. Multi-level Modeling of Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Offers New Insights into Its Regulation by Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 1031 distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  16. PIN auxin efflux carriers are necessary for pulse-induced but not continuous light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2012-10-01

    Auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are thought to have central roles in regulating asymmetrical auxin translocation during tropic responses, including gravitropism and phototropism, in plants. Although PIN3 is known to be involved in phototropism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), no severe defects of phototropism in any of the pin mutants have been reported. We show here that the pulse-induced, first positive phototropism is impaired partially in pin1, pin3, and pin7 single mutants, and severely in triple mutants. In contrast, such impairment was not observed in continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism. Analysis with an auxin-reporter gene demonstrated that PIN3-mediated auxin gradients participate in pulse-induced phototropism but not in continuous-light-induced phototropism. Similar functional separation was also applicable to PINOID, a regulator of PIN localization. Our results strongly suggest the existence of functionally distinct mechanisms i.e. a PIN-dependent mechanism in which transient stimulation is sufficient to induce phototropism, and a PIN-independent mechanism that requires continuous stimulation and does not operate in the former phototropism process. Although a previous study has proposed that blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins, control PIN localization through the transcriptional down-regulation of PINOID, we could not detect this blue-light-dependent down-regulation event, suggesting that other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved in phototropin-mediated phototropic responses.

  17. Light-induced and sensing capabilities of SI-ATRP modified graphene oxide particles in elastomeric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Josef; Cvek, Martin; Mrlik, Miroslav; Ilcikova, Marketa; Pavlinek, Vladimir; Mosnacek, Jaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Photoactuators can concern light stimuli in appropriate wavelength into mechanical response. Such reversible changes in the material shape are highly promising in their applications as remote controllers, or safety sensors. In this work we were focused on light-induced actuation and sensing performance of the prepared materials. In this case poly(dimethyl siloxane) PDMS with various amounts of silicone oil and curing agent was used as matrix. Graphene oxide (GO) as filler in its neat form as well as its modified analogue were used in concentration of 0.1 vol. %. Modified GO particles were controllably coated with poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer chains using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) approach in order improve interactions between the filler and matrix which consequently lead to the enhanced light-induced actuation performance. Generally, the both, GO particles as well as modified ones were characterized using FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and finally conductivity measurement to confirm the controllable coating and simultaneously proceeded reduction. By studying of dielectric properties (activation energies), viscoelastic properties, which were investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis, the interactions between the filler and matrix were evaluated with connection to their light-responsive and sensing capabilities.

  18. The mechanism of color change in the neon tetra fish: a light-induced tunable photonic crystal array.

    PubMed

    Gur, Dvir; Palmer, Benjamin A; Leshem, Ben; Oron, Dan; Fratzl, Peter; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2015-10-12

    The fresh water fish neon tetra has the ability to change the structural color of its lateral stripe in response to a change in the light conditions, from blue-green in the light-adapted state to indigo in the dark-adapted state. The colors are produced by constructive interference of light reflected from stacks of intracellular guanine crystals, forming tunable photonic crystal arrays. We have used micro X-ray diffraction to track in time distinct diffraction spots corresponding to individual crystal arrays within a single cell during the color change. We demonstrate that reversible variations in crystal tilt within individual arrays are responsible for the light-induced color variations. These results settle a long-standing debate between the two proposed models, the "Venetian blinds" model and the "accordion" model. The insight gained from this biogenic light-induced photonic tunable system may provide inspiration for the design of artificial optical tunable systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biochemical Response to Ursodeoxycholic Acid Predicts Survival in a North American Cohort of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Craig; Juran, Brian D.; Schlicht, Erik; Chan, Landon L.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Biochemical response to Ursodeoxycholic Acid among patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis remains variable and there is no agreement of an ideal model. Novel assessment of response coupled to histologic progression was recently defined by the Toronto criteria. We retrospectively assessed transplant-free survival and clinical outcomes associated with Ursodeoxycholic Acid response to evaluate the Toronto criteria using a large North American cohort of PBC patients. Methods 398 PBC patients from the Mayo Clinic PBC Genetic Epidemiology (MCPGE) Registry were assessed for Ursodeoxycholic Acid treatment and biochemical response per the Toronto criteria. Responders were defined by reduction in alkaline phosphatase to less than or equal to 1.67 times the upper normal limit by 2 years of treatment, whereas non-responders had alkaline phosphatase values greater than 1.67 times the upper normal limit. Probability of survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 302 (76%) patients were responders and 96 (24%) were non-responders. Significantly more non-responders developed adverse events related to chronic liver disease compared to responders (Hazard Ratio (HR): 2.77, P = 0.001). Biochemical responders and early-stage disease at treatment start was associated with improved overall transplant-free survival compared to non-responders (HR: 1.9) and patients with late stage disease (HR: 2.7) after age and sex adjustment. Conclusions The Toronto criteria are capable of identifying Ursodeoxycholic Acid-treated Primary Biliary Cirrhosis patients at risk of poor transplant-free survival and adverse clinical outcomes. Our data reveal that despite advanced disease at diagnosis, biochemical response per the Toronto criteria associates with improved overall transplant-free survival. PMID:24317935

  20. Henslow's sparrow winter-survival estimates and response to prescribed burning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, B.S.; Krementz, D.G.; Woodrey, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Wintering Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) populations rely on lands managed with prescribed burning, but the effects of various burn regimes on their overwinter survival are unknown. We studied wintering Henslow's sparrows in coastal pine savannas at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge, Jackson County, Mississippi, USA, during January and February 2001 and 2002. We used the known-fate modeling procedure in program MARK to evaluate the effects of burn age (1 or 2 growing seasons elapsed), burn season (growing, dormant), and calendar year on the survival rates of 83 radiomarked Henslow's sparrows. We found strong evidence that Henslow's sparrow survival rates differed by burn age (with higher survival in recently burned sites) and by year (with lower survival rates in 2001 likely because of drought conditions). We found some evidence that survival rates also differed by bum season (with higher survival in growing-season sites), although the effects of burn season were only apparent in recently burned sites. Avian predation was the suspected major cause of mortality (causing 6 of 14 deaths) with 1 confirmed loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) depredation. Our results indicated that recently burned savannas provide high-quality wintering habitats and suggested that managers can improve conditions for wintering Henslow's sparrows by burning a large percentage of savannas each year.

  1. Prevention of scattered light-induced asthenopia and fatigue by a polarized filter.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Orita, Kumi; Jikumaru, Mika; Kasahara, Emiko; Sato, Eisuke F; Tamura, Shinzo; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-04-01

    It has been well documented that a long-time irradiation of the eye by a strong light elicits eyestrain and fatigue. To elucidate the mechanism for the induction of light-induced fatigue and asthenopia, changes in the mouse were analyzed after white light-irradiation to the eye. C57BL/6j male mice were irradiated with white light in a specially designed room equipped with four mirrors covering all areas of its four walls to elicit diffused reflected light, and changes in their plasma levels of cortisol, INF-gamma, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) were analyzed. Irradiation of mice with scattered white light significantly decreased the motional activity of animals, suggesting the occurrence of fatigue. Biochemical analysis and enzyme-immunoassay revealed that the irradiation of mice significantly elevated the plasma levels of cortisol, IFN-gamma, IL-10 and TGF-beta. All these changes were not observed with mice irradiated with the light in a similar room not equipped with mirrors. These changes were successfully inhibited by a polarized glass filter but not by a non-polarized filter with a similar absorbance. These observations suggest that irradiation of the eye by scattered reflected light stimulated a stress response via hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to enhance the secretion of cortisol from the adrenal grand and increase the plasma levels of cytokines.

  2. Light-induced h secretion and the relation to senescence of oat leaves.

    PubMed

    Gepstein, S

    1982-10-01

    When abraded oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) leaf segments are floated on KCl solution, white light causes acidification of the solution external to leaf tissue. The presence of mannitol amplifies the light-induced proton secretion. Mature leaves as well as young ones acidify the medium in light, while senescing leaves (after 3 to 4 days incubated in water in the dark) lose the ability to produce this response to light. The decrease in H(+) secretion is already measureable after as little as 30 minutes in darkness, while the increase in proteolysis rate was detected only after 6 hours in dark. The decrease in capacity to secrete protons is one of the symptoms of leaf senescence. Moreover, fusicoccin mimics light in stimulating H(+) pumping and delaying the senescence in the dark. On the other hand vanadate, an apparent inhibitor of plasma membrane H(+) ATPase, blocks the acidification and promotes the chlorophyll and protein degradation in leaf segments during the 2-day period of incubation. These results, which show a parallel between cessation of H(+) secretion and acceleration of senescence, may suggest a regulatory role for H(+) secretion in leaf senescence.

  3. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  4. Light-induced morphological plasticity in the scleractinian coral Goniastrea pectinata and its functional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ow, Y. X.; Todd, P. A.

    2010-09-01

    Environment-induced i.e., phenotypically plastic, changes in morphology, are potentially an important life-history component of sessile corals. Previous reciprocal transplant experiments have demonstrated depth-related responses in various coral species, but the potential adaptive significance is rarely investigated. To test for small-scale morphological plasticity in the massive coral Goniastrea pectinata Ehrenberg 1834, fragments from five colonies were reciprocally transplanted between two depths at Raffles Lighthouse (Pulau Satumu), Singapore. After 163 days, all fragments were collected, cleared of tissue, and examined. Reaction norms and multivariate analysis of variance describe light-induced changes in corallite architecture and genotype × environment interactions. In fragments transplanted to the shallow station, calices were deeper, and septa were shorter than in fragments transplanted to the deep station. To explore the functional significance of this plasticity, a two-dimensional model of corallite shape was constructed. The induced calice morphology of the shallow-water transplants was efficient at shading, possibly to protect tissue from excess radiation, whereas the calice morphology found in the deep-water transplants was more efficient at capturing light when irradiance was low.

  5. Light-Induced Polar pH Changes in Leaves of Elodea canadensis1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Prins, Hidde B. A.

    1989-01-01

    Leaves of the submerged aquatic Elodea canadensis Michx. exhibit a light induced polar pH reaction. In this study, the effects of light intensity and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration on this polar reaction were examined. At a light intensity of 100 watts per square meter the leaf showed a polar pH response when the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration was less than about 1 millimolar. The polar reaction was suppressed at a higher dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This suppression was not due to the buffering capacity of bicarbonate. Because another weak acid, acetate, did not inhibit the polarity, but even had a small stimulatory effect, the effect of bicarbonate is also not due to acidification of the cytoplasm. The suppression of the polar reaction by CO2/HCO3− was relieved when the light intensity was increased. Apparently there is competition for product(s) of the photosynthetic light reactions between processes generating the polar reaction and the carbon fixation reactions. The possibility that the redox state of the cell regulates the generation of the polar reaction is discussed. PMID:16667044

  6. Microsecond light-induced proton transfer to flavin in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Langenbacher, Thomas; Immeln, Dominik; Dick, Bernhard; Kottke, Tilman

    2009-10-14

    Plant cryptochromes are blue light photoreceptors that regulate key responses in growth and daily rhythm of plants and might be involved in magnetoreception. They show structural homology to the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and bind flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore. Blue light absorption initiates the photoreduction from the oxidized dark state of flavin to the flavin neutral radical, which is the signaling state of the sensor. Previous time-resolved studies of the photoreduction process have been limited to observation of the decay of the radical in the millisecond time domain. We monitored faster, light-induced changes in absorption of an algal cryptochrome covering a spectral range of 375-750 nm with a streak camera setup. Electron transfer from tryptophan to flavin is completed before 100 ns under formation of the flavin anion radical. Proton transfer takes place with a time constant of 1.7 micros leading to the flavin neutral radical. Finally, the flavin radical and a tryptophan neutral radical decay with a time constant >200 micros in the millisecond and second time domain. The microsecond proton transfer has not been observed in animal cryptochromes from insects or photolyases. Furthermore, the strict separation in time of electron and proton transfer is novel in the field of flavin-containing photoreceptors. The reaction rate implies that the proton donor is not in hydrogen bonding distance to the flavin N5. Potential candidates for the proton donor and the involvement of the tryptophan triad are discussed.

  7. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  8. Light-induced oxidative stress, N-formylkynurenine, and oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dreaden Kasson, Tina M; Rexroth, Sascha; Barry, Bridgette A

    2012-01-01

    Light stress in plants results in damage to the water oxidizing reaction center, photosystem II (PSII). Redox signaling, through oxidative modification of amino acid side chains, has been proposed to participate in this process, but the oxidative signals have not yet been identified. Previously, we described an oxidative modification, N-formylkynurenine (NFK), of W365 in the CP43 subunit. The yield of this modification increases under light stress conditions, in parallel with the decrease in oxygen evolving activity. In this work, we show that this modification, NFK365-CP43, is present in thylakoid membranes and may be formed by reactive oxygen species produced at the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex. NFK accumulation correlates with the extent of photoinhibition in PSII and thylakoid membranes. A modest increase in ionic strength inhibits NFK365-CP43 formation, and leads to accumulation of a new, light-induced NFK modification (NFK317) in the D1 polypeptide. Western analysis shows that D1 degradation and oligomerization occur under both sets of conditions. The NFK modifications in CP43 and D1 are found 17 and 14 Angstrom from the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that NFK is an oxidative modification that signals for damage and repair in PSII. The data suggest a two pathway model for light stress responses. These pathways involve differential, specific, oxidative modification of the CP43 or D1 polypeptides.

  9. CD8(+) T cell response to human papillomavirus 16 E7 is able to predict survival outcome in oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Liam; Lechner, Matt; Loewenbein, Sarah; Mohammed, Hassan; Davies-Husband, Cameron; Fenton, Tim; Sudhoff, Holger; Jani, Piyush; Goon, Peter; Sterling, Jane

    2016-11-01

    Immunological response to human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development and progression of HPV16+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) (accounting for the majority of viral associated cases) is largely unknown and may provide important insights for new therapeutic strategies. In this prospective clinical trial (UKCRN11945), we examined cell-mediated immune responses to HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 in peripheral blood using IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. CD56(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and regulatory T cell frequencies were also discerned by flow cytometry. Fifty-one study participants with oropharyngeal carcinoma were recruited. Control subjects were those undergoing tonsillectomy for benign disease. All patients were treated with curative intent by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Disease-specific survival was investigated by multivariate analysis. HPV16 DNA was detected in 41/51 of the OPSCC participants. T cell responses against HPV16 E6 or E7 peptides were detected in 33/51 evaluable patients, respectively and correlated with HPV status. Matched pre- and post-treatment T cell responses were available for 39/51 OPSCC cases. Within the whole cohort, elevated post-treatment CD8(+) response to HPV16 E7 correlated with longer disease free survival (multivariate DFS p < 0.03). Within the HPV + OPSCC cohort, a significant increase in regulatory T cells (p < 0.02) was noted after treatment. This is the first study to provide survival data in OPSCC stratified by cell-mediated immune response to HPV16 peptides. Within the HPV16+ OPSCC cohort, enhanced immunoreactivity to antigen E7 was linked to improved survival. An increase in regulatory T cell frequencies after treatment may suggest that immunosuppression can contribute to a reduced HPV-specific cell-mediated response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  11. c-Cbl Inhibition Improves Cardiac function and Survival in Response to Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Khadija; Kolpakov, Mikhail A; Seqqat, Rachid; Guo, Jianfen; Guo, Xinji; Qi, Zhao; Yu, Daohai; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Band, Hamid; Sanjay, Archana; Houser, Steven R; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    Background The proto-oncogene Casitas b-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl) is an adaptor protein with an intrinsic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that targets receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, resulting in their ubiquitination and down-regulation. However, the function of c-Cbl in the control of cardiac function is currently unknown. In this study, we examined the role of c-Cbl in myocyte death and cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results We show increased c-Cbl expression in human ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy hearts and in response to pathological stress stimuli in mice. c-Cbl deficient mice demonstrated a more robust functional recovery after myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, as well as significantly reduced myocyte apoptosis and improved cardiac function. Ubiquitination and downregulation of key survival c-Cbl targets, epidermal growth factor receptors and focal adhesion kinase, were significantly reduced in c-Cbl knockout mice. Inhibition of c-Cbl expression or its ubiquitin ligase activity in cardiac myocytes offered protection against H2O2 stress. Interestingly, c-Cbl deletion reduced the risk of death and increased cardiac functional recovery after chronic myocardial ischemia. This beneficial effect of c-Cbl deletion was associated with enhanced neoangiogenesis and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-a and VEGF receptor type 2 in the infarcted region. Conclusions c-Cbl activation promotes myocyte apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and causes adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. These findings point to c-Cbl as a potential therapeutic target for the maintenance of cardiac function and remodeling after myocardial ischemia. PMID:24583314

  12. Fibroblasts Influence Survival and Therapeutic Response in a 3D Co-Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Majety, Meher; Pradel, Leon P.; Gies, Manuela; Ries, Carola H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has indicated that the tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a significant role in tumor progression. Fibroblasts represent an abundant cell population in the TME and produce several growth factors and cytokines. Fibroblasts generate a suitable niche for tumor cell survival and metastasis under the influence of interactions between fibroblasts and tumor cells. Investigating these interactions requires suitable experimental systems to understand the cross-talk involved. Most in vitro experimental systems use 2D cell culture and trans-well assays to study these interactions even though these paradigms poorly represent the tumor, in which direct cell-cell contacts in 3D spaces naturally occur. Investigating these interactions in vivo is of limited value due to problems regarding the challenges caused by the species-specificity of many molecules. Thus, it is essential to use in vitro models in which human fibroblasts are co-cultured with tumor cells to understand their interactions. Here, we developed a 3D co-culture model that enables direct cell-cell contacts between pancreatic, breast and or lung tumor cells and human fibroblasts/ or tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs). We found that co-culturing with fibroblasts/TAFs increases the proliferation in of several types of cancer cells. We also observed that co-culture induces differential expression of soluble factors in a cancer type-specific manner. Treatment with blocking antibodies against selected factors or their receptors resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation in the co-cultures. Using our co-culture model, we further revealed that TAFs can influence the response to therapeutic agents in vitro. We suggest that this model can be reliably used as a tool to investigate the interactions between a tumor and the TME. PMID:26053043

  13. 17β-estradiol ameliorates light-induced retinal damage in Sprague-Dawley rats by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaolan; Wang, Baoying; Feng, Yan; Mo, Mingshu; Du, Fangying; Li, Hongbo; Yu, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered as a major cause of light-induced retinal neurodegeneration. The protective role of 17β-estradiol (βE2) in neurodegenerative disorders is well known, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we utilized a light-induced retinal damage model to explore the mechanism by which βE2 exerts its neuroprotective effect. Adult male and female ovariectomized (OVX) rats were exposed to 8,000 lx white light for 12 h to induce retinal light damage. Electroretinogram (ERG) assays and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed that exposure to light for 12 h resulted in functional damage to the rat retina, histological changes, and retinal neuron loss. However, intravitreal injection (IVI) of βE2 significantly rescued this impaired retinal function in both female and male rats. Based on the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) production (a biomarker of oxidative stress), an increase in retinal oxidative stress followed light exposure, and βE2 administration reduced this light-induced oxidative stress. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase (qRT)-PCR indicated that the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) were downregulated in female OVX rats but were upregulated in male rats after light exposure, suggesting a gender difference in the regulation of these antioxidant enzyme genes in response to light. However, βE2 administration restored or enhanced the SOD and Gpx expression levels following light exposure. Although the catalase (CAT) expression level was insensitive to light stimulation, βE2 also increased the CAT gene expression level in both female OVX and male rats. Further examination indicated that the antioxidant proteins thioredoxin (Trx) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) are also involved in βE2-mediated antioxidation and that the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a key role in the endogenous defense mechanism

  14. Ebi, a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, regulates the balance between cellular defense responses and neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Mi; Tsuda, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), a transcriptional co-repressor complex, is a causative factor for late-onset hearing impairments. Transcriptional co-repressor complexes play pivotal roles in gene expression by making a complex with divergent transcription factors. However, it remained to be clarified how co-repressor complex regulates cellular survival. We herein demonstrated that ebi, a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, suppressed photoreceptor cell degeneration in the presence of excessive innate immune signaling. We also showed that the balance between NF-κB and AP-1 is a key component of cellular survival under stress conditions. Given that Ebi plays an important role in innate immune responses by regulating NF-κB activity and inhibition of apoptosis induced by associating with AP-1, it may be involved in the regulation of photoreceptor cell survival by modulating cross-talk between NF-κB and AP-1. PMID:27073743

  15. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Sheikh, Søren Paludan; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2017-07-22

    There is a rising interest in adipose-derived stromal cells for clinical use; however, it is unknown whether freshly isolated stromal cells (SVF) or culture-expanded cells (ASCs) are more efficacious. We therefore aimed to compare the 2 cellular therapies in an in vivo model of angiogenesis, the ischemic flap in rats, which induces acute ischemia. We also aimed to determine the importance of cell presence and the host immune response. A total of 96 rats (n = 12 in each group) were used, and in each rat, a caudally based random flap measuring 2 × 7 cm was made. The study was conducted in 3 phases. First, each rat was treated with human SVF cells, human ASCs, or vehicle. Second, each rat was treated with human SVF, human SVF lysate, or vehicle. Finally, each rat was treated with rat (autologous) SVF cells or vehicle. Flap survival, vessel density, and stromal cell retention were evaluated after 7 days. The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human and rat SVF and human ASC but not for SVF lysate. Human cells were not detected in the flaps after 7 days. Flap survival increased with SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin, suggesting that increased flap survival is independent of the host immune response. All cell injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC.

  16. Cell cycle and aging, morphogenesis, and response to stimuli genes are individualized biomarkers of glioblastoma progression and survival

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    associated glioblastoma survival included morphogenesis, cell cycle, aging, response to stimuli, and programmed cell death. Conclusions Known biomarkers of glioblastoma survival were confirmed, and new general and clinical-dependent gene profiles were uncovered. The comparison of biomarkers across glioblastoma phases and functional analyses offered insights into the role of genes. These findings support the development of more accurate and personalized prognostic tools and gene-based therapies that improve the survival and quality of life of individuals afflicted by glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:21649900

  17. Light-Induced Chloroplast Shrinkage in vivo Detectable After Rapid Isolation of Chloroplasts From Pisum sativum 1

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1968-01-01

    A light-induced shrinkage of chloroplasts in vivo could be detected with chloroplasts isolated within 2 minutes of harvesting pea plants. As determined both by packed volume and Coulter counter, the mean volume of chloroplasts from plants in the dark was 39 μ3, whereas it was 31 μ3 for chloroplasts from plants in the light. Upon illumination of the plants, the half-time for the chloroplast shrinkage in vivo was about 3 minutes, and the half-time for the reversal in the dark was about 5 minutes. A plant growth temperature of 20° was optimal for the volume change. The chloroplast shrinkage was half-maximal for a light intensity of 400 lux incident on the plants and was light-saturated near 2000 lux. The light-absorbing pigment responsible for the volume change was chlorophyll. This light-induced shrinkage resulted in a flattening and slight indenting of the chloroplasts. This chloroplast flattening upon illumination of the plants may accompany an increase in the photosynthetic efficiency of chloroplasts. PMID:16656840

  18. Preparation and controlled drug delivery applications of mesoporous silica polymer nanocomposites through the visible light induced surface-initiated ATRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Wan, Qing; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-01

    The mesoporous materials with large pore size, high specific surface area and high thermal stability have been widely utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental remediation to separation and biomedicine. However, surface modification of these silica nanomaterials is required to endow novel properties and achieve better performance for most of these applications. In this work, a new method has been established for surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that relied on the visible light induced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the procedure, the copolymers composited with itaconic acid (IA) and poly(ethylene glycol)methyl acrylate (PEGMA) were grafted from MSNs using IA and PEGMA as the monomers and 10-Phenylphenothiazine(PTH) as the organic catalyst. The successful preparation of final polymer nanocomposites (named as MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA)) were evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. More importantly, the anticancer agent cisplatin can be effectively loaded on MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) and controlled release it from the drug-loading composites with pH responsive behavior. As compared with conventional ATRP, the light induced surface-initiated ATRP could also be utilized for preparation of various silica polymer nanocomposites under rather benign conditions (e.g. absent of transition metal ions, low polymerization temperature and short polymerization time). Taken together, we have developed a rather promising strategy method for fabrication of multifunctional MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) with great potential for biomedical applications.

  19. Effects of RGD immobilization on light-induced cell sheet detachment from TiO2 nanodots films.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kui; Wang, Tiantian; Yu, Mengliu; Wan, Hongping; Lin, Jun; Weng, Wenjian; Wang, Huiming

    2016-06-01

    Light-induced cell detachment is reported to be a safe and effective cell sheet harvest method. In the present study, the effects of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) immobilization on cell growth, cell sheet construction and cell harvest through light illumination are investigated. RGD was first immobilized on TiO2 nanodots films through simple physical adsorption, and then mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the films. It was found that RGD immobilization promoted cell adhesion and proliferation. It was also observed that cells cultured on RGD immobilized films showed relatively high level of pan-cadherin. Cells harvested with ultraviolet illumination (365 nm) showed good viability on both RGD immobilized and unmodified TiO2 nanodot films. Single cell detachment assay showed that cells detached more quickly on RGD immobilized TiO2 nanodot films. That could be ascribed to the RGD release after UV365 illumination. The current study demonstrated that RGD immobilization could effectively improve both the cellular responses and light-induced cell harvest.

  20. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  1. Embryonic Origin of Primary Colon Cancer Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients Undergoing Resection for Colon Cancer Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Suguru; Brudvik, Kristoffer Watten; Kopetz, Scott E; Maru, Dipen; Clarke, Callisia N; Passot, Guillaume; Conrad, Claudius; Chun, Yun Shin; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-12-19

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of embryonic origin in patients undergoing resection after chemotherapy for colon cancer liver metastases (CCLM). We identified 725 patients with primary colon cancer and known RAS mutation status who underwent hepatic resection after preoperative chemotherapy for CCLM (1990 to 2015). Survival after resection of CCLM from midgut origin (n = 238) and hindgut origin (n = 487) was analyzed. Predictors of pathologic response and survival were determined. Prognostic value of embryonic origin was validated with a separate cohort of 252 patients with primary colon cancer who underwent resection of CCLM without preoperative chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after hepatic resection were worse in patients with midgut origin tumors (RFS rate at 3 years: 15% vs 27%, P < 0.001; OS rate at 3 years: 46% vs 68%, P < 0.001). Independent factors associated with minor pathologic response were midgut embryonic origin [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, P = 0.010], absence of bevacizumab (OR 1.42, P = 0.034), and mutant RAS (OR 1.41, P = 0.043). Independent factors associated with worse OS were midgut embryonic origin [hazard ratio (HR) 2.04, P < 0.001], carcinoembryonic antigen value ≥5 ng/mL at hepatic resection (HR 1.46, P = 0.0021), synchronous CCLM (HR 1.45, P = 0.012), and mutant RAS (HR 1.43, P = 0.0040). In the validation cohort, patients with CCLM of midgut origin had a worse 3-year OS rate (55% vs 78%, P = 0.003). Compared with CCLM from hindgut origin, CCLM from midgut origin are associated with worse pathologic response to chemotherapy and worse survival after resection. This effect appears to be independent of RAS mutation status.

  2. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase Skin Allograft Survival and Inhibit Th-17 Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Larocca, Rafael Assumpção; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro Manoel; Bassi, Ênio José; Semedo, Patrícia; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; da Silva, Marina Burgos; Thornley, Thomas; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) exhibit immunosuppressive capabilities both in vitro and in vivo. Their use for therapy in the transplant field is attractive as they could render the use of immunosuppressive drugs unnecessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ADSC therapy on prolonging skin allograft survival. Animals that were treated with a single injection of donor allogeneic ADSC one day after transplantation showed an increase in donor skin graft survival by approximately one week. This improvement was associated with preserved histological morphology, an expansion of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in draining lymph nodes, as well as heightened IL-10 expression and down-regulated IL-17 expression. In vitro, ADSC inhibit naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation and constrain Th-1 and Th-17 polarization. In summary, infusion of ADSC one day post-transplantation dramatically increases skin allograft survival by inhibiting the Th-17 pathogenic immune response and enhancing the protective Treg immune response. Finally, these data suggest that ADSC therapy will open new opportunities for promoting drug-free allograft survival in clinical transplantation. PMID:24124557

  3. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-08-04

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. This shows that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex. A physiologically-based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity.

  4. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. This shows that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex. A physiologically-based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity. PMID:25087606

  5. Signaling events leading to red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Varsha; Roy, Ansuman; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2010-10-01

    Perception of red light (400 μmol photon m²/s) by the shoot bottom turned off the greening process in wheat. To understand the signaling cascade leading to this photomorphogenic response, certain signaling components were probed in seedlings grown in different light regimes. Upon analysis the gene expression of heterotrimeric Gα and Gβ were severely down-regulated in seedlings grown without vermiculite and having their shoot bottom exposed to red light (R/V-) and was similar to that of dark-grown seedlings. Supplementing the red-light-grown V- seedlings with blue light resulted in up-regulation of both Gα and Gβ expression, suggesting that blue light is able to modulate G protein expression. Treatment of cytokinin analog benzyladenine to cytokinin-deficient red-light-grown R/V- seedlings resulted in up-regulation of gene expression of both Gα and Gβ. To probe further, modulators of signal transduction pathway--AlF₃ (G protein activator), LaCl₃ (Ca(2+) channel blocker), NaF (nonspecific phosphatase inhibitor), or calmodulin (CaM) antagonists trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-nafthalene-sulfonamide (W-7)--were added along with Hoagland solution to the roots of 4-day-old etiolated seedlings, grown on germination paper and transferred to red light. AlF₃, LaCl₃, NaF failed to elicit any photomorphogenic response. However, CaM antagonists TFP and W-7 significantly reversed the red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis. Phosphorylation of proteins assayed in the absence or presence of CaM antagonist TFP revealed respective up-regulation or down-regulation of phosphorylation of several plastidic proteins in R/V- seedlings. These suggest that signal transduction of red light perceived by the shoot bottom to suppress photomorphogenesis is mediated by CaM-dependent protein kinases.

  6. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  7. Survival improvement in hormone-responsive young breast cancer patients with endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tae In; Hwang, Ui-Kang; Kim, Eui Tae; Lee, SaeByul; Sohn, Guiyun; Ko, Beom Seok; Lee, Jong Won; Son, Byung Ho; Kim, Seonok; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Kim, Hee Jeong

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the oncologic outcomes by intrinsic subtype and age in young breast cancer patients and whether survival differences were related to treatment changes over time. A retrospective analysis was performed on 9633 invasive breast cancer patients treated at Asan Medical Center from January 1989 to December 2008. We also enrolled a matched cohort adjusting for tumor size, lymph node metastasis, subtypes, and tumor grade. Patients aged <35 years were included in the younger group (n = 602) and those aged ≥35 years were included in the older group (n = 3009). The younger patients showed a significantly higher T stage, a more frequent axillary node presentation, higher histologic grade, and higher incidence of triple-negative subtype tumors than older patients and also received more chemotherapy and were less likely to undergo hormone therapy. The younger patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive tumors showed significantly poorer disease-free survival (DFS), loco-regional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and breast cancer-specific survival outcomes than older patients. Younger patients with HR-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumor subtypes had a significantly improved DFS over time (p = 0.032). Within the HR-positive/Her2-negative subtype, more women received gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and tamoxifen treatment from 2003 to 2008 compared with 1989 to 2002 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.075, respectively). HR-positive young breast cancer patients have a poorer survival compared with older patients, even with more frequent chemotherapy, but more recent use of tamoxifen and ovarian suppression might improve this outcome in these patients.

  8. Systemic administration of the iron chelator deferiprone protects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Zhong, Yong; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the light damage (LD) model of retinal degeneration as well as in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since iron can promote oxidative stress, the iron chelator Deferiprone (DFP) was tested for protection against light-induced retinal degeneration. To accomplish this, A/J mice were treated with or without DFP in drinking water, and then were placed in constant bright white fluorescent light (10,000 lux) for 20 hours. Retinas were evaluated at several time points after light exposure. Photoreceptor apoptosis was assessed using the TUNEL assay. Retinal degeneration was assessed by histology 10 days after exposure to damaging white light. Two genes upregulated by oxidative stress, heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and ceruloplasmin (Cp), as well as complement component 3 (C3) were quantified by RT-qPCR. Cryosections were immunolabeled for oxidative stress marker (nitrotyrosine), a microglial marker (Iba1) as well as both heavy (H) and light (L) ferritin. Light exposure resulted in substantial photoreceptor-specific cell death. Dosing with DFP protected photoreceptors, decreasing the numbers of TUNEL-positive photoreceptors and increasing the number of surviving photoreceptors. The retinal mRNA levels of oxidative stress related genes and C3 were upregulated following light exposure and diminished by DFP treatment. Immunostaining for nitrotyrosine indicated that DFP reduced the nitrative stress caused by light exposure. Robust H/L-ferritin-containing microglial activation and migration to the outer retina occurred after light exposure and DFP treatment reduced microglial invasion. DFP is protective against light-induced retinal degeneration and has the potential to diminish oxidative stress in the retina. PMID:22579919

  9. Light induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, T.; Förster, S.; Schneider, T.; Maiberg, M.; Widdra, W.; Scheer, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate light-induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) layers by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Illumination in the range of minutes with 1 sun white light equivalent leads to a strong reduction of the carrier lifetime as determined by TRPL. Ambient storage in the dark, however, does not cause degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CIGSe surface reveals a light induced enhancement of Na 1s and O 1s core-level emission. The position of the O 1s peak at 531.6 eV is related to a Na-O-CIGSe bonding complex. The light-induced degradation of the CIGSe layer finally translates into inferior open circuit voltages due to the dominance of interface recombination in completed solar cell devices. This study has implications for laboratory research and may need to be regarded in CIGSe module production.

  10. Localized light-induced protein dimerization in living cells using a photocaged dimerizer

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Aonbangkhen, Chanat; Mayo, Alyssa M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Chenoweth, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated protein localization is critical for many cellular processes. Several techniques have been developed for experimental control over protein localization, including chemically induced and light-induced dimerization, which both provide temporal control. Light-induced dimerization offers the distinct advantage of spatial precision within subcellular length scales. A number of elegant systems have been reported that utilize natural light-sensitive proteins to induce dimerization via direct protein–protein binding interactions, but the application of these systems at cellular locations beyond the plasma membrane has been limited. Here we present a new technique to rapidly and reversibly control protein localization in living cells with subcellular spatial resolution using a cell-permeable, photoactivatable chemical inducer of dimerization. We demonstrate light-induced recruitment of a cytosolic protein to individual centromeres, kinetochores, mitochondria and centrosomes in human cells, indicating that our system is widely applicable to many cellular locations. PMID:25400104

  11. Hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside inhibit light-induced oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Adem, Yilma T; Molina, Patricia; Liu, Hongbin; Patapoff, Thomas W; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Esue, Osigwe

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the photo-protective effect of sugar-based surfactants--hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside--against light-induced oxidation of a monoclonal antibody. Reactive oxygen species are generated in solutions in the presence of light; these reactive species readily oxidize amino acids such as tryptophan. Hexyl glucosides and hexyl maltosides scavenge these reactive species and protect tryptophan residues from light-induced oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. As a result of the scavenging process, hydrogen peroxide is formed, especially at high (millimolar) concentrations of the alkyl glycoside surfactants. These results suggest that hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside have the potential to protect tryptophan residues against light-induced oxidation.

  12. Survival responses of cell subpopulations isolated from a heterogeneous human colon tumour after combinations of hyperthermia and X-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Leith, J T; Heyman, P; Dewyngaert, J K; Glicksman, A S; Dexter, D L; Calabresi, P

    1983-03-01

    In summary, this research has investigated the effects of combined modality treatment (i.e., low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation and hyperthermia at 42.5 degrees C) on the survival responses of two tumour subpopulations (designated clones A and D) obtained from a heterogeneous human colon adenocarcinoma. A constant hyperthermic exposure (2 hours at 42.5 degrees C) was given either 3 min before or 3 min after graded exposure to X-rays. An isobologram analysis (Steel and Peckham 1979) of the clonogenic survival responses of the two tumour subpopulations showed that the clone A responses were within the envelope of additivity for either sequence of application. In contrast, the responses of the clone D tumour subpopulation exhibited a supra-additive response to the combined treatments with the sequence of heat followed by X-irradiation being somewhat more effective than the sequence of X-irradiation followed by heat. These data indicate that the responses of tumour subpopulations obtained from heterogeneous solid tumours to combined modality treatments may vary in an, at present, unpredictable manner.

  13. Light-induced thermodiffusion in two-component media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Ivanova, G.; Okishev, K.; Khe, V.

    2017-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the optical transmittance response of thin cell with liquid containing absorbing nanoparticles in a Gaussian beam field. The transmittance spatial changing is caused by thermal diffusion phenomenon (Soret effect) which produces the variations of concentration of absorbing nanoparticles. The thickness of optical cell (including windows) is significantly less than the size of the beam. As a result, an exact analytical expression for the one dimensional thermal task is derived, taking into account the Soret feedback that leads to the temperature rising on the axis of a Gaussian beam. We have experimentally studied this phenomenon in carbon nanosuspension.

  14. Visible Light Induced Organic Transformations Using Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs).

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-08-22

    With the aim of developing renewable energy based processes, researchers are paying increasing interest to light induced organic transformations. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of micro-/mesoporous hybrid materials, are recently emerging as a new type of photoactive materials for organic syntheses due to their unique structural characteristics. In this Review, we summarized the recent applications of MOFs as photocatalysts for light induced organic transformations, including (1) oxidation of alcohols, amines, alkene, alkanes and sulfides; (2) hydroxylation of aromatic compounds like benzene; (3) activation of the C-H bonds to construct new C-C or C-X bonds; (4) atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This Review starts with general background information of using MOFs in photocatalysis, followed by a description of light induced organic transformations promoted by photoactive inorganic nodes and photocatalytic active ligands in MOFs, respectively. Thereafter, the use of MOFs as multifunctional catalysts for light induced organic transformations via an efficient merge of the metal/ligand/guest based catalysis where the photocatalytic activity of MOFs plays a key role are discussed. Finally, the limitations, challenges and the future perspective of the application of MOFs for light induced organic transformations were addressed. The objective of this Review is to serve as a starting point for other researchers to get into this largely unexplored field. It is also our goal to stimulate intensive research in this field for rational designing of MOF materials to overcome their current limitations in photocatalysis, which can lead to more creative visible-light-induced organic transformations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Light-induced basilar membrane vibrations in the sensitive cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosh, Karl; Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Fridberger, Anders; Li, Yizeng; Nankali, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organ is attributed to an outer hair cell-mediated active process, where forces produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. A physiologically based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity. The experiments and the theoretical analysis show that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex.

  16. Theory of Light-Induced Drift of Electrons in Coupled Quantum Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    AD-A253 609 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant N00014-90-J- 1193 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 89 Theory of Light-Induced Drift of Electrons in Coupled Quantum...AGENCY USE ONLY (Lepave &as*) 12. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I July 1992 IInterim 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMNERS Theory of...CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited I 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum,,OO woins) A theory of the new effect of light-induced drift (LID) in

  17. Growth and survival response of potted Cupressus sempervirens seedlings to different soils.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Masoud; Saeidi, Hamid Reza; Alavi-Panah, Kazem; Basiri, Reza; Poormadjidian, Mohammad Reza

    2007-04-15

    In February 2001, one-year bareroot cypress (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis) seedlings were replanted in plastic pot in a lowland nursery located in southern coast of the Caspian Sea (north of Iran). Soils of pots consisted of 1:1 sand:clay (A), pure sand (B), 2:1 sand:clay (C), 1:1:1 sand:clay:organic matter (D), 1:1:2 sand:clay:organic matter (E). In each soil treatment a high value of survival and growth was appeared in July and progressively decreased till November. In each month the seedlings grown on rich soils (D and E) had mostly greater growth and survival than on infertile soils. At the end of the first growing season seedling vitality differed significantly among the soils but did not differed notably in soil A with those in other soils. Survival rate was highest in the rich soils (D and E). Stem length as well as collar diameter performed the least growth on the poor soils (B and C). Like other characteristics measured, survival responded better to soils containing organic matter (D and E). It is concluded that generally characteristics of cypress seedling are suited by adding organic matter to sandy soils. This is while that poor nutrient available soil such as soil A produces a proper growth for cypress seedling, too.

  18. Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

    Treesearch

    Lindsay Chaney; Bryce A. Richardson; Matthew J. Germino

    2016-01-01

    A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common-...

  19. Survival and growth response of white spruce stock types to site preparation in Alaska

    Treesearch

    Andrew Youngblood; Elizabeth Cole; Michael Newton

    2011-01-01

    To identify suitable methods for reforestation, we evaluated the interacting effects of past disturbance, stock types, and site preparation treatments on white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) seedling survival and growth across a range of sites in Alaska. Replicated experiments were established in five regions. At each site, two complete...

  20. Reduced early life growth and survival in a fish in direct response to increased carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Hannes; Talmage, Stephanie C.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of anthropogenic carbon dioxide by the world's oceans is causing mankind's `other CO2 problem', ocean acidification. Although this process will challenge marine organisms that synthesize calcareous exoskeletons or shells, it is unclear how it will affect internally calcifying organisms, such as marine fish. Adult fish tolerate short-term exposures to CO2 levels that exceed those predicted for the next 300 years (~2,000ppm ref. ), but potential effects of increased CO2 on growth and survival during the early life stages of fish remain poorly understood. Here we show that the exposure of early life stages of a common estuarine fish (Menidia beryllina) to CO2 concentrations expected in the world's oceans later this century caused severely reduced survival and growth rates. When compared with present-day CO2 levels (~400ppm), exposure of M. beryllina embryos to ~1,000ppm until one week post-hatch reduced average survival and length by 74% and 18%, respectively. The egg stage was significantly more vulnerable to high CO2-induced mortality than the post-hatch larval stage. These findings challenge the belief that ocean acidification will not affect fish populations, because even small changes in early life survival can generate large fluctuations in adult-fish abundance.

  1. Douglas-fir survival and growth in response to spring planting date and depth

    Treesearch

    R. O. Strothmann

    1971-01-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings were planted by four methods in late February and late March on hot, south-facing slopes in northwestern California. Besides standard planting, the techniques used included deep planting at two different depths, and shading the lower stem. The differences in survival after 3 growing seasons were not statistically significant, but deep planting had...

  2. Light-induced structural phase behaviour of metal nanoparticle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plech, A.; Kotaidis, V.; Wulff, M.; Dahmen, C.; von Plessen, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the structural dynamics of gold nanoparticles induced by femtosecond light excitation. Structure evolution in both embedded particles (glass matrix or liquid water suspension) and quasi-free particles adsorbed on a solid surface is analyzed. By use of stroboscopic laser pump- x-ray probe techniques the structural relaxations have been resolved on the 100 ps time scale at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Several methods including powder scattering, liquid scattering and small angle scattering serve to resolve microscopic and mesoscopic length scales of the composite system. The thermal response includes the heating, lattice melting, explosive solvent evaporation and solvent cooling subsequent to the laser flash excitation. Nonthermal effects are observed with femtosecond excitation. They are attributed to ablation from the particle and particle explosion at strong nonequilibrium conditions. The observations can form a complete picture of the energy dissipation and phase transitions involved in nanoscale composites.

  3. Relationship between 3-Methyl-2,4-nonanedione Concentration and Intensity of Light-induced Off-odor in Soy Bean Oil.

    PubMed

    Sano, Takashi; Iwahashi, Maiko; Imagi, Jun; Sato, Toshiro; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    A beany and green off-odor is developed in soy bean oil (SBO) under light-induced oxidative conditions. 3-Methyl-2,4-nonanedione (3-MND) was inferred as the compound responsible for the off-odor. In this study, we designed a simple quantification method for 3-MND in SBO, and evaluated the relationship between the 3-MND concentration and the intensity of the off-odor. 3-MND was analyzed by GC/MS with a thermal desorption unit system. By our method, the 3-MND concentration was found to increase with storage days and the SBO content under light exposure, and there was a high correlation between the measured 3-MND concentration and the intensity of the light-induced off-odor in SBO (R = 0.9586).

  4. Dissecting the proteome dynamics of the early heat stress response leading to plant survival or death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Echevarría-Zomeño, Sira; Fernández-Calvino, Lourdes; Castro-Sanz, Ana B; López, Juan Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Castellano, M Mar

    2016-06-01

    In many plant species, an exposure to a sublethal temperature triggers an adaptative response called acclimation. This response involves an extensive molecular reprogramming that allows the plant to further survive to an otherwise lethal increase of temperature. A related response is also launched under an abrupt and lethal heat stress that, in this case, is unable to successfully promote thermotolerance and therefore ends up in plant death. Although these molecular programmes are expected to have common players, the overlapping degree and the specific regulators of each process are currently unknown. We have carried out a high-throughput comparative proteomics analysis during acclimation and during the early stages of the plant response to a severe heat stress that lead Arabidopsis seedlings either to survival or death. This analysis dissects these responses, unravels the common players and identifies the specific proteins associated with these different fates. Thermotolerance assays of mutants in genes with an uncharacterized role in heat stress demonstrate the relevance of this study to uncover both positive and negative heat regulators and pinpoint a pivotal role of JR1 and BAG6 in heat tolerance.

  5. A highly efficient TiO(2-x)C(x) nano-heterojunction photocatalyst for visible light induced antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Michlits, Georg; Seery, Michael K; Hinder, Steven J; Pillai, Suresh C

    2013-03-13

    Visible-light-induced antibacterial activity of carbon-doped anatase-brookite titania nano-heterojunction photocatalysts are reported for the first time. These heterostructures were prepared using a novel low temperature (100 °C) nonhydrothermal low power microwave (300 W) assisted method. Formation of interband C 2p states was found to be responsible for the band gap narrowing of the carbon doped heterojunctions. The most active photocatalyst obtained after 60 min of microwave irradiation exhibits a 2-fold higher visible-light induced photocatalytic activity in contrast to the standard commercial photocatalyst Evonik-Degussa P-25. Staphylococcus aureus inactivation rate constant for carbon-doped nano-heterojunctions and the standard photocatalyst was 0.0023 and -0.0081 min(-1), respectively. It is proposed that the photoexcited electrons (from the C 2p level) are effectively transferred from the conduction band of brookite to that of anatase causing efficient electron-hole separation, which is found to be responsible for the superior visible-light induced photocatalytic and antibacterial activities of carbon-doped anatase-brookite nano-heterojunctions.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected tumor response for locally advanced rectal cancer predicts survival outcomes: MERCURY experience.

    PubMed

    Patel, Uday B; Taylor, Fiona; Blomqvist, Lennart; George, Christopher; Evans, Hywel; Tekkis, Paris; Quirke, Philip; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Moran, Brendan; Heald, Richard; Guthrie, Ashley; Bees, Nicola; Swift, Ian; Pennert, Kjell; Brown, Gina

    2011-10-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study. In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics. On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes. MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

  7. Glucose Starvation Alters Heat Shock Response, Leading to Death of Wild Type Cells and Survival of MAP Kinase Signaling Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd; Brambl, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A moderate heat shock induces Neurospora crassa to synthesize large quantities of heat shock proteins that are protective against higher, otherwise lethal temperatures. However, wild type cells do not survive when carbohydrate deprivation is added to heat shock. In contrast, a mutant strain defective in a stress-activated protein kinase does survive the combined stresses. In order to understand the basis for this difference in survival, we have determined the relative levels of detected proteins in the mutant and wild type strain during dual stress, and we have identified gene transcripts in both strains whose quantities change in response to heat shock or dual stress. These data and supportive experimental evidence point to reasons for survival of the mutant strain. By using alternative respiratory mechanisms, these cells experience less of the oxidative stress that proves damaging to wild type cells. Of central importance, mutant cells recycle limited resources during dual stress by undergoing autophagy, a process that we find utilized by both wild type and mutant cells during heat shock. Evidence points to inappropriate activation of TORC1, the central metabolic regulator, in wild type cells during dual stress, based upon behavior of an additional signaling mutant and inhibitor studies. PMID:27870869

  8. Glucose Starvation Alters Heat Shock Response, Leading to Death of Wild Type Cells and Survival of MAP Kinase Signaling Mutant.

    PubMed

    Plesofsky, Nora; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd; Brambl, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A moderate heat shock induces Neurospora crassa to synthesize large quantities of heat shock proteins that are protective against higher, otherwise lethal temperatures. However, wild type cells do not survive when carbohydrate deprivation is added to heat shock. In contrast, a mutant strain defective in a stress-activated protein kinase does survive the combined stresses. In order to understand the basis for this difference in survival, we have determined the relative levels of detected proteins in the mutant and wild type strain during dual stress, and we have identified gene transcripts in both strains whose quantities change in response to heat shock or dual stress. These data and supportive experimental evidence point to reasons for survival of the mutant strain. By using alternative respiratory mechanisms, these cells experience less of the oxidative stress that proves damaging to wild type cells. Of central importance, mutant cells recycle limited resources during dual stress by undergoing autophagy, a process that we find utilized by both wild type and mutant cells during heat shock. Evidence points to inappropriate activation of TORC1, the central metabolic regulator, in wild type cells during dual stress, based upon behavior of an additional signaling mutant and inhibitor studies.

  9. Genetic Variants in MicroRNA Biosynthesis Pathways and Binding Sites Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk, Survival, and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dong; Meyer, Larissa; Chang, David W.; Lin, Jie; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play important roles in tumorigenesis. Genetic variations in miRNA processing genes and miRNA binding sites may affect the biogenesis of miRNA and the regulatory effect of miRNAs to their target genes, hence promoting tumorigenesis. This study analyzed 226 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in miRNA processing genes and miRNA binding sites in 339 ovarian cancer cases and 349 healthy controls to assess association with cancer risk, overall survival, and treatment response. Thirteen polymorphisms were found to have significant association with risk. The most significant were 2 linked SNPs (r2 = 0.99), rs2740351 and rs7813 in GEMIN4 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.57–0.87 and OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57–0.88, respectively]. Unfavorable genotype analysis showed the cumulative effect of these 13 SNPs on risk (P for trend < 0.0001). Potential higher order gene–gene interactions were identified, which categorized patients into different risk groups according to their genotypic signatures. In the clinical outcome study, 24 SNPs exhibited significant association with overall survival and 17 SNPs with treatment response. Notably, patients carrying a rare homozygous genotype of rs1425486 in PDGFC had poorer overall survival [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.69; 95% CI, 1.67–4.33] and worse treatment response (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.39–8.19), compared to carriers of common homozygous and heterozygous genotypes. Unfavorable genotype analyses also showed a strong gene-dosage effect with decreased survival and increased risk of treatment nonresponse in patients with greater number of unfavorable genotypes (P for trend < 0.0001). Taken together, miRNA-related genetic polymorphisms may impact ovarian cancer predisposition and clinical outcome both individually and jointly. PMID:21118967

  10. Compartmentalized expression of light-induced clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Campbell, Amy; Tomczak, Ashley; Nunez, Antonio A.; Smale, Laura; Yan, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Photic responses of the circadian system are mediated through light-induced clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In nocturnal rodents, depending on the timing of light exposure, Per1 and Per2 gene expression shows distinct compartmentalized patterns that correspond to the behavioral responses. Whether the gene-and region-specific induction patterns are unique to nocturnal animals, or are also present in diurnal species is unknown. We explored this question by examining the light-induced Per1 and Per2 gene expression in functionally distinct SCN sub regions, using diurnal grass rats Arvicanthis niloticus. Light exposure during nighttime induced Per1 and Per2 expression in the SCN, showing unique spatiotemporal profiles depending on the phase of the light exposure. After a phase delaying light pulse (LP) in the early night, strong Per1 induction was observed in the retinorecipient core region of the SCN, while strong Per2 induction was observed throughout the entire SCN. After a phase advancing LP in the late night, Per1 was first induced in the core and then extended into the whole SCN, accompanied by a weak Per2 induction. This compartmentalized expression pattern is very similar to that observed in nocturnal rodents, suggesting that the same molecular and intercellular pathways underlying acute photic responses are present in both diurnal and nocturnal species. However, after a LP in early subjective day, which induces phase advances in diurnal grass rats, but not in nocturnal rodents, we did not observe any Per1 or Per2 induction in the SCN. This result suggests that in spite of remarkable similarities in the SCN of diurnal and nocturnal rodents, unique mechanisms are involved in mediating the phase shifts of diurnal animals during the subjective day. PMID:19393297

  11. Red light-induced suppression of gravitropism in moss protonemata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, V. D.; Sack, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    Moss protonemata are among the few cell types known that both sense and respond to gravity and light. Apical cells of Ceratodon protonemata grow by oriented tip growth which is negatively gravitropic in the dark or positively phototropic in unilateral red light. Phototropism is phytochrome-mediated. To determine whether any gravitropism persists during irradiation, cultures were turned at various angles with respect to gravity and illuminated so that the light and gravity vectors acted either in the same or in different directions. Red light for 24h (≥140nmol m-2s-1) caused the protonemata to be oriented directly towards the light. Similarly, protonemata grew directly towards the light regardless of light position with respect to gravity indicating that all growth is oriented strictly by phototropism, not gravitropism. At light intensities ≤100nmol m-2s-1, no phototropism occurs and the mean protonemal tip angle remains above the horizontal, which is the criterion for negative gravitropism. But those protonemata are not as uniformly upright as they would be in the dark indicating that low intensity red light permits gravitropism but also modulates the response. Protonemata of the aphototropic mutant ptr1 that lacks a functional Pfr chromophore, exhibit gravitropism regardless of red light intensity. This indicates that red light acts via Pfr to modulate gravitropism at low intensities and to suppress gravitropism at intensities ≥140nmol m-2s-1.

  12. Cell therapy for Parkinson's disease: Functional role of the host immune response on survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wenker, Shirley D; Leal, María Celeste; Farías, María Isabel; Zeng, Xianmin; Pitossi, Fernando J

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, whose cardinal pathology is the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current treatments for PD have side effects in the long term and do not halt disease progression or regenerate dopaminergic cell loss. Attempts to compensate neuronal cell loss by transplantation of dopamine-producing cells started more than 30 years ago, leading to several clinical trials. These trials showed safety and variable efficacy among patients. In addition to variability in efficacy, several patients developed graft-induced dyskinesia. Nevertheless, they have provided a proof of concept that motor symptoms could be improved by cell transplantation. Cell transplantation in the brain presents several immunological challenges. The adaptive immune response should be abolished to avoid graft rejection by the host. In addition, the innate immune response will always be present after transplanting cells into the brain. Remarkably, the innate immune response can have dramatic effects on the survival, differentiation and proliferation of the transplanted cells, but has been hardly investigated. In this review, we analyze data on the functional effects of signals from the innate immune system on dopaminergic differentiation, survival and proliferation. Then, we discussed efforts on cell transplantation in animal models and PD patients, highlighting the immune response and the immunomodulatory treatment strategies performed. The analysis of the available data lead us to conclude that the modulation of the innate immune response after transplantation can increase the success of future clinical trials in PD by enhancing cell differentiation and survival. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain.

  13. Light-induced inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Christian A; Perroni, Yareni; Pérez, José Antonio García; Rivera, Beatriz Gutiérrez; Alarcón, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine which specific regions of the visible light spectrum were responsible for the induction or inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus. Cultures were exposed to various bandwidth lights: blue (460 nm), green (525 nm), white (a combination of 460 and 560 nm), red (660 nm), and darkness. The results indicate that short wavelengths strongly inhibit the production of laccase: green (3.76 ± 1.12 U/L), blue (1.94 ± 0.36 U/L), and white (1.05 ± 0.21 U/L) in proportions of 85.8, 92.6, and 96.0%, respectively; whereas long wavelengths inhibit laccase production only partially i.e., red light (14.05 ± 4.79 U/L) in a proportion of 46.8%. Maximum activity was induced in absence of visible light (30 °C, darkness), i.e., 30.76 ± 4.0 U/L. It is concluded that the production of laccase in P. sanguineus responds to light stimuli [measured as wavelengths and lx] and that it does so inversely. This can be explained as an ecological mechanism of environmental recognition, given that P. sanguineus develops inside lignocellulose structures in conditions of darkness. The presence of short wavelength light (460-510 nm) would indicate that the organism finds itself in an external environment, unprovided of lignin, and that it is therefore unnecessary to secrete laccase. This possible new regulation in the laccase production in P. sanguineus has important biotechnological implications, for it would be possible to control the production of laccase using light stimuli.

  14. Survival but not brain metastasis response relates to lung cancer mutation status after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Samuel M; Cooper, Benjamin T; Chachoua, Abraham; Butler, James; Donahue, Bernadine; Silverman, Joshua S; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-02-01

    We prospectively addressed whether EGFR and KRAS mutations, EML4-ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements, or wild-type (WT), affects radiosurgery outcomes and overall survival (OS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases (BM). Of 326 patients with BM treated in 2012-2014 with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), 112 NSCLC patients received GKRS as their initial intracranial treatment. OS, intracranial progression-free survival, and time to intracranial failure were determined. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to determine factors affecting OS. Toxicity of treatment was evaluated. Median follow-up was 9 months. Patients with EGFR mutant BM had improved survival compared to WT. Median time to development of BM was higher in EGFR mutant patients, but this difference was not significant (2.2 vs 0.9 months; p = 0.2). Median time to distant brain failure was independent of EGFR mutation status. Karnofsky performance status (KPS), non-squamous histopathology, targeted therapy, systemic disease control, EGFR mutation, and low tumor volume were predictive of increased OS on univariate analysis. KPS (p = 0.001) and non-squamous histopathology (p = 0.03) continued to be significant on multivariate analysis. Patients with EGFR mutant BM underwent salvage treatment more often than those without (p = 0.04). Treatment-related toxicity was no different in patients treated with GKRS combined with targeted therapies versus GKRS alone (5 vs 7%, p = 0.7). Patients with EGFR mutant BM had improved survival compared to a WT cohort. Intracranial disease control following radiosurgery was similar for all tumor subtypes. Radiosurgery is effective for BM and concurrent treatment with targeted therapy appears to be safe.

  15. Differential response in chick survival to diet in least and crested auklets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gall, Adrian E.; Roby, D.D.; Irons, D.B.; Rose, I.C.

    2006-01-01

    Least auklets Aethia pusilla and crested auklets A. cristatella are abundant planktivorous seabirds found throughout the Bering Sea and are inextricably linked to the secondary productivity of this northern marine ecosystem. We assessed the relationship between productivity and diet in least and crested auklets by examining breeding chronology, daily survival rates (DSR) of chicks, and nestling diet composition at 2 mixed colonies on St. Lawrence Island in the northern Bering Sea during the 2000 to 2002 breeding seasons. Nestlings of both least and crested auklets hatched earlier, had higher survival rates, and were fed more of the large, oceanic copepod Neocalanus cristatus in 2002 compared to the 2 yr of lower chick survival. In contrast, during the year of lowest DSR for both auklet species (2001), the small copepod Calanus marshallae was more prevalent in the diet of least auklets and the mid-sized copepod N. flemingeri was more prevalent in the diet of crested auklets compared to the other 2 yr. The prevalence of oceanic copepods in meals fed to chicks explained much of the annual variation in DSR in least auklets. Interannual differences in timing of nest initiation, nest survival, and diet of least and crested auklets may be associated with the strength of the cold, nutrient-rich Anadyr Current, which passes in close proximity to St. Lawrence Island and has important influences on zooplankton productivity and distribution. Auklet productivity and diet composition may serve as key indicators in the overall effort to monitor the impact of climate change on the productivity of the Bering Sea.

  16. Forster's tern chick survival in response to a managed relocation of predatory California gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Hartman, C. Alex; Herring, Garth

    2014-01-01

    Gull populations can severely limit the productivity of waterbirds. Relocating gull colonies may reduce their effects on nearby breeding waterbirds, but there are few examples of this management strategy. We examined gull predation and survival of Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) chicks before (2010) and after (2011) the managed relocation of the largest California gull (Larus californicus) colony (24,000 adults) in San Francisco Bay, California. Overall, survival of radio-marked Forster's tern chicks from hatching to fledging was 0.22 ± 0.03 (mean ± SE), and daily survival rates increased with age. Gulls were the predominant predator of tern chicks, potentially causing 54% of chick deaths. Prior to the gull colony relocation, 56% of radio-marked and 20% of banded tern chicks from the nearest tern colony were recovered dead in the gull colony, compared to only 15% of radio-marked and 4% of banded chicks recovered dead from all other tern colonies. The managed relocation of the gull colony substantially increased tern chick survival (by 900%) in the nearby (3.8 km) reference tern colony (0.29 ± 0.10 in 2010 and 0.25 ± 0.09 in 2011). Among 19 tern nesting islands, fledging success was higher when gull abundance was lower at nearby colonies and when gull colonies were farther from the tern colony. Our results indicate that the managed relocation of gull colonies away from preferred nesting areas of sensitive waterbirds can improve local reproductive success, but this conservation strategy may shift gull predation pressure to other areas or species.

  17. Effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the avoidance response, survival, growth and reproduction of earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianchuan; Qian, Yan; Wu, Yingxin; Yin, Jun; Zhai, Jianping

    2013-04-01

    The effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on avoidance response, survival, growth, and reproduction of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were investigated under laboratory conditions using natural and artificial soils as substrate. Results showed that no significant avoidance response was observed when earthworms were exposed to 0.1-1000 mg/kg of BDE-209 for 48 h. After 28-days exposure, no significant effects on survival and growth of adult earthworms was induced by 0.1-1000 mg/kg of BDE-209 indicating the Lowest Observed Effect Level (LOEL) of BDE-209 on their survival and body weight was more than 1000 mg/kg. Except for a significant decrease in the number of juveniles per hatched cocoon in artificial soils at 1000 mg/kg of BDE-209, no significant effects on reproductive parameters (e.g. cocoon production per earthworms, weight per cocoon and cocoon hatchability) were observed. These results suggest that adult earthworms have a strong tolerance for BDE-209 exposure in soils, but a potential toxicity does exist for earthworm embryos or juveniles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive capacities from survival to stress responses of two isogenic lines of rainbow trout fed a plant-based diet

    PubMed Central

    Sadoul, B.; Foucard, A.; Valotaire, C.; Labbé, L.; Goardon, L.; LeCalvez, J. M.; Médale, F.; Quillet, E.; Dupont-Nivet, M.; Geurden, I.; Prunet, P.; Colson, V.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of feed for farmed salmonids has strongly evolved during the last decades due to the substitution of fishery-derived fish oil and fishmeal by ingredients of plant origin. Little information is available regarding the effects of this transition on adaptive capacities in fish. Two rainbow trout isogenic lines, known for their divergent ability to grow on a plant-based diet (PBD), were fed for seven months from first feeding either a fully PBD or a control marine-resources diet and were compared for their growing and survival capacities over time and their behavioral and stress responses at similar sizes but different ages. Although fish displayed similar appetitive behaviour, the two lines were highly affected by the PBD translated in decreased growth and apathetic behaviour, but also stronger stress responses displayed by stronger cortisol increases and more stress-related behaviour when isolated. The two lines were found to be similarly sensitive to a PBD for the assessed stress-related parameters, but one line displayed a lower survival during the early rearing period. Overall, these results suggest that a PBD supplied to fish from the alevin stage has strong effects on physiological and behavioural parameters, with possible impairment of fish welfare, but also genome-dependent survival. PMID:27808103

  19. Adaptive capacities from survival to stress responses of two isogenic lines of rainbow trout fed a plant-based diet.

    PubMed

    Sadoul, B; Foucard, A; Valotaire, C; Labbé, L; Goardon, L; LeCalvez, J M; Médale, F; Quillet, E; Dupont-Nivet, M; Geurden, I; Prunet, P; Colson, V

    2016-11-03

    The composition of feed for farmed salmonids has strongly evolved during the last decades due to the substitution of fishery-derived fish oil and fishmeal by ingredients of plant origin. Little information is available regarding the effects of this transition on adaptive capacities in fish. Two rainbow trout isogenic lines, known for their divergent ability to grow on a plant-based diet (PBD), were fed for seven months from first feeding either a fully PBD or a control marine-resources diet and were compared for their growing and survival capacities over time and their behavioral and stress responses at similar sizes but different ages. Although fish displayed similar appetitive behaviour, the two lines were highly affected by the PBD translated in decreased growth and apathetic behaviour, but also stronger stress responses displayed by stronger cortisol increases and more stress-related behaviour when isolated. The two lines were found to be similarly sensitive to a PBD for the assessed stress-related parameters, but one line displayed a lower survival during the early rearing period. Overall, these results suggest that a PBD supplied to fish from the alevin stage has strong effects on physiological and behavioural parameters, with possible impairment of fish welfare, but also genome-dependent survival.

  20. Bacterial survival in response to desiccation and high humidity at above zero and subzero temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yinjie; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-04-01

    Earthly microorganisms might have contaminated Mars for millions of years by intellectual activities or natural transfer. Knowledge on the preservation of microorganisms may help our searching for life on outer planets, particularly Mars-contaminated earthly microorganisms at ancient time. Extreme dryness is one of the current Mars characteristics. However, a humid or watery Mars at earlier time was suggested by evidence accumulated in recent decades. It raises the question that whether water helps preservation of the microorganisms or not, particularly those with high possibility of interplanetary transfer like spores and Deinococci. In this study, we examined the effects of desiccation and high humidity on survival and DNA double strand breaks (DSB) of Escherichia coli, Deinococcus radiodurans and spores of Bacillus pumilus at 25, 4 and -70 °C. They exhibited different survival rates and DSB patterns under desiccation and high humidity. Higher survival and less DSB occurred at lower temperature. We suggest that some Mars-contaminated bacteria might have been viably preserved on cold Mars regions for long periods, regardless of water availability. It is more likely to find ancient spores than ancient Deinococci on Mars. In our search for preserved extraterrestrial life, priority should be given to the Mars Polar Regions.

  1. Survival and physiologic response of common Amakihi and Japanese white-eyes during simulated translocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Massey, J. Gregory; Johnson, Luanne; Dougill, Steve; Banko, Paul C.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of three translocation trials on Common Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) and Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus). Trial 1 involved capturing birds, transporting them on rough roads for 4 hr followed by holding in an aviary for 48 hr without overnight thermal support prior to release. Trial 2 involved capture, then holding in an aviary for 48 hr with overnight thermal support followed by transport for 4 hr prior to release. Trial 3 and 1 were identical except that overnight thermal support was provided during trial 3. We monitored survival, food consumption, weight change, and fecal production during captivity as well as changes in hematocrit, estimated total solids, heterophil to lymphocyte ratios, plasma uric acid, and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) at capture and release. Survival was significantly lower for Amakihi during trial 1 (no thermal support). Birds that died lost significantly more weight than those that survived. Regardless of trial, birds responded to translocation by a combination of weight loss, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, uric acid, and CPK levels. The first 24 hr of captivity posed the greatest risk to birds regardless of whether transport or holding occurred first. Food consumption, fecal production, and weight all decreased at night, and overnight thermal support during holding was critical if ambient temperatures dipped to freezing. We recommend that if small passerines are to be held for > 12 hr, they be monitored individually for weight loss, food consumption, and fecal production.

  2. Survival and physiologic response of Common Amakihi and Japanese White-eyes during simulated translocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Massey, J.G.; Johnson, L.; Dougill, S.; Banko, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of three translocation trials on Common Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) and Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus). Trial 1 involved capturing birds, transporting them on rough roads for 4 hr followed by holding in an aviary for 48 hr without overnight thermal support prior to release. Trial 2 involved capture, then holding in an aviary for 48 hr with overnight thermal support followed by transport for 4 hr prior to release. Trial 3 and 1 were identical except that overnight thermal support was provided during trial 3. We monitored survival, food consumption, weight change, and fecal production during captivity as well as changes in hematocrit, estimated total solids, heterophil to lymphocyte ratios, plasma uric acid, and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) at capture and release. Survival was significantly lower for Amakihi during trial I (no thermal support). Birds that died lost significantly more weight than those that survived. Regardless of trial, birds responded to translocation by a combination of weight loss, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, uric acid, and CPK levels. The first 24 hr of captivity posed the greatest risk to birds regardless of whether transport or holding occurred first. Food consumption, fecal production, and weight all decreased at night, and overnight thermal support during holding was critical if ambient temperatures dipped to freezing. We recommend that if small passerines are to be held for > 12 hr, they be monitored individually for weight loss, food consumption, and fecal production.

  3. Survival and behavioural response to acaricides of the coconut mite predator Neoseiulus baraki.

    PubMed

    Lima, Debora B; Melo, José W S; Guedes, Raul N C; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Pallini, Angelo; Gondim, Manoel G C

    2013-07-01

    The coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, is a major pest of coconut palm in the world. The control of this pest species is done through acaricide applications at short time intervals. However, the predators of this pest may also be affected by acaricides. Among the predators of A. guerreronis, Neoseiulus baraki (Athias-Henriot) has potential for biological control. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of acaricides on the survival and behavior of N. baraki. The survivorship of N. baraki was recorded in surface-impregnated arenas. Choice and no-choice behavioral bioassays were carried out using a video tracking system to assess the walking behavior of the predator under acaricide exposure. Although all acaricides negatively affected the survival of N. baraki, chlorfenapyr and azadirachtin caused lower effect than the other acaricides. No significant differences in walking behavior were observed under exposure to fenpyroximate, chlorfenapyr and chlorpyrifos on fully-contaminated arenas. Azadirachtin and chlorpyrifos caused repellence. Irritability was observed for all acaricides, except for abamectin. Chlorfenapyr was the most suitable product for managing the coconut mite because of its low effect on survival and behavior of N. baraki.

  4. AMPK and PFKFB3 mediate glycolysis and survival in response to mitophagy during mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Doménech, Elena; Maestre, Carolina; Esteban-Martínez, Lorena; Partida, David; Pascual, Rosa; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Seco, Esther; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Pérez, Manuel; Megias, Diego; Allen, Katherine; López, Miguel; Saha, Asish K; Velasco, Guillermo; Rial, Eduardo; Méndez, Raúl; Boya, Patricia; Salazar-Roa, María; Malumbres, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    Blocking mitotic progression has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic strategy to impair proliferation of tumour cells. However, how cells survive during prolonged mitotic arrest is not well understood. We show here that survival during mitotic arrest is affected by the special energetic requirements of mitotic cells. Prolonged mitotic arrest results in mitophagy-dependent loss of mitochondria, accompanied by reduced ATP levels and the activation of AMPK. Oxidative respiration is replaced by glycolysis owing to AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of PFKFB3 and increased production of this protein as a consequence of mitotic-specific translational activation of its mRNA. Induction of autophagy or inhibition of AMPK or PFKFB3 results in enhanced cell death in mitosis and improves the anti-tumoral efficiency of microtubule poisons in breast cancer cells. Thus, survival of mitotic-arrested cells is limited by their metabolic requirements, a feature with potential implications in cancer therapies aimed to impair mitosis or metabolism in tumour cells.

  5. Survival and physiologic response of common Amakihi and Japanese white-eyes during simulated translocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Massey, J.G.; Johnson, L.; Dougill, S.; Banko, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of three translocation trials on Common Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) and Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus). Trial 1 involved capturing birds, transporting them on rough roads for 4 hr followed by holding in an aviary for 48 hr without overnight thermal support prior to release. Trial 2 involved capture, then holding in an aviary for 48 hr with overnight thermal support followed by transport for 4 hr prior to release. Trial 3 and 1 were identical except that overnight thermal support was provided during trial 3. We monitored survival, food consumption, weight change, and fecal production during captivity as well as changes in hematocrit, estimated total solids, heterophil to lymphocyte ratios, plasma uric acid, and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) at capture and release. Survival was significantly lower for Amakihi during trial 1 (no thermal support). Birds that died lost significantly more weight than those that survived. Regardless of trial, birds responded to translocation by a combination of weight loss, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, uric acid, and CPK levels. The first 24 hr of captivity posed the greatest risk to birds regardless of whether transport or holding occurred first. Food consumption, fecal production, and weight all decreased at night, and overnight thermal support during holding was critical if ambient temperatures dipped to freezing. We recommend that if small passerines are to be held for > 12 hr, they be monitored individually for weight loss, food consumption, and fecal production.

  6. Mechanisms of survival, responses and sources of Salmonella in low-moisture environments

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Sarah; Condell, Orla; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Alejandro; Fanning, Séamus

    2013-01-01

    Some Enterobacteriaceae possess the ability to survive in low-moisture environments for extended periods of time. Many of the reported food-borne outbreaks associated with low-moisture foods involve Salmonella contamination. The control of Salmonella in low-moisture foods and their production environments represents a significant challenge for all food manufacturers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to Salmonella survival in intermediate- and low-moisture food matrices and their production environments. The mechanisms utilized by this bacterium to ensure their survival in these dry conditions remain to be fully elucidated, however, in depth transcriptomic data is now beginning to emerge regarding this observation. Earlier research work described the effect(s) that low-moisture can exert on the long-term persistence and heat tolerance of Salmonella, however, data are also now available highlighting the potential cross-tolerance to other stressors including commonly used microbicidal agents. Sources and potential control measures to reduce the risk of contamination will be explored. By extending our understanding of these geno- and phenotypes, we may be able to exploit them to improve food safety and protect public health. PMID:24294212

  7. Light-Induced Alterations in Striatal Neurochemical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    that receives a number of dopaminergic and glutamatergic input and is known to be involved in the modulation of locomotor and behavioral responses.

  8. Visible-light-induced chemoselective reductive decarboxylative alkynylation under biomolecule-compatible conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Qi, Li; Hu, Chenchen; Chen, Yiyun

    2015-03-28

    We report a visible-light-induced reductive decarboxylative C(sp(3))-C(sp) bond coupling reaction to construct aryl, alkyl and silyl substituted alkynes at room temperature in organic solvents or neutral aqueous solutions. This chemoselective alkynylation was compatible with various functional groups and biomolecules, and did not affect the protein enzyme activity.

  9. Reply to Comment on Light-induced atomic desorption and diffusion of Rb from porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba, S.; Failache, H.; Lezama, A.

    2010-11-15

    We argue that the model used in our paper [Phys. Rev. A 81, 032901 (2010)] for the analysis of the experimental study of light-induced atomic desorption in porous alumina is the simplest consistent approach to a previously unexplored physical system.

  10. Visible light-induced ion-selective optodes based on a metastable photoacid for cation detection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parth K; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y

    2016-01-07

    A new platform of ion-selective optodes is presented here to detect cations under thermodynamic equilibrium via ratiometric analysis. This novel platform utilizes a 'one of a kind' visible light-induced metastable photoacid as a reference ion indicator to achieve activatable and controllable sensors. These ion-selective optodes were studied in terms of their stability, sensitivity, selectivity, and theoretical aspects.

  11. Light-induced Effects in Sillenite Crystals with Shallow and Deep Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, Tatiana; Kisteneva, Marina; Shandarov, Stanislav; Tolstik, Alexei

    This paper presents the light-induced effects in bismuth silicon and bismuth titanium oxide crystals associated both with the electron transitions into the conduction band and with the filling of shallow and deep traps, which determine the optical and electroconductive properties of these crystals. The dynamics of photoconductivity and light-induced absorption is analyzed under conditions of pulsed laser illumination at the wavelength of 532 nm. The possibility to describe the relaxation processes of a population for trapping levels with the use of two-exponential function is demonstrated. The photoconductivity dynamics is characterized by two relaxation times on the order of 100 ns and 10 μs, whereas for light-induced absorption the lifetimes about 10 μs and several days for short- and long-lived traps, respectively, have been obtained. Because of this, the relaxation transitions may be occurred both to the shallow trap centers with energy located close to the conduction band and to the deep-lying traps, which should be included into a diversified theoretical model adequately describing the light-induced phenomena in photorefractive sillenite-family crystals.

  12. Prolonged time to surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy increases histopathological response without affecting survival in patients with esophageal or junctional cancer.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Joel; van Hagen, Pieter; Lingsma, Hester F; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; Biermann, Katharina; ten Kate, Fiebo J W; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van der Gaast, Ate; van Lanschot, J Jan B

    2014-11-01

    To determine the relation between time to surgery (TTS) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) and pathologically complete response (pCR), surgical outcome, and survival in patients with esophageal cancer. Standard treatment for potentially curable esophageal cancer is nCRT plus surgery after 4 to 6 weeks. In rectal cancer patients, evidence suggests that prolonged TTS is associated with a higher pCR rate and possibly with better survival. We identified patients treated with nCRT plus surgery for esophageal cancer between 2001 and 2011. TTS (last day of radiotherapy to day of surgery) varied mainly for logistical reasons. Minimal follow-up was 24 months. The effect of TTS on pCR rate, postoperative complications, and survival was determined with (ordinal) logistic, linear, and Cox regression, respectively. In total, 325 patients were included. Median TTS was 48 days (p25-p75=40-60). After 45 days, TTS was associated with an increased probability of pCR [odds ratio (OR)=1.35 per additional week of TSS, P=0.0004] and a small increased risk of postoperative complications (OR=1.20, P<0.001). Prolonged TTS had no effect on disease-free and overall survivals (HR=1.00 and HR=1.06 per additional week of TSS, P=0.976 and P=0.139, respectively). Prolonged TTS after nCRT increases the probability of pCR and is associated with a slightly increased probability of postoperative complications, without affecting disease-free and overall survivals. We conclude that TTS can be safely prolonged from the usual 4 to 6 weeks up to at least 12 weeks, which facilitates a more conservative wait-and-see strategy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy to be tested.

  13. Triple Receptor–Negative Breast Cancer: The Effect of Race on Response to Primary Systemic Treatment and Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Shaheenah; Broglio, Kristine; Kau, Shu-Wan; Green, Marjorie C.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Albarracin, Constance; Yang, Wei T.; Hennessy, Bryan T.J.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to describe the effect of race on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and survival outcomes in women with triple receptor–negative (TN) breast cancers. Patients and Methods Four hundred seventy-one patients with TN breast cancer diagnosed between 1996 and 2005 and treated with primary systemic chemotherapy were included. pCR was defined as no residual invasive cancer in the breast and axillary lymph nodes. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and compared between groups using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted for each survival outcome to determine the relationship of patient and tumor variables with outcome. Results Median follow-up time was 24.5 months. One hundred patients (21.2%) were black, and 371 patients (78.8%) were white/other race. Seventeen percent of black patients (n = 17) and 25.1% of white/other patients (n = 93) achieved a pCR (P = .091). Three-year RFS rates were 68% (95% CI, 56% to 76%) and 62% (95% CI, 57% to 67%) for black and white/other patients, respectively, with no significant difference observed between the two groups (P = .302). Three-year OS was similar for the two racial groups. After controlling for patient and tumor characteristics, race was not significantly associated with RFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.68; P = .747) or OS (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.68; P = .735) when white/other patients were compared with black patients. Conclusion Race does not significantly affect pCR rates or survival outcomes in women with TN breast cancer treated in a single institution under the same treatment conditions. PMID:19047281

  14. A novel systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) for predicting the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Zhuang, Liping; Shen, Yehua; Geng, Yawen; Yu, Shulin; Chen, Hao; Liu, Luming; Meng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhen

    2016-07-15

    Predicting survival is uniquely difficult in patients with pancreatic cancer who receive chemotherapy. The authors developed a systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) based on peripheral neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts and evaluated the ability of the SIRI to predict the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer who received chemotherapy. The SIRI was developed in a training set of 177 patients who had advanced pancreatic cancer and received palliative chemotherapy. The ability of the SIRI to predict a patient's survival after chemotherapy was validated in 2 independent cohorts (n = 397). Compared with patients who had an SIRI <1.8, patients in the training cohort who had an SIRI ≥1.8 had a shorter time to progression (TTP) (hazard ratio [HR], 2.348; 95% confidence interval, 1.559-3.535; P = .003) and shorter overall survival (OS) (HR, 2.789; 95% confidence interval, 1.897-4.121; P < .001). Comparable TTP and OS findings were observed in 2 independent validation cohorts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the SIRI was an independent prognostic factor for both TTP and OS. In addition, compared with no change, an increase in the SIRI at week 8 was associated with poor TTP and OS, whereas a decrease in the SIRI was associated with improved outcomes. In addition, high SIRI scores were correlated with higher serum levels of interleukin 10, C-C motif chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17), CCL18, and CCL22 and with a shortened TTP. The SIRI can be used to predict the survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas who receive chemotherapy, potentially allowing clinicians to improve treatment outcomes by identifying candidates for aggressive therapy. Cancer 2016;122:2158-67. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  16. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B; Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M

    2016-01-21

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  17. Tunable diffraction grating using ultraviolet-light-induced spatial phase modulation in dual-frequency liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.-T.; Liang Xiao; Ren Hongwen; Wu, S.-T.

    2004-08-16

    An electrically tunable diffraction phase grating using ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced spatial dielectric modulation of a dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) cell is demonstrated. A photomask with transparent and opaque stripes was used for fabricating the grating. In the UV-exposed stripes, the negative dielectric anisotropy ({delta}{epsilon}) tolane compound of the DFLC mixture is partially polymerized resulting in a decreased threshold voltage as compared to that of the unexposed region. Upon applying a constant voltage, the phase difference between the adjacent pixels is produced. The first-order diffraction efficiency reaches {approx}60% which agrees well with the simulation results. Due to the dual-frequency addressing at 30 V{sub rms}, the response time of the DFLC phase grating was measured to be {approx}1 ms at room temperature.

  18. Light-induced damage to the retina: current understanding of the mechanisms and unresolved questions: a symposium-in-print.

    PubMed

    Rozanowska, Malgorzata B

    2012-01-01

    Light-induced injury to the retina resembles many features of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly age-related macular degeneration. This Symposium-in-Print on Retinal Photodamage discusses the mechanisms involved and protective strategies to increase the retinal resistance to damage and/or to counteract its deleterious effects. Recent results help explaining the wavelength dependence of susceptibility of the retina to photodamage and different sites of the initial injury for shorter- and longer-wavelength light. Still, there are many unanswered questions pointing toward next directions in research so as to increase the understanding of the responses of the retina to photodamage and help to develop effective therapeutic approaches for retinal degenerations. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  19. Survival and behavior of Chinese mystery snails (Bellamya chinensis) in response to simulated water body drawdowns and extended air exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unstad, Kody M.; Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Chaine, Noelle M.; Haak, Danielle M.; Kill, Robert A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Wong, Alec

    2013-01-01

    Nonnative invasive mollusks degrade aquatic ecosystems and induce economic losses worldwide. Extended air exposure through water body drawdown is one management action used for control. In North America, the Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is an invasive aquatic snail with an expanding range, but eradication methods for this species are not well documented. We assessed the ability of B. chinensis to survive different durations of air exposure, and observed behavioral responses prior to, during, and following desiccation events. Individual B. chinensis specimens survived air exposure in a laboratory setting for > 9 weeks, and survivorship was greater among adults than juveniles. Several B. chinensis specimens responded to desiccation by sealing their opercula and/or burrowing in mud substrate. Our results indicate that drawdowns alone may not be an effective means of eliminating B. chinensis. This study lays the groundwork for future management research that may determine the effectiveness of drawdowns when combined with factors such as extreme temperatures, predation, or molluscicides.

  20. Caspase-1 activation of lipid metabolic pathways in response to bacterial pore-forming toxins promotes cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gurcel, Laure; Abrami, Laurence; Girardin, Stephen; Tschopp, Jurg; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2006-09-22

    Many pathogenic organisms produce pore-forming toxins as virulence factors. Target cells however mount a response to such membrane damage. Here we show that toxin-induced membrane permeabilization leads to a decrease in cytoplasmic potassium, which promotes the formation of a multiprotein oligomeric innate immune complex, called the inflammasome, and the activation of caspase-1. Further, we find that when rendered proteolytic in this context caspase-1 induces the activation of the central regulators of membrane biogenesis, the Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which in turn promote cell survival upon toxin challenge possibly by facilitating membrane repair. This study highlights that, in addition to its well-established role in triggering inflammation via the processing of the precursor forms of interleukins, caspase-1 has a broader role, in particular linking the intracellular ion composition to lipid metabolic pathways, membrane biogenesis, and survival.

  1. Pathologic complete response and disease-free survival are not surrogate endpoints for 5-year survival in rectal cancer: an analysis of 22 randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Fausto; Borgonovo, Karen; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Lonati, Veronica; Barni, Sandro

    2017-02-01

    We performed a literature-based analysis of randomized clinical trials to assess the pathologic complete response (pCR) (ypT0N0 after neoadjuvant therapy) and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) as potential surrogate endpoints for 5-year overall survival (OS) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant (chemo)radiotherapy (CT)RT. A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library was performed. Treatment effects on 3-year DFS and 5-year OS were expressed as rates of patients alive (%), and those on pCR as differences in pCR rates (∆(pCR%)). A weighted regression analysis was performed at individual- and trial-level to test the association between treatment effects on surrogate (∆(pCR%) and ∆(3yDFS)) and the main clinical outcome (∆(5yOS)). Twenty-two trials involving 10,050 patients, were included in the analysis. The individual level surrogacy showed that the pCR% and 3-year DFS were poorly correlated with 5-year OS (R=0.52; 95% CI, 0.31-0.91; P=0.002; and R=0.60; 95% CI, 0.36-1; P=0.002). The trial-level surrogacy analysis confirmed that the two treatment effects on surrogates (∆(pCR%) and ∆(3yDFS)) are not strong surrogates for treatment effects on 5-year OS % (R=0.2; 95% CI, -0.29-0.78; P=0.5 and R=0.64; 95% CI, 0.29-1; P=0.06). These findings were confirmed in neoadjuvant CTRT studies but not in phase III trials were 3-year DFS could still represent a valid surrogate. This analysis does not support the use of pCR and 3-year DFS% as appropriate surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS% in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy.

  2. Pathologic complete response and disease-free survival are not surrogate endpoints for 5-year survival in rectal cancer: an analysis of 22 randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Karen; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Lonati, Veronica; Barni, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a literature-based analysis of randomized clinical trials to assess the pathologic complete response (pCR) (ypT0N0 after neoadjuvant therapy) and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) as potential surrogate endpoints for 5-year overall survival (OS) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant (chemo)radiotherapy (CT)RT. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library was performed. Treatment effects on 3-year DFS and 5-year OS were expressed as rates of patients alive (%), and those on pCR as differences in pCR rates (∆pCR%). A weighted regression analysis was performed at individual- and trial-level to test the association between treatment effects on surrogate (∆pCR% and ∆3yDFS) and the main clinical outcome (∆5yOS). Results Twenty-two trials involving 10,050 patients, were included in the analysis. The individual level surrogacy showed that the pCR% and 3-year DFS were poorly correlated with 5-year OS (R=0.52; 95% CI, 0.31–0.91; P=0.002; and R=0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–1; P=0.002). The trial-level surrogacy analysis confirmed that the two treatment effects on surrogates (∆pCR% and ∆3yDFS) are not strong surrogates for treatment effects on 5-year OS % (R=0.2; 95% CI, −0.29–0.78; P=0.5 and R=0.64; 95% CI, 0.29–1; P=0.06). These findings were confirmed in neoadjuvant CTRT studies but not in phase III trials were 3-year DFS could still represent a valid surrogate. Conclusions This analysis does not support the use of pCR and 3-year DFS% as appropriate surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS% in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:28280607

  3. Compartmental stress responses correlate with cell survival in bystander effects induced by the DNA damage agent, bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Savu, Diana; Petcu, Ileana; Temelie, Mihaela; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta

    2015-01-01

    Physical or chemical stress applied to a cell system trigger a signal cascade that is transmitted to the neighboring cell population in a process known as bystander effect. Despite its wide occurrence in biological systems this phenomenon is mainly documented in cancer treatments. Thus understanding whether the bystander effect acts as an adaptive priming element for the neighboring cells or a sensitization factor is critical in designing treatment strategies. Here we characterize the bystander effects induced by bleomycin, a DNA-damaging agent, and compartmental stress responses associated with this phenomenon. Mouse fibroblasts were treated with increasing concentrations of bleomycin and assessed for DNA damage, cell death and induction of compartmental stress response (endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic stress). Preconditioned media were used to analyze bystander damage using the same end-points. Bleomycin induced bystander response was reflected primarily in increased DNA damage. This was dependent on the concentration of bleomycin and time of media conditioning. Interestingly, we found that ROS but not NO are involved in the transmission of the bystander effect. Consistent transcriptional down-regulation of the stress response factors tested (i.e. BiP, mtHsp60, Hsp70) occurred in the direct effect indicating that bleomycin might induce an arrest of transcription correlated with decreased survival. We observed the opposite trend in the bystander effect, with specific stress markers appearing increased and correlated with increased survival. These data shed new light on the potential role of stress pathways activation in bystander effects and their putative impact on the pro-survival pro-death balance.

  4. RAC1 GTPase promotes the survival of breast cancer cells in response to hyper-fractionated radiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Hein, A L; Post, C M; Sheinin, Y M; Lakshmanan, I; Natarajan, A; Enke, C A; Batra, S K; Ouellette, M M; Yan, Y

    2016-12-08

    Radiation therapy is a staple approach for cancer treatment, whereas radioresistance of cancer cells remains a substantial clinical problem. In response to ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA damage, cancer cells can sustain/activate pro-survival signaling pathways, leading to apoptotic resistance and induction of cell cycle checkpoint/DNA repair. Previous studies show that Rac1 GTPase is overexpressed/hyperactivated in breast cancer cells and is associated with poor prognosis. Studies from our laboratory reveal that Rac1 activity is necessary for G2/M checkpoint activation and cell survival in response to IR exposure of breast and pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of Rac1 on the survival of breast cancer cells treated with hyper-fractionated radiation (HFR), which is used clinically for cancer treatment. Results in this report indicate that Rac1 protein expression is increased in the breast cancer cells that survived HFR compared with parental cells. Furthermore, this increase of Rac1 is associated with enhanced activities of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways and increased levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, which are downstream targets of ERK1/2 and NF-κB signaling pathways. Using Rac1-specific inhibitor and dominant-negative mutant N17Rac1, here we demonstrate that Rac1 inhibition decreases the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and inhibitory κBα (IκBα), as well as the levels of Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 protein in the HFR-selected breast cancer cells. Moreover, inhibition of Rac1 using either small molecule inhibitor or dominant-negative N17Rac1 abrogates clonogenic survival of HFR-selected breast cancer cells and decreases the level of intact poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which is indicative of apoptosis induction. Collectively, results in this report suggest that Rac1 signaling is essential for the survival of breast cancer cells subjected to HFR and

  5. Overall survival and the response to radiotherapy among molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacob A; Kotecha, Rupesh; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Chao, Samuel T; Barnett, Gene H; Murphy, Erin S; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Angelov, Lilyana; Peereboom, David M; Suh, John H

    2017-06-15

    The current study was conducted to investigate survival and the response to radiotherapy among patients with molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with or without targeted therapies. Patients diagnosed with breast cancer brain metastases at a single tertiary care institution were included. The primary outcome was overall survival, whereas secondary outcomes included the cumulative incidences of distant intracranial failure, local failure, and radiation necrosis. Competing risks regression was used to model secondary outcomes. Within the study period, 547 patients presented with 3224 brain metastases and met inclusion criteria. Among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-amplified disease, 80% received HER2 antibodies and 38% received HER2/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The median survival was significantly shorter in the basal cohort (8.4 months), and progressively increased in the luminal A (12.3 months), HER2-positive (15.4 months), and luminal B (18.8 months) cohorts (P<.001). Among patients with HER2-amplified disease, the median survival was extended with the use of both HER2 antibodies (17.9 months vs 15.1 months; P = .04) and TKIs (21.1 months vs 15.4 months; P = .03). The 12-month cumulative incidences of local failure among molecular subtypes were 6.0% in the luminal A cohort, 10.3% in the luminal B cohort, 15.4% in the HER2-positive cohort, and 9.9% in the basal cohort (P = .01). Concurrent HER2/epidermal growth factor receptor TKIs with stereotactic radiosurgery significantly decreased the 12-month cumulative incidence of local failure from 15.1% to 5.7% (P<.001). Molecular subtypes appear to be prognostic for survival and predictive of the response to radiotherapy. TKIs were found to improve survival and local control, and may decrease the rate of distant failure. To preserve neurocognition, these results support a paradigm of upfront radiosurgery and HER2

  6. Family Growth and Survival Response to Two Simulated Water Temperature Environments in the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yaqing; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhang, Weijie; Han, Fenjie; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Mi; Pang, Zhenguo; Qi, Shoubing; Feng, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Heat tolerance is a target trait in the selective breeding of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius, as it plays an important role in the survival and growth of cultured S. intermedius during summer. We investigated family growth and survival response to two temperature treatments to evaluate the genotype by temperature interaction (GEI) in the family selection of S. intermedius. Sea urchins from 11 families were exposed to two simulated water temperature environments—high temperature (HE) and control temperature (CE)—for 12 months, with each experiment divided into four periods (P1, stress-free period I; P2, stress-full high period; P3, stress-response period; and P4, stress-free period II) based on the temperature changes and the survival. Test diameter (TD), body weight (BW), and survival rate (SR) in HE and CE were measured monthly. Effects of family, temperature, and family-temperature interaction on TD, BW, SR, and specific growth rate (SGR) for BW were examined. In CE, BW differed significantly between families in P2, P3, and P4, while TD differed significantly between families in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05). In HE, family had significant effects on BW in P4, and on TD in P3 and P4, while temperature had significant effects on SR, TD, and BW in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05). GEI effects were not significant for TD or BW; however, family ranking changes revealed the existence of GEI in SR. The GEI results indicate the necessity of applying family selection in CE and HE for SR, but not for TD or BW. These results may provide a guide for aquaculture and selective breeding of S. intermedius under temperature pressure. PMID:27589722

  7. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer predict the response to chemotherapy and survival outcome: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Xu, Jianjun; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) influence tumor prognosis and the chemotherapeutic response. Here, we quantified the clinical relevance of TILs, including the effect of TILs on lymphocyte subpopulations and assessed their consistency in breast cancer. We searched published literature from January 2000 to January 2016. The main parameters analyzed were pathological complete response (pCR) and survival outcome following chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. Pooled odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) values with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using random and fixed-effects models. Subgroup and heterogeneity analyses were also conducted. Twenty-three studies, which included 13,100 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that TILs were associated with clinicopathological parameters of biologically aggressive phenotypes, such as high tumor grade or estrogen/progesterone receptor negativity, but they were not correlated with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression. Moreover, a high TIL level was associated with a significantly improved pCR rate compared with a low TIL level (OR, 2.81; P < 0.001), particularly in the triple-negative breast cancer subtype (OR, 4.67; P < 0.001). An analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations showed that infiltration by CD8 lymphocytes, but not by CD4 lymphocytes and Foxp3 cells, was associated with a high pCR rate. Furthermore, a high TIL level was associated with significantly longer disease-free survival and overall survival. Our present meta-analysis indicates that an increased number of TILs predicted pCR to chemotherapy and improved survival. A high TIL level, characterized mainly by the infiltration of CD8 lymphocytes, is a strong predictive and prognostic factor. PMID:27329588

  8. Family Growth and Survival Response to Two Simulated Water Temperature Environments in the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaqing; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhang, Weijie; Han, Fenjie; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Mi; Pang, Zhenguo; Qi, Shoubing; Feng, Wenping

    2016-08-29

    Heat tolerance is a target trait in the selective breeding of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius, as it plays an important role in the survival and growth of cultured S. intermedius during summer. We investigated family growth and survival response to two temperature treatments to evaluate the genotype by temperature interaction (GEI) in the family selection of S. intermedius. Sea urchins from 11 families were exposed to two simulated water temperature environments-high temperature (HE) and control temperature (CE)-for 12 months, with each experiment divided into four periods (P1, stress-free period I; P2, stress-full high period; P3, stress-response period; and P4, stress-free period II) based on the temperature changes and the survival. Test diameter (TD), body weight (BW), and survival rate (SR) in HE and CE were measured monthly. Effects of family, temperature, and family-temperature interaction on TD, BW, SR, and specific growth rate (SGR) for BW were examined. In CE, BW differed significantly between families in P2, P3, and P4, while TD differed significantly between families in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05). In HE, family had significant effects on BW in P4, and on TD in P3 and P4, while temperature had significant effects on SR, TD, and BW in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05). GEI effects were not significant for TD or BW; however, family ranking changes revealed the existence of GEI in SR. The GEI results indicate the necessity of applying family selection in CE and HE for SR, but not for TD or BW. These results may provide a guide for aquaculture and selective breeding of S. intermedius under temperature pressure.

  9. MKK5 regulates high light-induced gene expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Cao, Qingqin; Zhang, Qing; Qin, Ling; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-07-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) convert the superoxide radical to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, and play crucial roles in plant tolerance to oxidative stress. Expression of many genes encoding SODs is promoted in response to environmental stresses, but the exact mechanism of such promotion is largely unknown. Here, we report that MKK5, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, mediated the high light-induced expression of genes of two copper/zinc SODs, CSD1 and CSD2, and was involved in the oxidative adaptation to high light stress. In response to high light, wild-type Arabidopsis plants showed much enhanced expression of CSD1 and CSD2 and higher enzyme activity of MKK5. In the MKK5-RNAi (RNA interference) lines, however, the induction of CSD1 and CSD2 as well as the activation of MKK5 activity were completely arrested. In contrast, overexpression of MKK5 promoted the expression of CSD1 and CSD2. MKK5-RNAi gene silencing and CSD1/2-RNAi suppression plants became much more sensitive to high light stress than wild-type plants, and the double mutant mkk5 csd1 exhibited hypersensitivity to the stress. Plants overexpressing MKK5 showed enhanced tolerance to high light stress. Our results demonstrate that MKK5 mediated a signal of the high light-induced expression of the genes CSD1 and CSD2. Manipulating MKK5 and thereby up-regulating the levels of CSD1 and CSD2 transcripts can improve plant tolerance to high light stress.

  10. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-07

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K(+) channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H(+)-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42-63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36-41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K(+) channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H(+)-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth.

  11. SiO2/TiO2 Nanocomposite Films on Polystyrene for Light-Induced Cell Detachment Application.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiguo; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian

    2017-01-25

    Light-induced cell detachment shows much potential in in vitro cell culture and calls for high-performance light-responsive films. In this study, a smooth and dense SiO2/TiO2 nanocomposite thin film with thickness of around 250 nm was first fabricated on H2O2 treated polystyrene (PS) substrate via a low-temperature sol-gel method. It was observed that the film could well-adhere on the PS surface and the bonding strength became increasingly high with the increase of SiO2 content. The peeling strength and shear strength reached 3.05 and 30.02 MPa, respectively. It was observed the surface of the film could transform into superhydrophilic upon 20 min illumination of ultraviolet with a wavelength of 365 nm (UV365). In cell culture, cells, i.e., NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 cells, cultured on SiO2/TiO2 nanocomposite film were easily detached after 10 min of UV365 illumination; the detachment rates reached 90.8% and 88.6%, respectively. Correspondingly, continuous cell sheets with good viability were also easily obtained through the same way. The present work shows that SiO2/TiO2 nanocomposite thin film could be easily prepared on polymeric surface at low temperature. The corresponding film exhibits excellent biocompatibility, high bonding strength, and good light responses. It could be a good candidate for the surface of cell culture utensils with light-induced cell detachment property.

  12. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H+-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K+ channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H+-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42–63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36–41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K+ channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H+-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth. PMID:24367097

  13. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade suppresses light-induced neural damage in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Toshio; Ozawa, Yoko; Miyake, Seiji; Nagai, Norihiro; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to light contributes to the development and progression of retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying light-induced tissue damage are not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling, which is part of the renin-angiotensin system, in light-induced retinal damage. Light-exposed Balb/c mice that were treated with the AT1R blockers (angiotensin II receptor blockers; ARBs) valsartan, losartan, and candesartan before and after the light exposure exhibited attenuated visual function impairment, compared to vehicle-treated mice. This effect was dose-dependent and observed across the ARB class of inhibitors. Further evaluation of valsartan showed that it suppressed a number of light-induced retinal effects, including thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer caused by apoptosis, shortening of the photoreceptor cell outer segment, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of ROS in retinal pathogenesis was investigated further using the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Treatment of light-exposed mice with NAC before the light exposure suppressed the visual function impairment and photoreceptor cell histological changes due to apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with valsartan or NAC suppressed the induction of c-fos (a component of the AP-1 transcription factor) and the upregulation of fasl (a proapoptotic molecule whose transcript is regulated downstream of AP-1). Our results suggest that AT1R signaling mediates light-induced apoptosis, by increasing the levels of ROS and proapoptotic molecules in the retina. Thus, AT1R blockade may represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing light-induced retinal neural tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  15. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed.

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Elevated Tumour Markers Predict Worse Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salmiheimo, Aino; Mustonen, Harri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kemppainen, Esko; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimation of the prognosis of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) currently relies on tumour-related factors such as resection margins and on lymph-node ratio (LNR) both inconveniently available only postoperatively. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of preoperative laboratory data in predicting PDAC prognosis. Methods Collection of laboratory and clinical data was retrospective from 265 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for PDAC at Helsinki University Hospital. Cancer-specific survival assessment utilized Kaplan-Meier analysis, and independent associations between factors were by the Cox regression model. Results During follow-up, 76% of the patients died of PDAC, with a median survival time of 19.6 months. In univariate analysis, CRP, albumin, CEA, and CA19-9 were significantly associated with postoperative cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, taking into account age, gender, LNR, resection margins, tumour status, and adjuvant chemotherapy, the preoperative biomarkers independently associated with adverse prognosis were hypoalbuminemia (< 36 g/L, hazard ratio (HR) 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–2.19, p = 0.011), elevated CRP (> 5 mg/L, HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.03–2.02, p = 0.036), CEA (> 5 μg/L, HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.07–2.53, p = 0.047), and CA19-9 (≥555 kU/L, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.18–3.08, p = 0.008). Conclusion For patients with resectable PDAC, preoperative CRP, along with albumin and tumour markers, is useful for predicting prognosis. PMID:27632196

  17. The innate immune response may be important for surviving plague in wild Gunnison's prairie dogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, Joseph D.; Van Andel, Roger; Stone, Nathan E.; Cobble, Kacy R.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Lee, Judy; VerSteeg, Michael; Corcoran, Jeff; Cordova, Jennifer; Van Pelt, William E.; Shuey, Megan M.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Keim, Paul; Smith, Susan; Rodriguez-Ramos, Julia; Williamson, Judy L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Wagner, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis, with ≥99% mortality reported from multiple studies of plague epizootics. A colony of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) in the Aubrey Valley (AV) of northern Arizona appears to have survived several regional epizootics of plague, whereas nearby colonies have been severely affected by Y. pestis. To examine potential mechanisms accounting for survival in the AV colony, we conducted a laboratory Y. pestis challenge experiment on 60 wild-caught prairie dogs from AV and from a nearby, large colony with frequent past outbreaks of plague, Espee (n = 30 per colony). Test animals were challenged subcutaneously with the fully virulent Y. pestis strain CO92 at three doses: 50, 5,000, and 50,000 colony-forming units (cfu); this range is lethal in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Contrary to our expectations, only 40% of the animals died. Although mortality trended higher in the Espee colony (50%) compared with AV (30%), the differences among infectious doses were not statistically significant. Only 39% of the survivors developed moderate to high antibody levels to Y. pestis, indicating that mechanisms other than humoral immunity are important in resistance to plague. The ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes was not correlated with plague survival in this study. However, several immune proteins with roles in innate immunity (VCAM-1, CXCL-1, and vWF) were upregulated during plague infection and warrant further inquiry into their role for protection against this disease. These results suggest plague resistance exists in wild populations of the Gunnison's prairie dog and provide important directions for future studies.

  18. The innate immune response may be important for surviving plague in wild Gunnison's prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Van Andel, Roger; Stone, Nathan E; Cobble, Kacy R; Nottingham, Roxanne; Lee, Judy; VerSteeg, Michael; Corcoran, Jeff; Cordova, Jennifer; Van Pelt, William; Shuey, Megan M; Foster, Jeffrey T; Schupp, James M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Keim, Paul; Smith, Susan; Rodriguez-Ramos, Julia; Williamson, Judy L; Rocke, Tonie E; Wagner, David M

    2013-10-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis, with ≥99% mortality reported from multiple studies of plague epizootics. A colony of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) in the Aubrey Valley (AV) of northern Arizona appears to have survived several regional epizootics of plague, whereas nearby colonies have been severely affected by Y. pestis. To examine potential mechanisms accounting for survival in the AV colony, we conducted a laboratory Y. pestis challenge experiment on 60 wild-caught prairie dogs from AV and from a nearby, large colony with frequent past outbreaks of plague, Espee (n = 30 per colony). Test animals were challenged subcutaneously with the fully virulent Y. pestis strain CO92 at three doses: 50, 5,000, and 50,000 colony-forming units (cfu); this range is lethal in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Contrary to our expectations, only 40% of the animals died. Although mortality trended higher in the Espee colony (50%) compared with AV (30%), the differences among infectious doses were not statistically significant. Only 39% of the survivors developed moderate to high antibody levels to Y. pestis, indicating that mechanisms other than humoral immunity are important in resistance to plague. The ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes was not correlated with plague survival in this study. However, several immune proteins with roles in innate immunity (VCAM-1, CXCL-1, and vWF) were upregulated during plague infection and warrant further inquiry into their role for protection against this disease. These results suggest plague resistance exists in wild populations of the Gunnison's prairie dog and provide important directions for future studies.

  19. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Elevated Tumour Markers Predict Worse Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salmiheimo, Aino; Mustonen, Harri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kemppainen, Esko; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of the prognosis of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) currently relies on tumour-related factors such as resection margins and on lymph-node ratio (LNR) both inconveniently available only postoperatively. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of preoperative laboratory data in predicting PDAC prognosis. Collection of laboratory and clinical data was retrospective from 265 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for PDAC at Helsinki University Hospital. Cancer-specific survival assessment utilized Kaplan-Meier analysis, and independent associations between factors were by the Cox regression model. During follow-up, 76% of the patients died of PDAC, with a median survival time of 19.6 months. In univariate analysis, CRP, albumin, CEA, and CA19-9 were significantly associated with postoperative cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, taking into account age, gender, LNR, resection margins, tumour status, and adjuvant chemotherapy, the preoperative biomarkers independently associated with adverse prognosis were hypoalbuminemia (< 36 g/L, hazard ratio (HR) 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.19, p = 0.011), elevated CRP (> 5 mg/L, HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.03-2.02, p = 0.036), CEA (> 5 μg/L, HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.07-2.53, p = 0.047), and CA19-9 (≥555 kU/L, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.18-3.08, p = 0.008). For patients with resectable PDAC, preoperative CRP, along with albumin and tumour markers, is useful for predicting prognosis.

  20. Oxygenation predicts radiation response and survival in patients with cervix cancer.

    PubMed

    Fyles, A W; Milosevic, M; Wong, R; Kavanagh, M C; Pintilie, M; Sun, A; Chapman, W; Levin, W; Manchul, L; Keane, T J; Hill, R P

    1998-08-01

    Hypoxia appears to be an important factor in predicting tumor relapse following radiation therapy. This study measured oxygenation prior to treatment in patients with cervix cancer using a polarographic oxygen electrode to determine if oxygenation was an important prognostic factor with regard to tumor control and survival. Between May 1994 and June 1997, 74 eligible patients with cervix cancer were entered into an ongoing prospective study of tumor oxygenation prior to primary radiation therapy. All patients were evaluated with an Eppendorf oxygen electrode during examination under anesthesia. Oxygenation data are presented as the hypoxic proportion, defined as the percentage of pO2 readings of <5 mm Hg (abbreviated as HP5). The HP5 ranged from 2 to 99% with a median of 52%. With a median follow-up of 1.2 years, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 69% for patients with HP5 of < or =50% compared with 34% for those with HP5 of >50% (log-rank P = 0.02). Tumor size above and below the median of 5 cm was also significantly related to DFS (P = 0.0003) and patients with bulky hypoxic tumors had a significantly lower DFS (12% at 2 years) than either bulky oxygenated or non-bulky oxygenated or hypoxic tumors (65%, P = 0.0001). Hypoxia and tumor size are significant adverse prognostic factors in a univariate analysis of disease-free survival in patients with cervix cancer. A high risk group of patients with bulky hypoxic tumors have a significantly higher probability of relapse and death.

  1. 670 nm red light preconditioning supports Müller cell function: evidence from the white light-induced damage model in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, Rizalyn; Valter, Krisztina

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells play an important role in the maintenance of normal structure and function of the neural components of the central nervous system. The Müller cells are one of the macroglial elements in the retina and their wide-ranging roles are responsible for the protection and proper functioning of the photoreceptors. In the present study, we aimed to test the effects of pretreatment with 670 nm red light on Müller cells in the light-induced model of retinal degeneration. Adult Sprague-Dawley albino rats were treated with 670 nm red light, from an LED source prior to exposure to bright (1000 lux) continuous light for 24 h. Müller cell-specific markers were used to assess structural and functional changes in this cell type 1 week after contact with damaging light. Changes in gene (Edn2, LIF, TNF-α) and protein (S100β, Vimentin, LIF, iNOS, GS, Cyclin-D1) levels and localization were evaluated using RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that 670 nm light pretreatment ameliorates the light-induced alterations in the expression of Müller-cell specific markers for structure, stress, metabolism and inflammation. This suggests that 670 nm light preconditioning may promote neuroprotective effects in the retina from light-induced damage, possibly through pathways regulating the roles of Müller cells in maintaining retinal homeostasis.

  2. Cell Surface CD74-MIF Interactions Drive Melanoma Survival in Response to Interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Tanese, Keiji; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Berkova, Zuzana; Wang, Yuling; Samaniego, Felipe; Lee, Jeffrey E; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Melanoma is believed to be a highly immunogenic tumor and recent developments in immunotherapies are promising. IFN-γ produced by immune cells has a crucial role in tumor immune surveillance; however, it has also been reported to be pro-tumorigenic. In the current study, we found that IFN-γ enhances the expression of CD74, which interacts with its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and thereby activates the PI3K/AKT pathway in melanoma, promoting tumor survival. IFN-γ increased phosphorylation of AKT Ser473 and upregulated total cell surface expression of CD74 in human melanoma cell lines tested. CD74 was highly expressed in melanoma tissues. Moreover, the expression of CD74 on tumor cells correlated with plasma IFN-γ levels in melanoma patient samples. In our analysis of melanoma cell lines, all produced MIF constitutively. Blockade of CD74-MIF interaction reduced AKT phosphorylation and expression of pro-tumorigenic molecules, including IL-6, IL-8, and BCL-2. Inhibition of CD74-MIF interaction significantly suppressed tumor growth in the presence of IFN-γ in our xenograft mouse model. Thus, we conclude that IFN-γ promotes melanoma cell survival by regulating CD74-MIF signaling, suggesting that targeting the CD74-MIF interaction under IFN-γ-stimulatory conditions would be an effective therapeutic approach for melanoma.

  3. Hematological Responses, Survival, and Respiratory Exchange in the Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Park, I-S; Hur, J W; Choi, J W

    2012-09-01

    A 12-wk experiment was conducted to examine the hematological changes, survival, and respiratory exchange in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during starvation. The growth, survival and respiratory exchange rates of the starved group were lower than those of the fed group during the experiment. Blood analysis, including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between the fed and starved groups at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol, glucose, Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), or aspartate aminotransferase between the fed and starved groups (p>0.05). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in the starved group than in the fed group, whereas plasma osmolality was lower in the starved group than in the fed group. It was shown that starved fish had various problems after four weeks, which did not occur in the fed group. Long-term starvation is infrequent in aquaculture farms. However, starvation studies of this kind are very useful for a basic understanding of how physiological changes affect fish health, life expectancy, and growth.

  4. Hematological Responses, Survival, and Respiratory Exchange in the Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Park, I.-S.; Hur, J. W.; Choi, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    A 12-wk experiment was conducted to examine the hematological changes, survival, and respiratory exchange in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during starvation. The growth, survival and respiratory exchange rates of the starved group were lower than those of the fed group during the experiment. Blood analysis, including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between the fed and starved groups at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol, glucose, Na+, Cl−, K+, or aspartate aminotransferase between the fed and starved groups (p>0.05). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in the starved group than in the fed group, whereas plasma osmolality was lower in the starved group than in the fed group. It was shown that starved fish had various problems after four weeks, which did not occur in the fed group. Long-term starvation is infrequent in aquaculture farms. However, starvation studies of this kind are very useful for a basic understanding of how physiological changes affect fish health, life expectancy, and growth. PMID:25049691

  5. Arabidopsis RAP2.2: An Ethylene Response Transcription Factor That Is Important for Hypoxia Survival1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Manuela; Wilson, Iain W.; Yang, Jun; Buerstenbinder, Katharina; Llewellyn, Danny; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Sauter, Margret; Dolferus, Rudy

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RAP2.2 (At3g14230) is an APETALA2/ethylene response factor-type transcription factor that belongs to the same subfamily as the rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance gene SUB1A. RAP2.2 is expressed at constitutively high levels in the roots and at lower levels in the shoots, where it is induced by darkness. Effector studies and analysis of ethylene signal transduction mutants indicate that RAP2.2 is induced in shoots by ethylene and functions in an ethylene-controlled signal transduction pathway. Overexpression of RAP2.2 resulted in improved plant survival under hypoxia (low-oxygen) stress, whereas lines containing T-DNA knockouts of the gene had poorer survival rates than the wild type. This indicates that RAP2.2 is important in a plant's ability to resist hypoxia stress. Observation of the expression pattern of 32 low-oxygen and ethylene-associated genes showed that RAP2.2 affects only part of the low-oxygen response, particularly the induction of genes encoding sugar metabolism and fermentation pathway enzymes, as well as ethylene biosynthesis genes. Our results provide a new insight on the regulation of gene expression under low-oxygen conditions. Lighting plays an important regulatory role and is intertwined with hypoxia conditions; both stimuli may act collaboratively to regulate the hypoxic response. PMID:20357136

  6. Improving Pediatric Survival from Resuscitation Events: The Role and Organization of Hospital-based Rapid Response Systems and Code Teams.

    PubMed

    Jagt, Elise Willem van der

    2013-01-01

    During the past 10-15 years it has become evident that in spite of the sophistication of medicine, hospitalized patients frequently experience cardiac arrests from which the majority do not survive. A substantial number of these arrests occur on general inpatient units where patients begin to deteriorate but there is a failure of timely recognition so that appropriate intervention can be instituted before the arrest takes place. Much work has been done to determine how survival from adult in-hospital cardiac arrests can be improved by (1) teaching health care providers about resuscitation management using a team approach and (2) more recently, by developing rapid response systems to recognize deteriorating patients early and intervening to prevent the cardiac arrest. The purpose of this review is to outline what is known about the use and organization of resuscitation teams (code teams) and rapid response systems as they apply to pediatric patients. Effort has been made to include the most current pediatric science available as a basis for encouraging the ongoing implementation of hospital team-based systems which appear to be able to improve the outcomes of pediatric in-hospital cardiac and respiratory arrests. Practical suggestions, implementation strategies, potential barriers, and ways to integrate pediatric code teams and rapid response systems into the quality and safety fabric of the hospital are provided.

  7. Importance of stress-response genes to the survival of airborne Escherichia coli under different levels of relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Chan, Wing Lam; Lai, Ka Man

    2017-12-01

    Other than the needs for infection control to investigate the survival and inactivation of airborne bacterial pathogens, there has been a growing interest in exploring bacterial communities in the air and the effect of environmental variables on them. However, the innate biological mechanism influencing the bacterial viability is still unclear. In this study, a mutant-based approach, using Escherichia coli as a model, was used to prove the concept that common stress-response genes are important for airborne survival of bacteria. Mutants with a single gene knockout that are known to respond to general stress (rpoS) and oxidative stress (oxyR, soxR) were selected in the study. Low relative humidity (RH), 30-40% was more detrimental to the bacteria than high RH, >90%. The log reduction of ∆rpoS was always higher than that of the parental strain at all RH levels but the ∆oxyR had a higher log reduction than the parental strain at intermediate RH only. ∆soxR had the same viability compared to the parental strain at all RH levels. The results hint that although different types and levels of stress are produced under different RH conditions, stress-response genes always play a role in the bacterial viability. This study is the first reporting the association between stress-response genes and viability of airborne bacteria.

  8. Analysis of different strategies adapted by two cassava cultivars in response to drought stress: ensuring survival or continuing growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pingjuan; Liu, Pei; Shao, Jiaofang; Li, Chunqiang; Wang, Bin; Guo, Xin; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Peng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, however, the underlying mechanism for its ability to survive and produce under drought remains obscure. In this study, two cassava cultivars, SC124 and Arg7, were treated by gradually reducing the soil water content. Their responses to the drought stress were examined through their morphological and physiological traits and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis. SC124 plants adapted a ‘survival’ mode under mild drought stress as evidenced by early stomatal closure and a reduction in the levels of various photosynthetic proteins and photosynthetic capacity, resulting in early growth quiescence. In contrast, Arg7 plants underwent senescence of older leaves but continued to grow, although at a reduced rate, under mild drought. SC124 plants were more capable of surviving prolonged severe drought than Arg7. The iTRAQ analysis identified over 5000 cassava proteins. Among the drought-responsive proteins identified in the study were an aquaporin, myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthases, and a number of proteins involved in the antioxidant systems and secondary metabolism. Many proteins that might play a role in signalling or gene regulation were also identified as drought-responsive proteins, which included several protein kinases, two 14-3-3 proteins, several RNA-binding proteins and transcription factors, and two histone deacetylases. Our study also supports the notion that linamarin might play a role in nitrogen reallocation in cassava under drought. PMID:25547914

  9. A retrograde neuronal survival response: target-derived neurotrophins regulate MEF2D and bcl-w.

    PubMed

    Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Hans, Aymeric; Courchesne, Stephanie L; Karch, Christoph; Cosker, Katharina E; Heerssen, Heather M; Watson, Fiona L; Kim, Taekyung; Greenberg, Michael E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2009-05-20

    Survival and maturation of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons during development depend on target-derived neurotrophins. These target-derived signals must be transmitted across long distances to alter gene expression. Here, we address the possibility that long-range retrograde signals initiated by target-derived neurotrophins activate a specialized transcriptional program. The transcription factor MEF2D is expressed in sensory neurons; we show that expression of this factor is induced in response to target-derived neurotrophins that stimulate the distal axons. We demonstrate that MEF2D regulates expression of an anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member, bcl-w. Expression of mef2d and bcl-w is stimulated in response to activation of a Trk-dependent ERK5/MEF2 pathway, and our data indicate that this pathway promotes sensory neuron survival. We find that mef2d and bcl-w are members of a larger set of retrograde response genes, which are preferentially induced by neurotrophin stimulation of distal axons. Thus, activation of an ERK5/MEF2D transcriptional program establishes and maintains the cellular constituents of functional sensory circuits.

  10. A retrograde neuronal survival response: Target-derived neurotrophins regulate MEF2D and bcl-w

    PubMed Central

    Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Hans, Aymeric; Courchesne, Stephanie L.; Karch, Christoph; Cosker, Katharina E.; Heerssen, Heather M.; Watson, Fiona L.; Kim, Taekyung; Greenberg, Michael E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival and maturation of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons during development depends on target-derived neurotrophins. These target-derived signals must be transmitted across long distances to alter gene expression. Here we address the possibility that long-range retrograde signals initiated by target-derived neurotrophins activate a specialized transcriptional program. The transcription factor MEF2D is expressed in sensory neurons; we show that expression of this factor is induced in response to target-derived neurotrophins that stimulate the distal axons. We demonstrate that MEF2D regulates expression of an anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member, bcl-w. Expression of mef2d and bcl-w is stimulated in response to activation of a Trk-dependent ERK5/Mef2 pathway, and our data indicate that this pathway promotes sensory neuron survival. We find that mef2d and bcl-w are members of a larger set of retrograde response genes, which are preferentially induced by neurotrophin stimulation of distal axons. Thus activation of an ERK5/MEF2D transcriptional program establishes and maintains the cellular constituents of functional sensory circuits. PMID:19458239

  11. Early Response of Protein Quality Control in Gills Is Associated with Survival of Hypertonic Shock in Mozambique tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2013-01-01

    The protein quality control (PQC) mechanism is essential for cell function and viability. PQC with proper biological function depends on molecular chaperones and proteases. The hypertonicity-induced protein damage and responses of PQC mechanism in aquatic organisms, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we examine the short-term effects of different hypertonic shocks on the levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs, e.g., HSP70 and HSP90), ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and protein aggregation in gills of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Following transfer from fresh water (FW) to 20‰ hypertonicity, all examined individuals survived to the end of experiment. Moreover, the levels of branchial HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins significantly increased at 3 and 24 h post-transfer, respectively. Up-regulation of HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins was sufficient to prevent the accumulation of aggregated proteins. However, the survival rate of tilapia dramatically declined at 5 h and all fish died within 7 h after direct transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. We presumed that this result was due to the failed activation of gill PQC system, which resulted in elevating the levels of aggregated proteins at 3 and 4 h. Furthermore, in aggregated protein fractions, the amounts of gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) remained relatively low when fish were transferred to 20‰ hypertonicity, whereas abundant NKA was found at 4 h post-transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. This study demonstrated that the response of PQC in gills is earlier than observable changes in localization of ion-secreting transport proteins upon hypertonic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the regulation of PQC mechanism in fish and characterize its important role in euryhaline teleost survival in response to hypertonic stress. PMID:23690986

  12. The regrowth kinetic of the surviving population is independent of acute and chronic responses to temozolomide in glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andrew Oliveira; Dalsin, Eloisa; Onzi, Giovana Ravizzoni; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Lenz, Guido

    2016-11-01

    Chemotherapy acts on cancer cells by producing multiple effects on a cell population including cell cycle arrest, necrosis, apoptosis and senescence. However, often a subpopulation of cells survives and the behavior of this subpopulation, which is responsible for cancer recurrence, remains obscure. Here we investigated the in vitro short- and long-term responses of six glioblastoma cell lines to clinically relevant doses of temozolomide for 5 days followed by 23 days of recovery, mimicking the standard schedule used in glioblastoma patient for this drug. These cells presented different profiles of sensitivity to temozolomide with varying levels of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, followed by a regrowth of the surviving cells. The initial reduction in cell number and the subsequent regrowth was analyzed with four new parameters applied to Cumulative Population Doubling (CPD) curves that describe the overall sensitivity of the population and the characteristic of the regrowth: the relative end point CPD (RendCPD); the relative Area Under Curve (rAUC); the Relative Time to Cross a Threshold (RTCT); and the Relative Proliferation Rate (RPR). Surprisingly, the kinetics of regrowth were not predicted by the mechanisms activated after treatment nor by the acute or overall sensitivity. With this study we added new parameters that describe key responses of glioblastoma cell populations to temozolomide treatment. These parameters can also be applied to other cell types and treatments and will help to understand the behavior of the surviving cancer cells after treatment and shed light on studies of cancer resistance and recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A study of the dynamics of a light-induced detonation wave using a self-consistent numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shov, L. A.; Vorob'ev, V. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Chernov, S. Iu.

    1991-07-01

    Results of a theoretical and computational study of the dynamics of light-induced detonation waves in focused laser beams are presented. The effect of the radial structure of the emission on the propagation and breakdown of light-induced detonation waves is analyzed. The computer model used in the study is described in detail.

  14. Implementing Cooperative Writing Response Groups and Self-Evaluation in South America: Struggle and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the impact of cooperative writing response groups and self-evaluation on the learners, other faculty, and the institution (a university in Argentina). Argues that cooperative writing response groups and self-evaluation are worth pursuing in constrained educational environments because of how beneficial the approach was perceived to be…

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibition in Ankylosing Spondylitis and Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis: Treatment Response, Drug Survival, and Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Corli, Justine; Flipo, René-Marc; Philippe, Peggy; Bera-Louville, Anne; Béhal, Hélène; Wibaux, Cécile; Paccou, Julien

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate baseline characteristics of nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFi), (2) assess the response to first TNFi treatment, and (3) compare drug-survival duration and rates. Inclusion criteria were patients with axSpA who initiated first TNFi treatment between April 2001 and July 2014 and were followed up for at least 3 months. Efficacy criteria were an improvement of at least 2 points (on a 0-10 scale) or a 50% improvement in the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Baseline characteristics, responses at 12 months, and drug survival were compared between AS and nr-axSpA. A total of 361 patients were included in the study (AS, n = 263 and nr-axSpA, n = 98). Patients with AS were more often men (65.02% vs 45.92%, p = 0.001) and had longer symptom duration (11.71 ± 9.52 vs 7.34 ± 9.30 yrs, p < 0.001). Median levels of acute-phase reactants (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) were significantly higher in patients with AS (p < 0.001 for both). Median BASDAI scores at first TNFi initiation were not higher in patients with nr-axSpA than in patients with AS (59, 49-70 vs 60, 50-70, p = 0.73). BASDAI 20 and BASDAI 50 response rates at 12 months were not statistically different between patients with AS and patients with nr-axSpA (74.58% vs 64.58%, p = 0.19 and 61.02% vs 50.00%, p = 0.19, respectively). No statistically significant difference in terms of survival was observed between patients with AS and nr-axSpA (p = 1.00). Treatment response and drug survival were similar in patients with AS and nr-axSpA after first TNFi initiation.

  16. Nomogram based on systemic inflammatory response markers predicting the survival of patients with resectable gastric cancer after D2 gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shangxiang; Liu, Xuechao; Kong, Pengfei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhan, Youqing; Xu, Dazhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to construct a nomogram to predict survival of patients with resectable gastric cancer (RGC) based on both clinicopathology characteristics and systemic inflammatory response markers (SIRMs). Of 3,452 RGC patients after D2 gastrectomy at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 1058 patients who met the inclusion criterion were analyzed. The patients operated on from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2009 were assigned to the training set (817 patients) to establish a nomogram, and the rest (241 patients) were selected as validation set. Based on the training set, seven independent risk factors were selected in the nomogram. The calibration curves for probability of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) showed satisfactory accordance between nomogram prediction and actual observation. When the metastatic lymph node stage (mLNS) is replaced by metastasis lymph node ratio (mLNR) in validation set, the C-index in predicting OS rise from 0.77 to 0.79, higher than that of 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th (AJCC) staging system (0.70; p<0.001). In conclusions, the proposed nomogram which including mLNR and routine detected SIRMs resulted in optimal survival prediction for RGC patients after D2 gastrectomy. PMID:27121054

  17. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  18. Differential Adaptive Response and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Vidović, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive response and survival of planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis adapted to benzalkonium chloride (BC). Planktonic cells and biofilms were continuously exposed to 1 μg ml−1 of BC for 144 h. The proportion of BC-adapted biofilm cells able to survive a lethal BC treatment (30 μg ml−1) was significantly higher (4.6-fold) than that of BC-adapted planktonic cells. Similarly, there were 18.3-fold more survivors among the BC-adapted biofilm cells than among their nonadapted (i.e., without prior BC exposure) cell counterparts at the lethal BC concentration, and this value was significantly higher than the value for BC-adapted planktonic cells versus nonadapted cells (3.2-fold). A significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of surviving cells was noticed among BC-adapted biofilm cells relative to BC-adapted planktonic cells following a 10-min heat shock at 55°C. Fatty acid composition was significantly influenced by phenotype (planktonic cells or biofilm) and BC adaptation. Cell surface roughness of biofilm cells was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) than that of planktonic cells. Key proteins upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells included CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, STY0440. Nine and 17 unique proteins were upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells, respectively. These results suggest that enhanced biofilm-specific upregulation of 17 unique proteins, along with the increased expression of CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, phenotype-specific alterations in cell surface roughness, and a shift in fatty acid composition conferred enhanced survival to the BC-adapted biofilm cell population relative to their BC-adapted planktonic cell counterparts. PMID:18663028

  19. Germline and somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes predict platinum response and survival in ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Rendi, Mara H; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S; Agnew, Kathy J; Pritchard, Colin C; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the homologous recombination pathway. Thirty-one percent of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 homologous recombination genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Nonserous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of homologous recombination mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, P = 0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic homologous recombination mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (P = 0.0002) and improved overall survival (P = 0.0006), with a median overall survival of 66 months in germline homologous recombination mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic homologous recombination mutation, and 41 months for cases without a homologous recombination mutation. Germline or somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes are present in almost one third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and nonserous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of homologous recombination mutations in nonserous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. ©2013 AACR.

  20. Identification and characterization of a NaCl-responsive genetic locus involved in survival during desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor.

  1. Amphibian survival, growth and development in response to mineral nitrogen exposure and predator cues in the field: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Griffis-Kyle, Kerry L; Ritchie, Mark E

    2007-07-01

    Mineral nitrogen (N) has been suggested as a potential factor causing declines in amphibian populations, especially in agricultural landscapes; however, there is a question as to whether it remains in the water column long enough to be toxic. We explored the hypothesis that mineral N can cause both lethal and sublethal toxic effects in amphibian embryos and larvae in a manipulative field experiment. We sampled 12 ponds, fertilizing half with ammonium nitrate fertilizer early in the spring, and measured hatching, survival, development, growth, and the incidence of deformities in native populations of wood frog (Rana sylvatica) and eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) embryos and larvae held in in situ enclosures. We found that higher ammonium concentrations negatively affect R. sylvatica more strongly than A. tigrinum. R. sylvatica tended to have lower survival as embryos and young tadpoles, slowed embryonic development, and an increased proportion of hatchlings with deformities at experimentally elevated ammonium. A. tigrinum did not experience significantly reduced survival, but their larval development was slowed in response to elevated ammonium and the abundance of large invertebrate predators. Variable species susceptibility, such as that shown by R sylvatica and A. tigrinum, could have large indirect effects on aquatic community structure through modification of competitive or predator-prey relationships. Ammonium and nitrate + nitrite concentrations were not correlated with other measures that might have affected amphibians, such as pH, pond area, depth, or vegetation. Our results highlight the potential importance of elevated ammonium on the growth, development and survival of amphibians, especially those that breed in surface waters receiving anthropogenic N inputs.

  2. A high-throughput screen identifies miRNA inhibitors regulating lung cancer cell survival and response to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liqin; Borkowski, Robert; Zhao, Zhenze; Ma, Xiuye; Yu, Xiaojie; Xie, Xian-Jin; Pertsemlidis, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs endogenously expressed in multiple organisms that regulate gene expression largely by decreasing levels of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Over the past few years, numerous studies have demonstrated critical roles for miRNAs in the pathogenesis of many cancers, including lung cancer. Cellular miRNA levels can be easily manipulated, showing the promise of developing miRNA-targeted oligos as next-generation therapeutic agents. In a comprehensive effort to identify novel miRNA-based therapeutic agents for lung cancer treatment, we combined a high-throughput screening platform with a library of chemically synthesized miRNA inhibitors to systematically identify miRNA inhibitors that reduce lung cancer cell survival and those that sensitize cells to paclitaxel. By screening three lung cancer cell lines with different genetic backgrounds, we identified miRNA inhibitors that potentially have a universal cytotoxic effect on lung cancer cells and miRNA inhibitors that sensitize cells to paclitaxel treatment, suggesting the potential of developing these miRNA inhibitors as therapeutic agents for lung cancer. We then focused on characterizing the inhibitors of three miRNAs (miR-133a/b, miR-361-3p, and miR-346) that have the most potent effect on cell survival. We demonstrated that two of the miRNA inhibitors (miR-133a/b and miR-361-3p) decrease cell survival by activating caspase-3/7-dependent apoptotic pathways and inducing cell cycle arrest in S phase. Future studies are certainly needed to define the mechanisms by which the identified miRNA inhibitors regulate cell survival and drug response, and to explore the potential of translating the current findings into clinical applications. PMID:24157646

  3. Factors Predictive of Tumor Recurrence and Survival After Initial Complete Response of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Ryu; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Takeuchi, Yoji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tatsuta, Masaharu; Yano, Masahiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Kinji

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To assess factors predictive of recurrent disease and survival after achieving initial complete response (CR) to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who had clinical Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer and received definitive CRT between 2001 and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 269 patients with esophageal cancer, 110 who achieved CR after definitive CRT were included in the analyses. Chemoradiotherapy mainly consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin and fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. We identified 28 recurrences and 28 deaths during follow-up. The cumulative 1- and 3-year recurrence rates were 18% and 32%, respectively. By univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor category (hazard ratio [HR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-30.2; p = 0.015) was an independent risk factor for local recurrence, whereas age (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-14.0; p = 0.034) and primary tumor location (HR 4.5; 95% CI 1.6-12.4; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for regional lymph node or distant recurrences. The cumulative overall 1- and 3-year survival rates were 91% and 66%, respectively. As expected, recurrence was associated with poor survival (p = 0.019). By univariate and multivariate analyses, primary tumor location (HR 3.8; 95% CI 1.2-12.0; p = 0.024) and interval to recurrence (HR 4.3; 95% CI 1.3-14.4; p = 0.018) were independent factors predictive of survival after recurrence. Conclusion: Risk of recurrence after definitive CRT for esophageal cancer was associated with tumor category, age, and primary tumor location; this information may help in improved prognostication for these patients.

  4. Identification and Characterization of a NaCl-Responsive Genetic Locus Involved in Survival during Desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Jan A. C.; de Bruijn, Frans J.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor. PMID:23851090

  5. Surviving Stress: Modulation of ATF4-Mediated Stress Responses in Normal and Malignant Cells.

    PubMed

    Wortel, Inge M N; van der Meer, Laurens T; Kilberg, Michael S; van Leeuwen, Frank N

    2017-08-07

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a stress-induced transcription factor that is frequently upregulated in cancer cells. ATF4 controls the expression of a wide range of adaptive genes that allow cells to endure periods of stress, such as hypoxia or amino acid limitation. However, under persistent stress conditions, ATF4 promotes the induction of apoptosis. Recent advances point to a role for post-translational modifications (PTMs) and epigenetic mechanisms in balancing these pro- and anti-survival effects of ATF4. We review here how PTMs and epigenetic modifiers associated with ATF4 may be exploited by cancer cells to cope with cellular stress conditions that are intrinsically associated with tumor growth. Identification of mechanisms that modulate ATF4-mediated transcription and its effects on cellular metabolism may uncover new targets for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Survival, reproductive, and growth responses in fish to creosote exposure in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, K.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Bestari, K.T.; Robinson, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal tar distillate, consisting mainly of a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its widespread use as a wood preservative presents a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. The use of mesocosms (precolonized with zooplankton, phytoplankton, macroinvertebrates, and periphyton) enabled evaluation of the total impact of creosote exposure, resulting from both direct toxic effects and indirect community-level interactions. Two methods of creosote addition were used, resulting in two series of mesocosm exposures: sixteen ponds were dosed with liquid creosote (from 0 to 100 ppm), and eight were dosed using creosote impregnated pilings (0 to 6 pilings per pond). In addition to growth and survival in two species of fish, Carassius auratus and Pimephales promelas, a number of reproductive parameters were measured (reproductive hormones, egg production, hatching success, and weight/frequency distribution of juveniles).

  7. Responses of Bacillus subtilis to hypotonic challenges: physiological contributions of mechanosensitive channels to cellular survival.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Tamara; Boiangiu, Clara; Moses, Susanne; Bremer, Erhard

    2008-04-01

    Mechanosensitive channels are thought to function as safety valves for the release of cytoplasmic solutes from cells that have to manage a rapid transition from high- to low-osmolarity environments. Subsequent to an osmotic down-shock of cells grown at high osmolarity, Bacillus subtilis rapidly releases the previously accumulated compatible solute glycine betaine in accordance with the degree of the osmotic downshift. Database searches suggest that B. subtilis possesses one copy of a gene for a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (mscL) and three copies of genes encoding proteins that putatively form mechanosensitive channels of small conductance (yhdY, yfkC, and ykuT). Detailed mutational analysis of all potential channel-forming genes revealed that a quadruple mutant (mscL yhdY yfkC ykuT) has no growth disadvantage in high-osmolarity media in comparison to the wild type. Osmotic down-shock experiments demonstrated that the MscL channel is the principal solute release system of B. subtilis, and strains with a gene disruption in mscL exhibited a severe survival defect upon an osmotic down-shock. We also detected a minor contribution of the SigB-controlled putative MscS-type channel-forming protein YkuT to cellular survival in an mscL mutant. Taken together, our data revealed that mechanosensitive channels of both the MscL and MscS types play pivotal roles in managing the transition of B. subtilis from hyper- to hypo-osmotic environments.

  8. Survival implications of the development of behavioural responsiveness and awareness in different groups of mammalian young.

    PubMed

    Mellor, D J; Lentle, R G

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on the development of behaviours that are critical for the survival of newborn and juvenile mammals of veterinary and wider biological interest. It provides an updated, integrated and comparative analysis of how postnatal maturation of sensory, motor and perceptual capacities support and constrain behavioural interactions between mammalian young and the mother, any littermates and the environment. Young that are neurologically exceptionally immature, moderately immature and mature at birth are compared, and include, for example, marsupial joeys, rodent pups and ruminant offspring. Mothers in these three groups exhibit distinctive patterns of birthing and postnatal care behaviours. To secure survival of the young, maternal care must compensate for behavioural inadequacies imposed by the limited sensory capacities the young possess at each stage. These sensory capacities develop in a predictable sequence in most mammals such that before birth the sequence progresses to an extent that parallels the degree of neurological maturity reached at birth. The extent of neurological maturity is likewise reflected in how long it takes after birth for the necessary brain circuit connectivity to develop sufficiently to support cortically based cognitive modulation of behaviour. This takes several months, days-to-weeks or minutes-to-hours in young that are, respectively, neurologically exceptionally immature, moderately immature, or mature at birth. Once achieved, cognitive awareness confers a high degree of behavioural flexibility that allows the young to respond more effectively to the unpredictability of their postnatal environments. It is shown that the onset of this cognitively based flexibility in the young of each group coincides with their first exposure to a variable environment that requires such behavioural flexibility.

  9. Light-inducible and clock-controlled expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 in mouse central pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masao; Cho, Sehyung; Yujnovsky, Irene; Hirayama, Jun; Cermakian, Nicolas; Cato, Andrew C B; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP1) is a negative regulator for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signal transduction, a key pathway that leads to the regulated expression of circadian clock genes. Here the authors analyzed mkp1 expression by in situ hybridization and found that mkp1 is a light-inducible and clock-controlled gene expressed in the central pacemaker neurons of the hypothalamic SCN. Interestingly, mkp1 presents a marked similarity to the clock core gene per1 in terms of the gene expression profiles as well as the gene promoter organization. Both mkp1 and per1 are subject to bimodal regulation in the SCN: the external light-dependent acute up-regulation and the functional clock-dependent circadian oscillation. Consistent with this, the authors show that mkp1 gene has a per1-like promoter that contains 2 functionally distinct elements: cAMP-responsive element (CRE) and E-box. CRE sites present in the mkp1 promoter constitute the functional binding sites for the CRE binding protein (CREB), which serves as an important regulator that mediates the light-induced signaling cascades in the SCN neurons. Furthermore, the authors show that the E-box present in the mkp1 promoter is necessary and sufficient for transcriptional control exerted by circadian clock core regulators that include a positive complex CLOCK/BMAL1 and a negative factor CRY1. The authors' studies on mkp1 have identified for the first time a gene encoding a phosphatase that functions in light-dependent and time-of-day-dependent manners in the mammalian central clock structure SCN.

  10. Blue light induces degradation of the negative regulator phytochrome interacting factor 1 to promote photomorphogenic development of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2009-05-01

    Phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) are nuclear basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors that negatively regulate photomorphogenesis both in the dark and in the light in Arabidopsis. The phytochrome (phy) family of photoreceptors induces the rapid phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs in response to both red and far-red light conditions to promote photomorphogenesis. Although phys have been shown to function under blue light conditions, the roles of PIFs under blue light have not been investigated in detail. Here we show that PIF1 negatively regulates photomorphogenesis at the seedling stage under blue light conditions. pif1 seedlings displayed more open cotyledons and slightly reduced hypocotyl length compared to wild type under diurnal (12 hr light/12 hr dark) blue light conditions. Double-mutant analyses demonstrated that pif1phyA, pif1phyB, pif1cry1, and pif1cry2 have enhanced cotyledon opening compared to the single photoreceptor mutants under diurnal blue light conditions. Blue light induced the rapid phosphorylation, polyubiquitination, and degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway. PIF1 interacted with phyA and phyB in a blue light-dependent manner, and the interactions with phys are necessary for the blue light-induced degradation of PIF1. phyA played a dominant role under pulses of blue light, while phyA, phyB, and phyD induced the degradation of PIF1 in an additive manner under prolonged continuous blue light conditions. Interestingly, the absence of cry1 and cry2 enhanced the degradation of PIF1 under blue light conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that PIF1 functions as a negative regulator of photomorphogenesis under blue light conditions and that blue light-activated phys induce the degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway to promote photomorphogenesis.

  11. Modulation of the adrenocortical response to acute stress with respect to brood value, reproductive success and survival in the Eurasian hoopoe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Baptiste; Tam-Dafond, Laura; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Schaub, Michael; Jenni, Lukas

    2013-09-01

    Reproducing parents face the difficult challenge of trading-off investment in current reproduction against presumed future survival and reproduction. Glucocorticoids are supposed to mediate this trade-off because the adrenocortical response to stress disrupts normal reproductive behaviour in favour of self-maintenance and own survival. According to the brood-value hypothesis, individuals with a low survival probability until the next reproductive season have to invest in current reproduction, a process driven by a down-regulation of their adrenocortical response. If the adrenocortical response to stress effectively mediates the trade-off between current reproduction versus future survival and reproduction, we expect a negative relationship with reproductive success and a positive correlation of the adrenocortical stress response with survival. We studied the relationship between corticosterone secretion in parents and their current brood value, reproductive success and survival in a short-lived multi-brooded bird, the Eurasian hoopoe Upupa epops. The adrenocortical response to acute handling stress was correlated with the brood value within the individual (first and second broods of the year) and between individuals. Birds breeding late in the season mounted a lower total corticosterone response to acute stress than birds breeding earlier, while females showed lower levels than males. We observed a negative relationship between the adrenocortical stress response and rearing success or fledging success in females, as predicted by the brood-value hypothesis. However, we could not evidence a clear link between the adrenocortical stress response and survival. Future research testing the brood-value hypothesis and trade-offs between current reproduction and future survival should also measure free corticosterone and carefully differentiate between cross-sectional (i.e. between-individual) and individual-based experimental studies.

  12. Re-induction with L-DNR/FLAG improves response after AML relapse, but not long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Creutzig, U; Semmler, J; Kaspers, G L; Reinhardt, D; Zimmermann, M

    2014-11-01

    According to the results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01 response was better after re-induction with L-DNR/FLAG (liposomal daunorubicin, fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) compared to FLAG only but survival rate was not improved. However, the findings might be group-specific. Patient characteristics, actual therapy given and long-term course of the disease in 155 pediatric patients (including non-randomized) with first relapse and 10 primary nonresponders treated in Germany were analyzed. Overall 4-year survival rates after relapse were similar in the 2 treatment groups L-DNR/FLAG and FLAG (0.43 ± 0.05 vs. 0.47 ± 0.06, p(log-rank)=0.47). The rate of randomization was low (65%) and 5% of the 101 randomized patients changed the treatment arm. Therefore, induction was based in 40% patients on an individual decision with preference for L-DNR/FLAG. There were less patients with favorable cytogenetics and morphology in the L-DNR/FLAG-group (p<0.04). Response to the first re-induction course at day 28 tended to be more unfavorable with FLAG only. In this patient group protocol intensifications were more frequent as compared to the L-DNR/FLAG-group (p=0.07), and late CR could be achieved after intensification in 9/18 poor responding patients. The initial selection bias of relapse patients with unfavorable risk factors to the disadvantage of the L-DNR/FLAG-group and the more drug- and time-intensive treatment after 1(st) re-induction given in the FLAG-group may have nullified the initial beneficial effect of L-DNR containing re-induction therapy and led to similar and relatively favorable survival rates in both treatment groups in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry exhibit differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress, and survival in the egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Casavant, Carol; Hawley, Quincy; Addwebi, Tarek; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major foodborne pathogen that is primarily transmitted by contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice. Here we hypothesized that the differential virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis strains is due to the differential fitness in the adverse environments that may be encountered during infection in the host. The responses of a panel of six Salmonella Enteritidis strains to acid stress, oxidative stress, survival in egg albumen, and the ability to cause infection in chickens were analyzed. This analysis allowed classification of strains into two categories, stress-sensitive and stress-resistant, with the former showing significantly (p<0.05) reduced survival in acidic (gastric phase of infection) and oxidative (intestinal and systemic phase of infection) stress. Stress-sensitive strains also showed impaired intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination in orally inoculated chickens and failed to survive/grow in egg albumen. Comparative genomic hybridization microarray analysis revealed no differences at the discriminatory level of the whole gene content between stress-sensitive and stress-resistant strains. However, sequencing of rpoS, a stress-regulatory gene, revealed that one of the three stress-sensitive strains carried an insertion mutation in the rpoS resulting in truncation of σ(S). Finding that one of the stress-sensitive strains carried an easily identifiable small polymorphism within a stress-response gene suggests that the other strains may also have small polymorphisms elsewhere in the genome, which likely impact regulation of stress or virulence associated genes in some manner.

  14. Xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy for stage III melanoma: safety, immune-mediated responses and survival benefits.

    PubMed

    Seledtsova, Galina V; Shishkov, Alexey A; Kaschenko, Erika A; Goncharov, Andrey G; Gazatova, Natalya D; Seledtsov, Victor I

    2016-04-01

    New therapies for melanoma have yielded promising results, but their application is limited because of serious side-effects and only moderate impact on patient survival. Vaccine therapies may offer some hope by targeting tumor-specific responses, considering the immunogenic nature of melanomas. To investigate the safety profile and efficiency of a xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy in stage III melanoma patients and evaluate the survival rate in treated patients. Twenty-seven stage III melanoma patients were immunized with a lyophilized xenogeneic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from murine melanoma B16 and carcinoma LLC cells. Neither grade III/IV toxicities, nor clinically significant changes in blood and biochemical parameters were noted after an induction course of 10 XPV subcutaneous immunizations. No laboratory or clinical signs of systemic autoimmunity were documented. Following 10 vaccinations, a relative increase in the numbers of circulating memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells (but not CD8+ CD45RO+ T cells) was observed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from XPV-treated patients demonstrated increased proliferative responses to human BRO melanoma-associated antigens and marked increases in serum levels of IFN-γ and IL-8. Serum levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 were not affected. The overall five-year survival rate in the treated patients was significantly higher than that in 27 control patients with matched clinical and prognostic characteristics (55% vs 18%). XPV-based immunotherapy could be maximally effective when started as early as possible before or after surgical excision of the primary tumor and local metastases, i.e. when tumor-mediated suppressive effects on immunity are minimal.

  15. Xanomeline suppresses excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses through neural signal-mediated pathways and improves survival in lethal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Ferrer, Sergio Valdés; Dancho, Meghan; Ochani, Mahendar; Katz, David; Cheng, Kai Fan; Olofsson, Peder S.; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Al-Abed, Yousef; Tracey, Kevin J.; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive immune cell activation and cytokine release, are associated with bidirectional immune system-brain communication, underlying sickness behavior and other physiological responses. The vagus nerve has an important role in this communication by conveying sensory information to the brain, and brain-derived immunoregulatory signals that suppress peripheral cytokine levels and inflammation. Brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR)-mediated cholinergic signaling has been implicated in this regulation. However, the possibility of controlling inflammation by peripheral administration of centrally-acting mAChR agonists is unexplored. To provide insight we used the centrally-acting M1 mAChR agonist xanomeline, previously developed in the context of Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. Intraperitoneal administration of xanomeline significantly suppressed serum and splenic TNF levels, alleviated sickness behavior, and increased survival during lethal murine endotoxemia. The anti-inflammatory effects of xanomeline were brain mAChR-mediated and required intact vagus nerve and splenic nerve signaling. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of xanomeline was retained for at least 20h, associated with alterations in splenic lymphocyte, and dendritic cell proportions, and decreased splenocyte responsiveness to endotoxin. These results highlight an important role of the M1 mAChR in a neural circuitry to spleen in which brain cholinergic activation lowers peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokines to levels favoring survival. The therapeutic efficacy of xanomeline was also manifested by significantly improved survival in preclinical settings of severe sepsis. These findings are of interest for strategizing novel therapeutic approaches in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25063706

  16. Hepatocytes display a compensatory survival response against cadmium toxicity by a mechanism mediated by EGFR and Src.

    PubMed

    Martínez Flores, K; Uribe Marín, B C; Souza Arroyo, V; Bucio Ortiz, L; López Reyes, A; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Rojas del Castillo, E; Gutiérrez Ruiz, M C

    2013-04-01

    Although the liver is a cadmium-target organ, hepatocyte response involved in its toxicity is not yet elucidated. A link between this heavy metal treatment and Stat3 signaling pathways was examined in primary mouse hepatocytes. We provided evidence of a novel link among NADPH oxidase and Stat3 signaling, mediated by Src, EGFR, and Erk1/2. Cadmium activates NADPH oxidase. ROS produced by this oxidase activates Src, enable that in turn, transactivates EGFR that activates Stat3 in tyrosine, allowing its dimerization. Also, ROS from NADPH oxidase favors ERK1/2 activation that phosphorylates Stat3 in serine, resulting in a compensatory or adaptive survival response such as production of metallothionein-II in short Cd exposure times. However, after 12h CdCl2 treatment, cell viability diminished in 50%, accompanied by a drastic decrease of metallothionein-II production, and an increase in p53 activation and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax.

  17. Adaptive Immune Response to and Survival Effect of Temozolomide- and Valproic Acid-induced Autophagy in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Proske, Judith; Walter, Lisa; Bumes, Elisabeth; Hutterer, Markus; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Savaskan, Nicolai E; Seliger, Corinna; Hau, Peter; Uhl, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The combination of radiotherapy, temozolomide and valproic acid (VPA) has shown some promise in retrospective analyses of patients with glioblastoma, although their mechanisms of action remain unknown. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of pretreating glioma cells with temozolomide and VPA as an immunization strategy to boost an adaptive immune response in a syngeneic mouse model. Temozolomide and VPA induced autophagy in GL261 glioma cells, and caused tumor antigen-specific T-cells to become activated effector T-cells. Mice with a pre-existing glioma showed no improvement in clinical outcome when immunized with temozolomide- and VPA-treated glioma cells. Although temozolomide and VPA treatment of glioma cells can boost the adaptive immune response, in the context of a vaccine therapy, additional factors are necessary to eradicate the tumor and improve survival. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Association Between Survival and Time of Day for Rapid Response Team Calls in a National Registry.

    PubMed

    Churpek, Matthew Michael; Edelson, Dana P; Lee, Ji Yeon; Carey, Kyle; Snyder, Ashley

    2017-10-01

    Decreased staffing at nighttime is associated with worse outcomes in hospitalized patients. Rapid response teams were developed to decrease preventable harm by providing additional critical care resources to patients with clinical deterioration. We sought to determine whether rapid response team call frequency suffers from decreased utilization at night and how this is associated with patient outcomes. Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected registry database. National registry database of inpatient rapid response team calls. Index rapid response team calls occurring on the general wards in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Medical Emergency Team database between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed. None. The primary outcome was inhospital mortality. Patient and event characteristics between the hours with the highest and lowest mortality were compared, and multivariable models adjusting for patient characteristics were fit. A total of 282,710 rapid response team calls from 274 hospitals were included. The lowest frequency of calls occurred in the consecutive 1 AM to 6:59 AM period, with 266 of 274 (97%) hospitals having lower than expected call volumes during those hours. Mortality was highest during the 7 AM hour and lowest during the noon hour (18.8% vs 13.8%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.41 [1.31-1.52]; p < 0.001). Compared with calls at the noon hour, those during the 7 AM hour had more deranged vital signs, were more likely to have a respiratory trigger, and were more likely to have greater than two simultaneous triggers. Rapid response team activation is less frequent during the early morning and is followed by a spike in mortality in the 7 AM hour. These findings suggest that failure to rescue deteriorating patients is more common overnight. Strategies aimed at improving rapid response team utilization during these vulnerable hours may improve patient outcomes.

  19. MicroRNA-146a modulates human bronchial epithelial cell survival in response to the cytokine-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiangde Nelson, Amy; Wang Xingqi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kim, Miok; Sato, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masanori; Li Yingji; Sun Jianhong; Michalski, Joel; Patil, Amol; Basma, Hesham; Rennard, Stephen I.

    2009-02-27

    MicroRNA plays an important role in cell differentiation, proliferation and cell death. The current study found that miRNA-146a was up-regulated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in response to stimulation by TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (a mixture of IL-1ss, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha}). TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (TCM) induced apoptosis in HBECs (3.4 {+-} 0.6% of control vs 83.1 {+-} 4.0% of TCM treated cells, p < 0.01), and this was significantly blocked by the miRNA-146a mimic (8.8 {+-} 1.5%, p < 0.01). In contrast, a miRNA-146a inhibitor had only a modest effect on cell survival but appeared to augment the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to the cytokines. The MicroRNA-146a mimic appears to modulate HBEC survival through a mechanism of up-regulating Bcl-XL and STAT3 phosphorylation, and by this mechanism it could contribute to tissue repair and remodeling.

  20. Complete response and long-term survival (>20 years) of a child with tectal glioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Burzynski, Stanislaw R; Burzynski, Gregory S; Janicki, Tomasz J; Marszalek, Ania

    2015-01-01

    Tectal glioma is a midbrain tumor. The patient generally presents with symptoms related to increased intracranial pressure and requires treatment for hydrocephalus. No effective pharmacological treatments have yet been introduced. This report discusses a case of a 13-year-old male diagnosed with tectal glioma who obtained a complete response and long-term survival after the treatment with antineoplastons (ANP) in phase II trial. Prior treatment consisted of placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After 6 years of stabilization there had been an increase in tumor size with signs of malignant transformation. The patient received treatment with ANP A10 and AS2-1 infusions for 20 months, obtained a complete response, and was switched to maintenance with ANP capsules. All treatments were discontinued in December 2003. Adverse events according to CTCAE v3.0 included: hypernatremia (two events of grade 3, one event of grade 2, four events of grade 1), one case of fatigue (grade 2), and one allergic reaction (grade 1). Currently, over 20 years from his diagnosis and over 13 years from treatment start he is symptom-free and leads a normal life. This report indicates that it is possible to obtain long-term survival of a child with tectal glioma with currently available investigational treatment.

  1. Identification of cereblon-binding proteins and relationship with response and survival after IMiDs in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Braggio, Esteban; Shi, Chang-Xin; Kortuem, K Martin; Bruins, Laura A; Schmidt, Jessica E; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Jedlowski, Patrick; LaPlant, Betsy; Laumann, Kristina; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P Leif; Mikhael, Joseph; Lacy, Martha; Champion, Mia D; Stewart, A Keith

    2014-07-24

    Cereblon (CRBN) mediates immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) action in multiple myeloma (MM). Using 2 different methodologies, we identified 244 CRBN binding proteins and established relevance to MM biology by changes in their abundance after exposure to lenalidomide. Proteins most reproducibly binding CRBN (>fourfold vs controls) included DDB1, CUL4A, IKZF1, KPNA2, LTF, PFKL, PRKAR2A, RANGAP1, and SHMT2. After lenalidomide treatment, the abundance of 46 CRBN binding proteins decreased. We focused attention on 2 of these-IKZF1 and IKZF3. IZKF expression is similar across all MM stages or subtypes; however, IKZF1 is substantially lower in 3 of 5 IMiD-resistant MM cell lines. The cell line (FR4) with the lowest IKZF1 levels also harbors a damaging mutation and a translocation that upregulates IRF4, an IKZF target. Clinical relevance of CRBN-binding proteins was demonstrated in 44 refractory MM patients treated with pomalidomide and dexamethasone therapy in whom low IKZF1 gene expression predicted lack of response (0/11 responses in the lowest expression quartile). CRBN, IKZF1, and KPNA2 levels also correlate with significant differences in overall survival. Our study identifies CRBN-binding proteins and demonstrates that in addition to CRBN, IKZF1, and KPNA2, expression can predict survival outcomes.

  2. Survival Rate and Hematological Responses with Temperature Changes of Red Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus akaara in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Youn; Han, Kyeong Ho; Cho, Jae Kwon; Kim, Kyong Min; Son, Maeng Hyun; Park, Jae Min; Kang, Hee Woong

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sudden changes of water temperature (WT) on the survival rate and physiological responses of the red spotted grouper (Epinephelus akaara) were examined by manipulating WT control system for 9 days. Experimental condition was divided in two different regimes at low (from 10°C to 4°C, decreased 1℃/d) and high (from 28°C to 34°C, increased 1°C/d) WT. Survival rate of experimental fishes were observed, and determined the changes of hematological characteristics by analyzing plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, total protein, and electrolytes (Na+, Cl–, K+). No mortality was observed until low WT 6°C (144 h) and high WT 32°C (96 h), and 100% mortality was observed at low WT 4°C (216 h) and high WT 35°C (171 h). Plasma levels of cortisol and glucose increased rapidly as decreasing WT, and the loss of swimming ability and respiration response was observed at low WT 7°C and high WT 34°C conditions. PMID:27660825

  3. Mast Cells and IgE can Enhance Survival During Innate and Acquired Host Responses to Venoms*

    PubMed Central

    GALLI, STEPHEN J.; STARKL, PHILIPP; MARICHAL, THOMAS; TSAI, MINDY

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are thought to promote health by contributing to host responses to certain parasites, but other beneficial functions have remained obscure. Venoms provoke innate inflammatory responses and pathology reflecting the activities of the contained toxins. Venoms also can induce allergic sensitization and development of venom-specific IgE antibodies, which can predispose some subjects to exhibit anaphylaxis upon subsequent exposure to the relevant venom. We found that innate functions of mast cells, including degradation of venom toxins by mast cell–derived proteases, enhanced survival in mice injected with venoms from the honeybee, two species of scorpion, three species of poisonous snakes, or the Gila monster. We also found that mice injected with sub-lethal amounts of honeybee or Russell’s viper venom exhibited enhanced survival after subsequent challenge with potentially lethal amounts of that venom, and that IgE antibodies, FcεRI, and probably mast cells contributed to such acquired resistance. PMID:28790503

  4. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition spectrum quantification and its efficacy in deciphering survival and drug responses of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Miki, Yoshio; Noda, Tetsuo; Mori, Seiichi; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a reversible and dynamic process hypothesized to be co-opted by carcinoma during invasion and metastasis. Yet, there is still no quantitative measure to assess the interplay between EMT and cancer progression. Here, we derived a method for universal EMT scoring from cancer-specific transcriptomic EMT signatures of ovarian, breast, bladder, lung, colorectal and gastric cancers. We show that EMT scoring exhibits good correlation with previously published, cancer-specific EMT signatures. This universal and quantitative EMT scoring was used to establish an EMT spectrum across various cancers, with good correlation noted between cell lines and tumours. We show correlations between EMT and poorer disease-free survival in ovarian and colorectal, but not breast, carcinomas, despite previous notions. Importantly, we found distinct responses between epithelial- and mesenchymal-like ovarian cancers to therapeutic regimes administered with or without paclitaxelin vivo and demonstrated that mesenchymal-like tumours do not always show resistance to chemotherapy. EMT scoring is thus a promising, versatile tool for the objective and systematic investigation of EMT roles and dynamics in cancer progression, treatment response and survival. PMID:25214461

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1987 induces Th2 immune responses and enhances Mycobacterium smegmatis survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Sha, Shanshan; Shi, Xiaoxia; Deng, Guoying; Chen, Lina; Xin, Yi; Ma, Yufang

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can interfere with host immune response and escape clearance through its specific antigens. M. tuberculosis Rv1987 encoded by region of difference (RD)-2 gene is a secretory protein with immunogenic potency. Here, we investigated the impact of Rv1987 on host cytokine responses and T cell polarization in mouse aerosol model. A recombinant M. smegmatis mc(2)155 strain that overexpressed Rv1987 protein (named MS1987) was constructed and used to infect C57BL/6 mice. The mc(2)155 harbored the empty vector (named MSVec) was as a control. The results showed that MS1987 challenged mice promoted Th2-biased cytokine responses with lower secretion of IFN-γ but higher production of IL-4 and Rv1987-specific IgG antibody compared to MSVec infected mice. Neutrophilic inflammation and high bacterial burden were observed in the lung tissues of MS1987 infected mice probably own to the failed Th1 cell immunity. Besides, subcutaneous injection of Rv1987 protein could mediate the Th1 cytokine responses caused by M. bovis BCG in mice. These results indicated that M. tuberculosis Rv1987 protein could modulate host immune response towards Th2 profile, which probably contributed to the immune evasion of bacteria from host elimination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Mosquito control pesticides and sea surface temperatures have differential effects on the survival and oxidative stress response of coral larvae.

    PubMed

    Ross, Cliff; Olsen, Kevin; Henry, Michael; Pierce, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The declining health of coral reefs is intensifying worldwide at an alarming rate due to the combined effects of land-based sources of pollution and climate change. Despite the persistent use of mosquito control pesticides in populated coastal areas, studies examining the survival and physiological impacts of early life-history stages of non-targeted marine organisms are limited. In order to better understand the combined effects of mosquito pesticides and rising sea surface temperatures, we exposed larvae from the coral Porites astreoides to selected concentrations of two major mosquito pesticide ingredients, naled and permethrin, and seawater elevated +3.5 °C. Following 18-20 h of exposure, larvae exposed to naled concentrations of 2.96 µg L(-1) or greater had significantly reduced survivorship compared to controls. These effects were not detected in the presence of permethrin or elevated temperature. Furthermore, larval settlement, post-settlement survival and zooxanthellae density were not impacted by any treatment. To evaluate the sub-lethal stress response of larvae, several oxidative stress endpoints were utilized. Biomarker responses to pesticide exposure were variable and contingent upon pesticide type as well as the specific biomarker being employed. In some cases, such as with protein carbonylation and catalase gene expression, the effects of naled exposure and temperature were interactive. In other cases pesticide exposure failed to induce any sub-lethal stress response. Overall, these results demonstrate that P. astreoides larvae have a moderate degree of resistance against short-term exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticides even in the presence of elevated temperature. In addition, this work highlights the importance of considering the complexity and differential responses encountered when examining the impacts of combined stressors that occur on varying spatial scales.

  7. Recombinant human antithrombin III improves survival and attenuates inflammatory responses in baboons lethally challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Chang, A C; Jansen, P M; Lubbers, Y T; Pratt, B M; Whittaker, B G; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E; Friedman, B

    2000-02-15

    Plasma-derived antithrombin III (ATIII) prevents the lethal effects of Escherichia coli infusion in baboons, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant human ATIII (rhATIII) on the clinical course and the inflammatory cytokine and coagulation responses in baboons challenged with lethal dose of E coli. Animals in the treatment group (n = 5) received high doses of rhATIII starting 1 hour before an E coli challenge. Those in the control group were administered saline. Survival was significantly improved in the treatment group (P =.002). Both groups had similar hemodynamic responses to E coli challenge but different coagulation and inflammatory responses. The rhATIII group had an accelerated increase of thrombin-ATIII complexes and significantly less fibrinogen consumption compared to controls. In addition, the rhATIII group had much less severe thrombotic pathology on autopsy and virtually no fibrinolytic response to E coli challenge. Furthermore, the rhATIII group had a significantly attenuated inflammatory response as evidenced by marked reduction of the release of various cytokines. We conclude that the early administration of high doses of rhATIII improves the outcome in baboons lethally challenged with E coli, probably due to the combined anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects of this therapy. (Blood. 2000;95:1117-1123)

  8. Multiple phytochromes are involved in red-light-induced enhancement of first-positive phototropism in arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Janoudi, A.K.; Gordon, W.R.; Poff, K.L.; Wagner, D.; Quail, P. |

    1997-03-01

    The amplitude of phototropic curvature to blue light is enhanced by a prior exposure of seedlings to red light. This enhancement is mediated by phytochrome. Fluence-response relationships have been constructed for red-light-induced enhancement in the phytochrome A (phyA) null mutant, the phytochrome B- (phyB) deficient mutant, and in two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana that overexpress either phyA or phyB. These fluence-response relationships demonstrate the existence of two responses in enhancement, a response in the very-low-to-low-fluence range, and a response in the high-fluence range. Only the response in the high-fluence range is present in the phyA null mutant. In contrast, the phyB-deficient mutant is indistinguishable from the wild-type parent in red-light responsiveness. These data indicate that phyA is necessary for the very-low-to-low but not the high-fluence response, and that phyB is not necessary for either response range. Based on these results, the high-fluence response, if controlled by a single phytochrome, must be controlled by a phytochrome other than phyA or phyB. Overexpression of phyA has a negative effect and overexpression of phyB has an enhancing effect in the high fluence range. These results suggest that overexpression of either phytochrome perturbs the function of the endogenous photoreceptor system in unpreditable fashion. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  10. Kinetics of Light-induced Metastable Defect Creation and Annealing in a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodolbaþ, Alp Osman; Eray, Aynur; Öktü, Özcan

    2002-01-01

    Constant Photocurrent Method (CPM) and steady state photoconductivity measurements are used to investigate the creation of light-induced metastable defects in a-Si:H at room temperature and their annealing. Light-induced metastable defect concentration Nd varies with exposure time teas ter with r=0.34 ± 0.02, as expected from the recombination induced weak bond breaking model [1]. The validity of a stretched exponential model is also studied [2]. From the annealing experiments, the distribution of thermal annealing activation energies is calculated following the method proposed by Hata and Wagner [3]. Defects created at room temperature show a narrow distribution of annealing activation energies peaking at 0.97eV. The relation between photoconductivity and Nd is strongly nonlinear. Defects created at earlier times of illumination degrade photoconductivity more strongly, and these defects anneal out more easily than those created at later times of illumination.

  11. Light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Chermyaninov, I. V. Chernyak, V. G.; Vilisova, E. A.

    2007-10-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented of light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary tube at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. Surface and collisional mechanisms of transfer are analyzed, due to differences in accommodation coefficient and collision cross section between excited-and ground-state particles, respectively. Analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients characterizing the gas drift and heat transfer in a capillary tube are obtained in the limits of low and high Knudsen numbers. Numerical computations are performed for intermediate Knudsen numbers. Both drift and heat fluxes are determined as functions of the light beam frequency. In the case of an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line, the light-induced fluxes are found to depend not only on the sign, but also on the amount, of light beam detuning from the absorption line center frequency.

  12. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Quesada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS.

  13. Experimental study on light induced influence model to mice using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhao, Zhimin; Yu, Yinshan; Zhu, Xingyue

    2014-08-01

    Previous researchers have made studies on different influences created by light irradiation to animals, including retinal damage, changes of inner index and so on. However, the model of light induced damage to animals using physiological indicators as features in machine learning method is never founded. This study was designed to evaluate the changes in micro vascular diameter, the serum absorption spectrum and the blood flow influenced by light irradiation of different wavelengths, powers and exposure time with support vector machine (SVM). The micro images of the mice auricle were recorded and the vessel diameters were calculated by computer program. The serum absorption spectrums were analyzed. The result shows that training sample rate 20% and 50% have almost the same correct recognition rate. Better performance and accuracy was achieved by third-order polynomial kernel SVM quadratic optimization method and it worked suitably for predicting the light induced damage to organisms.

  14. Green-Light-Induced Inactivation of Receptor Signaling Using Cobalamin-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Kainrath, Stephanie; Stadler, Manuela; Reichhart, Eva; Distel, Martin; Janovjak, Harald

    2017-04-10

    Optogenetics and photopharmacology provide spatiotemporally precise control over protein interactions and protein function in cells and animals. Optogenetic methods that are sensitive to green light and can be used to break protein complexes are not broadly available but would enable multichromatic experiments with previously inaccessible biological targets. Herein, we repurposed cobalamin (vitamin B12) binding domains of bacterial CarH transcription factors for green-light-induced receptor dissociation. In cultured cells, we observed oligomerization-induced cell signaling for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 fused to cobalamin-binding domains in the dark that was rapidly eliminated upon illumination. In zebrafish embryos expressing fusion receptors, green light endowed control over aberrant fibroblast growth factor signaling during development. Green-light-induced domain dissociation and light-inactivated receptors will critically expand the optogenetic toolbox for control of biological processes.

  15. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulfrad, Yacine; Lindroos, Jeanette; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele

    2014-11-01

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  16. Absolute Configuration from Different Multifragmentation Pathways in Light-Induced Coulomb Explosion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Kunitski, Maksim; Jahnke, Till; Bauer, Tobias; Goihl, Christoph; Trinter, Florian; Schober, Carl; Henrichs, Kevin; Becht, Jasper; Zeller, Stefan; Gassert, Helena; Waitz, Markus; Kuhlins, Andreas; Sann, Hendrik; Sturm, Felix; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Johnson, Allan S; Mazenauer, Manuel; Spenger, Benjamin; Marquardt, Sabrina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Stohner, Jürgen; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus; Berger, Robert

    2016-08-18

    The absolute configuration of individual small molecules in the gas phase can be determined directly by light-induced Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI). Herein, this approach is demonstrated for ionization with a single X-ray photon from a synchrotron light source, leading to enhanced efficiency and faster fragmentation as compared to previous experiments with a femtosecond laser. In addition, it is shown that even incomplete fragmentation pathways of individual molecules from a racemic CHBrClF sample can give access to the absolute configuration in CEI. This leads to a significant increase of the applicability of the method as compared to the previously reported complete break-up into atomic ions and can pave the way for routine stereochemical analysis of larger chiral molecules by light-induced CEI.

  17. Dynamics of light-induced NIR-absorption of Nb4 polarons in SBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Vikhnin, V.; Kapphan, S.

    The dynamics of light-induced (Kr+-, Ar+-laser) electronic polarons (Nb4+ centers with broad absorption band around 0.8 eV) and light-induced centers of other types were investigated in SrxBa1-xNb2O6: Cr (SBN:Cr) and in SBN: Ce using FTIR absorption measurements at low temperature. A theoretical model involving Cr3+/Cr4+, Ce3+/Ce4+, Nb4+ electronic polarons and trapping X-centers is proposed. The trapping of polarons at Cr4+/Ce4+ centers with subsequent recharging is shown to play an important role in the polaron dynamics. The predictions of the model are in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Light-Induced Polar pH Changes in Leaves of Elodea canadensis1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Prins, Hidde B. A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of an extracellular electron acceptor, ferricyanide, on the light-induced polar leaf pH changes of the submerged angiosperm Elodea canadensis in light and in darkness was determined. The rate of transmembrane ferricyanide reduction was stimulated by increased light intensity and was inhibited by inorganic carbon, indicating that changes in the redox state of the chloroplast were reflected at the plasma membrane. The addition of ferricyanide inhibited the light-induced polar leaf pH reaction. This effect could be balanced by increasing the light intensity. In the dark, the acidification induced by ferricyanide was not influenced by diethylstilbestrol at concentrations that completely inhibited the polar leaf pH changes. This indicates that the ferricyanide-induced H+ extrusion and the H+ transport during the polar reaction were mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:16667045

  19. Light-Induced Movements of Chloroplasts and Nuclei Are Regulated in Both Cp-Actin-Filament-Dependent and -Independent Manners in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced chloroplast movement and attachment to the plasma membrane are dependent on actin