Science.gov

Sample records for limited feedback multi-antenna

  1. Feedback and efficiency in limit order markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challet, Damien

    2008-06-01

    A consistency criterion for price impact functions in limit order markets is proposed that prohibits chain arbitrage exploitation. Both the bid-ask spread and the feedback of sequential market orders of the same kind onto both sides of the order book are essential to ensure consistency at the smallest time scale. All the stocks investigated in Paris Stock Exchange have consistent price impact functions.

  2. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  3. PHOTON FEEDBACK: SCREENING AND THE EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle; Sironi, Lorenzo E-mail: lsironi@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-08-01

    Bright star-forming galaxies radiate well below their Eddington limits. The value of the flux-mean opacity that mediates the radiation force onto matter is orders of magnitude smaller than the UV or optical dust opacity. On empirical grounds, it is shown that high-redshift ULIRGs radiate at two orders of magnitude below their Eddington limits, while the local starbursters M82 and Arp 220 radiate at a few percent of their Eddington limits. A model for the radiative transfer of UV and optical light in dust-rich environments is considered. Radiation pressure on dust does not greatly affect the large-scale gas dynamics of star-forming galaxies.

  4. Stromal phosphate concentration is low during feedback limited photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Vanderveer, P.J. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that photosynthesis can be feedback limited when the phosphate concentration cannot be both low enough to allow starch and sucrose synthesis at the required rate and high enough for ATP synthesis at the required rate. We have measured the concentration of phosphate in the stroma and cytosol of leaves held under feedback conditions. We used nonaqueous fractionation techniques with freeze-clamped leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris plants grown on reduced phosphate nutrition. Feedback was induced by holding leaves in low O{sub 2} or high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. We found 7 millimolar phosphate in the stroma of leaves in normal oxygen but just 2.7 millimolar phosphate in leaves held in low oxygen. Because 1 to 2 millimolar phosphate in the stroma may be metabolically inactive, we estimate that in low oxygen, the metabolically active pool of phosphate is between negligible and 1.7 millimolar. We conclude that halfway between these extremes, 0.85 millimolar is a good estimate of the phosphate concentration in the stroma of feedback-limited leaves and that the true concentration could be even lower. The stromal phosphate concentration was also low when leaves were held in high CO{sub 2}, which also induces feedback-limited photosynthesis, indicating that the effect is related to feedback limitation, not to low oxygen per se. We conclude that the concentration of phosphate in the stroma is usually in excess and that it is sequestered to regulate photosynthesis, especially starch synthesis. The capacity for this regulation is limited by the coupling factor requirement for phosphate.

  5. Fronthaul Compression and Transmit Beamforming Optimization for Multi-Antenna Uplink C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhan; Yu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the joint fronthaul compression and transmit beamforming design for the uplink cloud radio access network (C-RAN), in which multi-antenna user terminals communicate with a cloud-computing based centralized processor (CP) through multi-antenna base-stations (BSs) serving as relay nodes. A compress-and-forward relaying strategy, named the VMAC scheme, is employed, in which the BSs can either perform single-user compression or Wyner-Ziv coding to quantize the received signals and send the quantization bits to the CP via capacity-limited fronthaul links; the CP performs successive decoding with either successive interference cancellation (SIC) receiver or linear minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) receiver. Under this setup, this paper investigates the joint optimization of the transmit beamformers at the users and the quantization noise covariance matrices at the BSs for maximizing the network utility. A novel weighted minimum-mean-square-error successive convex approximation (WMMSE-SCA) algorithm is first proposed for maximizing the weighted sum rate under the user transmit power and fronthaul capacity constraints with single-user compression. Assuming a heuristic decompression order, the proposed algorithm is then adapted for optimizing the transmit beamforming and fronthaul compression under Wyner-Ziv coding. This paper also proposes a low-complexity separate design consisting of optimizing transmit beamformers for the Gaussian vector multiple-access channel along with per-antenna quantizers with uniform quantization noise levels across the antennas at each BS. Numerical results show that with optimized beamforming and fronthaul compression, C-RAN can significantly outperform conventional cellular networks. Furthermore, the low complexity separate design already performs very close to the optimized joint design in regime of practical interest.

  6. Strong feedback limit of the Goodwin circadian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woller, Aurore; Gonze, Didier; Erneux, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The three-variable Goodwin model constitutes a prototypical oscillator based on a negative feedback loop. It was used as a minimal model for circadian oscillations. Other core models for circadian clocks are variants of the Goodwin model. The Goodwin oscillator also appears in many studies of coupled oscillator networks because of its relative simplicity compared to other biophysical models involving a large number of variables and parameters. Because the synchronization properties of Goodwin oscillators still remain difficult to explore mathematically, further simplifications of the Goodwin model have been sought. In this paper, we investigate the strong negative feedback limit of Goodwin equations by using asymptotic techniques. We find that Goodwin oscillations approach a sequence of decaying exponentials that can be described in terms of a single-variable leaky integrated-and-fire model.

  7. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  8. Distortion outage minimization in Nakagami fading using limited feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hong; Dey, Subhrakanti

    2011-12-01

    We focus on a decentralized estimation problem via a clustered wireless sensor network measuring a random Gaussian source where the clusterheads amplify and forward their received signals (from the intra-cluster sensors) over orthogonal independent stationary Nakagami fading channels to a remote fusion center that reconstructs an estimate of the original source. The objective of this paper is to design clusterhead transmit power allocation policies to minimize the distortion outage probability at the fusion center, subject to an expected sum transmit power constraint. In the case when full channel state information (CSI) is available at the clusterhead transmitters, the optimization problem can be shown to be convex and is solved exactly. When only rate-limited channel feedback is available, we design a number of computationally efficient sub-optimal power allocation algorithms to solve the associated non-convex optimization problem. We also derive an approximation for the diversity order of the distortion outage probability in the limit when the average transmission power goes to infinity. Numerical results illustrate that the sub-optimal power allocation algorithms perform very well and can close the outage probability gap between the constant power allocation (no CSI) and full CSI-based optimal power allocation with only 3-4 bits of channel feedback.

  9. Feedbacks, climate sensitivity, and the limits of linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugenstein, M.; Knutti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The term "feedback" is used ubiquitously in climate research, but implies varied meanings in different contexts. From a specific process that locally affects a quantity, to a formal framework that attempts to determine a global response to a forcing, researchers use this term to separate, simplify, and quantify parts of the complex Earth system. We combine large (>120 member) ensemble GCM and EMIC step forcing simulations over a broad range of forcing levels with a historical and educational perspective to organize existing ideas around feedbacks and linear forcing-feedback models. With a new method overcoming internal variability and initial condition problems we quantify the non-constancy of the climate feedback parameter. Our results suggest a strong state- and forcing-dependency of feedbacks, which is not considered appropriately in many studies. A non-constant feedback factor likely explains some of the differences in estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity from different methods and types of data. We discuss implications for the definition of the forcing term and its various adjustments. Clarifying the value and applicability of the linear forcing feedback framework and a better quantification of feedbacks on various timescales and spatial scales remains a high priority in order to better understand past and predict future changes in the climate system.

  10. Limiting parental feedback disrupts vocal development in marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Yasemin B.; Hage, Steffen R.

    2017-01-01

    Vocalizations of human infants undergo dramatic changes across the first year by becoming increasingly mature and speech-like. Human vocal development is partially dependent on learning by imitation through social feedback between infants and caregivers. Recent studies revealed similar developmental processes being influenced by parental feedback in marmoset monkeys for apparently innate vocalizations. Marmosets produce infant-specific vocalizations that disappear after the first postnatal months. However, it is yet unclear whether parental feedback is an obligate requirement for proper vocal development. Using quantitative measures to compare call parameters and vocal sequence structure we show that, in contrast to normally raised marmosets, marmosets that were separated from parents after the third postnatal month still produced infant-specific vocal behaviour at subadult stages. These findings suggest a significant role of social feedback on primate vocal development until the subadult stages and further show that marmoset monkeys are a compelling model system for early human vocal development. PMID:28090084

  11. Design of Massive-MIMO-NOMA With Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiguo; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a low-feedback non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) scheme using massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission is proposed. In particular, the proposed scheme can decompose a massive-MIMO-NOMA system into multiple separated single-input single-output NOMA channels, and analytical results are developed to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme for two scenarios, with perfect user ordering and with one-bit feedback, respectively.

  12. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-12-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  13. Limitations of synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging.

    PubMed

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Lacot, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we study the origin and the effect of amplitude and phase noise on laser optical feedback imaging associated with a synthetic aperture (SA) imaging system. Amplitude noise corresponds to photon noise and acts as an additive noise; it can be reduced by increasing the global measurement time. Phase noise can be divided in three families: random, sinusoidal, and drift phase noise; we show that it acts as a multiplicative noise. We explain how we can reduce phase noise by making oversampling or multiple measurements depending on its type. This work can easily be extended to all SA systems (radar, laser, or terahertz), especially when raw holograms are acquired point by point.

  14. Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacucci, Fabio; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Ferrara, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The most massive black holes observed in the universe weigh up to ∼1010 M ⊙, nearly independent of redshift. Reaching these final masses likely required copious accretion and several major mergers. Employing a dynamical approach that rests on the role played by a new, relevant physical scale—the transition radius—we provide a theoretical calculation of the maximum mass achievable by a black hole seed that forms in an isolated halo, one that scarcely merged. Incorporating effects at the transition radius and their impact on the evolution of accretion in isolated halos, we are able to obtain new limits for permitted growth. We find that large black hole seeds (M • ≳ 104 M ⊙) hosted in small isolated halos (M h ≲ 109 M ⊙) accreting with relatively small radiative efficiencies (ɛ ≲ 0.1) grow optimally in these circumstances. Moreover, we show that the standard M •–σ relation observed at z ∼ 0 cannot be established in isolated halos at high-z, but requires the occurrence of mergers. Since the average limiting mass of black holes formed at z ≳ 10 is in the range 104–6 M ⊙, we expect to observe them in local galaxies as intermediate-mass black holes, when hosted in the rare halos that experienced only minor or no merging events. Such ancient black holes, formed in isolation with subsequent scant growth, could survive, almost unchanged, until present.

  15. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y. E-mail: oka@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shoji, T.

    2014-02-15

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm{sup 2}. The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  16. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Shoji, T

    2014-02-01

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm(2). The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm(2)/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  17. Theoretical Limits of Damping Attainable by Smart Beams with Rate Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1997-01-01

    Using a generally accepted model we present a comprehensive analysis (within the page limitation) of an Euler- Bernoulli beam with PZT sensor-actuator and pure rate feedback. The emphasis is on the root locus - the dependence of the attainable damping on the feedback gain. There is a critical value of the gain beyond which the damping decreases to zero. We construct the time-domain response using semigroup theory, and show that the eigenfunctions form a Riesz basis, leading to a 'modal' expansion.

  18. Performance limitations of joint variable-feedback controllers due to manipulator structural flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetinkunt, Sabri; Book, Wayne J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance limitations of manipulators under joint variable-feedback control are studied as a function of the mechanical flexibility inherent in the manipulator structure. A finite-dimensional time-domain dynamic model of a two-link two-joint planar manipulator is used in the study. Emphasis is placed on determining the limitations of control algorithms that use only joint variable-feedback information in calculations of control decisions, since most motion control systems in practice are of this kind. Both fine and gross motion cases are studied. Results for fine motion agree well with previously reported results in the literature and are also helpful in explaining the performance limitations in fast gross motions.

  19. The performance of a reduced-order adaptive controller when used in multi-antenna hyperthermia treatments with nonlinear temperature-dependent perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kung-Shan; Yuan, Yu; Li, Zhen; Stauffer, Paul R.; Maccarini, Paolo; Joines, William T.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Das, Shiva K.

    2009-04-01

    In large multi-antenna systems, adaptive controllers can aid in steering the heat focus toward the tumor. However, the large number of sources can greatly increase the steering time. Additionally, controller performance can be degraded due to changes in tissue perfusion which vary non-linearly with temperature, as well as with time and spatial position. The current work investigates whether a reduced-order controller with the assumption of piecewise constant perfusion is robust to temperature-dependent perfusion and achieves steering in a shorter time than required by a full-order controller. The reduced-order controller assumes that the optimal heating setting lies in a subspace spanned by the best heating vectors (virtual sources) of an initial, approximate, patient model. An initial, approximate, reduced-order model is iteratively updated by the controller, using feedback thermal images, until convergence of the heat focus to the tumor. Numerical tests were conducted in a patient model with a right lower leg sarcoma, heated in a 10-antenna cylindrical mini-annual phased array applicator operating at 150 MHz. A half-Gaussian model was used to simulate temperature-dependent perfusion. Simulated magnetic resonance temperature images were used as feedback at each iteration step. Robustness was validated for the controller, starting from four approximate initial models: (1) a 'standard' constant perfusion lower leg model ('standard' implies a model that exactly models the patient with the exception that perfusion is considered constant, i.e., not temperature dependent), (2) a model with electrical and thermal tissue properties varied from 50% higher to 50% lower than the standard model, (3) a simplified constant perfusion pure-muscle lower leg model with ±50% deviated properties and (4) a standard model with the tumor position in the leg shifted by 1.5 cm. Convergence to the desired focus of heating in the tumor was achieved for all four simulated models. The

  20. An odd-number limitation of extended time-delayed feedback control in autonomous systems.

    PubMed

    Amann, Andreas; Hooton, Edward W

    2013-09-28

    We propose a necessary condition for the successful stabilization of a periodic orbit, using the extended version of time-delayed feedback control. This condition depends on the number of real Floquet multipliers larger than unity and is therefore related to the well-known odd-number limitation in non-autonomous systems. We show that the period of the orbit that is induced by mismatching the delay time of the control scheme and the period of the uncontrolled orbit plays an important role in the formulation of the odd-number limitation in the autonomous case.

  1. HIGH-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT AGN FEEDBACK: EDDINGTON-LIMITED STAR FORMATION IN COMPACT MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Tremonti, Christy A.; Sell, Paul H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Robaina, Aday R.; Rudnick, Gregory H.

    2012-08-20

    We present the discovery of compact, obscured star formation in galaxies at z {approx} 0.6 that exhibit {approx}> 1000 km s{sup -1} outflows. Using optical morphologies from the Hubble Space Telescope and infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we estimate star formation rate (SFR) surface densities that approach {Sigma}{sub SFR} Almost-Equal-To 3000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, comparable to the Eddington limit from radiation pressure on dust grains. We argue that feedback associated with a compact starburst in the form of radiation pressure from massive stars and ram pressure from supernovae and stellar winds is sufficient to produce the high-velocity outflows we observe, without the need to invoke feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  2. Anti-collision protocols for RFID systems exploiting multi-antenna readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yimin; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    In conventional RFID systems, only one tag can be identified at a time. Tag collisions occur if more than one tag simultaneously occupies the shared RF channel, resulting in low identification efficiency and long delay, particularly when the population of tags is large. In this paper, we propose two RFID anti-collision protocols, both are based on framed slotted ALOHA (FSA), to concurrently identify multiple tags by using a multi-antenna reader. The first one is Blind Identification Protocol, which relies on blind estimation of the channel between the activated tags and the reader and, as such, does not require redesign of the existing RFID tags. The second one is Orthogonal ID-aided Identification Protocol which estimates the channels with the use of temporary orthogonal IDs, which are randomly selected by the tags and are inserted at the head of each tag's reply signal. The use of orthogonal IDs facilitates both the detection of activated tags and the channel estimation. Unlike code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques which rely on the use of excessive bandwidth and require redesign of tags, the proposed protocols use multiple antennas at the reader to support concurrent identification of multiple tags without the requirement of additional bandwidth and no or minimal modifications to the existing tags. As a result, the proposed techniques yield significant improvement of the identification efficiency and reduction of the identification delay. We analyze, in an analytical framework, the identification efficiency of the proposed protocols, and the optimum frame size is derived.

  3. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2012-02-15

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1/5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A/cm{sup 2} level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  4. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Shoji, T

    2012-02-01

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1∕5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A∕cm(2) level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  5. Negative plant-soil feedbacks may limit persistence of an invasive tree due to rapid accumulation of soil pathogens.

    PubMed

    Nijjer, Somereet; Rogers, William E; Siemann, Evan

    2007-10-22

    Soil organisms influence plant species coexistence and invasion potential. Plant-soil feedbacks occur when plants change soil community composition such that interactions with that soil community in turn may positively or negatively affect the performance of conspecifics. Theories predict and studies show that invasions may be promoted by stronger negative soil feedbacks for native compared with exotic species. We present a counter-example of a successful invader with strong negative soil feedbacks apparently caused by host-specific, pathogenic soil fungi. Using a feedback experiment in pots, we investigated whether the relative strength of plant-soil feedbacks experienced by a non-native woody invader, Sapium sebiferum, differed from several native tree species by examining their performance in soils collected near conspecifics ('home soils') or heterospecifics ('away soils') in the introduced range. Sapium seedlings, but no native seedlings, had lower survival and biomass in its home soils compared with soils of other species (negative feedback'). To investigate biotic agents potentially responsible for the observed negative feedbacks, we conducted two additional experiments designed to eliminate different soil taxa ('rescue experiments'). We found that soil sterilization (pot experiment ) or soil fungicide applications (pot and field experiments) restored Sapium performance in home soil thereby eliminating the negative feedbacks we observed in the original experiment. Such negative feedbacks apparently mediated by soil fungi could have important effects on persistence of this invader by limiting Sapium seedling success in Sapium dominated forests (home soils) though their weak effects in heterospecific (away) soils suggest a weak role in limiting initial establishment.

  6. Space-Frequency Block Code with Matched Rotation for MIMO-OFDM System with Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Abhayapala, Thushara D.; Jayalath, Dhammika; Smith, David; Athaudage, Chandra

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel matched rotation precoding (MRP) scheme to design a rate one space-frequency block code (SFBC) and a multirate SFBC for MIMO-OFDM systems with limited feedback. The proposed rate one MRP and multirate MRP can always achieve full transmit diversity and optimal system performance for arbitrary number of antennas, subcarrier intervals, and subcarrier groupings, with limited channel knowledge required by the transmit antennas. The optimization process of the rate one MRP is simple and easily visualized so that the optimal rotation angle can be derived explicitly, or even intuitively for some cases. The multirate MRP has a complex optimization process, but it has a better spectral efficiency and provides a relatively smooth balance between system performance and transmission rate. Simulations show that the proposed SFBC with MRP can overcome the diversity loss for specific propagation scenarios, always improve the system performance, and demonstrate flexible performance with large performance gain. Therefore the proposed SFBCs with MRP demonstrate flexibility and feasibility so that it is more suitable for a practical MIMO-OFDM system with dynamic parameters.

  7. Negative plant–soil feedbacks may limit persistence of an invasive tree due to rapid accumulation of soil pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Somereet; Rogers, William E; Siemann, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Soil organisms influence plant species coexistence and invasion potential. Plant–soil feedbacks occur when plants change soil community composition such that interactions with that soil community in turn may positively or negatively affect the performance of conspecifics. Theories predict and studies show that invasions may be promoted by stronger negative soil feedbacks for native compared with exotic species. We present a counter-example of a successful invader with strong negative soil feedbacks apparently caused by host-specific, pathogenic soil fungi. Using a feedback experiment in pots, we investigated whether the relative strength of plant–soil feedbacks experienced by a non-native woody invader, Sapium sebiferum, differed from several native tree species by examining their performance in soils collected near conspecifics (‘home soils’) or heterospecifics (‘away soils’) in the introduced range. Sapium seedlings, but no native seedlings, had lower survival and biomass in its home soils compared with soils of other species (‘negative feedback’). To investigate biotic agents potentially responsible for the observed negative feedbacks, we conducted two additional experiments designed to eliminate different soil taxa (‘rescue experiments’). We found that soil sterilization (pot experiment) or soil fungicide applications (pot and field experiments) restored Sapium performance in home soil thereby eliminating the negative feedbacks we observed in the original experiment. Such negative feedbacks apparently mediated by soil fungi could have important effects on persistence of this invader by limiting Sapium seedling success in Sapium dominated forests (home soils) though their weak effects in heterospecific (away) soils suggest a weak role in limiting initial establishment. PMID:17711837

  8. Spherical Linear Interpolation for Transmit Beamforming in MIMO-OFDM Systems with Limited Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control ...between the uplink and the downlink channels, this requires informing the transmitter about all the beamforming vectors through a feedback control channel...feedback control channel. A practical solution for reducing the amount of feedback per beamforming vector is to use a codebook designed for quantization of

  9. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    a degradation of the geometric resolution, which in this case becomes equal to 5m. Such an operational flexibility, added to the above discussed single-pass interferometric capability and to the intrinsic flexibility of airborne platforms, renders the TELAER airborne SAR system a powerful instrument for fast generation of high resolution Digital Elevation Models, even in natural disaster scenarios. Accordingly, this system can play today a key role not only for strictly scientific purposes, but also for the monitoring of natural hazards, especially if properly integrated with other remote sensing sensors. [1] S. Perna et al., "Capabilities of the TELAER airborne SAR system upgraded to the multi-antenna mode", In Proceedings IGARSS 2012 Symposium, Munich, 2012. [2] G. Franceschetti, and R.Lanari, Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing, CRC PRESS, New York, 1999.

  10. Design of a feedback-feedforward steering controller for accurate path tracking and stability at the limits of handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapania, Nitin R.; Gerdes, J. Christian

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a feedback-feedforward steering controller that simultaneously maintains vehicle stability at the limits of handling while minimising lateral path tracking deviation. The design begins by considering the performance of a baseline controller with a lookahead feedback scheme and a feedforward algorithm based on a nonlinear vehicle handling diagram. While this initial design exhibits desirable stability properties at the limits of handling, the steady-state path deviation increases significantly at highway speeds. Results from both linear and nonlinear analyses indicate that lateral path tracking deviations are minimised when vehicle sideslip is held tangent to the desired path at all times. Analytical results show that directly incorporating this sideslip tangency condition into the steering feedback dramatically improves lateral path tracking, but at the expense of poor closed-loop stability margins. However, incorporating the desired sideslip behaviour into the feedforward loop creates a robust steering controller capable of accurate path tracking and oversteer correction at the physical limits of tyre friction. Experimental data collected from an Audi TTS test vehicle driving at the handling limits on a full length race circuit demonstrates the improved performance of the final controller design.

  11. Limited acquisition and generalization of rhotics with ultrasound visual feedback in childhood apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Maas, Edwin; Whittle, Jessica; Leece, Megan C.; McCabe, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound visual feedback of the tongue is one treatment option for individuals with persisting speech sound errors. This study evaluated children's performance during acquisition and generalisation of American English rhotics using ultrasound feedback. Three children aged 10–13 with persisting speech sound errors associated with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) were treated for 14 one-hour sessions. Two of the participants increased the accuracy of their rhotic production during practice trials within treatment sessions, but none demonstrated generalisation to untreated words. Lack of generalisation may be due to a failure to acquire the target with sufficient accuracy during treatment, or to co-existing linguistic weaknesses that are not addressed in a motor-based treatment. Results suggest a need to refine the intervention procedures for CAS and/or a need to identify appropriate candidates for intervention to optimise learning. PMID:26237652

  12. Limited acquisition and generalisation of rhotics with ultrasound visual feedback in childhood apraxia.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jonathan L; Maas, Edwin; Whittle, Jessica; Leece, Megan C; McCabe, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound visual feedback of the tongue is one treatment option for individuals with persisting speech sound errors. This study evaluated children's performance during acquisition and generalisation of American English rhotics using ultrasound feedback. Three children aged 10-13 with persisting speech sound errors associated with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) were treated for 14 one-hour sessions. Two of the participants increased the accuracy of their rhotic production during practise trials within treatment sessions, but none demonstrated generalisation to untreated words. Lack of generalisation may be due to a failure to acquire the target with sufficient accuracy during treatment, or to co-existing linguistic weaknesses that are not addressed in a motor-based treatment. Results suggest a need to refine the intervention procedures for CAS and/or a need to identify appropriate candidates for intervention to optimise learning.

  13. Cosmological galaxy evolution with superbubble feedback - II. The limits of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, B. W.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We explore when supernovae can (and cannot) regulate the star formation and bulge growth in galaxies based on a sample of 18 simulated galaxies. The simulations are the first to model feedback superbubbles including evaporation and conduction. These processes determine the mass loadings and wind speeds of galactic outflows. We show that for galaxies with virial masses >1012 M⊙, supernovae alone cannot prevent excessive star formation. This occurs due to a shutdown of galactic winds, with wind mass loadings falling from η ˜ 10 to η < 1. In more massive systems, the ejection of baryons to the circumgalactic medium falters earlier on and the galaxies diverge significantly from observed galaxy scaling relations and morphologies. The decreasing efficiency is due to a deepening potential well preventing gas escape, and is unavoidable if mass-loaded outflows regulate star formation on galactic scales. This implies that non-supernova feedback mechanisms must become dominant for galaxies with stellar masses greater than ˜4 × 1010 M⊙. The runaway growth of the central stellar bulge, strongly linked to black hole growth, suggests that feedback from active galactic nuclei is the likely mechanism. Below this mass, supernovae alone are able to produce a realistic stellar mass fraction, star formation history and disc morphology.

  14. Using Doppler shift induced by Galvanometric mirror scanning to reach shot noise limit with laser optical feedback imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, O; Lacot, E; Hugon, O; Guillet de Chatelus, H

    2015-03-10

    This paper proposes what we believe is a new method to remove the contribution of parasitic reflections in the images of the laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) technique. This simple method allows us to extend the LOFI technique to long-distance applications, as imaging through a fog or a smoke. The LOFI technique is an ultrasensitive imaging technique that is interesting for imaging objects through a scattering medium. However, the LOFI sensitivity can be dramatically limited by parasitic optical feedback occurring in the experimental setup. In previous papers [Appl. Opt.48, 64 (2009)10.1364/AO.48.000064APOPAI1559-128X, Opt. Lett.37, 2514 (2012)10.1364/OL.37.002514OPLEDP0146-9592], we already have proposed methods to filter a parasitic optical feedback, but they are not well suited to metric working distances. This new method uses a Doppler frequency shift induced by the moving mirror used to scan the object to be imaged. Using this Doppler frequency shift, we can distinguish the photons reflected by the target and the parasitic photons reflected by the optical components in the experimental setup. In this paper, we demonstrated theoretically and experimentally the possibility to filter the parasitic reflection in LOFI images using the Doppler frequency shift. This method significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor 15 and we can obtain a shot noise limited image through a scattering medium of an object at 3 m from the detector.

  15. Photoresponsive Liquid Crystal Elastomers as Feedback Controlled Light-driven Actuators - Theory, Real-time Behaviour, Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippenberger, Michael; Dengler, Philipp; Wandinger, Andreas; Schmidt, Michael

    Liquid Crystal Elastomers constitute a class of intelligent materials and actuators. External stimulation induces an internal phase-change that results in a mechanical motion of the Liquid Crystal Elastomer. External stimuli can be humidity, thermal energy but also radiation with an appropriate wavelength. In this paper we use the photomechanic response of Liquid Crystal Elastomers as a driving force for a controlled actuator, operating in feedback constellation with a tuned cascade-compensator. To accomplish this, we go the methodical route of dynamic system investigation consisting of an analysis of the phenomenological system-properties, the identification of the dynamic behaviour and the overall synthesis of the feedback-control loop. Since we also take practical considerations into account, we present a coordinated hard- and software concept to realize the application of the Liquid Crystal Elastomer as a controlled actuator. An application guide complements the paper and discusses the limits of this class of actuators.

  16. Short baseline solution from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver and its applications for high-precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Dong, Danan; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Zheng, Zhengqi; Yu, Chao; Kuang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver (using the same receiver clock) is a new type of receivers with low cost, high accuracy and broad range of applications. Using this receiver, single difference carrier phase observations are able to eliminate both the satellite and receiver clock errors simultaneously, which are equivalent to classical double difference model. However, current commercial products of this type of receivers still adopt the double differencing algorithm and hence do not take full advantage of the receiver clock synchronizing for better accuracy, efficiency and broader applications. In this study, we develop a single differencing algorithm for this emerging receiver, especially for short baseline solutions. Our results indicate that the single differencing algorithm enhances the resolving accuracy and efficiency, it also widens the applications. In addition, this innovate algorithm is able to observe the ground-based carrier phase wind-up (GPWU) effects clearly for the first time. Our major research results are summarized as the followings: (1) A real-time attitude determination algorithm is developed based on single difference carrier phase observations from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver. Comparing with the double differencing algorithm, it has more observations and redundancy. Its solutions show better repeatability and lower correlations among parameters. In this algorithm, we design an ambiguity substitution approach (ASA), which separates the fractional initial phase from the integer parts of single difference ambiguities effectively, thus narrows the searching space of ambiguities and improves the efficiency and correctness of integer ambiguity fixing. (2) We construct a Multipath Hemispherical Model (MHM) to mitigate the multipath effects. The MHM is applicable not only for static environment but also for dynamic carriers with static multipath environment such as ships and airplanes. (3) We also propose the Single Antenna Yaw

  17. Photonic-aided pre-coding QAM signal transmission in multi-antenna radio over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying; Zhu, Ming; Xin, Xiangjun; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2015-11-01

    A novel method has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated to provide photonic-aided pre-coding quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal transmission in multi-antenna radio over fiber system to increase the throughput. For downlink, two different multi-level amplitude-shift-keying (M-ASK) modulated signals, such as 4-ASK signals, are applied on two uncorrelated optical Mach-Zehnder modulators at central office. After photonic-aided pre-coding module and photo-detection process, the received M-ASK mm-waves from two remote access units (RAUs) can be synthesized to a M2-QAM signal in the proposed system. Regardless of forward error correction (FEC) coding overhead, the 4-Gb/s and 8-Gb/s 16-QAM mm-wave signals are obtained from two independent 2-Gb/s and 4-Gb/s 4-ASK 40-GHz channels, respectively. The experimental results show that a doubled bit rate of the original 4-ASK one can be achieved without additional digital signal processing (DSP) in small cell RAUs and mobile users.

  18. On Optimum Power Allocation for Multi-Antenna Wideband Helicopter-to-Ground Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    optimum [1]. In frequency selective fading, the general approach is to use OFDM and apply these techniques on a per subcarrier basis. This work was...Contracting Office under contract W900KK-09-C-0016. Given the constraints described above, OFDM is often of limited interest in helicopter-to-ground

  19. Quantum limits on the detection sensitivity of a linear detector with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    We show that the detection sensitivity of a linear detector is lower bounded by some quantum limits. For the force sensitivity, which is relevant for atomic force microscopes, the lower bound is given by the so-called ultimate quantum limit (UQL). For the displacement sensitivity, which is relevant for detecting gravitational waves, a generalized lower bound that can overcome the usual UQL is obtained.

  20. FEEDBACK: An Updated Look at Limited-English-Proficient Students in AISD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spano, Sedra G.

    1991-01-01

    Information about limited-English-proficient (LEP) students in the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) is summarized. In the 1990-91 school year, 5,047 students in the AISD were served in LEP programs at elementary schools (3,933 students), middle schools (555 students), and secondary schools (559 students). Most were Spanish…

  1. Holographic fabricated photonic-crystal distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser with near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Lu, Quan-Yong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Jun-Qi; Li, Lu; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2009-10-12

    We demonstrate the fabrication and characterization of photonic-crystal distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.7 microm. The tilted rectangular-lattice PCDFB structure was defined using a multi-exposure of two-beam holographic lithography. The devices exhibit the near-diffraction-limited beam emission with the full width at half maximum of the far-field divergence angles about 4.5 degrees and 2.5 degrees for stripe widths of 55 microm and 95 microm, respectively. Single-mode emission with a side mode suppression ratio of approximately 20 dB is achieved in the temperature range (80-210 K). The single-facet output power is above 1 W for a 95 microm x 2.5 mm laser bar at 85 K in pulsed operation.

  2. Shaped and Feedback-Controlled Excitation of Single Molecules in the Weak-Field Limit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control uses tailored femtosecond pulse shapes to influence quantum pathways and drive a light-induced process toward a specific outcome. There has been a long-standing debate whether the absorption properties or the probability for population to remain in an excited state of a molecule can be influenced by the pulse shape, even if only a single photon is absorbed. Most such experiments are performed on many molecules simultaneously, so that ensemble averaging reduces the access to quantum effects. Here, we demonstrate systematic coherent control experiments on the fluorescence intensity of a single molecule in the weak-field limit. We demonstrate that a delay scan of interfering pulses reproduces the excitation spectrum of the molecule upon Fourier transformation, but that the spectral phase of a pulse sequence does not affect the transition probability. We generalize this result to arbitrary pulse shapes by performing the first closed-loop coherent control experiments on a single molecule. PMID:26706166

  3. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  4. Investigation, development and application of optimal output feedback theory. Volume 2: Development of an optimal, limited state feedback outer-loop digital flight control system for 3-D terminal area operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Halyo, N.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains the development of a digital outer-loop three dimensional radio navigation (3-D RNAV) flight control system for a small commercial jet transport. The outer-loop control system is designed using optimal stochastic limited state feedback techniques. Options investigated using the optimal limited state feedback approach include integrated versus hierarchical control loop designs, 20 samples per second versus 5 samples per second outer-loop operation and alternative Type 1 integration command errors. Command generator tracking techniques used in the digital control design enable the jet transport to automatically track arbitrary curved flight paths generated by waypoints. The performance of the design is demonstrated using detailed nonlinear aircraft simulations in the terminal area, frequency domain multi-input sigma plots, frequency domain single-input Bode plots and closed-loop poles. The response of the system to a severe wind shear during a landing approach is also presented.

  5. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required ‘robustness margin’ for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations. PMID:27493558

  6. Using Statement Banks to Return Online Feedback: Limitations of the Transmission Approach in a Credit-Bearing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Philip; Rowe, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Electronic marking tools that incorporate statement banks have become increasingly prevalent within higher education. In an experiment, printed and emailed feedback was returned to 243 first-year students on a credit-bearing laboratory report assessment. A transmission approach was used, students being provided with comments on their work, but no…

  7. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  8. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally. PMID:27935947

  9. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    PubMed

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  10. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  11. Feedback & Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterworth, James R.

    1975-01-01

    Industrial objectives, if they are employee oriented, produce feedback, and the motivation derived from the feedback helps reduce turnover. Feedback is the power to clarify objectives, to stimulate communication, and to motivate people. (Author/MW)

  12. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  13. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light.

  14. Prey Vulnerability Limits Top-Down Control and Alters Reciprocal Feedbacks in a Subsidized Model Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, William I.; Palen, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Resource subsidies increase the productivity of recipient food webs and can affect ecosystem dynamics. Subsidies of prey often support elevated predator biomass which may intensify top-down control and reduce the flow of reciprocal subsidies into adjacent ecosystems. However, top-down control in subsidized food webs may be limited if primary consumers posses morphological or behavioral traits that limit vulnerability to predation. In forested streams, terrestrial prey support high predator biomass creating the potential for strong top-down control, however armored primary consumers often dominate the invertebrate assemblage. Using empirically based simulation models, we tested the response of stream food webs to variations in subsidy magnitude, prey vulnerability, and the presence of two top predators. While terrestrial prey inputs increased predator biomass (+12%), the presence of armored primary consumers inhibited top-down control, and diverted most aquatic energy (∼75%) into the riparian forest through aquatic insect emergence. Food webs without armored invertebrates experienced strong trophic cascades, resulting in higher algal (∼50%) and detrital (∼1600%) biomass, and reduced insect emergence (−90%). These results suggest prey vulnerability can mediate food web responses to subsidies, and that top-down control can be arrested even when predator-invulnerable consumers are uncommon (20%) regardless of the level of subsidy. PMID:24465732

  15. High normalized beta plasmas exceeding the ideal stability limit and projected RWM active stabilization performance using newly installed feedback sensors in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Bae, C.; Bae, Y. S.; in, Y. K.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H. K.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    H-mode plasma operation of KSTAR has been expanded to significantly surpass the ideal MHD no-wall beta limit by achieving normalized beta up to 4.3 while reducing plasma internal inductance to near 0.7 exceeding the computed n = 1 ideal no-wall limit by a factor of 1.6. These high normalized beta values have been achieved in discharges having BT in the range 0.9-1.1 T after the plasma reached flattop current of 0.35-0.4 MA, with the highest neutral beam heating power of 4 MW. A significant conclusion of the analysis of these plasmas is that low- n global kink/ballooning or RWMs were not detected, and therefore were not the cause of the plasma termination. Advances from the 2015 run campaign aiming to achieve prolonged pulse duration at maximum normalized beta and to subsequently investigate the MHD stability of these plasmas will be reported. As KSTAR H-mode operation can now routinely surpass the ideal no-wall stability limit, n = 1 RWM active control is planned for the device. RWM active feedback using a newly installed set of poloidal magnetic field sensors mounted on the passive stabilizer plates and designed for optimal performance is analyzed using the VALEN-3D code. The advantages of the new sensors over other device sensors for RWM active control are discussed. Supported by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  16. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz−1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise. PMID:27312284

  17. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-06-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz‑1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  18. Teleoperator comfort and psychometric stability: Criteria for limiting master-controller forces of operation and feedback during telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Hershkowitz, Elaine; Zik, John

    1989-01-01

    The following question is addressed: How much force should operators exert, or experience, when operating a telemanipulator master-controller for sustained periods without encountering significant fatigue and discomfort, and without loss of stability in psychometric perception of force. The need to minimize exertion demands to avoid fatigue is diametrically opposed by the need to present a wide range of force stimuli to enhance perception of applied or reflected forces. For 104 minutes subjects repetitiously performed a series of 15 s isometric pinch grasps; controlled at 5, 15, and 25 percent of their maximum voluntary strength. Cyclic pinch grasps were separated by rest intervals of 7.5 and 15 s. Upon completion of every 10 minute period, subjects interrupted grasping activities to gage the intensity of fatigue and discomfort in the hand and forearm using a cross-modal matching technique. A series of psychometric tests were then conducted to determine accuracy and stability in the subject's perception of force experienced. Results showed that onset of sensations of discomfort and fatigue were dependent upon the magnitude of grasp force, work/rest ratio, and progression of task. Declines in force magnitude estimation slopes, indicating a reduction in force perception sensitivity, occurred with increased grasp force when work/rest ratios were greater than 1.0. Specific recommendations for avoiding discomfort and shifts in force perception, by limiting pinch grasp force required for master-controller operation and range of force reflection or work/rest ratios, are provided.

  19. Magnetic turbulence and pressure gradient feedback effect of the 1/2 mode soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic limit in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, J.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohdachi, S.; Narushima, Y.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the feedback process between the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradients in Large Helical Device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations as well as its role in the transition between the soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for instabilities driven by the mode 1/2 in the middle plasma. In the present paper, we summarize the results of two simulations with different Lundquist numbers, S=2.5×10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6}, assuming a plasma in the slow reconnection regime. The results for the high Lundquist number simulation show that the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradient in the middle plasma region of LHD are below the critical value to drive the transition to the hard MHD regime, therefore only relaxations in the soft MHD limit are triggered (1/2 sawtooth-like events) [Phys. Plasmas 19, 082512 (2012)]. In the case of the simulation with low Lundquist number, the system reaches the hard MHD limit and a plasma collapse is observed.

  20. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  1. Feedback in Videogame-based Adaptive Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    individuals have limited information processing capabilities. Salvati et al. (2003) identified several antecedents and consequences to feedback overload... Antecedents included feedback value and job experience while important consequences were the desire to respond to feedback, stress, and job...Morin, D. (2003). Performance feedback overload: An exploratory field study of its antecedents and consequences . Montreal, Quebec: HEC Montreal

  2. Strategies for effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  3. Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Malgorzata; Romano, David; Herrero, Ana; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; Birtwistle, Marc; Quehenberger, Franz; Hatzl, Stefan; Kholodenko, Boris N; Segatto, Oreste; Kolch, Walter; Zebisch, Armin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed

  4. Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Milewska, Malgorzata; Romano, David; Herrero, Ana; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; Birtwistle, Marc; Quehenberger, Franz; Hatzl, Stefan; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Segatto, Oreste; Kolch, Walter; Zebisch, Armin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed

  5. Feedback and the Reconstruction of Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Philip; And Others

    This investigation of the impact of feedback upon scrambled discourse was intended to show the effects of idiosyncratic processing and to provide a more sensitive indicator of feedback usefulness. Learner schemata, text organization, and feedback strategies interact in processing discourse, although past research has favored limited models…

  6. Numerical Studies of Fluid Leakage from a Geologic DisposalReservoir for CO2 Show Self-Limiting Feedback between Fluid Flow and HeatTransfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-22

    Leakage of CO2 from a hypothetical geologic storage reservoir along an idealized fault zone has been simulated, including transitions between supercritical, liquid, and gaseous CO2. We find strong non-isothermal effects due to boiling and Joule-Thomson cooling of expanding CO2. Leakage fluxes are limited by limitations in conductive heat transfer to the fault zone. The interplay between multiphase flow and heat transfer effects produces non-monotonic leakage behavior.

  7. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  8. Student Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  9. Perceptual Learning Solely Induced by Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon; Watanabe, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Although feedback is considered to be an important factor in perceptual learning (PL), its role is normally considered limited to facilitation, rather than direct inducement, of PL. Recent studies, however, have suggested feedback to be more actively involved in the inducement of PL. The current study demonstrates an even more significant role for feedback in PL: feedback can evoke PL of a feature without any bottom-up processing of that feature. We use a “fake feedback” method, in which the feedback is related to an arbitrarily chosen feature, rather than actual performance. We find evidence of PL with this fake feedback method both when the learned feature is absent from the visual stimulus (Experiment 1) and when it conflicts with the visual stimulus (Experiment 2). We call this “feedback-based PL,” in contrast with the classical “exposure-based PL.” We find that feedback-based PL and exposure-based PL can occur independently of each other even while occurring in the same paradigm. These results suggest that feedback not only facilitates PL that is evoked by bottom-up information, but that it can directly induce PL, where such feedback-based PL occurs independently of exposure-based PL. PMID:22269189

  10. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  11. Delayed feedback control of chaos.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, Kestutis

    2006-09-15

    Time-delayed feedback control is well known as a practical method for stabilizing unstable periodic orbits embedded in chaotic attractors. The method is based on applying feedback perturbation proportional to the deviation of the current state of the system from its state one period in the past, so that the control signal vanishes when the stabilization of the target orbit is attained. A brief review on experimental implementations, applications for theoretical models and most important modifications of the method is presented. Recent advancements in the theory, as well as an idea of using an unstable degree of freedom in a feedback loop to avoid a well-known topological limitation of the method, are described in detail.

  12. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  13. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  14. Teachers' Classroom Feedback: Still Trying to Get It Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore

    2012-01-01

    This article examines feedback traditionally given by teachers in schools. Such feedback tends to focus on children's acquisition and retrieval of externally prescribed knowledge which is then assessed against mandated tests. It suggests that, from a sociocultural learning perspective, feedback directed towards such objectives may limit children's…

  15. Using "Signals" for Appropriate Feedback: Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanes, Zeynep; Arnold, Kimberly E.; King, Abigail Selzer; Remnet, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is a crucial form of information for learners. With the availability of new educational technologies, the manner in which feedback is delivered has changed tremendously. Existing research on the learning outcomes of the content and nature of computer mediated feedback is limited and contradictory. "Signals" is an educational data-mining…

  16. A Content Analysis of Peer Feedback in Triadic Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avent, Janeé R.; Wahesh, Edward; Purgason, Lucy L.; Borders, L. DiAnne; Mobley, A. Keith

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research on the types of peer feedback exchanged during triadic supervision. Through a content analysis, the authors found that students provided feedback about counseling performance and cognitive counseling skills most often in supervision sessions. However, there were differences in the types of feedback exchanged across three…

  17. Improved feedback shift register

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1972-01-01

    Design of feedback shift register with three tap feedback decoding scheme is described. Application for obtaining sequence synchronization patterns is examined. Operation of the circuitry is described and drawings of the systems are included.

  18. Distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Andrews, J. T.; Evans, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A ridge waveguide distributed feedback laser was developed in InGaAsP. These devices have demonstrated CW output powers over 7 mW with threshold currents as low as 60 mA at 25 C. Measurements of the frequency response of these devices show a 3 dB bandwidth of about 2 GHz, which may be limited by the mount. The best devices have a single mode spectra over the entire temperature range tested with a side mode suppression of about 20 dB in both CW and pulsed modes. The design of this device, including detailed modeling of the ridge guide structure, effective index calculations, and a discussion of the grating configuration are presented. Also, the fabrication of the devices is presented in some detail, especially the fabrication of and subsequent growth over the grating. In addition, a high frequency fiber pigtailed package was designed and tested, which is a suitable prototype for a commercial package.

  19. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  20. The Mythology of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  1. Passage Feedback with IRIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kiduk; Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Newby, Gregory B.

    2001-01-01

    Compares a user-defined passage feedback system to a document feedback system for information retrieval, based on TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) guidelines. Highlights include a description of IRIS, an interactive retrieval system; text processing; ranking; term weights; feedback models, including the adaptive linear model; and suggestions for…

  2. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  3. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change.

  4. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  5. "Feedback" For Instructioal Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur

    A number of different methods have been used by instructional television (ITV) projects to obtain audience feedback, and some of these are now being used in the ITV system in El Salvador. We know that pretesting programs on a representative sample can bring considerable gains in learning. Another feedback source can be a classroom of pupils in the…

  6. Convolution feedback systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Callier, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    Linear time-invariant feedback systems with multiple inputs and multiple outputs are examined. It is demonstrated that no loss of generality takes place considering the feedback to be unity. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived for the closed-loop impulse response to be stable in a prescribed sense.

  7. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller.

  8. Global Feedback Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Serrano, Lawrence Doolittle

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as the ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.

  9. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-05

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause.

  10. Feedback valence affects auditory perceptual learning independently of feedback probability.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners' responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability.

  11. Ambulatory Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Herbert; Weeks, Bill

    1985-01-01

    This presentation discusses instrumentation that will be used for a specific event, which we hope will carry on to future events within the Space Shuttle program. The experiment is the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) scheduled for Spacelab 3, currently scheduled to be launched in November, 1984. The objectives of the AFTE are to determine the effectiveness of autogenic feedback in preventing or reducing space adaptation syndrome (SAS), to monitor and record in-flight data from the crew, to determine if prediction criteria for SAS can be established, and, finally, to develop an ambulatory instrument package to mount the crew throughout the mission. The purpose of the Ambulatory Feedback System (AFS) is to record the responses of the subject during a provocative event in space and provide a real-time feedback display to reinforce the training.

  12. Haptic Feedback in Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS) holds great promise for improving the accuracy and dexterity of a surgeon while minimizing trauma to the patient. However, widespread clinical success with RMIS has been marginal. It is hypothesized that the lack of haptic (force and tactile) feedback presented to the surgeon is a limiting factor. This review explains the technical challenges of creating haptic feedback for robot-assisted surgery and provides recent results that evaluate the effectiveness of haptic feedback in mock surgical tasks. Recent Findings Haptic feedback systems for RMIS are still under development and evaluation. Most provide only force feedback, with limited fidelity. The major challenge at this time is sensing forces applied to the patient. A few tactile feedback systems for RMIS have been created, but their practicality for clinical implementation needs to be shown. It is particularly difficult to sense and display spatially distributed tactile information. The cost-benefit ratio for haptic feedback in RMIS has not been established. Summary The designs of existing commercial RMIS systems are not conducive for force feedback, and creative solutions are needed to create compelling tactile feedback systems. Surgeons, engineers, and neuroscientists should work together to develop effective solutions for haptic feedback in RMIS. PMID:19057225

  13. Remote feedback stabilization of tokamak instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K. )

    1994-05-01

    A novel remote suppressor consisting of an injected ion beam has been used for the stabilization of plasma instabilities. A collisionless curvature-driven trapped-particle instability, an [bold E][times][bold B] flute mode and an ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability have been successfully suppressed down to noise levels using this scheme. Furthermore, the first experimental demonstration of a multimode feedback stabilization with a single sensor--suppressor pair has been achieved. Two modes (an [bold E][times][bold B] flute and an ITG mode) were simultaneously stabilized with a simple state-feedback-type method where more state'' information was generated from a single-sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing. The above experiments may be considered as paradigms for controlling several important tokamak instabilities. First, feedback suppression of edge fluctuations in a tokamak with a suitable form of insulated segmented poloidal limiter sections used as Langmuir-probe-like suppressors is proposed. Other feedback control schemes are proposed for the suppression of electrostatic core fluctuations via appropriately phased ion density input from a modulated neutral beam. Most importantly, a scheme to control major disruptions in tokamaks via feedback suppression of kink (and possibly) tearing modes is discussed. This may be accomplished by using a modulated neutral beam suppressor in a feedback loop, which will supply a momentum input of appropriate phase and amplitude. Simple theoretical models predict modest levels of beam energy, current, and power.

  14. Feedback: How Does It Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardwell, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    A study of feedback delay, expectation, and development was conducted in grades four, six, and eight, to assess whether feedback on a school related learning task serves an informational or reinforcing function. Results indicate that feedback serves an informational function and delayed feedback facilitates retention, contrary to reinforcement…

  15. Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The term "feedback" is often used to describe all kinds of comments made after the fact, including advice, praise, and evaluation. But none of these are feedback, strictly speaking. Basically, feedback is information about how one is doing in his or her efforts to reach a goal. Whether feedback is just there to be grasped or is provided by another…

  16. Feedback: Now with Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Murray, Norman W.

    2017-01-01

    The most fundamental unsolved problems in galaxy formation revolve around "feedback" from massive stars and black holes. In the last few years, a new generation of theoretical models have emerged which combine new numerical methods and physics in an attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from super-massive black holes and massive stars (winds, jets, SNe, and radiation). These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law, the inefficiency of star formation, and the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, change the nature of dark matter cores and ‘cusps’, and re-structure the circum-galactic and inter-galactic medium. These winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches. This resolves long-standing problems in understanding even apparently "simple" galaxy properties like the mass-metallicity relation. Finally, I'll discuss where feedback fails, and where either additional, exotic physics, or new, previously-dismissed feedback mechanisms, may be needed to explain observations.

  17. Calibrated feedback for laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.G.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of calibrating the feedback output from the feedback light detector of the laser diode of an optical disk drive of a laser light pen which consists of mounting a first and a second resistor in a laser light pen; connecting the first resistor between the feedback light detector and ground; connecting the second resistor between the feedback light detector and a feedback output; operating the laser diode to produce a predetermined light power output; adjusting the resistance of the first resistor to produce a predetermined voltage at the feedback output; and adjusting the resistance of the second resistor to produce a predetermined impedance at the feedback output.

  18. Video-Based Feedback on Student Assessment: Scarily Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael; Phillips, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Assessment feedback is an important part of students' learning experiences; however, text-based feedback has limitations. This article proposes an alternative in the form of individualised video recordings of the lecturer discussing each assignment. This research reports on 126 undergraduate and postgraduate students' reactions to 5-minute videos…

  19. A Cognitively Oriented Psychologist Looks at Bio-feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Richard S.

    1975-01-01

    It is advocated that bio-feedback research be approached within the larger context of emotion and adaption and oriented to the wide variety of mediators that affect the reaction pattern, rather than be treated as a special or unique kind of process limited to the bio-feedback laboratory. (EH)

  20. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. Baseband feedback for SAFARI-SPICA using Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounab, A.; de Korte, P.; Cros, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Monna, B.; Mossel, R.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ravera, L.

    We report on the performance of the digital baseband feedback circuit developed to readout and process signals from arrays of transition edge sensors for SPICA-SAFARI in frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). The standard procedure to readout the SQUID current amplifiers is to use a feedback loop (flux-locked loop: FLL). However the achievable FFL bandwidth is limited by the cable transport delay t_d, which makes standard feedback inconvenient. A much better approach is to use baseband feedback. We have developed a model of the electronic readout chain for SPICA-SAFARI instrument by using an Anlog-digital co-simulation based on Simulink-System Generator environment.

  2. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  3. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  4. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    We consider the task of deterministically entangling two remote qubits using joint measurement and feedback, but no directly entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Finally, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  5. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  6. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; ...

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less

  7. Self-control of feedback during motor learning: accounting for the absolute amount of feedback using a yoked group with self-control over feedback.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steve; Pfeiffer, Jacob; Patterson, Jae Todd

    2011-01-01

    A traditional control group yoked to a group that self-controls their reception of feedback receives feedback in the same relative and absolute manner. This traditional control group typically does not learn the task as well as the self-control group. Although the groups are matched for the amount of feedback they receive, the information is provided on trials in which the individual may not request feedback if he or she were provided the opportunity. Similarly, individuals may not receive feedback on trials for which it would be a beneficial learning experience. Subsequently, the mismatch between the provision of feedback and the potential learning opportunity leads to a decrement in retention. The present study was designed to examine motor learning for a yoked group with the same absolute amount of feedback, but who could self-control when they received feedback. Increased mental processing of error detection and correction was expected for the participants in the yoked self-control group because of their choice to employ a limited resource in the form of a decreasing amount of feedback opportunities. Participants in the yoked with self-control group committed fewer errors than the self-control group in retention and the traditional yoked group in both the retention and time transfer blocks. The results suggest that the yoked with self-control group was able to produce efficient learning effects and can be a viable control group for further motor learning studies.

  8. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  9. Smart feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gribov, I. V.; Gudkov, K. A.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    1994-12-01

    It is necessary to find the golden mean in allocating the processing resources of a computer control system. Traditionally, feedback loops operate at the lower levels to ensure safe and stable operation of the accelerator. At present we use analogue and digital feedback loops. Some systems, such as the RF, require more complex algorithms. A possible way of providing these, using digital signal processors is described. The results of tests with the Race-Track Microtron Linac are given and the sources of the main internal and external disturbances have been analysed.

  10. Measuring Feedback in Nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Turner, T. J.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) AGN. From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in total mass outflow rate (Ṁout) and kinetic luminosity (LK) for each AGN, summed over all of the absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, or other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine Ṁout and LK. The 6 Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (Lbol = 1043 - 1045 ergs s-1) all have mass outflow rates that are 10 - 1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have LK in the range 0.5 - 5% Lbol, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black-hole and galactic bulge growth. The other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have LK > 0.1%Lbol, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGN have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  11. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  12. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  13. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  14. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  15. Review of Assessment Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  16. Feedback Complexity and Practice: Response Pattern Analysis in Retention and Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phye, Gary D.; Bender, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    Feedback effectiveness and efficiency were studied using 120 college students practicing 40 difficult vocabulary items in 4 experiments. The significant impact of immediate feedback was seen in immediate and delayed posttests. Conditional probability of feedback as a corrective function is discussed via a limited model of general working memory.…

  17. Social-comparative feedback affects motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Lewthwaite, Rebecca; Wulf, Gabriele

    2010-04-01

    This study examined motivational effects of feedback on motor learning. Specifically, we investigated the influence of social-comparative feedback on the learning of a balance task (stabilometer). In addition to veridical feedback (error scores reflecting deviation from the target horizontal platform position) about their own performance after each trial, two groups received false normative information about the "average" score of others on that trial. Average performance scores indicated that the participant's performance was either above (better group) or below (worse group) the average, respectively. A control group received veridical feedback about trial performance without normative feedback. Learning as a function of social-comparative feedback was determined in a retention test without feedback, performed on a third day following two days of practice. Normative feedback affected the learning of the balance task: The better group demonstrated more effective balance performance than both the worse and control groups on the retention test. Furthermore, high-frequency/low-amplitude balance adjustments, indicative of more automatic control of movement, were greater in the better than in the worse group. The control group exhibited more limited learning and less automaticity than both the better and the worse groups. The findings indicate that positive normative feedback had a facilitatory effect on motor learning.

  18. How to Give Professional Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  19. Feedback: Part of a System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Just as a thermostat adjusts room temperature, effective feedback helps maintain a supportive environment for learning. Because of the many factors affecting how recipients respond to feedback, research offers no simple prescription for making feedback work effectively. What works in one classroom for one teacher will not work for another teacher.…

  20. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  1. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  2. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  3. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  4. Systems approach to identification of feedback enhanced optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Hullas; Aggarwal, Tanuj; Salapaka, Murti V.

    2008-08-01

    Feedback enhanced optical tweezers, based on Proportional and Integral (PI) control, are routinely used for increasing the stiffness of optical traps. Digital implementation of PI controller, using DSP or FPGA, enables easy maneuverability of feedback gains. In this paper, we report occurrence of a peak in the thermal noise power spectrum of the trapped bead as the proportional gain is cranked up, which imposes a limit on how stiff a trap can be made using position feedback. We explain the reasons for the deviant behavior in the power spectrum and present a mathematical formula to account for the anomaly, which is in very good agreement with the experimental observations. Further, we present a new method to do the closed loop system identification of feedback enhanced optical tweezers by applying a frequency chirp. The system model thus obtained greatly predicts the closed loop behavior of our feedback based optical tweezers system.

  5. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  6. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  7. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  8. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  9. Does visual augmented feedback reduce local dynamic stability while walking?

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Daniel; Hamacher, Dennis; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Augmented feedback is frequently used in gait training to efficiently correct specific gait patterns in patients with different disorders. The patients use this external augmented feedback to align actual movements in a way that predefined gait characteristics can be achieved. Voluntary changes of gait characteristics are reported to reduce local dynamic stability (LDS) which in turn is associated with increased risk of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of visual feedback, provided to help patients to correct frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements, on the LDS of pelvis and trunk. Kinematic gait data was captured in ten women with gait disorders. The effect of visual feedback on LDS, quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent, of walking was examined. We found a significant decreased LDS (e.g. pelvis: p=.009) in our subjects when they were using visual augmented feedback. Our data suggest that the use of visual augmented feedback causes less stable gait patterns indicating a reduced ability to respond to small perturbations which might increase risk of falling. Therefore, researchers or clinicians who aim to correct gait patterns through real time based external augmented feedback should consider the potential negative effect on gait stability. It should be evaluated if the possible increased fall risk provoked by visual feedback exceeds possible increases in fall risk induced by conventional gait-retraining interventions. The external validity of the study is limited because of the low sample size and inhomogeneous group characteristics. Thus, further studies including homogeneous cohorts are required.

  10. Visual feedback distortion in a robotic environment for hand rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Bambi Roberts; Klatzky, Roberta; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2008-04-15

    Robotic therapy offers a means of enhancing rehabilitation for individuals with chronic stroke or traumatic brain injury. The present research targets members of this population who demonstrate learned nonuse, a tendency to use affected limbs below the level of the individual's true capability. These individuals may not strive for difficult goals in therapy, which ultimately hampers their progress and the outcome of rehabilitation. Our research uses a paradigm called visual feedback distortion in which the visual feedback corresponding to force or distance is gradually changed by an imperceptible amount to encourage improved performance. Our first set of experiments was designed to assess the limits of imperceptible distortion for visual feedback concerning the force exerted or the distance moved by the index finger. A second set of experiments used these limits to gradually distort visual feedback in order to manipulate a subject's force or distance response. Based on this work, we designed a paradigm applying visual feedback distortion to the rehabilitation of individuals with chronic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Initial tests are reported for two subjects who participated in a six-week rehabilitation protocol. Each patient followed visual feedback distortion to levels of performance above that predicted by her performance during an initial assessment. Both patients showed functional improvements after participating in the study. Visual feedback distortion may provide a way to help a patient move beyond his or her self-assessed "best" performance, improving the outcome of robotic rehabilitation.

  11. Feedbacks and the coevolution of plants and atmospheric CO2

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, David J.; Berner, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The coupled evolution of land plants, CO2, and climate over the last half billion years has maintained atmospheric CO2 concentrations within finite limits, indicating the involvement of a complex network of geophysiological feedbacks. But insight into this important regulatory network is extremely limited. Here we present a systems analysis of the physiological and geochemical processes involved, identifying new positive and negative feedbacks between plants and CO2 on geological time scales. Positive feedbacks accelerated falling CO2 concentrations during the evolution and diversification of terrestrial ecosystems in the Paleozoic and enhanced rising CO2 concentrations across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary during flood basalt eruptions. The existence of positive feedbacks reveals the unexpected destabilizing influence of the biota in climate regulation that led to environmental modifications accelerating rates of terrestrial plant and animal evolution in the Paleozoic. PMID:15668402

  12. Electronic Implementation of a Repressilator with Quorum Sensing Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Hellen, Edward H.; Dana, Syamal K.; Zhurov, Boris; Volkov, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a synthetic genetic repressilator with quorum sensing feedback. In a basic genetic ring oscillator network in which three genes inhibit each other in unidirectional manner, an additional quorum sensing feedback loop stimulates the activity of a chosen gene providing competition between inhibitory and stimulatory activities localized in that gene. Numerical simulations show several interesting dynamics, multi-stability of limit cycle with stable steady-state, multi-stability of different stable steady-states, limit cycle with period-doubling and reverse period-doubling, and infinite period bifurcation transitions for both increasing and decreasing strength of quorum sensing feedback. We design an electronic analog of the repressilator with quorum sensing feedback and reproduce, in experiment, the numerically predicted dynamical features of the system. Noise amplification near infinite period bifurcation is also observed. An important feature of the electronic design is the accessibility and control of the important system parameters. PMID:23658793

  13. Feedbacks and the coevolution of plants and atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Beerling, David J; Berner, Robert A

    2005-02-01

    The coupled evolution of land plants, CO2, and climate over the last half billion years has maintained atmospheric CO2 concentrations within finite limits, indicating the involvement of a complex network of geophysiological feedbacks. But insight into this important regulatory network is extremely limited. Here we present a systems analysis of the physiological and geochemical processes involved, identifying new positive and negative feedbacks between plants and CO2 on geological time scales. Positive feedbacks accelerated falling CO2 concentrations during the evolution and diversification of terrestrial ecosystems in the Paleozoic and enhanced rising CO2 concentrations across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary during flood basalt eruptions. The existence of positive feedbacks reveals the unexpected destabilizing influence of the biota in climate regulation that led to environmental modifications accelerating rates of terrestrial plant and animal evolution in the Paleozoic.

  14. Managing uncertainty in soil carbon feedbacks to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Wieder, William R.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Fierer, Noah; Raymond, Peter A.; Crowther, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Planetary warming may be exacerbated if it accelerates loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere. This carbon-cycle-climate feedback is included in climate projections. Yet, despite ancillary data supporting a positive feedback, there is limited evidence for soil carbon loss under warming. The low confidence engendered in feedback projections is reduced further by the common representation in models of an outdated knowledge of soil carbon turnover. 'Model-knowledge integration' -- representing in models an advanced understanding of soil carbon stabilization -- is the first step to build confidence. This will inform experiments that further increase confidence by resolving competing mechanisms that most influence projected soil-carbon stocks. Improving feedback projections is an imperative for establishing greenhouse gas emission targets that limit climate change.

  15. Portable Dextrous Force Feedback Master for robot telemanipulation (PDMFF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdea, Grigore C.; Speeter, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    A major drawback of open loop masters is a lack of force feedback, limiting their ability to perform complex tasks such as assembly and repair. Researchers present a simple dextrous force feedback master for computer assisted telemanipulation. The device is compact, portable and can be held in the operator hand, without the need for a special joystick or console. The system is capable of both position feed forward and force feedback, using electronic position sensors and a pneumatic micro-actuator. The level of forces exercised by the pneumatic actuator is such that near rigidity may be attained. Experimental results showing good system linearity and small time lag are given.

  16. Torque feedback transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.L.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes an infinitely variable transmission of inline configuration for interconnecting a primer mover with a load for clutch free operation in a range of speed including hydraulic neutral comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears supported by a planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the sun gear being connected mechanically to the load, output shaft means for joining the sun gear to the load; b. variable torque feedback means comprising (i) a variable displacement hydraulic motor whose rotor shaft is in line with the output shaft means and drivingly connected to the prime mover and the planetary gear carrier during the full range of operation of the transmission, and (ii) a fixed displacement hydraulic pump connected hydraulically to the motor, the rotor shaft of the pump being connected mechanically to the ring gear and being axially displaced from the output shaft means; c. means for adjusting the displacement volume within the hydraulic motor for controlling the torque feedback in the transmission to provide infinitely variable coupling between the prime mover and the load over the full range of the transmission including hydraulic neutral; d. a speed reducer between the primer mover and the motor rotor shaft and a speed multiplier between the sun gear and the load; and e. mechanical transmission assembly means between the speed multiplier and the load in line with the motor rotor shaft and the output shaft means for providing selection of drive, reverse, park, and neutral.

  17. Haptic gas pedal feedback.

    PubMed

    Mulder, M; Mulder, M; van Paassen, M M; Abbink, D A

    2008-11-01

    Active driver support systems either automate a control task or present warnings to drivers when their safety is seriously degraded. In a novel approach, utilising neither automation nor discrete warnings, a haptic gas pedal (accelerator) interface was developed that continuously presents car-following support information, keeping the driver in the loop. This interface was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator. Twenty-one drivers between the ages of 24 and 30 years participated in a driving experiment to investigate the effects of haptic gas pedal feedback on car-following behaviour. Results of the experiment indicate that when haptic feedback was presented to the drivers, some improvement in car-following performance was achieved, while control activity decreased. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of the system in more varied driving conditions. Haptics is an under-used modality in the application of human support interfaces, which usually draw on vision or hearing. This study demonstrates how haptics can be used to create an effective driver support interface.

  18. Feedback in clinical medical education.

    PubMed

    Ende, J

    1983-08-12

    In the setting of clinical medical education, feedback refers to information describing students' or house officers' performance in a given activity that is intended to guide their future performance in that same or in a related activity. It is a key step in the acquisition of clinical skills, yet feedback is often omitted or handled improperly in clinical training. This can result in important untoward consequences, some of which may extend beyond the training period. Once the nature of the feedback process is appreciated, however, especially the distinction between feedback and evaluation and the importance of focusing on the trainees' observable behaviors rather than on the trainees themselves, the educational benefit of feedback can be realized. This article presents guidelines for offering feedback that have been set forth in the literature of business administration, psychology, and education, adapted here for use by teachers and students of clinical medicine.

  19. The Effect of Negative Feedback Loops on the Dynamics of Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Eduardo; Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Jarrah, Abdul Salam

    2008-01-01

    Feedback loops play an important role in determining the dynamics of biological networks. To study the role of negative feedback loops, this article introduces the notion of distance-to-positive-feedback which, in essence, captures the number of independent negative feedback loops in the network, a property inherent in the network topology. Through a computational study using Boolean networks, it is shown that distance-to-positive-feedback has a strong influence on network dynamics and correlates very well with the number and length of limit cycles in the phase space of the network. To be precise, it is shown that, as the number of independent negative feedback loops increases, the number (length) of limit cycles tends to decrease (increase). These conclusions are consistent with the fact that certain natural biological networks exhibit generally regular behavior and have fewer negative feedback loops than randomized networks with the same number of nodes and same connectivity. PMID:18375509

  20. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  1. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  2. Modeling climate related feedback processes

    SciTech Connect

    Elzen, M.G.J. den; Rotmans, J. )

    1993-11-01

    In order to assess their impact, the feedbacks which at present can be quantified reasonably are built into the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE). Unlike previous studies, this study describes the scenario- and time-dependent role of biogeochemical feedbacks. A number of simulation experiments are performed with IMAGE to project climate changes. Besides estimates of their absolute importance, the relative importance of individual biogeochemical feedbacks is considered by calculating the gain for each feedback process. This study focuses on feedback processes in the carbon cycle and the methane (semi-) cycle. Modeled feedbacks are then used to balance the past and present carbon budget. This results in substantially lower projections for atmospheric carbon dioxide than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates. The difference is approximately 18% from the 1990 level for the IPCC [open quotes]Business-as-Usual[close quotes] scenario. Furthermore, the IPCC's [open quotes]best guess[close quotes] value of the CO[sub 2] concentration in the year 2100 falls outside the uncertainty range estimated with our balanced modeling approach. For the IPCC [open quotes]Business-as-Usual[close quotes] scenario, the calculated total gain of the feedbacks within the carbon cycle appears to be negative, a result of the dominant role of the fertilization feedback. This study also shows that if temperature feedbacks on methane emissions from wetlands, rice paddies, and hydrates do materialize, methane concentrations might be increased by 30% by 2100. 70 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. A laser feedback interferometer with an oscillating feedback mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Guang-Zong

    2012-11-01

    A method is proposed to solve the problem of direction discrimination for laser feedback interferometers. By vibrating the feedback mirror with a small-amplitude and high-frequency sine wave, laser intensity is modulated accordingly. The modulation amplitude can be extracted using a phase sensitive detector (PSD). When the feedback mirror moves, the PSD output shows a quasi-sine waveform similar to a laser intensity interference fringe but with a phase difference of approximately ±π/2. If the movement direction of the feedback mirror changes, the phase difference sign reverses. Therefore, the laser feedback interferometer offers a potential application in displacement measurement with a resolution of 1/8 wavelength and in-time direction discrimination. Without using optical components such as polarization beam splitters and wave plates, the interferometer is very simple, easy to align, and less costly.

  4. Multi-Antenna Radar Systems for Doppler Rain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen; Tanelli, Simone; Siqueira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Use of multiple-antenna radar systems aboard moving high-altitude platforms has been proposed for measuring rainfall. The basic principle of the proposed systems is a variant of that of along-track interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems used previously to measure ocean waves and currents.

  5. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  6. Managing Residential Electricity Demand Through Provision of Better Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Myles

    New and affordable technology for providing detailed feedback on household electricity usage presents a host of opportunities for utilities and policy-makers to manage demand. This dissertation examines ways to use these devices to reduce - and shift the timing of - energy use in the residential sector by influencing consumers' behavior. The first portion of the study analyzes the impact of programmable thermostats (PTs) on energy use, focusing on residents' knowledge of climate control settings in the dwelling. I found that of households with natural gas heating systems, young households with PTs used 17 percent less heating energy on average. In addition, residents who did not know their thermostat settings tended to use 10 percent more energy for heating. The main portion of the dissertation focuses specifically on the potential for better feedback on electricity usage to reduce household energy consumption. The existing literature suggests that feedback can reduce electricity consumption in homes by 5 to 20 percent, but that significant uncertainties remain in our knowledge of the effectiveness of feedback. These uncertainties include the variation in feedback effectiveness between demographic groups and consumers in different climate regions. This analysis uses these uncertainties to perform an exploratory analysis to determine the conditions under which the benefits of feedback outweigh the costs and to compare the cost-effectiveness of providing feedback against that of other DSM programs. I found that benefits would likely outweigh costs for enhanced monthly billing and real-time feedback and that cost-effectiveness was superior to that of other DSM programs for these types of feedback. For feedback that is disaggregated by appliance type, cost effectiveness was competitive with other DSM programs under a limited set of cases. This study also examines how energy consumption devices should display feedback on GHG emissions from electricity use under a real

  7. Implementation and Tuning of an Optical Tweezers Force-Clamp Feedback System.

    PubMed

    Bugiel, Michael; Jannasch, Anita; Schäffer, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Feedback systems can be used to control the value of a system variable. In optical tweezers, active feedback is often implemented to either keep the position or tension applied to a single biomolecule constant. Here, we describe the implementation of the latter: an optical force-clamp setup that can be used to study the motion of processive molecular motors under a constant load. We describe the basics of a software-implemented proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, how to tune it, and how to determine its optimal feedback rate. Limitations, possible feed-forward applications, and extensions into two- and three-dimensional optical force clamps are discussed. The feedback is ultimately limited by thermal fluctuations and the compliance of the involved molecules. To investigate a particular mechanical process, understanding the basics and limitations of the feedback system will be helpful for choosing the proper feedback hardware, for optimizing the system parameters, and for the design of the experiment.

  8. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  9. Feedback Seeking in Training Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinke, K. Peter

    The role of feedback in training settings was examined in a survey-based study of feedback in nine 5-day management development training courses in a United Kingdom government agency. The courses followed a highly standardized curriculum and delivery process. Although the courses were primarily instructor-and theory-centered, they also included…

  10. Interpersonal Feedback: Origins and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbour, Alton

    This paper identifies the origins of the concept of feedback and its entry into the interpersonal communication literature as a social science variable. It touches on why feedback might be important in interpersonal relations, what it consists of, some of the relevant research, and some possible dangers or misuses. It speaks to how the process of…

  11. Haptic feedback helps bipedal coordination.

    PubMed

    Roelofsen, Eefje G J; Bosga, Jurjen; Rosenbaum, David A; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Hullegie, Wim; van Cingel, Robert; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated whether special haptic or visual feedback would facilitate the coordination of in-phase, cyclical feet movements of different amplitudes. Seventeen healthy participants sat with their feet on sliding panels that were moved externally over the same or different amplitudes. The participants were asked to generate simultaneous knee flexion-extension movements, or to let their feet be dragged, resulting in reference foot displacements of 150 mm and experimental foot displacements of 150, 120, or 90 mm. Four types of feedback were given: (1) special haptic feedback, involving actively following the motions of the sliders manipulated by two confederates, (2) haptic feedback resulting from passive motion, (3) veridical visual feedback, and (4) enhanced visual feedback. Both with respect to amplitude assimilation effects, correlations and standard deviation of relative phase, the results showed that enhanced visual feedback did not facilitate bipedal independence, but haptic feedback with active movement did. Implications of the findings for movement rehabilitation contexts are discussed.

  12. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  13. Motivating Students through Formative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauch, Lois

    2007-01-01

    Technology tools that are used to help apply standards and benchmarks motivate physical educators to use new methods of teaching, and create new ways to provide students with direct formative feedback, the number one motivator for students. Direct formative feedback refers to verbal communication between the teacher and/or parent and student. The…

  14. Feedback Control for Aerodynamics (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TP-2006-348 FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR AERODYNAMICS (PREPRINT) R. Chris Camphouse, Seddik M. Djouadi, and James H. Myatt...CONSTRUCTION FOR THE DESIGN OF BOUNDARY FEEDBACK CONTROLS FROM REDUCED ORDER MODELS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0601102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...

  15. Feedback: Implications for Further Research and Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishikawa, Sue S.

    This report reviews current literature on feedback and suggests practical implications of feedback research for educators. A definition of feedback is offered, and past definitions in prior research are noted. An analysis of the current state of knowledge of feedback discusses the historical development of feedback theory and suggests that…

  16. The Sound of Feedback in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback…

  17. Attributes of an Effective Feedback Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Not all feedback is created equal. It is actually quite uneven in its design and effectiveness. Feedback forms typically used by educators and the feedback process used to support learning have markedly different attributes. Understanding the key attributes of effective feedback is important for those involved in the feedback process. The tools…

  18. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  19. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  20. Environmental disasters: preparing for impact assessments and operational feedback.

    PubMed

    Verger, Pierre; Bard, Denis; Noiville, Christine; Lahidji, Reza

    2008-01-01

    On March 24, 2006, the French Minister of Environment asked the Committee for Prevention and Precaution (CPP), an independent multidisciplinary committee created in 1996, to conduct a methodological analysis of operational feedback of natural and technological disasters to determine if France is equipped to collect the information and data necessary for the assessment, and optimal management of a disaster and its consequences. The Committee's analysis was based on the testimony it heard from 13 experts--scientists and representatives of associations and advocacy groups--and its review of the literature, including operational feedback reports. Its response to the Minister focused on the assessment of the health, social, environmental, and economic impacts of disasters and on their operational feedback (defined as the systematic analysis of a past event to draw lessons for the management of the risk), as practiced in France. It presents the results of the literature review about the consequences of disasters, expert's views on the current utility and limitations of impact assessments and operational feedback, the CPP's discussion of these results, and its recommendations to improve impact assessment and operational feedback of disasters. These recommendations cover preparation for and activation of data collection and operational feedback, financial provisions, coordination of stakeholders, education and training in disaster preparedness, and the distribution and use of data from operational feedback.

  1. Triggering star formation by both radiative and mechanical AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Gan, Zhao-Ming; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2013-08-01

    We perform two dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations to study the positive active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback which triggers, rather than suppresses, star formation. Recently, it was shown by Nayakshin et al. and Ishibashi et al. that star formation occurs when the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is squeezed by the impact of mass outflow or radiation pressure, respectively. Mass outflow is ubiquitous in this astrophysical context, and radiation pressure is also important if the AGN is luminous. For the first time in this subject, we incorporate both mass outflow feedback and radiative feedback into our model. Consequently, the ISM is shocked into shells by the AGN feedback, and these shells soon fragment into clumps and filaments because of Rayleigh-Taylor and thermal instabilities. We have two major findings: (1) the star formation rate can indeed be very large in the clumps and filaments. However, the resultant star formation rate density is too large compared with previous works, which is mainly because we ignore the fact that most of the stars that are formed would be disrupted when they move away from the galactic center. (2) Although radiation pressure feedback has a limited effect, when mass outflow feedback is also included, they reinforce each other. Specifically, in the gas-poor case, mass outflow is always the dominant contributor to feedback.

  2. Tuneable vibration absorber using acceleration and displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alujević, N.; Tomac, I.; Gardonio, P.

    2012-06-01

    This study is concerned with the analysis and design of a tuneable vibration absorber, which is composed by a flexible beam with a clamping block in the middle and two masses symmetrically mounted at the two ends. The free length of the beam is used to accommodate piezoelectric strain actuators. The two masses at the ends are equipped with inertial accelerometers. This arrangement is used to generate two independent acceleration feedback control loops that produce virtual mass effects, which shift the absorbing frequency of the device. Another arrangement is also studied where the two accelerometer outputs are time-integrated twice in order to implement displacement feedback loops that change the beam stiffness to shift the characteristic frequency of the device. The two feedback approaches are first analysed theoretically, using a mobility-impedance model, and then experimentally on a prototype absorber unit. The stability of the feedback loops is studied using the Nyquist criterion in order to estimate the limits on the tuneable range of frequencies which are set by the maximum stable feedback gains. The study indicates that the stability margins for the acceleration feedback loops substantially depend on the application of an appropriate low-pass filter. On the contrary, the implementation of displacement feedback gives better stability margins.

  3. Time-Delay Systems with Band-Limited Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    1998] and theoretically [Ikeda, 1979; Nardone , 1986; Ikeda, 1987; Hale, 1996; Giannakopoulos, 1999; Nizette, 2004; Erneux, 2004], starting in 1979 with...large delays (τ τl) [ Nardone , 1986; Erneux, 2004]. Since high-pass filter- ing, in contrast, results in a stability boundary where the mode at...Lett., 78, pp. 1496-1498. Nardone , P. Mandel, P. and Kapral, R. (1986) Analysis of a delay-differential equation in optical bistability, Phys. Rev. A, 33

  4. "This Is Not What I Need": Conflicting Assessment Feedback Beliefs in a Post-Secondary Institution in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    To, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Exploring students' perspective on feedback is high on the research agenda following the comparatively lower satisfaction scores for assessment and feedback in the National Student Survey. However, limited research examines how teachers and students perceive the same feedback events in the post-secondary context. This case study fills the gap by…

  5. Feedback on the Feedback: Sociocultural Interpretation of Saudi ESL Learners' Opinions about Writing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustafa, Rami F.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study employed informal conversational interviews and semi-structured individual interviews to capture the Saudi students' opinions about the feedback they receive, and about their perceptions on what constitutes helpful feedback. Sociocultural theory was used as the framework of this study. The findings suggest that the Saudi…

  6. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of…

  7. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy.

  8. Children's reasoning about evaluative feedback.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gail D; Fu, Genyue; Sweet, Monica A; Lee, Kang

    2009-11-01

    Children's reasoning about the willingness of peers to convey accurate positive and negative performance feedback to others was investigated among a total of 179 6- to 11-year-olds from the USA and China. In Study 1, which was conducted in the USA only, participants responded that peers would be more likely to provide positive feedback than negative feedback, and this tendency was strongest among the younger children. In Study 2, the expectation that peers would preferentially disclose positive feedback was replicated among children from the USA, and was also seen among younger but not older children from China. Participants in all groups took the relationship between communication partners into account when predicting whether peers would express evaluative feedback. Results of open-ended responses suggested cross-cultural differences, including a greater emphasis by Chinese children on the implications of evaluative feedback for future performance, and reference by some older Chinese children to the possibility that positive feedback might make the recipient 'too proud'.

  9. On feedback and stable price adjustment mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Anaya, Guillermo; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Ibarra-Valdez, Carlos

    2007-04-01

    Given an excess demand function of an economy, say Z(p), a stable price adjustment mechanism (SPAM) guarantees convergence of solution path p(t,p0) to an equilibrium peq solution of Z(p)=0. Besides, all equilibrium points of Z(p) are asymptotically stable. Some SPAMs have been proposed, including Newton and transpose Jacobian methods. Despite this powerful stability property of SPAMs, their acceptation in the economics community has been limited by a lack of interpretation. This paper focuses on this issue. Specifically, feedback control theory is used to link SPAMs and price dynamics models with control inputs, which match the economically intuitive Walrasian Hypothesis (i.e., prices change with excess demand sign). Under mild conditions, it is shown the existence of a feedback function that transforms the price dynamics into a desired SPAM. Hence, a SPAM is interpreted as a fundamental (e.g., Walrasian) price dynamics under the action of a feedback function aimed to stabilize the equilibrium set of the excess demand function.

  10. Robust Control Feedback and Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-30

    98-1-0026 5b. GRANT NUMBER Robust Control, Feedback and Learning F49620-98-1-0026 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Michael G...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report: ROBUST CONTROL FEEDBACK AND LEARNING AFOSR Grant F49620-98-1-0026 October 1...Philadelphia, PA, 2000. [16] M. G. Safonov. Recent advances in robust control, feedback and learning . In S. 0. R. Moheimani, editor, Perspectives in Robust

  11. Global Orbit Feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.

    2010-05-23

    For improved reproducibility of good operating conditions and ramp commissioning efficiency, new dual-plane slow orbit feedback during the energy ramp was implemented during run-10 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The orbit feedback is based on steering the measured orbit, after subtraction of the dispersive component, to either a design orbit or to a previously saved reference orbit. Using multiple correctors and beam position monitors, an SVD-based algorithm is used for determination of the applied corrections. The online model is used as a basis for matrix computations. In this report we describe the feedback design, review the changes made to realize its implementation, and assess system performance.

  12. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  13. Feedback Augmented Sub-Ranging (FASR) Quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guilligan, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is intended to reduce the size, power, and complexity of pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) that require high resolution and speed along with low power. Digitizers are important components in any application where analog signals (such as light, sound, temperature, etc.) need to be digitally processed. The innovation implements amplification of a sampled residual voltage in a switched capacitor amplifier stage that does not depend on charge redistribution. The result is less sensitive to capacitor mismatches that cause gain errors, which are the main limitation of such amplifiers in pipeline ADCs. The residual errors due to mismatch are reduced by at least a factor of 16, which is equivalent to at least 4 bits of improvement. The settling time is also faster because of a higher feedback factor. In traditional switched capacitor residue amplifiers, closed-loop amplification of a sampled and held residue signal is achieved by redistributing sampled charge onto a feedback capacitor around a high-gain transconductance amplifier. The residual charge that was sampled during the acquisition or sampling phase is stored on two or more capacitors, often equal in value or integral multiples of each other. During the hold or amplification phase, all of the charge is redistributed onto one capacitor in the feedback loop of the amplifier to produce an amplified voltage. The key error source is the non-ideal ratios of feedback and input capacitors caused by manufacturing tolerances, called mismatches. The mismatches cause non-ideal closed-loop gain, leading to higher differential non-linearity. Traditional solutions to the mismatch errors are to use larger capacitor values (than dictated by thermal noise requirements) and/or complex calibration schemes, both of which increase the die size and power dissipation. The key features of this innovation are (1) the elimination of the need for charge redistribution to achieve an accurate closed-loop gain of two

  14. Oscillation onset in neural delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper studies dynamical aspects of neural systems with delayed negative feedback modelled by nonlinear delay-differential equations. These systems undergo a Hopf bifurcation from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle oscillation as certain parameters are varied. We show that their frequency of oscillation is robust to parameter variations and noisy fluctuations, a property that makes these systems good candidates for pacemakers. The onset of oscillation is postponed by both additive and parametric noise in the sense that the state variable spends more time near the fixed point. Finally, we show that a distributed delay (rather than a fixed delay) also stabilizes the fixed point solution. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Ghrelin and feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is produced primarily in the stomach in response to hunger, and circulates in the blood. Plasma ghrelin levels increase during fasting and decrease after ingesting glucose and lipid, but not protein. The efferent vagus nerve contributes to the fasting-induced increase in ghrelin secretion. Ghrelin secreted by the stomach stimulates the afferent vagus nerve and promotes food intake. Ghrelin also stimulates pituitary gland secretion of growth hormone (GH) via the afferent vagus nerve. GH inhibits stomach ghrelin secretion. These findings indicate that the vagal circuit between the central nervous system and stomach has a crucial role in regulating plasma ghrelin levels. Moreover, body mass index modulates plasma ghrelin levels. In a lean state and anorexia nervosa, plasma ghrelin levels are increased, whereas in obesity, except in Prader-Willi syndrome, plasma ghrelin levels are decreased and the feeding- and sleeping-induced decline in plasma ghrelin levels is disrupted. There are two forms of ghrelin: active n-octanoyl-modified ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin. Fasting increases both ghrelin types compared with the fed state. Hyperphagia and obesity are likely to decrease plasma des-acyl ghrelin, but not n-octanoyl-modified ghrelin levels. Hypothalamic serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 and serotonin 5-HT2C/1B receptor gene expression levels are likely to be proportional to plasma des-acyl ghrelin levels during fasting, whereas they are likely to be inversely proportional to plasma des-acyl ghrelin levels in an increased energy storage state such as obesity. Thus, a dysfunction of the ghrelin feedback systems might contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity and eating disorders.

  16. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  17. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Wang, Yong-Ji; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to [Formula: see text] at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a [Formula: see text] uncertainty to the G value.

  18. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  19. Thermodynamics of feedback controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F. J.; Feito, M.

    2009-04-01

    We compute the entropy reduction in feedback controlled systems due to the repeated operation of the controller. This was the lacking ingredient to establish the thermodynamics of these systems, and in particular of Maxwell’s demons. We illustrate some of the consequences of our general results by deriving the maximum work that can be extracted from isothermal feedback controlled systems. As a case example, we finally study a simple system that performs an isothermal information-fueled particle pumping.

  20. Bisensory force feedback in telerobotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lorraine E. P.

    2001-11-01

    Effectively controlling a robot remotely to perform a desired task---teleoperation---offers benefits in improving human safety, reducing workload, providing location accessibility, and in convenience. Because these benefits become more evident under the extreme environmental conditions of space operations, NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching the usage of and improvements in teleoperations. Teleoperator task performance has been shown to improve with the addition of sensory feedback. In particular, providing force-feedback to a human operator, has been shown to decrease task completion times and lessen potentially damaging contact forces between the slave robot and its target work environment. We summarize the design, development, and usage of a human interface system built to provide position control as well as both kinesthetic and visual six-axis force-feedback displays to a human teleoperator of a remote manipulator. The system developed is utilized as an experimentation platform evaluating the merit of providing force feedback through both kinesthetic (muscular position and force) and substituted visual displays on a typical space operations task utilizing an anthropomorphic slave robot called "Robonaut". Teleoperator performance of a drill task is measured under four different display scenarios: no force display, visual force display, kinesthetic, and both. Task completion times and contact forces are measured, and subjective questionnaire responses collected. Our results indicate lower maximum force/torque, lower cumulative force/torque, and a greater task consistency with any type of feedback, with no significant differences in task completion time. Cumulative force/torque was reduced between 46--51% with visually substituted force feedback, 69--81% with kinesthetic feedback and 63--92% with both forms of feedback. Maximum force/torque variance between subjects was reduced between 61--90% with any type of force display, indicating improved

  1. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developed in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. With the help of Meteo France datas and experts, Predict services helps local communities and companies in decision making for flood management. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which

  2. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developped in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which are responsible of the transmission of meteorological alert and of rescue actions. In the crossing of the géo-information stemming from the

  3. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  4. Effects of invalid feedback on learning and feedback-related brain activity in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2015-10-01

    For adaptive decision-making it is important to utilize only relevant, valid and to ignore irrelevant feedback. The present study investigated how feedback processing in decision-making is impaired when relevant feedback is combined with irrelevant and potentially invalid feedback. We analyzed two electrophysiological markers of feedback processing, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300, in a simple decision-making task, in which participants processed feedback stimuli consisting of relevant and irrelevant feedback provided by the color and meaning of a Stroop stimulus. We found that invalid, irrelevant feedback not only impaired learning, it also altered the amplitude of the P300 to relevant feedback, suggesting an interfering effect of irrelevant feedback on the processing of relevant feedback. In contrast, no such effect on the FRN was obtained. These results indicate that detrimental effects of invalid, irrelevant feedback result from failures of controlled feedback processing.

  5. Pinhole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J

    2004-05-17

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam e{sup -}e{sup -} e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamsstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on L. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important--especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our ''pin-hole'' camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  6. Automatic noise limiter-blanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A blanker system that may be used with audio noise limiters or automatic noise limiters was described. The system employs a pair of silicon diodes and two RC filters connected across the feedback impedance of an operational amplifier so as to counteract impulse noise interference caused by local spherics activity or 60 Hz harmonics radiated from ac motor control systems. The following information is given: circuit diagram and description, operating details, evaluation, discussion of other noise blanking methods.

  7. Multimedia as a Means to Enhance Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsutsui, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Interactive feedback, the most common feedback method for oral performance, cannot be used in activities that do not allow for instructor-student interaction, such as speeches and presentations, where feedback should occur after the performance. The conventional ways of providing post-performance or delayed feedback, however, are neither efficient…

  8. Dynamics of Team Reflexivity after Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabelica, Catherine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A great deal of work has been generated on feedback in teams and has shown that giving performance feedback to teams is not sufficient to improve performance. To achieve the potential of feedback, it is stated that teams need to proactively process this feedback and thus collectively evaluate their performance and strategies, look for…

  9. Electromyograph Feedback as a Relaxation Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coursey, Robert D.

    1975-01-01

    An electromyograph (EMG) feedback group of 10 normal undergraduate males received variable-tone feedback from the frontalis muscle. Comparisons showed that the feedback group achieved significantly lower EMG scores than the two control groups, but only one of the six measures of state anxiety favored the feedback group over the controls. (Author)

  10. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective thinking. A…

  11. Audiotape Feedback for Essays in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twelve students writing essays for a photochemistry course at the Open University of the Netherlands received either audiocasette or written feedback. Time spent in recording versus writing feedback differed minimally. Recorded feedback was considerably greater in amount. Students' final grades did not differ, but recorded feedback was more…

  12. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  13. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  14. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  15. Seeing the risks of multiple Arctic amplifying feedbacks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are several potentially very large sources of Arctic amplifying feedbacks that have been identified. They present a great risk to the future as they could become self and inter-reinforcing with uncontrollable knock-on, or cascading risks. This has been called a domino effect risk by Carlos Duarte. Because of already committed global warming and the millennial duration of global warming, these are highly policy relevant. These Arctic feedback processes are now all operant with emissions of carbon dioxide methane and nitrous oxide detected. The extent of the risks from these feedback sources are not obvious or easy to understand by policy makers and the public. They are recorded in the IPCC AR5 as potential tipping points, as is the irreversibility of permafrost thaw. Some of them are not accounted for in the IPCC AR5 global warming projections because of quantitative uncertainty. UNEP issued a 2012 report (Policy Implications of Thawing Permafrost) advising that by omitting carbon feedback emissions from permafrost, carbon budget calculations by err on the low side. There is the other unassessed issue of a global warming safety limit for preventing uncontrollable increasing Arctic feedback emissions. Along with our paper, we provide illustrations of the Arctic feedback sources and processes from satellite imagery and flow charts that allows for their qualitative consideration. We rely on the IPCC assessments, the 2012 paper Possible role of wetlands permafrost can methane hydrates in the methane cycle under future climate change; a review, by Fiona M. O'Connor et al., and build on the WWF 2009 Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications. The potential sources of Arctic feedback processes identified include: Arctic and Far North snow albedo decline, Arctic summer sea ice albedo decline, Greenland summer ice surface melting albedo loss, albedo decline by replacement of Arctic tundra with forest, tundra fires, Boreal forest fires, Boreal forest die

  16. Single photon delayed feedback: a way to stabilize intrinsic quantum cavity electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Carmele, Alexander; Kabuss, Julia; Schulze, Franz; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Knorr, Andreas

    2013-01-04

    We propose a scheme to control cavity quantum electrodynamics in the single photon limit by delayed feedback. In our approach a single emitter-cavity system, operating in the weak coupling limit, can be driven into the strong coupling-type regime by an external mirror: The external loop produces Rabi oscillations directly connected to the electron-photon coupling strength. As an expansion of typical cavity quantum electrodynamics, we treat the quantum correlation of external and internal light modes dynamically and demonstrate a possible way to implement a fully quantum mechanical time-delayed feedback. Our theoretical approach proposes a way to experimentally feedback control quantum correlations in the single photon limit.

  17. Constructing a Multimedia Mobile Classroom Using a Novel Feedback System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wen-Chen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Weng, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the conventional classroom, many obstacles hinder interaction between an instructor and students, such as limited class hours, fixed seating, and inadequate time for meetings after class. This work develops a novel multimedia mobile classroom feedback system (MMCFS) that instantly displays students' responses, such as class-related questions or…

  18. Using Computer-Based Technology to Improve Feedback to Staff and Students on MCQ Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malau-Aduli, Bunmi S.; Assenheimer, Dwight; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Zimitat, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The massification of higher education (HE) has led to an unprecedented increase in the number of students in the classrooms, resulting in increased workload for teaching staff, sometimes leading to a great reliance on Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) examinations with limited feedback provided to students. The central role of feedback in student…

  19. Individual Differences and the Effectiveness of Visual Feedback on Reflexive Binding in L2 Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Rebecca Raewyn

    2011-01-01

    Second language acquisition research into the effects of corrective feedback has investigated a variety of learning targets using a wide range of implicit and explicit feedback types (Li, 2010). To date, however, its linguistic focus has been limited to theoretically noticeable surface features (Carroll, 2001; Schmidt, 2001), and researchers have…

  20. Flemish Primary Teachers' Use of School Performance Feedback and the Relationship with School Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhoof, Jan; Verhaeghe, Goedele; Van Petegem, Peter; Valcke, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Schools are increasingly confronted with the challenges that information about school performance brings with it. It is common for schools' use of performance feedback to be limited. Equally, however, there are documented cases in which school performance feedback is meaningfully used. Purpose: This study looks at how Flemish primary…

  1. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  2. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  3. Parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian

    2013-12-15

    We present a parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometer based on spatial multiplexing which avoids the signal crosstalk in the former feedback interferometer. The interferometer outputs two close parallel laser beams, whose frequencies are shifted by two acousto-optic modulators by 2Ω simultaneously. A static reference mirror is inserted into one of the optical paths as the reference optical path. The other beam impinges on the target as the measurement optical path. Phase variations of the two feedback laser beams are simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with two different detectors. Their subtraction accurately reflects the target displacement. Under typical room conditions, experimental results show a resolution of 1.6 nm and accuracy of 7.8 nm within the range of 100 μm.

  4. Ergonomics of laparoscopic graspers and the importance of haptic feedback: the surgeons' perspective.

    PubMed

    Alleblas, Chantal C J; Vleugels, Michel P H; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2016-01-01

    Haptic feedback is drastically reduced in laparoscopic surgery compared to open surgery. Introducing enhanced haptic feedback in laparoscopic instruments might well improve surgical safety and efficiency. In the design process of a laparoscopic grasper with enhanced haptic feedback, handle design should be addressed to strive for optimal usability and comfort. Additionally, the surgeons' perspective on the potential benefits of haptic feedback should be assessed to ascertain the clinical interest of enhanced haptic feedback. A questionnaire was designed to determine surgeons' use and preferences for laparoscopic instruments and expectations about enhanced haptic feedback. Surgeons were also asked whether they experience physical complaints related to laparoscopic instruments. The questionnaire was distributed to a group of laparoscopic surgeons based in Europe. From the 279 contacted subjects, 98 completed the questionnaire (response rate 35 %). Of all respondents, 77 % reported physical complaints directly attributable to the use of laparoscopic instruments. No evident similarity in the main preference for graspers was found, either with or without haptic feedback. According to respondents, the added value of haptic feedback could be of particular use in feeling differences in tissue consistencies, feeling the applied pressure, locating a tumor or enlarged lymph node, feeling arterial pulse, and limiting strain in the surgeon's hand. This study stresses that the high prevalence of physical complaints directly related to laparoscopic instruments among laparoscopic surgeons is still relevant. Furthermore, the potential benefits of enhanced haptic feedback in laparoscopic surgery are recognized by laparoscopic specialists. Therefore, haptic feedback is considered an unmet need in laparoscopy.

  5. Temporal De-biasing of Behaviour in Residential Energy Consumption: Supporting Conservation Compliance Through Feedback Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Kevin

    Despite years of research in residential energy conservation, means of inducing conservation behaviour through feedback are not well understood. In this thesis I take a novel approach to feedback design by addressing temporal inconsistencies that may hinder individuals from forming an intention to conserve. To help understand conservation compliance strategies, I proposed a visual framework to categorize interventions. I present two design heuristics that were inspired by temporal construal theory (Liberman & Trope, 2003). They were the impetus for the design of three feedback display prototypes, which were examined. Due to methodological limitations, significant improvements to compliance were not found. However, evidence suggests that comparative feedback may have supported reasoning about conservation rather than supporting conservation compliance directly. Future work includes refinement of feedback displays to avoid direct comparisons, exploring the use of nature imagery, and the study of a possible interaction between environmental values and comparative feedback on compliance.

  6. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  7. Dynamic Feedback in Ferromagnet-Spin Hall Metal Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-08-01

    In ferromagnet-normal-metal heterostructures, spin pumping and spin-transfer torques are two reciprocal processes that occur concomitantly. Their interplay introduces a dynamic feedback effect interconnecting energy dissipation channels of both magnetization and current. By solving the spin diffusion process in the presence of the spin Hall effect in the normal metal, we show that the dynamic feedback gives rise to (i) a nonlinear magnetic damping that is crucial to sustain uniform steady-state oscillations of a spin Hall oscillator at large angles and (ii) a frequency-dependent spin Hall magnetoimpedance that reduces to the spin Hall magnetoresistance in the dc limit.

  8. Electrorheological Fluid Based Force Feedback Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeiffer, Charles; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Dolgin, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Parallel to the efforts to develop fully autonomous robots, it is increasingly being realized that there are applications where it is essential to have a fully controlled robot and "feel" its operating conditions, i.e. telepresence. This trend is a result of the increasing efforts to address tasks where humans can perform significantly better but, due to associated hazards, distance, physical limitations and other causes, only robots can be employed to perform these tasks. Such robots need to be assisted by a human that remotely controls the operation. To address the goal of operating robots as human surrogates, the authors launched a study of mechanisms that provide mechanical feedback. For this purpose, electrorheological fluids (ERF) are being investigated for the potential application as miniature haptic devices. This family of electroactive fluids has the property of changing the viscosity during electrical stimulation. Consequently, ERF can be used to produce force feedback haptic devices for tele-operated control of medical and space robotic systems. Forces applied at the robot end-effector due to a compliant environment are reflected to the user using an ERF device where a change in the system viscosity will occur proportionally to the transmitted force. Analytical model and control algorithms are being developed taking into account the non-linearities of these type of devices. This paper will describe the concept and the developed mechanism of ERF based force feedback. The test process and the physical properties of this device will be described and the results of preliminary tests will be presented.

  9. Optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: effective adjustment of the feedback-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habig, J. C.; Nadolny, J.; Meinen, J.; Saathoff, H.; Leisner, T.

    2012-02-01

    Optical-feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) is a very sensitive technique for the detection of trace amounts of gaseous absorbers. The most crucial parameter in an OF-CEAS setup is the optical phase of the light fed back into the laser source, which is usually controlled by the position of a piezo driven mirror. Various approaches for the analysis of the cavity transmitted light with respect to feedback-phase are presented, and tested on simulated phase and frequency dependent cavity transmission. Finally, we present the performance of a digital signal processor based regulator—employing one of these approaches—in a real OF-CEAS experiment. The results of the simulation show that several algorithms are well suited for the task of control signal generation. They confirm also that with the presented approach, a mode by mode correction of the feedback-phase is possible. Consequently, a regulatory bandwidth of 37 Hz was achieved. This maximum control frequency was limited by the piezo system.

  10. A cognitive neuroprosthetic that uses cortical stimulation for somatosensory feedback

    PubMed Central

    Klaes, Christian; Shi, Ying; Kellis, Spencer; Minxha, Juri; Revechkis, Boris; Andersen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Present day cortical brain machine interfaces (BMI) have made impressive advances using decoded brain signals to control extracorporeal devices. Although BMIs are used in a closed-loop fashion, sensory feedback typically is visual only. However medical case studies have shown that the loss of somesthesis in a limb greatly reduces the agility of the limb even when visual feedback is available (for review see Robles-De-La-Torre, 2006). To overcome this limitation, this study tested a closed-loop BMI that utilizes intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to provide ‘tactile’ sensation to a non-human primate (NHP). Using stimulation electrodes in Brodmann area 1 of somatosensory cortex (BA1) and recording electrodes in the anterior intraparietal area (AIP), the parietal reach region (PRR) and dorsal area 5 (area 5d), it was found that this form of feedback can be used in BMI tasks. PMID:25242377

  11. Deterministic Squeezed States with Joint Measurements and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Graham P.; Cox, Kevin C.; Wu, Baochen; Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Joint measurement of many qubits or atoms is a powerful way to create entanglement for precision measurement and quantum information science. However, the random quantum collapse resulting from the joint measurement also leads to randomness in which entangled state is created. We present an experiment in which we apply real-time feedback to eliminate the randomness generated during the joint measurement of 5 ×104 laser-cooled Rb atoms. The feedback effectively steers the quantum state to a desired squeezed state. After feedback, the final state achieves a directly observed phase resolution variance up to 7.4(6) dB below the standard quantum limit for unentangled atoms. The entanglement and improved measurement capability of these states can be realized without retaining knowledge of the joint measurement's outcome, possibly opening new applications for spin squeezed states generated via joint measurement.

  12. Negative feedback in genetic circuits confers evolutionary resilience and capacitance.

    PubMed

    Marciano, David C; Lua, Rhonald C; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Amin, Shivas R; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2014-06-26

    Natural selection for specific functions places limits upon the amino acid substitutions a protein can accept. Mechanisms that expand the range of tolerable amino acid substitutions include chaperones that can rescue destabilized proteins and additional stability-enhancing substitutions. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that is simple and uses a frequently encountered network motif. Computational and experimental evidence shows that the self-correcting, negative-feedback gene regulation motif increases repressor expression in response to deleterious mutations and thereby precisely restores repression of a target gene. Furthermore, this ability to rescue repressor function is observable across the Eubacteria kingdom through the greater accumulation of amino acid substitutions in negative-feedback transcription factors compared to genes they control. We propose that negative feedback represents a self-contained genetic canalization mechanism that preserves phenotype while permitting access to a wider range of functional genotypes.

  13. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  14. The Secret of Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    "The only important thing about feedback is what students do with it," declares Dylan Wiliam in this article. The standard school procedure (in which a teacher looks at a piece of student work and writes something on it, and the student later looks at what the teacher has written) does not necessarily increase student learning. Teachers…

  15. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  16. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  17. Educational Accountability and Policy Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, accountability policies have become more prominent in public K-12 education and have changed how teaching and learning are organized. It is less clear the extent to which these policies have altered the politics of education. This article begins to address that question through the lens of policy feedback. It identifies…

  18. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  19. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  20. Engineering the Feedback Dynamics of in vitro Synthetic Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua D.

    Building a biochemical system from scratch that rivals a living cell in ability to robustly perform many complex tasks in response to environmental signals is beyond the state-of-the- art. However, feedback is clearly a principle widely employed by cells---as it is by engineers---to enable robust dynamical behaviors, although a limited system-level understanding of feedback regulation and dynamical behavior in biochemical contexts hampers our ability to engineer such systems. Studying simple feedback systems in a rich, yet fully synthetic, biochemical context---like that provided by DNA nanotechnology---may therefore lead to a new state-of-the-art for synthetic biological systems. This thesis, in keeping with this philosophy, describes basic efforts in engineering bio- chemical feedback control systems in the form of simple, in vitro, nucleic-acid-based devices. I describe two such devices, which provide basic test-beds for engineering feedback dynamics in vitro. The first device is a DNA nanomotor, previously described in the literature, that is built from and operated by nucleic acid components, and that I modify by the introduction of a protein enzyme to improve the performance of the device in experimental tests. The second device I design and build from nucleic acid components and two protein enzymes to regulate the free quantity of an RNA molecule, which in turn can be used to dynamically drive the operation of other nucleic-acid-based systems---such as the first device---in a robust manner.

  1. Perception, Interpretation, and Impact of Health Risk Appraisal Feedback.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Kathryn; Simpson, Vicki; Hyner, Gerry

    2017-01-01

    One mandate of the Affordable Care Act is continued support of workplace wellness programs. A tool used to encourage behavior change is a health risk appraisal (HRA). However, research indicates there is limited benefit to HRAs unless supported by additional health interventions. The purpose of these two pilot studies was to examine effects of the individual HRA personalized feedback, including the perceived value of the feedback and its influence on behavior change. Six months after completing and receiving HRA personalized feedback, participants in two separate Indiana organizations answered survey questions about the HRA value, motivational influence, and ability to prompt behavior change. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, analyses of variance, and factor analysis were used to analyze the influence of various factors and test the relationship between HRA generated feedback and these characteristics. The majority of respondents indicated the HRA was helpful with 69% (Study 1, n = 51) and 63% (Study 2, n = 116) of the respondents reporting an attempted behavior change. Preliminary results indicate that completion of an HRA with feedback alone may be beneficial in prompting behavior change.

  2. Dynamic Spectrum Sharing with Limited Network State Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    possibly different) messages to a set of mobile receivers . We have studied limited feedback schemes for both single-user Orthogonal Frequency...in which the broadcast node sequentially receives feedback from the mobiles and decides when to stop receiving additional feedback and begin data...concerned with the costs and benefits of learning and exchanging Network State Information (NSI) among cooperative nodes in a wireless network. NSI

  3. What's Stopping Them? A Study of Teachers' Use of Formative Feedback with Students Learning in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Acknowledging the powerful that role formative feedback plays in learning, students who are training for professions in the clinical setting and learn while working alongside professionals in their field report that they receive limited feedback. Formative feedback helps students gauge progress, identify weaknesses, and improve performance as well…

  4. Use of the "Stop, Start, Continue" Method Is Associated with the Production of Constructive Qualitative Feedback by Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Alice; Oliver, Emily; Szpakowska, Kasia; Newton, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Students in higher education are increasingly asked to give feedback on their education experience, reflecting an increase in the importance attached to that feedback. Existing literature demonstrates that qualitative student feedback is valued and important, yet there has been limited evaluation of the means by which qualitative student feedback…

  5. Terrestrial ecosystem feedbacks to global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Lashof, D.A.; DeAngelo, B.J.; Saleska, S.R.; Harte, J.

    1997-12-31

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to induce changes in global climate that can alter ecosystems in ways that, in turn, may further affect climate. Such climate-ecosystem interactions can generate either positive or negative feedbacks to the climate system, thereby either enhancing or diminishing the magnitude of global climate change. Important terrestrial feedback mechanisms include CO{sub 2} fertilization (negative feedbacks), carbon storage in vegetation and soils (positive and negative feedbacks), vegetation albedo (positive feedbacks), and peatland methane emissions (positive and negative feedbacks). While the processes involved are complex, not readily quantifiable, and demonstrate both positive and negative feedback potential, the authors conclude that the combined effect of the feedback mechanisms reviewed here will likely amplify climate change relative to current projections that have not yet adequately incorporated these mechanisms. 162 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Investigating shareable feedback tags for programming assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Stephen; Burd, Liz; Hatch, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    This article presents an investigation into the usage of shareable feedback tags as a way of delivering feedback to three different cohorts of programming students. A series of research questions are examined; these include investigating any perceived benefit from students using feedback tags and exploring how students interact with their feedback. Results indicate that students with both the lower and higher marks in a cohort are more likely to opt to share their feedback and programming work than students with mid-ranged marks. A variety of reasons, both for and against sharing, given by students are discussed. Six categories of student behaviour exhibited during interaction with their feedback have been identified in this article. This article has shown that feedback tags can be used successfully as a form of shareable feedback and that a number of future research possibilities exist that can extend this topic.

  7. Toward Harnessing User Feedback For Machine Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-02

    feedback and to understand what kinds of feedback users could give . Users were shown explanations of machine learning predictions and asked to provide... learning algorithm. The results show that user feedback has the potential to significantly improve machine learning systems, but that learning ...machine learning predictions and asked to provide feedback to improve the predictions. We found that users had no difficulty providing generous amounts

  8. Plasmonic distributed feedback lasers at telecommunications wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Marell, Milan J H; Smalbrugge, Barry; Geluk, Erik Jan; van Veldhoven, Peter J; Barcones, Beatrix; Koopmans, Bert; Nötzel, Richard; Smit, Meint K; Hill, Martin T

    2011-08-01

    We investigate electrically pumped, distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, based on gap-plasmon mode metallic waveguides. The waveguides have nano-scale widths below the diffraction limit and incorporate vertical groove Bragg gratings. These metallic Bragg gratings provide a broad bandwidth stop band (~500 nm) with grating coupling coefficients of over 5000/cm. A strong suppression of spontaneous emission occurs in these Bragg grating cavities, over the stop band frequencies. This strong suppression manifests itself in our experimental results as a near absence of spontaneous emission and significantly reduced lasing thresholds when compared to similar length Fabry-Pérot waveguide cavities. Furthermore, the reduced threshold pumping requirements permits us to show strong line narrowing and super linear light current curves for these plasmon mode devices even at room temperature.

  9. Evolution model with a cumulative feedback coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The paper is concerned with a toy model that generalizes the standard Lotka-Volterra equation for a certain population by introducing a competition between instantaneous and accumulative, history-dependent nonlinear feedback the origin of which could be a contribution from any kind of mismanagement in the past. The results depend on the sign of that additional cumulative loss or gain term of strength λ. In case of a positive coupling the system offers a maximum gain achieved after a finite time but the population will die out in the long time limit. In this case the instantaneous loss term of strength u is irrelevant and the model exhibits an exact solution. In the opposite case λ<0 the time evolution of the system is terminated in a crash after ts provided u=0. This singularity after a finite time can be avoided if u≠0. The approach may well be of relevance for the qualitative understanding of more realistic descriptions.

  10. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  11. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  12. Using a Dialogical Approach to Examine Peer Feedback During Chemistry Investigative Task Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan Joo Seng, Mark; Hill, Mary

    2014-10-01

    Peer feedback is an inherent feature of classroom collaborative learning. Students invariably turn to their peers for feedback when carrying out an investigative task, and this feedback is usually implicit, unstructured and may positively or negatively influence students' learning when they work on a task. This study explored the characteristics of verbal peer feedback during a collaborative investigative chemistry task involving New Zealand Year 13 students. During the planning stage of the students' investigation, the discussions of five pairs of students were recorded and then transcribed. Analysis of transcribed verbal data focused on interactions that involved peer feedback along two dimensions, interactive/non-interactive and dialogic/authoritative (Mortimer and Scott, 2003). The findings indicated that although students adopted a predominantly interactive/authoritative communicative approach, with peer feedback as confirmation or evaluation, they are also capable of a more interactive/dialogic exchange, characterised by elaborative peer feedback. We discuss how this dialogic perspective on peer feedback provides an alternative approach to the analysis and study of student-student interactions during science investigations. The findings should be interpreted in light of the limitations in terms of sample size, grouping and specificity of the coding scheme. Implications for teacher practice are discussed in relation to facilitating peer feedback discourse in the science classroom.

  13. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  14. Analytical study of quantum-feedback-enhanced Rabi oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuss, Julia; Krimer, Dmitry O.; Rotter, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Knorr, Andreas; Carmele, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We present an analytical solution of the single-photon quantum feedback in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system based on a half-cavity setup coupled to a structured continuum. Our exact analytical expression constitutes an important benchmark for quantum-feedback models and allows us to unravel the necessary conditions for the previously reported numerical result that a single-emitter-cavity system, which is initially in the weak-coupling regime, can be driven into the strong-coupling regime via the proposed quantum-feedback mechanism [A. Carmele et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 013601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.013601]. We specify the phase relations between the cavity mode and the delay time and state explicitly the theoretical limit for a feedback effect in the single-photon regime. Via the photon-path representation, we prove that the stabilization phenomenon relies on a destructive interference effect and we discuss the stabilization time in the weak- and strong-coupling limits.

  15. Derepression and repression of the histidine operon: role of the feedback site of the first enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, V M; Martíndelrío, R; Tébar, A R; Guisán, J M; Ballesteros, A O

    1975-01-01

    Thiazolealanine, a false feedback inhibitor, causes transient repression of the his operon previously derepressed by a severe histidine limitation in strains with a wild-type or feedback-hypersensitive first enzyme but not in feedback-resistant mutants. Since experiments reported here clearly demonstrate that thiazolealanine is not transferred to tRNAHis, it is proposed that this "transient repression" is effected through the interaction of thiazolealanine with the feedback site of the enzyme. Experiments in the presence of rifampin indicate that this thiazolealanine-mediated effect is exerted at the level of translation. We conclude that histidine (free), in addition to forming co-repressor, also represses the operon at the level of translation through feedback interaction with the first enzyme of the pathway (adenosine 5'-triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase). Rates of derepression in feedback-resistant strains are roughly half of those observed in controls, suggesting a positive role played by a first enzyme with a normal but unoccupied feedback site. Some feedback-resistant mutants, in contrast to the wild type, were unable to exhibit derepression under histidine limitation caused by aminotriazole. PMID:1104584

  16. The Courage to Seek Authentic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Educators assess students' work and behavior every day. They are professional feedback-givers, dispensing grades, advice, support, and red ink. They believe in the power of feedback to communicate what students are doing well and how they can do better. However, some teachers shy away from opportunities for feedback on their own work. Some don't…

  17. A Survey of Psychological Assessment Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.; Wiggins, Chauntel M.; Gorske, Tad T.

    2007-01-01

    There have been no previous studies on how often psychologists conduct feedback and whether they view this practice as a useful component of assessment. To explore psychologists' feedback practices and their perception of the effects of feedback on their clients, the authors examined survey data from 719 psychologist members of the International…

  18. Effective Feedback Design Using Free Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Jiangmei; Kim, ChanMin

    2015-01-01

    Feedback plays a critical role in student learning and performance. However, providing students with effective feedback is challenging in online environments because of physical separation between students and instructors. Technologies can be used to enhance the effectiveness of feedback in online courses. In this article, we propose effective…

  19. Why Receiving Feedback Collides with Self Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Cate, Olle Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    Providing feedback to trainees in clinical settings is considered important for development and acquisition of skill. Despite recommendations how to provide feedback that have appeared in the literature, research shows that its effectiveness is often disappointing. To understand why receiving feedback is more difficult than it appears, this paper…

  20. The Impact of Feedback Training for Inspectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbelaer, Marjoleine J.; Prins, Frans J.; van Dongen, Dre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether oral feedback by inspectors of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education is an adequate method to support the professional development of teachers in primary education. This study aims to examine the impact of short feedback training for inspectors (focused on effective feedback conversations) on…

  1. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  2. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  3. Changing Teachers' Feedback Practices: A Workshop Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Jesuína; Carvalho, Carolina; Conboy, Joseph; Valente, Maria Odete; Gama, Ana Paula; Salema, Maria Helena; Fiúza, Edite

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can promote teacher-student relations and student academic involvement, performance and self-regulation. However, some research indicates that teachers do not always employ feedback effectively. There is a need to promote teachers' appropriate use of feedback in the classroom. We describe a long-term workshop designed to enhance teachers'…

  4. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  5. The Positive Impact of Negative Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    supervisors, subordinates, and peers prior to course start. Following the FRLM lesson on day five, students received individual feedback reports based...Additionally, Nowack (2009) identified where managers who received a small amount of unfavorable feedback actually improved their performance...their arrival at Squadron Officer School, students received a web-based 360-degree feedback survey. Once students completed the surveys, identical

  6. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  7. Student Feedback Sensitivity and the Efficacy of Feedback Interventions in Public Speaking Performance Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Camille; King, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Although feedback from teachers to students occupies a central role in learning and instruction, the manner in which feedback functions in performance improvement remains unclear. The current study examined how students' sensitivity to feedback and variations in the wording of feedback messages impacted public speaking performance. Results…

  8. The Nature of Feedback: How Different Types of Peer Feedback Affect Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    Although providing feedback is commonly practiced in education, there is no general agreement regarding what type of feedback is most helpful and why it is helpful. This study examined the relationship between various types of feedback, potential internal mediators, and the likelihood of implementing feedback. Five main predictions were developed…

  9. Interpreting Feedback: A Discourse Analysis of Teacher Feedback and Student Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, J. T.; Anguiano, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has typically been studied as a means of improving academic performance. Few studies inquire into the processes by which feedback shapes student identity. The authors carry out a discourse analysis of written comments to explore how feedback is discursively constructed by both teachers and students. Analysis of written feedback,…

  10. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of feedback…

  11. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  12. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  13. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  14. Physiological Feedback Method and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Severance, Kurt E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and system provide physiological feedback for a patient and/or physician. At least one physiological effect experienced by a body part of a patient is measured noninvasively. A three-dimensional graphics model serving as an analogous representation of the body part is altered in accordance with the measurements. A binocular image signal representative of the three-dimensional graphics model so-altered is displayed for the patient and/or physician in a virtual reality environment.

  15. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  16. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  18. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  19. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  20. The feedback-related negativity is modulated by feedback probability in observational learning.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Stefan; Thoma, Patrizia; Daum, Irene; Bellebaum, Christian

    2011-12-01

    The feedback-related negativity (FRN), an event-related potentials (ERPs) component reflecting activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has been shown to be modulated by feedback expectancy following active choices in feedback-based learning tasks. A general reduction of FRN amplitude has been described in observational feedback learning, raising the question whether FRN amplitude is modulated in a similar way in this type of learning. The present study investigated whether the FRN and the P300 - a second ERP component related to feedback processing - are modulated by feedback probability in observational learning. Thirty-two subjects participated in the experiment. They observed a virtual person choosing between two symbols and receiving positive or negative feedback. Learning about stimulus-specific feedback probabilities was assessed in active test trials without feedback. In addition, the bias to learn from positive or negative feedback and - in a subsample of 17 subjects - empathy scores were obtained. General FRN and P300 modulations by feedback probability were found across all subjects. Only for the FRN in learners, an interaction between probability and valence was observed. Larger FRN amplitudes for negative relative to positive feedback only emerged for the lowest outcome probability. The results show that feedback expectancy modulates FRN amplitude also in observational learning, suggesting a similar ACC function as in active learning. On the other hand, the modulation is only seen for very low feedback expectancy, which suggests that brain regions other than those of the reward system contribute to feedback processing in an observation setting.

  1. Feedback in Flow for Accelerated Reaction Development.

    PubMed

    Reizman, Brandon J; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-09-20

    The pharmaceutical industry is investing in continuous flow and high-throughput experimentation as tools for rapid process development accelerated scale-up. Coupled with automation, these technologies offer the potential for comprehensive reaction characterization and optimization, but with the cost of conducting exhaustive multifactor screens. Automated feedback in flow offers researchers an alternative strategy for efficient characterization of reactions based on the use of continuous technology to control chemical reaction conditions and optimize in lieu of screening. Optimization with feedback allows experiments to be conducted where the most information can be gained from the chemistry, enabling product yields to be maximized and kinetic models to be generated while the total number of experiments is minimized. This Account opens by reviewing select examples of feedback optimization in flow and applications to chemical research. Systems in the literature are classified into (i) deterministic "black box" optimization systems that do not model the reaction system and are therefore limited in the utility of results for scale-up, (ii) deterministic model-based optimization systems from which reaction kinetics and/or mechanisms can be automatically evaluated, and (iii) stochastic systems. Though diverse in application, flow feedback systems have predominantly focused upon the optimization of continuous variables, i.e., variables such as time, temperature, and concentration that can be ramped from one experiment to the next. Unfortunately, this implies that the screening of discrete variables such as catalyst, ligand, or solvent generally does not factor into automated flow optimization, resulting in incomplete process knowledge. Herein, we present a system and strategy developed for optimizing discrete and continuous variables of a chemical reaction simultaneously. The approach couples automated feedback with high-throughput reaction screening in droplet flow

  2. Optimal Feedback Scheme and Universal Time Scaling for Hamiltonian Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haidong; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred

    2015-09-01

    Time is a valuable resource and it is expected that a longer time period should lead to better precision in Hamiltonian parameter estimation. However, recent studies in quantum metrology have shown that in certain cases more time may even lead to worse estimations, which puts this intuition into question. In this Letter we show that by including feedback controls this intuition can be restored. By deriving asymptotically optimal feedback controls we quantify the maximal improvement feedback controls can provide in Hamiltonian parameter estimation and show a universal time scaling for the precision limit under the optimal feedback scheme. Our study reveals an intriguing connection between noncommutativity in the dynamics and the gain of feedback controls in Hamiltonian parameter estimation.

  3. Feedback and Acousto Optic Isolation Effects on Laser Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of optical feedback on laser frequency stability and the acousto optic isolator concept, which was demonstrated...nonlinearity such as saturation in the laser medium. The analysis mathematically corroborates the initial acousto optic isolator concept and the...limited experimental data available. In the study of the acousto optic isolator, it was determined that an acceptable analytic expression for the

  4. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  5. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  6. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Thomas W; Thomas, Stephen M; Maynard, Daniel S; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, Kristofer; Frey, Serita D; van Diepen, Linda T A; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-06-02

    Decomposition of organic material by soil microbes generates an annual global release of 50-75 Pg carbon to the atmosphere, ∼7.5-9 times that of anthropogenic emissions worldwide. This process is sensitive to global change factors, which can drive carbon cycle-climate feedbacks with the potential to enhance atmospheric warming. Although the effects of interacting global change factors on soil microbial activity have been a widespread ecological focus, the regulatory effects of interspecific interactions are rarely considered in climate feedback studies. We explore the potential of soil animals to mediate microbial responses to warming and nitrogen enrichment within a long-term, field-based global change study. The combination of global change factors alleviated the bottom-up limitations on fungal growth, stimulating enzyme production and decomposition rates in the absence of soil animals. However, increased fungal biomass also stimulated consumption rates by soil invertebrates, restoring microbial process rates to levels observed under ambient conditions. Our results support the contemporary theory that top-down control in soil food webs is apparent only in the absence of bottom-up limitation. As such, when global change factors alleviate the bottom-up limitations on microbial activity, top-down control becomes an increasingly important regulatory force with the capacity to dampen the strength of positive carbon cycle-climate feedbacks.

  7. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    predictive control, as the subjects used the feedback to adjust the desired force even before the prosthesis contacted the object. In conclusion, the online emgFB was superior to the classic forceFB in realistic conditions that included electrotactile stimulation, limited feedback resolution (8 levels), cognitive processing delay, and time constraints (fast grasping).

  8. Improved magnetic feedback system on the fast rotating kink mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian

    This thesis presents an improved feedback system on HBT-EP and suppression of the fast rotating kink mode using this system. HBT-EP is an experimental tokamak at Columbia University designed to study the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in confined fusion. The most damaging instabilities are global long wavelength kink modes, which break the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic structure and lead to plasma disruption and termination. When a tokamak is surrounded by a close fitting conducting wall, then the single helicity linear dispersion relation of the kink instability has two dominating branches: one is the "slow mode", rotating at the time scale of wall time, known as resistive wall mode (RWM), the other is the fast mode, that becomes unstable near the ideal wall stability limit. Both instabilities are required to be controlled by the feedback system in HBT-EP. In this thesis, improvements have been made upon the previous GPU-based system to enhance the feedback performance and obtain clear evidence of the feedback suppression effect. Specifically, a new algorithm is implemented that maintains an accurate phase shift between the applied perturbation and the unstable mode. This prevents the excitation of the slow kink mode observed in previous studies and results in high gain suppression for fast mode control at all frequency for the first time. When the system is turned off, suppression is lost and the fast mode is observed to grow back. The feedback performance is tested with several wall configurations including the presence of ferritic material. This provides the first comparison of feedback control between the ferritic and stainless wall. The effect of plasma rotation on feedback control is tested by applying a static voltage on a bias probe. As the mode rotation being slowed by the radial current flow, a higher gain on the kink mode is required to achieve feedback suppression. The change in plasma rotation also modifies the plasma response to the

  9. Self-controlled feedback: does it enhance learning because performers get feedback when they need it?

    PubMed

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele

    2002-12-01

    This paper examines whether self-controlled feedback schedules enhance learning, because they are more tailored to the performers' needs than externally controlled feedback schedules. Participants practiced a sequential timing task. One group of learners (self-control) was provided with feedback whenever they requested it, whereas another group (yoked) had no influence on the feedback schedule. The self-control group showed learning benefits on a delayed transfer test. Questionnaire results revealed that self-control learners asked for feedback primarily after good trials and yoked learners preferred to receive feedback after good trials. Analyses demonstrated that errors were lower on feedback than no-feedback trials for the self-control group but not for the yoked group. Thus, self-control participants appeared to use a strategy for requesting feedback. This might explain learning advantages of self-controlled practice.

  10. Improving Feedback with Modern Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. M.; Siedell, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    The teaching of introductory astronomy has undergone a transformation over the last few years due to advancements in technology. The developments make large amounts of feedback available to both student and instructor regarding student understanding of the material. This presentation will look at two components of that evolution -- peer instruction and web-based assessment -- and show how technology is continuing to make ever greater strides by increasing the sophistication of the prompts to which students react. Demonstration of FLASH animations from the ClassAction Project and the Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project will be used to illustrate these ideas. This work is funded by National Science Foundation grants #0231270 and #0404988.

  11. Adaptive-feedback control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Debin

    2006-06-01

    This paper is motivated by giving the detailed proofs and some interesting remarks on the results the author obtained in a series of papers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 214101 (2004); Phys. Rev. E 71, 037203 (2005); 69, 067201 (2004)], where an adaptive-feedback algorithm was proposed to effectively stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems. This note proves in detail the strictness of this algorithm from the viewpoint of mathematics, and gives some interesting remarks for its potential applications to chaos control & synchronization. In addition, a significant comment on synchronization-based parameter estimation is given, which shows some techniques proposed in literature less strict and ineffective in some cases.

  12. Visual feedback in stuttering therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Elzbieta

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results concerning the influence of visual echo and reverberation on the speech process of stutterers. Visual stimuli along with the influence of acoustic and visual-acoustic stimuli have been compared. Following this the methods of implementing visual feedback with the aid of electroluminescent diodes directed by speech signals have been presented. The concept of a computerized visual echo based on the acoustic recognition of Polish syllabic vowels has been also presented. All the research nd trials carried out at our center, aside from cognitive aims, generally aim at the development of new speech correctors to be utilized in stuttering therapy.

  13. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  14. Exploring Patients’ Views Toward Giving Web-Based Feedback and Ratings to General Practitioners in England: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Rebecca; Neailey, Kevin; Hooberman, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient feedback websites or doctor rating websites are increasingly being used by patients to give feedback about their health care experiences. There is little known about why patients in England may give Web-based feedback and what may motivate or dissuade them from giving Web-based feedback. Objective The aim of this study was to explore patients’ views toward giving Web-based feedback and ratings to general practitioners (GPs), within the context of other feedback methods available in primary care in England, and in particular, paper-based feedback cards. Methods A descriptive exploratory qualitative approach using face-to-face semistructured interviews was used in this study. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 18 participants from different age groups in London and Coventry. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using applied thematic analysis. Results Half of the participants in this study were not aware of the opportunity to leave feedback for GPs, and there was limited awareness about the methods available to leave feedback for a GP. The majority of participants were not convinced that formal patient feedback was needed by GPs or would be used by GPs for improvement, regardless of whether they gave it via a website or on paper. Some participants said or suggested that they may leave feedback on a website rather than on a paper-based feedback card for several reasons: because of the ability and ease of giving it remotely; because it would be shared with the public; and because it would be taken more seriously by GPs. Others, however, suggested that they would not use a website to leave feedback for the opposite reasons: because of accessibility issues; privacy and security concerns; and because they felt feedback left on a website may be ignored. Conclusions Patient feedback and rating websites as they currently are will not replace other mechanisms for patients in England to leave feedback for a GP. Rather, they may motivate a

  15. A cognitive neuroprosthetic that uses cortical stimulation for somatosensory feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaes, Christian; Shi, Ying; Kellis, Spencer; Minxha, Juri; Revechkis, Boris; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Present day cortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have made impressive advances using decoded brain signals to control extracorporeal devices. Although BMIs are used in a closed-loop fashion, sensory feedback typically is visual only. However medical case studies have shown that the loss of somesthesis in a limb greatly reduces the agility of the limb even when visual feedback is available. Approach. To overcome this limitation, this study tested a closed-loop BMI that utilizes intracortical microstimulation to provide ‘tactile’ sensation to a non-human primate. Main result. Using stimulation electrodes in Brodmann area 1 of somatosensory cortex (BA1) and recording electrodes in the anterior intraparietal area, the parietal reach region and dorsal area 5 (area 5d), it was found that this form of feedback can be used in BMI tasks. Significance. Providing somatosensory feedback has the poyential to greatly improve the performance of cognitive neuroprostheses especially for fine control and object manipulation. Adding stimulation to a BMI system could therefore improve the quality of life for severely paralyzed patients.

  16. Observing chaos for quantum-dot microlasers with external feedback.

    PubMed

    Albert, Ferdinand; Hopfmann, Caspar; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas; Kamp, Martin; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Forchel, Alfred; Kanter, Ido

    2011-06-21

    Chaos presents a striking and fascinating phenomenon of nonlinear systems. A common aspect of such systems is the presence of feedback that couples the output signal partially back to the input. Feedback coupling can be well controlled in optoelectronic devices such as conventional semiconductor lasers that provide bench-top platforms for the study of chaotic behaviour and high bit rate random number generation. Here we experimentally demonstrate that chaos can be observed for quantum-dot microlasers operating close to the quantum limit at nW output powers. Applying self-feedback to a quantum-dot microlaser results in a dramatic change in the photon statistics wherein strong, super-thermal photon bunching is indicative of random-intensity fluctuations associated with the spiked emission of light. Our experiments reveal that gain competition of few quantum dots in the active layer enhances the influence of self-feedback and will open up new avenues for the study of chaos in quantum systems.

  17. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept.

    PubMed

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages.

  18. Corrective Feedback and Student Uptakes in English Immersion Classrooms in Japan: Is the Counter-Balance Hypothesis Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakurai, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of studies on teachers' corrective feedback and students' uptakes in immersion settings, but the majority is carried out in the North American context. Based on limited data, "the counter­-balance hypothesis" was proposed by Lyster and Mori (2006) to explain distributions of teacher feedback and students' uptakes in…

  19. Not Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Developing a Feedback Analysis Tool to Explore Feed Forward in Modularised Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Gwyneth; Smith, Holly; Creese, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers feedback in the context of modularised programmes in higher education in the UK. It is argued that the self-contained nature of modular assessment may limit feedback dialogue between staff and students to assignment-specific issues, and may impede student progress towards holistic programme-level aims and outcomes. A feedback…

  20. Invasive grasses consistently create similar plant-soil feedback types in soils collected from geographically distant locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive PSF is limited by soil type. Most, but not all, plant species exhibit negative plant soil feedback (PSF), wherein plants perform poorly in soils formerly occupied (conditioned) by conspecifics. This dynamic has led to the Plant-Soil Feedback Hypothesis of Invasion which posits that plant sp...

  1. Feedback power control strategies in wireless sensor networks with joint channel decoding.

    PubMed

    Abrardo, Andrea; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Martalò, Marco; Perna, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we derive feedback power control strategies for block-faded multiple access schemes with correlated sources and joint channel decoding (JCD). In particular, upon the derivation of the feasible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region for the considered multiple access schemes, i.e., the multidimensional SNR region where error-free communications are, in principle, possible, two feedback power control strategies are proposed: (i) a classical feedback power control strategy, which aims at equalizing all link SNRs at the access point (AP), and (ii) an innovative optimized feedback power control strategy, which tries to make the network operational point fall in the feasible SNR region at the lowest overall transmit energy consumption. These strategies will be referred to as "balanced SNR" and "unbalanced SNR," respectively. While they require, in principle, an unlimited power control range at the sources, we also propose practical versions with a limited power control range. We preliminary consider a scenario with orthogonal links and ideal feedback. Then, we analyze the robustness of the proposed power control strategies to possible non-idealities, in terms of residual multiple access interference and noisy feedback channels. Finally, we successfully apply the proposed feedback power control strategies to a limiting case of the class of considered multiple access schemes, namely a central estimating officer (CEO) scenario, where the sensors observe noisy versions of a common binary information sequence and the AP's goal is to estimate this sequence by properly fusing the soft-output information output by the JCD algorithm.

  2. Mechanisms controlling the SST air-sea heat flux feedback and its dependence on spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Ute; Czaja, Arnaud; Marshall, John

    2017-02-01

    The turbulent air-sea heat flux feedback (α, in {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}) is a major contributor to setting the damping timescale of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. In this study we compare the spatial distribution and magnitude of α in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, as estimated from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The comparison is rationalized in terms of an upper bound on the heat flux feedback, associated with "fast" atmospheric export of temperature and moisture anomalies away from the marine boundary layer, and a lower bound associated with "slow" export. It is found that regions of cold surface waters (≤10 ° C) are best described as approaching the slow export limit. This conclusion is not only valid at the synoptic scale resolved by the reanalysis data, but also on basin scales. In particular, it applies to the heat flux feedback acting as circumpolar SST anomaly scales are approached in the Southern Ocean, with feedbacks of ≤10 {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}. In contrast, the magnitude of the heat flux feedback is close to that expected from the fast export limit over the Gulf Stream and its recirculation with values on the order of ≈40 {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}. Further analysis suggests that this high value reflects a compensation between a moderate thermodynamic adjustment of the boundary layer, which tends to weaken the heat flux feedback, and an enhancement of the surface winds over warm SST anomalies, which tend to enhance the feedback.

  3. Kinetics of Inhibitory Feedback from Horizontal Cells to Photoreceptors: Implications for an Ephaptic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ted J.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Tranchina, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to cones generates center-surround receptive fields and color opponency in the retina. Mechanisms of HC feedback remain unsettled, but one hypothesis proposes that an ephaptic mechanism may alter the extracellular electrical field surrounding photoreceptor synaptic terminals, thereby altering Ca2+ channel activity and photoreceptor output. An ephaptic voltage change produced by current flowing through open channels in the HC membrane should occur with no delay. To test for this mechanism, we measured kinetics of inhibitory feedback currents in Ambystoma tigrinum cones and rods evoked by hyperpolarizing steps applied to synaptically coupled HCs. Hyperpolarizing HCs stimulated inward feedback currents in cones that averaged 8–9 pA and exhibited a biexponential time course with time constants averaging 14–17 ms and 120–220 ms. Measurement of feedback-current kinetics was limited by three factors: (1) HC voltage-clamp speed, (2) cone voltage-clamp speed, and (3) kinetics of Ca2+ channel activation or deactivation in the photoreceptor terminal. These factors totaled ∼4–5 ms in cones meaning that the true fast time constants for HC-to-cone feedback currents were 9–13 ms, slower than expected for ephaptic voltage changes. We also compared speed of feedback to feedforward glutamate release measured at the same cone/HC synapses and found a latency for feedback of 11–14 ms. Inhibitory feedback from HCs to rods was also significantly slower than either measurement kinetics or feedforward release. The finding that inhibitory feedback from HCs to photoreceptors involves a significant delay indicates that it is not due to previously proposed ephaptic mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Lateral inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to photoreceptors creates center-surround receptive fields and color-opponent interactions. Although underlying mechanisms remain unsettled, a longstanding hypothesis proposes that

  4. Raman fiber lasers with a random distributed feedback based on Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Churkin, D. V.; Babin, S. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Podivilov, E. V.; El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Karalekas, V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Ania-Castanon, J. D.

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate lasing based on a random distributed feedback due to the Raman amplified Rayleigh backscattering in different types of cavities with and without conventional point-action reflectors. Quasistationary generation of a narrowband spectrum is achieved despite the random nature of the feedback. The generated spectrum is localized at the reflection or gain spectral maxima in schemes with and without point reflectors, respectively. The length limit for a conventional cavity and the minimal pump power required for the lasing based purely on a random distributed feedback are determined.

  5. Generative model for feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas R.; Kejžar, Nataša; Tsallis, Constantino; Farmer, Doyne; White, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We propose a model for network formation and study some of its statistical properties. The motivation for the model comes from the growth of several kinds of real networks (i.e., kinship and trading networks, networks of corporate alliances, networks of autocatalytic chemical reactions). These networks grow either by establishing closer connections by adding links in the existing network or by adding new nodes. A node in these networks lacks the information of the entire network. In order to establish a closer connection to other nodes it starts a search in the neighboring part of the network and waits for a possible feedback from a distant node that received the “searching signal.” Our model imitates this behavior by growing the network via the addition of a link that creates a cycle in the network or via the addition of a new node with a link to the network. The forming of a cycle creates feedback between the two ending nodes. After choosing a starting node, a search is made for another node at a suitable distance; if such a node is found, a link is established between this and the starting node, otherwise (such a node cannot be found) a new node is added and is linked to the starting node. We simulate this algorithm and find that we cannot reject the hypothesis that the empirical degree distribution is a q -exponential function, which has been used to model long-range processes in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  6. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I [Bolingbrook, IL

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  7. Climate Change and Aerosol Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ann-Lise

    2008-05-01

    Climate instability is expected as mixing ratios of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere increase. The current trend in rising temperature can be related to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this trend may change as feedback mechanisms amplify; one of the least-understood aspects of climate change. Formation of cloud condensation nuclei from rising sulfate concentrations in the atmosphere may counteract the current warming trend. A key point is where the sulfate, and cloud condensation nuclei are formed. Is cloud formation widespread or localized near sulfate emission sources? A major source of atmospheric sulfate is dimethylsulfide, a compound related to biotic turnover in the surface ocean that constitutes a widespread natural source of aerosols over the remote ocean. A second major source contributing a significant proportion of atmospheric sulfate in the northern hemisphere is produced over continents from industrial activities and fossil fuel combustion. Distinguishing the source of sulfate in well-mixed air is important so that relationships with cloud formation, sea-ice in polar regions, and albedo can be explored. This distinction in sulfate sources can be achieved using isotope apportionment techniques. Recent measurements show an increase in biogenic sulfate coincident with rising temperatures in the Arctic and large amounts sulfur from DMS oxidation over the Atlantic, potentially indicating a widespread biotic feedback to warming over northern oceans.

  8. Reducing the uncertainty in subtropical cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Timothy A.; Norris, Joel R.

    2016-03-01

    Large uncertainty remains on how subtropical clouds will respond to anthropogenic climate change and therefore whether they will act as a positive feedback that amplifies global warming or negative feedback that dampens global warming by altering Earth's energy budget. Here we reduce this uncertainty using an observationally constrained formulation of the response of subtropical clouds to greenhouse forcing. The observed interannual sensitivity of cloud solar reflection to varying meteorological conditions suggests that increasing sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the future climate will have largely canceling effects on subtropical cloudiness, overall leading to a weak positive shortwave cloud feedback (0.4 ± 0.9 W m-2 K-1). The uncertainty of this observationally based approximation of the cloud feedback is narrower than the intermodel spread of the feedback produced by climate models. Subtropical cloud changes will therefore complement positive cloud feedbacks identified by previous work, suggesting that future global cloud changes will amplify global warming.

  9. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  10. Fuzzy cloud concepts for assessing radiation feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.

    1995-09-01

    The importance of clouds in the climate system is well-known but poorly understood. Modeling and observational studies have suggested that there may be positive feedbacks associated with certain cloud processes, but it is not known how strong these feedbacks are in the context of the overall system. Examples include ice microphysics feedback, as shown by Liou`s model, and the relationship between SST and cloud cover in the tropics, which is the focus of this research. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization.

    PubMed

    Gori, Monica; Vercillo, Tiziana; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014). To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback, or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject's forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially congruent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality.

  12. Representation of feedback operators for hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; King, Belinda B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the problem of obtaining integral representation of feedback operators for damped hyperbolic control systems. We show that for the wave equation with Kelvin-Voigt damping and non-compact input operator, the feedback gain operator is Hilbert-Schmidt. This result is then used to provide an explicit integral representation for the feedback operator in terms of functional gains. Numerical results are given to illustrate the role that damping plays in the smoothness of these gains.

  13. [Complex biotechnical feedback in electrostimulation systems].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A N; Dik, S K; Senkovskiĭ, K G

    2002-01-01

    Basic principles in design of electrostimulating equipment with complex biotechnical coupling combining biotechnical feedback and biological feedback are formulated. Realization of these principles in one system leads to qualitatively new capacities of enhancing the efficiency of implemented rehabilitative measures, which is the basis of the designed multichannel electromyostimulation device MYOS having a complex biotechnical feedback, which is used to treat a number of central and peripheral motor disorders (paralyses, pareses), to correct movements, to learn motor skills during training, etc.

  14. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  15. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  16. Constraints on the Longwave Cloud Altitude Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, M. D.; Klein, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud feedback represents the source of largest spread among global climate model projections of future climate change. Though most studies to date have focused on the large spread in cloud feedback that arises from disparate responses of subtropical low clouds, we show using a new technique for quantifying the contribution to cloud feedback from individual cloud types that a significant spread exists in the response of high clouds, with implications for both longwave and shortwave feedbacks. In this talk, we focus on the inter-model spread in longwave altitude feedback, defined as the impact on top of atmosphere longwave fluxes due solely to changes in the vertical distribution of clouds, holding both the total amount and the optical depth distribution fixed. Among the ten models analyzed, this feedback varies from 0.06 to 0.80 W m-2 K-1. We show that the magnitude of this feedback is dependent on two key variables: the effective high cloud amount in the control climate and the change in mean cloud top pressure under doubling of CO2. The latter component is governed by the degree to which the troposphere deepens under doubling of CO2, suggesting an inverse relationship with the lapse rate feedback. To the extent that realistic bounds can be placed on effective high cloud amount using observations, the range of plausible longwave cloud altitude feedback magnitudes can be further reduced.

  17. Wingful, an extracellular feedback inhibitor of Wingless

    PubMed Central

    Gerlitz, Offer; Basler, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    Secreted peptide signals control many fundamental processes during animal development. Proper responses to these signals require cognate inducible feedback antagonists. Here we report the identification of a novel Drosophila Wingless (Wg) target gene, wingful (wf), and show that it encodes a potent extracellular feedback inhibitor of Wg. In contrast to the cytoplasmic protein Naked cuticle (Nkd), the only known Wg feedback antagonist, Wf functions during larval stages, when Nkd function is dispensable. We propose that Wf may provide feedback control for the long-range morphogen activities of Wg. PMID:12000788

  18. Permafrost-carbon feedbacks and climate stabilization costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Addor, Nans

    2013-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost in recent years is reported at various locations in the arctic. Studies using a range of climate models show that permafrost thawing due to arctic warming and resulting CO2 and CH4 emissions provide feedbacks to the global climate system. However, such permafrost-carbon feedbacks have not been accounted for in the calculations of stabilization emissions scenarios of greenhouse gases and related components to cap the global warming below certain levels (e.g. 2°C target). This raises the following two questions: 1) how permafrost-carbon feedbacks influence the pathways of climate stabilizations and 2) how much permafrost-carbon feedbacks generate additional economic costs to stabilize the temperature. We derive a simple parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks from the results of (Schneider von Deimling et al. 2012) that show the ranges of CO2 and CH4 emissions due to the thawing of permafrost under the RCP8.5 scenario. Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012) developed a process-based model to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral and peatland soils distributed across 50 latitudinal bands in the arctic and varied a large number of parameters stochastically to estimate uncertainty ranges in the output. In contrast, we limit the number of stochastic parameters to several and tune them to reproduce the stochastic behavior of the model of Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012). This simple parameterization is based on a linear dependence of the permafrost thaw on global temperature changes and relies on a system of linear reservoirs to control CO2 and CH4 emissions. It can be easily implemented in Simple Climate Models (SCMs). We implement such a simplified parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks to the Aggregate Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate model (ACC2) (Tanaka et al. 2007), which comprises a box model of the global carbon cycle, simple parameterizations of the atmospheric chemistry and the radiative forcing

  19. Quantifying Uncertainty in the Greenland Surface Mass Balance Elevation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, T.

    2015-12-01

    As the shape of the Greenland ice sheet responds to changes in surface mass balance (SMB) and dynamics, it affects the surface mass balance through the atmospheric lapse rate and by altering atmospheric circulation patterns. Positive degree day models include simplified representations of this feedback, but it is difficult to simulate with state-of-the-art models because it requires coupling of regional climate models with dynamical ice sheet models, which is technically challenging. This difficulty, along with the high computational expense of regional climate models, also drastically limits opportunities for exploring the impact of modelling uncertainties on sea level projections. We present a parameterisation of the SMB-elevation feedback in the MAR regional climate model that provides a far easier and quicker estimate than atmosphere-ice sheet model coupling, which can be used with any ice sheet model. This allows us to use ensembles of different parameter values and ice sheet models to assess the effect of uncertainty in the feedback and ice sheet model structure on future sea level projections. We take a Bayesian approach to uncertainty in the feedback parameterisation, scoring the results from multiple possible "SMB lapse rates" according to how well they reproduce a MAR simulation with altered ice sheet topography. We test the impact of the resulting parameterisation on sea level projections using five ice sheet models forced by MAR (in turned forced by two different global climate models) under the emissions scenario A1B. The estimated additional sea level contribution due to the SMB-elevation feedback is 4.3% at 2100 (95% credibility interval 1.8-6.9%), and 9.6% at 2200 (3.6-16.0%).

  20. Movement Retraining using Real-time Feedback of Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Michael Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Any modification of movement - especially movement patterns that have been honed over a number of years - requires re-organization of the neuromuscular patterns responsible for governing the movement performance. This motor learning can be enhanced through a number of methods that are utilized in research and clinical settings alike. In general, verbal feedback of performance in real-time or knowledge of results following movement is commonly used clinically as a preliminary means of instilling motor learning. Depending on patient preference and learning style, visual feedback (e.g. through use of a mirror or different types of video) or proprioceptive guidance utilizing therapist touch, are used to supplement verbal instructions from the therapist. Indeed, a combination of these forms of feedback is commonplace in the clinical setting to facilitate motor learning and optimize outcomes. Laboratory-based, quantitative motion analysis has been a mainstay in research settings to provide accurate and objective analysis of a variety of movements in healthy and injured populations. While the actual mechanisms of capturing the movements may differ, all current motion analysis systems rely on the ability to track the movement of body segments and joints and to use established equations of motion to quantify key movement patterns. Due to limitations in acquisition and processing speed, analysis and description of the movements has traditionally occurred offline after completion of a given testing session. This paper will highlight a new supplement to standard motion analysis techniques that relies on the near instantaneous assessment and quantification of movement patterns and the display of specific movement characteristics to the patient during a movement analysis session. As a result, this novel technique can provide a new method of feedback delivery that has advantages over currently used feedback methods. PMID:23353633

  1. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  2. Robust cloud feedback over tropical land in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Ogura, Tomoo; Watanabe, Masahiro; Xie, Shang-Ping; Ueda, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Cloud-related radiative perturbations over land in a warming climate are of importance for human health, ecosystem, agriculture, and industry via solar radiation availability and local warming amplification. However, robustness and physical mechanisms responsible for the land cloud feedback were not examined sufficiently because of the limited contribution to uncertainty in global climate sensitivity. Here we show that cloud feedback in general circulation models over tropical land is robust, positive, and is relevant to atmospheric circulation change and thermodynamic constraint associated with water vapor availability. In a warming climate, spatial variations in tropospheric warming associated with climatological circulation pattern result in a general weakening of tropical circulation and a dynamic reduction of land cloud during summer monsoon season. Limited increase in availability of water vapor also reduces the land cloud. The reduction of land cloud depends on global-scale oceanic warming and is not sensitive to regional warming patterns. The robust positive feedback can contribute to the warming amplification and drying over tropical land in the future.

  3. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  4. Limit circuit prevents overdriving of operational amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Openshaw, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cutoff-type high gain amplifier coupled by a diode prevents overdriving of operational amplifier. An amplified feedback signal offsets the excess input signal that tends to cause the amplifier to exceed its preset limit. The output is, therfore, held to the set clamp level.

  5. Personalized Behavioral Feedback for Online Gamblers: A Real World Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Michael M.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Responsible gambling tools (e.g., limit-setting tools, pop-up messages, and personalized feedback) have become increasingly popular as a way of facilitating players to gamble in a more responsible manner. However, relatively few studies have evaluated whether such tools actually work. The present study examined whether the use of three types of information (i.e., personalized feedback, normative feedback, and/or a recommendation) could enable players to gamble more responsibly as assessed using three measures of gambling behavior, i.e., theoretical loss (TL), amount of money wagered, and gross gaming revenue (GGR) (i.e., net win/loss). By manipulating the three forms of information, data from six different groups of players were analyzed. The participant sample drawn from the population were those that had played at least one game for money on the Norsk Tipping online platform (Instaspill) during April 2015. A total of 17,452 players were randomly selected from 69,631 players that fulfilled the selection criteria. Of these, 5,528 players participated in the experiment. Gambling activity among the control group (who received no personalized feedback, normative feedback or no recommendation) was also compared with the other five groups that received information of some kind (personalized feedback, normative feedback and/or a recommendation). Compared to the control group, all groups that received some kind of messaging significantly reduced their gambling behavior as assessed by TL, amount of money wagered, and GGR. The results support the hypothesis that personalized behavioral feedback can enable behavioral change in gambling but that normative feedback does not appear change behavior significantly more than personalized feedback. PMID:27965611

  6. Negative Feedback for Small Capacitive Touchscreen Interfaces: A Usability Study for Data Entry Tasks.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S P; Esposito, J M

    2012-01-01

    Touchscreen technology has become pervasive in the consumer product arena over the last decade, offering some distinct advantages such as software reconfigurable interfaces and the removal of space consuming mice and keyboards. However, there are significant drawbacks to these devices that have limited their adoption by some users. Most notably, standard touchscreens demand the user's visual attention and require them to look at the input device to avoid pressing the wrong button. This issue is particularly important for mobile, capacitive sensing, nonstylus devices, such as the iPhone where small button sizes can generate high error rates. While previous work has shown the benefits of augmenting such interfaces with audio or vibrotactile feedback, only positive feedback (confirmation of button presses) has been considered. In this paper, we present a simple prototype interface that provides negative vibrotactile feedback. By negative, we mean feedback is generated when an inactive or ambiguous part of the screen, such as the area between two buttons, is touched. First, we present a usability study comparing positive and negative vibrotactile feedback for a benchmark numerical data entry task. The difference in performance is not statistically significant, implying negative feedback provides comparable benefits. Next, based on the experimenter's observations and the users comments, we introduce a multimodal feedback strategy-combining complementary positive audio and negative vibrotactile signals. User tests on a text entry experiment show that, with multimodal feedback, users exhibit a (statistically significant) 24 percent reduction in corrective key presses, as compared to positive audio feedback alone. Exit survey comments indicate that users favor multimodal feedback.

  7. Personalized Behavioral Feedback for Online Gamblers: A Real World Empirical Study.

    PubMed

    Auer, Michael M; Griffiths, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Responsible gambling tools (e.g., limit-setting tools, pop-up messages, and personalized feedback) have become increasingly popular as a way of facilitating players to gamble in a more responsible manner. However, relatively few studies have evaluated whether such tools actually work. The present study examined whether the use of three types of information (i.e., personalized feedback, normative feedback, and/or a recommendation) could enable players to gamble more responsibly as assessed using three measures of gambling behavior, i.e., theoretical loss (TL), amount of money wagered, and gross gaming revenue (GGR) (i.e., net win/loss). By manipulating the three forms of information, data from six different groups of players were analyzed. The participant sample drawn from the population were those that had played at least one game for money on the Norsk Tipping online platform (Instaspill) during April 2015. A total of 17,452 players were randomly selected from 69,631 players that fulfilled the selection criteria. Of these, 5,528 players participated in the experiment. Gambling activity among the control group (who received no personalized feedback, normative feedback or no recommendation) was also compared with the other five groups that received information of some kind (personalized feedback, normative feedback and/or a recommendation). Compared to the control group, all groups that received some kind of messaging significantly reduced their gambling behavior as assessed by TL, amount of money wagered, and GGR. The results support the hypothesis that personalized behavioral feedback can enable behavioral change in gambling but that normative feedback does not appear change behavior significantly more than personalized feedback.

  8. Radiation feedback in dusty clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiki, Shohei; Okamoto, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the impact of photoionization and radiation pressure on a dusty star-forming cloud using one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, which include absorption and re-emission of photons by dust. We find that, in a cloud of mass 105 M⊙ and radius 17 pc, the effect of radiation pressure is negligible when star formation efficiency is 2 per cent. The importance of radiation pressure increases with increasing star formation efficiency or an increasing dust-to-gas mass ratio. The net effect of radiation feedback, however, becomes smaller with the increasing dust-to-gas mass ratio, since the absorption of ultraviolet photons by dust grains suppresses photoionization and hence photoheating.

  9. Biological Feedbacks in Global Desertification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, William H.; Reynolds, James F.; Cunningham, Gary L.; Huenneke, Laura F.; Jarrell, Wesley M.; Virginia, Ross A.; Whitford, Walter G.

    1990-03-01

    Studies of ecosystem processes on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico suggest that long-term grazing of semiarid grasslands leads to an increase in the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water, nitrogen, and other soil resources. Heterogeneity of soil resources promotes invasion by desert shrubs, which leads to a further localization of soil resources under shrub canopies. In the barren area between shrubs, soil fertility is lost by erosion and gaseous emissions. This positive feedback leads to the desertification of formerly productive land in southern New Mexico and in other regions, such as the Sahel. Future desertification is likely to be exacerbated by global climate warming and to cause significant changes in global biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Biological feedbacks in global desertification.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, W H; Reynolds, J F; Cunningham, G L; Huenneke, L F; Jarrell, W M; Virginia, R A; Whitford, W G

    1990-03-02

    Studies of ecosystem processes on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico suggest that longterm grazing of semiarid grasslands leads to an increase in the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water, nitrogen, and other soil resources. Heterogeneity of soil resources promotes invasion by desert shrubs, which leads to a further localization of soil resources under shrub canopies. In the barren area between shrubs, soil fertility is lost by erosion and gaseous emissions. This positive feedback leads to the desertification of formerly productive land in southern New Mexico and in other regions, such as the Sahel. Future desertification is likely to be exacerbated by global climate warming and to cause significant changes in global biogeochemical cycles.

  11. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  12. Adaptation of reflexive feedback during arm posture to different environments.

    PubMed

    de Vlugt, Erwin; Schouten, Alfred C; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2002-07-01

    predicted velocity feedback gains were larger in all cases, probably indicating a mutual gain limiting relation between length and velocity afferent signals. The results suggest that both reflex gains seem to be adjusted by the CNS, where in particular the length feedback gain was optimal so as to maximize performance at minimum control effort.

  13. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  15. Effects of Feedback Timing on Second Language Vocabulary Learning: Does Delaying Feedback Increase Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakata, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Feedback, or information given to learners regarding their performance, is found to facilitate second language (L2) learning. Research also suggests that the timing of feedback (whether it is provided immediately or after a delay) may affect learning. The purpose of the present study was to identify the optimal feedback timing for L2 vocabulary…

  16. Explanation Feedback Is Better than Correct Answer Feedback for Promoting Transfer of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Andrew C.; Godbole, Namrata; Marsh, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Among the many factors that influence the efficacy of feedback on learning, the information contained in the feedback message is arguably the most important. One common assumption is that there is a benefit to increasing the complexity of the feedback message beyond providing the correct answer. Surprisingly, studies that have manipulated the…

  17. Feedback Perceptions and Attribution by Secretarial Employees: Effects of Feedback-Content and Sender Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raemdonck, Isabel; Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Theoretical explanations for the diverse reactive feedback from secretarial employees in different career phases are relatively unexplored. However, research examining age differences in the impact of feedback suggests that the effects of performance feedback may differ for employees in the early career phase and employees in the late…

  18. Can Performance Feedback during Instruction Boost Knowledge Acquisition? Contrasting Criterion-Based and Social Comparison Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollöffel, Bas; de Jong, Ton

    2016-01-01

    Feedback indicating how well students are performing during a learning task can be very stimulating. In this study with a pre- and post-test design, the effects of two types of performance feedback on learning results were compared: feedback during a learning task was either stated in terms of how well the students were performing relative to…

  19. The Impact of Middle-School Students' Feedback Choices and Performance on Their Feedback Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutumisu, Maria; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel examination of the impact of students' feedback choices and performance on their feedback memory. An empirical study was designed to collect the choices to seek critical feedback from a hundred and six Grade 8 middle-school students via Posterlet, a digital assessment game in which students design posters. Upon…

  20. Feedbacks between air pollution and weather, part 2: Effects on chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makar, P. A.; Gong, W.; Hogrefe, C.; Zhang, Y.; Curci, G.; Žabkar, R.; Milbrandt, J.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Bianconi, R.; Cheung, P.; Forkel, R.; Gravel, S.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Hou, A.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Langer, M.; Moran, M. D.; Pabla, B.; Pérez, J. L.; Pirovano, G.; San José, R.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    Fully-coupled air-quality models running in "feedback" and "no-feedback" configurations were compared against each other and observation network data as part of Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative. In the "no-feedback" mode, interactions between meteorology and chemistry through the aerosol direct and indirect effects were disabled, with the models reverting to climatologies of aerosol properties, or a no-aerosol weather simulation, while in the "feedback" mode, the model-generated aerosols were allowed to modify the models' radiative transfer and/or cloud formation processes. Annual simulations with and without feedbacks were conducted for domains in North America for the years 2006 and 2010, and for Europe for the year 2010. Comparisons against observations via annual statistics show model-to-model variation in performance is greater than the within-model variation associated with feedbacks. However, during the summer and during intense emission events such as the Russian forest fires of 2010, feedbacks have a significant impact on the chemical predictions of the models. The aerosol indirect effect was usually found to dominate feedbacks compared to the direct effect. The impacts of direct and indirect effects were often shown to be in competition, for predictions of ozone, particulate matter and other species. Feedbacks were shown to result in local and regional shifts of ozone-forming chemical regime, between NOx- and VOC-limited environments. Feedbacks were shown to have a substantial influence on biogenic hydrocarbon emissions and concentrations: North American simulations incorporating both feedbacks resulted in summer average isoprene concentration decreases of up to 10%, while European direct effect simulations during the Russian forest fire period resulted in grid average isoprene changes of -5 to +12.5%. The atmospheric transport and chemistry of large emitting sources such as plumes from forest fires and large cities

  1. CESR feedback system using a constant amplitude pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Codner, G.; Billing, M.; Meller, R.; Patten, R.; Rogers, J.; Sikora, J.; Sloand, M.; Strohman, C.

    1998-12-10

    Particle beam feedback system using constant-amplitude, 1000 V, 12 ns pulses has been built to provide longitudinal and horizontal feedback for stabilizing 14 ns spaced bunches for use in CESR (Cornell Electron Storage Ring). The pulse rate is modulated to obtain proportional amplitude control and the pulse arrival time is modulated to obtain both positive and negative kicks. The average repetition rate is limited by pulser power dissipation, but the instantaneous rate may be increased to full duty cycle for short periods of time to handle transients. The pulser drives a 50-ohm stripline kicker so the equivalent peak power at 1000 V is 10 kW. The characteristics of the pulser and its modulator will be described along with the system's operation.

  2. Self-sustained micro mechanical oscillator with linear feedback

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damian H.; Guest, Jeffrey R.; ...

    2016-07-01

    Autonomous oscillators, such as clocks and lasers, produce periodic signals without any external frequency reference. In order to sustain stable periodic motions, there needs to be external energy supply as well as nonlinearity built into the oscillator to regulate the amplitude. Usually, nonlinearity is provided by the sustaining feedback mechanism, which also supplies energy, whereas the constituent resonator that determines the output frequency stays linear. Here we propose a new self-sustaining scheme that relies on the nonlinearity originating from the resonator itself to limit the oscillation amplitude, while the feedback remains linear. We introduce a model to describe the workingmore » principle of the self-sustained oscillations and validate it with experiments performed on a nonlinear microelectromechanical (MEMS) based oscillator.« less

  3. Stability of constant gain systems with vector feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The state space, the controllability, and the observability concepts are discussed in connection with the proposed stability analysis which permits drastic dimensional reductions for a vector feedback problem. Any constant gain system's stability can thus be analyzed in the frequency domain with a single Nyquist plot. The analysis considers the total system with all loops closed, a disturbance vector as input, and the feedback vector as output. All constant gain systems are shown to be decomposable into stable subsystems where the degree of the decomposition determines the dimensions. The maximum decomposition results in the state-space approach which is the limit case. The method is demonstrated with the stability analysis of the pogo phenomenon, an oscillatory interaction between the propulsion and the structure of a space vehicle. This problem, with eigenvalues over a hundred, was drastically but rigorously reduced to a stability analysis of a 4x4 matrix.

  4. Self-sustained micro mechanical oscillator with linear feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damian H.; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Czaplewski, David A.; Lopez, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Autonomous oscillators, such as clocks and lasers, produce periodic signals without any external frequency reference. In order to sustain stable periodic motions, there needs to be external energy supply as well as nonlinearity built into the oscillator to regulate the amplitude. Usually, nonlinearity is provided by the sustaining feedback mechanism, which also supplies energy, whereas the constituent resonator that determines the output frequency stays linear. Here we propose a new self-sustaining scheme that relies on the nonlinearity originating from the resonator itself to limit the oscillation amplitude, while the feedback remains linear. We introduce a model to describe the working principle of the self-sustained oscillations and validate it with experiments performed on a nonlinear microelectromechanical (MEMS) based oscillator.

  5. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  6. Feedback for Teachers: Focused, Specific, and Constructive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerberg, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    Across the country, there is a renewed emphasis on using teacher evaluation not only to rate teachers but also to give them formative feedback that will help them improve classroom instruction. Recent research shows that applying the strategies that teachers use to give students effective feedback to the teacher evaluation process produces…

  7. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  8. The Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce Wayne

    Originally designed to provide teachers with feedback and also used as a quantitative tool for specifying teacher behavior consistent with a psychological model of teaching described by Tuckman (1974), the Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF) is a 28-item semantic differential which generates four scores in the areas of creativity, dynamism…

  9. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  10. Preregulator feedback circuit utilizes Light Actuated Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayser, T. P.

    1966-01-01

    Preregulator feedback circuit employing a Light Actuated Switch /LAS/ provides a simple and efficient feedback device in a power supply preregulator which maintains dc isolation between input and output grounds. The LAS consists of a diode PN junction infrared source close to, but electrically isolated from, a photodetector.

  11. Feedback for Web-based Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; De Boer, W.; Slotman, K.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a concept used at the University of Twente based on increased flexibility in learning options and the active student in which there are assignments submitted and monitored via a Web-based course management system. Outlines conceptual aspects of feedback as part of the assessment process, particularly feedback supported by a Web-based…

  12. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  13. Engaging Feedback: Meaning, Identity and Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Paul; Gill, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a methodology that synthesises an Academic Literacies approach and Critical Discourse Analysis to explore student experiences of feedback on written assessments in two higher education institutions. The qualitative analysis of student interviews is oriented around three topics: (1) the socially situated meaning of feedback; (2)…

  14. Students' Reflections on Mathematics Homework Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Mara; Reinholz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Homework is considered an important aspect of learning mathematics, but little research has considered how students utilize feedback as part of the homework process. This mixed methods, quasi-experimental study examines how community college students in a developmental intermediate algebra course participated in a feedback reflection activity…

  15. Feedback Control Analysis Using Parameter Plane Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    compensation of linear control systems. General equations have been derived for the cases of feedback, cascade, and combination feedback-cascade...Bode and root-locus analyses, the program provides the capability to investigate ř% the entire gamut of linear control system architecture. A basis

  16. Peer Feedback on Language Form in Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige D.; O'Dowd, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We performed a two-phase, year-long research project that explored the impact of peer feedback on language development. We investigated specifically how and when post-secondary learners of English and Spanish provide corrective feedback on their partners' use of the target language in weekly asynchronous discussions by assigning them to one of two…

  17. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  18. Student Views on the Value of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Jenny A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the value that a sample of students placed on feedback, what they valued it for and the conditions that affected this value judgement. I show that not all students value feedback particularly highly, especially when considered in relation to other factors in their education and when considered for its intrinsic value as…

  19. Advanced Feedback Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In this study, automatic feedback techniques are applied to Boolean query statements in online information retrieval to generate improved query statements based on information contained in previously retrieved documents. Feedback operations are carried out using conventional Boolean logic and extended logic. Experimental output is included to…

  20. Feedback Processes in Multimedia Language Learning Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Feedback has been one of the important elements of learning and teaching theories and still pervades the literature and instructional models, especially computer and web-based ones. However, the mechanisms about feedback dominating the fundamentals of all the instructional models designed for self-learning have changed considerably with the…

  1. Feedback after Good Trials Enhances Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies (Chiviacowsky & Wulf, 2002, 2005) have shown that learners prefer to receive feedback after they believe they had a "good" rather than "poor" trial. The present study followed up on this finding and examined whether learning would benefit if individuals received feedback after good relative to poor trials. Participants practiced a…

  2. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  3. Supporting Second Language Writing Using Multimodal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elola, Idoia; Oskoz, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The educational use of computer-based feedback in the classroom is becoming widespread. However, less is known about (1) the extent to which tools influence how instructors provide written and oral comments, and (2) whether receiving oral or written feedback influences the nature of learners' revisions. This case study, which expands existing…

  4. Feedback Effectiveness in Professional Learning Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment organisations that operate at a national level in the UK employ hierarchic assessor monitoring arrangements, where the most senior assessors (known as team leaders) feedback to assessors in their teams on their marking performance. According to a sociocultural viewpoint, this feedback possesses learning potential as it allows assessors…

  5. Teaching Writing Using Peer Feedback Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furneaux, Clare

    2002-01-01

    Discusses incorporation of peer feedback check lists in the English-as-a-Second-Language writing classroom. Highlights different types of check lists, including generic and text-specific, and how to use check lists for peer feedback. (Author/VWL)

  6. Visual Feedback of Intonation I: Effectiveness and Induced Practice Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, K.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts to show that audio-visual feedback is more effective in intonation learning than auditory feedback. While practice time did not seem to be a major factor, results showed audio-visual feedback to be more effective than auditory feedback. In addition, feedback modality was shown to influence learning behavior. (SL)

  7. A new approach to the water vapour feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, W.

    2012-12-01

    Climate sensitivity is often said to be doubled by water vapour feedback. From simple physical arguments, confirmed by GCMs, and consistent with the limited observational evidence, we expect the distribution of RH to change little under climate change. This implies a substantial positive feedback on climate change - but why about a doubling? And why is this value so robust even to major modelling errors and approximations? And why do GCMs never give a run-away water vapour greenhouse effect, plausible though extrapolation can make it seem? Considering the "paradox" of Simpson (1928) leads to a simple model that explains all these. The "partly-Simpsonian" model for the water vapour feedback on climate change implies a very simple constraint - that the component of OLR radiated by water vapour does not change as climate changes, while that radiated by everything else (surface, clouds, CO2, etc.) increases following Planck's Law. This does not predict the actual non-cloud LW response λCSLW of GCMs quantitatively accurately, but gives the general size. It also explains why a run-away water vapour greenhouse effect is not possible in Earth-like conditions: the partly-Simpsonian water vapour feedback can do no more than cancel part of the basic Planck's-Law negative feedback - less than 100% as long as some OLR is not from water vapour. The robustness of the GCMs' water vapour feedbacks, even if they simulate the water vapour distribution very badly, also follows: the fraction of emission by water vapour is both innately computationally robust (even large errors in water vapour amounts can only affect those limited parts of the spectrum of intermediate optical depth: most of the spectrum will be effectively opaque or effectively transparent at any given location), and closely related to the surface downward LW flux, which is verifiable and tunable. In addition, the partly-Simpsonian model provides a physical explanation for the long-known fact that LW radiances or OLR

  8. Feedbacks and landscape-level vegetation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Perry, George L W; Marston, J B

    2015-05-01

    Alternative stable-state theory (ASS) is widely accepted as explaining landscape-level vegetation dynamics, such as switches between forest and grassland. This theory argues that webs of feedbacks stabilise vegetation composition and structure, and that abrupt state shifts can occur if stabilising feedbacks are weakened. However, it is difficult to identify stabilising feedback loops and the disturbance thresholds beyond which state changes occur. Here, we argue that doing this requires a synthetic approach blending observation, experimentation, simulation, conceptual models, and narratives. Using forest boundaries and large mammal extinctions, we illustrate how a multifaceted research program can advance understanding of feedback-driven ecosystem change. Our integrative approach has applicability to other complex macroecological systems controlled by numerous feedbacks where controlled experimentation is impossible.

  9. Effects of altered auditory feedback across effector systems: production of melodies by keyboard and singing.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Mantell, James T

    2012-01-01

    We report an experiment that tested whether effects of altered auditory feedback (AAF) during piano performance differ from its effects during singing. These effector systems differ with respect to the mapping between motor gestures and pitch content of auditory feedback. Whereas this action-effect mapping is highly reliable during phonation in any vocal motor task (singing or speaking), mapping between finger movements and pitch occurs only in limited situations, such as piano playing. Effects of AAF in both tasks replicated results previously found for keyboard performance (Pfordresher, 2003), in that asynchronous (delayed) feedback slowed timing whereas alterations to feedback pitch increased error rates, and the effect of asynchronous feedback was similar in magnitude across tasks. However, manipulations of feedback pitch had larger effects on singing than on keyboard production, suggesting effector-specific differences in sensitivity to action-effect mapping with respect to feedback content. These results support the view that disruption from AAF is based on abstract, effector independent, response-effect associations but that the strength of associations differs across effector systems.

  10. Host behaviour–parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology

    PubMed Central

    Archie, Elizabeth A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Hawley, Dana M.; Martin, Lynn B.; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour–disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour–parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour–parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  11. Adaptive CQI Update and Feedback for Codebook Based MU-MIMO in E-UTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianchi; She, Xiaoming; Liu, Jingxiu; Chen, Lan

    Codebook based multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) precoding can significantly improve the system spectral efficiency with limited feedback and has been accepted as one of the most promising techniques for the Evolved UTRA (E-UTRA). Compared with single-user (SU) MIMO, multi-user (MU) MIMO can further improve the system spectral efficiency due to increased multi-user diversity gain. MU-MIMO is preferred for the case of a large number of users, when the total feedback overhead will become a problem. In order to reduce the feedback overhead, feedback of single channel quality indicator (CQI), e.g. rank 1 CQI, is required in E-UTRA currently. The main challenge is how to obtain CQIs of other ranks at Node B for rank adaptation with single CQI feedback. In this paper, an adaptive CQI update scheme at Node B based on statistical characteristics of CQI of various ranks is proposed. To further increase the accuracy of CQI at Node B for data transmission, an adaptive CQI feedback scheme is then proposed in which single CQI with the rank same as previously scheduled is fed back. Simulation results show that our proposed CQI update scheme can achieve 2.5-5% gain compared with the conventional method with fixed backoff. Moreover, with the proposed adaptive feedback scheme, 20-40% performance gain can be obtained and the performance can approach the upper bound.

  12. Social is special: A normative framework for teaching with and learning from evaluative feedback.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mark K; MacGlashan, James; Littman, Michael L; Cushman, Fiery

    2017-03-21

    Humans often attempt to influence one another's behavior using rewards and punishments. How does this work? Psychologists have often assumed that "evaluative feedback" influences behavior via standard learning mechanisms that learn from environmental contingencies. On this view, teaching with evaluative feedback involves leveraging learning systems designed to maximize an organism's positive outcomes. Yet, despite its parsimony, programs of research predicated on this assumption, such as ones in developmental psychology, animal behavior, and human-robot interaction, have had limited success. We offer an explanation by analyzing the logic of evaluative feedback and show that specialized learning mechanisms are uniquely favored in the case of evaluative feedback from a social partner. Specifically, evaluative feedback works best when it is treated as communicating information about the value of an action rather than as a form of reward to be maximized. This account suggests that human learning from evaluative feedback depends on inferences about communicative intent, goals and other mental states-much like learning from other sources, such as demonstration, observation and instruction. Because these abilities are especially developed in humans, the present account also explains why evaluative feedback is far more widespread in humans than non-human animals.

  13. Host behaviour-parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Archie, Elizabeth A; Craft, Meggan E; Hawley, Dana M; Martin, Lynn B; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-04-13

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour-disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour-parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour-parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained.

  14. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    PubMed Central

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  15. Simulation Results of a Feedback Control System to Damp Electron Cloud Single-Bunch Transverse Instabilities In The Cern SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Secondo, R.; Vay, J. L.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J. D.; Rivetta, C. H.; Hofle, W.

    2011-03-28

    Transverse Single-Bunch Instabilities due to the Electron Cloud effect are limiting the operation at high current of the SPS at CERN. Recently a high-bandwidth Feedback System has been proposed as a possible solution to stabilize the beam and is currently under study. We analyze the dynamics of the bunch actively damped with a simple model of the Feedback in the macro-particle code WARP, in order to investigate the limitations of the System such as the minimum amount of power required to maintain stability. We discuss the feedback model, report on simulation results and present our plans for further development of the numerical model.

  16. The password is praise: content of feedback affects categorization of feedback sources.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Anna; Morton, Thomas A; Landon, Emily; Neill, Caitlin; Mason-Brown, Sapphire; Burdett, Lucie

    2014-09-01

    In three experimental studies, we investigated the effect of the content of group-directed feedback on categorization of the feedback source as an ingroup or an outgroup member. In all studies, feedback valence (criticism vs. praise) and the attributional content of feedback (attributing outcomes to internal properties of the group vs. external circumstances) were experimentally manipulated. The results demonstrated that anonymous (Study 1) and ambiguous (Studies 2 and 3) sources of feedback are more likely to be seen as (typical) ingroup members when they provide praise rather than criticism. In addition, in all studies there was a significant interaction between valence and the attributional content of feedback, such that sources of praise were more likely to be seen as ingroup members when they attributed the group's success to internal (rather than external) causes, while the opposite was observed for critics. These effects were mediated by perceived group image threat. Implications for research on group-based feedback and social categorization are discussed.

  17. Square-wave oscillations in edge-emitting diode lasers with polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, A.; Erneux, T.; Sukow, D. W.; Burner, G.; McLachlan, T.; Miller, J.; Amonette, J.

    2006-04-01

    The square-wave response of edge-emitting diode lasers subject to a delayed polarization-rotated optical feedback is studied experimentally and theoretically. Square-wave self-modulated polarization intensities of a period close to twice the delay τ of the feedback gradually appear through a sequence of bifurcations starting with a Hopf bifurcation (Gavrielides et al, Proc. SPIE 6115, to appear, 2006). In Gavrielides et al (submitted, 2006), squarewave solutions were determined analytically from the laser equations in the limit of large τ. A condition on the laser parameters was derived explaining why square-wave oscillations are preferentially observed for suffciently large feedback strength. In this paper, we concentrate on the relaxation oscillations that always appear at each intensity jump between the plateaus of the square-wave. We show analytically that if the feedback strength is progressively decreased, a bifurcation to sustained relaxation oscillations is possible for one of the two plateaus.

  18. Failure to learn from feedback underlies word learning difficulties in toddlers at risk for autism.

    PubMed

    Bedford, R; Gliga, T; Frame, K; Hudry, K; Chandler, S; Johnson, M H; Charman, T

    2013-01-01

    Children's assignment of novel words to nameless objects, over objects whose names they know (mutual exclusivity; ME) has been described as a driving force for vocabulary acquisition. Despite their ability to use ME to fast-map words (Preissler & Carey, 2005), children with autism show impaired language acquisition. We aimed to address this puzzle by building on studies showing that correct referent selection using ME does not lead to word learning unless ostensive feedback is provided on the child's object choice (Horst & Samuelson, 2008). We found that although toddlers aged 2;0 at risk for autism can use ME to choose the correct referent of a word, they do not benefit from feedback for long-term retention of the word-object mapping. Further, their difficulty using feedback is associated with their smaller receptive vocabularies. We propose that difficulties learning from social feedback, not lexical principles, limits vocabulary building during development in children at risk for autism.

  19. Feedback and assessment for clinical placements: achieving the right balance

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    During clinical placements, the provision of feedback forms an integral part of the learning process and enriches students’ learning experiences. The purpose of feedback is to improve the learner’s knowledge, skills, or behavior. Receipt of accurate feedback can help to narrow the gap between actual and desired performance. Effective and regular feedback has the potential to reinforce good practice and motivate the learner toward the desired outcome. Despite the obvious role of feedback in effective teaching and learning, a common complaint from students is that they do not receive adequate feedback. Unfortunately, skills in giving and receiving feedback are rarely taught to students or clinicians. This study aims to provide an understanding of the role of feedback within the learning process, consider consequences of inadequate or poorly given feedback, consider the barriers to the feedback process, provide practical guidelines for providing feedback, and consider the need for student and faculty development in feedback skills. PMID:26056511

  20. Wide-Angle Quasar Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, George; Strickland, Sarah

    We present results from the detection of relativistic winds launched near the innermost stable circular orbits of supermassive black holes. A recent detection of a powerful wind in the X-ray-bright narrow absorption line (NAL) z=1.51 quasar HS 0810+2554 strengthens the case that quasars play a significant role in feedback. In both deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of HS 0810 we detected blueshifted absorption lines implying outflowing velocities ranging from 0.1c and 0.4c. The presence of both an emission line at 6.8 keV and an absorption line at 7.8 keV in the spectral line profile of HS 0810 is a characteristic feature of a P-Cygni profile supporting the presence of an expanding outflowing highly ionized Fe absorber. A hard excess component is detected in the XMM-Newton observation of HS 0810 possibly originating from reflection off the disk. Modelling of the XMM-Newton spectrum constrains the inclination angle to be < 35° (68% confidence). The presence of relativistic winds in both low inclination angle NAL quasars as well as in high inclination angle BAL quasars implies that the solid angle of quasar winds may be quite large. The larger solid angle of quasar winds would also indicate that their contribution to the regulation of the host galaxy may be more important than previously thought.

  1. Pseudo-Haptic Feedback in Teleoperation.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Carsten; Matich, Sebastian; Scherping, Nick; Kupnik, Mario; Werthschutzky, Roland; Hatzfeld, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop possible realizations of pseudo-haptic feedback in teleoperation systems based on existing works for pseudo-haptic feedback in virtual reality and the intended applications. We derive four potential factors affecting the performance of haptic feedback (calculation operator, maximum displacement, offset force, and scaling factor), which are analyzed in three compliance identification experiments. First, we analyze the principle usability of pseudo-haptic feedback by comparing information transfer measures for teleoperation and direct interaction. Pseudo-haptic interaction yields well above-chance performance, while direct interaction performs almost perfectly. In order to optimize pseudo-haptic feedback, in the second study we perform a full-factorial experimental design with 36 subjects performing 6,480 trials with 36 different treatments. Information transfer ranges from 0.68 bit to 1.72 bit in a task with a theoretical maximum of 2.6 bit, with a predominant effect of the calculation operator and a minor effect of the maximum displacement. In a third study, short- and long-term learning effects are analyzed. Learning effects regarding the performance of pseudo-haptic feedback cannot be observed for single-day experiments. Tests over 10 days show a maximum increase in information transfer of 0.8 bit. The results show the feasibility of pseudo-haptic feedback for teleoperation and can be used as design basis for task-specific systems.

  2. Nonlinear and Nonlocal Feedbacks in an Aquaplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldl, N.; Roe, G.

    2012-12-01

    The power of the feedback framework lies in its ability to reveal the energy pathways by which the climate system adjusts to an imposed forcing. By understanding the closure of the energy budget in as much detail and precision as possible, and within as clean an experimental set-up as possible, we are also able to isolate nonlinear interactions between feedbacks. For an aquaplanet simulation under perpetual equinox conditions, we account for rapid tropospheric adjustments to CO2 and diagnose radiative kernels for this precise model set-up. We characterize the contributions of feedbacks, heat transport, and nonlinearities in controlling the meridional structure of the climate response. The presence of strongly positive subtropical feedbacks, combined with polar amplification, implies a critical role for transport and nonlinear effects, with the latter acting to substantially reduce global climate sensitivity. At the hemispheric scale, a rich picture emerges: net heat divergence away from strong positive feedbacks in the tropics; nonlinearities induced by circulation changes that cool the tropics and warm the high-latitudes; and strong ice-line feedbacks that drive further amplification of polar warming. Overall, these results highlight how spatial patterns in feedbacks affect both the local and nonlocal climate response, with implications for regional predictability.

  3. Novel tactile feedback to reduce overt stuttering.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Dwight E; Goggans, Paul M; Snyder, Gregory J

    2012-08-22

    Stuttering is generally considered to be a speech disorder that affects ∼1% of the global population. Various forms of speech feedback have been shown to reduce overt stuttered speaking, and in particular, second speech signal through speech feedback has drastically reduced utterances of stuttered speech in adults with persistent stuttering. This study reports data for increased overt fluency of speech in an adult stuttering population, whereby the vocalization of the speaker is captured by a microphone or an accelerometer, signal processed, and returned as mechanical tactile speech feedback to the speaker's skin. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to show that both the microphone and the accelerometer speaking conditions were significantly more fluent than a control (no feedback) condition, with the microphone-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 71% and the accelerometer-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 80%. It is apparent that self-generated tactile feedback can be used to enhance fluency significantly in those who stutter.

  4. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    As human interactions with Earth systems intensify in the "Anthropocene", understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes is increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of "feedbacks" in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling these interactions. Deciphering interacting human-landscape feedbacks extends our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Enormous challenges exist, however, in quantifying impact-feedback loops in landscapes with significant human alterations. This paper illustrates an example of human-landscape interactions following a wildfire in Colorado (USA) that elicited feedback responses. After the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, concerns for heightened flood potential and debris flows associated with post-fire hydrologic changes prompted local landowners to construct tall fences at the base of a burned watershed. These actions changed the sediment transport regime and promoted further landscape change and human responses in a positive feedback cycle. The interactions ultimately increase flood and sediment hazards, rather than dampening the effects of fire. A simple agent-based model, capable of integrating social and hydro-geomorphological data, demonstrates how such interacting impacts and feedbacks could be simulated. Challenges for fully capturing human-landscape feedback interactions include the identification of diffuse and subtle feedbacks at a range of scales, the availability of data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, and the varied metrics and data needed to represent both the physical and human systems. By collaborating with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of landscape change, as well as the human responses to those changes, geoscientists could more fully recognize and anticipate the coupled

  5. Multiplexing Readout of TES Microcalorimeters Based on Analog Baseband Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N.Y; Mitsuda, K.; Kimura, S.; Hirakoso, W.; Masui, K.; Korte, P. A. J. de; Kuur, J. van der; Gottardi, L.

    2009-12-16

    A TES microcalorimeter array is a promising spectrometer with excellent energy resolution and a moderate imaging capability. To realize a large format array in space, multiplexing the TES signals at the low tempersture stage is mandatory. We are developing frequency division multiplexing (FDM) based on baseband feedback technique. In FDM, each TES is AC-biased with a different carrier frequency. Signals from several pixels are summed and then read out by one SQUID. The maximum number of multiplexed pixels are limited by the frequency band in which the SQUID can be operated in a flux-locked loop, which is {approx}1 MHz with standard flux-locked loop circuit. In the baseband feedback, the signal ({approx}10 kHz band) from the TES is once demodulated. Then a reconstructed copy of the modulated signal with an appropriate phase is fed back to the SQUID input coil to maintain an approximately constant magnetic flux. This can be implemented even for large cable delays and automatically suppresses the carrier. We developed a prototype electronics for the baseband feedback based on an analog phase sensitive detector (PSD) and a multiplier. Combined with Seiko 80-SSA SQUID amp, open-loop gain of 8 has been obtained for 10 kHz baseband signal at 5 MHz carrier frequency, with a moderate noise contribution of 27pA/{radical}(Hz) at input.

  6. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  7. Effects of Active galactic nuclei feedback in galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Cora, S.; Padilla, N.

    We analyze the effects of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) on the formation and evolution of galaxies, which is assumed to quench cooling flows in massive halos. With this aim we use an hybrid model that combines a cosmological Lambda CDM simulation with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We consider the semi-analytic model described by Cora (2006) (SAMC06) which has been improved by including AGNs, which are associated with the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs). Modellization of BH includes gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and black hole mergers (Malbon et al., 2006), accretion during starbursts triggered by disk instabilities (Bower et al. 2006), and accretion of cooling gas from quasi-hydrostatically cooling haloes (Croton et al. 2006); Eddington limit is applied in all accretion processes. It is assumed that feedback from AGNs operates in the later case. We show that this new model can simultaneously explain: (i) the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF); (ii) the observed older population of stars in massive galaxies, thus reproducing the stellar mass function (SMF); (iii) a star formation rate (SFR) seemingly showing an anti-hierarchical galaxy growth. The success of our model is mainly due to the ability of AGN feedback to suppress further cooling and SF in the most massive structures.

  8. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals with ASD remained emotionally unaffected. Thus, individuals with ASD do not experience feedback from activated facial expressions as controls do. This facial feedback-impairment enhances our understanding of the social and emotional lives of individuals with ASD. PMID:18293075

  9. The effects of outcome and process feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Debra Steele

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of process and outcome feedback on performance during a skill acquisition phase and a transfer test phase. The research also examined the role of two moderators: self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Subjects were college students participating for course credit. The task involved using a computerized simulation of the Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulation System (RMS). Results provided evidence of the beneficial effects of process feedback during skill acquisition. Results also provided evidence that self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation moderate the effects of feedback type on performance.

  10. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  11. Haptic seat for fuel economy feedback

    DOEpatents

    Bobbitt, III, John Thomas

    2016-08-30

    A process of providing driver fuel economy feedback is disclosed in which vehicle sensors provide for haptic feedback on fuel usage. Such sensors may include one or more of a speed sensors, global position satellite units, vehicle pitch/roll angle sensors, suspension displacement sensors, longitudinal accelerometer sensors, throttle position in sensors, steering angle sensors, break pressure sensors, and lateral accelerometer sensors. Sensors used singlely or collectively can provide enhanced feedback as to various environmental conditions and operating conditions such that a more accurate assessment of fuel economy information can be provided to the driver.

  12. Multibunch feedback: Strategy, technology and implementation options

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Oxoby, G.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Linscott, I.; Serio, M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed next generation accelerator and synchrotron light facilities will require active feedback systems to control multi-bunch instabilities. These feedback systems must operate in machines with thousands of circulating bunches and with short (2--4 ns) interbunch intervals. The functional requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback systems are presented. Several possible implementation options are discussed and system requirements developed. Results are presented from a digital signal processing based synchrotron oscillation damper operating at the SSRL/SLAC SPEAR storage ring.

  13. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  14. Feedback-Enhanced Parametric Squeezing of Mechanical Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinante, A.; Falferi, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present a single-quadrature feedback scheme able to overcome the conventional 3 dB limit on parametric squeezing. The method is experimentally demonstrated in a micromechanical system based on a cantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is detected at low temperature by a SQUID susceptometer, while parametric pumping is obtained by modulating the magnetic field gradient at twice the cantilever frequency. A maximum squeezing of 11.5 dB and 11.3 dB is observed, respectively, in the response to a sinusoidal test signal and in the thermomechanical noise. So far, the maximum squeezing factor is limited only by the maximum achievable parametric modulation. The proposed technique might be used to squeeze one quadrature of a mechanical resonator below the quantum noise level, even without the need for a quantum limited detector.

  15. Dynamic Behavior of an Isolated Repressilator with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. I.; Zhurov, B. A.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic behavior of the model describing the literature-known synthetic genetic oscillator (repressilator), which is constructed as a three-gene ring, is studied by the methods of numerical analysis of bifurcations. The protein products of each gene inhibit activity of the subsequent neighbor gene, which ensures the limit-cycle existence. One feedback caused by the production of the signal molecules activating expression of a ring gene is added to the repressilator ring. Such a system of four ordinary differential equations is shown to demonstrate diversified and unusual multistable behavior, i.e., coexistence of the stable limit cycle and stable stationary state. Homoclinic saddle-node bifurcations occur at the boundaries of parameter ranges where such a coexistence is observed. The number of homoclinic transitions increases with increasing cycle amplitude if the characteristic times of the protein and signal-molecule dynamics converge. In this case, the limit cycle undergoes forward and backward period-doubling bifurcations.

  16. Software feedback for monochromator tuning at UNICAT (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemian, Pete R.

    2002-03-01

    Automatic tuning of double-crystal monochromators presents an interesting challenge in software. The goal is to either maximize, or hold constant, the throughput of the monochromator. An additional goal of the software feedback is to disable itself when there is no beam and then, at the user's discretion, re-enable itself when the beam returns. These and other routine goals, such as adherence to limits of travel for positioners, are maintained by software controls. Many solutions exist to lock in and maintain a fixed throughput. Among these include a hardware solution involving a wave form generator, and a lock-in amplifier to autocorrelate the movement of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) providing fine adjustment of the second crystal Bragg angle. This solution does not work when the positioner is a slow acting device such as a stepping motor. Proportional integral differential (PID) loops have been used to provide feedback through software but additional controls must be provided to maximize the monochromator throughput. Presented here is a software variation of the PID loop which meets the above goals. By using two floating point variables as inputs, representing the intensity of x rays measured before and after the monochromator, it attempts to maximize (or hold constant) the ratio of these two inputs by adjusting an output floating point variable. These floating point variables are connected to hardware channels corresponding to detectors and positioners. When the inputs go out of range, the software will stop making adjustments to the control output. Not limited to monochromator feedback, the software could be used, with beam steering positioners, to maintain a measure of beam position. Advantages of this software feedback are the flexibility of its various components. It has been used with stepping motors and PZTs as positioners. Various devices such as ion chambers, scintillation counters, photodiodes, and photoelectron collectors have been used as

  17. Calcium wave of tubuloglomerular feedback.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-08-01

    ATP release from macula densa (MD) cells into the interstitium of the juxtaglomerular (JG) apparatus (JGA) is an integral component of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism that controls the glomerular filtration rate. Because the cells of the JGA express a number of calcium-coupled purinergic receptors, these studies tested the hypothesis that TGF activation triggers a calcium wave that spreads from the MD toward distant cells of the JGA and glomerulus. Ratiometric calcium imaging of in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from rabbits was performed with fluo-4/fura red and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Activation of TGF by increasing tubular flow rate at the MD rapidly produced a significant elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in extraglomerular mesangial cells (by 187.6 +/- 45.1 nM) and JG renin granular cells (by 281.4 +/- 66.6 nM). Subsequently, cell-to-cell propagation of the calcium signal at a rate of 12.6 +/- 1.1 microm/s was observed upstream toward proximal segments of the afferent arteriole and adjacent glomeruli, as well as toward intraglomerular elements including the most distant podocytes (5.9 +/- 0.4 microm/s). The same calcium wave was observed in nonperfusing glomeruli, causing vasoconstriction and contractions of the glomerular tuft. Gap junction uncoupling, an ATP scavenger enzyme cocktail, and pharmacological inhibition of P(2) purinergic receptors, but not adenosine A(1) receptor blockade, abolished the changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and propagation of the calcium wave. These studies provided evidence that both gap junctional communication and extracellular ATP are integral components of the TGF calcium wave.

  18. Overt vs. covert speed cameras in combination with delayed vs. immediate feedback to the offender.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Hadas; Setter, Pe'erly; Norman, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Speeding is a major problem in road safety because it increases both the probability of accidents and the severity of injuries if an accident occurs. Speed cameras are one of the most common speed enforcement tools. Most of the speed cameras around the world are overt, but there is evidence that this can cause a "kangaroo effect" in driving patterns. One suggested alternative to prevent this kangaroo effect is the use of covert cameras. Another issue relevant to the effect of enforcement countermeasures on speeding is the timing of the fine. There is general agreement on the importance of the immediacy of the punishment, however, in the context of speed limit enforcement, implementing such immediate punishment is difficult. An immediate feedback that mediates the delay between the speed violation and getting a ticket is one possible solution. This study examines combinations of concealment and the timing of the fine in operating speed cameras in order to evaluate the most effective one in terms of enforcing speed limits. Using a driving simulator, the driving performance of the following four experimental groups was tested: (1) overt cameras with delayed feedback, (2) overt cameras with immediate feedback, (3) covert cameras with delayed feedback, and (4) covert cameras with immediate feedback. Each of the 58 participants drove in the same scenario on three different days. The results showed that both median speed and speed variance were higher with overt than with covert cameras. Moreover, implementing a covert camera system along with immediate feedback was more conducive to drivers maintaining steady speeds at the permitted levels from the very beginning. Finally, both 'overt cameras' groups exhibit a kangaroo effect throughout the entire experiment. It can be concluded that an implementation strategy consisting of covert speed cameras combined with immediate feedback to the offender is potentially an optimal way to motivate drivers to maintain speeds at the

  19. The Effect of Feedback Delay and Feedback Type on Perceptual Category Learning: The Limits of Multiple Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John C.; Newell, Ben R.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that learning rule-based (RB) and information-integration (II) category structures can be dissociated across different experimental variables has been used to support the view that such learning is supported by multiple learning systems. Across 4 experiments, we examined the effects of 2 variables, the delay between response and feedback…

  20. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  1. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  2. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  3. Reactivity feedback mechanisms in aqueous fissile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D.E. . Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Solutions of fissile materials are often encountered during spent-fuel reprocessing. To estimate the hazards from accidental criticalities in these solutions, models have been developed to understand better the dynamics involved. Accurate representation of reactivity feedback mechanisms is a crucial part of such models. Reactivity feedback from uniform volumetric solution expansion is studied. For faster transients, density redistribution may also occur because of a variation of nuclear energy as a function of position in the assembly. Neutronic spectral temperature reactivity effects are studied by creating temperature-dependent cross sections from ENDF/B-VI data. The volumetric and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients are determined for the CRAC, KEWB-5, SILENE, and SHEBA solution assemblies. Spectral temperature coefficients are also calculated for poisoned, unpoisoned, and reflected plutonium solutions. Feedback coefficients are seen to be functions of geometry and isotopic contents of the assemblies. Results for plutonium solutions agree with other calculations, which confirms the possibility of autocatalytic excursions in large, dilute solutions.

  4. Self-Directed Learning with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Youngeun; Anderson, William

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a weekly writing assignment named SelFeed (Self-Directed Learning with Feedback), in which students are asked to identify their own questions relevant to the lecture content and provide logical answers.

  5. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  6. Negative feedback system reduces pump oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenmann, W.

    1967-01-01

    External negative feedback system counteracts low frequency oscillations in rocket engine propellant pumps. The system uses a control piston to sense pump discharge fluid on one side and a gas pocket on the other.

  7. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  8. The Greenhouse Effect and Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, C.; Haberle, R. M.; McKay, C. P.; Titov, D. V.

    This chapter reviews the theory of the greenhouse effect and climate feedback. It also compares the theory with observations, using examples taken from all four known terrestrial worlds with substantial atmospheres: Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan. The greenhouse effect traps infrared radiation in the atmosphere, thereby increasing surface temperature. It is one of many factors that affect a world's climate. (Others include solar luminosity and the atmospheric scattering and absorption of solar radiation.) A change in these factors — defined as climate forcing — may change the climate in a way that brings other processes — defined as feedbacks — into play. For example, when Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, warming the surface, the water vapor content of the atmosphere increases. This is a positive feedback on global warming because water vapor is itself a potent greenhouse gas. Many positive and negative feedback processes are significant in determining Earth's climate, and probably the climates of our terrestrial neighbors.

  9. Observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for nonlinear strict-feedback systems with sampled observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2016-02-01

    The design of observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for continuous-time strict-feedback systems with sampled observation is considered. First two types of observers are designed. One is a discrete-time semiglobal and practical reduced-order observer for the exact model and the other is a continuous-time semiglobal and practical full-order observer for continuous-time strict feedback systems with sampled observation. Then by combining the designed continuous-time observers and continuous-time state feedback laws that are continuous, zero at the origin, and uniformly globally asymptotically stabilise continuous-time systems, output feedback semiglobally practically uniformly asymptotically stabilising controllers are constructed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the proposed design of observers and output feedback controllers.

  10. Different aspects of performance feedback engage different brain areas: Disentangling valence and expectancy in feedback processing

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinand, Nicola K.; Opitz, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the positive and negative outcomes of our behaviour is important for action selection and learning. Such reinforcement learning has been shown to engage a specific neural circuitry including the mesencephalic dopamine system and its target areas, the striatum and medial frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). An intensively pursued debate regards the prevailing influence of feedback expectancy and feedback valence on the engagement of these two brain regions in reinforcement learning and their respective roles are far from being understood. To this end, we used a time estimation task with three different types of feedback that allows disentangling the effect of feedback valence and expectancy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results show greater ACC activation after unexpected positive and unexpected negative feedback than after expected feedback and by this sensitivity to unexpected events in general irrespective of their valence. PMID:25100234

  11. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production.

  12. Feedback-charging a metallic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Gernot

    2017-03-01

    We consider electronic transport through a single-electron quantum dot that is tunnel-coupled to an electronic lead and a metallic island. A background reservoir keeps the metallic island at a thermal state with the ambient temperature, while the charge accumulated on the island is reflected in a time-dependent chemical potential. Without feedback, a current would flow through the system until the chemical potentials of island and lead are equilibrated. A feedback loop can be implemented by a quantum point contact detecting the dot state, classical processing of the result and appropriate feedback actions on the electronic tunneling rates taken, with the objective to direct the current in a preferred direction. Since we directly take the detector counting statistics into account, this automatically includes measurement errors in the description. When mainly the rates are modified but hardly any energy is exchanged with the system, this feedback loop effectively implements a Maxwell demon, capable of transporting electrons against an electric bias and thereby charging the metallic island. Once the feedback protocol is stopped, the metallic island simply discharges. We find that a quantitative detector model may be useful for a realistic statistical description of feedback loops.

  13. Pin-Hole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norem, James H.; Spencer, James E.

    Previously, the generalized luminosity { L} was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e+e- design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e-e-, eγ and γγ channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on { L}. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important - especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our "pin-hole" camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  14. On the role of auditory feedback in robot-assisted movement training after stroke: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Giulio; Rodà, Antonio; Avanzini, Federico; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to address a topic that is rarely investigated in the literature of technology-assisted motor rehabilitation, that is, the integration of auditory feedback in the rehabilitation device. After a brief introduction on rehabilitation robotics, the main concepts of auditory feedback are presented, together with relevant approaches, techniques, and technologies available in this domain. Current uses of auditory feedback in the context of technology-assisted rehabilitation are then reviewed. In particular, a comparative quantitative analysis over a large corpus of the recent literature suggests that the potential of auditory feedback in rehabilitation systems is currently and largely underexploited. Finally, several scenarios are proposed in which the use of auditory feedback may contribute to overcome some of the main limitations of current rehabilitation systems, in terms of user engagement, development of acute-phase and home rehabilitation devices, learning of more complex motor tasks, and improving activities of daily living.

  15. On the Role of Auditory Feedback in Robot-Assisted Movement Training after Stroke: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodà, Antonio; Avanzini, Federico; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to address a topic that is rarely investigated in the literature of technology-assisted motor rehabilitation, that is, the integration of auditory feedback in the rehabilitation device. After a brief introduction on rehabilitation robotics, the main concepts of auditory feedback are presented, together with relevant approaches, techniques, and technologies available in this domain. Current uses of auditory feedback in the context of technology-assisted rehabilitation are then reviewed. In particular, a comparative quantitative analysis over a large corpus of the recent literature suggests that the potential of auditory feedback in rehabilitation systems is currently and largely underexploited. Finally, several scenarios are proposed in which the use of auditory feedback may contribute to overcome some of the main limitations of current rehabilitation systems, in terms of user engagement, development of acute-phase and home rehabilitation devices, learning of more complex motor tasks, and improving activities of daily living. PMID:24382952

  16. The 'sensory tolerance limit': A hypothetical construct determining exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Hureau, Thomas J; Romer, Lee M; Amann, Markus

    2016-11-07

    Neuromuscular fatigue compromises exercise performance and is determined by central and peripheral mechanisms. Interactions between the two components of fatigue can occur via neural pathways, including feedback and feedforward processes. This brief review discusses the influence of feedback and feedforward mechanisms on exercise limitation. In terms of feedback mechanisms, particular attention is given to group III/IV sensory neurons which link limb muscle with the central nervous system. Central corollary discharge, a copy of the neural drive from the brain to the working muscles, provides a signal from the motor system to sensory systems and is considered a feedforward mechanism that might influence fatigue and consequently exercise performance. We highlight findings from studies supporting the existence of a 'critical threshold of peripheral fatigue', a previously proposed hypothesis based on the idea that a negative feedback loop operates to protect the exercising limb muscle from severe threats to homeostasis during whole-body exercise. While the threshold theory remains to be disproven within a given task, it is not generalisable across different exercise modalities. The 'sensory tolerance limit', a more theoretical concept, may address this issue and explain exercise tolerance in more global terms and across exercise modalities. The 'sensory tolerance limit' can be viewed as a negative feedback loop which accounts for the sum of all feedback (locomotor muscles, respiratory muscles, organs, and muscles not directly involved in exercise) and feedforward signals processed within the central nervous system with the purpose of regulating the intensity of exercise to ensure that voluntary activity remains tolerable.

  17. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  18. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from high-resolution models.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, Christopher S

    2015-11-13

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Turbulence-resolving models better simulate such cloud regimes and support the GCM consensus that they contribute to positive global cloud feedbacks. Large-eddy simulations using sub-100 m grid spacings over small computational domains elucidate marine boundary-layer cloud response to greenhouse warming. Four observationally supported mechanisms contribute: 'thermodynamic' cloudiness reduction from warming of the atmosphere-ocean column, 'radiative' cloudiness reduction from CO2- and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, 'stability-induced' cloud increase from increased lower tropospheric stratification, and 'dynamical' cloudiness increase from reduced subsidence. The cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback. Cloud-resolving models with horizontal grid spacings of a few kilometres illuminate how cumulonimbus cloud systems affect climate feedbacks. Limited-area simulations and superparameterized GCMs show upward shift and slight reduction of cloud cover in a warmer climate, implying positive cloud feedbacks. A global cloud-resolving model suggests tropical cirrus increases in a warmer climate, producing positive longwave cloud feedback, but results are sensitive to subgrid turbulence and ice microphysics schemes.

  19. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  20. Exploring Occupational Therapy Students' Meaning of Feedback during Fieldwork Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathgeber, Karen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that students' confidence and performance improve after they receive feedback from clinical supervisors regarding the delivery of quality patient care. Multiple studies of feedback have focused on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if or how students internalized feedback to promote…

  1. Feedback Expectancy and EFL Learners' Achievement in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Kaivanpanah, Shiva

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between feedback expectancy of Iranian learners of English and their level of education, achievement in English, and attitude toward peer and teacher feedback. To fulfill the purpose of this study, a sixty-item questionnaire focusing on issues related to feedback expectancy, peer feedback, teacher…

  2. Rethinking Feedback Practices in Higher Education: A Peer Review Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David; Thomson, Avril; Breslin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is a reciprocal process whereby students produce feedback reviews on the work of peers and receive feedback reviews from peers on their own work. Prior research has primarily examined the learning benefits that result from the receipt of feedback reviews, with few studies specifically exploring the merits of producing feedback reviews…

  3. Immediate Feedback and Learning in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Context: Immediate feedback has been shown to improve student learning more efficiently than delayed feedback in lower-level general education courses. No research exists examining the effects of immediate feedback on learning in higher-level athletic training coursework. Objective: To determine if using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique…

  4. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  5. Adapting Progress Feedback and Emotional Support to Learner Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Matt; Masthoff, Judith; Mellish, Chris

    2016-01-01

    As feedback is an important part of learning and motivation, we investigate how to adapt the feedback of a conversational agent to learner personality (as well as to learner performance, as we expect an interaction effect between personality and performance on feedback). We investigate two aspects of feedback. Firstly, we investigate whether the…

  6. A Role for Technology in Enhancing Students' Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Helen J.; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Irwin, Brian; Thorpe, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of technology-enabled feedback to improve student learning. "Technology, Feedback, Action!: The impact of learning technology upon students' engagement with their feedback" aimed to evaluate how a range of technical interventions might encourage students to engage with feedback and formulate actions to…

  7. Feedback Frequency in Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Butalla, Christine E.; Farinella, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of feedback frequency in treatment for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Reducing the frequency of feedback enhances motor learning, and recently, such feedback frequency reductions have been recommended for the treatment of CAS. However, no published studies have explicitly compared different feedback frequencies in…

  8. EFL Teachers' Attempts at Feedback Innovation in the Writing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy; Mak, Pauline; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    To date, research on feedback in second language (L2) writing has primarily focused on feedback per se, with little attention paid to the teachers' professional development with regard to feedback in writing. This study aims to explore the ways in which two secondary teachers in Hong Kong attempted to implement feedback innovation in their writing…

  9. Factors Influencing Spanish Instructors' In-Class Feedback Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura

    2016-01-01

    While oral corrective feedback is a principal focus in second language acquisition research, most studies examine feedback once it has been provided. Investigating how instructors make in-class feedback decisions has not been thoroughly explored, despite the fact that classroom feedback occurs at the discretion of the individual language…

  10. Effects of Web-Based Feedback on Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kol, Simone; Rietz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role in supporting students' learning process. Nonetheless, providing feedback is still rather unusual in higher education. Moreover, research on the design of ideal feedback as well as its effects is rare. In order to contribute to the development of this field, a web-based feedback system was implemented in a lecture…

  11. Uncovering Embedded Face Threat Mitigation in Landscape Architecture Critique Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housley Gaffney, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving public feedback on academic work may threaten students' face, particularly when such feedback is critical. One way that feedback may be cushioned is through face-threat mitigation techniques. I analyzed the use of such techniques in the feedback given by faculty and professionals to landscape architecture students as preparation for…

  12. The role of feedback in improving the effectiveness of workplace based assessments: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With recent emphasis placed on workplace based assessment (WBA) as a method of formative performance assessment, there is limited evidence in the current literature regarding the role of feedback in improving the effectiveness of WBA. The aim of this systematic review was to elucidate the impact of feedback on the effectiveness of WBA in postgraduate medical training. Methods Searches were conducted using the following bibliographic databases to identify original published studies related to WBA and the role of feedback: Medline (1950-December 2010), Embase (1980-December 2010) and Journals@Ovid (English language only, 1996-December 2010). Studies which attempted to evaluate the role of feedback in WBA involving postgraduate doctors were included. Results 15 identified studies met the inclusion criteria and minimum quality threshold. They were heterogeneous in methodological design. 7 studies focused on multi source feedback, 3 studies were based on mini-clinical evaluation exercise, 2 looked at procedural based assessment, one study looked at workplace based assessments in general and 2 studies looked at a combination of 3 to 6 workplace based assessments. 7 studies originated from the United Kingdom. Others were from Canada, the United States and New Zealand. Study populations were doctors in various grades of training from a wide range of specialties including general practice, general medicine, general surgery, dermatology, paediatrics and anaesthetics. All studies were prospective in design, and non-comparative descriptive or observational studies using a variety of methods including questionnaires, one to one interviews and focus groups. Conclusions The evidence base contains few high quality conclusive studies and more studies are required to provide further evidence for the effect of feedback from workplace based assessment on subsequent performance. There is, however, good evidence that if well implemented, feedback from workplace based

  13. Negative plant-soil feedback predicts tree-species relative abundance in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Scott A; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Herre, Edward A; Mack, Keenan M L; Valencia, Mariana C; Sanchez, Evelyn I; Bever, James D

    2010-08-05

    The accumulation of species-specific enemies around adults is hypothesized to maintain plant diversity by limiting the recruitment of conspecific seedlings relative to heterospecific seedlings. Although previous studies in forested ecosystems have documented patterns consistent with the process of negative feedback, these studies are unable to address which classes of enemies (for example, pathogens, invertebrates, mammals) exhibit species-specific effects strong enough to generate negative feedback, and whether negative feedback at the level of the individual tree is sufficient to influence community-wide forest composition. Here we use fully reciprocal shade-house and field experiments to test whether the performance of conspecific tree seedlings (relative to heterospecific seedlings) is reduced when grown in the presence of enemies associated with adult trees. Both experiments provide strong evidence for negative plant-soil feedback mediated by soil biota. In contrast, above-ground enemies (mammals, foliar herbivores and foliar pathogens) contributed little to negative feedback observed in the field. In both experiments, we found that tree species that showed stronger negative feedback were less common as adults in the forest community, indicating that susceptibility to soil biota may determine species relative abundance in these tropical forests. Finally, our simulation models confirm that the strength of local negative feedback that we measured is sufficient to produce the observed community-wide patterns in tree-species relative abundance. Our findings indicate that plant-soil feedback is an important mechanism that can maintain species diversity and explain patterns of tree-species relative abundance in tropical forests.

  14. Magnetospheric Feedback Effects on Mercury's Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Perez, N.; Heyner, D.; Wicht, J.; Solomon, S. C.; Glassmeier, K.

    2010-12-01

    The internal magnetic field of Mercury has been sampled by the Mariner 10 and MESSENGER spacecraft during a combined total of five flybys to date. The measurements are consistent with a magnetic dipole moment of ~ 250 nT RM3, where RM is the radius of Mercury. The action of high solar wind pressure at Mercury’s solar distance on such a weak internal field produces a small magnetosphere for which the dayside magnetopause is unusually close to the surface of the planet (at a planetocentric distance of about 1.5 RM). Because of this small magnetosphere and Mercury’s relatively thin silicate mantle, it has been proposed that magnetospheric currents may influence the internal dynamo process. From numerical simulations, we have previously demonstrated that magnetic field sources external to the dynamo-generating region may modify core dynamics and that this magnetospheric feedback may have influenced the history of Mercury’s dipole field. Here we combine new results from two types of numerical simulations. First, we estimate the magnitude of magnetospheric surface currents with a semi-empirical Earth model adapted to Mercury’s conditions. These currents are calculated for a range of internal dipole moments to establish the functional dependence of the feedback magnitude on internal field amplitude. Second, we implement this feedback function in the internal dynamo model. Earlier magnetospheric feedback models, such as those by Glassmeier and others and Heyner and others, demonstrated that this process is able to sustain an extremely weak magnetic field. Our new, more realistic feedback function leads to slower secular variation than in previous dynamic feedback models, but the secular variation is still typically faster than for isolated dynamos that neglect the external field altogether. Most generally, magnetospheric feedback is able to stabilize a weak dipole field with characteristics that are consistent in magnitude and form with measurements at Mercury.

  15. A method of providing engaging formative feedback to large cohort first-year physiology and anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Weston-Green, Katrina; Wallace, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates a critical role for effective, meaningful feedback to enhance student learning. Effective feedback can become part of the learning cycle that is not only a learning opportunity for the student but can also be used to inform the teacher and ongoing curriculum development. Feedback is considered particularly important during the first year of university and can even be viewed as a retention strategy that can help attenuate student performance anxieties and solidify perceptions of academic support. Unfortunately, the provision of individualized, timely feedback can be particularly challenging in first-year courses as they tend to be large and diverse cohort classes that pose challenges of time and logistics. Various forms of generic feedback can provide rapid and cost-effect feedback to large cohorts but may be of limited benefit to students other than signaling weaknesses in knowledge. The present study describes a method that was used to provide formative task-related feedback to a large cohort of first-year physiology and anatomy students. Based on student evaluations presented in this study, this method provided feedback in a manner that engaged students, uncovered underlying misconceptions, facilitated peer discussion, and provided opportunity for new instruction while allowing the lecturer to recognize common gaps in knowledge and inform ongoing curriculum development.

  16. In the Face of Fallible AWE Feedback: How Do Students Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Lifang; Hu, Guangwei

    2017-01-01

    Automated writing evaluation (AWE) systems can provide immediate computer-generated quantitative assessments and qualitative diagnostic feedback on an enormous number of submitted essays. However, limited research attention has been paid to locally designed AWE systems used in English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom contexts. This study…

  17. Video Feedback in the Classroom: Development of an Easy-to-Use Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Poorter, John; De Jaegher, Lut; De Cock, Mieke; Neuttiens, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Video feedback offers great potential for use in teaching but the relative complexity of the normal set-up of a video camera, a special tripod and a monitor has limited its use in teaching. The authors have developed a computer-webcam set-up which simplifies this. Anyone with an ordinary computer and webcam can learn to control the video feedback…

  18. Feedback on Second Language Pronunciation: A Case Study of EAP Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Amanda; Burri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the modern English language classroom, teachers are often faced with the challenging task of supporting students to achieve comprehensible pronunciation, but many teachers limit or neglect giving students feedback on their pronunciation for a variety of reasons. This paper examines the case of five experienced English for Academic Purposes…

  19. Optimal Control Allocation with Load Sensor Feedback for Active Load Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    These slide sets describe the OCLA formulation and associated algorithms as a set of new technologies in the first practical application of load limiting flight control utilizing load feedback as a primary control measurement. Slide set one describes Experiment Development and slide set two describes Flight-Test Performance.

  20. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  1. Partial Compensation for Altered Auditory Feedback: A Tradeoff with Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katseff, Shira; Houde, John; Johnson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Talkers are known to compensate only partially for experimentally-induced changes to their auditory feedback. In a typical experiment, talkers might hear their F1 feedback shifted higher (so that /[epsilon]/ sounds like /[ash]/, for example), and compensate by lowering F1 in their subsequent speech by about a quarter of that distance. Here, we…

  2. Enhancing the Impact of Formative Feedback on Student Learning through an Online Feedback System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatziapostolou, Thanos; Paraskakis, Iraklis

    2010-01-01

    Formative feedback is instrumental in the learning experience of a student. It can be effective in promoting learning if it is timely, personal, manageable, motivational, and in direct relation with assessment criteria. Despite its importance, however, research suggests that students are discouraged from engaging in the feedback process primarily…

  3. Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in Australian Universities: They're Less than Impressed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate accounting students in Australian universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they currently receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of Australian university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…

  4. Self-reinnervated muscles lose autogenic length feedback, but intermuscular feedback can recover functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Mark A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Gregor, Robert J; Abelew, Thomas A; Nichols, T Richard

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we sought to identify sensory circuitry responsible for motor deficits or compensatory adaptations after peripheral nerve cut and repair. Self-reinnervation of the ankle extensor muscles abolishes the stretch reflex and increases ankle yielding during downslope walking, but it remains unknown whether this finding generalizes to other muscle groups and whether muscles become completely deafferented. In decerebrate cats at least 19 wk after nerve cut and repair, we examined the influence of quadriceps (Q) muscles' self-reinnervation on autogenic length feedback, as well as intermuscular length and force feedback, among the primary extensor muscles in the cat hindlimb. Effects of gastrocnemius and soleus self-reinnervation on intermuscular circuitry were also evaluated. We found that autogenic length feedback was lost after Q self-reinnervation, indicating that loss of the stretch reflex appears to be a generalizable consequence of muscle self-reinnervation. However, intermuscular force and length feedback, evoked from self-reinnervated muscles, was preserved in most of the interactions evaluated with similar relative inhibitory or excitatory magnitudes. These data indicate that intermuscular spinal reflex circuitry has the ability to regain functional connectivity, but the restoration is not absolute. Explanations for the recovery of intermuscular feedback are discussed, based on identified mechanisms responsible for lost autogenic length feedback. Functional implications, due to permanent loss of autogenic length feedback and potential for compensatory adaptations from preserved intermuscular feedback, are discussed.

  5. The Effect of Combination of Video Feedback and Audience Feedback on Social Anxiety: Preliminary Findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junwen; Mak, Rebecca; Fujita, Satoko

    2015-09-01

    Although video feedback (VF) is shown to improve appraisals of social performance in socially anxious individuals, its impact on state anxiety during a social situation is mixed. The current study investigated the effect of combined video feedback and audience feedback (AF) on self-perceptions of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety pertaining to a speech task. Forty-one socially anxious students were randomly allocated to combined video feedback with audience feedback (VF + AF), video feedback only (VF), audience feedback only (AF), or a control condition. Following a 3-min speech, participants in the VF + AF, VF, and AF conditions watched the videotape of their speech with cognitive preparation in the presence of three confederates who served as audience, and/or received feedback from the confederates, while the control group watched their videotaped speech without cognitive preparation. Both VF + AF and AF conditions improved distorted appraisal of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Is transverse feedback necessary for the SSC emittance preservation? (Vibration noise analysis and feedback parameters optimization)

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper considers the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site ground motion measurements as well as data from accelerators worldwide about noises that worsen beam performance. Unacceptably fast emittance growth due to these noises is predicted for the SSC. A transverse feedback system was found to be the only satisfactory alternative to prevent emittance decay. Optimization of the primary feedback parameters was done.

  7. Investigating Feedback on Practice among Teachers: Coherence of Observed and Perceived Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Despite that benefits of feedback in student learning are reported in much research, little has been reported regarding the use of feedback from teachers to other teachers--a key tool in professional development. In this study, we triangulated data from videotaped peer coaching sessions, questionnaires, and interviews regarding 12 primary school…

  8. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  9. Prompting Secondary Students' Use of Criteria, Feedback Specificity and Feedback Levels during an Investigative Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Mark J. S.; Hattie, John

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of prompting on secondary students' written peer feedback in chemistry investigation reports. In particular, we examined students' feedback features in relation to the use of criteria, feedback specificity, and feedback levels. A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was adopted. Reviewers in…

  10. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  11. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  12. Determinants of feedback retention in soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Januário, Nuno; Rosado, António; Mesquita, Isabel; Aguilar-Parra, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study analyzed soccer players’ retention of coaches’ feedback during training sessions. We intended to determine if the retention of information was influenced by the athletes’ personal characteristic (age, gender and the sports level), the quantity of information included in coach’s feedback (the number of ideas and redundancy), athletes’ perception of the relevance of the feedback information and athletes’ motivation as well as the attention level. The study that was conducted over the course of 18 sessions of soccer practice, involved 12 coaches (8 males, 4 females) and 342 athletes (246 males, 96 females), aged between 10 and 18 years old. All coach and athlete interventions were transposed to a written protocol and submitted to content analysis. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression were calculated. The results showed that a substantial part of the information was not retained by the athletes; in 65.5% of cases, athletes experienced difficulty in completely reproducing the ideas of the coaches and, on average, the value of feedback retention was 57.0%. Six variables with a statistically significant value were found: gender, the athletes’ sports level, redundancy, the number of transmitted ideas, athletes’ perception of the relevance of the feedback information and the athletes’ motivation level. PMID:28149387

  13. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  14. Nonlinear plants, factorizations and stable feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, Charles A.; Kabuli, M. Guntekin

    1987-01-01

    For nonlinear plants represented by causal maps defined over extended spaces, right factorization and normalized right-coprime factorization concepts are discussed in terms of well-posed stable feedback systems. This setup covers continuous-time, discrete-time, time-invariant or time-varying input-output maps. The nonlinear maps are factored in terms of causal bounded-input bounded-output stable maps. In factored form, all instabilities of the original map are represented by the inverse of a causal stable `denominator' map. The existence of maps with right factorizations and normalized right-coprime factorizations is shown using a well-posed stable unity-feedback system. In the case where one of the subsystems has a normalized right-coprime factorization, the stability of the feedback system is equivalent to the stability of the pseudostate map.

  15. Preceptor Development: Providing Effective Feedback, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Samaneh T.; Phillips, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An integral part of providing effective feedback to pharmacy residents occurs during the evaluation process. Residency evaluation involves measuring and documenting performance as it relates to standardized residency outcomes, goals, and learning objectives. Evaluations may be formative or summative and include the preceptor’s evaluation of the resident’s performance, the resident’s self-assessments, and the resident’s evaluation of the preceptor and learning experience. Evaluations are more structured than feedback, and they involve documentation of the verbal feedback that was provided throughout the learning experience. This article will focus on the preceptor’s role in providing effective resident evaluations based on specific learning activities. PMID:24958969

  16. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations.

  17. Visual Feedback Leader-following Attitude Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibuki, Tatsuya; Hatanaka, Takeshi; Fujita, Masayuki

    In this paper we investigate visual feedback attitude synchronization in leader-follower type visibility structures on the Special Euclidean group SE(3). We first define visual robotic networks consisting of the dynamics describing rigid body motion, visibility structures among bodies and visual measurements. We then propose a visual feedback attitude synchronization law combining a vision-based observer with the attitude synchronization law presented in our previous works. We then prove that when the leader does not rotate, the visual robotic network with the control law achieves visual feedback attitude synchronization. Moreover, for a rotating leader, we evaluate the tracking performance of the other bodies. In analysis, we employ the notion of input-to-state stability and L2-gain performance regarding the leader’s angular velocity as an external disturbance. Finally, the validity of the proposed control law and the analysis is demonstrated through simulations.

  18. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  19. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L

    2015-08-07

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays.

  20. Shrub expansion and climate feedbacks in Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Goetz, Scott J.

    2012-03-01

    Arctic tundra ecosystems stand to play a substantial role in both the magnitude and rate of global climate warming over the coming decades and centuries. The exact nature of this role will be determined by the combined effects of currently amplified rates of climate warming in the Arctic (Serreze et al 2000) and a series of related positive climate feedbacks that include mobilization of permafrost carbon (Schuur et al 2008), decreases in surface albedo (Chapin et al 2005) and evapotranspiration (ET) mediated increases in atmospheric water vapor (Swann et al 2010). Conceptually, these feedback mechanisms are intuitive and readily comprehensible: warming-induced permafrost thaw will make new soil carbon pools accessible for microbial respiration, and increased vegetation productivity, expansion of shrubs in particular, will lower surface reflectance and increase ET. However, our current understanding of these feedback mechanisms relies largely on limited and local field studies and, as such, the quantitative estimates of feedback effects on regional and global climate require spatial upscaling and uncertainty estimates derived from models. Moreover, the feedback mechanisms interact and their combined net effect on climate is highly variable and not well characterized. A recent study by Bonfils et al (2012) is among the first to explicitly examine how shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems will impact regional climate. Using an Earth system model, Bonfils et al find that an idealized 20% increase in shrub cover north of 60°N latitude will lead to annual temperature increases of 0.66 °C and 1.84 °C, respectively, when the shrubs are 0.5 m and 2 m tall. The modeled temperature increases arise from atmospheric heating as a combined consequence of decreased albedo and increased ET. The primary difference between the two cases is associated with the fact that tall shrubs protrude above the snow, thus reducing albedo year round, whereas short shrubs are completely

  1. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stabilizability of discrete-time systems via delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiandong; Tian, Yu-Ping

    2005-08-01

    In this Letter, the stabilizability problem for single-input chaotic discrete-time systems under delayed feedback control (DFC) is completely solved. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stabilizability via DFC are obtained, which reveal the limitation of DFC more exactly than the odd number limitation. A nonlinear DFC is analytically designed for stabilizing a class of discrete-time systems at an unknown fixed point.

  2. Incomplete state feedback for systems with parameter uncertainty and random disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basuthakur, S.

    1972-01-01

    A unified design philosophy is presented for limited state feedback control problems with parameter uncertainty for both deterministic and stochastic problems. Two approaches are considered: linear compensator for the deterministic problem with parameter uncertainty, and for the single input-single output system with parameter uncertainty, a model on order equal to that of the system less the number of zeroes. The limitations of these approaches are discussed along with suggestions for further research.

  3. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  4. Fiber ring laser with a feedback mirror.

    PubMed

    Abitan, H; Bohr, H; Pedersen, C F

    2005-12-20

    We describe the spectral and power features of a ytterbium-doped double-clad photonic crystal fiber laser that is operated in a ring configuration with an external mirror that feeds back only one of its two output beams. We compare the operation of the laser with and without an external feedback mirror. We find that the feedback mirror reduces significantly the spectral and power fluctuations. It is also responsible for an interesting spectral phenomenon: The laser frequency is drifting periodically over 9 nm at a rate of 2 nm/s from a short wavelength to a longer wavelength and vice versa.

  5. Balanced-Bridge Feedback Control Of Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity to variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics reduced. Proposed control system for motor-driven rotary actuator includes three nested feedback loops which, when properly designed, decoupled from each other. Intended to increase accuracy of control by mitigating such degrading effects as vibrations and variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics of structure rotated. Lends itself to optimization of performance via independent optimization of each of three loops. Includes outer, actuator, and driver feedback loops, configured so that actuator is subsystem, and driver is subsystem of actuator.

  6. The fast correction coil feedback control system

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.; Caporaso, G.; Zentler, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model-based feedback control system has been developed to correct beam displacement errors in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) electron beam accelerator. The feedback control system drives an X/Y dipole steering system that has a 40-MHz bandwidth and can produce {+-}300-Gauss-cm dipole fields. A simulator was used to develop the control algorithm and to quantify the expected performance in the presence of beam position measurement noise and accelerator timing jitter. The major problem to date has been protecting the amplifiers from the voltage that is inductively coupled to the steering bars by the beam. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Static inverter with synchronous output waveform synthesized by time-optimal-response feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kernick, A.; Stechschulte, D. L.; Shireman, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Time-optimal-response 'bang-bang' or 'bang-hang' technique, using four feedback control loops, synthesizes static-inverter sinusoidal output waveform by self-oscillatory but yet synchronous pulse-frequency-modulation (SPFM). A single modular power stage per phase of ac output entails the minimum of circuit complexity while providing by feedback synthesis individual phase voltage regulation, phase position control and inherent compensation simultaneously for line and load disturbances. Clipped sinewave performance is described under off-limit load or input voltage conditions. Also, approaches to high power levels, 3-phase arraying and parallel modular connection are given.

  8. Simulation of a Feedback System for the Attenuation of e-Cloud Driven Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Fox, J.; Rivetta, C.; de Maria, R.; Rumolo, G.

    2009-05-04

    Electron clouds impose limitations on current accelerators that may be more severe for future machines, unless adequate measures of mitigation are taken. Recently, it has been proposed to use feedback systems operating at high frequency (in the GHz range) to damp single-bunch transverse coherent oscillations that may otherwise be amplified during the interaction of the beam with ambient electron clouds. We have used the simulation package WARP-POSINST and the code Headtail to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven beam breakup instability in the CERN SPS accelerator with, or without, an idealized feedback model for damping the instability.

  9. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limit protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside of the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  10. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limited protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  11. Feedback strategies for visual search in airframe structural inspection.

    PubMed

    Gramopadhye, A K; Drury, C G; Sharit, J

    1997-05-01

    Feedback of information has consistently shown positive results in human inspection, provided it is given in a timely and appropriate manner. Feedback serves as the basis of most training schemes; traditionally this has been performance feedback. Other forms of feedback which provide strategy information rather than performance information may have a role in improving inspection. This study compared performance feedback and cognitive feedback in a realistic simulation of an aircraft structural inspection task. Performance (time, errors) feedback showed the greatest improvements in performance measures. Cognitive feedback enhanced efficiency measures of search strategy. When cognitive feedback consisted of visual representations of the path and the coverage of the search sequence, subjects also were able to use this task information to improve their search performance.

  12. The influence of feedback valence in associative learning.

    PubMed

    Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Hazeltine, Eliot; Bergren, Lindsey; Ivry, Richard B; Grafton, Scott T

    2009-01-01

    The neural systems engaged by intrinsic positive or negative feedback were defined in an associative learning task. Through trial and error, participants learned the arbitrary assignments of a set of stimuli to one of two response categories. Informative feedback was provided on less than 25% of the trials. During positive feedback blocks, half of the trials were eligible for informative feedback; of these, informative feedback was only provided when the response was correct. A similar procedure was used on negative feedback blocks, but here informative feedback was only provided when the response was incorrect. In this manner, we sought to identify regions that were differentially responsive to positive and negative feedback as well as areas that were responsive to both types of informative feedback. Several regions of interest, including the bilateral nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, anterior insula, right cerebellar lobule VI, and left putamen, were sensitive to informative feedback regardless of valence. In contrast, several regions were more selective to positive feedback compared to negative feedback. These included the insula, amygdala, putamen, and supplementary motor area. No regions were more strongly activated by negative feedback compared to positive feedback. These results indicate that the neural areas supporting associative learning vary as a function of how that information is learned. In addition, areas linked to intrinsic reinforcement showed considerable overlap with those identified in studies using extrinsic reinforcers.

  13. Feedback-related brain activity predicts learning from feedback in multiple-choice testing.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Different event-related potentials (ERPs) have been shown to correlate with learning from feedback in decision-making tasks and with learning in explicit memory tasks. In the present study, we investigated which ERPs predict learning from corrective feedback in a multiple-choice test, which combines elements from both paradigms. Participants worked through sets of multiple-choice items of a Swahili-German vocabulary task. Whereas the initial presentation of an item required the participants to guess the answer, corrective feedback could be used to learn the correct response. Initial analyses revealed that corrective feedback elicited components related to reinforcement learning (FRN), as well as to explicit memory processing (P300) and attention (early frontal positivity). However, only the P300 and early frontal positivity were positively correlated with successful learning from corrective feedback, whereas the FRN was even larger when learning failed. These results suggest that learning from corrective feedback crucially relies on explicit memory processing and attentional orienting to corrective feedback, rather than on reinforcement learning.

  14. Role of microprojections in myoendothelial feedback – a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Kapela, Adam; Tran, Cam H; Welsh, Donald G; Tsoukias, Nikolaos M

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of myoendothelial projections (MPs) in endothelial cell (EC) feedback response to smooth muscle cell (SMC) stimulation using mathematical modelling. A previously developed compartmental EC–SMC model is modified to include MPs as subcellular compartments in the EC. The model is further extended into a 2D continuum model using a finite element method (FEM) approach and electron microscopy images to account for MP geometry. The EC and SMC are coupled via non-selective myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJs) which are located on MPs and allow exchange of Ca2+, K+, Na+ and Cl− ions and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). Models take into consideration recent evidence for co-localization of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (IKCa) and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) in the MPs. SMC stimulation causes an IP3-mediated Ca2+ transient in the MPs with limited global spread in the bulk EC. A hyperpolarizing feedback generated by the localized IKCa channels is transmitted to the SMC via MEGJs. MEGJ resistance (Rgj) and the density of IKCa and IP3R in the projection influence the extent of EC response to SMC stimulation. The predicted Ca2+ transients depend also on the volume and geometry of the MP. We conclude that in the myoendothelial feedback response to SMC stimulation, MPs are required to amplify the SMC initiated signal. Simulations suggest that the signal is mediated by IP3 rather than Ca2+ diffusion and that a localized rather than a global EC Ca2+ mobilization is more likely following SMC stimulation. PMID:23529128

  15. Galaxies on FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments): stellar feedback explains cosmologically inefficient star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Oñorbe, José; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman; Bullock, James S.

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of high-resolution cosmological simulations1 of galaxy formation to z = 0, spanning halo masses ˜108-1013 M⊙, and stellar masses ˜104-1011 M⊙. Our simulations include fully explicit treatment of the multiphase interstellar medium and stellar feedback. The stellar feedback inputs (energy, momentum, mass, and metal fluxes) are taken directly from stellar population models. These sources of feedback, with zero adjusted parameters, reproduce the observed relation between stellar and halo mass up to Mhalo ˜ 1012 M⊙. We predict weak redshift evolution in the M*-Mhalo relation, consistent with current constraints to z > 6. We find that the M*-Mhalo relation is insensitive to numerical details, but is sensitive to feedback physics. Simulations with only supernova feedback fail to reproduce observed stellar masses, particularly in dwarf and high-redshift galaxies: radiative feedback (photoheating and radiation pressure) is necessary to destroy giant molecular clouds and enable efficient coupling of later supernovae to the gas. Star formation rates (SFRs) agree well with the observed Kennicutt relation at all redshifts. The galaxy-averaged Kennicutt relation is very different from the numerically imposed law for converting gas into stars, and is determined by self-regulation via stellar feedback. Feedback reduces SFRs and produces reservoirs of gas that lead to rising late-time star formation histories, significantly different from halo accretion histories. Feedback also produces large short-time-scale variability in galactic SFRs, especially in dwarfs. These properties are not captured by common `sub-grid' wind models.

  16. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  17. An exploratory pilot study of mechanisms of action within normative feedback for adult drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Frederick J.; Lee, Rufina; Pena, Juan; Hail, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    dissonance through discrepancy, but belief in the accuracy of feedback may be important. It appears the more one believes the feedback, the more one makes a plan for change, suggesting practitioners should be mindful of how information within feedback is presented. Findings also indicate NF may work by validating a preexisting perception that drinking is a problem instead of creating concern related to discrepancy where none existed. Limitations regarding generalizability are discussed. PMID:27366638

  18. The effect of feedback on performance in a fracture detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Phillips, Peter W.; Higham, Stephen; Crawford, Trevor

    2005-04-01

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested to determine the effect of feedback on eye movements and accuracy whilst performing a simple radiological task. The observer groups were 8 experts, 9 year 1 radiography students, 9 year 3 radiography students, and 10 naive observers (psychology students). The task was fracture detection in the wrist. A test bank of 32 films was compiled with 14 normals, 6 grade 1 fractures (subtle appearance), 6 grade 2 fractures, and 6 grade 3 fractures (obvious appearance). Eye tracking was carried out on all observers to demonstrate differences in visual activity. Observers were asked to rate their confidence in their decision on a ten point scale. Feedback was presented to the observers in the form of circles displayed on the film where fixations had occurred, the size of which was proportional to the length of fixation. Observers were asked to repeat their decision rating. Accuracy was determined by ROC analysis and the area under the curve (AUC). In two groups, the novices and first year radiography students, the feedback resulted in no significant difference in the AUC. In the other two groups, experts (p = 0.002) and second year radiography students (p = 0.031), feedback had a negative effect on performance. The eye tracking parameters were measured for all subjects and compared. This is work in progress, but initial analysis of the data suggests that in a simple radiological task such as fracture detection, where search is very limited, feedback by encouraging observers to look harder at the image can have a negative effect on image interpretation performance, however for the novice feedback is beneficial as post feedback eye-tracking parameters measured more closely matched those of the experts.

  19. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of aerodynamic pressure differentials to position a control surface is evaluated. The system is a differential pressure command loop, analogous to a position command loop, where the surface is commanded to move until a desired differential pressure across the surface is achieved. This type of control is more direct and accurate because it is the differential pressure which causes the control forces and moments. A frequency response test was performed in a low speed wind tunnel to measure the performance of the system. Both pressure and position feedback were tested. The pressure feedback performed as well as position feedback implying that the actuator, with a break frequency on the order of 10 Rad/sec, was the limiting component. Theoretical considerations indicate that aerodynamic lags will not appear below frequencies of 50 Rad/sec, or higher.

  20. Indirect human impacts turn off reciprocal feedbacks and decrease ecosystem resilience.

    PubMed

    Bertness, Mark D; Brisson, Caitlin P; Crotty, Sinead M

    2015-05-01

    Creek bank salt marsh die-off is a conservation problem in New England, driven by predator depletion, which releases herbivores from consumer control. Many marshes, however, have begun to recover from die-off. We examined the hypothesis that the loss of the foundation species Spartina alterniflora has decreased facilitator populations, weakening reciprocal positive plant/animal feedbacks, resilience, and slowing recovery. Field surveys and experiments revealed that loss of Spartina leads to decreased biodiversity, and increased mortality and decreased growth of the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa, a key facilitator of Spartina. Experimental addition of Geukensia facilitators to creek banks accelerated Spartina recovery, showing that their loss limits recovery and the reciprocal feedbacks that drive community resilience. Reciprocal positive feedbacks involving foundation species, often lost to human impacts, may be a common, but generally overlooked mechanism of ecosystem resilience, making their reestablishment a valuable restoration tool.

  1. The failure of feedback on alcohol impairment to reduce impaired driving.

    PubMed Central

    Nau, P A; Van Houten, R; Rolider, A; Jonah, B A

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effects of rules to govern drinking, individual feedback on blood alcohol concentration (BAC), and public posting of group data on impaired driving on the incidence of impaired driving. Level of impairment was determined from breath samples taken from tavern patrons. Following baseline, an intervention package consisting of (a) cards to guide patrons in pacing their drinking to stay under the legal limit, (b) individual feedback on BAC, and (c) posted group feedback on the percentage of patrons driving while impaired the preceding week was introduced in two taverns. Results indicated that the intervention package did not reduce the percentage of impaired drivers departing either tavern. The addition of a brief intensive police enforcement program directed at impaired driving produced a short-term reduction in impaired driving. PMID:8407684

  2. The failure of feedback on alcohol impairment to reduce impaired driving.

    PubMed

    Nau, P A; Van Houten, R; Rolider, A; Jonah, B A

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effects of rules to govern drinking, individual feedback on blood alcohol concentration (BAC), and public posting of group data on impaired driving on the incidence of impaired driving. Level of impairment was determined from breath samples taken from tavern patrons. Following baseline, an intervention package consisting of (a) cards to guide patrons in pacing their drinking to stay under the legal limit, (b) individual feedback on BAC, and (c) posted group feedback on the percentage of patrons driving while impaired the preceding week was introduced in two taverns. Results indicated that the intervention package did not reduce the percentage of impaired drivers departing either tavern. The addition of a brief intensive police enforcement program directed at impaired driving produced a short-term reduction in impaired driving.

  3. Observation of local cloud and moisture feedbacks over high ocean and desert surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa T.

    1995-01-01

    New data on clouds and moisture, made possible by reanalysis of weather satellite observations, show that the atmosphere reacts to warm clusters of very high sea surface temperatures in the western Pacific Ocean with increased moisture, cloudiness, and convection, suggesting a negative feedback limiting the sea surface temperature rise. The reverse was observed over dry and hot deserts where both moisture and cloudiness decrease, suggesting a positive feedback perpetuating existing desert conditions. In addition, the observations show a common critical surface temperature for both oceans and land; the distribution of atmospheric moisture is observed to reach a maximum value when the daily surface temperatures approach 304 +/- 1 K. These observations reveal complex dynamic-radiative interactions where multiple processes act simultaneously at the surface as well as in the atmosphere to regulate the feedback processes.

  4. Development of the force-feedback model for an epidural needle insertion simulator.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, L; Stredney, D; Schmalbrock, P

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center and the Department of Anesthesiology at the OSU Medical Center have developed a computer-based simulation system for use in training anesthesiology residents in the technique of placing a needle for an epidural block. Although the simulator has been well regarded, the fidelity of the haptic feedback is limited because it is based on subjective expert-user evaluation and not on objective model-based or data-based empirical methods. Only a single degree of freedom for force-feedback is required. However, the simulation must be able to accurately portray the force required to puncture each layer of tissue in order to feel realistic. The purpose of the research described in this paper was to devise a methodology for creating empirically based realistic force-feedback models for the epidural needle insertion procedure using MRI data and biomechanical data from materials testing.

  5. Carbon cycle feedbacks and future climate change.

    PubMed

    Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2015-11-13

    Climate and carbon cycle are tightly coupled on many timescales, from interannual to multi-millennial timescales. Observations always evidence a positive feedback, warming leading to release of carbon to the atmosphere; however, the processes at play differ depending on the timescales. State-of-the-art Earth System Models now represent these climate-carbon cycle feedbacks, always simulating a positive feedback over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, although with substantial uncertainty. Recent studies now help to reduce this uncertainty. First, on short timescales, El Niño years record larger than average atmospheric CO2 growth rate, with tropical land ecosystems being the main drivers. These climate-carbon cycle anomalies can be used as emerging constraint on the tropical land carbon response to future climate change. Second, centennial variability found in last millennium records can be used to constrain the overall global carbon cycle response to climatic excursions. These independent methods point to climate-carbon cycle feedback at the low-end of the Earth System Models range, indicating that these models overestimate the carbon cycle sensitivity to climate change. These new findings also help to attribute the historical land and ocean carbon sinks to increase in atmospheric CO2 and climate change.

  6. Postidentification Feedback Affects Subsequent Eyewitness Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Matthew A.; Brewer, Neil; Weber, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Eyewitnesses sometimes view more than one lineup during an investigation. We investigated the effects of postidentification feedback following one lineup on responses to a second lineup. Witnesses (N = 621) viewed a mock crime and, later, attempted to identify the culprit from an initial (target-absent) lineup and a second (target-present or…

  7. TRANSIENT FEEDBACK AND ROBUST SIGNALING GRADIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Aghavni; Wan, Frederic Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Robust development of biological organisms in the presence of genetic and epi-genetic perturbations is important for time spans short relative to evolutionary time. Gradients of receptor bound signaling morphogens are responsible for patterning formation and development. A variety of inhibitors for reducing ectopic signaling activities are known to exist and their specific role in down-regulating the undesirable ectopic activities reasonably well understood. However, how a developing organism manages to adjust inhibition/stimulation in response to genetic and/or environmental changes remains to be uncovered. The need to adjust for ectopic signaling activities requires the presence of one or more feedback mechanisms to stimulate the needed adjustment. As the ultimate effect of many inhibitors (including those of the nonreceptor type) is to reduce the availability of signaling morphogens for binding with signaling receptors, a negative feedback on signaling morphogen synthesis rate based on a root-mean-square measure of the spatial distribution of signaling concentration offers a simple approach to robusness and has been demonstrated to be effective in a proof-of-concept implementation. In this paper, we complement the previous investigation of feedback in steady state by examining the effect of one or more feedback adjustments during the transient phase of the biological development. PMID:27840649

  8. The Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    1976-01-01

    The Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form is a short, 28-item semantic differential which generates four scores, based on a factor structure described by Tuckman (1974), in the areas of creativity, dynamism (energy plus dominance), organized demeaner (organization plus control), and warmth and acceptance. (Author/MV)

  9. Group-Level Formative Feedback and Metadiscourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resendes, Monica; Scardamalia, Marlene; Bereiter, Carl; Chen, Bodong; Halewood, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the ability of grade 2 students to engage in productive discussion about the state of their knowledge building using group-level feedback tools to support their metadiscourse. Two aspects of knowledge work were common to the comparison and experimental classes: "Knowledge Building talk" (KB talk) involving…

  10. Gathering Teacher's Perceptions of Evaluator Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherasaro, Trudy L.; Brodersen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In response to initiatives to increase educator effectiveness states throughout the nation are placing greater emphasis on teacher evaluation tools that differentiate teacher effectiveness and include timely and constructive feedback. One of the three principles of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) flexibility waivers requires that…

  11. Timely Diagnostic Feedback for Database Concept Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng; Chuang, Yuh-Shy

    2013-01-01

    To efficiently learn database concepts, this work adopts association rules to provide diagnostic feedback for drawing an Entity-Relationship Diagram (ERD). Using association rules and Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) techniques, this work implements a novel Web-based Timely Diagnosis System (WTDS), which provides timely diagnostic feedback…

  12. From Nonlinear to Hamiltonian via Feedback1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    distribution unlimited. 13. Abstract Mechanical control systems are a very important class of nonlinear control systems . They posses a rich mathematical...methodologies developed for mechanical control systel logically rendering nonlinear control systems , mechanical by a proper choice of feedback. In particular, w...OF PA Nonlinear mechanical control systems , Hamiltonian Control Systems x 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19

  13. Chaos control using notch filter feedback.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2006-01-27

    A method for stabilizing periodic orbits and steady states of chaotic systems is presented using specifically filtered feedback signals. The efficiency of this control technique is illustrated with simulations (Rössler system, laser model) and a successful experimental application for stabilizing intensity fluctuations of an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Pairwise Document Classification for Relevance Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Pairwise Document Classification for Relevance Feedback Jonathan L. Elsas, Pinar Donmez, Jamie Callan, Jaime G. Carbonell Language Technologies...Collins-Thompson and J. Callan. Query expansion using random walk models. In CIKM ’05, page 711. ACM, 2005. [5] P. Donmez and J. Carbonell . Paired

  15. A Surprising Effect of Feedback on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmeyer, Regina; Rheinberg, Falko

    2005-01-01

    As meta-analyses demonstrate feedback effects on performance, our study examined possible mediators. Based on our cognitive-motivational model [Vollmeyer, R., & Rheinberg, F. (1998). Motivationale Einflusse auf Erwerb und Anwendung von Wissen in einem computersimulierten System [Motivational influences on the acquisition and application of…

  16. The Effect of Feedback on Group Cohesiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Peter M.

    The effect of feedback on group cohesiveness (measured in terms of group and task attractiveness) for a person who is performing a simple, highly repetitive task was studied. One hundred business administration students, randomly assigned to five member groups, completed a series of trials having the goal of determining the number commonly held by…

  17. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  18. An Investigation into Effectiveness of Peer Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Copious researches argue the effectiveness of peer-correction in writing courses (e.g., Connor & Asenavage, 1994). Also, Coit (2004) mentions using peer feedback for correcting articles through a student-centered environment is a beneficial pedagogy to extend learners' academic-style writing practice. Therefore, this study focused on…

  19. Oral Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyster, Roy; Saito, Kazuya; Sato, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews research on oral corrective feedback (CF) in second language (L2) classrooms. Various types of oral CF are first identified, and the results of research revealing CF frequency across instructional contexts are presented. Research on CF preferences is then reviewed, revealing a tendency for learners to prefer receiving CF more…

  20. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  1. Feed up, Feedback, and Feed Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    "Feeding up" establishes a substantive line of inquiry that compels learners to engage in investigation and inquire. It also forms the basis for the assessments that follow. Once students understand the purpose and begin to work, they receive "feedback" that is timely and scaffolds their understanding. Based on their responses, the teacher gains a…

  2. Positive force feedback in bouncing gaits?

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    During bouncing gaits (running, hopping, trotting), passive compliant structures (e.g. tendons, ligaments) store and release part of the stride energy. Here, active muscles must provide the required force to withstand the developing tendon strain and to compensate for the inevitable energy losses. This requires an appropriate control of muscle activation. In this study, for hopping, the potential involvement of afferent information from muscle receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) is investigated using a two-segment leg model with one extensor muscle. It is found that: (i) positive feedbacks of muscle-fibre length and muscle force can result in periodic bouncing; (ii) positive force feedback (F+) stabilizes bouncing patterns within a large range of stride energies (maximum hopping height of 16.3 cm, almost twofold higher than the length feedback); and (iii) when employing this reflex scheme, for moderate hopping heights (up to 8.8 cm), an overall elastic leg behaviour is predicted (hopping frequency of 1.4-3 Hz, leg stiffness of 9-27 kN m(-1)). Furthermore, F+ could stabilize running. It is suggested that, during the stance phase of bouncing tasks, the reflex-generated motor control based on feedbacks might be an efficient and reliable alternative to central motor commands. PMID:14561282

  3. Learning to learn about uncertain feedback.

    PubMed

    Faraut, Maïlys C M; Procyk, Emmanuel; Wilson, Charles R E

    2016-02-01

    Unexpected outcomes can reflect noise in the environment or a change in the current rules. We should ignore noise but shift strategy after rule changes. How we learn to do this is unclear, but one possibility is that it relies on learning to learn in uncertain environments. We propose that acquisition of latent task structure during learning to learn, even when not necessary, is crucial. We report results consistent with this hypothesis. Macaque monkeys acquired adaptive responses to feedback while learning to learn serial stimulus-response associations with probabilistic feedback. Monkeys learned well, decreasing their errors to criterion, but they also developed an apparently nonadaptive reactivity to unexpected stochastic feedback, even though that unexpected feedback never predicted problem switch. This surprising learning trajectory permitted the same monkeys, naïve to relearning about previously learned stimuli, to transfer to a task of stimulus-response remapping at immediately asymptotic levels. Our results suggest that learning new problems in a stochastic environment promotes the acquisition of performance rules from latent task structure, providing behavioral flexibility. Learning to learn in a probabilistic and volatile environment thus appears to induce latent learning that may be beneficial to flexible cognition.

  4. Sex Differences, Positive Feedback and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deci, Edward L.; And Others

    The paper presents two experiments which test the "change in feelings of competence and self-determination" proposition of cognitive evaluation theory. This proposition states that when a person receives feedback about his performance on an intrinsically motivated activity this information will affect his sense of competence and…

  5. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40... representing beryllium-associated workers who request such information....

  6. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40... representing beryllium-associated workers who request such information....

  7. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40... representing beryllium-associated workers who request such information....

  8. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40... representing beryllium-associated workers who request such information....

  9. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40... representing beryllium-associated workers who request such information....

  10. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  11. The Problems of Multiple Feedback Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulcock, Jeffrey W.

    The use of two-stage least squares (2SLS) for the estimation of feedback linkages is inappropriate for nonorthogonal data sets because 2SLS is extremely sensitive to multicollinearity. It is argued that what is needed is use of a different estimating criterion than the least squares criterion. Theoretically the variance normalization criterion has…

  12. Information Feedback Systems (IFS) and Educational Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, William F.

    An information feedback system for use in evaluating an educational program is described, and its effectiveness in evaluating the Follow Through program and its use in relation to the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills are discussed. The systems approach to program evaluation consists of objectives clarification, decision making, and program planning. In…

  13. Give Better Feedback on Engineering Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Robert, Jr.; Graham, Tony; Kapur, Arjun; Rhodes, Craig; Blackwell, Ellinor

    2005-01-01

    Most, if not all, systems have a mechanism that collects information to facilitate monitoring performance. This information is primarily used to modify the system to make it more efficient in performing desired tasks and, thus, attaining desired results. Similar to electrical, mechanical, or hydraulic systems, the feedback mechanism in an…

  14. Designing Educational Social Machines for Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee-King, Matthew; Krivenski, Maria; Brenton, Harry; Grimalt-Reynes, Andreu; d'Inverno, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report on our development of an educational social machine based on the concept that feedback in communities is an effective means to support the development of communities of learning and practice. Key challenges faced by this work are how best to support educational and social interactions, how to deliver personalised tuition, and how to…

  15. Diversity in School Performance Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaeghe, Goedele; Schildkamp, Kim; Luyten, Hans; Valcke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As data-based decision making is receiving increased attention in education, more and more school performance feedback systems (SPFSs) are being developed and used worldwide. These systems provide schools with data on their functioning. However, little research is available on the characteristics of the different SPFSs. Therefore, this study…

  16. Hysteresis and feedback of ice sheet response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Takahashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Investigating the response of ice sheets to climatic forcings in the past by climate-ice sheet modelling is important for understanding the ice sheets' change. The 100-kyr cycle of the large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and fast termination of the glacial cycle are the prominent pattern known from paleoclimate records. We simulate the past glacial cycles with an ice sheet model, IcIES in combination with a general circulation model, MIROC, using the time series of insolation and atmospheric CO2. Feedback processes between ice sheet and atmosphere such as the ice albedo feedback, the elevation-mass balance feedback, desertification effect and stationary wave feedback are analyzed. We show that the threshold of termination of the glacial cycles can be explained by the pattern of the hysteresis of ice sheet change, i.e. multiple steady states of the ice sheets under climatic forcings. We find that slope of the upper branch of the multiple equilibria curve for Laurentide ice volumes is fundamental for the observed glacial patterns. Finally, we discuss the similarity and difference between the hysteresis structure of ice sheets variation for Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland.

  17. Assessing feedback in a mobile videogame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Player feedback is an important part of serious games, although there is no consensus regarding its delivery or optimal content. "Mommio" is a serious game designed to help mothers motivate their preschoolers to eat vegetables. The purpose of this study was to assess optimal format and content of pl...

  18. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  19. Distributed feedback imprinted electrospun fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Fasano, Vito; Moffa, Maria; Manco, Rita; D'Agostino, Stefania; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-01

    Imprinted, distributed feedback lasers are demonstrated on individual, active electrospun polymer nanofibers. In addition to advantages related to miniaturization, optical confinement and grating nanopatterning lead to a significant threshold reduction compared to conventional thin-film lasers. The possibility of imprinting arbitrary photonic crystal geometries on electrospun lasing nanofibers opens new opportunities for realizing optical circuits and chips.

  20. Learning to learn about uncertain feedback

    PubMed Central

    Procyk, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected outcomes can reflect noise in the environment or a change in the current rules. We should ignore noise but shift strategy after rule changes. How we learn to do this is unclear, but one possibility is that it relies on learning to learn in uncertain environments. We propose that acquisition of latent task structure during learning to learn, even when not necessary, is crucial. We report results consistent with this hypothesis. Macaque monkeys acquired adaptive responses to feedback while learning to learn serial stimulus-response associations with probabilistic feedback. Monkeys learned well, decreasing their errors to criterion, but they also developed an apparently nonadaptive reactivity to unexpected stochastic feedback, even though that unexpected feedback never predicted problem switch. This surprising learning trajectory permitted the same monkeys, naïve to relearning about previously learned stimuli, to transfer to a task of stimulus-response remapping at immediately asymptotic levels. Our results suggest that learning new problems in a stochastic environment promotes the acquisition of performance rules from latent task structure, providing behavioral flexibility. Learning to learn in a probabilistic and volatile environment thus appears to induce latent learning that may be beneficial to flexible cognition. PMID:26787780