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Sample records for limb intracompartmental sepsis

  1. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the episode 3 , 4 . What is the economic cost of sepsis? Treatment for sepsis often involves a ... care unit and complex therapies, which incur high costs. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality lists ...

  2. Influence of mechanical ventilation and sepsis on redox balance in diaphragm, myocardium, limb muscles, and lungs.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Rojas, Yeny; Martínez-Caro, Leticia; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Nin, Nicolas; Ferruelo, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV), using high tidal volumes (V(T)), causes lung (ventilator-induced lung injury [VILI]) and distant organ injury. Additionally, sepsis is characterized by increased oxidative stress. We tested whether MV is associated with enhanced oxidative stress in sepsis, the commonest underlying condition in clinical acute lung injury. Protein carbonylation and nitration, antioxidants, and inflammation (immunoblotting) were evaluated in diaphragm, gastrocnemius, soleus, myocardium, and lungs of nonseptic and septic (cecal ligation and puncture 24 hours before MV) rats undergoing MV (n = 7 per group) for 150 minutes using 3 different strategies (low V(T) [V(T) = 9 mL/kg], moderate V(T) [V(T) = 15 mL/kg], and high V(T) [V(T) = 25 mL/kg]) and in nonventilated control animals. Compared with nonventilated control animals, in septic and nonseptic rodents (1) diaphragms, limb muscles, and myocardium of high-V(T) rats exhibited a decrease in protein oxidation and nitration levels, (2) antioxidant levels followed a specific fiber-type distribution in slow- and fast-twitch muscles, (3) tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels were higher in respiratory and limb muscles, whereas no differences were observed in myocardium, and (4) in lungs, protein oxidation was increased, antioxidants were rather decreased, and TNF-α remained unmodified. In this model of VILI, oxidative stress does not occur in distant organs or skeletal muscles of rodents after several hours of MV with moderate-to-high V(T), whereas protein oxidation levels were increased in the lungs of the animals. Inflammatory events were moderately expressed in skeletal muscles and lungs of the MV rats. Concomitant sepsis did not strongly affect the MV-induced effects on muscles, myocardium, or lungs in the rodents.

  3. Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Essential facts Sepsis, a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection, is believed to cause about 44,000 deaths a year. If not recognised early and treated promptly, sepsis can lead to shock, multiple organ failure and death. Major reports (UK parliamentary and health service ombudsman enquiry in 2013 and the UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death in 2015) have highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined. PMID:27581906

  4. Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Essential facts [Figure: see text] Sepsis, a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection, is believed to cause about 44,000 deaths a year. If not recognised early and treated promptly, sepsis can lead to shock, multiple organ failure and death. Major reports (UK parliamentary and health service ombudsman enquiry in 2013 and the UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death in 2015) have highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined. PMID:27615338

  5. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in People with weakened immune systems Infants and children The elderly People with chronic ...

  6. Intracompartmental and Intercompartmental Transcriptional Networks Coordinate the Expression of Genes for Organellar Functions1[W

    PubMed Central

    Leister, Dario; Wang, Xi; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Kleine, Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    Genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are distributed between the nuclear and organellar genomes. Organelle biogenesis and metabolism, therefore, require appropriate coordination of gene expression in the different compartments to ensure efficient synthesis of essential multiprotein complexes of mixed genetic origin. Whereas organelle-to-nucleus signaling influences nuclear gene expression at the transcriptional level, organellar gene expression (OGE) is thought to be primarily regulated posttranscriptionally. Here, we show that intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks coordinate the expression of genes for organellar functions. Nearly 1,300 ATH1 microarray-based transcriptional profiles of nuclear and organellar genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were analyzed. The activity of genes involved in organellar energy production (OEP) or OGE in each of the organelles and in the nucleus is highly coordinated. Intracompartmental networks that link the OEP and OGE gene sets serve to synchronize the expression of nucleus- and organelle-encoded proteins. At a higher regulatory level, coexpression of organellar and nuclear OEP/OGE genes typically modulates chloroplast functions but affects mitochondria only when chloroplast functions are perturbed. Under conditions that induce energy shortage, the intercompartmental coregulation of photosynthesis genes can even override intracompartmental networks. We conclude that dynamic intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks for OEP and OGE genes adjust the activity of organelles in response to the cellular energy state and environmental stresses, and we identify candidate cis-elements involved in the transcriptional coregulation of nuclear genes. Regarding the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes, novel tentative target genes of σ factors are identified. PMID:21775496

  7. Sepsis-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Leigh Ann; Supinski, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and despite advances in management, mortality remains high. In survivors, sepsis increases the risk for the development of persistent acquired weakness syndromes affecting both the respiratory muscles and the limb muscles. This acquired weakness results in prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, difficulty weaning, functional impairment, exercise limitation, and poor health-related quality of life. Abundant evidence indicates that sepsis induces a myopathy characterized by reductions in muscle force-generating capacity, atrophy (loss of muscle mass), and altered bioenergetics. Sepsis elicits derangements at multiple subcellular sites involved in excitation contraction coupling, such as decreasing membrane excitability, injuring sarcolemmal membranes, altering calcium homeostasis due to effects on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and disrupting contractile protein interactions. Muscle wasting occurs later and results from increased proteolytic degradation as well as decreased protein synthesis. In addition, sepsis produces marked abnormalities in muscle mitochondrial functional capacity and when severe, these alterations correlate with increased death. The mechanisms leading to sepsis-induced changes in skeletal muscle are linked to excessive localized elaboration of proinflammatory cytokines, marked increases in free-radical generation, and activation of proteolytic pathways that are upstream of the proteasome including caspase and calpain. Emerging data suggest that targeted inhibition of these pathways may alter the evolution and progression of sepsis-induced myopathy and potentially reduce the occurrence of sepsis-mediated acquired weakness syndromes. PMID:20046121

  8. Neutropenic sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tracie

    2016-09-28

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article discussed the causes, signs and symptoms of neutropenic sepsis in adult patients after cancer treatment. It also explored the prevention and management of this condition. PMID:27682569

  9. Sepsis biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prucha, Miroslav; Bellingan, Geoff; Zazula, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of death in non-coronary intensive care units (ICUs). In the past 10 years, progress has been made in the early identification of septic patients and in their treatment and these improvements in support and therapy mean that the mortality is gradually decreasing but it still remains unacceptably high. Leaving clinical diagnosis aside, the laboratory diagnostics represent a complex range of investigations that can place significant demands on the system given the speed of response required. There are hundreds of biomarkers which could be potentially used for diagnosis and prognosis in septic patients. The main attributes of successful markers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bed-side monitoring, and financial accessibility. Only a fraction is used in routine clinical practice because many lack sufficient sensitivity or specificity. The following review gives a short overview of the current epidemiology of sepsis, its pathogenesis and state-of-the-art knowledge on the use of specific biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters in its diagnostics. Prospective approaches towards discovery of new diagnostic biomarkers have been shortly mentioned.

  10. Sepsis Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... has kidney problems, sepsis can lead to kidney failure that requires lifelong dialysis. Top of Page How ... to prevent healthcare-associated infections. Recently, CDC has projects specifically focused on sepsis prevention so that we ...

  11. [Sepsis in Emergency Medicine].

    PubMed

    Christ, Michael; Geier, Felicitas; Bertsch, Thomas; Singler, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is defined as "life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host-response to infection". Presence of organ dysfunction is associated with a mortality of 10% and higher in hospitalized sepsis patients.Introduction of standards in diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in intensive care units has not considerably reduced sepsis mortality. About 80% of patients with sepsis are transferred to intensive care units from usual care wards and emergency departments. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether opportunities for further improvement of sepsis management exist outside of intensive care units. Performing a "quick sequential organ assessment" (qSOFA; two of following criteria have to be present: respiratory rate >22/min; sytolic blood pressure <100mmHg; altered mental status) supports to identify patients with suspicion of an infection and an increased risk of death within the hospital. Subsequent treatment according to current guidelines on sepsis management will reduce in-hospital mortality of sepsis patients. Indeed, we were able to show a substantial decrease of in-hospital mortality of about 20% in patients presenting with community acquired pneumonia to the emergency department.In summary, decision of further management of sepsis patients has to be done outside intensive care units at the time of initial presentation to professional care givers. Sepsis management in acute care settings should include a structured and standardized protocol to further improve survival in affected patients with even mild organ dysfunction.

  12. Limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Simon, András; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    Limb regeneration is observed in certain members of the animal phyla. Some animals keep this ability during their entire life while others lose it at some time during development. How do animals regenerate limbs? Is it possible to find unifying, conserved mechanisms of limb regeneration or have different species evolved distinct means of replacing a lost limb? How is limb regeneration similar or different to limb development? Studies on many organisms, including echinoderms, arthropods, and chordates have provided significant knowledge about limb regeneration. In this focus article, we concentrate on tetrapod limb regeneration as studied in three model amphibians: newts, axolotls, and frogs. We review recent progress on tissue interactions during limb regeneration, and place those findings into an evolutionary context. PMID:24009038

  13. Early management of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Pereira, Adriano José; Gleeson, James; Backer, Daniel De

    2014-01-01

    Increased awareness of the signs and symptoms of sepsis and an emphasis on the importance of early treatment have helped to improve survival rates from this serious and frequent condition in recent years. With no specific, effective anti-sepsis therapies available, management focuses on early source control with adequate and appropriate antibiotics and removal of any source of infection, rapid resuscitation, hemodynamic stabilization and organ support. Use of dedicated teams to care for patients with sepsis can help optimize early management.

  14. Exogenous arginine in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2007-09-01

    Sepsis is a severe condition in critically ill patients and is considered an arginine deficiency state. The rationale for arginine deficiency in sepsis is mainly based on the reduced arginine levels in sepsis that are associated with the specific changes in arginine metabolism related to endothelial dysfunction, severe catabolism, and worse outcome. Exogenous arginine supplementation in sepsis shows controversial results with only limited data in humans and variable results in animal models of sepsis. Since in these studies the severity of sepsis varies but also the route, timing, and dose of arginine, it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion for sepsis in general without considering the influence of these factors. Enhanced nitric oxide production in sepsis is related to suggested detrimental effects on hemodynamic instability and enhanced oxidative stress. Potential mechanisms for beneficial effects of exogenous arginine in sepsis include enhanced (protein) metabolism, improved microcirculation and organ function, effects on immune function and antibacterial effects, improved gut function, and an antioxidant role of arginine. We recently performed a study indicating that arginine can be given to septic patients without major effects on hemodynamics, suggesting that more studies can be conducted on the effects of arginine supplementation in septic patients.

  15. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as before.

  16. Limb Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... accidents and military combat Cancer Birth defects Some amputees have phantom pain, which is the feeling of ... problems, if you wear an artificial limb. Many amputees use an artificial limb. Learning how to use ...

  17. Neurology of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sweis, Rochelle; Ortiz, Jorge; Biller, José

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome occurring secondary to infection and labeled severe when end organ dysfunction or tissue hypoperfusion transpires. Sepsis-associated mortality remains high among critically ill patients, with chronic disease and immunosuppression being the most common risk factors. Studies demonstrate that early recognition and treatment are vital to decreasing mortality. Some of the least understood effects of sepsis are the associated neurologic complications. The peripheral nervous system (PNS) has gained most consideration and thought, largely due to dependence on mechanical ventilation. Central nervous system (CNS) complications related to sepsis have only more recently gained attention but continue to go unnoticed. Aside from the clinical examination, electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive tool for prognostication or uncovering non-convulsive seizures in encephalopathic patients. Further studies are needed to further define the urgency of a prevention and treatment plan for the deleterious effects of sepsis on the PNS and CNS. PMID:26820754

  18. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  19. The older adult experiencing sepsis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Nadine C; Ross, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a potentially fatal response to infection affecting patients across the life span. Sepsis can progress from systemic inflammatory response to severe sepsis and septic shock if not recognized promptly and managed effectively. Risk factors for sepsis include age, gender, the presence of invasive devices (eg, urinary catheters), and chronic medical conditions (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Sepsis awareness is essential and includes identification of population-focused risk factors, recognition of clinical signs and symptoms, and timely implementation of interventions. The purpose of this article was to examine sepsis in older adults, including prevalence, atypical presentation of the condition, and considerations for sepsis management in the elderly population.

  20. Animal models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains a common, serious, and heterogeneous clinical entity that is difficult to define adequately. Despite its importance as a public health problem, efforts to develop and gain regulatory approval for a specific therapeutic agent for the adjuvant treatment of sepsis have been remarkably unsuccessful. One step in the critical pathway for the development of a new agent for adjuvant treatment of sepsis is evaluation in an appropriate animal model of the human condition. Unfortunately, the animal models that have been used for this purpose have often yielded misleading findings. It is likely that there are multiple reasons for the discrepancies between the results obtained in tests of pharmacological agents in animal models of sepsis and the outcomes of human clinical trials. One of important reason may be that the changes in gene expression, which are triggered by trauma or infection, are different in mice, a commonly used species for preclinical testing, and humans. Additionally, many species, including mice and baboons, are remarkably resistant to the toxic effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, whereas humans are exquisitely sensitive. New approaches toward the use of animals for sepsis research are being investigated. But, at present, results from preclinical studies of new therapeutic agents for sepsis must be viewed with a degree of skepticism. PMID:24022070

  1. Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole. PMID:23905041

  2. Sepsis in critical care.

    PubMed

    King, Joan E

    2007-03-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome produced by the accelerated activity of the inflammatory immune response, the clotting cascade, and endothelial damage. It is a systematic process that can progress easily into septic shock and MODS. The chemical mediators or cytokines produce a complex self-perpetuating process that impacts all body systems. It is critical for the nurse first to identify patients at risk for developing sepsis and to assess patients who have SIRS and sepsis continually for signs and symptoms of organ involvement and organ dysfunction. Once sepsis has been diagnosed, evidence-based practice indicates initiation of fluid resuscitation. Vasopressor therapy, positive inotropic support, and appropriate antibiotic therapy should be started within the first hour. Within a 6-hour timeframe the goal is stabilization of the CVP, MAP, and UOP to prevent further organ damage. The challenge for nurses caring for septic patients is to support the treatment goals, to prevent added complications including stress ulcers, DVTs, aspiration pneumonia, and the progression to MODS, and to address the patient's and the family's psychosocial needs. As complex as the pathophysiology of sepsis is, the nursing care is equally complex but also rewarding. Patients who previously might have died now recover as vigilant nursing care combines forces with new drug therapies and evidence-based practice guidelines.

  3. Essentials of sepsis management.

    PubMed

    Green, John M

    2015-04-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the knowledge of infection and human response to it, sepsis continues to be one of the most common challenges surgeons and critical care providers face. Surgeons confront the problem of infection every day, in treating established infections or reacting to a consequence of surgical intervention. Infections after surgery continue to be a problem despite massive efforts to prevent them. Patients rely on the surgeon's ability to recognize infection and treat it. Also, preventing nosocomial infection and antibiotic resistance is a primary responsibility. This article describes diagnostic and therapeutic measures for sepsis in the perioperative surgical patient.

  4. The resuscitation package in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Demertzis, Lee M; Kollef, Marin H

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis and its attendant complications are commonly encountered in the intensive care unit. Early recognition of sepsis is critical because it allows for rapid deployment of a multifaceted resuscitation package. The cornerstones of sepsis management are antibiotic therapy, source control, and hemodynamic resuscitation. In select patients, ancillary therapies are indicated, such as activated protein C, corticosteroids, and glycemic control. Given the complexity of sepsis management, optimal care can be delivered as a bundle-a protocol encompassing the above interventions. The evidence behind the various components of sepsis management are reviewed here.

  5. Revisiting caspases in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  6. Nutrition and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Chin, w Dat N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional support in critically ill patients with sepsis has received much attention in recent years. However, many of the studies have produced conflicting results. As for all critically ill patients, nutritional support, preferably via the enteral route, should be commenced once initial resuscitation and adequate perfusion pressure is achieved. Where enteral feeding is impossible or not tolerated, parenteral nutrition (either as total or complimentary therapy) may safely be administered. Most positive studies relating to nutritional support and sepsis have been in the setting of sepsis prevention. Thus, the administration of standard nutrition formulas to critically ill patients within 24 h of injury or intensive care unit admission may decrease the incidence of pneumonia. Both arginine-supplemented enteral diets, given in the perioperative period, and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition have been shown to decrease infections in surgical patients. Parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions as well as probiotics given in the perioperative period may also reduce infections in patients undergoing major abdominal operations, such as liver transplantation. There is little support at the present time for the positive effect of specific pharmaconutrients, in particular fish oil, probiotics, or antioxidants, in the setting of established sepsis. More studies are clearly required on larger numbers of more homogeneous groups of patients. PMID:23075593

  7. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  8. Nutrition and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Chin, w Dat N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional support in critically ill patients with sepsis has received much attention in recent years. However, many of the studies have produced conflicting results. As for all critically ill patients, nutritional support, preferably via the enteral route, should be commenced once initial resuscitation and adequate perfusion pressure is achieved. Where enteral feeding is impossible or not tolerated, parenteral nutrition (either as total or complimentary therapy) may safely be administered. Most positive studies relating to nutritional support and sepsis have been in the setting of sepsis prevention. Thus, the administration of standard nutrition formulas to critically ill patients within 24 h of injury or intensive care unit admission may decrease the incidence of pneumonia. Both arginine-supplemented enteral diets, given in the perioperative period, and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition have been shown to decrease infections in surgical patients. Parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions as well as probiotics given in the perioperative period may also reduce infections in patients undergoing major abdominal operations, such as liver transplantation. There is little support at the present time for the positive effect of specific pharmaconutrients, in particular fish oil, probiotics, or antioxidants, in the setting of established sepsis. More studies are clearly required on larger numbers of more homogeneous groups of patients.

  9. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  10. [Sepsis management -- antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Welte, T

    2004-11-26

    Sepsis is one of the most frequent infectious problems at Intensive Care Units, and sepsis is associated with significant mortality. The latter could not be markedly reduced in the last years, despite a number of advances in the field of volume substitution, catecholamines, and endocrinologic therapy. The reason might be that important steps towards overcoming of sepsis are the surgical resection of infectious foci and an adequate antibiotic treatment. A critical role plays the growing resistance of pathogens against the common antibiotics. Since no major progress in the development of new antibiotics can be expected for the next years, sepsis treatment must be focused on prevention of infection, and on an optimised application of current antibiotic substances. The key factors are a broad and high dose initial treatment, a de-escalation strategy according to the clinical course, and -with exceptions- a limitation of treatment to 7 to 10 days. Rotation of antibiotics should be performed, if problems with resistances exist or no specialist for infectious diseases is available on the Intensive Care Unit.

  11. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  12. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  13. Sepsis-associated hyperlactatemia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alvarez, Mercedes; Marik, Paul; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2014-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that sepsis and septic shock are associated with hyperlactatemia (sepsis-associated hyperlactatemia (SAHL)). SAHL is a strong independent predictor of mortality and its presence and progression are widely appreciated by clinicians to define a very high-risk population. Until recently, the dominant paradigm has been that SAHL is a marker of tissue hypoxia. Accordingly, SAHL has been interpreted to indicate the presence of an 'oxygen debt' or 'hypoperfusion', which leads to increased lactate generation via anaerobic glycolysis. In light of such interpretation of the meaning of SAHL, maneuvers to increase oxygen delivery have been proposed as its treatment. Moreover, lactate levels have been proposed as a method to evaluate the adequacy of resuscitation and the nature of the response to the initial treatment for sepsis. However, a large body of evidence has accumulated that strongly challenges such notions. Much evidence now supports the view that SAHL is not due only to tissue hypoxia or anaerobic glycolysis. Experimental and human studies all consistently support the view that SAHL is more logically explained by increased aerobic glycolysis secondary to activation of the stress response (adrenergic stimulation). More importantly, new evidence suggests that SAHL may actually serve to facilitate bioenergetic efficiency through an increase in lactate oxidation. In this sense, the characteristics of lactate production best fit the notion of an adaptive survival response that grows in intensity as disease severity increases. Clinicians need to be aware of these developments in our understanding of SAHL in order to approach patient management according to biological principles and to interpret lactate concentrations during sepsis resuscitation according to current best knowledge. PMID:25394679

  14. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response Many people have never heard of sepsis, or ... tract infection) and then a powerful and harmful response by your body’s own immune system . “With sepsis, ...

  15. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  16. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  17. Surviving sepsis in the critical care environment.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The management of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care environment is a complex task requiring the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign provides systematic guidelines for the recognition, early intervention, and supportive management of sepsis. Critical care nurses are instrumental in ensuring that these guidelines and other sources of evidence-based practice are used for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. This article discusses the pathophysiologic processes in severe sepsis and septic shock and discusses the appropriate interventions as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Recommended early treatments are reviewed along with interventions related to hemodynamics, perfusion, and supportive care in the critical care environment.

  18. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  20. Current epidemiology of sepsis in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xuelian; Du, Bin; Lu, Meizhu; Wu, Minming

    2016-01-01

    The disease burden of sepsis is a global issue. Most of the large-scale epidemiological investigations on sepsis have been carried out in developed countries. The population of 1.3 billion in mainland China accounts for approximately 1/5th of the whole world population. Thus, the knowledge of the incidence and mortality of sepsis in mainland China is vital before employing measures for its improvement. However, most of the epidemiological data of sepsis in mainland China was obtained from ICU settings, and thus lacks the population-based incidence and mortality of sepsis. In the present review, we summarized the limited literature encompassing the incidence, mortality, long-term outcome, and pathogens of sepsis in mainland China. Therefore, it might provide some valuable information regarding the sepsis disease burden and current issues in the management of sepsis in mainland China. PMID:27713882

  1. Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160574.html Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC Know the signs of extreme response to ... treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs ...

  2. Severe sepsis management are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Tom; Vollman, Kathleen

    2003-10-01

    For the first time in medical history, a drug has been shown to reduce the mortality associated with sepsis, the leading cause of death in many ICUs. Optimal use by appropriate selection of patients and early recognition of sepsis could save thousands of lives. Nurses play a major role in recognizing severe sepsis. By using the concepts introduced here, nurses can play a direct role in saving the lives of patients with sepsis.

  3. Sepsis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Lucas, K G; Kiehn, T E; Sobeck, K A; Armstrong, D; Brown, A E

    1994-07-01

    Previous reports of F. oryzihabitans sepsis involving central venous access devices reveal a relatively high rate of complications, including device removal, despite a course of broad-spectrum anti-microbials with compatible in vitro susceptibility results. In the present report of 22 cases of F. oryzihabitans sepsis treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from February 1986 through September 1993, the majority of CVAD-related infections with F. oryzihabitans were successfully treated with a 14-day course of antimicrobials with antipseudomonal activity, and removal of the device was usually not required. Factors that may complicate successful treatment of CVAD-related sepsis caused by F. oryzihabitans include polymicrobial infections and premature discontinuation of antibiotic therapy.

  4. Sepsis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Lucas, K G; Kiehn, T E; Sobeck, K A; Armstrong, D; Brown, A E

    1994-07-01

    Previous reports of F. oryzihabitans sepsis involving central venous access devices reveal a relatively high rate of complications, including device removal, despite a course of broad-spectrum anti-microbials with compatible in vitro susceptibility results. In the present report of 22 cases of F. oryzihabitans sepsis treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from February 1986 through September 1993, the majority of CVAD-related infections with F. oryzihabitans were successfully treated with a 14-day course of antimicrobials with antipseudomonal activity, and removal of the device was usually not required. Factors that may complicate successful treatment of CVAD-related sepsis caused by F. oryzihabitans include polymicrobial infections and premature discontinuation of antibiotic therapy. PMID:8041243

  5. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  6. Epidemiologic trends of sepsis in western countries

    PubMed Central

    Suarez De La Rica, Alejandro; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Since the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and the Society of Critical care Medicine (SCCM) published the first consensus definition of syndromes related to sepsis in 1992, the knowledge of epidemiology of sepsis has clearly improved, although no prospective studies have been performed to analyse the incidence of sepsis in general population. There are differences in epidemiologic trends in sepsis between western countries and low-income and middle-income countries. In the United States (US), most of epidemiologic studies have been based on large, administrative databases, reporting an increase in the incidence of severe sepsis over years. In general, studies describing epidemiology of sepsis outside the US use clinical definitions and intensive care unit (ICU) observational cohort designs instead of administrative databases and definitions. Incidence of sepsis has increased over years, probably due to progressive aging of population, the existence of more comorbidities and maybe the liberal use of sepsis codification, by including patients with less severity. Notwithstanding, mortality due to sepsis is clearly decreasing over years, probably to improvement in ICU care, although absolute mortality is growing on account of the raise in incidence. Risk factors for sepsis are the two ends of life, male sex, US black race, presence of comorbidities and certain genetic variants. Respiratory tract infections are the most common source of sepsis, and, nowadays, Gram-positive infections are more frequent that Gram-negative sepsis in most prospective studies. PMID:27713883

  7. Improving management of sepsis in the community.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Fiona

    2016-08-31

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Pathological changes in the circulation reduce the blood supply to major organs, causing them to fail. This may lead to death, therefore rapid recognition and treatment of sepsis is vital. Sepsis research has focused on patients in acute hospital settings. However, most cases of sepsis originate in the community, suggesting that the identification of sepsis and delivery of timely care is necessary before hospital admission. Therefore, it is essential that nurses practising in the community are provided with appropriate sepsis guidelines that can be implemented immediately. The UK Sepsis Trust has developed the General Practice Sepsis Decision Support Tool, which has been designed specifically for use in the community. This article provides an overview of how the tool is used in the community and how it works in conjunction with the 'Sepsis Six' care bundle and care bundles for hospital settings. Changes to the terminology used in relation to sepsis and recent guidelines are also explained. PMID:27577313

  8. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  9. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2005-10-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a frequent complication of sepsis. Coagulation activation, inhibition of fibrinolysis, and consumption of coagulation inhibitors lead to a procoagulant state resulting in inadequate fibrin removal and fibrin deposition in the microvasculature. As a consequence, microvascular thrombosis contributes to promotion of organ dysfunction. Recently, three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigated the efficacy of antithrombin, activated protein C (APC), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, respectively, in sepsis patients. A significant reduction in mortality was demonstrated in the APC trial. In this article, we first discuss the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis activation. Then, the pathophysiology of coagulation activation, consumption of coagulation inhibitors, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis leading to a procoagulant state are described in more detail. Moreover, therapeutic concepts as well as the three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are discussed.

  10. Sepsis: Medical errors in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rorat, Marta; Jurek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Health, safety and medical errors are currently the subject of worldwide discussion. The authors analysed medico-legal opinions trying to determine types of medical errors and their impact on the course of sepsis. The authors carried out a retrospective analysis of 66 medico-legal opinions issued by the Wroclaw Department of Forensic Medicine between 2004 and 2013 (at the request of the prosecutor or court) in cases examined for medical errors. Medical errors were confirmed in 55 of the 66 medico-legal opinions. The age of victims varied from 2 weeks to 68 years; 49 patients died. The analysis revealed medical errors committed by 113 health-care workers: 98 physicians, 8 nurses and 8 emergency medical dispatchers. In 33 cases, an error was made before hospitalisation. Hospital errors occurred in 35 victims. Diagnostic errors were discovered in 50 patients, including 46 cases of sepsis being incorrectly recognised and insufficient diagnoses in 37 cases. Therapeutic errors occurred in 37 victims, organisational errors in 9 and technical errors in 2. In addition to sepsis, 8 patients also had a severe concomitant disease and 8 had a chronic disease. In 45 cases, the authors observed glaring errors, which could incur criminal liability. There is an urgent need to introduce a system for reporting and analysing medical errors in Poland. The development and popularisation of standards for identifying and treating sepsis across basic medical professions is essential to improve patient safety and survival rates. Procedures should be introduced to prevent health-care workers from administering incorrect treatment in cases.

  11. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  12. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  13. Early-onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kari A; Anderson-Berry, Ann L; Delair, Shirley F; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS.

  14. Sepsis: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliézer; Passos, Rogério Da Hora; Ferri, Maurício Beller; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome related to severe infections. It is defined as the systemic host response to microorganisms in previously sterile tissues and is characterized by end-organ dysfunction away from the primary site of infection. The normal host response to infection is complex and aims to identify and control pathogen invasion, as well as to start immediate tissue repair. Both the cellular and humoral immune systems are activated, giving rise to both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory responses. The chain of events that leads to sepsis is derived from the exacerbation of these mechanisms, promoting massive liberation of mediators and the progression of multiple organ dysfunction. Despite increasing knowledge about the pathophysiological pathways and processes involved in sepsis, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. A large number of immunomodulatory agents have been studied in experimental and clinical settings in an attempt to find an efficacious anti-inflammatory drug that reduces mortality. Even though preclinical results had been promising, the vast majority of these trials actually showed little success in reducing the overwhelmingly high mortality rate of septic shock patients as compared with that of other critically ill intensive care unit patients. Clinical management usually begins with prompt recognition, determination of the probable infection site, early administration of antibiotics, and resuscitation protocols based on “early-goal” directed therapy. In this review, we address the research efforts that have been targeting risk factor identification, including genetics, pathophysiological mechanisms and strategies to recognize and treat these patients as early as possible. PMID:18297215

  15. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team. PMID:24109139

  16. Systems for Paediatric Sepsis: A Global Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kang, KT; Chandler, HK; Espinosa, V; Kissoon, N

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for early diagnosis and treatment of paediatric sepsis at hospitals in developing and developed countries. Methods: This was a voluntary online survey involving 101 hospitals from 41 countries solicited through the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies contact list and website. The survey was designed to assess the spectrum of sepsis epidemiology, patterns of applied therapies, availability of resources and barriers to optimal sepsis treatment. Results: Ninety per cent of respondents represented a tertiary or general hospital with paediatric intensive care facilities, including 63% from developed countries. Adequate triage services were absent in more than 20% of centres. Insufficiently trained personnel and lack of a sepsis protocol was reported in 40% of all sites. While there were specific guidelines for sepsis management in 78% of centres (n = 100), protocols for assessing sepsis patients were not applied in nearly 70% of centres. Lack of parental recognition of sepsis and failure of referring centres to diagnose sepsis were identified as major barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Conclusions: Even among centres with no significant resource constraints and advanced medical systems, significant deficits in sepsis care exist. Early recognition and management remains a key issue and may be addressed through improved triage, augmented support for referring centres and public awareness. Focussed research is necessary at the institutional level to identify and address specific barriers. PMID:25867557

  17. Autophagy in sepsis: Degradation into exhaustion?

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffery; Yu, Jun; Wong, Sunny H; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wong, Wai T; Leung, Czarina C H; Choi, Gordon; Wang, Maggie H T; Gin, Tony; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William K K

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against microbial challenges. Previous in vitro and in vivo models of sepsis demonstrated that autophagy was activated initially in sepsis, followed by a subsequent phase of impairment. Autophagy modulation appears to be protective against multiple organ injuries in these murine sepsis models. This is achieved in part by preventing apoptosis, maintaining a balance between the productions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and preserving mitochondrial functions. This article aims to discuss the role of autophagy in sepsis and the therapeutic potential of autophagy enhancers.

  18. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team.

  19. Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis ... Threatening Bacterial Infection Remains Mysterious This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  20. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  1. Pseudomonas sepsis with Noma: an association?

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, S; Tullu, M S; Lahiri, K R; Deshmukh, C T

    2005-08-01

    We report here a 2.5-year-old male child with community-acquired Pseudomonal sepsis showing the characteristic lesions of ecthyma gangrenosum. The child had development of gangrenous changes of the nose and face - the 'cancrum oris' or 'Noma'. We highlight the possible association of Pseudomonas sepsis and Noma, with malnutrition playing a central role in causing both the diseases.

  2. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Mitigation Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  3. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  4. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arghya

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common sequel of sepsis in the intensive care unit. It is being suggested that sepsis-induced AKI may have a distinct pathophysiology and identity. Availability of biomarkers now enable us to detect AKI as early as four hours after it's inception and may even help us to delineate sepsis-induced AKI. Protective strategies such as preferential use of vasopressin or prevention of intra-abdominal hypertension may help, in addition to the other global management strategies of sepsis. Pharmacologic interventions have had limited success, may be due to their delayed usage. Newer developments in extracorporeal blood purification techniques may proffer effects beyond simple replacement of renal function, such as metabolic functions of the kidney or modulation of the sepsis cascade.

  5. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  6. Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in intensive care unit interventions, including the use of specific antibiotics and anti-inflammation treatment, sepsis with concomitant multiple organ failure is the most common cause of death in many acute care units. In order to understand the mechanisms of clinical sepsis and develop effective therapeutic modalities, there is a need to use effective experimental models that faithfully replicate what occurs in patients with sepsis. Several models are commonly used to study sepsis, including intravenous endotoxin challenge, injection of live organisms into the peritoneal cavity, establishing abscesses in the extremities, and the induction of polymicrobial peritonitis via cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Here, we describe the surgery procedure of CLP in mice, which has been proposed to closely replicate the nature and course of clinical sepsis in humans. PMID:23824895

  7. Hemostasis and endothelial damage during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Maria Egede

    2015-08-01

    The sepsis syndrome represents a disease continuum, including severe sepsis and septic shock associated with high mortality. One of the main problems in severe sepsis and septic shock, resulting in organ failure and death, are disturbances in the hemostasis due to sepsis-related coagulopathy. Sepsis-related coagulopathy affects not only traditional coagulation factors, but also the platelets and endothelium. Functional testing of the hemostatic system has found application in critical illness. Thrombelastography (TEG) provides an overview of the hemostatic system allowing for an evaluation of interactions between coagulation factors and platelets. Additionally, the role of the endothelium during sepsis can be explored through testing of biomarkers of endothelial damage. The three studies comprising this PhD thesis all investigate important aspects of the disturbed hemostasis during sepsis, including endothelial damage. Together, the specific findings from the three studies improve the existing understanding of sepsis-related coagulopathy, and the possible influences of some of the treatments offered these patients. The first study investigates the occurrence of antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia among critically ill patients. In sepsis, thrombocytopenia is a predictor of poor outcome, and reports, of mainly casuistic nature, have previously hypothesized that specific antimicrobial agents could induce in sepsis-related thrombocytopenia. This hypothesis was tested using a randomized designed set-up, encompassing 1147 critically ill patients, and no significant difference in risk of thrombocytopenia was observed among patients receiving large amounts of antimicrobials vs. patients receiving standard-of-care. As a consequence, the risk of antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia in the general population of critically ill patients seemingly does not represent a substantial problem and thrombocytopenia during critical illness is most likely due to other factors such

  8. A clinical trial of a combination of amoxycillin and flucloxacillin in amputations for septic ischaemic lower limb lesions.

    PubMed

    Robbs, J V; Kritzinger, N A; Mogotlane, K A; Odell, J A; Huizinga, W H

    1981-12-12

    The incidence of sepsis after amputation with or without a proximal arterial reconstructive procedure in 24 patients presenting with septic ischaemic lower limb lesions and who received a parenteral combination of amoxycillin and flucloxacillin (Suprapen; Bencard) is compared with that in a similar control group of 22 patients who received antibiotics only if postoperative sepsis developed. There was no significant difference in the incidence of sepsis in the arterial reconstruction wounds. Amputation stump sepsis occurred in 33.3% of patients receiving prophylactic antibiotics compared with 72.7% of the control group. The difference is statistically significant. A similar significant difference was found among 32 patients submitted to primary amputation without an arterial reconstructive procedure. Bacteriological data are discussed.

  9. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  10. Out on a Limb: Investigating the Anatomy of Tree Limbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L.

    2008-01-01

    The author presents several upper elementary science activities involving tree limbs that were collected after severe weather conditions. The activities involved 3rd-grade students arranging tree limb pieces in the correct order from the trunk to the tip of the limb, measuring the pieces, determining the age of a tree limb by its rings,…

  11. Five additions to the list of Sepsidae Diptera for Vietnam: Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n., Perochaeta lobo sp. n., Sepsis spura sp. n., Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003 and Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yuchen; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent collecting trip to Vietnam yielded three new species and two new records of Sepsidae (Diptera) for the country. Here we describe two new species in the species-poor genus Perochaeta (Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n. andPerochaeta lobo sp. n.) and one to the largest sepsid genus Sepsis (Sepsis spura sp. n.) which is also found in Sumatra and Sulawesi. Two additional Sepsis species are new records for Vietnam (Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003; Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869). We conclude with a discussion of the distribution of Perochaeta and the three Sepsis species. PMID:21594042

  12. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Christa A; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) was created in 2002 and consists of severe sepsis management guidelines and a sepsis performance improvement program. The second revision of the guidelines, published in 2013, are sponsored by 30 international scientific organizations and contain changes in recommendations for fluids and vasopressor administration. The new 3- and 6-hour sepsis 'bundles' (sets of care elements) include a software program that can be downloaded free from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign website (www.survivingsepsis.org). The traditional intensive care unit and emergency department champion-driven sepsis performance improvement program continues internationally with the kick off of a new grant-funded hospital floor sepsis performance improvement initiative.

  13. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies. PMID:24966015

  14. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies.

  15. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluids are given through a vein. Other medical treatments include: Medicines that increase blood pressure Dialysis if there is kidney failure A breathing machine ( mechanical ventilation ) if there is lung failure

  16. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 100.4°F [38°C] and above rectal temperature) in newborns and young infants labored or unusual breathing change in skin color (paler than usual or mildly bluish) or a rash listlessness or lethargy change in the sound of the baby's cry or excessive crying change ...

  17. Diagnostic Value of Presepsin for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zhi-De; Song, Jia; Shao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several individual studies have reported the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST) for sepsis, but the results are inconsistent. The present systematic review and meta-analysis pooled data to better ascertain the value of circulatory presepsin as a biomarker for sepsis. Studies published in English before November 7, 2014 and assessing the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis were retrieved from medical databases. The quality of eligible studies was assessed using a revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2). The overall diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis was pooled according to a bivariate model. Publication bias was assessed using Deek funnel plot asymmetry test. Eleven studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The overall diagnostic sensitivity of presepsin for sepsis was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77–0.88), and specificity was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.72–0.83). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84–0.90). The pretest probability of sepsis was 0.56 among all subjects. When presepsin was introduced as the diagnostic test for sepsis, the posttest probabilities were 0.81 for a positive result and 0.19 for a negative. The major design deficits of the included studies were lack of prespecified thresholds and patient selection bias. The publication bias was negative. Presepsin is an effective adjunct biomarker for the diagnosis of sepsis, but is insufficient to detect or rule out sepsis when used alone. PMID:26632748

  18. Dysglycemia and Glucose Control During Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Mark P; Deane, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis predisposes to disordered metabolism and dysglycemia; the latter is a broad term that includes hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability. Dysglycemia is a marker of illness severity. Large randomized controlled trials have provided considerable insight into the optimal blood glucose targets for critically ill patients with sepsis. However, it may be that the pathophysiologic consequences of dysglycemia are dynamic throughout the course of a septic insult and also altered by premorbid glycemia. This review highlights the relevance of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability in patients with sepsis with an emphasis on a rational approach to management. PMID:27229647

  19. Management of neonatal sepsis in term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Du Pont-Thibodeau, Geneviève; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a common and deadly disease. It is broadly defined as a systemic inflammatory response, occurring in the first four weeks of life, as a result of a suspected or proven infection. Yet, more reliable and consistently applied diagnostic criteria would help improve our knowledge of the disease epidemiology. Several therapeutic attempts to control systemic inflammation in sepsis were unsuccessful. Immediate empirical administration of broad-spectrum anti-microbials, aggressive fluid resuscitation, and vaso-active or inotropic support (or both) are the mainstays of the therapeutic management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:25165566

  20. Morganella morganii sepsis with massive hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Chong Rae; Um, Tae Hyun; Rhu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Eu Suk; Jeong, Jae Won; Lee, Hye Ran

    2007-12-01

    Morganella morganii is a facultative gram-negative and anaerobic rod. It may be a cause of devastating infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Some bacterial infections such as Clostridium and Vibrio are associated with hemolysis. However, massive hemolysis caused by M. morganii sepsis has not yet been reported. We observed a 59-yr-old man who had chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and was found to have massive hemolysis and metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. He died 6 hr after admission in spite of aggressive treatment. Two sets of blood cultures revealed the growth of M. morganii. We report here that M. morganii sepsis can cause fatal massive hemolysis leading to death.

  1. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research.

  2. Upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, A

    2001-04-30

    This article discusses the technical and medical difficulties involved in managing prostheses of the upper limb. The level of amputation governs the type of prosthesis construction chosen, but does not affect emotional acceptance. The factors determining therapeutic success include the quality of the stump, the skill involved in prosthetic socket fabrication, and the proper selection of modular components, as well as good rehabilitation and professional care for the patient with amputated upper limb. PMID:17987000

  3. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  4. A prospective treatment for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi Bonjar, Mohammad Rashid; Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principal component to this approach is a bacterial polyvalent antibody-column (BPVAC), which selectively traps wide spectrum of BATs from blood in an extracorporeal circuit, and detoxified blood returns back to the patient's body. BPVAC treatment would be a device of targeted medicine. Detoxification is performed under supervision of trained personnel using simple blood-circulating machines in which blood circulates from the patient to BPVAC and back to the patient aseptically. BPVACs' reactive sites consist of carbon nanotubes on which a vast spectra of polyvalent BATs-antibodies are bond to. The devise acts as a biological filter that selectively immobilizes harmful BATs from intoxicated blood; however, no dialysis is involved. For effective neutralization, BPVAC provides large contact surface area with blood. BPVAC approach would have advantages of: 1) urgent neutralization of notorious BATs from blood of septic patients; 2) applicability in parallel with conventional treatments; 3) potential to minimize side effects of the malady; 4) applicability for a vast range of BATs; 5) potential to eliminate contact of BATs with internal tissues and organs; 6) tolerability by patients sensitive to antiserum injections; 7) capability for universal application; 8) affectivity when antibiotic-resistant bacteria are involved and the physician has no or limited access to appropriate antibiotics; and 10) being a single-use, disposable, and stand-alone device. Before using it for clinical trials in human beings, it should pass animal evaluations accurately; however, research works should optimize its implementation in human beings. For optimization, it needs appropriate

  5. A prospective treatment for sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Mohammad Rashid; Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principal component to this approach is a bacterial polyvalent antibody-column (BPVAC), which selectively traps wide spectrum of BATs from blood in an extracorporeal circuit, and detoxified blood returns back to the patient’s body. BPVAC treatment would be a device of targeted medicine. Detoxification is performed under supervision of trained personnel using simple blood-circulating machines in which blood circulates from the patient to BPVAC and back to the patient aseptically. BPVACs’ reactive sites consist of carbon nanotubes on which a vast spectra of polyvalent BATs-antibodies are bond to. The devise acts as a biological filter that selectively immobilizes harmful BATs from intoxicated blood; however, no dialysis is involved. For effective neutralization, BPVAC provides large contact surface area with blood. BPVAC approach would have advantages of: 1) urgent neutralization of notorious BATs from blood of septic patients; 2) applicability in parallel with conventional treatments; 3) potential to minimize side effects of the malady; 4) applicability for a vast range of BATs; 5) potential to eliminate contact of BATs with internal tissues and organs; 6) tolerability by patients sensitive to antiserum injections; 7) capability for universal application; 8) affectivity when antibiotic-resistant bacteria are involved and the physician has no or limited access to appropriate antibiotics; and 10) being a single-use, disposable, and stand-alone device. Before using it for clinical trials in human beings, it should pass animal evaluations accurately; however, research works should optimize its implementation in human beings. For optimization, it needs appropriate

  6. Seeking Sepsis in the Emergency Department- Identifying Barriers to Delivery of the Sepsis 6.

    PubMed

    Bentley, James; Henderson, Susan; Thakore, Shobhan; Donald, Michael; Wang, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    The Sepsis 6 is an internationally accepted management bundle that, when initiated within one hour of identifying sepsis, can reduce morbidity and mortality. This management bundle was advocated by the Scottish Patient Safety Programme as part of its Acute Adult campaign launched in 2008 and adopted by NHS Tayside in 2012. Despite this, the Emergency Department (ED) of Ninewells Hospital, a tertiary referral centre and major teaching hospital in Scotland, was displaying poor success in the Sepsis 6. We therefore set out to improve compliance by evaluating the application of all aspects of the NHS Tayside Sepsis 6 bundle within one hour of ED triage time, to identify what human factors may influence achieving the one hour The Sepsis 6 bundle. This allowed us to tailor a number of specific interventions including educational sessions, regular audit and personal feedback and check list Sepsis 6 sticker. These interventions promoted a steady increase in compliance from an initial rate of 51.0% to 74.3%. The project highlighted that undifferentiated patients create a challenge in initiating the Sepsis 6. Pyrexia is a key human factor-trigger for recognising sepsis with initial nursing assessment being vital in recognition and identifying the best area (resus) of the department to manage severely septic patients. EDs need to recognise these challenges and develop educational and feedback plans for staff and utilise available resources to maximise the Sepsis 6 compliance. PMID:27239303

  7. Seeking Sepsis in the Emergency Department- Identifying Barriers to Delivery of the Sepsis 6

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, James; Henderson, Susan; Thakore, Shobhan; Donald, Michael; Wang, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    The Sepsis 6 is an internationally accepted management bundle that, when initiated within one hour of identifying sepsis, can reduce morbidity and mortality. This management bundle was advocated by the Scottish Patient Safety Programme as part of its Acute Adult campaign launched in 2008 and adopted by NHS Tayside in 2012. Despite this, the Emergency Department (ED) of Ninewells Hospital, a tertiary referral centre and major teaching hospital in Scotland, was displaying poor success in the Sepsis 6. We therefore set out to improve compliance by evaluating the application of all aspects of the NHS Tayside Sepsis 6 bundle within one hour of ED triage time, to identify what human factors may influence achieving the one hour The Sepsis 6 bundle. This allowed us to tailor a number of specific interventions including educational sessions, regular audit and personal feedback and check list Sepsis 6 sticker. These interventions promoted a steady increase in compliance from an initial rate of 51.0% to 74.3%. The project highlighted that undifferentiated patients create a challenge in initiating the Sepsis 6. Pyrexia is a key human factor-trigger for recognising sepsis with initial nursing assessment being vital in recognition and identifying the best area (resus) of the department to manage severely septic patients. EDs need to recognise these challenges and develop educational and feedback plans for staff and utilise available resources to maximise the Sepsis 6 compliance. PMID:27239303

  8. Sepsis in Pregnancy: Identification and Management.

    PubMed

    Albright, Catherine M; Mehta, Niharika D; Rouse, Dwight J; Hughes, Brenna L

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis accounts for up to 28% of all maternal deaths. Prompt, appropriate treatment improves maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. To date, there are no validated tools for identification of sepsis in pregnant women, and tools used in the general population tend to overestimate mortality. Once identified, management of pregnancy-associated sepsis is goal-directed, but because of the lack of studies of sepsis management in pregnancy, it must be assumed that modifications need to be made on the basis of the physiologic changes of pregnancy. Key to management is early fluid resuscitation and early initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy directed toward the likely source of infection or, if the source is unknown, empiric broad-spectrum therapy. Efforts directed at identifying the source of infection and appropriate source control measures are critical. Development of an illness severity scoring system and treatment algorithms validated in pregnant women needs to be a research priority.

  9. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  10. Sepsis: From Pathophysiology to Individualized Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    László, Ildikó; Trásy, Domonkos; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis has become a major health economic issue, with more patients dying in hospitals due to sepsis related complications compared to breast and colorectal cancer together. Despite extensive research in order to improve outcome in sepsis over the last few decades, results of large multicenter studies were by-and-large very disappointing. This fiasco can be explained by several factors, but one of the most important reasons is the uncertain definition of sepsis resulting in very heterogeneous patient populations, and the lack of understanding of pathophysiology, which is mainly based on the imbalance in the host-immune response. However, this heroic research work has not been in vain. Putting the results of positive and negative studies into context, we can now approach sepsis in a different concept, which may lead us to new perspectives in diagnostics and treatment. While decision making based on conventional sepsis definitions can inevitably lead to false judgment due to the heterogeneity of patients, new concepts based on currently gained knowledge in immunology may help to tailor assessment and treatment of these patients to their actual needs. Summarizing where we stand at present and what the future may hold are the purpose of this review. PMID:26258150

  11. Raftlin: a new biomarker in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-06-01

    Raftlin is a major protein in lipid raft. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of raftlin in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice) or subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of raftlin in LPS-treated HUVECs, and LPS-injected and CLP-mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of raftlin were significantly elevated, compared with control donors. Raftlin levels were higher in patients with septic shock, 891.6 (789.7-1,087.8, n = 30) than in patients with severe sepsis, 681.6 (480.1-819.6, n = 22) or sepsis, 496.1 (418.1-738.9, n = 30), compared with healthy volunteers 364.9 (312.1-392.4, n = 21). These results suggest that in septic patients, raftlin blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and the outcome of the patient and may represent a novel marker of endothelial cell dysfunction, and that raftlin can be used as a biomarker for determining the severity of sepsis.

  12. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  13. Homology, limbs, and genitalia.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    Similarities in genetic control between the main body axis and its appendages have been generally explained in terms of genetic co-option. In particular, arthropod and vertebrate appendages have been explained to invoke a common ancestor already provided with patterned body outgrowths or independent recruitment in limb patterning of genes or genetic cassettes originally used for purposes other than axis patterning. An alternative explanation is that body appendages, including genitalia, are evolutionarily divergent duplicates (paramorphs) of the main body axis. However, are all metazoan limbs and genitalia homologous? The concept of body appendages as paramorphs of the main body axis eliminates the requirement for the last common ancestor of limb-bearing animals to have been provided with limbs. Moreover, the possibility for an animal to express complex organs ectopically demonstrates that positional and special homology may be ontogenetically and evolutionarily uncoupled. To assess the homology of animal genitalia, we need to take into account three different sets of mechanisms, all contributing to their positional and/or special homology and respectively involved (1) in the patterning of themain body axis, (2) in axis duplication, followed by limb patterning mechanisms diverging away from those still patterning the main body axis (axis paramorphism), and (3) in controlling the specification of sexual/genital features, which often, but not necessarily, come into play by modifying already developed and patterned body appendages. This analysis demonstrates that a combinatorial approach to homology helps disentangling phylogenetic and ontogenetic layers of homology.

  14. Plasma arginine correlations in trauma and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chiarla, C; Giovannini, I; Siegel, J H

    2006-02-01

    Arginine (ARG) is an amino acid (AA) with unique properties and with a key-role in the metabolic, immune and reparative response to trauma and sepsis. This study has been performed to characterize the correlations between plasma levels of ARG, of other AA and of multiple metabolic variables in trauma and sepsis. Two-hundred and sixty-three plasma amino-acidograms with a large series of additional biochemical and blood variables were obtained consecutively in 9 trauma patients who developed sepsis, undergoing total parenteral nutrition with dextrose, fat and a mixed AA solution containing 10.4% arginine. ARG was low soon after trauma, then it increased with increasing distance from trauma and with the development of sepsis. ARG was also directly related to the AA infusion rate (AAIR) and for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. ARG was also related directly to the plasma levels of most of the other AA, the best correlation being that with lysine (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001). These correlations were often shifted downwards (showing lower ARG for any given level of the other AA) in measurements performed after trauma, compared to those performed after development of sepsis; this effect was more pronounced for the correlations with branched chain AA. Correlations between ARG and non-AA variables were not particularly relevant. The best simultaneous correlates of ARG, among variables involved in plasma ARG availability, were citrulline level, AAIR and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion (accounting for the effect of endogenous proteolysis) (multiple r(2) = 0.70, p < 0.001). Plasma ornithine (ORN), the AA more specifically linked to ARG metabolism, correlated with AAIR better than ARG and, for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. Correlations of ORN with other AA levels were poorer than those found for ARG, however ORN was directly related to white blood cell and platelet count, fibrinogen

  15. Limb salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2013-05-01

    The threat of lower limb loss is seen commonly in severe crush injury, cancer ablation, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy. The primary goal of limb salvage is to restore and maintain stability and ambulation. Reconstructive strategies differ in each condition such as: Meticulous debridement and early coverage in trauma, replacing lost functional units in cancer ablation, improving vascularity in ischaemic leg and providing stable walking surface for trophic ulcer. The decision to salvage the critically injured limb is multifactorial and should be individualised along with laid down definitive indications. Early cover remains the standard of care, delayed wound coverage not necessarily affect the final outcome. Limb salvage is more cost-effective than amputations in a long run. Limb salvage is the choice of procedure over amputation in 95% of limb sarcoma without affecting the survival. Compound flaps with different tissue components, skeletal reconstruction; tendon transfer/reconstruction helps to restore function. Adjuvant radiation alters tissue characters and calls for modification in reconstructive plan. Neuropathic ulcers are wide and deep often complicated by osteomyelitis. Free flap reconstruction aids in faster healing and provides superior surface for offloading. Diabetic wounds are primarily due to neuropathy and leads to six-fold increase in ulcerations. Control of infections, aggressive debridement and vascular cover are the mainstay of management. Endovascular procedures are gaining importance and have reduced extent of surgery and increased amputation free survival period. Though the standard approach remains utilising best option in the reconstruction ladder, the recent trend shows running down the ladder of reconstruction with newer reliable local flaps and negative wound pressure therapy.

  16. Limb salvage surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The threat of lower limb loss is seen commonly in severe crush injury, cancer ablation, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy. The primary goal of limb salvage is to restore and maintain stability and ambulation. Reconstructive strategies differ in each condition such as: Meticulous debridement and early coverage in trauma, replacing lost functional units in cancer ablation, improving vascularity in ischaemic leg and providing stable walking surface for trophic ulcer. The decision to salvage the critically injured limb is multifactorial and should be individualised along with laid down definitive indications. Early cover remains the standard of care, delayed wound coverage not necessarily affect the final outcome. Limb salvage is more cost-effective than amputations in a long run. Limb salvage is the choice of procedure over amputation in 95% of limb sarcoma without affecting the survival. Compound flaps with different tissue components, skeletal reconstruction; tendon transfer/reconstruction helps to restore function. Adjuvant radiation alters tissue characters and calls for modification in reconstructive plan. Neuropathic ulcers are wide and deep often complicated by osteomyelitis. Free flap reconstruction aids in faster healing and provides superior surface for offloading. Diabetic wounds are primarily due to neuropathy and leads to six-fold increase in ulcerations. Control of infections, aggressive debridement and vascular cover are the mainstay of management. Endovascular procedures are gaining importance and have reduced extent of surgery and increased amputation free survival period. Though the standard approach remains utilising best option in the reconstruction ladder, the recent trend shows running down the ladder of reconstruction with newer reliable local flaps and negative wound pressure therapy. PMID:24501463

  17. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  18. Accessories to Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanchao; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-05-23

    In a recent issue of Nature, Nacu et al. (2016) identified FGF and HH ligands as interacting molecular influences that are necessary and sufficient to induce the formation of supernumerary limbs from blastemal tissue in axolotl salamanders. PMID:27219058

  19. A blueprint for a sepsis protocol.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan I; Howell, Michael; Talmor, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    Despite numerous advances in medicine, sepsis remains an unconquered challenge. Although outcomes have improved slightly over decades, the unacceptably high mortality rate of 30%-50% for severe sepsis and septic shock continues. However, after years of unsuccessful clinical trials, several investigations over the last few years have reported survival benefit in the treatment of sepsis. Physicians now have several proven therapies to treat sepsis, but have yet to implement them on a widespread, systematic basis. This led 11 international professional societies spanning multiple specialties and continents to come together to create the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. The product of their work is an international effort organized to improve care of patients with sepsis and includes consensus, evidence-based guidelines for care that improves survival in septic patients, and an action plan for change. Given the clear role of early identification and treatment in stopping the sepsis cascade, therapy must start early in the emergency department (ED) and continue throughout the hospital course. The first of the recommendations by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign is the aggressive resuscitation strategy of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). EGDT is reported to reduce absolute mortality by a staggering 16%. The use of recombinant activated protein C was demonstrated to confer a 6% absolute survival benefit. Steroid supplementation in adrenal insufficiency produced a 10% benefit. Additionally, early and appropriate use of antibiotics remains a cornerstone of therapy. Although no randomized trial will be performed, the effects are undisputed. Finally, although predominantly intensive care unit therapies, tight glucose control and low-tidal-volume ventilation strategies have also led to improved survival. Armed with these new therapies, the medical community must rise to this call to action. Clinicians must change the approach to this disease, as well as the way the septic patient is

  20. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  1. Neonatal sepsis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Koutouby, A; Habibullah, J

    1995-06-01

    The case records of all neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of Al Wasl Hospital (Dubai) in a period of 60 months (May 1987-April 1992) were analysed. One-hundred-and-six neonates had confirmed sepsis. The most common causative organisms were Group B Streptococci (23 per cent), E. coli (17 per cent), Staph. epidermidis (17 per cent), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16 per cent). Group B Streptococcus presented as the most common organism in very early (< or = 24 hours) and early onset (2-6 days) of sepsis (34 per cent, 21/61), Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 per cent), Staphylococcal epidermidis (18 per cent) and Candida (13 per cent) were most common organisms causing late onset of sepsis (7-30 days). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae had highest mortality (71 per cent, 5/7; and 59 per cent, 10/17, respectively). Lowest mortality (4 per cent, 1/25) was observed in Group B Streptococcus sepsis. Prematurity, low birth weight, and nosocomial sepsis were high risk factors associated with fatal outcome.

  2. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  3. Year in review 2008: Critical Care - sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the most important papers appearing in Critical Care and other major journals about severe sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction over the past year. A number of these clinical and laboratory studies will have a considerable impact on the sepsis research agenda for years to come. The steroid controversy, the debate over tight glycemic control, the colloid versus crystalloid issue, the value of selective decontamination of the digestive tract, the enlarging role of biomarkers, the value of genomics and rapid diagnostic techniques have all been prominently featured in recent publications. Basic research into novel predictive assays, genetic polymorphisms, and new molecular methods to risk-stratify and to determine treatment options for sepsis have occupied much of the Critical Care publications relating to sepsis pathophysiology in 2008. We will attempt to briefly summarize what we consider to be the most significant contributions to the sepsis literature over the last year, and their likely ramifications in the future, for critical care clinicians, clinical investigators and basic researchers alike. PMID:19886974

  4. Endotoxins and other sepsis triggers.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Endotoxin, or more accurately termed bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is recognized as the most potent microbial mediator implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock. Yet despite its discovery well over a century ago, the fundamental role of circulating endotoxin in the blood of most patients with septic shock remains enigmatic and a subject of considerable controversy. LPS is the most prominent 'alarm molecule' sensed by the host's early warning system of innate immunity presaging the threat of invasion of the internal milieu by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. In small doses within a localized tissue space, LPS signaling is advantageous to the host in orchestrating an appropriate antimicrobial defense and bacterial clearance mechanisms. Conversely, the sudden release of large quantities of LPS into the bloodstream is clearly deleterious to the host, initiating the release of a dysregulated and potentially lethal array of inflammatory mediators and procoagulant factors in the systemic circulation. The massive host response to this single bacterial pattern recognition molecule is sufficient to generate diffuse endothelial injury, tissue hypoperfusion, disseminated intravascular coagulation and refractory shock. Numerous attempts to block endotoxin activity in clinical trials with septic patients have met with inconsistent and largely negative results. Yet the groundbreaking discoveries within the past decade into the precise molecular basis for LPS-mediated cellular activation and tissue injury has rekindled optimism that a new generation of therapies that specifically disrupt LPS signaling might succeed. Other microbial mediators found in Gram-positive bacterial and viral and fungal pathogens are now appreciated to activate many of the same host defense networks induced by LPS. This information is providing novel interventions in the continuing effots to improve the care of septic patients.

  5. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  7. Host innate immune responses to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Leopold, Stije J; Cranendonk, Duncan R; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to sepsis can be seen as a pattern recognition receptor-mediated dysregulation of the immune system following pathogen invasion in which a careful balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses is vital. Invasive infection triggers both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host responses, the magnitude of which depends on multiple factors, including pathogen virulence, site of infection, host genetics, and comorbidities. Toll-like receptors, the inflammasomes, and other pattern recognition receptors initiate the immune response after recognition of danger signals derived from microorganisms, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or derived from the host, so-called danger-associated molecular patterns. Further dissection of the role of host–pathogen interactions, the cytokine response, the coagulation cascade, and their multidirectional interactions in sepsis should lead toward the development of new therapeutic strategies in sepsis. PMID:23774844

  8. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  9. Anticoagulant modulation of inflammation in severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Karen S; Sawheny, Eva; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are so tightly linked that the cytokine storm which accompanies the development of sepsis initiates thrombin activation and the development of an intravascular coagulopathy. This review examines the interaction between the inflammatory and coagulation cascades, as well as the role of endogenous anticoagulants in regulating this interaction and dampening the activity of both pathways. Clinical trials attempting to improve outcomes in patients with severe sepsis by inhibiting thrombin generation with heparin and or endogenous anticoagulants are reviewed. In general, these trials have failed to demonstrate that anticoagulant therapy is associated with improvement in mortality or morbidity. While it is possible that selective patients who are severely ill with a high expected mortality may be shown to benefit from such therapy, at the present time none of these anticoagulants are neither approved nor can they be recommended for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25938026

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis. Case 7.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, S; Zürcher Zenklusen, R; Hack, C E; Wuillemin, W A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a man (age: 49 years), who died from severe meningococcal sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and extended skin necrosis. We discuss in detail the pathophysiology of the activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during sepsis. The article discusses new therapeutic concepts in the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis, too.

  11. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  12. Ghrelin inhibits sympathetic nervous activity in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongqian; Zhou, Mian; Das, Padmalaya; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Derek; Miksa, Michael; Zhang, Fangming; Ravikumar, Thanjavur S; Wang, Ping

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that norepinephrine (NE) upregulates proinflammatory cytokines by activating alpha(2)-adrenoceptor. Therefore, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system represents a novel treatment for sepsis. We have also shown that a novel stomach-derived peptide, ghrelin, is downregulated in sepsis and that its intravenous administration decreases proinflammatory cytokines and mitigates organ injury. However, it remains unknown whether ghrelin inhibits sympathetic activity through central ghrelin receptors [i.e., growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-la)] in sepsis. To study this, sepsis was induced in male rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Ghrelin was administered through intravenous or intracerebroventricular injection 30 min before CLP. Our results showed that intravenous administration of ghrelin significantly reduced the elevated NE and TNF-alpha levels at 2 h after CLP. NE administration partially blocked the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on TNF-alpha in sepsis. GHSR-la inhibition by the administration of a GHSR-la antagonist, [d-Arg(1),d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7,9),Leu(11)]substance P, significantly increased both NE and TNF-alpha levels even in normal animals. Markedly elevated circulating levels of NE 2 h after CLP were also significantly decreased by intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on NE release was completely blocked by intracerebroventricular injection of the GHSR-1a antagonist or a neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y(1) receptor antagonist. However, ghrelin's downregulatory effect on TNF-alpha release was only partially diminished by these agents. Thus ghrelin has sympathoinhibitory properties that are mediated by central ghrelin receptors involving a NPY/Y1 receptor-dependent pathway. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production in sepsis is partially because of its modulation of the overstimulated sympathetic nerve activation.

  13. Pediatric sepsis: challenges and adjunctive therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, William; Wong, Hector R.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Sepsis remains an important challenge in pediatric critical care medicine. The current review intends to provide an appraisal of adjunctive therapies for sepsis and to highlight opportunities for meeting selected challenges in the field. Future clinical studies should address long-term and functional outcomes, as well as acute outcomes. Potential adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids, hemofiltration, hemoadsorption, and plasmapheresis may have important roles, but still require formal and more rigorous testing by way of clinical trials. Finally, the design of future clinical trials should consider novel approaches for stratifying outcome risks as a means of improving the risk to benefit ratio of experimental therapies. PMID:23537672

  14. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Avila, Audrey A; Kinberg, Eliezer C; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-03-10

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer's Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role.

  15. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  16. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Audrey A; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer’s Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role. PMID:27081589

  17. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  18. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  19. Sunrise, Earth Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This sunrise scene (5.5S, 29.5E) was taken early in the morning, when the sun was still below the horizon and not yet illuminating the dark band of low level clouds on the Earth limb. Ranging from 13 to 18 km. above these low level clouds is a brown layer at the tropopause, an atmospheric temperature inversion which isolates the troposphere from the stratosphere and effectively concentrates particulates from both above and below this level.

  20. [International guidelines of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign : update 2012].

    PubMed

    Briegel, J; Möhnle, P

    2013-04-01

    An update of the international guidelines for therapy of sepsis was published in February 2012 by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). The update includes a further development of the guidelines from 2004 and 2008. The guidelines are divided into three sections, sepsis-specific therapeutic measures, recommendations on general intensive care measures for sepsis and finally special features of sepsis in pediatric intensive care medicine are presented in detail. This article discusses the most important amendments in the first two sections and delving deeper into the guidelines.

  1. Therapeutic Targets in Sepsis: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Eric J; Bernard, Gordon R

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics and fluids have been standard treatment for sepsis since World War II. Many molecular mediators of septic shock have since been identified. In models of sepsis, blocking these mediators improved organ injury and decreased mortality. Clinical trials, however, have failed. The absence of new therapies has been vexing to clinicians, clinical researchers, basic scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry. This article examines the evolution of sepsis therapy and theorizes about why so many well-reasoned therapies have not worked in human trials. We review new molecular targets for sepsis and examine trial designs that might lead to successful treatments for sepsis. PMID:27229636

  2. Elucidating the role of genomics in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kirpalani, Haresh; Cotten, Charles Michael

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable preterm populations. Immature immune defenses, and environmental and maternal factors contribute to this risk, with as many as a third of very preterm infants experiencing sepsis during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Epidemiologic and twin studies have suggested that there is a genetic contribution to sepsis predilection. Several investigators have conducted candidate gene association studies on variants of specific interest and potential functional significance in neonatal sepsis. In this review, we describe details of studies that have evaluated genetic susceptibility in neonatal sepsis, and summarize findings from a review of candidate gene association studies.

  3. Global Epidemiology of Pediatric Severe Sepsis: The Sepsis Prevalence, Outcomes, and Therapies Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Pappachan, John; Wheeler, Derek; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C.; Salloo, Asma; Singhi, Sunit C.; Erickson, Simon; Roy, Jason A.; Bush, Jenny L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Thomas, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Limited data exist about the international burden of severe sepsis in critically ill children. Objectives: To characterize the global prevalence, therapies, and outcomes of severe sepsis in pediatric intensive care units to better inform interventional trials. Methods: A point prevalence study was conducted on 5 days throughout 2013–2014 at 128 sites in 26 countries. Patients younger than 18 years of age with severe sepsis as defined by consensus criteria were included. Outcomes were severe sepsis point prevalence, therapies used, new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction, ventilator- and vasoactive-free days at Day 28, functional status, and mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Of 6,925 patients screened, 569 had severe sepsis (prevalence, 8.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.6–8.9%). The patients’ median age was 3.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.7–11.0) years. The most frequent sites of infection were respiratory (40%) and bloodstream (19%). Common therapies included mechanical ventilation (74% of patients), vasoactive infusions (55%), and corticosteroids (45%). Hospital mortality was 25% and did not differ by age or between developed and resource-limited countries. Median ventilator-free days were 16 (IQR, 0–25), and vasoactive-free days were 23 (IQR, 12–28). Sixty-seven percent of patients had multiorgan dysfunction at sepsis recognition, with 30% subsequently developing new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Among survivors, 17% developed at least moderate disability. Sample sizes needed to detect a 5–10% absolute risk reduction in outcomes within interventional trials are estimated between 165 and 1,437 patients per group. Conclusions: Pediatric severe sepsis remains a burdensome public health problem, with prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates similar to those reported in critically ill adult populations. International clinical trials targeting children with severe sepsis are warranted. PMID:25734408

  4. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  5. Immunomodulation during sepsis in organ transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Angele, M K; Loehe, F; Faist, E

    2005-10-01

    Newer immunosuppressive agents have dramatically reduced the rates of acute graft rejection over the last decade but may have exacerbated the problem of post-transplant infections. Causes of early mortality include graft dysfunction and sepsis. Late mortality occurs mainly due to sepsis. An excessive inflammatory response followed with a dramatic paralysis of cell-mediated immunity has been documented in septic patients. In transplanted individuals the pathophysiological changes of the immune response are further complicated by immunosuppressive agents. This article will focus on the effect of immunosuppressive agents and sepsis on cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, potentially promising immunomodulatory approaches, i.e. human activated protein C, immunomodulatory diets containing L-arginine and fish oil, selective cytokine blockade, platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, LPS receptor CD14 blockade and G-CSF, for the treatment of immunodysfunction in septic patients will be outlined in this review article. Most of them, however, have not been tested in the clinical arena in transplanted patients. Thus, the main part of the article, immunomodulation during sepsis in organ transplanted children is quite speculative and based on immunomodulatory strategies in other non-transplanted septic patients.

  6. Current treatment of sepsis and endotoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Periti, P

    2000-09-01

    This article reviews the new criteria for selecting the proper antimicrobial agent and dosage regimen for standard treatment of severe sepsis, with the intention of preventing septic shock. After introducing new concepts on the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock, the authors analyse the parameters of beta-lactam antibacterial activity, the antibiotic-induced release of bacterial endotoxin and the interrelationships between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in the search for an optimum dosage regimen of antimicrobial mono- or polytherapy for severely ill septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The mortality rate resulting from severe bacterial sepsis, particularly that associated with shock, still approaches 50% in spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and optimum supportive care. Bacterial endotoxins that are part of the cell wall are one of the cofactors in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock and are often induced by antimicrobial chemotherapy, even if administered rationally. Not all antimicrobial agents are equally capable of inducing septic shock; this is dependent on their mechanism of action rather than on the causative pathogen species. The quantity of endotoxin released depends on the drug dose and whether filaments or spheroplast formation predominate. Some antibiotics, such as carbapenems, ceftriaxone, cefepime, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and quinolones, do not have the propensity to provoke septic shock because their rapid bacterial activity induces mainly spheroplast or fragile spheroplast-like bacterial forms.

  7. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome.

  8. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome. PMID:24021703

  9. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  10. Role of biomarkers in sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Samraj, Ravi S; Zingarelli, Basilia; Wong, Hector R

    2013-11-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, even with the current availability of extended-spectrum antibiotics and advanced medical care. Biomarkers offer a tool in facilitating early diagnosis, in identifying patient populations at high risk of complications, and in monitoring progression of the disease, which are critical assessments for appropriate therapy and improvement in patient outcomes. Several biomarkers are already available for clinical use in sepsis; however, their effectiveness in many instances is limited by the lack of specificity and sensitivity to characterize the presence of an infection and the complexity of the inflammatory and immune processes and to stratify patients into homogenous groups for specific treatments. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of novel biomarkers, which can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluids to genes and proteins in circulating blood cells. The purpose of this review was to examine the current status of sepsis biomarkers, with special emphasis on emerging markers, which are undergoing validation and may transition into clinical practice for their informative value in diagnosis, prognosis, or response to therapy. We will also discuss the new concept of combination biomarkers and biomarker risk models, their existing challenges, and their potential use in the daily management of patients with sepsis.

  11. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  12. A tale of two soles: sociomechanical and biomechanical considerations in diabetic limb salvage and amputation decision-making in the worst of times

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Joseph; Trinidad-Hernadez, Magdiel; Leykum, Brian; Smith, Derek; Mills, Joseph L.; Armstrong, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcerations complicated by infection are the major cause of limb loss in people with diabetes. This is especially true in those patients with severe sepsis. Determining whether to amputate or attempt to salvage a limb often requires in depth evaluation of each individual patient's physical, mental, and socioeconomic status. The current report presents and juxtaposes two similar patients, admitted to the same service at the same time with severe diabetic foot infections complicated by sepsis. We describe in detail the similarities and differences in the clinical presentation, extent of infection, etiology, and socioeconomic concerns that ultimately led to divergent clinical decisions regarding the choices of attempting diabetic limb salvage versus primary amputation and prompt rehabilitation. PMID:23050063

  13. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-01

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  14. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  15. Potentially Inadvertent Immunomodulation: Norepinephrine Use in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Roeland F; van der Poll, Tom; Angus, Derek C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Pickkers, Peter; Kox, Matthijs

    2016-09-01

    Septic shock is a major cause of death worldwide and a considerable healthcare burden in the twenty-first century. Attention has shifted from damaging effects of the proinflammatory response to the detrimental role of antiinflammation, a phenomenon known as sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. Sepsis-induced immunoparalysis may render patients vulnerable to secondary infections and is associated with impaired outcome. The immunoparalysis hypothesis compels us to reevaluate the current management of septic shock and to assess whether we are inadvertently compromising or altering the host immune response. In this perspective, we discuss the potential detrimental role of norepinephrine, the cornerstone treatment for septic shock, in sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. We provide a short overview of the current understanding of the immunologic pathophysiology of sepsis, followed by a detailed description of the immunomodulatory effects of norepinephrine and alternative vasopressors. We conclude that although the development of novel therapies aimed at reversing immunoparalysis is underway, the use of norepinephrine may aggravate the development, extent, and duration of sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. Current in vitro and animal data indicate that norepinephrine treatment exerts immunosuppressive and bacterial growth-promoting effects and may increase susceptibility toward infections. However, evidence in humans is circumstantial, as immunologic effects of norepinephrine have not been investigated properly in experimental or clinical studies. Alternatives such as vasopressin/selepressin, angiotensin II, and phenylephrine could have a fundamental advantage over norepinephrine with respect to their immunologic properties. However, also for these agents, in vivo immunologic data in humans are largely lacking. As such, human studies on the immunomodulatory properties of norepinephrine and viable alternatives are highly warranted. PMID:27398737

  16. Hospitalization Type and Subsequent Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Hospitalization is associated with microbiome perturbation (dysbiosis), and this perturbation is more severe in patients treated with antimicrobials. Objectives: To evaluate whether hospitalizations known to be associated with periods of microbiome perturbation are associated with increased risk of severe sepsis after hospital discharge. Methods: We studied participants in the U.S. Health and Retirement Study with linked Medicare claims (1998–2010). We measured whether three hospitalization types associated with increasing severity of probable dysbiosis (non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with Clostridium difficile infection [CDI]) were associated with increasing risk for severe sepsis in the 90 days after hospital discharge. We used two study designs: the first was a longitudinal design with between-person comparisons and the second was a self-controlled case series design using within-person comparison. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 43,095 hospitalizations among 10,996 Health and Retirement Study–Medicare participants. In the 90 days following non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with CDI, adjusted probabilities of subsequent admission for severe sepsis were 4.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8–4.4%), 7.1% (95% CI, 6.6–7.6%), and 10.7% (95% CI, 7.7–13.8%), respectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of severe sepsis was 3.3-fold greater during the 90 days after hospitalizations than during other observation periods. The IRR was 30% greater after an infection-related hospitalization versus a non–infection-related hospitalization. The IRR was 70% greater after a hospitalization with CDI than an infection-related hospitalization without CDI. Conclusions: There is a strong dose–response relationship between events known to result in dysbiosis and subsequent severe sepsis hospitalization that is not present

  17. The effect of HIV infection on the incidence and severity of circular external fixator pin track sepsis: a retrospective comparative study of 229 patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nando; Marais, Leonard Charles

    2014-08-01

    Pin track sepsis is a common complication of circular external fixation. HIV status has been implicated as an independent risk factor for the development of pin track infection and has been cited as a reason not to attempt complex limb reconstruction in HIV-positive patients. This retrospective review of patients treated with circular external fixators looked at the incidence of pin track sepsis in HIV-positive, HIV-negative and patients whose HIV status was unknown. The records of 229 patients, 40 of whom were HIV-positive, were reviewed. The overall incidence of pin track sepsis was 22.7 %. HIV infection did not affect the incidence of pin track sepsis (p = 0.9). The severity of pin track sepsis was not influenced by HIV status (p = 0.9) or CD4 count (p = 0.2). With the employment of meticulous pin insertion techniques and an effective postoperative pin track care protocol, circular external fixation can be used safely in HIV-positive individuals. PMID:25056512

  18. Plasma soluble Tim-3 emerges as an inhibitor in sepsis: sepsis contrary to membrane Tim-3 on monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Li, J; Jiang, X; Xiao, K; Zhang, D; Zhao, Z; Ai, J; Hou, C; Jia, Y; Han, G; Xie, L

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction is the main characteristic of sepsis. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) on the monocytes has been reported to promote immune homeostasis during sepsis, but the influences of plasm soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) on the immune system during sepsis remain unknown. Here, 100 patients with different severities of sepsis (40 sepsis, 42 severe sepsis, and 18 septic shock) were enrolled in this study. The Tim-3 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) on the circulating monocytes were detected using flow cytometry. Plasma sTim-3 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Inflammatory factors and two kinds of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) - ADAM10 and ADAM17 were assessed. The Tim-3 and HLA-DR on the monocytes decreased with increasing sepsis severity. The sTim-3 was reduced in the sepsis and severe sepsis patients but was elevated in the septic shock patients who exhibited significant immunosuppression as predicted by HLA-DR. sTim-3 levels were negatively correlated with IL-12 and TNF-α. ADAM10 and ADAM17, sheddases of Tim-3, exhibited trends toward elevations in the septic shock group. In conclusion, sTim-3 was involved in the development of sepsis. The homeostasis-promoting role of the Tim-3 on the monocytes was disrupted, while the inhibitory role of sTim-3 emerged during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

  19. Limb lengthening in achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chilbule, Sanjay K; Dutt, Vivek; Madhuri, Vrisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stature lengthening in skeletal dysplasia is a contentious issue. Specific guidelines regarding the age and sequence of surgery, methods and extent of lengthening at each stage are not uniform around the world. Despite the need for multiple surgeries, with their attendant complications, parents demanding stature lengthening are not rare, due to the social bias and psychological effects experienced by these patients. This study describes the outcome and complications of extensive stature lengthening performed at our center. Materials and Methods: Eight achondroplasic and one hypochondroplasic patient underwent bilateral transverse lengthening for tibiae, humeri and femora. Tibia lengthening was carried out using a ring fixator and bifocal corticotomy, while a monolateral pediatric limb reconstruction system with unifocal corticotomy was used for the femur and humerus. Lengthening of each bone segment, height gain, healing index and complications were assessed. Subgroup analysis was carried out to assess the effect of age and bone segment on the healing index. Results: Nine patients aged five to 25 years (mean age 10.2 years) underwent limb lengthening procedures for 18 tibiae, 10 femora and 8 humeri. Four patients underwent bilateral lengthening of all three segments. The mean length gain for the tibia, femur and humerus was 15.4 cm (100.7%), 9.9 cm (52.8%) and 9.6 cm (77.9%), respectively. Healing index was 25.7, 25.6 and 20.6 days/cm, respectively, for the tibia, femur and humerus. An average of 33.3% height gain was attained. Lengthening of both tibia and femur added to projected height achieved as the 3rd percentile of standard height in three out of four patients. In all, 33 complications were encountered (0.9 complications per segment). Healing index was not affected by age or bone segment. Conclusion: Extensive limb lengthening (more than 50% over initial length) carries significant risk and should be undertaken only after due consideration. PMID

  20. Lipotyphla limb myology comparison.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Pauline; Gasc, Jean-Pierre

    2002-05-01

    Fore- and hindlimb muscles were dissected in four species of Lipotyphla: the western European hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus (Erinaceidae, Erinaceinae); the moonrat Echinosorex gymnura (Erinaceidae, Hylomyinae or Galericinae); the tailless tenrec Tenrec ecaudatus (Tenrecidae, Tenrecinae); and the common European white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula (Soricidae, Soricinae). This work completely reviews the limb musculature of these walking mammals. Twelve myological characters were evaluated in order to disclose phylogenetic relationships. The cladogram obtained supported previous ones based on cranial and dental characters. This study shows that myological characters are valuable in phylogenetic analyses.

  1. Sirtuin-2 Regulates Sepsis Inflammation in ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianfeng; Buechler, Nancy L.; Martin, Ayana; Wells, Jonathan; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles E.; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity increases morbidity and resource utilization in sepsis patients. Sepsis transitions from early/hyper-inflammatory to late/hypo-inflammatory phase. Majority of sepsis-mortality occurs during the late sepsis; no therapies exist to treat late sepsis. In lean mice, we have shown that sirtuins (SIRTs) modulate this transition. Here, we investigated the role of sirtuins, especially the adipose-tissue abundant SIRT-2 on transition from early to late sepsis in obese with sepsis. Methods Sepsis was induced using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in ob/ob mice. We measured microvascular inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide/normal saline re-stimulation as a “second-hit” (marker of immune function) at different time points to track phases of sepsis in ob/ob mice. We determined SIRT-2 expression during different phases of sepsis. We studied the effect of SIRT-2 inhibition during the hypo-inflammatory phase on immune function and 7-day survival. We used a RAW264.7 (RAW) cell model of sepsis for mechanistic studies. We confirmed key findings in diet induced obese (DIO) mice with sepsis. Results We observed that the ob/ob-septic mice showed an enhanced early inflammation and a persistent and prolonged hypo-inflammatory phase when compared to WT mice. Unlike WT mice that showed increased SIRT1 expression, we found that SIRT2 levels were increased in ob/ob mice during hypo-inflammation. SIRT-2 inhibition in ob/ob mice during the hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis reversed the repressed microvascular inflammation in vivo via activation of endothelial cells and circulating leukocytes and significantly improved survival. We confirmed the key finding of the role of SIRT2 during hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis in this project in DIO-sepsis mice. Mechanistically, in the sepsis cell model, SIRT-2 expression modulated inflammatory response by deacetylation of NFκBp65. Conclusion SIRT-2 regulates microvascular inflammation in obese mice with sepsis and may

  2. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  3. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the 'Sepsis Six' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  4. Severe sepsis and septic shock: defining the clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that severe sepsis/septic shock is a major problem in clinical medicine, yet the extent of the problem and its basic immunology remain poorly defined. The generation of accurate statistics about sepsis is confounded by the imprecise and highly variable terminology used to describe sepsis by clinicians around the world. The problem of sepsis is further complicated by the remarkably diverse spectrum of illness encompassed under the term 'sepsis'. Sepsis may range in severity from mild systemic inflammation without significant clinical consequences to multisystem failure in septic shock with an exceedingly high mortality rate. Sepsis connotes a clinical syndrome that may occur in any age group, in markedly different patient populations, and in response to a multitude of microbial pathogens from multiple different anatomical sites within the human body. A concerted effort has been made to standardize definitions of sepsis by the use of international committees and consensus opinions from panels of experts in sepsis research. While consensus definitions of sepsis have proven to be of value, the lack of uniformity in interpretation of these definitions continues to be problematic by clinicians and basic researchers alike. Recently, a new conceptual framework for understanding sepsis has been developed, called the PIRO concept (predisposition, infection, response and organ dysfunction). This has been conceptually modeled from the TNM classification (tumor size, nodal spread, metastases) which has been successfully used in defining treatment and prognostic indicators in clinical oncology. Further refinements in the definitions and predisposing factors of severe sepsis should improve the understanding and management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the near future.

  5. Sepsis in the severely immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Opal, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    The prevention and treatment of sepsis in the immunocompromised host present a challenging array of diagnostic and management issues. The neutropenic patient has a primary defect in innate immune responses and is susceptible to conventional and opportunistic pathogens. The solid organ transplant patient has a primary defect in adaptive immunity and is susceptible to a myriad of pathogens that require an effective cellular immune response. Risk for infections in organ transplant recipients is further complicated by mechanical, vascular, and rejection of the transplanted organ itself. The immune suppressed state can modify the cardinal signs of inflammation, making accurate and rapid diagnosis of infection and sepsis difficult. Empiric antimicrobial agents can be lifesaving in these patients, but managing therapy in an era of progressive antibiotic resistance has become a real issue. This review discusses the challenges faced when treating severe infections in these high-risk patients.

  6. Sepsis in the severely immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Opal, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    The prevention and treatment of sepsis in the immunocompromised host present a challenging array of diagnostic and management issues. The neutropenic patient has a primary defect in innate immune responses and is susceptible to conventional and opportunistic pathogens. The solid organ transplant patient has a primary defect in adaptive immunity and is susceptible to a myriad of pathogens that require an effective cellular immune response. Risk for infections in organ transplant recipients is further complicated by mechanical, vascular, and rejection of the transplanted organ itself. The immune suppressed state can modify the cardinal signs of inflammation, making accurate and rapid diagnosis of infection and sepsis difficult. Empiric antimicrobial agents can be lifesaving in these patients, but managing therapy in an era of progressive antibiotic resistance has become a real issue. This review discusses the challenges faced when treating severe infections in these high-risk patients. PMID:25939918

  7. Carbon monoxide in the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-12-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low-molecular-weight gas, is endogenously produced in the body as a product of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. As the beneficial roles of HO system have been elucidated in vitro and in vivo, CO itself has also been reported as a potent cytoprotective molecule. Whereas CO represents a toxic inhalation hazard at high concentration, low-dose exogenous CO treatment (~250-500 parts per million) demonstrates protective functions including but not limited to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects in preclinical models of human diseases. Of note, CO exposure confers protection in animal models of sepsis by inhibiting inflammatory responses and also enhancing bacterial phagocytosis in leukocytes. These unique functions of CO including both dampening inflammation and promoting host defense mechanism are mediated by multiple pathways such as autophagy induction or biosynthesis of specialized proresolving lipid mediators. We suggest that CO gas may represent a novel therapy for patients with sepsis.

  8. Sepsis management: An evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Shahzad, Hira; Jamil, Bushra; Hussain, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines have outlined an early goal directed therapy (EGDT) which demonstrates a standardized approach to ensure prompt and effective management of sepsis. Having said that, there are barriers associated with the application of evidence-based practice, which often lead to an overall poorer adherence to guidelines. Considering the global burden of disease, data from low- to middle-income countries is scarce. Asia is the largest continent but most Asian countries do not have a well-developed healthcare system and compliance rates to resuscitation and management bundles are as low as 7.6% and 3.5%, respectively. Intensive care units are not adequately equipped and financial concerns limit implementation of expensive treatment strategies. Healthcare policy-makers should be notified in order to alleviate financial restrictions and ensure delivery of standard care to septic patients.

  9. Haemophilus influenzae sepsis resulting from pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marinella, M A

    1997-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a pleomorphic gram-negative bacterium that causes a myriad of infections in both adults and children. The organism frequently causes respiratory infections in patients with obstructive lung disease but may on occasion cause invasive infections including pneumonia with bacteremia. We report the case of a patient with underlying lung disease and metastatic malignancy in whom sepsis related to pneumonia caused by H. influenzae developed.

  10. THE EPITHELIUM AS A TARGET IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Fink, Mitchell; Goldstein, Stuart L; Opal, Steven; Gómez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Gómez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2016-03-01

    Organ dysfunction induced by sepsis has been consistently associated with worse outcome and death. Regardless of the organ compromised, epithelial dysfunction is present throughout the body, affecting those organs that contain epithelia like the skin, lungs, liver, gut, and kidneys. Despite their obvious differences, sepsis seems to alter common features of all epithelia, such as barrier function and vectorial ion transport. Such alterations in the lung, the gut, and the kidney have direct implications that may explain the profound organ functional impairments in the absence of overt cell death. Epithelial injury in this context is not only an explanatory real pathophysiologic event, but also represents a source of biomarkers that have been explored to identify organ compromise earlier, predict outcome, and even to test novel therapeutic interventions such as blood purification. However, this remains largely experimental, and despite promising results, work is still required to better understand the response of the epithelial cells to sepsis, to define their role in adaptation to insults, to comprehend the interorgan cross-talk that occurs in these circumstances, and to exploit these aspects in pursuit of targeted therapies like blood purification, which may improve outcome for these patients in the future. PMID:26863125

  11. Reduction in maternal mortality due to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Kaipa, A; Kakani, A

    2005-02-01

    The present study was undertaken at a rural medical institute in India to analyse the trends in maternal mortality due to sepsis and the factors associated with change, if any. During the study period of 20 years, a total of 37,155 women delivered, 192 deaths occurred and forty deaths (20.83%) were due to sepsis and it's sequlae. It was revealed that there is a definite decrease in the proportion of deaths due to sepsis, to 10% in the last five years from 35% in earlier years. The change seems to be due to the advocacy of clean deliveries and reduction in case fatality because of alterations in medication and earlier surgical intervention. However the percentage contribution of septic abortion has remained the same. Septic abortion continues to exist inspite of all the current laws and discussion about the availability of a liberal law, which permits abortion almost on request. Most of the women who had died due to septic abortion were married (65%). Deaths due to septic abortion, are persisting even in married women and it is a matter of concern for health providers, policy makers and governments. PMID:15814392

  12. Sepsis and Meningitis due to Listeria Monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Aygen, Bilgehan; Esel, Duygu; Kayabas, Uner; Alp, Emine; Sumerkan, Bulent; Doganay, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study focused on the effect of immuno-compromising conditions on the clinical presentation of severe listerial infection. Patients and Methods Nine human listeriosis cases seen from 1991-2002 were reviewed. All adult patients, from whose blood, peritoneal fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) the L. monocytogenes was isolated, were included in this retrospective study. Results Listeriosis presented as primary sepsis with positive blood cultures in 5 cases and meningitis with positive CSF cultures in 4 cases. All of these patients had at least one underlying disease, most commonly, hematologic malignancy, diabetes mellitus, amyloidosis and hepatic cirrhosis; 55.6% had received immunosuppressive or corticosteroid therapy within a week before the onset of listeriosis. The patients were adults with a mean age of 60 years. Fever, night sweats, chills and lethargy were the most common symptoms; high temperature (> 38℃), tachycardia, meningeal signs and poor conditions in general were the most common findings on admission. The mortality rate was 33.3% and was strictly associated with the severity of the underlying disease. Mortality differences were significant between sepsis (20%) and meningitis (50%) patients. Conclusion Listeriosis as an uncommon infection in our region and that immuno-suppressive therapy is an important pre-disposing factor of listeriosis. Sepsis and meningitis were more common in this group of patients and had the highest case-fatality rate for food-borne illnesses. PMID:17594151

  13. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways. PMID:25590524

  14. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  15. The pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model: potential implications for sepsis therapy and biology.

    PubMed

    Alder, Matthew N; Lindsell, Christopher J; Wong, Hector R

    2014-07-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adult and pediatric intensive care units. Heterogeneity of demographics, comorbidities, biological mechanisms, and severity of illness leads to difficulty in determining which patients are at highest risk of mortality. Determining mortality risk is important for weighing the potential benefits of more aggressive interventions and for deciding whom to enroll in clinical trials. Biomarkers can be used to parse patients into different risk categories and can outperform current methods of patient risk stratification based on physiologic parameters. Here we review the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model that has also been modified and applied to estimate mortality risk in adult patients. We compare the two models and speculate on the biological implications of the biomarkers in patients with sepsis.

  16. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  17. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  18. Factor v Leiden mutation in severe infection and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Schouten, Marcel; van't Veer, Cees; van der Poll, Tom

    2011-11-01

    In severe infection and sepsis, activation of coagulation frequently occurs, which contributes to the development of multiple organ dysfunction. Factor V Leiden is a relatively common mutation resulting in a mild prohemostatic state and consequently with an increased tendency to develop thrombosis. Hypothetically, patients with factor V Leiden may suffer from more severe coagulopathy in cases of severe infection or sepsis. Aggravation of the procoagulant state in sepsis may subsequently result in more severe organ dysfunction and an increased risk of death. In this article we review the experimental and clinical evidence regarding the relationship between the presence of a factor V Leiden mutation and the incidence and outcome of sepsis.

  19. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guilang; Lyu, Juanjuan; Huang, Jingda; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1) Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2) drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3) drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4) hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials. PMID:25983774

  20. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Young; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2016-04-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  1. Different regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 expression on blood CD14+ monocytes by simvastatin in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huanzhang; Wang, Cunzhen; Zhu, Wenliang; Huang, Xiaopei; Guo, Zhisong; Zhang, Huifeng; Qin, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) surface expression levels on blood CD14+ monocytes by simvastatin treatment in patient with sepsis is different from that in patients with severe sepsis. In patients with sepsis simvastatin treatment statistically significantly decreased TLR4 surface expression level on blood CD14+ monocytes, while in patients with severe sepsis simvastatin treatment had no significant influence on TLR4 surface expression level on blood CD14+ monocytes. The changes of plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced by simvastatin in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis were similar with that of TLR4. Our results indicated simvastatin treatment differently influenced inflammation process in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis, which might partially explain the discrepancy, presented by previous trials, about the therapeutic effects of simvastatin treatment in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis. PMID:26550333

  2. Management of Major Limb Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Management of major limb injuries is a daunting challenge, especially as many of these patients have severe associated injuries. In trying to save life, often the limb is sacrificed. The existing guidelines on managing such trauma are often confusing. There is scope to lay down such protocols along with the need for urgent transfer of such patients to a multispecialty center equipped to salvage life and limb for maximizing outcome. This review article comprehensively deals with the issue of managing such major injuries. PMID:24511296

  3. Simulation of Upper Limb Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherčík, Filip; Hučko, Branislav

    2011-12-01

    The paper deals with controlling an upper limb prosthesis based on the measurement of myoelectric signals (MES) while drinking. MES signals have been measured on healthy limbs to obtain the same response for the prosthesis. To simulate the drinking motion of a healthy upper limb, the program ADAMS was used, with all degrees of freedom and a hand after trans-radial amputation with an existing hand prosthesis. Modification of the simulation has the exact same logic of control, where the muscle does not have to be strenuous all the time, but it is the impulse of the muscle which drives the motor even though the impulse disappears and passed away.

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  5. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  6. New perspectives on immunomodulatory therapy for bacteraemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-12-01

    Systemic immune dysregulation is generally acknowledged to be the fundamental molecular mechanism that underlies the pathophysiology of severe sepsis and septic shock. In the presence of a systemic infection, microbial pathogens and their soluble mediators induce generalised immune activation and coagulation activation, leading to severe sepsis and septic shock. For decades, immune-based therapies have been devised with the specific intent of inhibiting the pro-inflammatory events that are thought to precipitate the septic process. Despite a clear therapeutic rationale based upon the available experimental evidence, anti-inflammatory therapies targeting the innate or acquired immune response have largely been unsuccessful in clinical trials of sepsis. Compelling evidence now exists that a prolonged state of sepsis-induced immune suppression follows the initial period of stabilisation and resuscitation in many critically ill patients. Sepsis-related immune suppression is evidenced by histological findings of markedly enhanced lymphocytic and monocytic apoptosis, poor response to neoantigens and recall antigens, and increased incidence of infections by opportunistic pathogens. Candidiasis, cytomegalovirus activation and secondary infections by relatively avirulent bacterial pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter spp. are commonplace in septic patients during prolonged Intensive Care Unit stays. Immunological tools to detect sepsis-induced immunosuppression are now available, and novel immunoadjuvants are in development to re-establish immune competence in sepsis patients. The intelligent use of immunomodulatory agents in sepsis will necessitate a personalised medicine approach to treat each patient at the appropriate time and with the optimal therapy.

  7. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures. PMID:27699168

  8. Late mortality after sepsis: propensity matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Osterholzer, John J; Langa, Kenneth M; Angus, Derek C; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether late mortality after sepsis is driven predominantly by pre-existing comorbid disease or is the result of sepsis itself. Deign Observational cohort study. Setting US Health and Retirement Study. Participants 960 patients aged ≥65 (1998-2010) with fee-for-service Medicare coverage who were admitted to hospital with sepsis. Patients were matched to 777 adults not currently in hospital, 788 patients admitted with non-sepsis infection, and 504 patients admitted with acute sterile inflammatory conditions. Main outcome measures Late (31 days to two years) mortality and odds of death at various intervals. Results Sepsis was associated with a 22.1% (95% confidence interval 17.5% to 26.7%) absolute increase in late mortality relative to adults not in hospital, a 10.4% (5.4% to 15.4%) absolute increase relative to patients admitted with non-sepsis infection, and a 16.2% (10.2% to 22.2%) absolute increase relative to patients admitted with sterile inflammatory conditions (P<0.001 for each comparison). Mortality remained higher for at least two years relative to adults not in hospital. Conclusions More than one in five patients who survives sepsis has a late death not explained by health status before sepsis. PMID:27189000

  9. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures.

  10. Severe sepsis and septic shock in the elderly: An overview.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Juneja, Deven; Singh, Omender

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing in the older population leading to increased admissions to the intensive care units (ICUs). The elderly are predisposed to sepsis due to co-existing co-morbidities, repeated and prolonged hospitalizations, reduced immunity, functional limitations and above all due to the effects of aging itself. A lower threshold and a higher index of suspicion is required to diagnose sepsis in this patient population because the initial clinical picture may be ambiguous, and aging increases the risk of a sudden deterioration in sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Management is largely based on standard international guidelines with a few modifications. Age itself is an independent risk factor for death in patients with severe sepsis, however, many patients respond well to timely and appropriate interventions. The treatment should not be limited or deferred in elderly patients with severe sepsis only on the grounds of physician prejudice, but patient and family preferences should also be taken into account as the outcomes are not dismal. Future investigations in the management of sepsis should not only target good functional recovery but also ensure social independence and quality of life after ICU discharge. PMID:24701398

  11. Pediatric limb differences and amputations.

    PubMed

    Le, Joan T; Scott-Wyard, Phoebe R

    2015-02-01

    Congenital limb differences are uncommon birth defects that may go undetected even with prenatal screening ultrasound scans and often go undetected until birth. For children with congenital limb differences, a diagnostic evaluation should be done to rule out syndromes involving other organ systems or known associations. The most common etiology of acquired amputation is trauma. Postamputation complications include pain and terminal bony overgrowth. A multidisciplinary approach to management with the child and family can lead to a successful, functional, and fulfilling life.

  12. Cardiac Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Kimberly E; Parker, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function and dysfunction are important in the clinical outcomes of sepsis and septic shock. Cardiac dysfunction is not a single entity, but is a broad spectrum of syndromes that result in biventricular cardiac dysfunction manifested by both systolic and diastolic dysfunction and is influenced by cardiac loading conditions (ie, preload and afterload). Elucidating the underlying pathophysiology has proved to be complex. This article emphasizes the underlying pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction and explores recent evidence related to diagnosis, including the utility of biomarkers, the role of echocardiography, and management goals and treatment. PMID:27229645

  13. Ethical issues in limb transplants.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, D; Widdershoven, G

    2001-04-01

    On one view, limb transplants cross technological frontiers but not ethical ones; the only issues to be resolved concern professional competence, under the assumption of patient autonomy. Given that the benefits of limb transplant do not outweigh the risks, however, the autonomy and rationality of the patient are not necessarily self-evident. In addition to questions of resource allocation and informed consent, limb, and particularly hand, allograft also raises important issues of personal identity and bodily integrity. We present two linked schemas for exploring ethical issues in limb transplants. The first, relying on conventional concepts in biomedical ethics, asks whether the procedure is research or therapy, whether the costs outweigh the benefits, and whether it should be up to the patient to decide. The second introduces more speculative and theoretically challenging questions, including bodily integrity, the argument from unnaturalness, and the function of the hand in expressing personal identity and intimacy. We conclude that limb transplants are not ruled out a priori, unlike some procedures that are prima facie wrong to perform, such as amputation of healthy limbs to relieve body dysmorphic disorders. However, their legitimacy is not proven by appeals to the interests of scientific research, cost-benefit, or patient autonomy.

  14. Proximodistal patterning during limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2005-03-15

    Regeneration is an ability that has been observed extensively throughout metazoan phylogeny. Amongst vertebrates, the urodele amphibians stand out for their exceptional capacity to regenerate body parts such as the limb. During this process, only the missing portion of the limb is precisely replaced--amputation in the upper arm results in regeneration of the entire limb, while amputation at the wrist produces a hand. Limb regeneration occurs through the formation of a local proliferative zone called the blastema. Here, we examine how proximodistal identity is established in the blastema. Using cell marking and transplantation experiments, we show that distal identities have already been established in the earliest stages of blastemas examined. Transplantation of cells into new environments is not sufficient to respecify cell identity. However, overexpression of the CD59, a cell surface molecule previously implicated in proximodistal identity during limb regeneration, causes distal blastema cells to translocate to a more proximal location and causes defects in the patterning of the distal elements of the regenerate. We suggest a model for the limb regeneration blastema where by 4 days post-amputation the blastema is already divided into distinct growth zones; the cells of each zone are already specified to give rise to upper arm, lower arm, and hand. PMID:15733667

  15. Science review: The brain in sepsis – culprit and victim

    PubMed Central

    Sharshar, Tarek; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2005-01-01

    On one side, brain dysfunction is a poorly explored complication of sepsis. On the other side, brain dysfunction may actively contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The current review aimed at summarizing the current knowledge about the reciprocal interaction between the immune and central nervous systems during sepsis. The immune-brain cross talk takes part in circumventricular organs that, being free from blood-brain-barrier, interface between brain and bloodstream, in autonomic nuclei including the vagus nerve, and finally through the damaged endothelium. Recent observations have confirmed that sepsis is associated with excessive brain inflammation and neuronal apoptosis which clinical relevance remains to be explored. In parallel, damage within autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems may contribute to sepsis induced organ dysfunction. PMID:15693982

  16. How Can the Microbiologist Help in Diagnosing Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Michela; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon whether the onset of symptoms is before 72 hours of life (early-onset neonatal sepsis—EONS) or later (late-onset neonatal sepsis—LONS). These definitions have contributed greatly to diagnosis and treatment by identifying which microorganisms are likely to be responsible for sepsis during these periods and the expected outcomes of infection. This paper focuses on the tools that microbiologist can offer to diagnose and eventually prevent neonatal sepsis. Here, we discuss the advantages and limitation of the blood culture, the actual gold standard for sepsis diagnosis. In addition, we examine the utility of molecular techniques in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:22319539

  17. Targeting HMGB1 in the treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Ward, Mary F.; Sama, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis refers to the host’s deleterious and non-resolving systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections, and represents the leading cause of death in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex, but partly mediated by a newly identified alarmin molecule, the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). Areas covered Here we review the evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis with a wider therapeutic window, and discuss the therapeutic potential of HMGB1-neutralizing antibodies and small molecule inhibitors (herbal components) in experimental sepsis. Expert opinion It will be important to evaluate the efficacy of HMGB1-targeting strategies for the clinical management of human sepsis in the future. PMID:24392842

  18. Improving Sepsis Management in the Acute Admissions Unit.

    PubMed

    Adcroft, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. We therefore wanted to investigate and improve how the acute admission unit (AAU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH) is managing patients who present directly to the unit with sepsis. In order to obtain this information, an audit was undertaken against the College of Emergency Medicine standards used by the emergency department within GWH and across the UK. Data was retrospectively collected for 30 patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. The notes were scrutinized with regard to the implementation of College of Emergency Medicine standards for the management of sepsis. This meant that performance in the AAU was compared against the emergency department at GWH and national figures. The data collected shows performance is below national standards with regard to documentation of high flow oxygen use (AAU: 24%, ED 100%; national median: 50%; CEM standard 95%), crystalloid fluid boluses (AAU: 52%; ED: 90%; national median: 83%; CEM standard 100%), lactate measurements (AAU: 66%, ED: 93%; national median: 80%; CEM standard 95%), and obtainment of blood cultures (AAU: 52%; ED 73%; national median: 77%; CEM standard: 95%). Only 3% of patients received all six parts of the sepsis bundle. Since auditing in 2012/2013 we have introduced a sepsis proforma based on a current proforma being used within Severn Deanery. This proforma uses the 'Sepsis Six' bundle appropriate to ward based care. We have raised awareness of sepsis implications and management through the creation of a 'sepsis working group' to educate both junior doctors and nurses. In turn, this has led to education through the use of posters, pocket reference cards, and teaching sessions. Re-audit shows significant improvement in administering all parts of the Sepsis Six bundle and an 8% improvement in patients receiving all six of the bundle.

  19. Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection. PMID:27468649

  20. Sepsis-induced alterations in sleep of rats.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Ingiosi, Ashley M; Raymond, Richard M; Opp, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    Sepsis is a systemic immune response to infection that may result in multiple organ failure and death. Polymicrobial infections remain a serious clinical problem, and in the hospital, sepsis is the number-one noncardiac killer. Although the central nervous system may be one of the first systems affected, relatively little effort has been made to determine the impact of sepsis on the brain. In this study, we used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to determine the extent to which sepsis alters sleep, the EEG, and brain temperature (Tbr) of rats. Sepsis increases the amount of time rats spend in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during the dark period, but not during the light period. Rapid eye movements sleep (REMS) of septic rats is suppressed for about 24 h following CLP surgery, after which REMS increases during dark periods for at least three nights. The EEG is dramatically altered shortly after sepsis induction, as evidenced by reductions in slow-frequency components. Furthermore, sleep is fragmented, indicating that the quality of sleep is diminished. Effects on sleep, the EEG, and Tbr persist for at least 84 h after sepsis induction, the duration of our recording period. Immunohistochemical assays focused on brain stem mechanisms responsible for alterations in REMS, as little information is available concerning infection-induced suppression of this sleep stage. Our immunohistochemical data suggest that REMS suppression after sepsis onset may be mediated, in part, by the brain stem GABAergic system. This study demonstrates for the first time that sleep and EEG patterns are altered during CLP-induced sepsis. These data suggest that the EEG may serve as a biomarker for sepsis onset. These data also contribute to our knowledge of potential mechanisms, whereby infections alter sleep and other central nervous system functions.

  1. Percutaneous isolated limb perfusion with thrombolytics for severe limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahsan T; Kalapatapu, Venkat R; Bledsoe, Shelly; Moursi, Mohammed M; Eidt, John F

    2005-01-01

    Patients with severe tibioperoneal disease are poor candidates for a distal bypass. Absence of a distal target, lack of conduit, or multiple medical problems can make these patients a prohibitive risk for revascularization. Acute on chronic ischemia in this group poses a greater challenge. Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemia can be prolonged and carries a significant risk of bleeding if continued beyond 24 hours. However, if the ischemic limbs can be isolated from the systemic circulation, a higher dose of the lytic agent can be given with lower risk. These are the initial results of a series of 10 patients who underwent percutaneous isolated limb perfusion with a high dose of thrombolytics for severe ischemia. Ten patients (lower extremity 8 and upper extremity 2) presented with severe limb-threatening ischemia. Mean ankle/brachial index (ABI) was 0.15 for the lower extremity, and there were no recordable digital pressures in patients with upper extremity ischemia. No distal target was visible on the initial arteriogram. These patients were then taken to the operating room, and under anesthesia, catheters were placed in an antegrade fashion via femoral approach in the popliteal artery and vein percutaneously. For upper extremity, the catheters were placed in the brachial artery and vein. A proximal tourniquet was then applied. This isolated the limb from the systemic circulation. Heparinized saline was infused through the arterial catheter while the venous catheter was left open. A closed loop or an isolated limb perfusion was confirmed when effluent became clear coming out of the venous port. A high dose of thrombolytic agent (urokinase 500,000 to 1,000,000 U) was infused into the isolated limb via the arterial catheter and drained out of the venous catheter. After 45 minutes, arterial flow was reestablished. In 4 patients, Reopro((R)) was used in addition to thrombolytics. Postprocedure angiograms showed minimal changes, but patients exhibited marked

  2. Vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kampmeier, T G; Rehberg, S; Westphal, M; Lange, M

    2010-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its synthetic, long-acting analog terlipressin (TP) are potent alternative vasoconstrictors in the treatment of septic patients with catecholamine-refractive vasodilatatory shock. The results from one large randomized clinical trial suggest that AVP plus norepinephrine (NE) infusion is as safe and effective as treatment with NE alone in patients with septic shock. Because the desired effects of vasopressin analogs are basically related to their vasopressinergic effects via the V1a receptor, more selective V1 agonists, such as TP, may be more potent in reversing sepsis-related arterial hypotension. In this regard, recent evidence from small-scale studies suggests that continuous low-dose infusion rather than intermittent bolus injection of TP is associated with fewer side effects, such as depression of cardiac output and rebound arterial hypotension. However, because clinical data on the administration of TP in patients with sepsis are limited, it should not currently be used beyond the scope of controlled trials. The optimal time point for the initiation of therapy with vasopressin analogs has yet to be determined. While AVP and TP are commonly used as last-resort therapies in severe septic shock, some evidence supports the initiation of treatment in a less severe state of the disease.

  3. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  4. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  5. The phantom limb in dreams.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned.

  6. Mast Cell Stabilization Improves Survival by Preventing Apoptosis in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laura; Peña, Geber; Cai, Bolin; Deitch, E. A.; Ulloa, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Inhibiting single cytokines produced modest effects in clinical trials, in part because the cytokines werenot specific for sepsis, and sepsis may require cellular strategies. Previous studies reported that mast cells (MCs) fight infections in early sepsis. In this study, we report that MC stabilizers restrain serum TNF levels and improve survival in wild-type but not in MC-deficient mice. Yet, MC depletion in knockout mice attenuates serum TNF but does not improve survival in sepsis. Serum HMGB1 was the only factor correlating with survival. MC stabilizers inhibit systemic HMGB1 levels and rescue mice from established peritonitis. MC stabilizers fail to inhibit HMGB1 secretion from macrophages, but they prevent apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in sepsis. These results suggest that MC stabilization provides therapeutic benefits in sepsis by inhibiting extracellular release of HMGB1 from apoptotic cells. Our study provides the first evidence that MCs have major immunological implications regulating cell death in sepsis and represent a pharmacological target for infectious disorders in a clinically realistic time frame. PMID:20519642

  7. Angiopoietin-2 associations with the underlying infection and sepsis severity.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulou, Korina; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Kotsaki, Antigone; Antypa, Elli; Georgiadou, Sara; Tsaganos, Thomas; Koulenti, Despina; Paggalou, Evgenia; Damoraki, Georgia; Karagiannidis, Napoleon; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2015-05-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is an important mediator in sepsis. We have previously shown that endotoxemia levels are related to the underlying infection and affect septic patients' outcome. Based on this background we now investigated if circulating Ang-2 (cAng-2) and monocyte Ang-2 expression in septic patients are associated with the underlying infection and organ failure. We measured cAng-2 in 288 septic patients (121 with sepsis, 167 with severe sepsis/septic shock) at less than 24h post study inclusion (day 1) and on days 3 and 7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were additionally isolated; Ang-2 gene expression was estimated by means of real-time PCR. Levels of cAng-2 were higher under severe sepsis and septic shock, as compared to uncomplicated sepsis; PBMC Ang-2 copies were higher in severe sepsis. On day 1, cAng-2 and Ang-2 gene copies were greater under severe sepsis/septic shock in sufferers from all types of infections with the exception of community-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia. cAng-2 increased proportionally to the number of failing organs, and was higher under metabolic acidosis and acute coagulopathy as compared to no failing organ. On day 1, copies of Ang-2 were higher in survivors, whereas cAng-2 was higher in non-survivors. In a large cohort of septic patients, cAng-2 kinetics appears associated with the underlying infection and organ failure type.

  8. The role of arginine in infection and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Ramsay, Graham; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to an infection, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Metabolic changes during infection and sepsis could be related to changes in metabolism of the amino acid L-arginine. In sepsis, protein breakdown is increased, which is a key process to maintain arginine delivery because both endogenous de novo arginine production from citrulline and food intake are reduced. Arginine catabolism, on the other hand, is markedly increased by enhanced use of arginine via the arginase and nitric oxide pathways. As a result, lowered plasma arginine levels are usually found. Arginine may therefore be considered as an essential amino acid in sepsis, and supplementation could be beneficial in sepsis by improving microcirculation and protein anabolism. L-Arginine supplementation in a hyperdynamic pig model of sepsis prohibits the increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure, improves muscle and liver protein metabolism, and restores the intestinal motility pattern. Arguments raised against arginine supplementation are mainly pointed at stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production, with concerns about toxicity of increased NO and hemodynamic instability with refractory hypotension. NO synthase inhibition, however, increased mortality. Arginine supplementation in septic patients has transient effects on hemodynamics when supplied as a bolus but seems without hemodynamic side effects when supplied continuously. In conclusion, arginine could have an essential role in infection and sepsis.

  9. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  10. Neonatal sepsis: an old problem with new insights.

    PubMed

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW<1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount.

  11. Mortality in Sepsis and its relationship with Gender

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Nosheen; Jamil, Bushra; Siddiqui, Shahla; Talat, Najeeha; Khan, Fauzia A.; Hussain, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Sepsis remains a leading cause of death across the world, carrying a mortality rate of 20–50%. Women have been reported to be less likely to suffer from sepsis and to have a lower risk of mortality from sepsis compared to men. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between gender and mortality in sepsis, and compare cytokine profiles of male and female patients. Methods: This was a prospective case series on 97 patients admitted with sepsis. Clinical and microbiological data was gathered, blood samples were collected for cytokine (IL-10, IL-6 and TNFα) levels and patients were followed up for clinical outcome. Results: There were 54% males and 46% females, with no significant difference of age or comorbids between genders. Respiratory tract infection was the commonest source of sepsis, and was more common in females (60%) compared to males (39%) (p=0.034). Males had a higher mortality (p=0.048, RR 1.73) and plasma IL-6 level(p=0.040) compared to females. Mean IL-6 plasma level was significantly (p<0.01) higher in patients who died vs. who recovered. Conclusion: Our study shows that males with sepsis have a 70% greater mortality rate, and mortality is associated with a higher IL-6 plasma level. PMID:26649014

  12. Colloids in sepsis: evenly distributed molecules surrounded by uneven questions.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2013-05-01

    Colloids are frequently used for fluid expansion in the intensive care unit, although its use on several clinical scenarios remains unproven of any relevant clinical benefit. The purpose of this article was to carry out a narrative review regarding the safety and efficacy of colloids in patients with sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the most commonly used colloids, albumin and starches. Colloids are effective fluid expanders and are able to restore the hemodynamic profile with less total volume than crystalloids. These properties appear to be preserved even in patients with sepsis with increased capillary permeability. However, some colloids are associated with renal impairment and coagulation abnormalities. Starch use was associated with increased mortality in two large clinical trials. Also, starches probably have significant renal adverse effects and may be related to more need for renal replacement therapy in severe sepsis. Albumin is the only colloid that has been shown safe in patients with sepsis and that may be associated with improved outcomes on specific subpopulations. No trial so far found any robust clinical end point favoring colloid use in patients with sepsis. Because there is no proven benefit of the use of most colloids in patients with sepsis, its use should not be encouraged outside clinical trials. Albumin is the only colloid solution that has proven to be safe, and its use may be considered on hypoalbuminemic patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, there are no robust data to recommend routine albumin administration in sepsis. Starch use should be avoided in patients with sepsis because of the recent findings of a multicenter randomized study until further evidence is available.

  13. Automated lower limb prosthesis design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Gulab H.; Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    The design of lower limb prostheses requires definitive geometric data to customize socket shape. Optical surface imaging and spiral x-ray computed tomography were applied to geometric analysis of limb residua in below knee (BK) amputees. Residua (limb remnants after amputation) of BK amputees were digitized and measured. Surface (optical) and volumetric (CT) data of the residuum were used to generate solid models and specify socket shape in (SDRC I-DEAS) CAD software. Volume measurements on the solid models were found to correspond within 2% of surface models and direct determinations made using Archimedean weighing. Anatomic 3D reconstruction of the residuum by optical surface and spiral x-ray computed tomography imaging are feasible modalities for prosthesis design.

  14. Congenital Anomalies of the Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, G.; Mongeau, M.; Moreault, P.; Dupuis, M.; Hebert, B.; Corriveau, C.

    1964-01-01

    As a preparatory step towards the development of a complete habilitation program for children with congenital limb anomalies associated with maternal ingestion of thalidomide, the medical records of all patients with congenital limb anomalies referred to the Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal in the past decade were studied, and an examination and a thorough reassessment were made of 41 patients (21 males and 20 females). In this paper, Part I, the medical and prosthetic aspects are dealt with and a form of management is described for each type of anomaly. The conclusions are reached that prosthetic fitting and training should be initiated very early in life and that co-operation of the parent is essential to successful habilitation of a child with congenital limb anomalies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14154297

  15. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  16. Potential of surface acoustic wave biosensors for early sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Csete, Marie; Hunt, William D

    2013-08-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis is a difficult problem for intensivists and new biomarkers for early diagnosis have been difficult to come by. Here we discuss the potential of adapting a technology from the electronics industry, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, for diagnosis of multiple markers of sepsis in real time, using non-invasive assays of exhaled breath condensate. The principles and advantages of the SAW technology are reviewed as well as a proposed plan for adapting this flexible technology to early sepsis detection. PMID:23471596

  17. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Kalin M; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A; Haase, Krystal K; Maxvill, Kristen; Pass, Steven E; Alvarez, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis and offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population.

  18. Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Nutritional Support of Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Joshua A; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is characterized by profound changes in systemic and cellular metabolism that disrupt normal metabolic homeostasis. These metabolic changes can serve as biomarkers for disease severity. Lactate, a metabolite of anaerobic metabolism, is the most widely used ICU biomarker and it is incorporated into multiple management algorithms. Technological advances now make broader metabolic profiling possible, with early studies identifying metabolic changes associated with sepsis mortality. Finally, given the marked changes in metabolism in sepsis and the association of worse prognosis in patients with severe metabolic derangements, we summarize the seminal trials conducted to optimize nutrition in the ICU. PMID:27229648

  19. Apparatus for determining changes in limb volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, P. K.; Wu, V. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Measuring apparatus for determining changes in the volume of limbs or other boty extremities by determining the cross-sectional area of such limbs many comprise a transmitter including first and second transducers for positioning on the surface of the limb at a predetermined distance there between, and a receiver including a receiver crystal for positioning on the surface of the limb. The distance between the receiver crystal and the first and second transducers are represented by respective first and second chords of the cross-section of the limb and the predetermined distance between the first and second transducers is represented by a third chord of the limb cross section.

  20. Vasoactive agents for the treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes some commonly used vasoactive agents in patients with septic shock. Depending on their distinct pharmacological properties, their effects on vascular bed and cardiac function are different. For example, dopamine has equivalent effect on heart and vasculature, which can result in increases in cardiac output, mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Dobutamine is considered as inodilator because it has potent effect on cardiac systole and vasculature. Patients with sepsis and septic shock sometimes have coexisting cardiac dysfunction that justifies the use of dobutamine. Levosimendan is a relatively new agent exerting its inodilator effect by increasing sensitivity of myocardium to calcium. Some preliminary studies showed a promising result of levosimendan on reducing mortality. PMID:27713891

  1. Time course of cytokine levels in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1995-11-01

    In severe sepsis, a network of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8) is activated and blood levels of these cytokines are elevated, albeit inconsistently and with large individual variations. In addition, elevated blood levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), as well as of soluble cytokine receptors (sTNF-RI and II, IL-1ra), have been found. They seem to have a regulatory function in the host response. Levels of TNF and IL-6 are usually highest at the time of admission, whereas the time course of IL-1 beta levels (when detectable) can vary considerably. Limited data on IL-8 levels suggest that they may remain elevated for longer periods. Elevated levels of sTNFR and IL-1ra may also persist for a prolonged period of time. The pathogenetic significance of these observations is still unclear, but persistingly high levels of proinflammatory cytokines may be associated with organ failure and mortality.

  2. Sepsis: From Pattern to Mechanism and Back

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Namas, Rami A.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical entity in which complex inflammatory and physiological processes are mobilized, not only across a range of cellular and molecular interactions, but also in clinically relevant physiological signals accessible at the bedside. There is a need for a mechanistic understanding that links the clinical phenomenon of physiologic variability with the underlying patterns of the biology of inflammation, and we assert that this can be facilitated through the use of dynamic mathematical and computational modeling. An iterative approach of laboratory experimentation and mathematical/computational modeling has the potential to integrate cellular biology, physiology, control theory, and systems engineering across biological scales, yielding insights into the control structures that govern mechanisms by which phenomena, detected as biological patterns, are produced. This approach can represent hypotheses in the formal language of mathematics and computation, and link behaviors that cross scales and domains, thereby offering the opportunity to better explain, diagnose, and intervene in the care of the septic patient. PMID:23140124

  3. [Community acquired sepsis by Serratia rubidaea].

    PubMed

    Okada, Takanori; Yokota, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Isao

    2002-02-01

    A 48-year-old male who had a past history of alcoholic pancreatitis and diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital due to chills and vomiting, on August 13, 1998. His body temperature was 38.0 degrees C, and he had the disturbance of consciousness, tachypnea, tachycardia and hepatomegaly with tenderness. Laboratory findings showed highly inflammatory reactions, DIC and hepatorenal dysfunction. Abdominal CT and US revealed multiple liver abscess with portal vein thrombus. Serratia rubidaea was detected in the blood culture. SBT/CPZ and TOB were administered and he recovered. This is a rare case of Serratia rubidaea sepsis. It is also necessary to pay attention to Serratia infections as well as S. marcescens.

  4. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  5. Interprofessional sepsis education module: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Han-Oh; Medina, Damien; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2016-03-01

    Although there is an increasing emphasis on interprofessional collaboration for safer health care systems, there remains a paucity of opportunities for postgraduate trainees to engage in formal interprofessional education (IPE). Current opportunities for interprofessional learning, such as simulation sessions, typically do not provide true IPE because they often utilize actors or confederates as support staff, making residents the only stakeholders in the education experience. Here, we describe a flexible educational module designed to provide genuine IPE for physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. We outline how simulation, feedback, and group discussions can be used to teach interprofessional team communication, collaboration, and crew resource management skills-while, at the same time, also teaching a highly relevant medical topic (sepsis management) and thus resulting in learner engagement and motivation.

  6. A latent class approach for sepsis diagnosis supports use of procalcitonin in the emergency room for diagnosis of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the acknowledged problems in sepsis diagnosis, we use a novel way with the application of the latent class analysis (LCA) to determine the operative characteristics of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer (DD) and Procalcitonin (PCT) as diagnostic tests for sepsis in patients admitted to hospital care with a presumptive infection. Methods Cross-sectional study to determine the diagnostic accuracy of three biological markers against the gold standard of clinical definition of sepsis provided by an expert committee, and also against the likelihood of sepsis according to LCA. Patients were recruited in the emergency room within 24 hours of hospitalization and were follow-up daily until discharge. Results Among 765 patients, the expert committee classified 505 patients (66%) with sepsis, 112 (15%) with infection but without sepsis and 148 (19%) without infection. The best cut-offs points for CRP, DD, and PCT were 7.8 mg/dl, 1616 ng/ml and 0.3 ng/ml, respectively; but, neither sensitivity nor specificity reach 70% for any biomarker. The LCA analysis with the same three tests identified a “cluster” of 187 patients with several characteristics suggesting a more severe condition as well as better microbiological confirmation. Assuming this subset of patients as the new prevalence of sepsis, the ROC curve analysis identified new cut-off points for the tests and suggesting a better discriminatory ability for PCT with a value of 2 ng/ml. Conclusions Under a “classical” definition of sepsis three typical biomarkers (CRP, PCT and DD) are not capable enough to differentiate septic from non-septic patients in the ER. However, a higher level of PCT discriminates a selected group of patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24050481

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and its carrier apolipoprotein M in human sepsis and in Escherichia coli sepsis in baboons.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Linder, Adam; Happonen, Kaisa E; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of vascular integrity and immune cell migration, carried in plasma by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) and by albumin. In sepsis, the protein and lipid composition of HDL changes dramatically. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in S1P and its carrier protein apoM during sepsis. For this purpose, plasma samples from both human sepsis patients and from an experimental Escherichia coli sepsis model in baboons were used. In the human sepsis cohort, previously studied for apoM, plasma demonstrated disease-severity correlated decreased S1P levels, the profile mimicking that of plasma apoM. In the baboons, a similar disease-severity dependent decrease in plasma levels of S1P and apoM was observed. In the lethal E. coli baboon sepsis, S1P decreased already within 6-8 hrs, whereas the apoM decrease was seen later at 12-24 hrs. Gel filtration chromatography of plasma from severe human or baboon sepsis on Superose 6 demonstrated an almost complete loss of S1P and apoM in the HDL fractions. S1P plasma concentrations correlated with the platelet count but not with erythrocytes or white blood cells. The liver mRNA levels of apoM and apoA1 decreased strongly upon sepsis induction and after 12 hr both were almost completely lost. In conclusion, during septic challenge, the plasma levels of S1P drop to very low levels. Moreover, the liver synthesis of apoM decreases severely and the plasma levels of apoM are reduced. Possibly, the decrease in S1P contributes to the decreased endothelial barrier function observed in sepsis. PMID:26990127

  8. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  9. A plethora of angiopoietin-2 effects during clinical sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The interesting study by Davis and colleagues in the current issue of Critical Care expands on the increasingly recognized role of angiopoietins in human sepsis but raises a number of questions, which are discussed in this commentary. The authors describe an association between elevated angiopoietin (ang)-2 levels and impaired vascular reactivity, measured by the partly nitric oxide-dependent finger hyperemic response to forearm vascular occlusion, in patients with sepsis. This suggests that the ang-1/2-Tie2 system is involved in a number of pathophysiologic, phenotypic and perhaps prognostic alterations in human sepsis, on top of the effect on pulmonary endothelial barrier function. The novel inflammatory route may be a target for future therapeutic studies in human sepsis and acute lung injury, including those with activated protein C. PMID:20587077

  10. Paradoxical Roles of the Neutrophil in Sepsis: Protective and Deleterious

    PubMed Central

    Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Leite, Caio Abner Vitorino Gonçalves; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Colón, David Fernando; Borges, Vanessa de Fátima; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, an overwhelming inflammatory response syndrome secondary to infection, is one of the costliest and deadliest medical conditions worldwide. Neutrophils are classically considered to be essential players in the host defense against invading pathogens. However, several investigations have shown that impairment of neutrophil migration to the site of infection, also referred to as neutrophil paralysis, occurs during severe sepsis, resulting in an inability of the host to contain and eliminate the infection. On the other hand, the neutrophil antibacterial arsenal contributes to tissue damage and the development of organ dysfunction during sepsis. In this review, we provide an overview of the main events in which neutrophils play a beneficial or deleterious role in the outcome of sepsis. PMID:27199981

  11. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  12. Development of an e-learning package for sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anna; Henderson, James; Langmack, Gill

    Severe sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This article describes the collaborative development and implementation of an interactive online learning package to understand the key role nurses have in recognising and then starting to apply the Sepsis Six care bundle in clinical practice. The e-learning package, developed in a UK teaching hospital, uses a case study approach to address the knowledge that is required to be able to recognise sepsis, to understand the processes that occur and the ongoing care and treatment required. The package is relevant to final-year student nurses, newly registered nurses in preceptorship and other health professionals involved in assessing and treating patients who may be developing sepsis.

  13. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis. PMID:27413421

  14. Biomarkers for sepsis: a review with special attention to India.

    PubMed

    Nelson, George E; Mave, Vidya; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious infection and still a common cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-limited settings such as India. Even when microbiologic diagnostics are available, bacteremia is only identified in a proportion of patients who present with sepsis and bloodstream infections. Biomarkers have been used in a variety of disease processes and can help aid in diagnosing bacterial infections. There have been numerous biomarkers investigated to aid with diagnosis and prognostication in sepsis with the majority suffering from lack of sensitivity or specificity. Procalcitonin has been heralded as the biomarker that holds the most promise for bloodstream infections. Data are emerging in India, and in this review, we focus on the current data of biomarkers in sepsis with particular attention to how biomarkers could be used to augment diagnosis and treatment in India.

  15. Biomarkers for Sepsis: What Is and What Might Be?

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Bethany M.; Ayala, Alfred; Lomas-Neira, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Every year numerous individuals develop the morbid condition of sepsis. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are sorely needed. Difficulty in identifying such markers is in part due to the complex heterogeneity of sepsis, resulting from the broad and vague definition of this state/condition based on numerous possible clinical signs and symptoms as well as an incomplete understanding of the underlying pathobiology of this complex condition. This review considers some of the attempts that have been made so far, looking at both the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to sepsis, as well as genomic analysis, as sources of potential biomarkers. Irrespective, for functional biomarker(s) of sepsis to successfully translate from the laboratory to a clinical setting, the biomarker must be target specific and sensitive as well as easy to implement/interpret, and be cost effective, such that they can be utilized routinely in patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26417200

  16. Learning about Vertebrate Limb Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jennifer O.; Noll, Matthew; Olsen, Shayna

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an upper-level undergraduate laboratory exercise that enables students to replicate a key experiment in developmental biology. In this exercise, students have the opportunity to observe live chick embryos and stain the apical ectodermal ridge, a key tissue required for development of the vertebrate limb. Impressively, every…

  17. Acute limb ischemia: contemporary approach.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Chiyoya, Mari; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Wakako

    2015-10-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a critical condition with high mortality and morbidity even after surgical or endovascular intervention. Early recognition is important, but a delayed presentation is not uncommon. Viability of the limb is assessed by motor and sensory function and with interrogating Doppler flow signals in pedal arteries and popliteal veins as categorized by Rutherford. Category IIa indicates mild-to-moderate threat to limb salvage over a time frame without revascularization. Limb ischemia is critical without prompt revascularization in category IIb. Because the risk of reperfusion injury is high in this group of patients, perioperative management is important. In category III, reperfusion is not indicated except for embolism within several hours of onset. Intimal injury should be avoided by careful tactile control of a balloon with a smaller size catheter and under radiographic monitoring. Adjunctive treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis or bypass surgery is sometimes necessary. Endovascular treatment is a promising option for thrombotic occlusion of an atherosclerotic artery. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a serious problem. Controlled reperfusion with low-pressure perfusion at a reduced temperature and use of a leukocyte filter should be considered. The initial reperfusate is hyperosmolar, hypocalcemic, slightly alkaline, and contains free radical scavengers such as allopurinol. Immediate hemodialysis is necessary for acute renal injury caused by myoglobinemia. Compartment syndrome should be managed with assessment of intra-compartment pressure and fasciotomy.

  18. Heart Rate Variability in Porcine Progressive Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Sviglerova, Jitka; Florova, Blanka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) alterations could serve as an indicator of sepsis progression and outcome, however, the relationships of HRV and major pathophysiological processes of sepsis remain unclear. Therefore, in this experimental study HRV was investigated in a clinically relevant long-term porcine model of severe sepsis/septic shock. HRV was analyzed by several methods and the parameters were correlated with pathophysiological processes of sepsis. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented domestic pigs of either gender, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. Experimental subjects were screened up to the refractory shock development or death. ECG was continuously recorded throughout the experiment, afterwards RR intervals were detected and HRV parameters computed automatically using custom made measurement and analysis MATLAB routines. In all septic animals, progressive hyperdynamic septic shock developed. The statistical measures of HRV, geometrical measures of HRV and Poincaré plot analysis revealed a pronounced reduction of HRV that developed quickly upon the onset of sepsis and was maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis demonstrated a decrease in the high frequency component and increase in the low frequency component together with an increase of the low/high frequency component ratio. The reduction of HRV parameters preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes including heart rate increase or shock progression. In a clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced progressive septic shock, reduction of HRV parameters heralded sepsis development. HRV reduction was associated with a pronounced parasympathetic inhibition and a shift of sympathovagal balance. Early reduction of HRV may serve as a non-invasive and sensitive marker of systemic inflammatory syndrome, thereby widening the therapeutic window for early interventions. PMID:26779039

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis. PMID:25153878

  20. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2015-12-01

    Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID:26683913

  1. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  2. Opsonic Fibronectin Deficiency and Sepsis: Cause or Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Lanser, Marc E.; Saba, Thomas M.

    1982-01-01

    Opsonic fibronectin is known to modulate macrophage (RE cell) and neutrophil Phagocytic function. Its depletion has been documented following trauma, burn, and operation in patients with rapid restoration of normal levels unless bacteremia and/or wound sepsis intervenes. Sepsis is associated with a secondary phase of opsonic fibronectin deficiency. We have observed in burn patients that this secondary phase of opsonic fibronectin depletion following trauma and burn is seen two to three days prior to the onset of clinical sepsis, raising the question of whether this deficiency sensitized the host to the subsequent development of sepsis or whether its deplection was merely an unsuspected sensitive indication of preclinical sepsis. To address the possibility that opsonic fibronectin deficiency might lower resistance to sepsis, Sprague-Dawley rats (200 gm) were partially depleted (35%) of their opsonic fibronectin prior to intraperitoneal inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus. Mortality to S. aureus peritonitis was significantly (p < 0.05) increased in animals with fibronectin deficiency. Furthermore, in control animals, nonsurvival was also associated with significantly (p < 0.05) lower initial fibronectin levels than survival. However, peritonitis itself also resulted in an early (within one hour) depletion of opsonic fibronectin followed by a marked “hyperopsonemia” within 12 hours in both groups. Thus, opsonic fibronectin depletion decreases resistance to sepsis, and the development of sepsis itself will initiate opsonic fibronectin deficiency. Host defense against infection may depend on early restoration and maintenance of normal opsonic fibronectin levels following trauma, burn, and operation, as well as the ability of the host to mount an appropriate hyperopsonemic elevation of fibronectin levels in response to infection. PMID:7059244

  3. Development and Validation of an Automated Sepsis Risk Assessment System.

    PubMed

    Back, Ji-Sun; Jin, Yinji; Jin, Taixian; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive resuscitation can decrease sepsis mortality, but its success depends on early detection of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify an Automated Sepsis Risk Assessment System (Auto-SepRAS), which would automatically assess the sepsis risk of inpatients by applying data mining techniques to electronic health records (EHR) data and provide daily updates. The seven predictors included in the Auto-SepRAS after initial analysis were admission via the emergency department, which had the highest odds ratio; diastolic blood pressure; length of stay; respiratory rate; heart rate; and age. Auto-SepRAS classifies inpatients into three risk levels (high, moderate, and low) based on the predictive values from the sepsis risk-scoring algorithm. The sepsis risk for each patient is presented on the nursing screen of the EHR. The AutoSepRAS was implemented retrospectively in several stages using EHR data and its cut-off scores adjusted. Overall discrimination power was moderate (AUC>.80). The Auto-SepRAS should be verified or updated continuously or intermittently to maintain high predictive performance, but it does not require invasive tests or data input by nurses that would require additional time. Nurses are able to provide patients with nursing care appropriate to their risk levels by using the sepsis risk information provided by the Auto-SepRAS. In particular, with early detection of changes related to sepsis, nurses should be able to help in providing rapid initial resuscitation of high-risk patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functional outcomes of general medical patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is a common cause for admission to the general medical ward. Previous work has demonstrated substantial new long-term disability in patients with severe sepsis, but the short-term functional outcomes of patients admitted to the general medical floor -- where the majority of severe sepsis is treated -- are largely unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients initially admitted to non-ICU medical wards at a tertiary care academic medical center. Severe sepsis was confirmed by three physician reviewers, using the International Consensus Conference definition of sepsis. Baseline functional status, disposition location, and receipt of post-acute skilled care were recorded using a structured abstraction instrument. Results 3,146 discharges had severe sepsis by coding algorithm; from a random sample of 111 patients, 64 had the diagnosis of severe sepsis confirmed by reviewers. The mean age of the 64 patients was 63.5 years +/- 18.0. Prior to admission, 80% of patients lived at home and 50.8% of patients were functionally independent. Inpatient mortality was 12.5% and 37.5% of patients were discharged to a nursing facility. Of all patients in the cohort, 50.0% were discharged home, and 66.7% of patients who were functionally independent at baseline were discharged to home. Conclusions New physical debility is a common feature of severe sepsis in patients initially cared for on the general medical floor. Debility occurs even in those with good baseline physical function. Interventions to improve the poor functional outcomes of this population are urgently needed. PMID:24330544

  5. Manatí Medical Center Sepsis Management Epidemiological Study.

    PubMed

    Morales Serrano, Tamara; Ramos, Shirley; Lara Gonzalez, Yanira; Torres Colberg, Heileene; Vera Quiñones, Alexis; Miranda Santiago, Roberto; Amill, Samuel; Otero, Marielys; Cintron, Vielka; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the combination of infection and physiological changes known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There have been improvements in mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients based on "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" guidelines. Current management of sepsis at our Institution follows no specific mandatory protocols. This study aimed to verify the incidence and outcome of sepsis in Manati Medical Center, Puerto Rico. An observational retrospective study was conducted. All the Emergency Department admissions from May 1/ to October 31/ 2013 were screened for sepsis per ICD-9 code. For all included patients, demographic and clinical data at ED admission were collected. During this period 8931 patients were admitted and 148 met criteria for sepsis and related conditions. The overall mortality rate was 43.91%. Mortality increased with age, from 10.52% among ≤ 44 years old to 68.75% in those ≥ 85 years old. The main infection sources were respiratory (32.66%) and urinary tract (24.62%). Mean age among non-survivors was 10.8 years higher than the survivor group (95% Cl 5.2-1 6.5, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed an increased fatality rate associated to severity of sepsis (HR 1.33; 95% Cl; 1.03-1.72, p = 0.02) and the APACHE2 score (HR 1.05; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.09 p = 0.03). Our data suggests that sepsis is an important problem to consider. We strongly encourage an institutional standardized protocol to diminish the mortality impact. Our results will allow adequate preventive strategies to improve early diagnosis, mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients.

  6. Molecular diagnosis of sepsis: New aspects and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, L.; Hunfeld, K.-P.; Kost, G.

    2014-01-01

    By shortening the time to pathogen identification and allowing for detection of organisms missed by blood culture, new molecular methods may provide clinical benefits for the management of patients with sepsis. While a number of reviews on the diagnosis of sepsis have recently been published we here present up-to-date new developments including multiplex PCR, mass spectrometry and array techniques. We focus on those techniques that are commercially available and for which clinical studies have been performed and published. PMID:24678402

  7. Psychophysical correlates of phantom limb experience.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, J

    1992-01-01

    Phantom limb phenomena were correlated with psychophysiological measures of peripheral sympathetic nervous system activity measured at the amputation stump and contralateral limb. Amputees were assigned to one of three groups depending on whether they reported phantom limb pain, non-painful phantom limb sensations, or no phantom limb at all. Skin conductance and skin temperature were recorded continuously during two 30 minute sessions while subjects continuously monitored and rated the intensity of any phantom limb sensation or pain they experienced. The results from both sessions showed that mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the stump than the contralateral limb in the groups with phantom limb pain and non-painful phantom limb sensations, but not among subjects with no phantom limb at all. In addition, stump skin conductance responses correlated significantly with the intensity of non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae but not other qualities of sensation or pain. Between-limb measures of pressure sensitivity were not significantly different in any group. The results suggest that the presence of a phantom limb, whether painful or painless, is related to the sympathetic-efferent outflow of cutaneous vasoconstrictor fibres in the stump and stump neuromas. The hypothesis of a sympathetic-efferent somatic-afferent mechanism involving both sudomotor and vasoconstrictor fibres is proposed to explain the relationship between stump skin conductance responses and non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae. It is suggested that increases in the intensity of phantom limb paresthesiae follow bursts of sympathetic activity due to neurotransmitter release onto apposing sprouts of large diameter primary afferents located in stump neuromas, and decreases correspond to periods of relative sympathetic inactivity. The results of the study agree with recent suggestions that phantom limb pain is not a unitary syndrome, but a symptom class with each class subserved by

  8. New Approaches to Sepsis: Molecular Diagnostics and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Michael; Riedemann, Niels C.; Hartog, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in hospitals. It arises from the host response to infection. Currently, diagnosis relies on nonspecific physiological criteria and culture-based pathogen detection. This results in diagnostic uncertainty, therapeutic delays, the mis- and overuse of antibiotics, and the failure to identify patients who might benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. There is a need for new sepsis biomarkers that can aid in therapeutic decision making and add information about screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and monitoring of the response to therapy. The host response involves hundreds of mediators and single molecules, many of which have been proposed as biomarkers. It is, however, unlikely that one single biomarker is able to satisfy all the needs and expectations for sepsis research and management. Among biomarkers that are measurable by assays approved for clinical use, procalcitonin (PCT) has shown some usefulness as an infection marker and for antibiotic stewardship. Other possible new approaches consist of molecular strategies to improve pathogen detection and molecular diagnostics and prognostics based on transcriptomic, proteomic, or metabolic profiling. Novel approaches to sepsis promise to transform sepsis from a physiologic syndrome into a group of distinct biochemical disorders and help in the development of better diagnostic tools and effective adjunctive sepsis therapies. PMID:23034322

  9. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Mayeux, Philip R.; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis. PMID:26956613

  10. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V; Mayeux, Philip R; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis.

  11. Predictive values for procalcitonin in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem Abdel; Kamel, Bothina Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis followed by appropriate treatment decreases mortality and morbidity in infants. The aim of this study is to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Methods: We present a cross sectional study where 35 neonates with early onset sepsis (admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Units at El-Minia Children University Hospital from August 2012 to August 2013) were included in the study. Another 35 healthy neonates with no clinical or biological data of infection were included as a control group. Subjects were subjected to a thorough history taking and routine laboratory investigations. Serum PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Mean levels of PCT and CRP in neonates with sepsis were significantly higher than in the control group (p=0.0001). There was a moderate, but significant, positive correlation between PCT and C-reactive protein (p=0.001, r=0.55) and an insignificant correlation between procalcitonin and total leukocytic count among the neonates with sepsis (p=0.2, r=0.2). In addition, procalcitonin had high sensitivity, specificity, a high positive predictive value, and a high negative predictive value (80%, 85.7%, 84.8%, and 81.1% respectively). Procalcitonin showed higher sensitivity when compared to CRP. Conclusion: Procalcitonin is a sensitive, independent, and useful biomarker in comparison to CRP in early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. PMID:26396733

  12. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers for Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Benz, Fabian; Roy, Sanchari; Trautwein, Christian; Roderburg, Christoph; Luedde, Tom

    2016-01-09

    Sepsis represents a major cause of lethality during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. Pharmacological treatment strategies for sepsis are still limited and mainly based on the early initiation of antibiotic and supportive treatment. In this context, numerous clinical and serum based markers have been evaluated for the diagnosis, the severity, and the etiology of sepsis. However until now, few of these factors could be translated into clinical use. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) do not encode for proteins but regulate gene expression by inhibiting the translation or transcription of their target mRNAs. Recently it was demonstrated that miRNAs are released into the circulation and that the spectrum of circulating miRNAs might be altered during various pathologic conditions, such as inflammation, infection, and sepsis. By using array- and single PCR-based methods, a variety of deregulated miRNAs, including miR-25, miR-133a, miR-146, miR-150, and miR-223, were described in the context of sepsis. Some of the miRNAs correlated with the disease stage, as well as patients' short and long term prognosis. Here, we summarize the current findings on the role of circulating miRNAs in the diagnosis and staging of sepsis in critically ill patients. We compare data from patients with findings from animal models and, finally, highlight the challenges and drawbacks that currently prevent the use of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers in clinical routine.

  13. HMGB1 Mediates Anemia of Inflammation in Murine Sepsis Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ferrer, Sergio I; Papoin, Julien; Dancho, Meghan E; Olofsson, Peder S; Li, Jianhua; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Avancena, Patricia; Yang, Huan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Volpe, Bruce T; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Steinberg, Bettie M; Blanc, Lionel; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis develop anemia, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we observed that mice surviving polymicrobial gram-negative sepsis develop hypochromic, microcytic anemia with reticulocytosis. The bone marrow of sepsis survivors accumulates polychromatophilic and orthochromatic erythroblasts. Compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis in the spleen is defective during terminal differentiation. Circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 are elevated for 5 d after the onset of sepsis, and serum high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels are increased from d 7 until at least d 28. Administration of recombinant HMGB1 to healthy mice mediates anemia with extramedullary erythropoiesis and significantly elevated reticulocyte counts. Moreover, administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibodies after sepsis significantly ameliorates the development of anemia (hematocrit 48.5 ± 9.0% versus 37.4 ± 6.1%, p < 0.01; hemoglobin 14.0 ± 1.7 versus 11.7 ± 1.2 g/dL, p < 0.01). Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 mediates anemia by interfering with erythropoiesis, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for anemia in sepsis. PMID:26736178

  14. Improving time to antibiotics and implementing the "Sepsis 6".

    PubMed

    McGregor, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that completion of the "Sepsis 6" within 1 hour reduces mortality (1). This project aims to assess compliance with this standard and evaluate the effectiveness of a sepsis improvement plan in a district general hospital in the UK. A baseline audit was performed, examining case notes of "septic patients" retrospectively (those on intravenous antibiotics). Compliance with each element of the sepsis six plus time to first antibiotic (TTFA) was assessed. A sepsis improvement plan was introduced consisting of staff education, reinforcing vigilance, regular multidisciplinary meetings and incorporating a standardised approach through the use of a sepsis proforma. Following the introduction of this, and after some refinement, the average time to antibiotic fell from 6 hours to 1.4 hours. In conclusion, an educational drive along with a systematic change in processes has seen reduced TTFA along with enhanced compliance with most elements of the sepsis 6. Through continued assessment and further improving upon systematic processes with continued education we would anticipate consistent improvement in the management of septic patients.

  15. Identification of adults with sepsis in the prehospital environment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early identification of sepsis could enable prompt delivery of key interventions such as fluid resuscitation and antibiotic administration which, in turn, may lead to improved patient outcomes. Limited data indicate that recognition of sepsis by paramedics is often poor. We systematically reviewed the literature on prehospital sepsis screening tools to determine whether they improved sepsis recognition. Design Systematic review. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed were systematically searched up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. Setting Prehospital/emergency medical services (EMS). Study selection All studies addressing identification of sepsis (including severe sepsis and septic shock) among adult patients managed by EMS. Outcome measures Recognition of sepsis by EMS clinicians. Results Owing to considerable variation in the methodological approach adopted and outcome measures reported, a narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Three studies addressed development of prehospital sepsis screening tools. Six studies addressed paramedic diagnosis of sepsis with or without use of a prehospital sepsis screening tool. Conclusions Recognition of sepsis by ambulance clinicians is poor. The use of screening tools, based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign diagnostic criteria, improves prehospital sepsis recognition. Screening tools derived from EMS data have been developed, but they have not yet been validated in clinical practice. There is a need to undertake validation studies to determine whether prehospital sepsis screening tools confer any clinical benefit. PMID:27496231

  16. From fins to limbs to fins: limb evolution in fossil marine reptiles.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael W

    2002-10-15

    Limb osteology and ontogenetic patterns of limb ossification are reviewed for extinct lineages of aquatically adapted diapsid reptiles. Phylogenies including these fossil taxa show that paddle-like limbs were independently derived, and that the varied limb morphologies were produced by evolutionary modifications to different aspects of the limb skeleton. Ancient marine reptiles modify the limb by reducing the relative size of the epipodials, modifying the perichondral and periosteal surface of elements distal to the propodials, and evolving extremes of hyperphalangy and hyperdactyly. Developmental genetic models illuminate gene systems that may have controlled limb evolution in these animals. PMID:12357467

  17. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis. PMID:27416083

  18. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS. PMID:25425653

  19. [Immunology and sepsis syndrome in burn trauma].

    PubMed

    Ipaktchi, K; Vogt, P M

    2009-05-01

    Despite significant advances in burn surgery and critical care, severe burn trauma defined as injuries covering more than 25% of the total body surface area, is still associated with high mortality and morbidity. Burn trauma is a whole body injury where peripheral dermal injury rapidly results in systemic inflammation and inflammatory core organ damage. The severe disturbance of internal homeostasis involves all vital organ systems and obligates early referral to specialized burn centers. Treatment of severely burned patients is a multifaceted challenge directed by pathophysiologic events which progress from local skin destruction, disruption of physicochemical and microvascular barriers to breakdown of peripheral and central circulation, organ failure and ultimately death. While early intensive care focuses on maintenance of tissue oxygenation and perfusion, surgical treatment deals with management of the burn wounds as a source of inflammation and infection. Here wound debridement and coverage is essential to abrogate systemic effects of inflammation and limit pathogen invasion. While control of early burn stages minimizes mortality due to burn shock, subsequent burn sepsis continues to be a formidable challenge for physicians and the main cause of burn mortality.

  20. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  1. Model for predicting short-term mortality of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Adrie, Christophe; Francais, Adrien; Alvarez-Gonzalez, Antonio; Mounier, Roman; Azoulay, Elie; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Clec'h, Christophe; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Hammer, Laure; Descorps-Declere, Adrien; Jamali, Samir; Timsit, Jean-Francois

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To establish a prognostic model for predicting 14-day mortality in ICU patients with severe sepsis overall and according to place of infection acquisition and to sepsis episode number. Methods In this prospective multicentre observational study on a multicentre database (OUTCOMEREA) including data from 12 ICUs, 2268 patients with 2737 episodes of severe sepsis were randomly divided into a training cohort (n = 1458) and a validation cohort (n = 810). Up to four consecutive severe sepsis episodes per patient occurring within the first 28 ICU days were included. We developed a prognostic model for predicting death within 14 days after each episode, based on patient data available at sepsis onset. Results Independent predictors of death were logistic organ dysfunction (odds ratio (OR), 1.22 per point, P < 10-4), septic shock (OR, 1.40; P = 0.01), rank of severe sepsis episode (1 reference, 2: OR, 1.26; P = 0.10 ≥ 3: OR, 2.64; P < 10-3), multiple sources of infection (OR; 1.45, P = 0.03), simplified acute physiology score II (OR, 1.02 per point; P < 10-4), McCabe score ([greater than or equal to]2) (OR, 1.96; P < 10-4), and number of chronic co-morbidities (1: OR, 1.75; P < 10-3, ≥ 2: OR, 2.24, P < 10-3). Validity of the model was good in whole cohorts (AUC-ROC, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.74 to 0.79; and HL Chi-square: 15.3 (P = 0.06) for all episodes pooled). Conclusions In ICU patients, a prognostic model based on a few easily obtained variables is effective in predicting death within 14 days after the first to fourth episode of severe sepsis complicating community-, hospital-, or ICU-acquired infection. PMID:19454002

  2. Serum Procalcitonine Levels as an Early Diagnostic Indicator of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Beqja-Lika, Anila; Bulo-Kasneci, Anyla; Refatllari, Etleva; Heta-Alliu, Nevila; Rucaj-Barbullushi, Alma; Mone, Iris; Mitre, Anila

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Prompt and accurate diagnosis of sepsis is of high importance for clinicians. Procalcitonine (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been proposed as markers for this purpose. Our aim was to evaluate the levels of PCT and CRP in early sepsis and its correlation with severity of sepsis. Methods: Levels of PCT and CRP were taken from 60 patients with sepsis criteria and 39 patients with SIRS symptoms from the University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” in Tirana, Albania during 2010-2012. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for PCT and CRP were calculated. Results: PCT and CRP levels increased in parallel with the severity of the clinical conditions of the patients. The mean PCT level in patients with sepsis was 11.28 ng/ml versus 0.272 ng/ml in patients with SIRS symptoms, with a sensitivity of 97.4% and a specificity of 96.6% for PCT >0.5ng/ml. The mean CRP level in septic patients was 146.58 mg/l vs. 34.4 mg/l in patients with SIRS, with a sensitivity of 98.6% for sepsis and a specificity of 75 % for CRP >11mg/l. Conclusion: PCT and CRP values are useful markers to determine early diagnosis and severity of an infection. In the present study, PCT was found to be a more accurate diagnostic parameter for differentiating SIRS from sepsis and may be helpful in the follow-up of critically ill patients. PMID:23687457

  3. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  4. Assessment of Fibrinolysis in Sepsis Patients with Urokinase Modified Thromboelastography

    PubMed Central

    Panigada, Mauro; Zacchetti, Lucia; L’Acqua, Camilla; Cressoni, Massimo; Anzoletti, Massimo Boscolo; Bader, Rossella; Protti, Alessandro; Consonni, Dario; D’Angelo, Armando; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impairment of fibrinolysis during sepsis is associated with worse outcome. Early identification of this condition could be of interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a modified point-of-care viscoelastic hemostatic assay can detect sepsis-induced impairment of fibrinolysis and to correlate impaired fibrinolysis with morbidity and mortality. Methods This single center observational prospective pilot study was performed in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary academic hospital. Forty consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Forty healthy individuals served as controls. We modified conventional kaolin activated thromboelastography (TEG) adding urokinase to improve assessment of fibrinolysis in real time (UK-TEG). TEG, UK-TEG, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), d-dimer, DIC scores and morbidity (rated with the SOFA score) were measured upon ICU admission. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of mortality at ICU discharge. Results UK-TEG revealed a greater impairment of fibrinolysis in sepsis patients compared to healthy individuals confirmed by PAI-1. TAFI was not different between sepsis patients and healthy individuals. 18/40 sepsis patients had fibrinolysis impaired according to UK-TEG and showed higher SOFA score (8 (6–13) vs 5 (4–7), p = 0.03), higher mortality (39% vs 5%, p = 0.01) and greater markers of cellular damage (lactate levels, LDH and bilirubin). Mortality at ICU discharge was predicted by the degree of fibrinolysis impairment measured by UK-TEG Ly30 (%) parameter (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.93–0.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions Sepsis-induced impairment of fibrinolysis detected at UK-TEG was associated with increased markers of cellular damage, morbidity and mortality. PMID:26308340

  5. Improving the care of sepsis: Between system redesign and professional responsibility: A roundtable discussion in the world sepsis day, September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Yaseen; Alamry, Ahmed; Levy, Mitchell M; Taher, Saadi; Marini, Abdellatif M

    2014-07-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion in September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as part of the World Sepsis Day held in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to (1) review the chasm between the current management of sepsis and best practice, (2) discuss system redesign and role of the microsystem in sepsis management, (3) emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of the care of sepsis and that improvement of the care of sepsis is the responsibility of all, (4) discuss the bundle concept in sepsis management, and (5) reflect on the individual responsibility of the health care team toward sepsis with a focus on accountability and the moral agent.

  6. Orthoses of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, A

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the medical indications and contemporary technological capabilities in the orthotic treatment of the upper limb. The devices that today constitute an integral part of therapeutic procedures are presented, as well as the potential created by the application of low-temperature thermoplastic materials. Therapeutic success is conditioned by professional cooperation between the physician, the kinesitherapist, the orthotic technician, and the patient. PMID:17984921

  7. Orbital cellulitis with periorbital abscess secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sepsis in an immunocompetent neonate.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lavanya G; Rao, Krishna; Bhandary, Sulatha; Shetty, Priyanka Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates the need for early incision and drainage of periorbital abscesses. We report a case of a 1.5-month-old neonate with orbital cellulitis and periorbital abscess, which had rapidly developed over a period of 3 days. Treatment history revealed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sepsis treated with intravenous vancomycin, and incision and drainage of abscesses at multiple sites (left parotid region, upper and lower limbs). A small swelling noted on the left temporal region on discharge from the hospital was treated with oral cotrimoxazole. However, it spread rapidly to involve the periorbital tissue and the bones of the orbital walls to form a periorbital abscess and orbital cellulitis. PMID:25899513

  8. A Rare Case of Fatal Endocarditis and Sepsis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Nandakumar, Sandya; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial catheter-related and Arteriovenous fistula (AV)-related infections are significant concern in patients undergoing haemodialysis. These infections are associated with multiple complications as well as mortality and demands immediate and appropriate management. While coagulase-negative staphylococci, S.aureus, and Escherichia coli are the most common causes of catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients, such infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are relatively rare. Here, we present an unusual case of 36-year-old male patient with chronic renal failure, who developed endocarditis and sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the left hand arteriovenous fistula. The bacteraemia in the present case caused multiple complications including dry gangrene of bilateral lower limbs, stroke, endophthalmitis, left brachial artery thrombosis and vegetations on the interventricular septum and aortic wall. Despite antibiotic treatment, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be revived. PMID:27630891

  9. A Rare Case of Fatal Endocarditis and Sepsis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Manav; Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Nandakumar, Sandya; Mathew, Navin

    2016-07-01

    Nosocomial catheter-related and Arteriovenous fistula (AV)-related infections are significant concern in patients undergoing haemodialysis. These infections are associated with multiple complications as well as mortality and demands immediate and appropriate management. While coagulase-negative staphylococci, S.aureus, and Escherichia coli are the most common causes of catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients, such infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are relatively rare. Here, we present an unusual case of 36-year-old male patient with chronic renal failure, who developed endocarditis and sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the left hand arteriovenous fistula. The bacteraemia in the present case caused multiple complications including dry gangrene of bilateral lower limbs, stroke, endophthalmitis, left brachial artery thrombosis and vegetations on the interventricular septum and aortic wall. Despite antibiotic treatment, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be revived. PMID:27630891

  10. Global fibrinolytic capacity in pediatric patients with sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Kose, Dogan; Dogan, Murat

    2006-10-01

    There are many complex pathophysiologic changes of the coagulation system in sepsis. The fibrinolytic system was evaluated in septic children using the global fibrinolytic capacity (GFC), a new technique reflecting the overall fibrinolytic activity. The study consisted of 24 children with sepsis, 36 children with sepsis plus disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and 20 healthy age-matched control individuals. Compared with controls, 86% of sepsis patients and 87% of sepsis plus DIC patients had decreased GFC levels. Between the sepsis plus DIC and sepsis groups there was no significant difference in terms of GFC levels. While 19 patients (52.7%) died in the sepsis plus DIC group, only three patients (12.5%) died in the sepsis group. When survivors and nonsurvivors were compared in terms of coagulation tests, there were significant differences for protein C, antithrombin, platelet, fibrinogen, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, prothrombin time, and white blood cell values. In conclusion, the level of GFC reduced in most of the pediatric sepsis patients but no difference was observed between patients with sepsis and patients with sepsis plus DIC. While inhibition of fibrinolysis is an important finding in sepsis, the mortality is mainly associated with the presence of end-organ damage and the status of coagulation parameters.

  11. Gremlin1 induces anterior-posterior limb bifurcations in developing Xenopus limbs but does not enhance limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Keenan, Samuel R; Lynn, Jeremy; McEwan, James C; Beck, Caroline W

    2015-11-01

    Gremlin1 (grem1) has been previously identified as being significantly up-regulated during regeneration of Xenopus laevis limbs. Grem1 is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) with a known role in limb development in amniotes. It forms part of a self-regulating feedback loop linking epithelial (FGF) and mesenchymal (shh) signalling centres, thereby controlling outgrowth, anterior posterior and proximal distal patterning. Spatiotemporal regulation of the same genes in developing and regenerating Xenopus limb buds supports conservation of this mechanism. Using a heat shock inducible grem1 (G) transgene to created temperature regulated stable lines, we have shown that despite being upregulated in regeneration, grem1 overexpression does not enhance regeneration of tadpole hindlimbs. However, both the regenerating and contralateral, developing limb of G transgenics developed skeletal defects, suggesting that overexpressing grem1 negatively affects limb patterning. When grem1 expression was targeted earlier in limb bud development, we saw dramatic bifurcations of the limbs resulting in duplication of anterior posterior (AP) pattern, forming a phenotypic continuum ranging from duplications arising at the level of the femoral head to digit bifurcations, but never involving the pelvis. Intriguingly, the original limbs have AP pattern inversion due to de-restricted Shh signalling. We discuss a possible role for Grem1 regulation of limb BMPs in regulation of branching pattern in the limbs.

  12. Gremlin1 induces anterior-posterior limb bifurcations in developing Xenopus limbs but does not enhance limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Keenan, Samuel R; Lynn, Jeremy; McEwan, James C; Beck, Caroline W

    2015-11-01

    Gremlin1 (grem1) has been previously identified as being significantly up-regulated during regeneration of Xenopus laevis limbs. Grem1 is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) with a known role in limb development in amniotes. It forms part of a self-regulating feedback loop linking epithelial (FGF) and mesenchymal (shh) signalling centres, thereby controlling outgrowth, anterior posterior and proximal distal patterning. Spatiotemporal regulation of the same genes in developing and regenerating Xenopus limb buds supports conservation of this mechanism. Using a heat shock inducible grem1 (G) transgene to created temperature regulated stable lines, we have shown that despite being upregulated in regeneration, grem1 overexpression does not enhance regeneration of tadpole hindlimbs. However, both the regenerating and contralateral, developing limb of G transgenics developed skeletal defects, suggesting that overexpressing grem1 negatively affects limb patterning. When grem1 expression was targeted earlier in limb bud development, we saw dramatic bifurcations of the limbs resulting in duplication of anterior posterior (AP) pattern, forming a phenotypic continuum ranging from duplications arising at the level of the femoral head to digit bifurcations, but never involving the pelvis. Intriguingly, the original limbs have AP pattern inversion due to de-restricted Shh signalling. We discuss a possible role for Grem1 regulation of limb BMPs in regulation of branching pattern in the limbs. PMID:26527308

  13. Biomarkers of endothelial cell activation in early sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Skibsted, Simon; Jones, Alan E; Puskarich, Michael A.; Arnold, Ryan; Sherwin, Robert; Trzeciak, Stephen; Schuetz, Philipp; Aird, William C.; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the association of endothelial-related markers with organ dysfunction and in-hospital mortality to validate our earlier findings in a multicenter study. We hypothesize that: 1) endothelial biomarkers will be associated with organ dysfunction and mortality in sepsis; and, that sFlt-1, holds promise as novel prognostic markers in sepsis. METHODS A prospective, multicenter, observational study of a convenience sample of Emergency Department (ED) patients with a suspected infection presenting to one of four urban, academic medical center EDs between January 2009 and January 2010. We collected plasma while the patients were in the ED, and subsequently assayed endothelial-related biomarkers, namely sFlt-1, sE-Selectin, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and PAI-1. Outcomes were organ dysfunction and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS We enrolled at a total of 166 patients: 63 with sepsis (38%), 61 with severe sepsis (37%) and 42 with septic shock (25%). All endothelial biomarkers were significantly associated with sepsis severity, P < 0.002. We found a significant inter-correlation between all biomarkers, strongest between sFlt1 and PAI-1 (r=0.61, P < 0.001) and PAI-1 and sE-selectin and sICAM-1 (r=0.49, P < 0.001). Among the endothelial biomarkers, sFlt-1 had the strongest association with SOFA score (r=0.58, P < 0.001). sFlt-1 and PAI-1 had the highest area under the operating receiver characteristic curve for mortality of 0.87. CONCLUSIONS This multi-center validation study confirms that markers of endothelial activation are associated with sepsis severity, organ dysfunction and mortality in sepsis. This supports the hypothesis that the endothelium plays a central role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and may serve as a more accurate prediction tool and a target for therapies aimed at ameliorating endothelial cell dysfunction. Additionally, sFLT-1 holds promise as a novel sepsis severity biomarker. PMID:23524845

  14. Blood Culture Proven Early Onset Sepsis and Late Onset Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Min; Chang, Meayoung; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains one of the most important causes of death and co-morbidity in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. The aim of this study was to determine the current incidences of early-onset sepsis (EOS) and late-onset sepsis (LOS), the distribution of pathogens, and the impact of infection on co-morbidities in VLBW infants. We analyzed the data including sepsis episode from 2,386 VLBW infants enrolled in Korean Neonatal Network from January 2013 to June 2014. We defined EOS as a positive blood culture occurring between birth and 7 days of life and LOS after 7 days of life. Sepsis was found in 21.1% of VLBW infants. The risk of sepsis was inversely related to birth weight and gestational age. EOS was found in only 3.6% of VLBW infants, however the mortality rate was as high as 34.1%. EOS was associated with the increased odds for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and intraventricular hemorrhage. The vast majority of EOS was caused by Gram-positive organisms, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci (30.6%). LOS developed in 19.4% of VLBW infants with a 16.1% mortality rate. Pathogens in LOS were dominated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (38.3%). Twenty-five percent and fifty percent of first LOS episode occurred after 12 days and 20 days from birth, respectively. Younger and smaller VLBW infants showed the earlier occurrence day for the 25% of first LOS episode. This study provides a recent nationwide epidemiology of sepsis in VLBW infants in Korea. Based on this study, successful strategies to reduce infections would improve survival and reduce morbidity.

  15. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the ‘Sepsis Six’ recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  16. Experience with new techniques for extraanatomic arterial reconstruction of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Katsamouris, A N; Giannoukas, A D; Alamanos, E; Karniadakis, S; Petrakis, I; Drositis, I; Touloupakis, E; Mouloudi, E; Siatitsas, I

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present our experience with new techniques for extraanatomic lower limb arterial reconstruction. Two techniques are described here of construction of an extraanatomical bypass for lower limb revascularization either through the wing of the iliac bone or underneath the iliopsoas fascia through the muscular lacuna close to the anterior superior spine of the iliac crest. Both techniques are recommended for the treatment of a severely injured groin, such as in patients with pelvic malignancy and/or an acute groin bleeding due to postirradiation femoral artery erosion or an infected femoropopliteal bypass graft with severe upper medial thigh sepsis. These techniques were used in nine patients (five with malignancy and four with an infected femoropopliteal bypass graft). Our results showed that the transosseous route through the wing of the iliac bone or underneath the iliopsoas fascia through the muscular lacuna may be considered effective alternate routes for lower limb arterial extraanatomic reconstruction when the common femoral cannot be used for arterial inflow.

  17. A clinical perspective of sepsis-associated delirium.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Oda, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    The term sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) has been applied to animal models, postmortem studies in patients, and severe cases of sepsis. SAE is considered to include all types of brain dysfunction, including delirium, coma, seizure, and focal neurological signs. Clinical data for sepsis-associated delirium (SAD) have been accumulating since the establishment of definitions of coma or delirium and the introduction of validated screening tools. Some preliminary studies have examined the etiology of SAD. Neuroinflammation, abnormal cerebral perfusion, and neurotransmitter imbalances are the main mechanisms underlying the development of SAD. However, there are still no specific diagnostic blood, electrophysiological, or imaging tests or treatments specific for SAD. The duration of delirium in intensive care patients is associated with long-term functional disability and cognitive impairment, although this syndrome usually reverses after the successful treatment of sepsis. Once the respiratory and hemodynamic states are stabilized, patients with severe sepsis or septic shock should receive rehabilitation as soon as possible because early initiation of rehabilitation can reduce the duration of delirium. We expect to see further pathophysiological data and the development of novel treatments for SAD now that reliable and consistent definitions of SAD have been established. PMID:27011789

  18. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  19. Interleukin-8 in sepsis: relation to shock and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Hart, M; van Schijndel, R J; Eerenberg, A J; Nuijens, J H; Thijs, L G; Aarden, L A

    1992-07-01

    Because of its neutrophil-activating properties, interleukin-8 (IL-8) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis. We measured circulating IL-8 levels in 47 patients with clinical sepsis. Levels on admission were elevated in 42 of the 47 patients (89%) and were comparable in patients with gram-positive or gram-negative infections. Patients with shock had significantly higher IL-8 levels than normotensive patients (P = 0.0014, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test), whereas no differences in IL-8 levels were found between patients with or without adult respiratory distress syndrome. Patients who died had higher IL-8 levels on admission than the patients who survived. The largest differences in IL-8 levels between survivors and nonsurvivors was found when only patients with positive cultures were considered (P = 0.0342). IL-8 levels appeared to correlate significantly with lactate levels and inversely with leukocyte and platelet numbers and mean arterial pressure. In addition, the IL-8 level in the sepsis patients was found to correlate significantly with levels of IL-6, elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin, and C3a. Serial observations revealed that in most patients IL-8 levels decreased, irrespective of the outcome. Thus, our results demonstrate that IL-8 levels are increased in most patients with sepsis and correlate with some important clinical, biochemical, and inflammatory parameters. These findings suggest a role for IL-8 in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  20. The role of MBL2 gene polymorphism in sepsis incidence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Ning, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This case-control study was aimed to explore the role of mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene rs1800450 polymorphism (codon 54 A/B, G230A) in the development of sepsis in Han Chinese. Methods: MBL2 rs1800450 polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). MBL serum level was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Associations between rs1800450 and sepsis susceptibility was detected by Chi-square test and represented by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Correlation of rs1800450 genotypes and MBL serum level was assessed using t test. Result: Variant A allele frequency was significantly observed in cases than that in controls, indicating a significant association with the susceptibility of sepsis (OR = 1.979, 95% CI = 1.200-3.262). GA genotype also relate to the onset of sepsis (OR = 2.090, 95% CI = 1.163-3.753). MBL serum concentrations were significantly different between case and control groups (P<0.001). Meanwhile, variant allele carriers had lower serum level compared with wild homozygous (P<0.001). Conclusion: Variant A allele in MBL2 gene rs1800450 polymorphism might increase the risk of sepsis via decrease the MBL serum level. PMID:26823854

  1. Impaired Granuloma Formation in Sepsis: Impact of Monocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alingrin, Julie; Coiffard, Benjamin; Textoris, Julien; Belenotti, Pauline; Daumas, Aurélie; Leone, Marc; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are a collection of immune cells considered to be protective in infectious diseases. The in vitro generation of granulomas is an interesting substitution to invasive approaches of granuloma study. The monitoring of immune response through the determination of in vitro granuloma formation in patients with severe sepsis may be critical to individualize treatments. We compared the in vitro generation of granulomas by co-culturing circulating mononuclear cells from 19 patients with severe sepsis, 9 patients cured from Q fever and 12 healthy subjects as controls, and Sepharose beads coated either with BCG or Coxiella burnetii extracts to analyze both immune and innate granulomas, respectively. We showed that the great majority of patients with severe sepsis were unable to form granulomas in response to BCG and C. burnetii extracts whereas more than 80% of healthy controls and patients cured from Q fever formed granulomas. We also found that monocytopenia and defective production of tumor necrosis factor were associated with reduced formation of granulomas in patients with severe sepsis even if TNF did not seem to be involved in the defective granuloma formation. Taken together, these results suggest that the deficiency of granuloma formation may be a measurement of altered recruitment and activation of monocytes and lymphocytes in patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27441846

  2. Multi-analytical Approaches Informing the Risk of Sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Lewden, Benoit; Mequanint, Selam; Bauer, Michael

    Sepsis is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity and is often associated with increased hospital resource utilization, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. The economic burden associated with sepsis is huge. With advances in medicine, there are now aggressive goal oriented treatments that can be used to help these patients. If we were able to predict which patients may be at risk for sepsis we could start treatment early and potentially reduce the risk of mortality and morbidity. Analytic methods currently used in clinical research to determine the risk of a patient developing sepsis may be further enhanced by using multi-modal analytic methods that together could be used to provide greater precision. Researchers commonly use univariate and multivariate regressions to develop predictive models. We hypothesized that such models could be enhanced by using multiple analytic methods that together could be used to provide greater insight. In this paper, we analyze data about patients with and without sepsis using a decision tree approach and a cluster analysis approach. A comparison with a regression approach shows strong similarity among variables identified, though not an exact match. We compare the variables identified by the different approaches and draw conclusions about the respective predictive capabilities,while considering their clinical significance.

  3. Glycocalyx and sepsis-induced alterations in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Chelazzi, Cosimo; Villa, Gianluca; Mancinelli, Paola; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; Adembri, Chiara

    2015-01-28

    Endothelial cells line the inner portion of the heart, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels; a basal membrane of extracellular matrix lines the extraluminal side of endothelial cells. The apical side of endothelial cells is the site for the glycocalyx, which is a complex network of macromolecules, including cell-bound proteoglycans and sialoproteins. Sepsis-associated alterations of this structure may compromise endothelial permeability with associated interstitial fluid shift and generalized edema. Indeed, in sepsis, the glycocalyx acts as a target for inflammatory mediators and leukocytes, and its ubiquitous nature explains the damage of tissues that occurs distant from the original site of infection. Inflammatory-mediated injury to glycocalyx can be responsible for a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and hepatic dysfunction. Moreover, some markers of glycocalyx degradation, such as circulating levels of syndecan or selectins, may be used as markers of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. Although a great deal of experimental evidence shows that alteration of glycocalyx is widely involved in endothelial damage caused by sepsis, therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving its integrity did not significantly improve the outcome of these patients.

  4. Use of miRNAs as biomarkers in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19-23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis.

  5. [Usefulness of Presepsin Measurement: A New Biomarker for Sepsis].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) caused by infection, and it is one of the major causes of mortality of critical care patients. Since it has been reported that early, optimal treatment of patients is important to reduce mortality from sepsis, a sepsis marker with a high sensitivity and specificity is required. Presepsin (P-SEP) was discovered as a new marker whose levels elevated specifically in the blood of patients with sepsis in Japan in 2002. Presepsin is a 13-kDa glycoprotein that is a truncated N-terminal fragment of CD14. Since one of the production mechanisms of presepsin is related to the phagocytosis of bacteria, the biological characteristics of presepsin are different from those of other inflammatory markers. Presepsin has three features in comparison with procalcitonin(PCT), C-reactive protein(CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6): 1) Presepsin can be detected earlier after the onset of infection; 2) Presepsin is not affected by severe trauma, severe burn, or invasive surgical procedures, which lead to SIRS, more than PCT, CRP, or IL-6; 3) Presepsin levels reflect the clinical condition of septic patients. Although clinical evidence is not sufficient at present, presepsin may be a strong tool for the development of novel treatment strategies for sepsis.

  6. Impaired Granuloma Formation in Sepsis: Impact of Monocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Alingrin, Julie; Coiffard, Benjamin; Textoris, Julien; Belenotti, Pauline; Daumas, Aurélie; Leone, Marc; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are a collection of immune cells considered to be protective in infectious diseases. The in vitro generation of granulomas is an interesting substitution to invasive approaches of granuloma study. The monitoring of immune response through the determination of in vitro granuloma formation in patients with severe sepsis may be critical to individualize treatments. We compared the in vitro generation of granulomas by co-culturing circulating mononuclear cells from 19 patients with severe sepsis, 9 patients cured from Q fever and 12 healthy subjects as controls, and Sepharose beads coated either with BCG or Coxiella burnetii extracts to analyze both immune and innate granulomas, respectively. We showed that the great majority of patients with severe sepsis were unable to form granulomas in response to BCG and C. burnetii extracts whereas more than 80% of healthy controls and patients cured from Q fever formed granulomas. We also found that monocytopenia and defective production of tumor necrosis factor were associated with reduced formation of granulomas in patients with severe sepsis even if TNF did not seem to be involved in the defective granuloma formation. Taken together, these results suggest that the deficiency of granuloma formation may be a measurement of altered recruitment and activation of monocytes and lymphocytes in patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27441846

  7. Sepsis: Multiple Abnormalities, Heterogeneous Responses, and Evolving Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Iskander, Kendra N.; Osuchowski, Marcin F.; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Stepien, David; Valentine, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to a severe infection. It causes substantial human morbidity resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Despite decades of intense research, the basic mechanisms still remain elusive. In either experimental animal models of sepsis or human patients, there are substantial physiological changes, many of which may result in subsequent organ injury. Variations in age, gender, and medical comorbidities including diabetes and renal failure create additional complexity that influence the outcomes in septic patients. Specific system-based alterations, such as the coagulopathy observed in sepsis, offer both potential insight and possible therapeutic targets. Intracellular stress induces changes in the endoplasmic reticulum yielding misfolded proteins that contribute to the underlying pathophysiological changes. With these multiple changes it is difficult to precisely classify an individual's response in sepsis as proinflammatory or immunosuppressed. This heterogeneity also may explain why most therapeutic interventions have not improved survival. Given the complexity of sepsis, biomarkers and mathematical models offer potential guidance once they have been carefully validated. This review discusses each of these important factors to provide a framework for understanding the complex and current challenges of managing the septic patient. Clinical trial failures and the therapeutic interventions that have proven successful are also discussed. PMID:23899564

  8. Prevention of Sepsis in Children: A New Paradigm for Public Policy

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Carley; Wheeler, Derek S.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. While the management of critically ill patients with sepsis is certainly better now compared to 20 years ago, sepsis-associated mortality remains unacceptably high. Annual deaths from sepsis in both children and adults far surpass the number of deaths from acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, or cancer. Given the substantial toll that sepsis takes worldwide, prevention of sepsis remains a global priority. Multiple effective prevention strategies exist. Antibiotic prophylaxis, immunizations, and healthcare quality improvement initiatives are important means through which we may reduce the morbidity and mortality from sepsis around the world. Inclusion of these strategies in a coordinated and thoughtful campaign to reduce the global burden of sepsis is necessary for the improvement of pediatric health worldwide. PMID:22216408

  9. Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Progamme, 2011.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie C; Le, Tam; Daly, Denise A; Robinson, James O; Gottlieb, Thomas; Howden, Benjamin P; Johnson, Paul D R; Bennett, Catherine M; Stinear, Timothy P; Turnidge, John D

    2014-09-01

    From 1 January to 31 December 2011, 29 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP). The aim of AESOP 2011 was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteraemia isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to ampicillin and the glycopeptides, and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates. Of the 1,079 unique episodes of bacteraemia investigated, 95.8% were caused by either E. faecalis (61.0%) or E. faecium (34.8%). Ampicillin resistance was detected in 90.4% of E. faecium but not detected in E. faecalis. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints (CLSI), vancomycin non-susceptibility was reported in 0.6% and 31.4% of E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively and was predominately due to the acquisition of the vanB operon. Approximately 1 in 6 vanB E. faecium isolates however, had an minimum inhibitory concentration at or below the CLSI vancomycin susceptible breakpoint of ≤ 4 mg/L. Overall, 37% of E. faecium harboured vanA or vanB genes. Although molecular typing identified 126 E. faecalis pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pulsotypes, more than 50% belonged to 2 pulsotypes that were isolated across Australia. E. faecium consisted of 73 PFGE pulsotypes from which 43 multilocus sequence types were identified. Almost 90% of the E. faecium were identified as clonal complex 17 clones, of which approximately half were characterised as sequence type 203, which was isolated Australia-wide. In conclusion, the AESOP 2011 has shown that although polyclonal, enterococcal bacteraemias in Australia are frequently caused by ampicillin-resistant vanB E. faecium. PMID:25391408

  10. Functional and histopathologic changes in the liver during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Caruana, J A; Montes, M; Camara, D S; Ummer, A; Potmesil, S H; Gage, A A

    1982-05-01

    Although liver failure from sepsis is a frequent occurrence in serious ill, hospitalized patients, little information is available on the histologic changes of the liver. We examined the histopathology of the liver of 19 patients who died of clinical sepsis and attempted to relate certain features of the illness or treatment to the observed histopathologic changes. The most striking finding was midzonal and peripheral necrosis of a moderate to marked degree in 11 of 19 patients. Other important changes were acute inflammation and cholestasis. The severity of hepatocellular necrosis did not appear to be influenced by the premortem circulating pathogen, by the nutritional support administered or by the arterial blood pressure. It is suggested that hepatocellular necrosis is characteristic of sepsis and may be caused by loss of specific factors which normally maintain liver function and structure. PMID:6803371

  11. [Reinstating cloxacilin for empiric antibiotic in late-onset sepsis].

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Alejandra; Cofré, Fernanda; Delpiano, Luis; Izquierdo, Giannina; Labraña, Yenis; Reyes, Alejandra

    2015-04-01

    Vancomycin has been used for more than 50 years in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as the therapy of choice for late-onset sepsis, mainly because Coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS) are common and mostly resistant to oxacyllin despitelow virulence and unusual association with fulminant sepsis. CUs due to several factors including its high pharmacokinetic variability, difficulty in reaching therapeutic plasmatic drug concentrations and progressively increasing minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The increase of CoNS with higher MICs as well as the rise of infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacilli and candida should move to reconsider Vancomycin as first line treatment. Infections in neonates have a different behavior than in other populations and we consoder of utmost importance to consider the use of oxacyllin as first line antimicrobial therapy for late-onset sepsis. PMID:26065451

  12. Hydrogen Gas Presents a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingling; Yu, Yonghao; Wang, Guolin

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response to infection. It remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients despite developments in monitoring devices, diagnostic tools, and new therapeutic options. Recently, some studies have found that molecular hydrogen is a new therapeutic gas. Our studies have found that hydrogen gas can improve the survival and organ damage in mice and rats with cecal ligation and puncture, zymosan, and lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis. The mechanisms are associated with the regulation of oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and apoptosis, which might be through NF-κB and Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway. In this paper, we summarized the progress of hydrogen treatment in sepsis. PMID:24829918

  13. Host response biomarkers in sepsis: the role of procalcitonin.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Van Nuffelen, Marc; Lelubre, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Procalcitonin is the prohormone of calcitonin and present in minute quantities in health. However, during infection, its levels rise considerably and are correlated with the severity of the infection. Several assays have been developed for measurement of procalcitonin levels; in this article, we will briefly present the PCT-sensitive Kryptor(®) test (Brahms, Hennigsdorf, Germany), one of the most widely used assays for procalcitonin in recent studies. Many studies have demonstrated the value of procalcitonin levels for diagnosing sepsis and assessing disease severity. Procalcitonin levels have also been successfully used to guide antibiotic administration. However, procalcitonin is not specific for sepsis, and values need to be interpreted in the context of a full clinical examination and the presence of other signs and symptoms of sepsis.

  14. Fatal sepsis caused by an unusual Klebsiella species that was misidentified by an automated identification system.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Akeda, Yukihiro; Yoshii, Tadashi; Miyaguchi, Shinichi; Inohara, Hidenori; Horii, Toshihiro; Oishi, Kazunori; Iida, Tetsuya; Tomono, Kazunori

    2013-05-01

    This is a description of fatal sepsis caused by infection with Klebsiella variicola, which is an isolate genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient's condition was incorrectly diagnosed as common sepsis caused by K. pneumoniae, which was identified using an automated identification system, but next-generation sequencing and the non-fermentation of adonitol finally identified the cause of sepsis as K. variicola.

  15. Mangling upper limb injuries in industry.

    PubMed

    Ring, D; Jupiter, J B

    1999-01-01

    The salvage of upper limbs mangled by industrial machinery became possible with the development of predictable techniques of vascular and microvascular anastamosis. Unfortunately, many of these salvaged limbs are associated with fair and poor functional outcomes. The quality of the skeletal fixation can have a substantial effect on the functional outcome and should be a major focus of the limb repair process. Internal plate fixation facilitates wound care and limb mobilization without tethering muscle-tendon units and is safe in the majority of severe upper limb injuries provided that all devitalized tissue is debrided and, if necessary, reconstructed using microvascular tissue transfers. Injury patterns, especially those which involve associated injury of the elbow or forearm ligaments, must be identified and treated appropriately. Internal fixation should restore anatomical alignment and provide sufficient stability to allow immediate active mobilization of the limb without contributing to devascularization of the soft tissues or skeleton. PMID:10562855

  16. Proteolytic inactivation of plasma C1- inhibitor in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Huijbregts, C C; Schreuder, W O; Felt-Bersma, R J; Abbink, J J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1989-08-01

    Activation of both the complement system and the contact system of intrinsic coagulation is implicated in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Because C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh) regulates the activation of both cascade systems, we studied the characteristics of plasma C1-Inh in 48 patients with severe sepsis on admission to the Intensive Care Unit at the Free University of Amsterdam. The ratio between the level of functional and antigenic C1-Inh (functional index) was significantly reduced in the patients with sepsis compared with healthy volunteers (P = 0.004). The assessment of modified (cleaved), inactive C1-Inh (iC1-Inh), and complexed forms of C1-Inh (nonfunctional C1-Inh species) revealed that the reduced functional index was mainly due to the presence of iC1-Inh. On SDS-PAGE, iC1-Inh species migrated with a lower apparent molecular weight (Mr 98,000, 91,000, and 86,000) than native C1-Inh (Mr 110,000). Elevated iC1-Inh levels (greater than or equal to 0.13 microM) were found in 81% of all patients, sometimes up to 1.6 microM. Levels of iC1-Inh on admission appeared to be of prognostic value: iC1-Inh was higher in 27 patients who died than in 21 patients who survived (P = 0.003). The mortality in 15 patients with iC1-Inh levels up to 0.2 microM was 27%, but in 12 patients with plasma iC1-Inh exceeding 0.44 microM, the mortality was 83%. The overall mortality in the patients with sepsis was 56%. We propose that the cleavage of C1-Inh in patients with sepsis reflects processes that play a major role in the development of fatal complications during sepsis.

  17. Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of sepsis in critical care.

    PubMed

    Kibe, Savitri; Adams, Kate; Barlow, Gavin

    2011-04-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. Delay in diagnosis and initiation of antibiotics have been shown to increase mortality in this cohort. However, differentiating sepsis from non-infectious triggers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is difficult, especially in critically ill patients who may have SIRS for other reasons. It is this conundrum that predominantly drives broad-spectrum antimicrobial use and the associated evolution of antibiotic resistance in critical care environments. It is perhaps unsurprising, therefore, that the search for a highly accurate biomarker of sepsis has become one of the holy grails of medicine. Procalcitonin (PCT) has emerged as the most studied and promising sepsis biomarker. For diagnostic and prognostic purposes in critical care, PCT is an advance on C-reactive protein and other traditional markers of sepsis, but is not accurate enough for clinicians to dispense with clinical judgement. There is stronger evidence, however, that measurement of PCT has a role in reducing the antibiotic exposure of critical care patients. For units intending to incorporate PCT assays into routine clinical practice, the cost-effectiveness of this is likely to depend on the pre-implementation length of an average antibiotic course and the subsequent impact of implementation on emerging antibiotic resistance. In most of the trials to date, the average baseline duration of the antibiotic course was longer than is currently standard practice in many UK critical care units. Many other biomarkers are currently being investigated. To be highly useful in clinical practice, it may be necessary to combine these with other novel biomarkers and/or traditional markers of sepsis.

  18. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Christina C; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Wu, Manhong; Castillo, Leticia; Jahoor, Farook

    2009-06-02

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by NO synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions which play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore affect NO synthesis in patients with sepsis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whole-body in vivo arginine and citrulline metabolism and NO synthesis rates, and their relationship to protein breakdown in patients with sepsis or septic shock and in healthy volunteers. Endogenous leucine flux, an index of whole-body protein breakdown rate, was measured in 13 critically ill patients with sepsis or septic shock and seven healthy controls using an intravenous infusion of [1-13C]leucine. Arginine flux, citrulline flux and the rate of conversion of arginine into citrulline (an index of NO synthesis) were measured with intravenous infusions of [15N2]guanidino-arginine and [5,5-2H2]citrulline. Plasma concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate, arginine, citrulline and asymmetric dimethylarginine were measured. Compared with controls, patients had a higher leucine flux and higher NO metabolites, but arginine flux, plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentration and the rate of NO synthesis were not different. Citrulline flux and plasma arginine and citrulline were lower in patients than in controls. Arginine production was positively correlated with the protein breakdown rate. Whole-body arginine production and NO synthesis were similar in patients with sepsis and septic shock and healthy controls. Despite increased proteolysis in sepsis, there is a decreased arginine plasma concentration, suggesting inadequate de novo synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline production.

  19. Heparanase mediates renal dysfunction during early sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lygizos, Melissa I; Yang, Yimu; Altmann, Christopher J; Okamura, Kayo; Hernando, Ana Andres; Perez, Mario J; Smith, Lynelle P; Koyanagi, Daniel E; Gandjeva, Aneta; Bhargava, Rhea; Tuder, Rubin M; Faubel, Sarah; Schmidt, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Heparanase, a heparan sulfate-specific glucuronidase, mediates the onset of pulmonary neutrophil adhesion and inflammatory lung injury during early sepsis. We hypothesized that glomerular heparanase is similarly activated during sepsis and contributes to septic acute kidney injury (AKI). We induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in the presence or absence of competitive heparanase inhibitors (heparin or nonanticoagulant N-desulfated re-N-acetylated heparin [NAH]). Four hours after surgery, we collected serum and urine for measurement of renal function and systemic inflammation, invasively determined systemic hemodynamics, harvested kidneys for histology/protein/mRNA, and/or measured glomerular filtration by inulin clearance. CLP-treated mice demonstrated early activation of glomerular heparanase with coincident loss of glomerular filtration, as indicated by a >twofold increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and a >50% decrease in inulin clearance (P < 0.05) in comparison to sham mice. Administration of heparanase inhibitors 2 h prior to CLP attenuated sepsis-induced loss of glomerular filtration rate, demonstrating that heparanase activation contributes to early septic renal dysfunction. Glomerular heparanase activation was not associated with renal neutrophil influx or altered vascular permeability, in marked contrast to previously described effects of pulmonary heparanase on neutrophilic lung injury during sepsis. CLP induction of renal inflammatory gene (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) expression was attenuated by NAH pretreatment. While serum inflammatory indices (KC, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) were not impacted by NAH pretreatment, heparanase inhibition attenuated the CLP-induced increase in serum IL-10. These findings demonstrate that glomerular heparanase is active during sepsis and contributes to septic renal dysfunction via mechanisms disparate from heparanase-mediated lung injury. PMID:24400155

  20. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  1. Development of an anti-endotoxin vaccine for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Alan S

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is an important initiator of sepsis, a clinical syndrome that is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Vaccines directed against core LPS structures that are widely conserved among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have been developed for the treatment and/or prevention of sepsis. Killed whole bacterial vaccines (E. coli O111:B4, J5 [Rc chemotype] mutant and S. minnesota, Re chemotype) protected mice against experimental sepsis. Human J5 immune antisera reduced the mortality from GNB sepsis in a large controlled clinical trial; however, subsequent clinical studies with antiendotoxin antibodies did not demonstrate protective efficacy in sepsis. Multiple clinical studies have since demonstrated a correlation between the level of circulating antibodies to LPS core and morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. We therefore developed a subunit vaccine by combining detoxified J5 LPS (J5 dLPS) with the outer membrane protein (OMP) from group B N. meningitidis. This vaccine was highly efficacious in experimental models of sepsis and progressed to phase 1 clinical trial. While well-tolerated, this vaccine induced only 3-4-fold increases in anti-J5 dLPS antibody. Addition of the TLR9 agonist, oligodeoxynucleotide with a CpG motif, as adjuvant to the vaccine increased antibody levels in mice and the vaccine/CpG combination will progress to phase 1 human study. Additional vaccines in which the core glycolipid was either conjugated to carrier protein or incorporated into liposomes have been developed, but have not progressed to clinical trial. Should an antiendotoxin vaccine become available, a new immunization strategy directed towards distinct populations at risk will be required. PMID:20593272

  2. Sepsis attenuates the anabolic response to skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically stimulated muscle contraction is a potential clinical therapy to treat sepsis-induced myopathy; however, whether sepsis alters contraction-induced anabolic signaling is unknown. Polymicrobial peritonitis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male C57BL/6 mice and time-matched, pair-fed controls (CON). At ~24 h post-CLP, the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve to evoke maximal muscle contractions and the gastrocnemius was collected 2 h later. Protein synthesis was increased by muscle contraction in CON mice. Sepsis suppressed the rate of synthesis in both the non-stimulated (31%) and stimulated (57%) muscle versus CON. Contraction of muscle in CON mice increased the phosphorylation of mTORC1 substrates S6K1 Thr389 (8-fold), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (7-fold) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (11-fold). Sepsis blunted the contraction-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr389 (67%), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (46%) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (85%). Conversely, sepsis did not appear to modulate protein elongation as eEF2 Thr56 phosphorylation was decreased similarly by muscle contraction in both groups. MAPK signaling was discordant following muscle contraction in septic muscle; phosphorylation of ERK Thr202/Tyr204 and p38 Thr180/Tyr182 was increased similarly in both CON and CLP mice while sepsis prevented the contraction-induced phosphorylation of JNK Thr183/Tyr185 and c-JUN Ser63. The expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in muscle was increased by sepsis, and contraction increased TNF-α to a greater extent in muscle from septic than CON mice. Injection of the mTOR inhibitor Torin2 in separate mice confirmed that contraction-induced increases in S6K1 and 4E-BP1 were mTOR-mediated. These findings demonstrate that resistance to contraction-induced anabolic signaling occurs during sepsis and is predominantly mTORC1-dependent. PMID:25423127

  3. Cold agglutinin disease in sepsis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravinder; Kukar, Neetu; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Shaminder

    2015-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAgD) is a type of autoimmune hemolytic anemia which generally occurs in adults and is characterized by the presence of IgM antibodies directed against polysaccharide antigens on red blood cell surface. A 16-year-old male, having clinical picture of sepsis and anemia, presented to the Emergency Department of our Institute in an Hemodynamically unstable condition. Investigation profile revealed hemolysis due to CAgD, which responded to corticosteroids, antibiotics and supportive treatment. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this entity in such type of cases presenting with sepsis and anemia. PMID:26229347

  4. Endothelial and Microcirculatory Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Colbert, James F; Schmidt, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    The microcirculation is a series of arterioles, capillaries, and venules that performs essential functions of oxygen and nutrient delivery, customized to the unique physiologic needs of the supplied organ. The homeostatic microcirculatory response to infection can become harmful if overactive and/or dysregulated. Pathologic microcirculatory dysfunction can be directly visualized by intravital microscopy or indirectly measured via detection of circulating biomarkers. Although several treatments have been shown to protect the microcirculation during sepsis, they have not improved patient outcomes when applied indiscriminately. Future outcomes-oriented studies are needed to test sepsis therapeutics when personalized to a patient's microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:27229643

  5. Neuroanatomy and Physiology of Brain Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mazeraud, Aurelien; Pascal, Quentin; Verdonk, Franck; Heming, Nicholas; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), a complication of sepsis, is often complicated by acute and long-term brain dysfunction. SAE is associated with electroencephalogram pattern changes and abnormal neuroimaging findings. The major processes involved are neuroinflammation, circulatory dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Neuroinflammation and microcirculatory alterations are diffuse, whereas excitotoxicity might occur in more specific structures involved in the response to stress and the control of vital functions. A dysfunction of the brainstem, amygdala, and hippocampus might account for the increased mortality, psychological disorders, and cognitive impairment. This review summarizes clinical and paraclinical features of SAE and describes its mechanisms at cellular and structural levels. PMID:27229649

  6. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  7. Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: current evidence for emergency department management.

    PubMed

    Booker, Ethan

    2011-05-01

    In the middle of a busy shift, a patient arrives by ambulance from a local long-term care facility with a report of altered mental status. You enter the room to find a chronically ill-appearing 85-year-old man with fever, tachycardia, and hypotension, and it is instantly apparent that this patient is septic. What is not clear is what the source is, what modifications in treatment might be necessary based on preexisting microbial resistance, and which of the array of invasive resuscitation techniques are appropriate when meaningful recovery is questionable and efforts may not be desired by the patient and family. You order IV fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics; send lab tests, including lactate and cultures of blood, urine, and sputum; and begin to review his extensive history to discuss goals of care with his family and primary doctor. While reviewing these issues, a 54-year-old woman with a history of asthma is brought straight back from triage with respiratory distress. You listen to her lungs, expecting wheezes, but hear decreased lung sounds at the right base, preserved air movement elsewhere, and her skin radiates heat. Now, on the monitor, she has a heart rate of 135 beats per minute, blood pressure of 90/60 mm Hg, O2 saturation of 86%, and a temperature of 39.4 degrees C (103 degrees F). You again identify sepsis and instruct your team that you will be using your department's severe sepsis protocol. Equipment for monitoring and procedures is assembled, your staff provides preprinted order and monitoring flow sheets, and the ICU is alerted. Within an hour, the patient is intubated, has a central line placed, and has received IV fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics and norepinephrine, and you are pleased to see a MAP of 67 mm Hg, a lactate decreasing from an initial value of 7.0, CVP of 10, and ScvO2 of 78%.

  8. Endovascular Techniques in Limb Salvage: Stents

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with critical limb ischemia, the first-line approach for limb salvage has shifted over the past decade from bypass surgery to endovascular intervention. Stenting for the treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease is an important tool and continues to evolve, with new stent designs and technologies that have been developed to provide superior patency rates and limb salvage. In this article, we discuss the role of peripheral stenting in the treatment of patients with critical limb ischemia, including a review of the relevant current literature and the future directions of such interventions. PMID:23805339

  9. The accessory limb model: an alternative experimental system of limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Gardiner, David M; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Accessory limb model (ALM) was developed as an experimental model and functional assay for limb regeneration. The ALM provides several ways to identify pathways and test for signaling molecules that regulate limb regeneration. Here, we summarize the history of the ALM and describe the specific details involved in inducing ectopic blastemas and limbs from a skin wound on the side of the arm. PMID:25740480

  10. Novel predictors of sepsis outperform the American Burn Association sepsis criteria in the burn intensive care unit patient.

    PubMed

    Mann-Salinas, Elizabeth A; Baun, Mara M; Meininger, Janet C; Murray, Clinton K; Aden, James K; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and American Burn Association (ABA) criteria predict sepsis in the burn patient and develop a model representing the best combination of novel clinical sepsis predictors. A retrospective, case-controlled, within-patient comparison of burn patients admitted to a single intensive care unit from January 2005 to September 2010 was made. Blood culture results were paired with documented sepsis: positive-sick, negative-sick (collectively defined as sick), and negative-not sick. Data for all predictors were collected for the 72 hours before blood culture. Variables were evaluated using regression and area under the curve (AUC) analyses. Fifty-nine subjects represented 177 culture periods. SIRS criteria were not discriminative: 98% of the subjects met criteria. ABA sepsis criteria were different on the day before (P = .004). The six best-fit variables identified for the model included heart rate > 130 beats per min, mean arterial pressure < 60 mm Hg, base deficit < -6 mEq/L, temperature < 36°C, use of vasoactive medications, and glucose > 150 mg/dl. The model was significant in predicting positive-sick and sick, with an AUC of 0.775 (P < .001) and 0.714 (P < .001), respectively; comparatively, the ABA criteria AUC was 0.619 (P = .028) and 0.597 (P = .035), respectively. Usefulness of the ABA criteria to predict sepsis is limited to the day before blood culture is obtained. A significant contribution of this research is the identification of six novel sepsis predictors for the burn patient.

  11. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  12. Impact of antibiotic resistance on the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, John

    2003-01-01

    Antibiotics are essential to the treatment of bacterial sepsis as they reduce the bacterial burden. The impact of bacterial resistance has recently been studied and found to be important in a range of conditions. Resistance to antibiotics can be defined genotypically, phenotypically and clinically through pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies and their correlations with clinical outcomes. Although the kinetics of antibiotics has been shown to be favourably altered in sepsis, a range of studies in sepsis has revealed that for most pathogens resistance contributes to significant increases in mortality. This has been clearly demonstrated in bacteraemia, including community- and hospital-acquired infection, and with bacteraemia caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant staphylococci and extended-spectrum producing Gram-negative bacteria. Significant mortality increases have also been seen with ventilator-associated pneumonia and serious infections requiring admission to intensive care. Gentotypic and phenotypic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci causing bacteraemia, and in invasive pneumococcal disease has not shown differences in mortality. In the latter case, dosage regimens have to date been adequate to overcome laboratory-defined resistance. Early indications are that de-escalating therapy from broad-spectrum initial coverage after results of cultures and susceptibility tests become available does not jeopardize outcomes, and further prospective studies are warranted. There is now convincing evidence that broad-spectrum initial therapy to cover the likely pathogens and their resistances pending culture results is mandatory in sepsis to minimize adverse outcomes.

  13. Late implant sepsis after fracture surgery in HIV positive patients.

    PubMed

    Graham, Simon Matthew; Bates, Jes; Mkandawire, Nyengo; Harrison, William J

    2015-04-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the incidence of late-implant sepsis after internal fixation in HIV-positive patients. A total of 91 HIV-positive patients (67 males and 24 females) who underwent 103 procedures (111 implants) were followed up for a mean period of 27 months (range 12-66 months). No occurrences of late implant sepsis were found in 100 implants (94 procedures) in 82 patients at 27 months' follow-up (range 12-66 months). Nine patients (9 procedures, 9 implants) developed early infections within 6 weeks and were treated with antibiotics (6 patients), amputation (1 patient) or removal of metal work (2 patients). There was no evidence of subsequent late implant sepsis in any of these patients, at a mean follow-up of 25 months (range 12-52 months). This study demonstrates that it is safe to perform internal fixation in HIV-positive patients, with no observed increase risk of late implant sepsis. There is no indication to remove implants after fracture union, other than for the general clinical indications that may lead to removal of metal work in any patient.

  14. Fatal sepsis by Bacillus circulans in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Alebouyeh, M; Gooran Orimi, P; Azimi-rad, M; Tajbakhsh, M; Tajeddin, E; Jahani Sherafat, S; Nazemalhosseini mojarad, E; Zali, MR

    2011-01-01

    An immunosuppressed man was admitted to hospital with diarrhea and a history of urinary tract infection. He was subjected to treatment with antibiotics. The patient died of putative severe sepsis. The etiological agent was a carbapenemase producing isolate of Bacillus circulans with resistance to all prescribed antimicrobial agents. PMID:22347600

  15. Time for a neonatal–specific consensus definition for sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Wong, Hector R.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Bizzarro, Matthew J.; Saiman, Lisa; Polin, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the accuracy of the pediatric consensus definition of sepsis in term neonates and to determine the definition of neonatal sepsis used. Study selection The review focused primarily on pediatric literature relevant to the topic of interest. Conclusions Neonatal sepsis is variably defined based on a number of clinical and laboratory criteria that make the study of this common and devastating condition very difficult. Diagnostic challenges and uncertain disease epidemiology necessarily result from a variable definition of disease. In 2005, intensivists caring for children recognized that as new drugs became available, children would be increasingly studied and thus, pediatric-specific consensus definitions were needed. Pediatric sepsis criteria are not accurate for term neonates and have not been examined in preterm neonates for whom the developmental stage influences aberrations associated with host immune response. Thus, specific consensus definitions for both term and preterm neonates are needed. Such definitions are critical for the interpretation of observational studies, future training of scientists and practitioners, and implementation of clinical trials in neonates. PMID:24751791

  16. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation.

  17. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  18. [Metabolic therapy and pulmonary disfunction in patients with obstetric sepsis].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, A Iu; Zaĭtsev, P M; Zubeev, P S; Mokrov, K B; Balandina, A V; Gushchina, N N; Kucherenko, V E

    2011-01-01

    The role of reamberin, a succinate-containing infusion preparation in correlation of pulmonary metabolic and respiratory disturbances in patients with obstetric puerperal sepsis was estimated. The prospective randomized study enrolled 43 patients with puerperal obstetric sepsis complicated by polyorganic deficiency (SOFA 8-10). Nineteen patients of the 1st group and 24 patients of the 2nd group were additionally treated with reamberin in a dose of 800 ml/day for 8 days. The venous and arterial difference by glucose, lactate, pyruvate, diene conjugates, malondialdehyde and ceruloplasmin was investigated. The blood gases were determined with the Ciba Corning 45 apparatus. Lower metabolic activity of the lungs with prevalence of the glucose anaerobic metabolism and lower activity of the intrapulmonary antioxidant protection were observed in the patients with obstetric sepsis. The use of reamberin in the complex therapy of obstetric sepsis promoted maintenance of the initial balance and anaeroibic and aerobic pulmonary metabolism, thus providing shorter terms of the decompensation and recovery of the lungs respiratory function. PMID:21913408

  19. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  20. Therapeutic interventions in sepsis: current and anticipated pharmacological agents

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Prashant; Rao, G Madhava; Pandey, Gitu; Sharma, Shweta; Mittapelly, Naresh; Shegokar, Ranjita; Mishra, Prabhat Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterized by a multisystem response to a pathogenic assault due to underlying infection that involves a combination of interconnected biochemical, cellular and organ–organ interactive networks. After the withdrawal of recombinant human-activated protein C (rAPC), researchers and physicians have continued to search for new therapeutic approaches and targets against sepsis, effective in both hypo- and hyperinflammatory states. Currently, statins are being evaluated as a viable option in clinical trials. Many agents that have shown favourable results in experimental sepsis are not clinically effective or have not been clinically evaluated. Apart from developing new therapeutic molecules, there is great scope for for developing a variety of drug delivery strategies, such as nanoparticulate carriers and phospholipid-based systems. These nanoparticulate carriers neutralize intracorporeal LPS as well as deliver therapeutic agents to targeted tissues and subcellular locations. Here, we review and critically discuss the present status and new experimental and clinical approaches for therapeutic intervention in sepsis. PMID:24977655

  1. Early onset neonatal sepsis due to Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sourabh; Narang, Anil

    2004-11-01

    Two neonates, both 32-weekers, developed Morganella morganii sepsis on the first day of life. They presented within a day of each other, primarily with respiratory signs. In both cases there was a history of spontaneous premature rupture of membranes, exposure to a single dose of ampicillin ante-partum, and similar antibiograms. No common source could be identified.

  2. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  3. Sepsis Patient Detection and Monitor Based on Auto-BN.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Sha, Lui; Rahmaniheris, Maryam; Wan, Binhua; Hosseini, Mohammad; Tan, Pengliu; Berlin, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition caused by an inappropriate immune response to infection, and is a leading cause of elderly death globally. Early recognition of patients and timely antibiotic therapy based on guidelines improve survival rate. Unfortunately, for those patients, it is often detected late because it is too expensive and impractical to perform frequent monitoring for all the elderly. In this paper, we present a risk driven sepsis screening and monitoring framework to shorten the time of onset detection without frequent monitoring of all the elderly. Within this framework, the sepsis ultimate risk of onset probability and mortality is calculated based on a novel temporal probabilistic model named Auto-BN, which consists of time dependent state, state dependent property, and state dependent inference structures. Then, different stages of a patient are encoded into different states, monitoring frequency is encoded into the state dependent property, and screening content is encoded into different state dependent inference structures. In this way, the screening and monitoring frequency and content can be automatically adjusted when encoding the sepsis ultimate risk into the guard of state transition. This allows for flexible manipulation of the tradeoff between screening accuracy and frequency. We evaluate its effectiveness through empirical study, and incorporate it into existing medical guidance system to improve medical healthcare.

  4. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  5. Surviving Sepsis Puerto Rico: A Call For Action.

    PubMed

    Vigo, Ronald; Matos, Miguel Laforet; Turbay, Tamid

    2015-01-01

    There are 1.7 million sepsis-related hospitalizations each year making it the sixth most common cause for hospitalization in the United States. Not only are this hospitalizations common, they are expensive to our medical system with $15.3 billion spent yearly (3) and hospitalizations lasting 75% longer than for other conditions. In 2001, Rivers et al published in the NEJM the results of his study "Early Goal Directed Therapy (EGDT) in The Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock". EGDT demonstrated a 16.5% decrease in mortality in septic patients (4). In 2002 the Surviving Sepsis Campaign began as a collaboration between the Society of Critical Care Medicine and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine with goals of reducing worldwide sepsis related mortality by 25% in the next 5 years. Despite the proven benefit of early identification and management, knowledge regarding the topic in Puerto Rico remains scarce. In a study performed in PR by Fernandez et al. in 2006, only an alarming 31.4% of doctors from different specialties correctly identified SIRS criteria. Our goal is to educate physicians about the importance of early identification and treatment of the septic patient. A campaign to increase awareness and improve care is essential and we propose treatment protocols for our Puerto Rican hospitals to help reduce morbidity, mortality, length of stay and costs. PMID:26434083

  6. Soluble Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 and Echocardiography in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Magrini, Laura; Marino, Rossella; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) has emerged as a biomarker of cardiac stretch or remodeling, and has demonstrated a role in acutely decompensated heart failure. However, its role in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction is still unknown. We explored whether sST2 serum concentration reflects either systolic or diastolic dysfunction as measured by Doppler echocardiography. In a total of 127 patients with sepsis, correlations between sST2 and blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV diastolic filling (ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity), and resting pulmonary arterial pressure were evaluated. Correlations between sST2 and other sepsis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP] and procalcitonin) were also examined. sST2 showed a moderate correlation with mean arterial pressure (r=-0.3499) but no correlation with LV ejection fraction, diastolic filling, or resting pulmonary hypertension. It showed moderate correlations with hs-CRP and procalcitonin (r=0.2608 and r=0.3829, respectively). sST2 might have a role as a biomarker of shock or inflammation, but it cannot reflect echocardiographic findings of LV ejection fraction or diastolic filling in sepsis. PMID:27578513

  7. Marked alterations of neutrophil functions during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Plassais, Jonathan; Jallades, Laurent; Malcus, Christophe; Poitevin-Later, Françoise; Textoris, Julien; Lepape, Alain; Monneret, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Severe septic syndromes deeply impair innate and adaptive immunity and are responsible for sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Although neutrophils represent the first line of defense against infection, little is known about their phenotype and functions a few days after sepsis, when the immunosuppressive phase is maximal (i.e., between d 3 and 8). The objective of the present study was to perform, for the first time, a global evaluation of neutrophil alterations in immunosuppressed septic patients (at d 3-4 and d 6-8) using phenotypic and functional studies. In addition, the potential association of these parameters and deleterious outcomes was assessed. Peripheral blood was collected from 43 septic shock patients and compared with that of 23 healthy controls. In the septic patients, our results highlight a markedly altered neutrophil chemotaxis (functional and chemokine receptor expressions), oxidative burst, and lactoferrin content and an increased number of circulating immature granulocytes (i.e., CD10(dim)CD16(dim)). These aspects were associated with an increased risk of death after septic shock. In contrast, phagocytosis and activation capacities were conserved. To conclude, circulating neutrophils present with phenotypic, functional, and morphologic alterations a few days after sepsis onset. These dysfunctions might participate in the deleterious role of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. The present results open new perspectives in the mechanisms favoring nosocomial infections after septic shock. They deserve to be further investigated in a larger clinical study and in animal models recapitulating these alterations. PMID:26224052

  8. IL-35 is elevated in clinical and experimental sepsis and mediates inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ju; Xu, Fang; Lin, Shihui; Tao, Xintong; Xiang, Yu; Lai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Liping

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis carries considerable morbidity and mortality. IL-35 is a newly described cytokine, which plays a regulatory role in infection and immunity. In this study, we found that IL-35 concentration in serum samples from adult or child patients with sepsis was significantly higher compared with that from healthy controls. IL-35 gradually increased according to sepsis severity. Increased serum IL-35 was associated with LOD (Logistic Organ Dysfunction) or SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) scores, and correlated with markers of inflammation. In murine abdominal sepsis, administration of anti-IL-35 p35 antibodies significantly diminished dissemination of the bacteria in septic animals, which was accompanied by enhanced local neutrophil recruitment and early increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, sepsis is associated with enhanced release of IL-35. In abdominal sepsis, IL-35 likely facilitates bacterial dissemination. IL-35 plays a major role in the immunopathogenesis of sepsis.

  9. CLOCK modulates survival and acute lung injury in mice with polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Hsieh, I-Chang; Shie, Shian-Sen; Ho, Ming-Yun; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-09-16

    Polymicrobial sepsis is a potentially fatal condition and a significant burden on health care systems. Acute lung injury is the most common complication of sepsis and results in high mortality. However, there has been no recent significant progress in the treatment of sepsis or acute lung injury induced by sepsis. Here we show that mice deficient in the circadian protein CLOCK had better survival than wild-type mice after induction of polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Inflammatory cytokine production was attenuated and bacterial clearance was improved in CLOCK-deficient mice. Moreover, acute lung injury after induction of sepsis was significantly decreased in CLOCK-deficient mice. Genome-wide profiling analysis showed that inhibin signaling was reduced in CLOCK-deficient mice. These data establish the importance of circadian CLOCK-inhibin signaling in sepsis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27520377

  10. 49 CFR 572.20 - Limbs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limbs. 572.20 Section 572.20 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.20 Limbs. The...

  11. Interhemispheric sensorimotor integration; an upper limb phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Jaspers, Ellen; Keller, Martin; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Somatosensory information from the limbs reaches the contralateral Primary Sensory Cortex (S1) with a delay of 23ms for finger, and 40ms for leg (somatosensory N20/N40). Upon arrival of this input in the cortex, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are momentarily inhibited. This phenomenon is called 'short latency afferent inhibition (SAI)' and can be used as a tool for investigating sensorimotor interactions in the brain. We used SAI to investigate the process of sensorimotor integration in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulated limb. We hypothesized that ipsilateral SAI would occur with a delay following the onset of contralateral SAI, to allow for transcallosal conduction of the signal. We electrically stimulated the limb either contralateral or ipsilateral to the hemisphere receiving TMS, using a range of different interstimulus intervals (ISI). We tested the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle in the hand, and Tibialis Anterior (TA) in the lower leg, in three separate experiments. Ipsilateral SAI was elicited in the upper limb (FDI) at all ISIs that were greater than N20+18ms (all p<.05) but never at any earlier timepoint. No ipsilateral SAI was detected in the lower limb (TA) at any of the tested ISIs. The delayed onset timing of ipsilateral SAI suggests that transcallosal communication mediates this inhibitory process for the upper limb. The complete absence of ipsilateral SAI in the lower limb warrants consideration of the potential limb-specific differences in demands for bilateral sensorimotor integration. PMID:27425210

  12. Effects of Limb Posture on Reactive Hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anandi; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.; Hogeman, Cindy; Blaha, Cheryl; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2012-01-01

    To examine the role of limb posture on vascular conductance during rapid changes in vascular transmural pressure, we determined brachial (n = 10) and femoral (n = 10) artery post-occlusive reactive hyperemic blood flow (RHBF, ultrasound/Doppler) and vascular conductance in healthy humans with each limb at three different positions – horizontal, up and down. Limb posture was varied by raising or lowering the arm or leg from the horizontal position by 45°. In both limbs, peak RHBF and vascular conductance was highest in the down or horizontal position and lowest in the up position (arm up 338 ± 38, supine 430 ± 52, down 415 ± 52 ml/min, P < 0.05; leg up 1208 ± 88, supine 1579 ± 130, down 1767 ± 149 ml/min, P < 0.05). In contrast, the maximal dynamic fall in blood flow following peak RHBF (in ml/s/s) in both limbs was highest in the limb down position and lowest with the limb elevated (P < 0.05). These data suggest that the magnitude and temporal pattern of limb reactive hyperemia is in part related to changes in vascular transmural pressure and independent of systemic blood pressure and sympathetic control. PMID:21161263

  13. Interhemispheric sensorimotor integration; an upper limb phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Jaspers, Ellen; Keller, Martin; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Somatosensory information from the limbs reaches the contralateral Primary Sensory Cortex (S1) with a delay of 23ms for finger, and 40ms for leg (somatosensory N20/N40). Upon arrival of this input in the cortex, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are momentarily inhibited. This phenomenon is called 'short latency afferent inhibition (SAI)' and can be used as a tool for investigating sensorimotor interactions in the brain. We used SAI to investigate the process of sensorimotor integration in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulated limb. We hypothesized that ipsilateral SAI would occur with a delay following the onset of contralateral SAI, to allow for transcallosal conduction of the signal. We electrically stimulated the limb either contralateral or ipsilateral to the hemisphere receiving TMS, using a range of different interstimulus intervals (ISI). We tested the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle in the hand, and Tibialis Anterior (TA) in the lower leg, in three separate experiments. Ipsilateral SAI was elicited in the upper limb (FDI) at all ISIs that were greater than N20+18ms (all p<.05) but never at any earlier timepoint. No ipsilateral SAI was detected in the lower limb (TA) at any of the tested ISIs. The delayed onset timing of ipsilateral SAI suggests that transcallosal communication mediates this inhibitory process for the upper limb. The complete absence of ipsilateral SAI in the lower limb warrants consideration of the potential limb-specific differences in demands for bilateral sensorimotor integration.

  14. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  19. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb

    PubMed Central

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A.

    2016-01-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  20. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb.

    PubMed

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A; Danish, Qazi

    2016-09-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  1. Considerations in the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Chris; Spigarelli, Michael G; Campbell, Sarah C; Constance, Jonathan E; Courter, Joshua D; Thorell, Emily A; Olson, Jared; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2014-02-01

    The management of neonatal sepsis is challenging owing to complex developmental and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe (i) the changing epidemiology of early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis; (ii) the pharmacologic considerations that influence the safety and efficacy of antibacterials, antifungals, and immunomodulatory adjuvants; and (iii) the recommended dosing regimens for pharmacologic agents commonly used in the treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal sepsis is marked by high morbidity and mortality, such that prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential following culture collection. Before culture results are available, combination therapy with ampicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended. When meningitis is suspected, ampicillin and cefotaxime may be considered. Following identification of the causative organism and in vitro susceptibility testing, antimicrobial therapy may be narrowed to provide targeted coverage. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered for neonates receiving vancomycin or aminoglycoside therapies. For neonates with invasive fungal infections, the development of new antifungal agents has significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in recent years. Liposomal amphotericin B has been found to be safe and efficacious in patients with renal impairment or toxicity caused by conventional amphotericin B. Antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole has also been reported to dramatically reduce rates of neonatal invasive fungal infections and to improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes among treated children. Additionally, several large multicenter studies are currently investigating the safety and efficacy of oral lactoferrin as an immunoprophylactic agent for the prevention of neonatal sepsis. PMID:24218112

  2. Membrane TLR Signaling Mechanisms in the Gastrointestinal Tract during Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Bettina M.; Bauer, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Our bacterial residents are deadly Janus-faced indwellers which can lead to a septic-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure. Over half of ICU patients suffer from infections and sepsis remains among the top ten causes of death in the United States. Severe ileus frequently accompanies sepsis setting up an insidious cycle of gut-derived microbial translocation and the copious intestinal production of potent systemic inflammatory mediators. Few therapeutic advances have occurred to prevent/treat the sequelae of sepsis. Here, we selectively review studies on cellular membrane bound Toll-like receptor (TLR) mechanisms of ileus. Virtually no data exists on Gram-positive/TLR2 signaling mechanisms of ileus, however, TLR2 is highly inducible by numerous inflammatory mediators and studies using clinically relevant scenarios of Gram-positive sepsis are needed. Specific Gram-negative/TLR4 signaling pathways are being elucidated using a “reverse engineering” approach and have revealed that endotoxin induced ileus is dually mediated by classical leukocyte inflammatory signaling and by a MyD88-dependent non-bone marrow derived mechanism, but the specific roles of individual cell populations are still unknown. Like TLR2, little is also know of the role of flagellin/TLR5 signaling in ileus. But, much can be learned by understanding TLR signaling in other systems. Clearly, the use of polymicrobial models provide important clinical relevancy but simultaneous activation of virtually all pattern recognition receptors make it impossible to discretely study specific signaling pathways. We believe that dissection of individual TLR pathways, which can then be intelligently re-assembled in a meaningful manner, will provide insight into treatments for sepsis induced ileus. PMID:20377787

  3. Thromboelastometry in patients with severe sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Sivula, Mirka; Pettilä, Ville; Niemi, Tomi T; Varpula, Marjut; Kuitunen, Anne H

    2009-09-01

    Severe sepsis induces coagulopathy, which may lead to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Thromboelastometry is a point-of-care whole blood coagulation monitor, which has been validated in human endotoxemia model. We assessed thromboelastometry in severe sepsis and overt DIC and investigated its applicability in differentiating sepsis-related coagulation disturbances. Thromboelastometry (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests) and traditional coagulation assays were analyzed in 28 patients with severe sepsis, 12 of who fulfilled the criteria of overt DIC on admission. Ten healthy persons served as controls. Coagulation parameters, clotting time, clot formation time (CFT), alpha angle, maximal clot firmness (MCF) and lysis index at 60 min, were registered. In patients with overt DIC, EXTEM MCF, CFT and alpha angle differed from that in both healthy controls and patients without DIC, indicating hypocoagulation (MCF 52, 63 and 68 mm; CFT 184, 88 and 73 s; and alpha angle 58, 72 and 76 degrees , respectively, P < 0.01 for all). In patients without DIC, the trend was toward hypercoagulation in EXTEM and FIBTEM MCF (68 vs. 63 mm, P = 0.042 and 23 vs. 15 mm, P = 0.034, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that MCF, CFT and alpha angle discriminated patients with overt DIC moderately (area under curve 0.891, 0.815 and 0.828, respectively, P < 0.001 for all). Traditional coagulation assays showed progressively worsening coagulopathy from controls to septic patients without DIC and further to those with overt DIC. We conclude that thromboelastometry may be a valuable tool in assessing whole blood coagulation capacity in patients with severe sepsis with and without overt DIC.

  4. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  5. Sinomenine hydrochloride protects against polymicrobial sepsis via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenmei; Lang, Yuejiao; Tong, Zhongyi; Wang, Kangkai; Zhang, Huali; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-23

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs). The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN) is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM). 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  6. Rapid rewarming after therapeutic hypothermia worsens outcome in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, You Hwan; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Rim, Kwang Pil; Cho, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to investigate the effect of the rewarming rate on survival and acute lung injury in sepsis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent cecal ligation and incision. After 1 hour of sepsis induction, normothermia (37°C±0.5°C, NT group) or hypothermia (32°C±0.5°C) was induced. Hypothermia was maintained for 4 hours and rats were divided into two groups according to the rewarming rate: RW1 group, 1 hour of rewarming; and RW2 group, 2 hours of rewarming. In the survival study, rats were observed for 12 hours after sepsis induction (n=6 per group). In the second experiment, rats were sacrificed 7 hours after sepsis induction, and lung tissues and plasma were harvested (n=10 per group). Results In the survival study, the RW2 group survived longer than the RW1 group (P<0.05), but the RW1 and NT groups showed no significant difference in survival duration (P>0.05). The histological lung injury score and malondialdehyde concentrations in the lung tissues were significantly higher in the RW1 group than in the RW2 group (P<0.05). Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 concentration and the ratio of IL-6 to IL-10 were higher in the RW1 group than in the RW2 group (P<0.05). Conclusion Rapid rewarming after therapeutic hypothermia results in a shorter survival period and acute lung injury in sepsis, which could be associated with the inflammatory responses.

  7. Neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission: an epidemiological study from the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo".

    PubMed

    López Sastre, J B; Coto Cotallo, G D; Fernández Colomer, B

    2000-01-01

    A prospective multicenter study was designed to assess the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission in Spain. The study was carried out by the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo" that included the neonatal services of 19 tertiary care (reference) hospitals and 9 secondary care hospitals. Prospective data from infants with culture-proved neonatal sepsis, clinical sepsis and bacteremia were recorded for 1995 to 1997. In a total of 203,288 neonates, proven sepsis was diagnosed in 515 (rate of 2.5 per 1000 live births), clinical sepsis in 724 (rate of 3.6 per 1000 live births), and bacteremia of vertical transmission in 155 (rate of 0.76 per 1000 live births). Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (< or = 1500 g) showed a significantly higher incidence of confirmed sepsis (26.5 per 1000 live births) and clinical sepsis (32.4 per 1000 live births) than infants weighing > 1500 g. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most frequent causative pathogen in cases of proven sepsis (51%) and bacteremia (33%), but Escherichia coli was the most frequently recovered organism in the VLBW group. The mortality rate of proven sepsis was significantly higher than that of clinical sepsis (8.7% versus 4.3%) (P < 0.01). In the VLBW cohort, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate between proven sepsis and clinical sepsis. In conclusion, clinical sepsis was the most frequent diagnosis, probably related to intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most frequent causative pathogen of culture-positive sepsis and bacteremia, whereas E. coli was the most significant in VLBW infants.

  8. IMPACT OF SEPSIS CLASSIFICATION AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE STATUS ON OUTCOME AMONG PATIENTS TREATED WITH APPROPRIATE THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Jason P.; Lane, Michael A.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of sepsis classification and multidrug resistance status on outcome in patients receiving appropriate initial antibiotic therapy. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting Barnes-Jewish Hospital, a 1250-bed teaching hospital. Patients Individuals with Enterobacteriaceae sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock that received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy between June 2009 and December 2013. Interventions Clinical outcomes were compared according to multidrug resistance status, sepsis classification, demographics, severity of illness, comorbidities, and antimicrobial treatment. Measurements and Main Results We identified 510 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia and sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Sixty-seven patients (13.1%) were non-survivors. Mortality increased significantly with increasing severity of sepsis (3.5%, 9.9%, and 28.6%, for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock, respectively, p<0.05). Time to antimicrobial therapy was not significantly associated with outcome. APACHE II was more predictive of mortality than age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index. Multidrug resistance status did not result in excess mortality. Length of intensive care unit and hospital stay increased with more severe sepsis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, African-American race, sepsis severity, APACHE II score, solid organ cancer, cirrhosis, and transfer from an outside hospital were all predictors of mortality. Conclusions Our results support sepsis severity, but not multidrug resistance status as being an important predictor of death when all patients receive appropriate initial antibiotic therapy. Future sepsis trials should attempt to provide appropriate antimicrobial therapy and take sepsis severity into careful account when determining outcomes. PMID:25855900

  9. Hospital Case Volume and Outcomes among Patients Hospitalized with Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Processes of care are potential determinants of outcomes in patients with severe sepsis. Whether hospitals with more experience caring for patients with severe sepsis also have improved outcomes is unclear. Objectives: To determine associations between hospital severe sepsis caseload and outcomes. Methods: We analyzed data from U.S. academic hospitals provided through University HealthSystem Consortium. We used University HealthSystem Consortium’s sepsis mortality model (c-statistic, 0.826) for risk adjustment. Validated International Classification of Disease, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification algorithms were used to identify hospital severe sepsis case volume. Associations between risk-adjusted severe sepsis case volume and mortality, length of stay, and costs were analyzed using spline regression and analysis of covariance. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 56,997 patients with severe sepsis admitted to 124 U.S. academic hospitals during 2011. Hospitals admitted 460 ± 216 patients with severe sepsis, with median length of stay 12.5 days (interquartile range, 11.1–14.2), median direct costs $26,304 (interquartile range, $21,900–$32,090), and average hospital mortality 25.6 ± 5.3%. Higher severe sepsis case volume was associated with lower unadjusted severe sepsis mortality (R2 = 0.10, P = 0.01) and risk-adjusted severe sepsis mortality (R2 = 0.21, P < 0.001). After further adjustment for geographic region, number of beds, and long-term acute care referrals, hospitals in the highest severe sepsis case volume quartile had an absolute 7% (95% confidence interval, 2.4–11.6%) lower hospital mortality than hospitals in the lowest quartile. We did not identify associations between case volume and resource use. Conclusions: Academic hospitals with higher severe sepsis case volume have lower severe sepsis hospital mortality without higher costs. PMID:24400669

  10. [Psychological adjustment following lower limb amputation].

    PubMed

    Panyi, Lilla Krisztina; Lábadi, Beatrix

    2015-09-27

    Rehabilitation of lower limb amputees and the fitting of their prosthesis depend highly on the psychological adjustment process and motivational state of the patient. The loss of a limb is extremely challenging and can cause various physical and psychological problems. Depression, anxiety, decreased well-being and quality of life, body image dissatisfaction and changes in self-concept and identity are frequent after lower limb amputation. In the interest of adjustment patients have to cope with the emerging changes and difficulties in their lifes as well as the problems in psychological functioning. It is important for them to accept the alterations in their body and identity, and integrate them in a new self-concept in which process motivation is a fundamental issue. The aim of this article is to review the literature on psychological consequences of lower limb amputation, and to propose an integrative way of rehabilitation for lower limb amputees. PMID:26550913

  11. Caring for patients with limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Virani, Anila; Werunga, Jane; Ewashen, Carol; Green, Theresa

    2015-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the care of patients undergoing limb amputation. Absence of a limb can be congenital or the result of trauma or complications of chronic diseases. While the economic burden of limb amputation is significant, nurses have an important role in limiting other losses attributable to limb loss, such as long-term disability leading to loss of employment and delayed return to work or school. Comprehensive nursing assessments and appropriate interventions, pre and post-operatively, as well as early discharge planning and community reintegration can help avoid some of these losses. Nurses should be aware of the resources available in communities and work in multidisciplinary teams to ensure optimal outcomes for patients following limb amputation and their families.

  12. Planar Cell Polarity in vertebrate limb morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the vertebrate limb development have contributed significantly to understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying growth, patterning and morphogenesis of a complex multicellular organism. In the limb, well-defined signaling centers interact to coordinate limb growth and patterning along the three axes. Recent analyses of live imaging and mathematical modeling have provided evidence that polarized cell behaviors governed by morphogen gradients play an important role in shaping the limb bud. Furthermore, the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway that controls uniformly polarized cellular behaviors in a field of cells has emerged to be critical for directional morphogenesis in the developing limb. Directional information coded in the morphogen gradient may be interpreted by responding cells through regulating the activities of PCP components in a Wnt morphogen dose-dependent manner. PMID:23747034

  13. Stress fractures of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Brukner, P

    1998-12-01

    Stress fractures are commonly found in the lower limb, but also occur in the upper limb, and are particularly associated with upper limb-dominated sports such as tennis and swimming and those involving throwing activities. Stress fractures of the clavicle and scapula are rare but have been reported, whereas those of the humerus are more frequent and have been described mainly in adolescent baseball pitchers. Olecranon stress fractures occur in throwers and gymnasts. Stress fractures of the ulna and radius have also been reported in a number of different upper limb-dominated sports. In all cases, these fractures heal with conservative management. The physician should consider stress fracture as a possible diagnosis in cases of upper limb pain of bony origin where the pain is associated with overuse.

  14. On stellar limb darkening and exoplanetary transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines how to compare stellar limb-darkening coefficients evaluated from model atmospheres with those derived from photometry. Different characterizations of a given model atmosphere can give quite different numerical results (even for a given limb-darkening 'law'), while light-curve analyses yield limb-darkening coefficients that are dependent on system geometry, and that are not directly comparable to any model-atmosphere representation. These issues are examined in the context of exoplanetary transits, which offer significant advantages over traditional binary-star eclipsing systems in the study of stellar limb darkening. 'Like for like' comparisons between light-curve analyses and new model-atmosphere results, mediated by synthetic photometry, are conducted for a small sample of stars. Agreement between the resulting synthetic-photometry/atmosphere-model (SPAM) limb-darkening coefficients and empirical values ranges from very good to quite poor, even though the targets investigated show only a small dispersion in fundamental stellar parameters.

  15. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  16. Phantom Limb Sensation (PLS) and Phantom Limb Pain (PLP) among Young Landmine Amputees

    PubMed Central

    POOR ZAMANY NEJATKERMANY, Mahtab; MODIRIAN, Ehsan; SOROUSH, Mohammadreza; MASOUMI, Mehdi; HOSSEINI, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of phantom limb sensation (PLS) and phantom limb pain (PLP) in children and young adults suffering landmine-related amputation. Materials & Methods All youths with amputation due to landmine explosions participated in this study. The proportions of patients with phantom limb sensation/pain, intensity and frequency of pain were reported. Chi square test was used to examine the relationship between variables. Comparison of PLP and PLS between upper and lower amputation was done by unpaired t-test. Results There were 38 male and 3 female with the mean age of 15.8±2.4yr. The mean interval between injury and follow-up was 90.7±39.6 months. Twelve (44.4%) upper limb amputees and 11 (26.8%) lower limb amputees had PLS. Nine (33.3%) upper limb amputees and 7 (17.1%) lower limb amputees experienced PLP. Of 27 upper limb amputees, 6 (14.6%) and among 15 lower limb amputees, 6 (14.6%) had both PLS and PLP. One case suffered amputation of upper and lower limbs and was experiencing PLS and PLP in both parts. PLS had a significant difference between the upper and lower amputated groups. Significant relationship was observed between age of casualty and duration of injury with PLP. Conclusion Phantom limb sensation and pain in young survivors of landmine explosions appear to be common, even years after amputation. PMID:27375755

  17. Lunar western limb pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Hawke, B. Ray

    1991-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the lunar pyroclastic volcanism played an important role in the formation and resurfacing of many areas of the Moon. On-going analysis of lunar Orbiter and Apollo photographs continues to locate and identify pyroclastic deposits and suggests that they just may be more ubiquitous than once thought. Located near mare/highland boundaries, many of these deposits formed contemporaneously with effusive mare volcanism. The mantling deposits formed as products of fire-fountaining. Probable source vents for these deposits include irregular depressions at the head of associated sinuous rilles and/or along irregular fractures in the floors of ancient craters. Here, researchers provide a brief synopsis of the nature of the dark mantling deposits and briefly discuss several newly identified deposits on the western limb.

  18. C-Reactive Protein and Hemogram Parameters for the Non-Sepsis Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Sepsis: What Do They Mean?

    PubMed Central

    Gucyetmez, Bulent; Atalan, Hakan K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sepsis is one of the most common reasons of increased mortality and morbidity in the intensive care unit. The changes in CRP levels and hemogram parameters and their combinations may help to distinguish sepsis from non-sepsis SIRS. The aim of this study is to investigate the CRP and hemogram parameters as an indicator of sepsis. Methods A total of 2777 patients admitted to the ICU of two centers between 2006–2013 were evaluated retrospectively. The patients were diagnosed as SIRS (-), non-sepsis SIRS and sepsis. The patients who were under 18 years old, re-admitted, diagnosed with hematological disease, on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy, SIRS (-), culture negative, undocumented laboratory values and outcomes were excluded. 1257 patients were divided into 2 groups as non-sepsis SIRS and sepsis. The patients’ demographic data, CRP levels, hemogram parameters, length of ICU stay and mortality were recorded. Results 1257 patients were categorized as non-sepsis SIRS (816, 64.9%) and sepsis (441, 35.1%). In the multivariate analysis, the likelihood of sepsis was increased 3.2 (2.2–4.6), 1.7 (1.2–2.4), 1.6 (1.2–2.1), 2.3 (1.4–3.8), 1.5 (1.1–2.1) times by the APACHE II≥13, SOFA score≥4, CRP≥4.0, LymC<0.45 and PLTC<150 respectively (p<0.001 p = 0.007 p = 0.004 p<0.001 p = 0.027). The likelihood of sepsis was increased 18.1 (8.4–38.7) times by the combination of CRP≥4.0, lymC<0.45 and PLTC<150 (P<0.001). Conclusions While WBCC, NeuC, Neu%, NLCR and EoC are far from being the indicators to distinguish sepsis from non-sepsis SIRS, the combinations of CRP, LymC and PLTC can be used to determine the likelihood of sepsis. PMID:26863002

  19. TES Limb-Geometry Observations of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on-board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has a pointing mirror that allows observations in the plane of the orbit anywhere from directly nadir to far above either the forward or aft limbs for details about the TES instrument). Nadir-geometry observations are defined as those where the field-of-view contains the surface of Mars (even if the actual observation is at a high emission angle far from true nadir). Limb-geometry observations are defined as those where the line-of-sight of the observations does not intersect the surface. At a number of points along the MGS orbit (typically every 10 deg. or 20 deg. of latitude) a limb sequence is taken, which includes a stack of overlapping TES spectra from just below the limb to more than 120 km above the limb. A typical limb sequence has approx. 20 individual spectra, and the projected size of a TES pixel at the limb is 13 km.

  20. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue oedema when electrically stimulating the lower limb of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William K; Young, Joseph R; Ginz, Hans F

    2014-05-01

    ICU patients typically are given large amounts of fluid and often develop oedema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the oedema would change inter-electrode resistance and, thus, require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves to assess muscle force. Inter-electrode tissue resistance in the lower leg was measured by applying a 300 µs constant current pulse and measuring the current through and voltage across the stimulating electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with oedema, eight surgical patients without oedema and eight healthy controls. No significant difference in inter-electrode resistance was found between the three groups. For all groups, resistance decreased as stimulation current increased. In conclusion, inter-electrode resistance in ICU patients with severe oedema is the same as the resistance in regular surgical patients and healthy controls. This means that non-invasive nerve stimulation devices do not need to be designed to accommodate different resistances when used with oedema patients; however, surface stimulation does require higher current levels with oedema patients because of the increased distance between the skin surface and the targeted nerve or muscle.

  1. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue oedema when electrically stimulating the lower limb of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William K; Young, Joseph R; Ginz, Hans F

    2014-05-01

    ICU patients typically are given large amounts of fluid and often develop oedema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the oedema would change inter-electrode resistance and, thus, require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves to assess muscle force. Inter-electrode tissue resistance in the lower leg was measured by applying a 300 µs constant current pulse and measuring the current through and voltage across the stimulating electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with oedema, eight surgical patients without oedema and eight healthy controls. No significant difference in inter-electrode resistance was found between the three groups. For all groups, resistance decreased as stimulation current increased. In conclusion, inter-electrode resistance in ICU patients with severe oedema is the same as the resistance in regular surgical patients and healthy controls. This means that non-invasive nerve stimulation devices do not need to be designed to accommodate different resistances when used with oedema patients; however, surface stimulation does require higher current levels with oedema patients because of the increased distance between the skin surface and the targeted nerve or muscle. PMID:24758395

  2. Association of the immature platelet fraction with sepsis diagnosis and severity

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Rodolfo Monteiro Enz; Rodrigues, Melina Veiga; Andreguetto, Bruna Dolci; Santos, Thiago M.; de Fátima Pereira Gilberti, Maria; de Castro, Vagner; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M.; Dragosavac, Desanka; Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio; De Paula, Erich Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    Management of Sepsis would greatly benefit from the incorporation of simple and informative new biomarkers in clinical practice. Ideally, a sepsis biomarker should segregate infected from non-infected patients, provide information about prognosis and organ-specific damage, and be accessible to most healthcare services. The immature platelet fraction (IPF) and immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) are new analytical parameters of the complete blood count, that have been studied as biomarkers of several inflammatory conditions. Recently, a study performed in critically-ill patients suggested that IPF could be a more accurate sepsis biomarker than C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. In this retrospective study we evaluated the performance of IPF and IRF as biomarkers of sepsis diagnosis and severity. 41 patients admitted to two intensive care units were evaluated, 12 of which with severe sepsis or septic shock, and 11 with non-complicated sepsis. Significantly higher IPF levels were observed in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. IPF correlated with sepsis severity scores and presented the highest diagnostic accuracy for the presence of sepsis of all studied clinical and laboratory parameters. No significant differences were observed in IRF levels. Our results suggest that IPF levels could be used as a biomarker of sepsis diagnosis and severity. PMID:25620275

  3. Association of the immature platelet fraction with sepsis diagnosis and severity.

    PubMed

    Enz Hubert, Rodolfo Monteiro; Rodrigues, Melina Veiga; Andreguetto, Bruna Dolci; Santos, Thiago M; de Fátima Pereira Gilberti, Maria; de Castro, Vagner; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Dragosavac, Desanka; Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio; De Paula, Erich Vinicius

    2015-01-26

    Management of Sepsis would greatly benefit from the incorporation of simple and informative new biomarkers in clinical practice. Ideally, a sepsis biomarker should segregate infected from non-infected patients, provide information about prognosis and organ-specific damage, and be accessible to most healthcare services. The immature platelet fraction (IPF) and immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) are new analytical parameters of the complete blood count, that have been studied as biomarkers of several inflammatory conditions. Recently, a study performed in critically-ill patients suggested that IPF could be a more accurate sepsis biomarker than C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. In this retrospective study we evaluated the performance of IPF and IRF as biomarkers of sepsis diagnosis and severity. 41 patients admitted to two intensive care units were evaluated, 12 of which with severe sepsis or septic shock, and 11 with non-complicated sepsis. Significantly higher IPF levels were observed in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. IPF correlated with sepsis severity scores and presented the highest diagnostic accuracy for the presence of sepsis of all studied clinical and laboratory parameters. No significant differences were observed in IRF levels. Our results suggest that IPF levels could be used as a biomarker of sepsis diagnosis and severity.

  4. Observation of limb movements reduces phantom limb pain in bilateral amputees

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Monica L; Murphy, Ian C; Griffin, Sarah C; Alphonso, Aimee L; Hussey-Anderson, Lindsey; Hughes, Katie E; Weeks, Sharon R; Merritt, Victoria; Yetto, Joseph M; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2014-01-01

    Background Mirror therapy has been demonstrated to reduce phantom limb pain (PLP) experienced by unilateral limb amputees. Research suggests that the visual feedback of observing a limb moving in the mirror is critical for therapeutic efficacy. Objective Since mirror therapy is not an option for bilateral lower limb amputees, the purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of another person’s limbs could be used to relieve PLP. Methods We randomly assigned 20 bilateral lower limb amputees with PLP to visual observation (n = 11) or mental visualization (n = 9) treatment. Treatment consisted of seven discrete movements which were mimicked by the amputee’s phantom limbs moving while visually observing the experimenter’s limbs moving, or closing the eyes while visualizing and attempting the movements with their phantom limbs, respectively. Participants performed movements for 20 min daily for 1 month. Response to therapy was measured using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Short-Form Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Results Direct visual observation significantly reduced PLP in both legs (P < 0.05). Amputees assigned to the mental visualization condition did not show a significant reduction in PLP. Interpretation Direct visual observation therapy is an inexpensive and effective treatment for PLP that is accessible to bilateral lower limb amputees. PMID:25493277

  5. Sepsis as a cause and consequence of acute kidney injury: Program to Improve Care in Acute Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Josée; Soroko, Sharon B.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Paganini, Emil P.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Sepsis commonly contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI); however, the frequency with which sepsis develops as a complication of AKI and the clinical consequences of this sepsis are unknown. This study examined the incidence of, and outcomes associated with, sepsis developing after AKI. Methods We analyzed data from 618 critically ill patients enrolled in a multicenter observational study of AKI (PICARD). Patients were stratified according to their sepsis status and timing of incident sepsis relative to AKI diagnosis. Results We determined the associations among sepsis, clinical characteristics, provision of dialysis, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay (LOS), comparing outcomes among patients according to their sepsis status. Among the 611 patients with data on sepsis status, 174 (28%) had sepsis before AKI, 194 (32%) remained sepsis-free, and 243 (40%) developed sepsis a median of 5 days after AKI. Mortality rates for patients with sepsis developing after AKI were higher than in sepsis-free patients (44 vs. 21%; p < 0.0001) and similar to patients with sepsis preceding AKI (48 vs. 44%; p = 0.41). Compared with sepsis-free patients, those with sepsis developing after AKI were also more likely to be dialyzed (70 vs. 50%; p < 0.001) and had longer LOS (37 vs. 27 days; p < 0.001). Oliguria, higher fluid accumulation and severity of illness scores, non-surgical procedures after AKI, and provision of dialysis were predictors of sepsis after AKI. Conclusions Sepsis frequently develops after AKI and portends a poor prognosis, with high mortality rates and relatively long LOS. Future studies should evaluate techniques to monitor for and manage this complication to improve overall prognosis. PMID:21152901

  6. Clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock from Rohtak, Haryana: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Vinayak, Nikhil; Mittal, Kundan; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Aamir, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information regarding early predictive factors for mortality and morbidity in sepsis is limited from developing countries. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Children aged 1 month to 14 years admitted to a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with a diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock were enrolled in the study. Hemodynamic and laboratory parameters which discriminate survivors from nonsurvivors were evaluated. Results: A total of 50 patients (30 [60%] males) were enrolled in the study, of whom 21 (42%) were discharged (survivors) and rest 29 (58%) expired (nonsurvivor). Median (interquartile range) age of enrolled patients were 18 (6, 60) months. Mortality was not significantly predicted individually by any factor including age (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval [CI

  7. Transducers for ultrasonic limb plethysmography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickell, W. T.; Wu, V. C.; Bhagat, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of ultasonic transducers suitable for limb plethysmography are presented. Both 3-mm-diameter flat-plate and 12-mm-diameter hemispheric ceramic transducers operating at 2 MHz were fitted in 1-mm thick epoxy-resin lens/acoustic-coupling structures and mounted in exercie-EKG electrode housings for placement on the calf using adhesive collars. The effects of transducer directional characteristics on performance under off-axis rotation and the electrical impedances of the transducers were measured: The flat transducer was found to be sensitive to rotation and have an impedance of 800 ohms; the hemispheric transducer, to be unaffected by rotation and have an impedance of 80 ohms. The use of hemispheric transducers as both transmitter and receiver, or of a flat transducer as transmitter and a hemispheric transducer as receiver, was found to produce adequate dimensional measurements, with minimum care in transducer placement, in short-term physiological experiments and long-term (up to 7-day) attachment tests.

  8. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Roy, Swapan; Bhattyacharya, Sukanta; Pal, Priyankar; Dhar, Sandipan

    2011-11-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis) after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum). She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications. PMID:22345792

  9. Haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Parameswaran; Rustagi, Rashi S; Sivaprakasam, Prabha; Subramanian, Mahadevan; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Mandal, Jharna; Kaplan, B S

    2013-11-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is a recognized complication of infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Shigella dysenteriae type 1. Infections with other micro-organisms, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, have been cited as causes of HUS. In addition, influenza virus and other viruses may rarely be associated with this syndrome. A 2-year-old girl presented with severe Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis with renal failure and ecthyma gangrenosum. Further investigations revealed features of HUS. She was managed with antibiotics and other supportive measures including peritoneal dialysis, and subsequently made a full recovery. A possible role of neuraminidase in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa-associated HUS was proposed. This is the first reported case of P. aeruginosa sepsis leading to HUS.

  10. Commercial Multiplex Technologies for the Microbiological Diagnosis of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Evan E.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with suspected sepsis, rapid and accurate diagnosis of the causative infectious agent is critical. Although clinicians often use empiric antimicrobial therapy until the blood cultures are available to potentially adjust treatment, this approach is often not optimum for patient care. Recently, several commercial molecular multiplex technologies have shown promise for fast and comprehensive diagnosis of microorganisms and their antimicrobial resistance signatures. While one class of multiplex technologies is directed at improving the speed and diagnostic information obtained from positive blood cultures, the other identifies the causative microorganisms directly from clinical blood samples. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of these molecular technologies and describe their performance capabilities compared to standard blood cultures and in some cases to each other. We discuss the current clinical impact, limitations, and likely futures advances these multiplex technologies may have in guiding the management of patients with sepsis. PMID:23636778

  11. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named “metabolic resuscitation”, would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to “mitochondrial resuscitation” are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  12. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named "metabolic resuscitation", would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to "mitochondrial resuscitation" are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Calcitriol in Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Raed, Anas; Donnino, Michael W.; Ginde, Adit A.; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Vitamin D and its metabolites have potent immunomodulatory effects in vitro, including up-regulation of cathelicidin, a critical antimicrobial protein. Objectives: We investigated whether administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) to critically ill patients with sepsis would have beneficial effects on markers of innate immunity, inflammation, and kidney injury. Methods: We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, physiologic study among 67 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Patients were randomized to receive a single dose of calcitriol (2 μg intravenously) versus placebo. The primary outcome was plasma cathelicidin protein levels assessed 24 hours after study drug administration. Secondary outcomes included leukocyte cathelicidin mRNA expression, plasma cytokine levels (IL-10, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-2), and urinary kidney injury markers. Measurements and Main Results: Patients randomized to calcitriol (n = 36) versus placebo (n = 31) had similar plasma cathelicidin protein levels at 24 hours (P = 0.16). Calcitriol-treated patients had higher cathelicidin (P = 0.04) and IL-10 (P = 0.03) mRNA expression than placebo-treated patients 24 hours after study drug administration. Plasma cytokine levels (IL-10, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-2) and urinary kidney injury markers were similar in calcitriol- versus placebo-treated patients (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). Calcitriol had no effect on clinical outcomes nor were any adverse effects observed. Conclusions: Calcitriol administration did not increase plasma cathelicidin protein levels in critically ill patients with sepsis and had mixed effects on other immunomodulatory markers. Additional phase II trials investigating the dose and timing of calcitriol as a therapeutic agent in specific sepsis phenotypes may be warranted. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01689441). PMID:25029202

  14. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named "metabolic resuscitation", would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to "mitochondrial resuscitation" are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics.

  15. Clavanin bacterial sepsis control using a novel methacrylate nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Saúde, Amanda CM; Ombredane, Alicia S; Silva, Osmar N; Barbosa, João ARG; Moreno, Susana E; Guerra Araujo, Ana Claudia; Falcão, Rosana; Silva, Luciano P; Dias, Simoni C; Franco, Octávio L

    2014-01-01

    Controlling human pathogenic bacteria is a worldwide problem due to increasing bacterial resistance. This has prompted a number of studies investigating peptides isolated from marine animals as a possible alternative for control of human pathogen infections. Clavanins are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the marine tunicate Styela clava, showing 23 amino acid residues in length, cationic properties, and also high bactericidal activity. In spite of clear benefits from the use of peptides, currently 95% of peptide properties have limited pharmaceutical applicability, such as low solubility and short half-life in the circulatory system. Here, nanobiotechnology was used to encapsulate clavanin A in order to develop nanoantibiotics against bacterial sepsis. Clavanin was nanostructured using EUDRAGIT® L 100-55 and RS 30 D solution (3:1 w:w). Atomic force, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering showed nanoparticles ranging from 120 to 372 nm in diameter, with a zeta potential of -7.16 mV and a polydispersity index of 0.123. Encapsulation rate of 98% was assessed by reversed-phase chromatography. In vitro bioassays showed that the nanostructured clavanin was partially able to control development of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, nanostructures did not show hemolytic activity. In vivo sepsis bioassays were performed using C57BL6 mice strain inoculated with a polymicrobial suspension. Assays led to 100% survival rate under sub-lethal sepsis assays and 40% under lethal sepsis assays in the presence of nanoformulated clavanin A until the seventh day of the experiment. Data here reported indicated that nanostructured clavanin A form shows improved antimicrobial activity and has the potential to be used to treat polymicrobial infections. PMID:25382976

  16. Case Report of Sepsis in Neonates Fed Expressed Mother's Milk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandra L; Serke, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mother's milk is the recommended food for premature infants cared for in the NICU. In the cases presented in this article, mothers pumped their milk into food-grade aseptic plastic containers. Milk was refrigerated before use. In Case 1, an infant developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. In Case 2, an infant developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Both cases were attributed to contaminated mother's milk. Proper cleaning and sterilization of pump parts is essential to prevent milk contamination. PMID:27486089

  17. Surviving sepsis--a 3D integrative educational simulator.

    PubMed

    Ježek, Filip; Tribula, Martin; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Mateják, Marek; Privitzer, Pavol; Šilar, Jan; Kofránek, Jiří; Lhotská, Lenka

    2015-08-01

    Computer technology offers greater educational possibilities, notably simulation and virtual reality. This paper presents a technology which serves to integrate multiple modalities, namely 3D virtual reality, node-based simulator, Physiomodel explorer and explanatory physiological simulators employing Modelica language and Unity3D platform. This emerging tool chain should allow the authors to concentrate more on educational content instead of application development. The technology is demonstrated through Surviving sepsis educational scenario, targeted on Microsoft Windows Store platform. PMID:26737091

  18. Update in sepsis and acute kidney injury 2014.

    PubMed

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Asfar, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) represent an important burden in intensive care unit clinical practices. The Journal published important contributions in sepsis for novel therapeutic approaches suggesting that combined molecular targets (e.g., dual inhibition of IL-1β and IL-18, and coadministration of endothelial progenitor cells and stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog) could perform better. The clinical effectiveness of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was reported in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Although its experimental properties appeared favorable in the pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine balance, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D failed to improve survival. Strategies for decreasing antimicrobial resistances are of particular importance. Effective (aerosolized antibiotics for ventilator-associated pneumonia) and ineffective (procalcitonin algorithm for antibiotic deescalation) approaches were published. In 2014, several publications raised an important point shared by survivors from sepsis and/or AKI. The increased number of survivors over time brought out long-term sequelae, leading to a poor outcome after hospital discharge. Among them, cardiovascular events and chronic kidney disease may explain the significant increase in the risk of death, which can persist up to 10 years and significantly increases the use of health care. Postdischarge survival represents a new target for future research in sepsis and AKI to find how we can prevent and manage long-term sequelae. A milestone of the year was the Ebola outbreak. The Journal contributed to our better understanding of Ebola virus disease with a paper underlying the crucial role of a large implementation of pragmatic supportive care, including fluid infusion and correction of metabolic abnormalities, to save more lives. PMID:26029837

  19. Early onset neonatal sepsis: diagnostic dilemmas and practical management.

    PubMed

    Bedford Russell, A R; Kumar, R

    2015-07-01

    Early onset neonatal sepsis is persistently associated with poor outcomes, and incites clinical practice based on the fear of missing a treatable infection in a timely fashion. Unnecessary exposure to antibiotics is also hazardous. Diagnostic dilemmas are discussed in this review, and suggestions offered for practical management while awaiting a more rapidly available 'gold standard' test; in an ideal world, this test would be 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the presence of organisms.

  20. Host response biomarker in sepsis: suPAR detection.

    PubMed

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Georgitsi, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of our group have shown that suPAR may complement APACHE II score for risk assessment in sepsis. suPAR may be measured in serum of patients by an enzyme immunosorbent assay developed by Virogates (suPARnostic™). Production of suPAR from circulating neutrophils and monocytes may be assessed after isolation of neutrophils and monocytes and ex vivo culture. This is followed by measurement of suPAR in culture supernatants.

  1. Surviving sepsis--a 3D integrative educational simulator.

    PubMed

    Ježek, Filip; Tribula, Martin; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Mateják, Marek; Privitzer, Pavol; Šilar, Jan; Kofránek, Jiří; Lhotská, Lenka

    2015-08-01

    Computer technology offers greater educational possibilities, notably simulation and virtual reality. This paper presents a technology which serves to integrate multiple modalities, namely 3D virtual reality, node-based simulator, Physiomodel explorer and explanatory physiological simulators employing Modelica language and Unity3D platform. This emerging tool chain should allow the authors to concentrate more on educational content instead of application development. The technology is demonstrated through Surviving sepsis educational scenario, targeted on Microsoft Windows Store platform.

  2. Sepsis in Buraidah Central Hospital, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Gasim, Gasim I.; Musa, Imad R; Yassin, Taha; Al Shobaili, Hani A.; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis is a major public health concern and a frequent cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with a high fatality rate. Higher (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) SOFA score and co-morbidity of acute renal failure (ARF) are risk factors contributing to fatal outcome. This work was meant to study the epidemiology of sepsis in Buraidah central hospital. Methods This is a descriptive study conducted in the period from January 1, 2012, to June 29, 2012 to determine the epidemiology (incidence, clinical characteristics) and the outcome of sepsis in Buraidah hospital, Saudi Arabia. Results Out of 387 patients admitted to ICU, 62 (16%) patients had sepsis, their mean (SD) age was 62.7 (21.3) years. Three quarters of them 47 (75.8%) presented with septic shock. The median APACHE II score was 26.5 (8 to 48) and SOFA score 11 (5 to 21). The mean of duration of hospital stay was 11.95 days. The most frequent infection site was the pulmonary (69.5%). There were 37 isolated organism, gram-negative organisms (13; 35.13%) were the predominant isolates. There were 25 (40.3%) deaths; the majority of the deaths were due to septic shock 20(80%). There was a significant difference between deaths and the survivors, in the APACHI II score, SOFA score), and whether ventilated or not. Conclusions There was a high incidence of septic shock (and higher mortality) among the patients admitted to the ICU of Buraidah central hospital, especially among the elderly patients with respiratory infections. PMID:27103899

  3. Upper limb prosthetic use in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Burger, H; Marincek, C

    1994-04-01

    The article deals with the use of different types of upper limb prostheses in Slovenia. Four hundred and fourteen upper limb amputees were sent a questionnaire on the type of their prosthesis, its use and reasons for non-use, respectively. The replies were subject to statistical analysis. Most of the questioned upper limb amputees (70%) wear a prosthesis only for cosmesis. The use of a prosthesis depends on the level of upper limb amputation, loss of the dominant hand, and time from amputation. Prosthetic success appears to be unrelated to age at the time of amputation and the rehabilitation programme. The most frequent reason for not wearing a prosthesis is heat and consequent sweating of the stump. More than a third of amputees are dissatisfied with their prostheses.

  4. Development of limb volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, P. K.; Kadaba, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the reductions in orthostatic tolerance associated with weightlessness are not well established. Contradictory results from measurements of leg volume changes suggest that altered venomotor tone and reduced blood flow may not be the only contributors to orthostatic intolerance. It is felt that a more accurate limb volume system which is insensitive to environmental factors will aid in better quantification of the hemodynamics of the leg. Of the varous limb volume techniques presently available, the ultrasonic limb volume system has proven to be the best choice. The system as described herein is free from environmental effects, safe, simple to operate and causes negligible radio frequency interference problems. The segmental ultrasonic ultrasonic plethysmograph is expected to provide a better measurement of limb volume change since it is based on cross-sectional area measurements.

  5. Zika Linked to Deformed Limbs in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160324.html Zika Linked to Deformed Limbs in Newborns Cause isn' ... 2016 TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus has already been linked to serious birth ...

  6. CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES OF THE UPPER LIMBS.

    PubMed Central

    Bisneto, Edgard Novaes França

    2015-01-01

    This article, divided into three parts, had the aims of reviewing the most common upper-limb malformations and describing their treatments. In this first part, failure of formation is discussed. The bibliography follows after the first part. PMID:27047864

  7. Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) and Limb Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... and limb loss by NLLIC Staff http://www.amputee-coalition.org/fact_sheets/dysvascular.html Back to Top Last updated: 07/23/2012 © Amputee Coalition. Local reproduction for use by Amputee Coalition ...

  8. Tips for Taking Care of Your Limb

    MedlinePlus

    ... Technorati Yahoo MyWeb by Paddy Rossbach, RN, Former Amputee Coalition President & CEO, and Terrence P. Sheehan, MD ... crisis. Limb Care If you are a new amputee, it's better to take a bath or shower ...

  9. A Cognitive Overview of Limb Apraxia.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Angela; Ham, Heidi Stieglitz

    2016-08-01

    Since the first studies on limb apraxia carried out by Hugo Liepmann more than a century ago, research interests focused on the way humans process manual gestures by assessing gesture production after patients suffered neurologic deficits. Recent reviews centered their attention on deficits in gesture imitation or processing object-related gestures, namely pantomimes and transitive gestures, thereby neglecting communicative/intransitive gestures. This review will attempt to reconcile limb apraxia in its entirety. To this end, the existing cognitive models of praxis processing that have been designed to account for the complexity of this disorder will be taken into account, with an attempt to integrate in these models the latest findings in the studies of limb apraxia, in particular on meaningful gestures. Finally, this overview questions the very nature of limb apraxia when other cognitive deficits are observed. PMID:27349561

  10. Linking the sepsis triad of inflammation, coagulation, and suppressed fibrinolysis to infants.

    PubMed

    Short, Mary A

    2004-10-01

    Sepsis continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized newborns and premature infants. The pathophysiology and disease state of sepsis appear to be similar between adults and children. Both groups display symptoms that indicate a systemic inflammatory response leading to coagulopathy, hypotension, inadequate perfusion of peripheral tissues and organs, and, ultimately, organ failure and death. By presenting a comparison of adult and neonatal pathophysiology, as well as a supporting literature review and clinical evidence, this article links the pathways of inflammation, activation of coagulation, and impaired fibrinolysis, known as the sepsis cascade, to neonatal sepsis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology has important clinical and research implications. Unlike traditional antimicrobial therapy, new potential therapies, currently under investigation for the treatment of sepsis, target the cellular response rather than the invading organism. A more complete understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis may also lead to diagnostic tools with improved sensitivity and specificity for early recognition and treatment.

  11. A Systematic Review of Rhubarb (a Traditional Chinese Medicine) Used for the Treatment of Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Xie, Dong-Ping; Mai, Shu-Tao; Weng, Yan-Na; Du, Jiong-Dong; Wu, Guang-Ping; Zheng, Jing-Xia; Han, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a global major health problem in great need for more effective therapy. For thousands of years, Rhubarb had been used for various diseases including severe infection. Pharmacological studies and trials reported that Rhubarb may be effective in treating sepsis, but the efficacy and the quality of evidence remain unclear since there is no systematic review on Rhubarb for sepsis. The present study is the first systematic review of Rhubarb used for the treatment of experimental sepsis in both English and Chinese literatures by identifying 27 studies from 7 databases. It showed that Rhubarb might be effective in reducing injuries in gastrointestinal tract, lung, and liver induced by sepsis, and its potential mechanisms might include reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, ameliorating microcirculatory disturbance, and maintaining immune balance. Yet the positive findings should be interpreted with caution due to poor methodological quality. In a word, Rhubarb might be a promising candidate that is worth further clinical and experimental trials for sepsis therapy.

  12. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  13. The role of genetics and antibodies in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of sepsis when immunosuppression predominates, the concentrations of circulating immunoglobulins (IGs) are decreased and this is associated with adverse outcomes. The production of IGs as response to invasive bacterial pathogens takes place through a complex pathway starting from the recognition of the antigen (Ag) by innate immune cells that process and present Ags to T cells. The orchestration of T-helper (Th) lymphocyte responses directs specific B cells and ends with the production of IGs by plasma cells. All molecules implicated in this process are encoded by genes bearing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Meta-analysis of case-control studies have shown that the carriage of minor frequency SNPs of CD14, TLR2 and TNF is associated with increased sepsis risk. The ambiguity of results of clinical trials studying the clinical efficacy of exogenous IG administration in sepsis suggests that efficacy of treatment should be considered after adjustment for SNPs of all implicated genes in the pathway of IG production. PMID:27713886

  14. Evaluating the Near-Term Infant for Early Onset Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jeanne A.; Durso, Mary Beth; Butchko, Allyson R.; Jones, Judith G.; Brozanski, Beverly S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the rate of early onset sepsis in the near-term neonate is low (one to eight of 1000 cases), the rate of mortality and morbidity is high. As a result, infants receive multiple, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, many for up to 7 days despite blood cultures showing no growth. Maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis and small blood volume collections from infants are cited as reasons for the lack of confidence in negative culture results. Incorporating an additional, more rapid test could facilitate a more timely diagnosis in these infants. To this end, a 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was compared to blood culturing for use as a tool in evaluating early onset sepsis. Of 1751 neonatal intensive care unit admissions that were screened, 1233 near-term infants met inclusion criteria. Compared to culture, PCR demonstrated excellent analytical specificity (1186 of 1216, 97.5%) and negative predictive value (1186 of 1196, 99.2%); however, PCR failed to detect a significant number of culture-proven cases. These findings underscore the cautionary stance that should be taken at this time when considering the use of a molecular amplification test for diagnosing neonatal sepsis. The experience gained from this study illustrates the need for changes in sample collection and preparation techniques so as to improve analytical sensitivity of the assay. PMID:16825509

  15. Zwitterionic chitosan for the systemic treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Jung; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Park, Jinho; Hyun, Hyesun; Wilson, Erin M; Snyder, Paul W; Tsifansky, Michael D; Yeo, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are life-threatening conditions, with Gram-negative organisms responsible for most sepsis mortality. Systemic administration of compounds that block the action of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the Gram-negative outer cell membrane, is hampered by their hydrophobicity and cationic charge, the very properties responsible for their interactions with LPS. We hypothesize that a chitosan derivative zwitterionic chitosan (ZWC), previously shown to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cellular mediators in LPS-challenged macrophages, will have protective effects in an animal model of sepsis induced by systemic injection of LPS. In this study, we evaluate whether ZWC attenuates the fatal effect of LPS in C57BL/6 mice and investigate the mechanism by which ZWC counteracts the LPS effect using a PMJ2-PC peritoneal macrophage cell line. Unlike its parent compound with low water solubility, intraperitoneally administered ZWC is readily absorbed with no local residue or adverse tissue reaction at the injection site. Whether administered at or prior to the LPS challenge, ZWC more than doubles the animals' median survival time. ZWC appears to protect the LPS-challenged organisms by forming a complex with LPS and thus attenuating pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. These findings suggest that ZWC have utility as a systemic anti-LPS agent. PMID:27412050

  16. Delayed emergency myelopoiesis following polymicrobial sepsis in neonates.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Alex G; Cuenca, Angela L; Gentile, Lori F; Efron, Philip A; Islam, Saleem; Moldawer, Lyle L; Kays, David W; Larson, Shawn D

    2015-05-01

    Neonates have increased susceptibility to infection, which leads to increased mortality. Whether or not this as a result of implicit deficits in neonatal innate immune function or recapitulation of innate immune effector cell populations following infection is unknown. Here, we examine the process of emergency myelopoiesis whereby the host repopulates peripheral myeloid cells lost following the initial infectious insult. As early inflammatory responses are often dependent upon NF-κB and type I IFN signaling, we also examined whether the absence of MyD88, TRIF or MyD88 and TRIF signaling altered the myelopoietic response in neonates to polymicrobial sepsis. Following neonatal polymicrobial septic challenge, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion in bone marrow and the spleen were both attenuated and delayed in neonates compared with adults. Similar reductions in other precursors were observed in neonates. Similar to adult studies, the expansion of progenitor stem cell populations was also seen in the absence of MyD88 and/or TRIF signaling. Overall, neonates have impaired emergency myelopoiesis in response to sepsis compared with young adults. Despite reports that this expansion may be related to TLR signaling, our data suggest that other factors may be important, as TRIF(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) neonatal HSCs are still able to expand in response to polymicrobial neonatal sepsis.

  17. Protective effect of Aloe vera on polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nari; Lee, Chan-Ho; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2009-06-01

    Sepsis is an acute life-threatening clinical condition and remains the major cause of death in intensive care units. The primary pathophysiologic event central to the septic response is an overwhelming activation of the inflammatory system and countervailing response from the anti-inflammatory system. However, the cause of this perturbation has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we report that Aloe vera therapeutically reverses the lethality induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a clinically relevant model of sepsis. The administration of Aloe vera ameliorated the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, as evidenced by the serum levels of biochemical parameters and histological changes. In order to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of Aloe vera, the levels of the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 were determined by ELISA at various time points. The increases in the levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 were attenuated by Aloe vera.In vivo administration of Aloe vera also markedly enhanced bacterial clearance. Our findings suggest that Aloe vera could be a potential therapeutic agent for the clinical treatment of sepsis. PMID:19298839

  18. Zwitterionic chitosan for the systemic treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Jung; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Park, Jinho; Hyun, Hyesun; Wilson, Erin M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Tsifansky, Michael D.; Yeo, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are life-threatening conditions, with Gram-negative organisms responsible for most sepsis mortality. Systemic administration of compounds that block the action of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the Gram-negative outer cell membrane, is hampered by their hydrophobicity and cationic charge, the very properties responsible for their interactions with LPS. We hypothesize that a chitosan derivative zwitterionic chitosan (ZWC), previously shown to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cellular mediators in LPS-challenged macrophages, will have protective effects in an animal model of sepsis induced by systemic injection of LPS. In this study, we evaluate whether ZWC attenuates the fatal effect of LPS in C57BL/6 mice and investigate the mechanism by which ZWC counteracts the LPS effect using a PMJ2-PC peritoneal macrophage cell line. Unlike its parent compound with low water solubility, intraperitoneally administered ZWC is readily absorbed with no local residue or adverse tissue reaction at the injection site. Whether administered at or prior to the LPS challenge, ZWC more than doubles the animals’ median survival time. ZWC appears to protect the LPS-challenged organisms by forming a complex with LPS and thus attenuating pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. These findings suggest that ZWC have utility as a systemic anti-LPS agent. PMID:27412050

  19. Sepsis: Something Old, Something New, and a Systems View

    PubMed Central

    Namas, Rami; Zamora, Ruben; Namas, Rajaie; An, Gary; Doyle, John; Dick, Thomas E.; Jacono, Frank J.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Nieman, Gary F.; Chang, Steve; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kellum, John A.; Angus, Derek C.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Sepsisis a clinical syndrome characterized by a multi-system response to a microbial pathogenic insult consisting of a mosaic of interconnected biochemical, cellular, and organ-organ interaction networks. A central thread that connects these responses is inflammation, which, while attempting to defend the body and prevent further harm, causes further damage through the feed-forward, pro-inflammatory effects of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. In this review, we address the epidemiology and current definitions of sepsis, and focus specifically on the biological cascades that comprise the inflammatory response to sepsis. We suggest that attempts to improve clinical outcomes by targeting specific components of this network have been unsuccessful due to the lack of an integrative, predictive, and individualized systems-based approach to define the time-varying, multi-dimensional state of the patient. We highlight the translational impact of computational modeling and other complex systems approaches as applied to sepsis, including in silico clinical trials, patient-specific models, and complexity-based assessments of physiology. PMID:21798705

  20. Nanomechanics of the Endothelial Glycocalyx in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Anne; Peters, Wladimir; Chappell, Daniel; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Oberleithner, Hans; Kümpers, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx (eGC), a carbohydrate-rich layer lining the luminal side of the endothelium, regulates vascular adhesiveness and permeability. Although central to the pathophysiology of vascular barrier dysfunction in sepsis, glycocalyx damage has been generally understudied, in part because of the aberrancy of in vitro preparations and its degradation during tissue handling. The aim of this study was to analyze inflammation-induced damage of the eGC on living endothelial cells by atomic-force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technique. AFM revealed the existence of a mature eGC on the luminal endothelial surface of freshly isolated rodent aorta preparations ex vivo, as well as on cultured human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) in vitro. AFM detected a marked reduction in glycocalyx thickness (266 ± 12 vs. 137 ± 17 nm, P<0.0001) and stiffness (0.34 ± 0.03 vs. 0.21 ± 0.01 pN/mn, P<0.0001) in septic mice (1 mg E. coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS)/kg BW i.p.) compared to controls. Corresponding in vitro experiments revealed that sepsis-associated mediators, such as thrombin, LPS or Tumor Necrosis Factor-α alone were sufficient to rapidly decrease eGC thickness (-50%, all P<0.0001) and stiffness (-20% P<0.0001) on HPMEC. In summary, AFM nanoindentation is a promising novel approach to uncover mechanisms involved in deterioration and refurbishment of the eGC in sepsis. PMID:24278345

  1. Antiviral Prevention of Sepsis Induced Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Meghan R.; Trgovcich, Joanne; Zimmerman, Peter; Chang, Alexander; Miller, Cortland; Klenerman, Paul; Cook, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Immunocompetent patients can reactivate latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) during critical illness and reactivation is associated with significantly worse outcomes. Prior to clinical trials in humans to prove causality, we sought to determine an optimal antiviral treatment strategy. Methods Mice latently infected with murine CMV (MCMV) received a septic reactivation trigger and were randomized to receive one of four ganciclovir regimens or saline. Lungs were evaluated for viral transcriptional reactivation and fibrosis after each regimen. Influences of ganciclovir on early sepsis induced pulmonary inflammation and T-cell activation were studied after sepsis induction. Results All ganciclovir regimens reduced measurable MCMV transcriptional reactivation, and 10mg/day for 7 or 21 days was most effective. Lower dose (5mg/kg/day) or delayed therapy were associated with significant breakthrough reactivation. Higher doses of ganciclovir given early were associated with the lowest incidence of pulmonary fibrosis, and delay of therapy for 1 week was associated with significantly worse pulmonary fibrosis. Although bacterial sepsis induced activation of MCMV-specific pulmonary T-cells, this activation was not influenced by ganciclovir. Conclusion These results suggest that antiviral treatment trials in humans should use 10mg/kg/day ganciclovir administered as early as possible in at-risk patients to minimize reactivation events and associated pulmonary injury PMID:20004216

  2. Mast cells aggravate sepsis by inhibiting peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Albert; Gautier, Gregory; Attout, Tarik; Fiore, Frédéric; Lebourdais, Emeline; Msallam, Rasha; Daëron, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C.; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Davoust, Jean; Blank, Ulrich; Malissen, Bernard; Launay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the overwhelming inflammatory reaction associated with polymicrobial sepsis remains a prevalent clinical challenge with few treatment options. In septic peritonitis, blood neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity to control infection, but the role of resident sentinel cells during the early phase of infection is less clear. In particular, the influence of mast cells on other tissue-resident cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a mouse model that allows both visualization and conditional ablation of mast cells and basophils to investigate the role of mast cells in severe septic peritonitis. Specific depletion of mast cells led to increased survival rates in mice with acute sepsis. Furthermore, we determined that mast cells impair the phagocytic action of resident macrophages, thereby allowing local and systemic bacterial proliferation. Mast cells did not influence local recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or the release of inflammatory cytokines. Phagocytosis inhibition by mast cells involved their ability to release prestored IL-4 within 15 minutes after bacterial encounter, and treatment with an IL-4–neutralizing antibody prevented this inhibitory effect and improved survival of septic mice. Our study uncovers a local crosstalk between mast cells and macrophages during the early phase of sepsis development that aggravates the outcome of severe bacterial infection. PMID:25180604

  3. Imaging in sepsis-associated encephalopathy--insights and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Daniel J; Yamamoto, Adam K; Menon, David K

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) refers to a clinical spectrum of acute neurological dysfunction that arises in the context of sepsis. Although the pathophysiology of SAE is incompletely understood, it is thought to involve endothelial activation, blood-brain barrier leakage, inflammatory cell migration, and neuronal loss with neurotransmitter imbalance. SAE is associated with a high risk of mortality. Imaging studies using MRI and CT have demonstrated changes in the brains of patients with SAE that are also seen in disorders such as stroke. Next-generation imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and PET, as well as experimental imaging modalities, provide options for early identification of patients with SAE, and could aid in identification of pathophysiological processes that represent possible therapeutic targets. In this Review, we explore the recent literature on imaging in SAE, relating the findings of these studies to pathological data and experimental studies to obtain insights into the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated neurological dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest how novel imaging technologies can be used for early-stage proof-of-concept and proof-of-mechanism translational studies, which may help to improve diagnosis in SAE.

  4. Critical points for sepsis management at the patient bedside.

    PubMed

    Tulli, G

    2003-01-01

    Following an interpretative philosophy, dyna-mic and faithful to the complexity theory, a clinical pathway is outlined close to the reality, at the patient bedside, that is comprehensive of the diagnostic process in its temporal dynamism, of the therapeutic process in its specificity (antibiotic therapy, surgical souce control), in the use of organs supportive therapy (haemodynamic, respiratory, renal, etc.) and in the use of adjunctive and immunomodulatory therapies (APC, AT, etc.). The importance of the contextual activation of microbiological, immunological and coagulative monitorings is underlined. Through a critical review of the more recent literature, a strict relationship, in sepsis and septic shock, between inflammation and coagulation is described, that allowed the activated protein C (drotrecogin alpha activated) success, in terms of reduction of the absolute and relative mortality. This therapeutic success is contextualized into two other important therapeutic successes, recently obtained in severe sepsis and septic shock, based on the medical evidence, one using low doses of corticosteroids and the other using the early (6 h) goal directed haemodynamic therapy to restore a balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen demand. Once systemic inflammation is complicated by organ failure, there are few options. Treatment with activated protein C lowers the risk of death but is associated with an increased risk of bleeding and is likely to be expensive. The strategies described by the groups of Rivers and Annane offer the opportunity for good therapeutic results, by preventing the progression or even the development of sepsis and its complications: septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction.

  5. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Paolo; Tonon, Marta; Pilutti, Chiara; Morando, Filippo; Piano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for the diagnosis of AKI have been proposed in patients with cirrhosis by the International Club of Ascites. Almost all types of bacterial infections can induce AKI in patients with cirrhosis representing its most common precipitating event. The bacterial infection-induced AKI usually meets the diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Well in keeping with the "splanchnic arterial vasodilation hypothesis", it has been stated that HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume related to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and to an inadequate cardiac output. Nevertheless, the role of bacterial infections in precipitating organ failures, including renal failure, is enhanced when their course is characterized by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), thus, when sepsis occurs. Sepsis has been shown to be capable to induce "per se" AKI in animals as well as in patients conditioning also the features of renal damage. This observation suggests that when precipitated by sepsis, the pathogenesis and the clinical course of AKI also in patients with cirrhosis may differentiate to a certain extent from AKI with another or no precipitating factor. The purpose of this review is to describe the features of AKI precipitated by bacterial infections and to highlight whether infection and/or the development of SIRS may influence its clinical course, and, in particular, the response to treatment.

  6. Chemical activation of RARβ induces post-embryonically bilateral limb duplication during Xenopus limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Rodrigo; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis can regenerate its limbs for a limited time during the larval stage, while limbs are still developing. Using this regeneration model, we evaluated the proximo-distal blastema cell identity when endogenous retinoids were increased by CYP26 inhibition or when RAR-specific agonists altered RA signaling. Simultaneous proximo-distal and antero-posterior limb duplications were generated, and the RAR-specific agonist can modify blastema identity after amputation, because chemical activation of RARβ produced bilateral hindlimb duplications that resulted in a drastic duplication phenotype of regenerating limbs. PMID:23703360

  7. Chemical activation of RARβ induces post-embryonically bilateral limb duplication during Xenopus limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cuervo, Rodrigo; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis can regenerate its limbs for a limited time during the larval stage, while limbs are still developing. Using this regeneration model, we evaluated the proximo-distal blastema cell identity when endogenous retinoids were increased by CYP26 inhibition or when RAR-specific agonists altered RA signaling. Simultaneous proximo-distal and antero-posterior limb duplications were generated, and the RAR-specific agonist can modify blastema identity after amputation, because chemical activation of RARβ produced bilateral hindlimb duplications that resulted in a drastic duplication phenotype of regenerating limbs. PMID:23703360

  8. New paradigms in sepsis: from prevention to protection of failing microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Hawiger, J; Veach, R A; Zienkiewicz, J

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis, also known as septicemia, is one of the 10 leading causes of death worldwide. The rising tide of sepsis due to bacterial, fungal and viral infections cannot be stemmed by current antimicrobial therapies and supportive measures. New paradigms for the mechanism and resolution of sepsis and consequences for sepsis survivors are emerging. Consistent with Benjamin Franklin's dictum 'an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure', sepsis can be prevented by vaccinations against pneumococci and meningococci. Recently, the NIH NHLBI Panel redefined sepsis as 'severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome in response to intravascular and extravascular infections causing reversible or irreversible injury to the microcirculation responsible for multiple organ failure'. Microvascular endothelial injury underlies sepsis-associated hypotension, edema, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Microbial genome products trigger 'genome wars' in sepsis that reprogram the human genome and culminate in a 'genomic storm' in blood and vascular cells. Sepsis can be averted experimentally by endothelial cytoprotection through targeting nuclear signaling that mediates inflammation and deranged metabolism. Endothelial 'rheostats' (e.g. inhibitors of NF-κB, A20 protein, CRADD/RAIDD protein and microRNAs) regulate endothelial signaling. Physiologic 'extinguishers' (e.g. suppressor of cytokine signaling 3) can be replenished through intracellular protein therapy. Lipid mediators (e.g. resolvin D1) hasten sepsis resolution. As sepsis cases rose from 387 330 in 1996 to 1.1 million in 2011, and are estimated to reach 2 million by 2020 in the US, mortality due to sepsis approaches that of heart attacks and exceeds deaths from stroke. More preventive vaccines and therapeutic measures are urgently needed. PMID:26190521

  9. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Where have we been and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Dellinger, R Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign develops and promotes evidence-based guidelines and performance-improvement practices aimed at reducing deaths from sepsis worldwide. The most recent guidelines, published in 2013, provide detailed management strategies for acute care, fluid resuscitation, and vasopressor use. In addition, the campaign has developed simple, short protocols for what to do within 3 and 6 hours of recognition of sepsis. These protocols are associated with reduced mortality rates.

  10. [Experience in the treatment of severe forms of sepsis by extracorporeal therapy and hyperbaric oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, K P; Klechikov, V Z; Bogatyr', M N

    1997-01-01

    The results of multiple modality treatment of 81 patients with sepsis complicated by multiple organ failure are assessed. In 40 patients the traditional therapy of sepsis was supplemented with extracorporeal methods (hemoperfusion, autotransfusion of UV-exposed blood, and perfusion of xenospleen slices) and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) sessions. In the patients treated traditionally the mortality was 94%, whereas addition of extracorporeal treatment and HBO decreased this value to 40%. Hence, extracorporeal treatment and HBO are recommended for the treatment of sepsis.

  11. Incidence and Outcome of Group B Streptococcal Sepsis in Infants in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Berger, Christoph; Stocker, Martin; Agyeman, Philipp; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Heininger, Ulrich; Konetzny, Gabriel; Niederer-Loher, Anita; Kahlert, Christian; Donas, Alex; Leone, Antonio; Hasters, Paul; Relly, Christa; Baer, Walter; Aebi, Christoph; Schlapbach, Luregn J

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and outcome of group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis were assessed prospectively between September 2011 and February 2015 in all tertiary care pediatric hospitals of Switzerland. We describe a low incidence of GBS early-onset sepsis (0.12/1000 livebirths) and a predominance of GBS late-onset sepsis (0.36/1000 livebirths), a pattern that has not been reported in other countries.

  12. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  13. Clouds above the Martin Limb: Viking observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.; Baum, W. A.; Wasserman, L. H.; Kreidl, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Whenever Viking Orbiter images included the limb of Mars, they recorded one or more layers of clouds above the limb. The height above the limb and the brightness (reflectivity) of these clouds were determined in a selected group of these images. Normalized individual brightness profiles of three separate traverses across the limb of each image are shown. The most notable finding is that some of these clouds can be very high. Many reach heights of over 60 km, and several are over 70 km above the limb. Statistically, the reflectivity of the clouds increases with phase angle. Reflectivity and height both appear to vary with season, but the selected images spanned only one Martian year, so the role of seasons cannot be isolated. Limb clouds in red-filter images tend to be brighter than violet-filter images, but both season and phase appear to be more dominant factors. Due to the limited sample available, the possible influences of latitude and longitude are less clear. The layering of these clouds ranges from a single layer to five or more layers. Reflectivity gradients range from smooth and gentle to steep and irregular.

  14. The diagnosis of sepsis revisited - a challenge for young medical scientists in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, a well-meaning consensus group of thought leaders derived a simple definition for sepsis which required the breach of only a few static thresholds. More than 20 years later, this simple definition has calcified to become the gold standard for sepsis protocols and research. Yet sepsis clearly comprises a complex, dynamic, and relational distortion of human life. Given the profound scope of the loss of life worldwide, there is a need to disengage from the simple concepts of the past. There is an acute need to develop 21st century approaches which engage sepsis in its true form, as a complex, dynamic, and relational pattern of death. PMID:24383420

  15. Association between PAI-1 polymorphisms and plasma PAI-1 level with sepsis in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y F; Chai, J K; Yu, Y M; Luo, H M; Zhang, Q X; Feng, R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) polymorphisms and plasma PAI-1 level with sepsis in severely burned patients. A total of 182 patients with burn areas lager than 30% of the body surface area were enrolled in this study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 103 patients with sepsis (sepsis group) and 79 patients without sepsis (control group). An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay was used to determine PAI-1 polymorphism 4G/5G distribution. Plasma PAI-1 levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The frequency of the 4G/4G genotype and the 4G allele frequency in the sepsis group were 42.7 and 62.1% respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Sepsis patients had a significantly higher plasma PAI-1 level than the control group (P < 0.05). Compared with the 5G/5G genotype, PAI-1 concentrations were significantly higher in the 4G/4G genotype (P < 0.05). The study indicates that the 4G/5G promoter polymorphism of PAI-1 gene may be related to the susceptibility to burn sepsis and that the 4G/4G genotype may be an important genetic risk factor of burn sepsis. Additionally, PAI-1 concentrations in the serum are increased in patients with burn sepsis.

  16. Development and Validation of a Disease Severity Scoring Model for Pediatric Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    HU, Li; ZHU, Yimin; CHEN, Mengshi; LI, Xun; LU, Xiulan; LIANG, Ying; TAN, Hongzhuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple severity scoring systems have been devised and evaluated in adult sepsis, but a simplified scoring model for pediatric sepsis has not yet been developed. This study aimed to develop and validate a new scoring model to stratify the severity of pediatric sepsis, thus assisting the treatment of sepsis in children. Methods: Data from 634 consecutive patients who presented with sepsis at Children’s hospital of Hunan province in China in 2011–2013 were analyzed, with 476 patients placed in training group and 158 patients in validation group. Stepwise discriminant analysis was used to develop the accurate discriminate model. A simplified scoring model was generated using weightings defined by the discriminate coefficients. The discriminant ability of the model was tested by receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results: The discriminant analysis showed that prothrombin time, D-dimer, total bilirubin, serum total protein, uric acid, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, myoglobin were associated with severity of sepsis. These seven variables were assigned with values of 4, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 3 respectively based on the standardized discriminant coefficients. Patients with higher scores had higher risk of severe sepsis. The areas under ROC (AROC) were 0.836 for accurate discriminate model, and 0.825 for simplified scoring model in validation group. Conclusions: The proposed disease severity scoring model for pediatric sepsis showed adequate discriminatory capacity and sufficient accuracy, which has important clinical significance in evaluating the severity of pediatric sepsis and predicting its progress. PMID:27516993

  17. Risk Factors and Prevention of Late Onset Sepsis in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L Corbin; Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2010-01-01

    Late-onset sepsis in premature infants is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased medical costs. Risk factors include low birth weight, low gestational age, previous antimicrobial exposure, poor hand hygiene, and central venous catheters. Methods studied to prevent late-onset sepsis include early feedings, immune globulin administration, prophylactic antimicrobial administration, and improved hand hygiene. In this review, we will outline the risk factors for development of late-onset sepsis and evidence supporting methods for prevention of late-onset sepsis in premature infants. PMID:20116186

  18. Angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2 and bicarbonate as diagnostic biomarkers in children with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Bhandari, Vineet; Giuliano, John S; O Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D; Kirby, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Severe pediatric sepsis continues to be associated with high mortality rates in children. Thus, an important area of biomedical research is to identify biomarkers that can classify sepsis severity and outcomes. The complex and heterogeneous nature of sepsis makes the prospect of the classification of sepsis severity using a single biomarker less likely. Instead, we employ machine learning techniques to validate the use of a multiple biomarkers scoring system to determine the severity of sepsis in critically ill children. The study was based on clinical data and plasma samples provided by a tertiary care center's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) from a group of 45 patients with varying sepsis severity at the time of admission. Canonical Correlation Analysis with the Forward Selection and Random Forests methods identified a particular set of biomarkers that included Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and Bicarbonate (HCO[Formula: see text]) as having the strongest correlations with sepsis severity. The robustness and effectiveness of these biomarkers for classifying sepsis severity were validated by constructing a linear Support Vector Machine diagnostic classifier. We also show that the concentrations of Ang-1, Ang-2, and HCO[Formula: see text] enable predictions of the time dependence of sepsis severity in children.

  19. Identification of microRNA as sepsis biomarker based on miRNAs regulatory network analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Sun, Zhandong; Yan, Wenying; Zhu, Yujie; Lin, Yuxin; Chen, Jiajai; Shen, Bairong; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is regarded as arising from an unusual systemic response to infection but the physiopathology of sepsis remains elusive. At present, sepsis is still a fatal condition with delayed diagnosis and a poor outcome. Many biomarkers have been reported in clinical application for patients with sepsis, and claimed to improve the diagnosis and treatment. Because of the difficulty in the interpreting of clinical features of sepsis, some biomarkers do not show high sensitivity and specificity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs which pair the sites in mRNAs to regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. They play a key role in inflammatory response, and have been validated to be potential sepsis biomarker recently. In the present work, we apply a miRNA regulatory network based method to identify novel microRNA biomarkers associated with the early diagnosis of sepsis. By analyzing the miRNA expression profiles and the miRNA regulatory network, we obtained novel miRNAs associated with sepsis. Pathways analysis, disease ontology analysis, and protein-protein interaction network (PIN) analysis, as well as ROC curve, were exploited to testify the reliability of the predicted miRNAs. We finally identified 8 novel miRNAs which have the potential to be sepsis biomarkers.

  20. Sepsis following cancer surgery: the need for early recognition and standardised clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hiong, A; Thursky, K A; Teh, B W; Haeusler, G M; Slavin, M A; Worth, L J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the implementation of multimodal bundles of care in hospitalised patients, post-operative sepsis in patients with cancer still accounts for a significant burden of illness and substantial healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for cancer are at particular risk of sepsis due to underlying malignancy, being immunocompromised associated with cancer management and the complexity of surgical procedures performed. In this review, we evaluate the burden of illness and risks for sepsis following surgery for cancer. Current evidence supporting standardised strategies for sepsis management (including early recognition and resuscitation) is examined together with challenges in implementing quality improvement programs.

  1. Decreased ADAMTS 13 Activity is Associated With Disease Severity and Outcome in Pediatric Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Wang, Yu; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-04-01

    Decreased ADAMTS 13 activity has been reported in severe sepsis and in sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation. This study aimed to investigate the role of ADAMTS 13 in different pediatric sepsis syndromes and evaluate its relationship with disease severity and outcome. We prospectively collected cases of sepsis treated in a pediatric intensive care unit, between July 2012 and June 2014 in Chang Gung Children's Hospital in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Clinical characteristics and ADAMTS-13 activity were analyzed. All sepsis syndromes had decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 of admission compared to healthy controls. Patients with septic shock had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 compared to those with sepsis and severe sepsis. There was a significant negative correlation between ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 and day 1 PRISM-II, PELOD, P-MOD, and DIC scores. Patients with mortality had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 than survivors, but not on day 3. Different pediatric sepsis syndromes have varying degrees of decreased ADAMTS 13 activity. ADAMTS 13 activity is strongly negatively correlated with disease severity of pediatric sepsis syndrome, whereas decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 is associated with increased risk of mortality. PMID:27100422

  2. Reactive oxygen species-associated molecular signature predicts survival in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bime, Christian; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Slepian, Marvin J; Garcia, Joe G N; Hecker, Louise

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. There is overwhelming evidence that oxidative stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated multiple organ failure; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated biomarkers and/or diagnostics that define mortality or predict survival in sepsis are lacking. Lung or peripheral blood gene expression analysis has gained increasing recognition as a potential prognostic and/or diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to identify ROS-associated biomarkers predictive of survival in patients with sepsis. In-silico analyses of expression profiles allowed the identification of a 21-gene ROS-associated molecular signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. Importantly, this signature performed well in a validation cohort consisting of sepsis patients aggregated from distinct patient populations recruited from different sites. Our signature outperforms randomly generated signatures of the same signature gene size. Our findings further validate the critical role of ROSs in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel gene signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. These results also highlight the utility of peripheral blood molecular signatures as biomarkers for predicting mortality risk in patients with sepsis, which could facilitate the development of personalized therapies. PMID:27252846

  3. Paramedic Recognition of Sepsis in the Prehospital Setting: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Andrew H.; Cain, Edward; Campbell, Samuel G.; Jensen, Jan L.; Petrie, David A.; Erdogan, Mete; Patrick, Gredi; Patrick, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with sepsis benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Accurate paramedic recognition of sepsis is important to initiate care promptly for patients who arrive by Emergency Medical Services. Methods. Prospective observational study of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) transported by paramedics to the emergency department (ED) of a Canadian tertiary hospital. Paramedic identification of sepsis was assessed using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool developed by the study team and compared to blind, independent documentation of ED diagnoses by attending emergency physicians (EPs). Specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Overall, 629 patients were included in the analysis. Sepsis was identified by paramedics in 170 (27.0%) patients and by EPs in 71 (11.3%) patients. Sensitivity of paramedic sepsis identification compared to EP diagnosis was 73.2% (95% CI 61.4–83.0), while specificity was 78.8% (95% CI 75.2–82.2). The accuracy of paramedic identification of sepsis was 78.2% (492/629, 52 true positive, 440 true negative). Positive and negative predictive values were 30.6% (95% CI 23.8–38.1) and 95.9% (95% CI 93.6–97.5), respectively. Conclusion. Using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool, paramedic recognition of sepsis had greater specificity than sensitivity with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27051533

  4. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    PubMed Central

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  5. Probiotics for Preventing Late-Onset Sepsis in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Hu, Hua-Jian; Liu, Chuan-Yang; Shakya, Shristi; Li, Zhong-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of probiotics on late-onset sepsis (LOS) in preterm neonates remains controversial. The authors systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether enteral probiotic supplementation reduced the risk of LOS in preterm neonates in neonatal intensive care units. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding the effect of probiotics in preterm neonates. The primary outcome was culture-proven bacterial and/or fungal sepsis. The Mantel–Haenszel method with random-effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twenty-seven trials were included in our review, and 25 trials involving 6104 preterm neonates were statistically analyzed. Pooled analysis indicated that enteral probiotic supplementation significantly reduced the risk of any sepsis (25 RCTs; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73–0.94; I2 = 26%), bacterial sepsis (11 RCTs; RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71–0.95; I2 = 0%), and fungal sepsis (6 RCTs; RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41–0.78; I2 = 0%). This beneficial effect remains in very low birth weight infants (<1500 g) (19 RCTs; RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75–0.97; I2 = 18%), but not in extremely low birth weight infants (<1000 g) (3 RCTs; RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.45–1.19; I2 = 53%). All the included trials reported no systemic infection caused by the supplemental probiotic organisms. Current evidence indicates that probiotic supplementation is safe, and effective in reducing the risk of LOS in preterm neonates in neonatal intensive care units. Further studies are needed to address the optimal probiotic organism, dosing, timing, and duration. High-quality and adequately powered RCTs regarding the efficacy and safety of the use of probiotics in extremely low birth weight infants are still warranted. PMID:26937897

  6. Feasibility of Modified Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines in a Resource-Restricted Setting Based on a Cohort Study of Severe S. Aureus Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Srisomang, Pramot; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Lorvinitnun, Pichet; Wongyingsinn, Mingkwan; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Hongsuwan, Maliwan; West, T. Eoin; Day, Nicholas P.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines describe best practice for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock in developed countries, but most deaths from sepsis occur where healthcare is not sufficiently resourced to implement them. Our objective was to define the feasibility and basis for modified guidelines in a resource-restricted setting. Methods and Findings We undertook a detailed assessment of sepsis management in a prospective cohort of patients with severe sepsis caused by a single pathogen in a 1,100-bed hospital in lower-middle income Thailand. We compared their management with the SSC guidelines to identify care bundles based on existing capabilities or additional activities that could be undertaken at zero or low cost. We identified 72 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock associated with S. aureus bacteraemia, 38 (53%) of who died within 28 days. One third of patients were treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Numerous interventions described by the SSC guidelines fell within existing capabilities, but their implementation was highly variable. Care available to patients on general wards covered the fundamental principles of sepsis management, including non-invasive patient monitoring, antimicrobial administration and intravenous fluid resuscitation. We described two additive care bundles, one for general wards and the second for ICUs, that if consistently performed would be predicted to improve outcome from severe sepsis. Conclusion It is feasible to implement modified sepsis guidelines that are scaled to resource availability, and that could save lives prior to the publication of international guidelines for developing countries. PMID:22363410

  7. Does the crossed-limb deficit affect the uncrossed portions of limbs?

    PubMed

    Azañón, Elena; Radulova, Svetla; Haggard, Patrick; Longo, Matthew R

    2016-09-01

    When locating touch, we remap its location from skin-based to external coordinates as a function of body posture. While remapping is thought to occur whenever there is tactile input, research has focused on a special case, the crossed-hands deficit, where tactile localization is impaired when the limbs are crossed compared with uncrossed. To date, these studies have always stimulated portions of the limbs that are crossed, such as a finger of each hand. It is therefore unknown whether the deficit induced by arm crossing is specific to the crossed portion of the limb or affects the limb as a whole. In Experiments 1 and 2, we stimulated the shoulders and elbows and found that tactile localization, measured with temporal order judgments, was unaffected by crossing the forearms. In Experiment 3, a crossed-limbs deficit was observed for touches on a single skin location when that location was distal-but not proximal-to the crossing point of the arms. In Experiment 4, we found a similar crossed-limbs deficit irrespective of how far distally to the crossing point touch was applied. Together, these results demonstrate that crossing the limbs affects tactile perception only distal to the point of crossing. The process of remapping tactile events does not take into account the end-point location of the limb, but an extremely precise metric description of the touch relative to the configuration of both arms. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26986180

  8. Drug dosage in isolated limb perfusion: evaluation of a limb volume model for extremity volume calculation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exact drug dosing in isolated limb perfusion (ILP) and infusion (ILI) is essential. We developed and evaluated a model for calculating the volume of extremities and compared this model with body weight- and height-dependent parameters. Methods The extremity was modeled by a row of coupled truncated cones. The sizes of the truncated cone bases were derived from the circumference measurements of the extremity at predefined levels (5 cm). The resulting volumes were added. This extremity volume model was correlated to the computed tomography (CT) volume data of the extremity (total limb volume). The extremity volume was also correlated with the patient’s body weight, body mass index (BMI) and ideal body weight (IBW). The no-fat CT limb volume was correlated with the circumference-measured limb volume corrected by the ideal-body-weight to actual-body-weight ratio (IBW corrected-limb-volume). Results The correlation between the CT volume and the volume measured by the circumference was high and significant. There was no correlation between the limb volume and the bare body weight, BMI or IBW. The correlation between the no-fat CT volume and IBW-corrected limb volume was high and significant. Conclusions An appropriate drug dosing in ILP can be achieved by combining the limb volume with the simple circumference measurements and the IBW to body-weight ratio. PMID:24684972

  9. Does Celiac Disease Influence Survival in Sepsis? A Nationwide Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Röckert Tjernberg, Anna; Bonnedahl, Jonas; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of sepsis. The aim of this study was to examine whether CD influences survival in sepsis of bacterial origin. Methods Nationwide longitudinal registry-based study. Through data on small intestinal biopsies from Sweden’s 28 pathology departments, we identified 29,096 individuals with CD (villous atrophy, Marsh stage III). Each individual with CD was matched with five population-based controls. Among these, 5,470 had a record of sepsis according to the Swedish Patient Register (1,432 celiac individuals and 4,038 controls). Finally we retrieved data on mortality in sepsis patients through the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results CD was associated with a 19% increase in overall mortality after sepsis (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.29), with the highest relative risk occurring in children (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.62; 95%CI = 0.67–3.91). However, aHR for death from sepsis was lower (aHR = 1.10) and failed to reach statistical significance (95%CI = 0.72–1.69). CD did not influence survival within 28 days after sepsis (aHR = 0.98; 95%CI = 0.80–1.19). Conclusions Although individuals with CD seem to be at an increased risk of overall death after sepsis, that excess risk does not differ from the general excess mortality previously seen in celiac patients in Sweden. CD as such does not seem to influence short-term or sepsis-specific survival in individuals with sepsis and therefore is not an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in sepsis. PMID:27124735

  10. Role of nicotine on cognitive and behavioral deficits in sepsis-surviving rats.

    PubMed

    Leite, Franco B; Prediger, Rui D; Silva, Mônica V; de Sousa, João Batista; Carneiro, Fabiana P; Gasbarri, Antonella; Tomaz, Carlos; Queiroz, Amadeu J; Martins, Natália T; Ferreira, Vania M

    2013-04-24

    Sepsis and its complications are important causes of mortality in intensive care units and sepsis survivors may present long-term cognitive and emotional impairments, including memory deficits and anxiety symptoms. In the present study, we investigated whether repeated nicotine administration can affect the behavioral changes in sepsis-surviving rats. Male Wistar rats were divided in two groups: sham-operated and experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The animals were injected subcutaneously with nicotine (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle once a day during 1 week before and/or 1 week after sepsis induction. Thirty minutes after the last administration (i.e., 7 days after surgery), the animals were tested in the open field, elevated plus-maze and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. The repeated nicotine treatment did not affect the survival rate in the sepsis group (50%). Moreover, no significant changes on locomotor activity were observed in the sepsis group while the treatment with nicotine during 1 week after surgery reduced the locomotion of sepsis-surviving rats in the open field. It is important to note that both schedules of nicotine treatment (prior and/or after CLP) improved the sepsis-induced anxiogenic-like responses. Interestingly, nicotine was able to improve short- and long-term inhibitory avoidance memory impairments, observed in sepsis survivors, only when administered during 2 consecutive weeks (i.e., prior and after CLP). Taken together, these results indicate that repeated nicotine administration does not alter the survival rate in rats submitted to CLP and provide new evidence that nicotine can improve long-lasting memory impairments and anxiogenic-like responses in sepsis-surviving animals.

  11. The Impact of HIV Co-Infection on the Genomic Response to Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Scicluna, Brendon P; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Cremer, Olaf L; Bonten, Marc J M; Schultz, Marcus J; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV patients have an increased risk to develop sepsis and HIV infection affects several components of the immune system involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We hypothesized that HIV infection might aggrevate the aberrant immune response during sepsis, so we aimed to determine the impact of HIV infection on the genomic host response to sepsis. We compared whole blood leukocyte gene expression profiles among sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and validated our findings in a cohort of patients admitted to the same ICUs in a different time frame. To examine the influence of HIV infection per se, we also determined the expression of genes of interest in a cohort of asymptomatic HIV patients. We identified a predominantly common host response in sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection. HIV positive sepsis patients in both ICU cohorts showed overexpression of genes involved in granzyme signaling (GZMA, GZMB), cytotoxic T-cell signaling (CD8A, CD8B) and T-cell inhibitory signaling (LAG3), compared to HIV negative patients. Enhanced expression of CD8A, CD8B and LAG3 was also unmasked in asymptomatic HIV patients. Plasma levels of granzymes in sepsis patients were largely below detection limit, without differences according to HIV status. These results demonstrate that sepsis is characterized by a massive common response with few differences between HIV positive and HIV negative sepsis patients. Observed differences in granzyme signaling, cytotoxic T-cell signaling and T-cell inhibitory signaling appear to be changes commonly observed in asymptomatic HIV patients which persist during sepsis.

  12. The Impact of HIV Co-Infection on the Genomic Response to Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; van Vught, Lonneke A.; Wiewel, Maryse A.; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Cremer, Olaf L.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P.; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV patients have an increased risk to develop sepsis and HIV infection affects several components of the immune system involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We hypothesized that HIV infection might aggrevate the aberrant immune response during sepsis, so we aimed to determine the impact of HIV infection on the genomic host response to sepsis. We compared whole blood leukocyte gene expression profiles among sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and validated our findings in a cohort of patients admitted to the same ICUs in a different time frame. To examine the influence of HIV infection per se, we also determined the expression of genes of interest in a cohort of asymptomatic HIV patients. We identified a predominantly common host response in sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection. HIV positive sepsis patients in both ICU cohorts showed overexpression of genes involved in granzyme signaling (GZMA, GZMB), cytotoxic T-cell signaling (CD8A, CD8B) and T-cell inhibitory signaling (LAG3), compared to HIV negative patients. Enhanced expression of CD8A, CD8B and LAG3 was also unmasked in asymptomatic HIV patients. Plasma levels of granzymes in sepsis patients were largely below detection limit, without differences according to HIV status. These results demonstrate that sepsis is characterized by a massive common response with few differences between HIV positive and HIV negative sepsis patients. Observed differences in granzyme signaling, cytotoxic T-cell signaling and T-cell inhibitory signaling appear to be changes commonly observed in asymptomatic HIV patients which persist during sepsis. PMID:26871709

  13. Neonatal Sepsis 2004–2013: The Rise and Fall of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Matthew J.; Shabanova, Veronika; Baltimore, Robert S.; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate data for the period 2004–2013 to identify changes in demographics, pathogens, and outcomes in a single, level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study design Sepsis episodes were identified prospectively and additional information obtained retrospectively from infants with sepsis while in the NICU from 2004–2013. Demographics, hospital course, and outcome data were collected and analyzed. Sepsis was categorized as early (≤3 days of life) or late-onset (>3 days of life). Results Four hundred and fifty two organisms were identified from 410 episodes of sepsis in 340 infants. Ninety percent of cases were late-onset. Rates of early-onset sepsis remained relatively static throughout the study period (0.9 per 1000 live births). The majority (60%) of infants with early-onset sepsis were very low birth weight for the first time in decades, and E. coli (45%) replaced GBS (36%) as the most common organism associated with early-onset sepsis. Rates of late-onset sepsis, particularly due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), decreased significantly after implementation of several infection prevention initiatives. CoNS was responsible for 31% of all cases from 2004–2009 but accounted for no cases of late-onset sepsis after 2011. Conclusions The epidemiology and microbiology of early- and late-onset sepsis continue to change, impacted by targeted infection prevention efforts. We believe the decrease in sepsis indicates that these interventions have been successful, but additional surveillance and strategies based on evolving trends are necessary. PMID:25919728

  14. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P < .01). We conclude that 2 major roadblocks to designing successful lower limb robotic exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  15. Alignment of lower-limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, M S; Spence, W D; Solomonidis, S E; Paul, J P

    1986-04-01

    Alignment of a prosthesis is defined as the position of the socket relative to the other prosthetic components of the limb. During dynamic alignment the prosthetist, using subjective judgment and feedback from the patient, aims to achieve the most suitable limb geometry for best function and comfort. Until recently it was generally believed that a patient could only be satisfied with a unique "optimum alignment." The purpose of this systematic study of lower-limb alignment parameters was to gain an understanding of the factors that make a limb configuration or optimum alignment, acceptable to the patient, and to obtain a measure of the variation of this alignment that would be acceptable to the amputee. In this paper, the acceptable range of alignments for 10 below- and 10 above-knee amputees are established. Three prosthetists were involved in the majority of the 183 below-knee and 100 above-knee fittings, although several other prosthetists were also involved. The effects of each different prosthetist on the established range of alignment for each patient are reported to be significant. It is now established that an amputee can tolerate several alignments ranging in some parameters by as much as 148 mm in shifts and 17 degrees in tilts. This paper describes the method of defining and measuring the alignment of lower-limb prostheses. It presents quantitatively established values for bench alignment position and the range of adjustment required for incorporation into the design of new alignment units.

  16. Pbx Homeodomain Proteins: TALEnted regulators of Limb Patterning and Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Terence D.; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. PMID:21416555

  17. Quantification of functional and inactivated alpha 2-macroglobulin in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Abbink, J J; Nuijens, J H; Eerenberg, A J; Huijbregts, C C; Strack van Schijndel, R J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1991-01-23

    Alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2 M) in vitro inhibits numerous proteinases that are generated during inflammatory reactions and therefore, probably plays an important role in diseases such as sepsis. To monitor the state of alpha 2 M in sepsis, we developed novel assays for functional and inactive alpha 2M. Functional alpha 2M in plasma was measured by quantitating the binding of alpha 2M to solid-phase trypsin. Inactive alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) was assessed with a monoclonal antibody, mcAb M1, that specifically reacts with a neodeterminant exposed on i alpha 2M. This mcAb in combination with chromogenic substrates was used to detect alpha 2M-proteinase complexes. Functional alpha 2M was reduced in plasma from 48 patients with clinical sepsis compared to healthy controls (p less than 0.0001). Levels of functional alpha 2M on admission and the lowest levels encountered in 23 patients with shock were lower than in 25 normotensive patients (p = 0.023 and p = 0.009, respectively). Increased levels of i alpha 2M (greater than 30 nM) at least on one occasion were found in only 4 of the 48 patients, being not different in hypotensive compared with normotensive patients, and not in patients who died compared with those who survived. Levels of functional alpha 2M correlated significantly with levels of factor XII and prekallikrein suggesting that decreases in alpha 2M at least in part were due to contact activation. Indeed, in two patients with increased i alpha 2M, complexes between alpha 2M and kallikrein were demonstrated in addition to plasmin- and thrombin-alpha 2M complexes.

  18. Computing network-based features from physiological time series: application to sepsis detection.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Sabato; Granite, Stephen J; Sarma, Sridevi V; Winslow, Raimond L

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic deleterious host response to infection. It is a major healthcare problem that affects millions of patients every year in the intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. Despite the fact that ICU patients are heavily instrumented with physiological sensors, early sepsis detection remains challenging, perhaps because clinicians identify sepsis by using static scores derived from bed-side measurements individually, i.e., without systematically accounting for potential interactions between these signals and their dynamics. In this study, we apply network-based data analysis to take into account interactions between bed-side physiological time series (PTS) data collected in ICU patients, and we investigate features to distinguish between sepsis and non-sepsis conditions. We treated each PTS source as a node on a graph and we retrieved the graph connectivity matrix over time by tracking the correlation between each pair of sources' signals over consecutive time windows. Then, for each connectivity matrix, we computed the eigenvalue decomposition. We found that, even though raw PTS measurements may have indistinguishable distributions in non-sepsis and early sepsis states, the median /I of the eigenvalues computed from the same data is statistically different (p <; 0.001) in the two states and the evolution of /I may reflect the disease progression. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that network-based features computed from continuous PTS data may be useful for early sepsis detection. PMID:25570825

  19. Oral lactoferrin for the treatment of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) cause significant neonatal mortality and morbidity in spite of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Enhancing host defence and modulating inflammation by using lactoferrin as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of sepsis and/or NEC may improve cl...

  20. Sepsis and development impede muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by different ribosomal mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In muscle, sepsis reduces protein synthesis (MPS) by restraining translation in neonates and adults. Even though protein accretion decreases with development as neonatal MPS rapidly declines by maturation, the changes imposed by development on the sepsis-associated decrease in MPS have not been desc...

  1. Oral lactoferrin for the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolotis in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferrin, a normal component of human colostrum, milk, tears and saliva can enhance host defence and may be effective in the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm neonates. To assess the safety and effectiveness of oral lactoferrin in the prevention of sepsis and NEC...

  2. Oral lactoferrin for the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferrin, a normal component of human colostrum, milk, tears, and saliva can enhance host defence and may be effective in the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm neonates. To assess the safety and effectiveness of oral lactoferrin in the prevention of sepsis and NE...

  3. Mechanical ventilation alone, and in the presence sepsis, induces peripheral skeletal muscle catabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced rates of skeletal muscle accretion are a prominent feature of the metabolic response to sepsis in infants and children. Septic neonates often require medical support with mechanical ventilation (MV). The combined effects of MV and sepsis in muscle have not been examined in neonates, in whom ...

  4. Maturity aggravates sepsis-associated skeletal muscle catabolism in growing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthesis and accretion of muscle protein is elevated in neonates and decreases with development. During sepsis, muscle protein synthesis is reduced, but the effect of development on the metabolic response to sepsis in skeletal muscle is not well understood. Fasted 7- and 26-d-old pigs were infused ...

  5. Mechanical ventilation and sepsis induce skeletal muscle catabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced rates of skeletal muscle accretion are a prominent feature of the metabolic response to sepsis in infants and children. Septic neonates often require medical support with mechanical ventilation (MV). The combined effects of MV and sepsis in muscle have not been examined in neonates, in whom ...

  6. Value of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Pretreatment in Experimental Sepsis Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alici, Ozlem; Kavakli, Havva Sahin; Koca, Cemile; Altintas, Neriman Defne; Aydin, Murat; Alici, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. The aim of this study was to determine the actions of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on the changes of endothelin-1 (ET-1) level, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) alpha, and oxidative stress parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in experimental sepsis model in rats. Materials and Methods. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: sham (group 1), sepsis (group 2), and sepsis + CAPE (group 3), n = 8 each. CAPE was administered (10 µmol/kg) intraperitoneally to group 3 before sepsis induction. Serum ET-1, serum TNF-alpha, tissue SOD activity, and tissue MDA levels were measured in all groups. Results. Pretreatment with CAPE decreased ET-1, TNF-alpha, and MDA levels in sepsis induced rats. Additionally SOD activities were higher in rats pretreated with CAPE after sepsis induction. Conclusion. Our results demonstrate that CAPE may have a beneficial effect on ET and TNF-alpha levels and oxidative stress parameters induced by sepsis in experimental rat models. Therefore treatment with CAPE can be used to avoid devastating effects of sepsis. PMID:25948886

  7. Computing network-based features from physiological time series: application to sepsis detection.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Sabato; Granite, Stephen J; Sarma, Sridevi V; Winslow, Raimond L

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic deleterious host response to infection. It is a major healthcare problem that affects millions of patients every year in the intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. Despite the fact that ICU patients are heavily instrumented with physiological sensors, early sepsis detection remains challenging, perhaps because clinicians identify sepsis by using static scores derived from bed-side measurements individually, i.e., without systematically accounting for potential interactions between these signals and their dynamics. In this study, we apply network-based data analysis to take into account interactions between bed-side physiological time series (PTS) data collected in ICU patients, and we investigate features to distinguish between sepsis and non-sepsis conditions. We treated each PTS source as a node on a graph and we retrieved the graph connectivity matrix over time by tracking the correlation between each pair of sources' signals over consecutive time windows. Then, for each connectivity matrix, we computed the eigenvalue decomposition. We found that, even though raw PTS measurements may have indistinguishable distributions in non-sepsis and early sepsis states, the median /I of the eigenvalues computed from the same data is statistically different (p <; 0.001) in the two states and the evolution of /I may reflect the disease progression. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that network-based features computed from continuous PTS data may be useful for early sepsis detection.

  8. Novel relationships between oxidative stress and angiogenesis-related factors in sepsis: New biomarkers and therapies.

    PubMed

    Vera, Sergio; Martínez, Rolando; Gormaz, Juan Guillermo; Gajardo, Abraham; Galleguillos, Fernanda; Rodrigo, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis is a systemic uncontrolled inflammatory response in the presence of an infection. It remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. According to its severity, sepsis can progress to three different states: severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, related to organ dysfunction and/or tissue hypoperfusion. Different processes underlie its pathophysiology; among them are oxidative stress, endothelial and mitochondrial dysfunction, and angiogenesis-related factors. However, no studies have integrated these elements in sepsis. The main difficulty in sepsis is its diagnosis. Currently, the potential of inflammatory biomarkers in septic patients remains weak. In this context, the research into new biomarkers is essential to aid with sepsis diagnosis and prognostication. Furthermore, even though the current management of severe forms of sepsis has been effective, morbimortality remains elevated. Therefore, it is essential to explore alternative approaches to therapy development. The aim of this review is to present an update of evidence supporting the role of oxidative stress and angiogenesis-related factors in the pathophysiology of the different forms of sepsis. It proposes a novel convergence between both elements in their role in the disease, and it will cover their utility as new diagnostic tools, predictors of outcome, and as novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls: Excessive Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fluid resuscitation is the mainstay therapy in modern sepsis management. Its efficacy was demonstrated in the landmark study by Emmanuel Rivers in 2001. However, more recent evidence largely shows that a positive fluid balance increases mortality in critically ill patients with sepsis. This article examines the theoretical benefits of fluid resuscitation and physiological responses to it that may negatively affect patients' outcome.

  10. Illusory limb movements in anosognosia for hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, T.; Roane, D.; Ali, J.

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the relation between anosognosia for hemiplegia and confabulation, 11 patients with acute right cerebral infarctions and left upper limb hemiparesis were assessed for anosognosia for hemiplegia, illusory limb movements (ILMs), hemispatial neglect, asomatognosia, and cognitive impairment. Five of 11 patients had unequivocal confabulation as evidenced by ILMs. The presence of ILMs was associated with the degree of anosognosia (p=0.002), with hemispatial neglect (p<0.05), and with asomatognosia (p<0.01). The results confirm that a strong relation exists between anosognosia for hemiplegia and confabulations concerning the movement of the plegic limb. There is also a strong relation between ILMs and asomatognosia.

 PMID:10727491

  11. Gradients of signalling in the developing limb.

    PubMed

    Towers, Matthew; Wolpert, Lewis; Tickle, Cheryll

    2012-04-01

    The developing limb is one of the first systems where it was proposed that a signalling gradient is involved in pattern formation. This gradient for specifying positional information across the antero-posterior axis is based on Sonic hedgehog signalling from the polarizing region. Recent evidence suggests that Sonic hedgehog signalling also specifies positional information across the antero-posterior axis by a timing mechanism acting in parallel with graded signalling. The progress zone model for specifying proximo-distal pattern, involving timing to provide cells with positional information, continues to be challenged, and there is further evidence that graded signalling by retinoic acid specifies the proximal part of the limb. Other recent papers present the first evidence that gradients of signalling by Wnt5a and FGFs govern cell behaviour involved in outgrowth and morphogenesis of the developing limb.

  12. Local autonomic failure affecting a limb.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R H; Robinson, B J

    1987-01-01

    Three patients are described who presented with autonomic failure affecting predominantly one limb. Physiological studies revealed that there was sweating loss in the limb which appeared to be due to a preganglionic autonomic lesion and not to a sweat gland abnormality. In all three patients there was also evidence of failure of vasomotor control. There was no evidence of more generalised autonomic failure or neurological deficit. In two patients the condition appeared to be static and, according to the patients' accounts was life long. In the third the sweating loss was present for three years prior to pain loss becoming evident from C2/3 to T1 on the same side as the sweating loss. These patients, together with two recent case reports, indicate that isolated local autonomic failure, probably from a discrete cord lesion, can be a cause of presenting symptoms related to sweating loss or to change in temperature in a limb. PMID:3612155

  13. Phantom limb pain: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Virani, Anila; Green, Theresa; Turin, Tanvir C

    2014-09-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a neuropathic pain condition occurring after amputation of a limb. PLP affects amputees' quality of life and results in loss of productivity and psychological distress. The origin of pain from a non-existing limb creates a challenging situation for both patients and nurses. It is imperative to provide patients and nurses with the knowledge that PLP is a real phenomenon that requires care and treatment. This knowledge will lead to reduced problems for patients by allowing them to talk about PLP and ask for help when needed. Understanding of this phenomenon will enable nurses to appreciate the unique features of this form of neuropathic pain and apply appropriate techniques to promote effective pain management. Performing accurate and frequent assessments to understand the unique characteristics of PLP, displaying a non-judgemental attitude towards patients and teaching throughout the peri-operative process are significant nursing interventions.

  14. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  15. CAFFEINE IMPROVES HEART RATE WITHOUT IMPROVING SEPSIS SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Bauzá, Gustavo; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Caffeine is consumed on a daily basis for its nervous system stimulant properties and is a global adenosine receptor antagonist. Since adenosine receptors have been found to play a major role in regulating the immune response to a septic insult, we investigated if caffeine consumption prior to a septic insult would alter immunological and physiological responses, as well as survival. Methods Two separate experimental designs were employed, both using outbred female ICR mice. In the first experiment mice were administered 20mg/kg of caffeine (equal to 2–3 cups of coffee for a human) or normal saline intraperitoneally at the time of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Immunological parameters including cytokines and local cell recruitment measured. In the second experiment caffeine (10mg/kg/hr) was delivered continuously for 24 hours via a subcutaneous infusion pump placed the day prior to CLP and hemodynamic parameters were examined. In both experiments survival was followed for five days. Results A single dose of caffeine at the initiation of sepsis did not alter survival. This single dose of caffeine did significantly increase in plasma levels of the chemokine KC six hours after the onset of sepsis compared to septic mice given normal saline. There were no changes in IL-6 or IL-10 levels in the caffeine groups. Peritoneal lavages performed 24 hours post-CLP showed no difference in the levels of IL-6, TNF, KC, MIP-1, IL-10 or the IL-1 receptor antagonist between caffeine and normal saline treated mice. Additionally, the lavages yielded similar numbers of cells (4.1×106 vehicle vs. 6.9×106 caffeine) and bacterial colony forming units (CFU, 4.1 million CFU vehicle vs. 2.8 million CFU caffeine). In the infusion group, caffeine also did not alter survival. However, caffeine infusion did increase heart rate prior to CLP, and prevented the decline in heart rate after CLP. Conclusion Caffeine increased heart rate in mice but does not impact cytokine

  16. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day. PMID:26931268

  17. Hyperferritinemic Sepsis: An Opportunity for Earlier Diagnosis and Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, E. Scott; Rajasekaran, Surender; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Weiss, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant with HSV meningitis and septic shock who demonstrated a remarkably high serum ferritin level. Aggressive pediatric intensive care and the administration of high-dose glucocorticoids were not able to reverse the multiple organ dysfunctions. Subsequent autopsy identified the presence of hemophagocytosis, thus the patient fulfilled hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) criteria post-mortem. This case highlights that serum ferritin may be an important early indicator of mortality in sepsis due to a cytokine storm similar to macrophage activation syndrome and HLH. PMID:27532033

  18. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  19. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon JH; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies. PMID:12587915

  20. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon J H; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies.

  1. The effect of limb crossing and limb congruency on multisensory integration in peripersonal space for the upper and lower extremities.

    PubMed

    van Elk, Michiel; Forget, Joachim; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-06-01

    The present study investigated how multisensory integration in peripersonal space is modulated by limb posture (i.e. whether the limbs are crossed or uncrossed) and limb congruency (i.e. whether the observed body part matches the actual position of one's limb). This was done separately for the upper limbs (Experiment 1) and the lower limbs (Experiment 2). The crossmodal congruency task was used to measure peripersonal space integration for the hands and the feet. It was found that the peripersonal space representation for the hands but not for the feet is dynamically updated based on both limb posture and limb congruency. Together these findings show how dynamic cues from vision, proprioception, and touch are integrated in peripersonal limb space and highlight fundamental differences in the way in which peripersonal space is represented for the upper and lower extremity. PMID:23579198

  2. A multicenter, prospective evaluation of quality of care and mortality in Japan based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Seitaro; Gando, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Shiraishi, Shin-Ichiro; Ogura, Hiroshi; Takuma, Kiyotsugu; Kotani, Joji; Ikeda, Hiroto; Yamashita, Norio; Suzuki, Koichiro; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Takeyama, Naoshi; Araki, Tsunetoshi; Suzuki, Yasushi; Miki, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Aikawa, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    To elucidate the standard Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines-based quality of care and mortality related to severe sepsis in Japan, we conducted a multicenter, prospective, observational study using a new web-based database between June 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011. A total of 1104 patients with severe sepsis were enrolled from 39 Japanese emergency and critical care centers. All-cause hospital mortality was 29.3% in patients with severe sepsis and 40.7% in patients with septic shock. Pulmonary, renal, hepatic, and hematological dysfunctions were associated with significantly higher mortality, and hematological dysfunction, especially coagulopathy, was associated with the highest odds ratio for mortality. Compliance with severe sepsis bundles in our study was generally low compared with that in a previous international sepsis registry study, and glycemic control was associated with lowest odds ratio for mortality. Despite higher complication rates of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and low compliance with severe sepsis bundles on the whole, mortality in our study was similar to that in the international sepsis registry study. From these results, we concluded that our prospective multicenter study was successful in evaluating SSC guidelines-based standard quality of care and mortality related to severe sepsis in Japan. Although mortality in Japan was equivalent to that reported worldwide in the above-mentioned international sepsis registry study, compliance with severe sepsis bundles was low. Thus, there is scope for improvement in the initial treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock in Japanese emergency and critical care centers.

  3. T-cell mediated immunity and the role of TRAIL in sepsis-induced immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Condotta, Stephanie A.; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in most intensive care units, and the death of septic patients usually does not result from the initial septic event but rather from subsequent nosocomial infections. Patients who survive severe sepsis often display severely compromised immune function. Not only is there significant apoptosis of lymphoid and myeloid cells that depletes critical components of the immune system during sepsis, there is also decreased function of the remaining immune cells. Studies in animals and humans suggest the immune defects that occur during sepsis may be critical to the pathogenesis and subsequent mortality. This review is focused on sepsis-induced alterations with the CD8 T-cell compartment that can affect the control of secondary heterologous infections. Understanding how a septic event directly influences CD8 T-cell populations through apoptotic death and homeostatic proliferation and indirectly by immune-mediated suppression will provide valuable starting points for developing new treatment options. PMID:23510024

  4. Learning a Severity Score for Sepsis: A Novel Approach based on Clinical Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Dyagilev, Kirill; Saria, Suchi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Early administration of treatment has been shown to decrease sepsis-related mortality and morbidity. Existing scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (SOFA) achieve poor sensitivity in distinguishing between the different stages of sepsis. Recently, we proposed the Disease Severity Score Learning (DSSL) framework that automatically derives a severity score from data based on clinical comparisons – pairs of disease states ordered by their severity. In this paper, we test the feasibility of using DSSL to develop a sepsis severity score. We show that the learned score significantly outperforms APACHE-II and SOFA in distinguishing between the different stages of sepsis. Additionally, the learned score is sensitive to changes in severity leading up to septic shock and post treatment administration. PMID:26958288

  5. [Serum lactate as a biomarker of severe sepsis in children with cancer, neutropenia and fever].

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rosas, Daniel Octavio; Huelgas-Plaza, Ana Celia; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la neutropenia es una complicación frecuente secundaria a la quimioterapia en los pacientes con cáncer, en quienes la prevalencia de sepsis es de 12.9 a 17.4 % y la letalidad es de 16 %. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la utilidad del lactato como biomarcador de sepsis grave en niños con cáncer, fiebre y neutropenia. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio de prueba diagnóstica fase II. Se midieron los niveles del lactato al ingreso. Los episodios de neutropenia se clasificaron en tres grupos: I, con sepsis II, sin sepsis; III, pacientes neutropénicos sin fiebre (controles). Se calculó sensibilidad, especificidad, valores predictivos positivo y negativo e índices de verosimilitud. El estándar de oro fue el diagnóstico clínico de sepsis grave.

  6. Sepsis through the eyes of an engineer -- why treatments have succeeded and failed.

    PubMed

    Jopling, Jeffrey; Buchman, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    The sepsis syndrome is an old phenomenon. A destructive response to a system disturbance, it manifests as widespread inflammation. Over the past two centuries, biomedical research has identified triggers and described components of the pathways that underlie the sepsis syndrome. Attempts at translating these findings into preventive and therapeutic interventions have met with varying levels of success. In this chapter, we examine the history of sepsis science through an engineering lens. Patterned attempts to intervene in the natural history of the sepsis syndrome will be discussed in parallel with similar, hypothetical adjustments made to a model system from the engineering canon. This juxtaposition will facilitate our review of the history of sepsis science. Using the logic of systems engineering and network science, we propose a way forward.

  7. Short-term Gains with Long-term Consequences: The Evolving Story of Sepsis Survivorship.

    PubMed

    Maley, Jason H; Mikkelsen, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is an acute, life-threatening condition that afflicts millions of patients annually. Advances in care and heightened awareness have led to substantial declines in short-term mortality. An expanding body of literature describes the long-term impact of sepsis, revealing long-term cognitive and functional impairments, sustained inflammation and immune dysfunction, increased healthcare resource use, reduced health-related quality of life, and increased mortality. The evidence challenges the notion that sepsis is an acute, transient illness, revealing rather that sepsis is an acute illness with lingering consequences. This article provides a state-of-the-art review of the emerging literature of the long-term consequences of sepsis. PMID:27229651

  8. The effect of HIV infection on the host response to bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. HIV causes increased susceptibility to invasive infections and affects sepsis pathogenesis caused by pre-existing activation and exhaustion of the immune system. We review the effect of HIV on different components of immune responses implicated in bacterial sepsis, and possible mechanisms underlying the increased risk of invasive bacterial infections. We focus on pattern recognition receptors and innate cellular responses, cytokines, lymphocytes, coagulation, and the complement system. A combination of factors causes increased susceptibility to infection and can contribute to a disturbed immune response during a septic event in patients with HIV. HIV-induced perturbations of the immune system depend on stage of infection and are only in part restored by combination antiretroviral therapy. Immunomodulatory treatments currently under development for sepsis might be particularly beneficial to patients with HIV co-infection because many pathogenic mechanisms in HIV and sepsis overlap. PMID:25459220

  9. Procession to pediatric bacteremia and sepsis: covert operations and failures in diplomacy.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Stacey L; Seed, Patrick C

    2010-07-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, bacterial sepsis remains a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates, the critically ill, and the growing immunocompromised patient population. Sepsis is the end point of a complex and dynamic series of events in which both host and microbial factors drive high morbidity and potentially lethal physiologic alterations. In this article we provide a succinct overview of the events that lead to pediatric bloodstream infections (BSIs) and sepsis, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms used by bacteria to subvert host barriers and local immunity to gain access to and persist within the systemic circulation. In the events preceding and during BSI and sepsis, Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens use a battery of factors for translocation, inhibition of immunity, molecular mimicry, intracellular survival, and nutrient scavenging. Gaps in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of bacterial BSIs and sepsis are highlighted as opportunities to identify and develop new therapeutics.

  10. Genomics and pharmacogenomics of sepsis: so close and yet so far.

    PubMed

    Russell, James A

    2016-01-01

    Sapru et al. show in this issue of Critical Care that variants of thrombomodulin and the endothelial protein C receptor, but not protein C, are associated with mortality and organ dysfunction (ventilation-free and organ failure-free days) in ARDS. Hundreds of gene variants have been found prognostic in sepsis. However, none of these prognostic genomic biomarkers are used clinically. Predictive biomarker discovery (pharmacogenomics) usually follows a candidate gene approach, utilizing knowledge of drug pathways. Pharmacogenomics could be applied to enhance efficacy and safety of drugs used for treatment of sepsis (e.g., norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, and corticosteroids). Pharmacogenomics can enhance drug development in sepsis, which is very important because there is no approved drug for sepsis. Pharmacogenomics biomarkers must pass three milestones: scientific, regulatory, and commercial. Huge challenges remain but great opportunities for pharmacogenomics of sepsis are on the horizon. PMID:27384443

  11. Solar limb brightening at 350 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Keene, J.; Whitcomb, S.E.

    1981-09-01

    We have used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea to observe the intensity profile of the quiet solar limb in the 300--400 ..mu..m continuum. We find a significant resolved brightening of several percent over the outer 60'' of the solar limb in this band. However, the magnitude of the brightening is considerably less than that indicated by earlier observations of a total solar eclipse in integrated Sun--Moon radiation by Beckman, Lesurf, and Ross in the 1.2 mm continuum.

  12. Electrodiagnostic testing in diabetic neuropathy: Which limb?

    PubMed

    Rota, E; Cocito, D

    2015-10-01

    Electrodiagnosis of subclinical diabetic neuropathies by nerve conduction studies remains challenging. The question arises about which nerves should be tested and what the best electrodiagnostic protocol to make an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathies would be. On the basis of our findings and other evidence, which highlighted the remarkable prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in nerve conduction studies of the upper limbs, often in the presence of normal lower limb conduction parameters, we suggest that both ulnar and median nerves, in their motor and sensitive component, should be the two target nerves for electrodiagnostic protocols in diabetic neuropathies.

  13. Deciphering skeletal patterning: clues from the limb.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Francesca V; Martin, Gail R

    2003-05-15

    Even young children can distinguish a Tyrannosaurus rex from a Brontosaurus by observing differences in bone size, shape, number and arrangement, that is, skeletal pattern. But despite our extensive knowledge about cartilage and bone formation per se, it is still largely a mystery how skeletal pattern is established. Much of what we do know has been learned from studying limb development in chicken and mouse embryos. Based on the data from such studies, models for how limb skeletal pattern is established have been proposed and continue to be hotly debated.

  14. Phantom limb perception interferes with motor imagery after unilateral upper-limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    A potential contributor to impaired motor imagery in amputees is an alteration of the body schema as a result of the presence of a phantom limb. However, the nature of the relationship between motor imagery and phantom experiences remains unknown. In this study, the influence of phantom limb perception on motor imagery was investigated using a hand mental rotation task by means of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Compared with healthy controls, significantly prolonged response time for both the intact and missing hand were observed specifically in amputees who perceived a phantom limb during the task but not in amputees without phantom limb perception. Event-related desynchronization of EEG in the beta band (beta-ERD) in central and parietal areas showed an angular disparity specifically in amputees with phantom limb perception, with its source localized in the right inferior parietal lobule. The response time as well as the beta-ERD values were significantly positively correlated with phantom vividness. Our results suggest that phantom limb perception during the task is an important interferential factor for motor imagery after amputation and the interference might be related to a change of the body representation resulting from an unnatural posture of the phantom limb. PMID:26879749

  15. Phantom limb perception interferes with motor imagery after unilateral upper-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    A potential contributor to impaired motor imagery in amputees is an alteration of the body schema as a result of the presence of a phantom limb. However, the nature of the relationship between motor imagery and phantom experiences remains unknown. In this study, the influence of phantom limb perception on motor imagery was investigated using a hand mental rotation task by means of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Compared with healthy controls, significantly prolonged response time for both the intact and missing hand were observed specifically in amputees who perceived a phantom limb during the task but not in amputees without phantom limb perception. Event-related desynchronization of EEG in the beta band (beta-ERD) in central and parietal areas showed an angular disparity specifically in amputees with phantom limb perception, with its source localized in the right inferior parietal lobule. The response time as well as the beta-ERD values were significantly positively correlated with phantom vividness. Our results suggest that phantom limb perception during the task is an important interferential factor for motor imagery after amputation and the interference might be related to a change of the body representation resulting from an unnatural posture of the phantom limb. PMID:26879749

  16. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induce Organ Damage during Experimental and Clinical Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Czaikoski, Paula Giselle; Mota, José Maurício Segundo Correia; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Melo, Paulo Henrique; Scortegagna, Gabriela Trentin; Silva, Rangel Leal; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Souto, Fabrício Oliveira; Pazin-Filho, Antonio; Figueiredo, Florencio; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Organ dysfunction is a major concern in sepsis pathophysiology and contributes to its high mortality rate. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in endothelial damage and take part in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in several conditions. NETs also have an important role in counteracting invading microorganisms during infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate systemic NETs formation, their participation in host bacterial clearance and their contribution to organ dysfunction in sepsis. C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to endotoxic shock or a polymicrobial sepsis model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The involvement of cf-DNA/NETs in the physiopathology of sepsis was evaluated through NETs degradation by rhDNase. This treatment was also associated with a broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment (ertapenem) in mice after CLP. CLP or endotoxin administration induced a significant increase in the serum concentrations of NETs. The increase in CLP-induced NETs was sustained over a period of 3 to 24 h after surgery in mice and was not inhibited by the antibiotic treatment. Systemic rhDNase treatment reduced serum NETs and increased the bacterial load in non-antibiotic-treated septic mice. rhDNase plus antibiotics attenuated sepsis-induced organ damage and improved the survival rate. The correlation between the presence of NETs in peripheral blood and organ dysfunction was evaluated in 31 septic patients. Higher cf-DNA concentrations were detected in septic patients in comparison with healthy controls, and levels were correlated with sepsis severity and organ dysfunction. In conclusion, cf-DNA/NETs are formed during sepsis and are associated with sepsis severity. In the experimental setting, the degradation of NETs by rhDNase attenuates organ damage only when combined with antibiotics, confirming that NETs take part in sepsis pathogenesis. Altogether, our results suggest that NETs are important for host bacterial control and are

  17. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  18. Neural coupling between upper and lower limbs during recumbent stepping.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen J; Ferris, Daniel P

    2004-10-01

    During gait rehabilitation, therapists or robotic devices often supply physical assistance to a patient's lower limbs to aid stepping. The expensive equipment and intensive manual labor required for these therapies limit their availability to patients. One alternative solution is to design devices where patients could use their upper limbs to provide physical assistance to their lower limbs (i.e., self-assistance). To explore potential neural effects of coupling upper and lower limbs, we investigated neuromuscular recruitment during self-driven and externally driven lower limb motion. Healthy subjects exercised on a recumbent stepper using different combinations of upper and lower limb exertions. The recumbent stepper mechanically coupled the upper and lower limbs, allowing users to drive the stepping motion with upper and/or lower limbs. We instructed subjects to step with 1) active upper and lower limbs at an easy resistance level (active arms and legs); 2) active upper limbs and relaxed lower limbs at easy, medium, and hard resistance levels (self-driven); and 3) relaxed upper and lower limbs while another person drove the stepping motion (externally driven). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from six lower limb muscles. Self-driven EMG amplitudes were always higher than externally driven EMG amplitudes (P < 0.05). As resistance and upper limb exertion increased, self-driven EMG amplitudes also increased. EMG bursts during self-driven and active arms and legs stepping occurred at similar times. These results indicate that active upper limb movement increases neuromuscular activation of the lower limbs during cyclic stepping motions. Neurologically impaired humans that actively engage their upper limbs during gait rehabilitation may increase neuromuscular activation and enhance activity-dependent plasticity. PMID:15180979

  19. Clinical course of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in a cohort of infected patients from ten Colombian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis has several clinical stages, and mortality rates are different for each stage. Our goal was to establish the evolution and the determinants of the progression of clinical stages, from infection to septic shock, over the first week, as well as their relationship to 7-day and 28-day mortality. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter cohort of inpatients hospitalized in general wards or intensive care units (ICUs). The general estimating equations (GEE) model was used to estimate the risk of progression and the determinants of stages of infection over the first week. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates and fixed covariates was used to determine the factors related with 7-day and 28-day mortality, respectively. Results In 2681 patients we show that progression to severe sepsis and septic shock increases with intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection [OR = 1,32; 95%IC = 1,20-1,46 and OR = 1.21, 95%CI = 1,11-1,33 respectively], as well as according to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) [OR = 1,03; 95%CI = 1,02-1,03] and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) [OR = 1,16; 95%CI = 1,14-1,17] scores. The variables related with first-week mortality were progression to severe sepsis [HR = 2,13; 95%CI = 1,13-4,03] and septic shock [HR = 3,00; 95%CI = 1,50-5.98], respiratory source of infection [HR = 1,76; 95%IC = 1,12-2,77], APACHE II [HR = 1,07; 95% CI = 1,04-1,10] and SOFA [HR = 1,09; 95%IC = 1,04-1,15] scores. Conclusions Intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection, independently of SOFA and APACHE II scores, increase the risk of clinical progression to more severe stages of sepsis; and these factors, together with progression of the infection itself, are the main determinants of 7-day and 28-day mortality. PMID:23883312

  20. Cellular origin and procoagulant properties of microparticles in meningococcal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nieuwland, R; Berckmans, R J; McGregor, S; Böing, A N; Romijn, F P; Westendorp, R G; Hack, C E; Sturk, A

    2000-02-01

    Patients with meningococcal sepsis generally suffer from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The aim of this study was to address whether these patients have elevated numbers of circulating microparticles that contribute to the development of DIC. Plasma samples from 5 survivors, 2 nonsurvivors, and 5 healthy volunteers were analyzed for the presence of microparticles by flow cytometry. Ongoing coagulation activation in vivo was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of plasma prothrombin fragment F(1 + 2), and procoagulant properties of microparticles in vitro were estimated by thrombin-generation assay. On admission, all patients had increased numbers of microparticles originating from platelets or granulocytes when compared with controls (P =.004 and P =.008, respectively). Patients had elevated levels of F(1 + 2) (P =.004), and their microparticles supported thrombin generation more strongly in vitro (P =.003) than those of controls. Plasma from the patient with the most fulminant disease course and severe DIC contained microparticles that expressed both CD14 and tissue factor, and these microparticles demonstrated extreme thrombin generation in vitro. We conclude that patients with meningococcal sepsis have elevated numbers of circulating microparticles that are procoagulant. These findings may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to combat clinical conditions with excessive coagulation activation.

  1. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Associated with Consumption of Raw Oysters

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil; Nookala, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram negative bacillus that is native to aquatic environments that is increasingly reported in humans. This case is remarkable for A. hydrophila with an initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain for two days. His past medical history was significant for alcohol abuse. Initial laboratory examination showed an elevated white blood cell count, elevated lipase, and elevated liver function tests (LFT). Computer tomography (CT) showed peripancreatic inflammatory changes and retroperitoneal free fluid, suggestive of acute pancreatitis. The patient was treated with intravenous (IV) fluids and IV meropenem. After two days, the patient developed sepsis and respiratory failure and was intubated. Blood cultures were positive for Aeromonas hydrophila sensitive to ciprofloxacin which was added to his treatment. Additionally, it was discovered that this patient had recently vacationed in Florida where he consumed raw oysters. He was discharged home on the eighth day of the hospital admission. Conclusion. This is a rare case of A. hydrophila sepsis in an elderly patient with acute pancreatitis and a history of consumption of raw oysters. This case suggests that A. hydrophila can cause disseminated infection in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25506003

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Associated with Consumption of Raw Oysters.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Ivan; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil; Vyas, Anix; Nookala, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram negative bacillus that is native to aquatic environments that is increasingly reported in humans. This case is remarkable for A. hydrophila with an initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain for two days. His past medical history was significant for alcohol abuse. Initial laboratory examination showed an elevated white blood cell count, elevated lipase, and elevated liver function tests (LFT). Computer tomography (CT) showed peripancreatic inflammatory changes and retroperitoneal free fluid, suggestive of acute pancreatitis. The patient was treated with intravenous (IV) fluids and IV meropenem. After two days, the patient developed sepsis and respiratory failure and was intubated. Blood cultures were positive for Aeromonas hydrophila sensitive to ciprofloxacin which was added to his treatment. Additionally, it was discovered that this patient had recently vacationed in Florida where he consumed raw oysters. He was discharged home on the eighth day of the hospital admission. Conclusion. This is a rare case of A. hydrophila sepsis in an elderly patient with acute pancreatitis and a history of consumption of raw oysters. This case suggests that A. hydrophila can cause disseminated infection in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25506003

  3. [Advances in the development of neutralizing therapies for sepsis].

    PubMed

    Florencia Henning, María; Garda, Horacio; Bakás, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolisaccharide (LPS), also called endotoxin, is the major component of the external membrane in Gram negative bacteria. This molecule is released to circulation by the bacteria, producing a large variety of toxic and pro-inflammatory effects which are associated with lipid A as well as with sepsis pathogenesis. Many physiological phenomena produced by LPS arise from this molecule's capacity to activate cells in the host immune system such as monocytes, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This process leads to a local inflammation, and it is beneficial for the host. However, if the amount of LPS released exceeds the critical concentration threshold an augmented release of inflammatory cytokines as TNF-alpha, and interleukines (IL) produce a severe sepsis. This fact led us to find therapeutical alternatives able to neutralize circulating endotoxin. This work is focused on the experimental results obtained in vivo and in vitro using synthetic proteins and peptides in order to neutralize LPS, and on future perpectives in this research area that offer the use of lipoprotein and in particular apolipoprotein A-I and mutants or peptides derived from this protein.

  4. Design of clinical trials in sepsis: problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Finch, R G

    1998-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis has been studied intensively in recent years and a variety of opportunities for therapeutic intervention have been identified. A number of biological products including endotoxin antibodies, cytokine inhibitors and receptor antagonists have been evaluated after the failure of pharmacological doses of steroids to influence survival in septic shock. Despite a number of large, international multi-centre studies, the therapeutic promise of these various interventions remains unfulfilled. These trials have largely been conducted in intensive care units in a heterogeneous population of patients with various entry criteria and end-points of response. While the clinical trial must remain the standard for assessing safety and efficacy of new interventions there are opportunities to improve on the design, execution and analysis of these studies. Factors such as the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy, the adequacy of medical and surgical management, and the issue of withdrawal or withholding of life support are discussed in relation to these studies. Furthermore the role of an independent scientific extramural review committee is stressed, particularly in relation to the impact of confounding events of an unforeseen nature. The potential for improving the quality of the analyses of clinical trials of sepsis is illustrated by a recently completed study of the efficacy of a murine monoclonal antibody to human tumour necrosis factor-alpha. PMID:9511091

  5. Oxidative stress as a novel target in pediatric sepsis management.

    PubMed

    von Dessauer, Bettina; Bongain, Jazmina; Molina, Víctor; Quilodrán, Julio; Castillo, Rodrigo; Rodrigo, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Sepsis with secondary multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome is the leading cause of death in the pediatric intensive care unit. Increased reactive oxygen species may influence circulating and endothelial cells, contributing to inflammatory tissue injury and explaining the tissue hypoxia paradigm based on microvascular dysfunction. An impaired mitochondrial cellular oxygen utilization, rather than inadequate oxygen delivery, was claimed to play a more important role in the development of multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome. Anyway, it seems plausible that reactive oxygen species can mediate the pathophysiologic processes occurring in sepsis. However, the consensus guidelines for the management of patients with these conditions do not include the enhancement of antioxidant potential. Therefore, further investigation is needed to support interventions aimed to attenuate the severity of the systemic compromise by abrogating the mechanism of oxidative damage. Antioxidant supplementation currently in use lacks a mechanistic support. Specific pharmacologic targets, such as mitochondria or Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Oxidase (NADPH) oxidase system, need to be explored. Furthermore, the early recognition of oxidative damage in these seriously ill patients and the usefulness of oxidative stress biomarkers to define a cut point for more successful therapeutic antioxidant interventions to be instituted would offer a new strategy to improve the outcome of critically ill children.

  6. Cosmesis: The Art of Making Artificial Limbs Look Lifelike

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Cosmesis: The Art of Making Artificial Limbs Look Lifelike Translated into ... Original article by Rick Bowers Cosmesis is the art of making artificial limbs look lifelike. Artificial hands ...

  7. Developmental mechanisms of vertebrate limb evolution.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M J

    2001-01-01

    Over the past few years, our understanding of the evolution of limbs has been improved by important new discoveries in the fossil record. Additionally, rapid progress has been made in identifying the molecular basis of vertebrate limb development. It is now possible to integrate these two areas of research in order to identify the molecular developmental mechanisms underlying the evolution of paired appendages in vertebrates. After the origin of paired appendages, several vertebrate lineages reduced or eliminated fins and limbs and returned to the limbless condition. Examples include eels, caecilians, snakes, slow worms and several marine mammals. Analyses of fossil and extant vertebrates show that evolution of limblessness frequently occurred together with elongation of the trunk and loss of clear morphological boundaries in the vertebral column. This may be suggestive of a common developmental mechanism linking these two processes. We have addressed this question by analysing python embryonic development at tissue, cellular and molecular levels, and we have identified a developmental mechanism which may account for evolution of limb loss in these animals.

  8. Limb disparity and wing shape in pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Dyke, G J; Nudds, R L; Rayner, J M V

    2006-07-01

    The limb proportions of the extinct flying pterosaurs were clearly distinct from their living counterparts, birds and bats. Within pterosaurs, however, we show that further differences in limb proportions exist between the two main groups: the clade of short-tailed Pterodactyloidea and the paraphyletic clades of long-tailed rhamphorhynchoids. The hindlimb to forelimb ratios of rhamphorhynchoid pterosaurs are similar to that seen in bats, whereas those of pterodactyloids are much higher. Such a clear difference in limb ratios indicates that the extent of the wing membrane in rhamphorhynchoids and pterodactyloids may also have differed; this is borne out by simple ternary analyses. Further, analyses also indicate that the limbs of Sordes pilosus, a well-preserved small taxon used as key evidence for inferring the extent and shape of the wing membrane in all pterosaurs, are not typical even of its closest relatives, other rhamphorhynchoids. Thus, a bat-like extensive hindlimb flight membrane, integrated with the feet and tail may be applicable only to a small subset of pterosaur diversity. The range of flight morphologies seen in these extinct reptiles may prove much broader than previously thought.

  9. Use and Usefulness of Lower Limb Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buijk, Catharina A.

    1988-01-01

    Adults (n=181) in the Netherlands were surveyed concerning their use of lower limb prostheses. Results are analyzed in terms of age and sex of users, reason for amputation, level of amputation, description of prosthesis, amount of time able to walk or stand, satisfaction with the prosthesis, and user recommendations. (JDD)

  10. Caring for patients with lower limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Deborah

    In 2014 a National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death report examined the care of people requiring lower limb amputation as a consequence of complications associated with vascular disease or diabetes. It suggests that less than half of patients who undergo surgery receive good care. This article summarises the key findings of the report and the implications for nursing practice.

  11. Upper Limb Motor Impairment Post Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Understanding upper limb impairment after stroke is essential to planning therapeutic efforts to restore function. However determining which upper limb impairment to treat and how is complex for two reasons: 1) the impairments are not static, i.e. as motor recovery proceeds, the type and nature of the impairments may change; therefore the treatment needs to evolve to target the impairment contributing to dysfunction at a given point in time. 2) multiple impairments may be present simultaneously, i.e., a patient may present with weakness of the arm and hand immediately after a stroke, which may not have resolved when spasticity sets in a few weeks or months later; hence there may be a layering of impairments over time making it difficult to decide what to treat first. The most useful way to understand how impairments contribute to upper limb dysfunction may be to examine them from the perspective of their functional consequences. There are three main functional consequences of impairments on upper limb function are: (1) learned nonuse, (2) learned bad-use, and (3) forgetting as determined by behavioral analysis of tasks. The impairments that contribute to each of these functional limitations are described. PMID:26522900

  12. Developmental mechanisms of vertebrate limb evolution.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M J

    2001-01-01

    Over the past few years, our understanding of the evolution of limbs has been improved by important new discoveries in the fossil record. Additionally, rapid progress has been made in identifying the molecular basis of vertebrate limb development. It is now possible to integrate these two areas of research in order to identify the molecular developmental mechanisms underlying the evolution of paired appendages in vertebrates. After the origin of paired appendages, several vertebrate lineages reduced or eliminated fins and limbs and returned to the limbless condition. Examples include eels, caecilians, snakes, slow worms and several marine mammals. Analyses of fossil and extant vertebrates show that evolution of limblessness frequently occurred together with elongation of the trunk and loss of clear morphological boundaries in the vertebral column. This may be suggestive of a common developmental mechanism linking these two processes. We have addressed this question by analysing python embryonic development at tissue, cellular and molecular levels, and we have identified a developmental mechanism which may account for evolution of limb loss in these animals. PMID:11277086

  13. What Determines Limb Selection for Reaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbig, Casi Rabb; Gabbard, Carl

    2004-01-01

    While motor dominance appears to drive limb selection for reaching movements at the midline and ipsilateral (dominant) side, this study examined the possible determinants associated with what drives the programming of movements in response to stimuli presented in contralateral space. Experiment 1 distinguished between object proximity and a…

  14. Developmental basis of limb homology in lizards.

    PubMed

    Fabrezi, Marissa; Abdala, Virginia; Oliver, María Inés Martínez

    2007-07-01

    Shubin and Alberch (Evol Biol 1986;20:319-387) proposed a scheme of tetrapod limb development based on cartilage morphogenesis that provides the arguments to interpret the homologies of skeletal elements and sets the basis to explain limb specialization through later developmental modification. Morphogenetic evidence emerged from the study of some reptiles, but the availability of data for lizards is limited. Here, the study of adult skeletal variation in 41 lizard taxa and ontogeny in species of Liolaemus and Tupinambis attempts to fill in this gap and provides supporting evidence for the Shubin-Alberch scheme. Six questions are explored. Is there an intermedium in the carpus? Are there two centralia in the carpus? Is there homology among proximal tarsalia of reptiles? Does digit V belong to the digital arch? Is the pisiform an element of the autopodium plan? And should the ossification processes be similar to cartilage morphogenesis? We found the following answers. Some taxa exhibit an ossified element that could represent an intermedium. There is one centrale in the carpus. Development of proximal tarsalia seems to be equivalent with that observed among reptiles. Digit V could arise from the digital arch. Pisiform does not arise as part of the limb plan. And different patterns of ossification occur following a single and conservative cartilaginous configuration. Lizard limb development shows an early pattern common to other reptiles with clear primary axis and digital arch. The pattern then becomes lizard-specific with specialization involving some reduction in prechondrogenic elements. PMID:17415759

  15. Neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin: an epidemiological study from the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo".

    PubMed

    López Sastre, J B; Coto Cotallo, D; Fernández Colomer, B

    2002-01-01

    A prospective multicenter study was designed to assess the frequency, etiology, and mortality of nosocomial neonatal sepsis diagnosed between 1996 and 1997 in the neonatology services of 27 acute-care hospitals in Spain ("Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo"). Nosocomial sepsis is defined in the literature using chronological criteria (> 3-7 days of life at the onset of symptoms); accordingly, there is the possibility of including late-onset maternally acquired sepsis or of excluding early-onset nosocomial sepsis (< 3-7 days of life). For these reasons, in this study, cases of nosocomial sepsis that developed at < or = 3-7 days after birth (early onset) were also recorded and maternally acquired sepsis diagnosed beyond 3-7 days of life were excluded. Using these criteria in a total of 30,993 admissions to the neonatal units of the participating hospitals, the nosocomial sepsis rate was 2.1% with an incidence density of 0.89 per 1000 patient days. Sepsis rate was significantly more frequent among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (15.6%) than among those weighing > or = 1500 g (1.16%) (P < 0.001). Fifty-eight percent of all isolates were Gram-positive organisms, mainly Staphylococcus epidermidis (42%). Gram-negative organisms were isolated in 29.5% of cases (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. were the most commonly isolated pathogens) and fungal infections in 12%, with absolute predominance of Candida spp. The overall mortality rate was 11.8% and the following subgroups had significantly higher (P < 0.001) mortality rates: sepsis caused by Gram-negative organisms (19% vs. 5.1% in Gram-positive pathogens) and sepsis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (33.3% vs. 9.4% for the total number of sepsis caused by the remaining causative pathogens). Sepsis caused by S. epidermidis showed a significantly lower mortality rate (5.5%) compared with overall sepsis for the remaining etiologies (14.2%) (P < 0.001). In VLBW infants, the mortality rate was significantly higher than in

  16. Changes of the immunological barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Long-yuan; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Tian-en; Yang, Zheng-fei; Wen, Li-qiang; Chang, Jian-xing

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis has become the greatest threat to in-patients, with a mortality of over 25%. The dysfunction of gut barrier, especially the immunological barrier, plays an important role in the development of sepsis. This dysfunction occurs after surgery, but the magnitude of change does not differentiate patients with sepsis from those without sepsis. Increased intestinal permeability before surgery is of no value in predicating sepsis. The present study aimed to observe the changes of intestinal mucosal immunologic barrier in rat models of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. METHODS: Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sepsis group (n=45) and a control group (n=15). The rats in the sepsis group were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), whereas the rats in the control group underwent a sham operation. The ileac mucosa and segments were harvested 3, 6 and 12 hours after CLP, and blood samples were collected. Pathological changes, protein levels of defensin-5 (RD-5) and trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) mRNA, and lymphocytes apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa were determined. In an additional experiment, the gut-origin bacterial DNA in blood was detected. RESULTS: The intestinal mucosa showed marked injury with loss of ileal villi, desquamation of epithelium, detachment of lamina propria, hemorrhage and ulceration in the sepsis group. The expression of TFF3 mRNA and level of RD-5 protein were decreased and the apoptosis of mucosal lymphocyte increased (P<0.05) in the sepsis group compared with the control group. Significant differences were observed in RD-5 and TFF3 mRNA 3 hours after CLP and they were progressively increased 6 and 12 hours after CLP in the sepsis group compared with the control group (P<0.05, RD-5 F=11.76, TFF3 F=16.86 and apoptosis F=122.52). In addition, the gut-origin bacterial DNA detected in plasma was positive in the sepsis group. CONCLUSION: The immunological function of the intestinal mucosa was impaired in

  17. One-sided limb preference is linked to alternating-limb locomotion in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Malashichev, Yegor B

    2006-11-01

    Amphibians provide a unique opportunity for identifying possible links between lateralized behaviors, locomotion, and phylogeny and for addressing the origin of lateralized behaviors of higher vertebrates. Five anuran species with different locomotive habits were tested for forelimb and hind limb preferences during 2 stereotyped behavior sequences--wiping a foreign object off their snout and righting themselves from the overturned position. The experiments were analyzed in a broader context of previous findings on anuran lateralization involving 11 anuran species that were studied within the same experimental paradigms. This analysis shows that one-sided forelimb and hind limb motor lateralization in anurans is strongly associated with alternating-limb locomotion and other unilateral limb activity. Conclusions reached for anuran amphibians may be applicable to other vertebrates possessing paired appendages-the degree of lateralization in motor response depends on the mode of locomotion used by a species.

  18. Improving outcomes for severe sepsis and septic shock: tools for early identification of at-risk patients and treatment protocol implementation.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Ahrens, Tom

    2008-07-01

    Sepsis is a significant problem, and septicemia is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Sepsis incidence is increasing, and the mortality rate is 20% to 50% for patients with severe sepsis. This article identifies methods for improving outcomes of severe sepsis and septic shock. Included are recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Case studies are included.

  19. Geophysical implications of Io limb profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Thomas, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Limb profiles can be used both to determine a body's long-wavelength shape, and to infer its averaged elastic thickness [1]. Here we apply previously-developed techniques [1] to analyze Galileo limb profiles for Io [2], for comparison with control-point network analysis [3]. We determine Io's long-wavelength topography at spherical harmonic degrees 3 and 4. The amplitude of the topography is +/- 0.5 km, small compared to the degree-2 (tidal and rotational) shape. The l=4 components contain 4 times more power than l=3, consistent with tidal heating playing a role in producing topography [e.g. 4]. However, the topographic pattern is anti-symmetric about the equator, which is not expected from tidal models. Nor does the topography correlate with the global pattern of volcanoes and mountains [5]. The variation in limb profile roughness with wavelength can be used to infer an elastic thickness [1,6]. In the case of Io, despite local mountains, overall the topography is quite smooth. The highest-resolution limb profiles suggest an elastic thickness of about 50 km, higher than that of other outer solar system satellites [1]. This value is consistent with previous estimates based on the existence of mountains [7] and expectations of a thick, cold lid resulting from Io's heat loss being dominated by erupting melt [8]. [1] Nimmo et al. JGR 2011 [2] Thomas et al. Icarus 1998 [3] Oberst and Schuster JGR 2004 [4] Ross et al. Icarus 1990 [5] Kirchoff et al. EPSL 2011 [6] Araki et al. Science 2009 [7] Carr et al. Icarus 1998 [8] O'Reilly and Davies GRL 1981 Io long-wavelength topography, obtained from limb profile data and expanded from l=m=3 to l=m=4. Contour interval 0.1 km.

  20. Internal models of limb dynamics and the encoding of limb state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eun Jung; Shadmehr, Reza

    2005-09-01

    Studies of reaching suggest that humans adapt to novel arm dynamics by building internal models that transform planned sensory states of the limb, e.g., desired limb position and its derivatives, into motor commands, e.g., joint torques. Earlier work modeled this computation via a population of basis elements and used system identification techniques to estimate the tuning properties of the bases from the patterns of generalization. Here we hypothesized that the neural representation of planned sensory states in the internal model might resemble the signals from the peripheral sensors. These sensors normally encode the limb's actual sensory state in which movement errors occurred. We developed a set of equations based on properties of muscle spindles that estimated spindle discharge as a function of the limb's state during reaching and drawing of circles. We then implemented a simulation of a two-link arm that learned to move in various force fields using these spindle-like bases. The system produced a pattern of adaptation and generalization that accounted for a wide range of previously reported behavioral results. In particular, the bases showed gain-field interactions between encoding of limb position and velocity, very similar to the gain fields inferred from behavioral studies. The poor sensitivity of the bases to limb acceleration predicted behavioral results that were confirmed by experiment. We suggest that the internal model of limb dynamics is computed by the brain with neurons that encode the state of the limb in a manner similar to that expected of muscle spindle afferents.

  1. 7 CFR 51.1220 - Leaf or limb rub injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf or limb rub injury. 51.1220 Section 51.1220... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1220 Leaf or limb rub injury. “Leaf or limb rub injury” means that the scarring is not smooth, not light colored, or aggregates...

  2. Varying Estimates of Sepsis Mortality Using Death Certificates and Administrative Codes--United States, 1999-2014.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lauren; Dantes, Ray; Magill, Shelley; Fiore, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by a dysregulated host response to infection (1). Because there is no confirmatory diagnostic test, the diagnosis of sepsis is based on evidence of infection and clinical judgement. Both death certificates and health services utilization data (administrative claims) have been used to assess sepsis incidence and mortality, but estimates vary depending on the surveillance definition and data source. To highlight the challenges and variability associated with estimating sepsis mortality, CDC compared national estimates of sepsis-related mortality based on death certificates using the CDC WONDER database with published sepsis mortality estimates generated using administrative claims data from hospital discharges reported in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2). During 2004-2009, using data rounded to thousands, the annual range of published sepsis-related mortality estimates based on administrative claims data was 15% to 140% higher (range = 168,000-381,000) than annual estimates generated using death certificate data (multiple causes) (range = 146,000-159,000). Differences in sepsis-related mortality reported using death certificates and administrative claims data might be explained by limitations inherent in each data source. These findings underscore the need for a reliable sepsis surveillance definition based on objective clinical data to more accurately track national sepsis trends and enable objective assessment of the impact of efforts to increase sepsis awareness and prevention. PMID:27054476

  3. The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2015-04-01

    The axolotl is one of the few tetrapods that are capable of regenerating complicated biological structures, such as complete limbs, throughout adulthood. Upon injury the axolotl generates a population of regeneration-competent limb progenitor cells known as the blastema, which will grow, establish pattern, and differentiate into the missing limb structures. In this review we focus on the crucial early events that occur during wound healing, the neural-epithelial interactions that drive the formation of the early blastema, and how these mechanisms differ from those of other species that have restricted regenerative potential, such as humans. We also discuss how the presence of cells from the different axes of the limb is required for the continued growth and establishment of pattern in the blastema as described in the polar coordinate model, and how this positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells during regeneration. Multiple cell types from the mature limb stump contribute to the blastema at different stages of regeneration, and we discuss the contribution of these types to the regenerate with reference to whether they are "pattern-forming" or "pattern-following" cells. Lastly, we explain how an engineering approach will help resolve unanswered questions in limb regeneration, with the goal of translating these concepts to developing better human regenerative therapies. PMID:27499868

  4. Effects of prosthetic limb prescription on 3-year mortality among Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Kurichi, Jibby E; Kwong, Pui; Vogel, W Bruce; Xie, Dawei; Cowper Ripley, Diane; Bates, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between receipt of a prescription for a prosthetic limb and 3 yr mortality postsurgery among Veterans with lower-limb amputation (LLA). We conducted a retrospective observational study that included 4,578 Veterans hospitalized for LLA and discharged in fiscal years 2003 and 2004. The outcome was time to all-cause mortality from the amputation surgical date up to the 3 yr anniversary of the surgical date. Of the Veterans with LLA, 1,300 (28.4%) received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation. About 46% (n = 2,086) died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. Among those who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb, only 25.2% died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. After adjustment, Veterans who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb were less likely to die after the surgery than Veterans without a prescription, with a hazard ratio of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.77). Findings demonstrated that Veterans with LLA who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation were less likely to die within 3 yr of the surgical amputation after controlling for patient-, treatment-, and facility-level characteristics. PMID:26348602

  5. Prevention of limb amputation in patients with limbs ulcers by autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell implantation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Akio; Horie, Takashi; Tsuda, Ichirou; Ikeda, Atushi; Egawa, Hirotoshi; Imamura, Emi; Iida, Jun-Ichi; Sakata, Hiromi; Tamaki, Tohru; Kukita, Kazutaka; Meguro, Jun-ichi; Yonekawa, Motoki; Kasai, Masaharu

    2005-02-01

    There are many cases of amputation of ischemic limbs of dialysis patients due to diabetes, despite the availability of medicine therapy and vascular by-pass operations. As there is extensive ruin of the vascular bed due to diabetes, vascular regeneration therapy by stem cell implantation is effective. Thirty patients with ischemic limbs due to diabetes (not including type-I) and on dialysis for chronic renal failure (19 cases), diabetes (5 cases), dialysis patients without diabetes (4 cases), and arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO, 2 cases) were treated by autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) implantation where imminent amputation was under consideration. Granulocyte Colony Stimulate Factor (G-CSF: 5 microg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously for 4 days before PBSC collection, that was carried out using a centrifuge (Spectra and/or CS3000) via the vein. The collected PBSC, containing 4.2 x 10(7) of CD 34 positive cells, was divided into units of 0.5-1.0 mL and implanted, without any purification, to the ischemic area of the limbs in about 65 points. In 21 cases, normalization of limb temperature was observed by thermograph, and symptoms also improved. The result of this first attempt of PBSC implantation is that we were able to save 22 ischemic limbs. This is the first large report of the application of regenerative medicine to peripheral ischemic limbs. PMID:15828908

  6. The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Catherine; Bryant, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The axolotl is one of the few tetrapods that are capable of regenerating complicated biological structures, such as complete limbs, throughout adulthood. Upon injury the axolotl generates a population of regeneration‐competent limb progenitor cells known as the blastema, which will grow, establish pattern, and differentiate into the missing limb structures. In this review we focus on the crucial early events that occur during wound healing, the neural−epithelial interactions that drive the formation of the early blastema, and how these mechanisms differ from those of other species that have restricted regenerative potential, such as humans. We also discuss how the presence of cells from the different axes of the limb is required for the continued growth and establishment of pattern in the blastema as described in the polar coordinate model, and how this positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells during regeneration. Multiple cell types from the mature limb stump contribute to the blastema at different stages of regeneration, and we discuss the contribution of these types to the regenerate with reference to whether they are “pattern‐forming” or “pattern‐following” cells. Lastly, we explain how an engineering approach will help resolve unanswered questions in limb regeneration, with the goal of translating these concepts to developing better human regenerative therapies. PMID:27499868

  7. Determinants of Carboxyhemoglobin Levels and Relationship with Sepsis in a Retrospective Cohort of Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Andrew J; Webbe, James; Sim, Kathleen; Parrish, Graham; Hoggart, Clive; Wang, Yifei; Kroll, J Simon; Godambe, Sunit; Cunnington, Aubrey J

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyhemoglobin levels in blood reflect endogenous carbon monoxide production and are often measured during routine blood gas analysis. Endogenous carbon monoxide production has been reported to be increased during sepsis, but carboxyhemoglobin levels have not been thoroughly evaluated as a biomarker of sepsis. We sought to determine whether carboxyhemoglobin levels were elevated during sepsis in a high risk population of premature neonates. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 30 infants in two neonatal intensive care units using electronic medical and laboratory records. The majority of infants were extremely premature and extremely low birth weight, and 25 had at least one episode of sepsis. We collected all carboxyhemoglobin measurements during their in-patient stay and examined the relationship between carboxyhemoglobin and a variety of clinical and laboratory parameters, in addition to the presence or absence of sepsis, using linear mixed-effect models. We found that postnatal age had the most significant effect on carboxyhemoglobin levels, and other significant associations were identified with gestational age, hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and blood pH. Accounting for these covariates, there was no significant relationship between the onset of sepsis and carboxyhemoglobin levels. Our results show that carboxyhemoglobin is unlikely to be a clinically useful biomarker of sepsis in premature infants, and raise a note of caution about factors which may confound the use of carbon monoxide as a clinical biomarker for other disease processes such as hemolysis. PMID:27552216

  8. A widened pulse pressure: a potential valuable prognostic indicator of mortality in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Al-khalisy, Hassan; Nikiforov, Ivan; Jhajj, Manjit; Kodali, Namratha; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Background Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and the most common cause of death among critically ill patients in non-coronary intensive care units. Previous studies have showed pulse pressure (PP) to be a predictor of fluid responsiveness in patients with sepsis. Additionally, previous studies have correlated PP to cardiovascular risk factors and increase in mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Objectives To determine the correlation between PP and mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 5,003 patients admitted with the diagnosis of sepsis using ICD-9 codes during the time period from January 2010 to December 2014 at two community-based hospitals in central Pennsylvania. Results Our study findings showed significant decrease in the mortality when the PP was greater than 70 mmHg of patients with sepsis (p-value: 0.0003, odds ratio: 0.67, 95% confidence limit: 0.54–0.83). Conclusion Based on our findings, we suggest that PP could be a valuable clinical tool in the early assessment of patients admitted with sepsis and could be used as a prognostic factor to assess and implement management therapy for the patients with sepsis. PMID:26653692

  9. Escherichia coli counting using lens-free imaging for sepsis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sangjun; Manzur, Fahim; Manzur, Tariq; Klapperich, Catherine; Demirci, Utkan

    2009-09-01

    Sepsis causes 9.3% of overall deaths in United States. To diagnose sepsis, cell/bacteria capture and culturing methods have been widely investigated in the medical field. Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) is used as a model organism for sepsis in blood stream since wide variety of antibodies are established and the genetic modification process is well documented for fluorescent tagging. In point-of-care testing applications, the sepsis diagnostics require fast monitoring, inexpensive testing, and reliable results at resource limited settings, i.e. battle field, home care for dialysis. However, the cell/E.coli are hard to directly capture and see at the POCT because of the small size, 2 μm long and 0.5 μm in diameter, and the bacteria are rare in the blood stream in sepsis. Here, we propose a novel POCT platform to image and enumerate cell/E.coli on a microfluidic surface to diagnose sepsis at resource limited conditions. We demonstrate that target cells are captured from 5 μl of whole blood using specific antibodies and E.coli are imaged using a lens-free imaging platform, 2.2 μm pixel CMOS based imaging sensor. This POCT cell/bacteria capture and enumeration approach can further be used for medical diagnostics of sepsis. We also show approaches to rapidly quantify white blood cell counts from blood which can be used to monitor immune response.

  10. Determinants of Carboxyhemoglobin Levels and Relationship with Sepsis in a Retrospective Cohort of Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kathleen; Parrish, Graham; Hoggart, Clive; Wang, Yifei; Kroll, J. Simon; Godambe, Sunit

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyhemoglobin levels in blood reflect endogenous carbon monoxide production and are often measured during routine blood gas analysis. Endogenous carbon monoxide production has been reported to be increased during sepsis, but carboxyhemoglobin levels have not been thoroughly evaluated as a biomarker of sepsis. We sought to determine whether carboxyhemoglobin levels were elevated during sepsis in a high risk population of premature neonates. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 30 infants in two neonatal intensive care units using electronic medical and laboratory records. The majority of infants were extremely premature and extremely low birth weight, and 25 had at least one episode of sepsis. We collected all carboxyhemoglobin measurements during their in-patient stay and examined the relationship between carboxyhemoglobin and a variety of clinical and laboratory parameters, in addition to the presence or absence of sepsis, using linear mixed-effect models. We found that postnatal age had the most significant effect on carboxyhemoglobin levels, and other significant associations were identified with gestational age, hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and blood pH. Accounting for these covariates, there was no significant relationship between the onset of sepsis and carboxyhemoglobin levels. Our results show that carboxyhemoglobin is unlikely to be a clinically useful biomarker of sepsis in premature infants, and raise a note of caution about factors which may confound the use of carbon monoxide as a clinical biomarker for other disease processes such as hemolysis. PMID:27552216

  11. The neutrophil elastase inhibitor, sivelestat, attenuates sepsis-related kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guofu; Jia, Jia; Ji, Kaiqiang; Gong, Xiaoying; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Haiyuan; Zang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a major cause of mortality in intensive care units. Sivelestat, a selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), can attenuate sepsis-related acute lung injury. However, whether sivelestat can preserve kidney function during sepsis remains unclear. In this study, we thus examined the effects of sivelestat on sepsis-related AKI. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed to induce multiple bacterial infection in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and subsequently, 50 or 100 mg/kg sivelestat were administered by intraperitoneal injection immediately after the surgical procedure. In the untreated rats with sepsis, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were decreased, whereas serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels were increased. We found that sivelestat promoted the survival of the rats with sepsis, restored the impairment of MAP and GFR, and inhibited the increased BUN and NGAL levels; specifically, the higher dose was more effective. In addition, sivelestat suppressed the CLP-induced macrophage infiltration, the overproduction of pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, high-mobility group box 1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) pathway activation in the rats. Collectively, our data suggest that the inhibition of NE activity with the inhibitor, sivelestat, is beneficial in ameliorating sepsis-related kidney injury. PMID:27430552

  12. A Pathophysiological Insight into Sepsis and Its Correlation with Postmortem Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pomara, C.; Riezzo, I.; Bello, S.; De Carlo, D.; Neri, M.; Turillazzi, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sepsis is among the leading causes of death worldwide and is the focus of a great deal of attention from policymakers and caregivers. However, sepsis poses significant challenges from a clinical point of view regarding its early detection and the best organization of sepsis care. Furthermore, we do not yet have reliable tools for measuring the incidence of sepsis. Methods based on analyses of insurance claims are unreliable, and postmortem diagnosis is still challenging since autopsy findings are often nonspecific. Aim. The objective of this review is to assess the state of our knowledge of the molecular and biohumoral mechanisms of sepsis and to correlate them with our postmortem diagnosis ability. Conclusion. The diagnosis of sepsis-related deaths is an illustrative example of the reciprocal value of autopsy both for clinicians and for pathologists. A complete methodological approach, integrating clinical data by means of autopsy and histological and laboratory findings aiming to identify and demonstrate the host response to infectious insults, is mandatory to illuminate the exact cause of death. This would help clinicians to compare pre- and postmortem findings and to reliably measure the incidence of sepsis. PMID:27239102

  13. Sepsis and pregnancy: do we know how to treat this situation?

    PubMed Central

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Cordioli, Eduardo; Negrini, Romulo; Silva, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an acute inflammatory response syndrome secondary to an infectious focus. It has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality, causing substantial financial costs, especially due to complications such as septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The pathogen toxins associated with individual susceptibility culminate with cytokine release, which promotes a systemic inflammatory response that can progress to multiple organ dysfunction and eventual patient death. Specifically, sepsis incidence, morbidity and mortality are lower in pregnant women, as this group is typically younger with fewer comorbidities having a polymicrobial etiology resulting in sepsis. Pregnant women exhibit physiological characteristics that may confer specific clinical presentation and laboratory patterns during the sepsis course. Thus, a better understanding of these changes is critical for better identification and management of these patients. The presence of a fetus also requires unique approaches in a pregnant woman with sepsis. Sepsis treatment is based on certain guidelines that were established after major clinical trials, which, unfortunately, all classified pregnancy as a exclusion criteria. Thus, the treatment of sepsis in the general population has been extrapolated to the pregnant population, with the following main goals: maintenance of tissue perfusion with fluid replacement and vasoactive drugs (initial resuscitation), adequate oxygenation, control of the infection source and an early start of antibiotic therapy, corticosteroid infusion and blood transfusion when properly indicated, prophylaxis, and specifically monitoring and maintenance of fetal heath. PMID:24553516

  14. Electroacupuncture at Bilateral Zusanli Points (ST36) Protects Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei-fei; Xing, Xi; Lei, Shu; Wu, Jian-nong; Wang, Ling-cong; Huang, Li-quan; Jiang, Rong-lin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis results in high morbidity and mortality. Immunomodulation strategies could be an adjunctive therapy to treat sepsis. Acupuncture has also been used widely for many years in China to treat sepsis. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well-defined. We demonstrated here that EA preconditioning at ST36 obviously ameliorated CLP-induced intestinal injury and high permeability and reduced the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis rats. Moreover, electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment exerted protective effects on intestinal mucosal immune barrier by increasing the concentration of sIgA and the percentage of CD3+, γ/δ, and CD4+ T cells and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells. Although EA at ST36 treatments immediately after closing the abdomen in the CLP procedure with low-frequency or high-frequency could not reduce the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis in rats, these EA treatments could also significantly improve intestinal injury index in rats with sepsis and obviously protected intestinal mucosal immune barrier. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that EA at ST36 could improve intestinal mucosal immune barrier in sepsis induced by CLP, while the precise mechanism underlying the effects needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26346309

  15. Diagnostic utility of biomarkers for neonatal sepsis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Wisborg, Kirsten; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of the neonate with suspected sepsis are essential to prevent life-threatening complications. Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is a challenge due to non-specific clinical signs and the fact that infection markers are difficult to interpret in the first and critical phase of neonatal sepsis. The objective of the present study was to systematically evaluate existing evidence of the diagnostic utility of biomarkers for prediction of sepsis in neonates. We conducted a systematic literature search performed in PubMed and Embase. The study population was neonates with gestation age > 24 weeks in their first 28 days of life with suspected sepsis. The included manuscripts were rated due to criteria from a modified rating scale developed by Douglas Altman. Of 292 potentially relevant manuscripts, 77 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria; 16 (21%) were rated as high-quality studies. C-reactive protein (CRP) was the most extensively studied biomarker evaluated. The high-quality studies indicated that the acute phase protein serum amyloid A had high sensitivity, both at onset of symptoms and 2 days after. The studies evaluating serum amyloid A presented a variable positive predictive value (PPV, 0.67 and 0.92) with a high negative predictive value (NPV, 0.97 and 1.00). The existing evidence of the diagnostic value of serum amyloid A for neonatal sepsis showed promising results, and should be further investigated in clinical settings.

  16. Sepsis and pregnancy: do we know how to treat this situation?

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Cordioli, Eduardo; Negrini, Romulo; Silva, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an acute inflammatory response syndrome secondary to an infectious focus. It has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality, causing substantial financial costs, especially due to complications such as septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The pathogen toxins associated with individual susceptibility culminate with cytokine release, which promotes a systemic inflammatory response that can progress to multiple organ dysfunction and eventual patient death. Specifically, sepsis incidence, morbidity and mortality are lower in pregnant women, as this group is typically younger with fewer comorbidities having a polymicrobial etiology resulting in sepsis. Pregnant women exhibit physiological characteristics that may confer specific clinical presentation and laboratory patterns during the sepsis course. Thus, a better understanding of these changes is critical for better identification and management of these patients. The presence of a fetus also requires unique approaches in a pregnant woman with sepsis. Sepsis treatment is based on certain guidelines that were established after major clinical trials, which, unfortunately, all classified pregnancy as a exclusion criteria. Thus, the treatment of sepsis in the general population has been extrapolated to the pregnant population, with the following main goals: maintenance of tissue perfusion with fluid replacement and vasoactive drugs (initial resuscitation), adequate oxygenation, control of the infection source and an early start of antibiotic therapy, corticosteroid infusion and blood transfusion when properly indicated, prophylaxis, and specifically monitoring and maintenance of fetal heath.

  17. Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress and Myocardial Dysfunctions in Sepsis: Evidence from the Literature and Postmortem Observations

    PubMed Central

    Neri, M.; Riezzo, I.; Pomara, C.; Schiavone, S.; Turillazzi, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Myocardial depression in sepsis is common, and it is associated with higher mortality. In recent years, the hypothesis that the myocardial dysfunction during sepsis could be mediated by ischemia related to decreased coronary blood flow waned and a complex mechanism was invoked to explain cardiac dysfunction in sepsis. Oxidative stress unbalance is thought to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiac impairment in septic patients. Aim. In this paper, we review the current literature regarding the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in sepsis, focusing on the possible role of oxidative-nitrosative stress unbalance and mitochondria dysfunction. We discuss these mechanisms within the broad scenario of cardiac involvement in sepsis. Conclusions. Findings from the current literature broaden our understanding of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress unbalance in the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in sepsis, thus contributing to the establishment of a relationship between these settings and the occurrence of oxidative stress. The complex pathogenesis of septic cardiac failure may explain why, despite the therapeutic strategies, sepsis remains a big clinical challenge for effectively managing the disease to minimize mortality, leading to consideration of the potential therapeutic effects of antioxidant agents. PMID:27274621

  18. Targeting IL-17A attenuates neonatal sepsis mortality induced by IL-18.

    PubMed

    Wynn, James Lawrence; Wilson, Chris S; Hawiger, Jacek; Scumpia, Philip O; Marshall, Andrew F; Liu, Jin-Hua; Zharkikh, Irina; Wong, Hector R; Lahni, Patrick; Benjamin, John T; Plosa, Erin J; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Sherwood, Edward R; Moldawer, Lyle L; Ungaro, Ricardo; Baker, Henry V; Lopez, M Cecilia; McElroy, Steven J; Colliou, Natacha; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Moore, Daniel Jensen

    2016-05-10

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is an important effector of innate and adaptive immunity, but its expression must also be tightly regulated because it can potentiate lethal systemic inflammation and death. Healthy and septic human neonates demonstrate elevated serum concentrations of IL-18 compared with adults. Thus, we determined the contribution of IL-18 to lethality and its mechanism in a murine model of neonatal sepsis. We find that IL-18-null neonatal mice are highly protected from polymicrobial sepsis, whereas replenishing IL-18 increased lethality to sepsis or endotoxemia. Increased lethality depended on IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1) signaling but not adaptive immunity. In genome-wide analyses of blood mRNA from septic human neonates, expression of the IL-17 receptor emerged as a critical regulatory node. Indeed, IL-18 administration in sepsis increased IL-17A production by murine intestinal γδT cells as well as Ly6G(+) myeloid cells, and blocking IL-17A reduced IL-18-potentiated mortality to both neonatal sepsis and endotoxemia. We conclude that IL-17A is a previously unrecognized effector of IL-18-mediated injury in neonatal sepsis and that disruption of the deleterious and tissue-destructive IL-18/IL-1/IL-17A axis represents a novel therapeutic approach to improve outcomes for human neonates with sepsis.

  19. Change in Pathogens Causing Late-onset Sepsis in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Izmir, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nisel Ozkalay; Agus, Neval; Helvaci, Mehmet; Kose, Sukran; Ozer, Esra; Sahbudak, Zumrut

    2010-01-01

    Objective Neonatal sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among newborns in the developing world. We have investigated the causative agents and their antimicrobial susceptibility of late-onset sepsis (>72 h post-delivery), and determined the possible association between various risk factors and the mortality due to neonatal sepsis in 2008. To view the changes in years, we compared them with the data which we gained in 2004. Methods Medical records of all neonates with late-onset sepsis were reviewed for demographic characteristics (birth weight, gestational age, gender, type of delivery, and mortality rate), positive cultures and risk factors of mortality. Findings One hundred and forty-seven and 227 neonates had been diagnosed as late-onset sepsis in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most frequent microorganisms. Gram-negative bacilli, particularly Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed a significant increase in years. The mortality rate was 11.5% and 19% in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Birth weight, gestational age, and infection with Klebsiella spp. isolates were found to have significant association with sepsis mortality in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Conclusion The present study emphasizes the importance of periodic surveys of sepsis encountered in particular neonatal setting to recognize the trend. Increased Gram-negative bacilli rate was possibly related to the widespread use of antibiotics in our NICU. PMID:23056745

  20. Early PREdiction of Severe Sepsis (ExPRES-Sepsis) study: protocol for an observational derivation study to discover potential leucocyte cell surface biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Jean; Warner, Noel; Brown, Kenneth Alun; Wright, John; Simpson, A John; Rennie, Jillian; Hulme, Gillian; Lewis, Sion Marc; Mare, Tracey Anne; Cookson, Sharon; Weir, Christopher John; Dimmick, Ian; Keenan, Jim; Rossi, Adriano Giorgio; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is an acute illness resulting from infection and the host immune response. Early identification of individuals at risk of developing life-threatening severe sepsis could enable early triage and treatment, and improve outcomes. Currently available biomarkers have poor predictive value for predicting subsequent clinical course in patients with suspected infection. Circulating leucocytes provide readily accessible tissues that reflect many aspects of the complex immune responses described in sepsis. We hypothesise that measuring cellular markers of immune responses by flow cytometry will enable early identification of infected patients at risk of adverse outcomes. We aim to characterise leucocyte surface markers (biomarkers) and their abnormalities in a population of patients presenting to the hospital emergency department with suspected sepsis, and explore their ability to predict subsequent clinical course. Methods and analysis We will conduct a prospective, multicentre, clinical, exploratory, cohort observational study. To answer our study question, 3 patient populations will be studied. First, patients with suspected sepsis from the emergency department (n=300). To assess performance characteristics of potential tests, critically ill patients with established sepsis, and age and gender matched patients without suspicion of infection requiring hospital admission (both n=100) will be recruited as comparator populations. In all 3 groups, we plan to assess circulating biomarker profiles using flow cytometry. We will select candidate biomarkers by cross-cohort comparison, and then explore their predictive value for clinical outcomes within the cohort with suspected sepsis. Ethics and dissemination The study will be carried out based on the principles in the Declaration of Helsinki and the International Conference on Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice. Ethics approval has been granted from the Scotland A Research Ethics Committee (REC) and Oxford C